Science.gov

Sample records for protein delivery activity

  1. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  2. Biodegradable nanoparticles for protein delivery: analysis of preparation conditions on particle morphology and protein loading, activity and sustained release properties.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jason; Lowman, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    PLGA particles have been extensively used as a sustained drug-delivery system, but there are multiple drawbacks when delivering proteins. The focus of this work is to address the most significant disadvantages to the W/O/W double emulsion procedure and demonstrate that simple changes to this procedure can have significant changes to particle size and dispersity and considerable improvements to protein loading, activity and sustained active protein release. A systematic approach was taken to analyze the effects of the following variables: solvent miscibility (dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate, acetone), homogenization speed (10 000-25 000 rpm), PLGA concentration (10-30 mg/ml) and additives in both the organic (sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB)) and aqueous (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) phases. Increasing solvent miscibility decreased particle size, dispersity and protein denaturation, while maintaining adequate protein loading. Increasing solvent miscibility also lowered the impact of homogenization on particle size and dispersity and protein activity. Changes to PLGA concentration demonstrated a minimum impact on particle size and dispersity, but showed an inverse relationship between protein encapsulation efficiency and particle protein weight percent. Most particles tested provided sustained release of active protein over 60 days. Increasing solvent miscibility resulted in increases in the percent of active protein released. When subjected to synthesis conditions with DCM as the solvent, BSA as a stabilizer resulted in the maximum stabilization of protein at a concentration of 100 mg/ml. At this concentration, BSA allowed for increases in the total amount of active protein delivered for all three solvents. The benefit of SAIB was primarily increased protein loading. PMID:21639993

  3. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  4. Endosomolytic activity of cationic liposomes enhances the delivery of human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein (TAT) to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Farhood, H; Serbina, N; Teepe, A G; Barsoum, J

    1995-12-26

    We have explored the use of cationic liposomes to deliver the human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein tat using a reporter gene expression assay. The human epidermoid carcinoma cell A431 stably transfected with a reporter gene under the control of human immunodeficiency virus-1 promoter was used as a target cell. Phosphatidylcholine-containing cationic liposomes had no detectable tat delivery activity. In contrast, delivery of tat was enhanced by up to 150-fold using cationic liposomes enriched with dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid which readily transforms a bilayer into a nonbilayer structure. Enhanced delivery of tat by DOPE-containing liposomes was most likely the result of the endosomolytic activity of the liposome. This phospholipid-rich formulation showed no toxicity at concentrations sufficient for maximal delivery of tat. A variety of cationic liposome formulations which contain DOPE were tested successfully for tat delivery. PMID:8554596

  5. Microspheres and microcapsules for protein delivery: strategies of drug activity retention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Weifeng; Chen, Xiaoming; Yang, Tingyuan; Ma, Guanghui

    2013-01-01

    With the recent progress in biotechnology and genetic engineering, a variety of proteins have formed a very important class of therapeutic agents. However, most proteins have short half-lives in vivo requiring multiple treatments to provide efficacy. In order to overcome this limitation, sustained release systems as hydrophilic microspheres and hydrophobic microcapsules have received extensive attention in recent years. As therapeutic proteins delivery systems, it is necessary to maintain protein bioactivity during microspheres or microcapsules formation as much as possible. This paper reviews different influencing factors that are closely involved in protein denaturation during the preparation of hydrophilic polymer microspheres and hydrophobic polymer microcapsules. The various strategies usually employed for overcoming these obstacles are described in detail. Both processing and formulation parameters can be modified for improving protein stability. The maximum or full protein stability retention within the microspheres or microcapsules might be achieved by individual or combined optimized strategies. In addition, the common techniques for proteins stability determination are also briefly reviewed. PMID:23470006

  6. Development of protein mimics for intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Tew, Gregory N

    2015-07-01

    Designing delivery agents for therapeutics is an ongoing challenge. As treatments and desired cargoes become more complex, the need for improved delivery vehicles becomes critical. Excellent delivery vehicles must ensure the stability of the cargo, maintain the cargo's solubility, and promote efficient delivery and release. In order to address these issues, many research groups have looked to nature for design inspiration. Proteins, such as HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (TAT) and Antennapedia homeodomain protein, are capable of crossing cellular membranes. However, due to the complexities of their structures, they are synthetically challenging to reproduce in the laboratory setting. Being able to incorporate the key features of these proteins that enable cell entry into simpler scaffolds opens up a wide range of opportunities for the development of new delivery reagents with improved performance. This review charts the development of protein mimics based on cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and how structure-activity relationships (SARs) with these molecules and their protein counterparts ultimately led to the use of polymeric scaffolds. These scaffolds deviate from the normal peptide backbone, allowing for simpler, synthetic procedures to make carriers and tune chemical compositions for application specific needs. Successful design of polymeric protein mimics would allow researchers to further understand the key features in proteins and peptides necessary for efficient delivery and to design the next generation of more efficient delivery reagents. PMID:25858701

  7. The ciliopathy disease protein NPHP9 promotes nuclear delivery and activation of the oncogenic transcriptional regulator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Habbig, Sandra; Bartram, Malte P; Sägmüller, Josef G; Griessmann, Anabel; Franke, Mareike; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Schwarz, Ricarda; Hoehne, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Tessmer, Claudia; Reinhardt, H Christian; Burst, Volker; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2012-12-15

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is a genetically heterogenous kidney disease and represents the most common genetic cause for end-stage renal disease in children. It is caused by the mutation of genes encoding for the nephrocystin proteins (NPHPs) which localize to primary cilia or centrosomes, classifying this disease as a 'ciliopathy'. Recently, it has been shown that NPHP4 acts as a potent negative regulator of mammalian Hippo signalling by interacting with the Lats protein kinase and controlling the phosphorylation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator TAZ. Here, we demonstrate that NPHP9, another NPH family member, also controls TAZ activity by a distinct mechanism. NPHP9, which is also called NEK8, directly interacted with TAZ and induced nuclear translocation of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein complex. Binding of NPHP9 to TAZ was enhanced in a TAZ mutant that lost its ability to bind 14-3-3, suggesting that 14-3-3 and NPHP9 may compete for TAZ binding, with 14-3-3 favouring cytoplasmic retention and NPHP9 mediating nuclear delivery. Consistently, co-expression of NPHP4, which inhibits TAZ phosphorylation at the 14-3-3 binding site through the inhibition of Lats kinase activity, induced efficient nuclear delivery of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein pair. Consistent with a role for TAZ in controlling proliferation and tumorigenesis, the downregulation of NPHP9 inhibited the TAZ-dependent proliferation of hippo-responsive normal epithelial and also breast cancer cells. As NPHP9 has been shown to be upregulated in breast cancer, these data do not only support a critical role for TAZ/hippo signalling in the pathogenesis of NPH but may also imply a possible role for NPHP9 in TAZ-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:23026745

  8. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  9. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Subin R C K; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior. PMID:27489854

  10. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Subin R. C. K.; Udenigwe, Chibuike C.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior. PMID:27489854

  11. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  12. Breakable Hybrid Organosilica Nanocapsules for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Bertucci, Alessandro; Septiadi, Dedy; Corradini, Roberto; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    The direct delivery of specific proteins to live cells promises a tremendous impact for biological and medical applications, from therapeutics to genetic engineering. However, the process mostly involves tedious techniques and often requires extensive alteration of the protein itself. Herein we report a straightforward approach to encapsulate native proteins by using breakable organosilica matrices that disintegrate upon exposure to a chemical stimulus. The biomolecule-containing capsules were tested for the intracellular delivery of highly cytotoxic proteins into C6 glioma cells. We demonstrate that the shell is broken, the release of the active proteins occurs, and therefore our hybrid architecture is a promising strategy to deliver fragile biomacromolecules into living organisms. PMID:26643574

  13. Combined neurothrombectomy or thrombolysis with adjunctive delivery of 3K3A-activated protein C in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arun Paul; Griffin, John H.; Zlokovic, Berislav V.

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS), vessel recanalization correlates with improved functional status and reduced mortality. Mechanical neurothrombectomy achieves a higher likelihood of revascularization than intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), but there remains significant discrepancy between rates of recanalization and rates of favorable outcome. The poor neurological recovery among some stroke patients despite successful recanalization confirms the need for adjuvant therapy, such as pharmacological neuroprotection. Prior clinical trials of neuroprotectant drugs failed perhaps due to inability of the agent to reach the ischemic tissue beyond the occluded artery. A protocol that couples mechanical neurothrombectomy with concurrent delivery of a neuroprotectant overcomes this pitfall. Activated protein C (APC) exerts pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antithrombotic, cytoprotective, and neuroregenerative effects in stroke and appears a compelling candidate for this novel approach. PMID:26388732

  14. Nanostructures for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pachioni-Vasconcelos, Juliana de Almeida; Lopes, André Moreni; Apolinário, Alexsandra Conceição; Valenzuela-Oses, Johanna Karina; Costa, Juliana Souza Ribeiro; Nascimento, Laura de Oliveira; Pessoa, Adalberto; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Use of nanoscale devices as carriers for drugs and imaging agents has been extensively investigated and successful examples can already be found in therapy. In parallel, recombinant DNA technology together with molecular biology has opened up numerous possibilities for the large-scale production of many proteins of pharmaceutical interest, reflecting in the exponentially growing number of drugs of biotechnological origin. When we consider protein drugs, however, there are specific criteria to take into account to select adequate nanostructured systems as drug carriers. In this review, we highlight the main features, advantages, drawbacks and recent developments of nanostructures for protein encapsulation, such as nanoemulsions, liposomes, polymersomes, single-protein nanocapsules and hydrogel nanoparticles. We also discuss the importance of nanoparticle stabilization, as well as future opportunities and challenges in nanostructures for protein drug delivery. PMID:26580477

  15. Lentiviral Delivery of Proteins for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved to traverse cellular barriers and travel to the nucleus by mechanisms that involve active transport through the cytoplasm and viral quirks to resist cellular restriction factors and innate immune responses. Virus-derived vector systems exploit the capacity of viruses to ferry genetic information into cells, and now - more than three decades after the discovery of HIV - lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 have become instrumental in biomedical research and gene therapies that require genomic insertion of transgenes. By now, the efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery to stem cells, cells of the immune system including T cells, hepatic cells, and many other therapeutically relevant cell types is well established. Along with nucleic acids, HIV-1 virions carry the enzymatic tools that are essential for early steps of infection. Such capacity to package enzymes, even proteins of nonviral origin, has unveiled new ways of exploiting cellular intrusion of HIV-1. Based on early findings demonstrating the packaging of heterologous proteins into virus particles as part of the Gag and GagPol polypeptides, we have established lentiviral protein transduction for delivery of DNA transposases and designer nucleases. This strategy for delivering genome-engineering proteins facilitates high enzymatic activity within a short time frame and may potentially improve the safety of genome editing. Exploiting the full potential of lentiviral vectors, incorporation of foreign protein can be combined with the delivery of DNA transposons or a donor sequence for homology-directed repair in so-called 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors. Here, we briefly describe intracellular restrictions that may affect lentiviral gene and protein delivery and review the current status of lentiviral particles as carriers of tool kits for genome engineering. PMID:27228988

  16. A practical approach for intracellular protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Biri, Stéphanie; Adib, Abdennaji; Erbacher, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Protein delivery represents a powerful tool for experiments in live cells including studies of protein-protein interactions, protein interference with blocking antibodies, intracellular trafficking and protein or peptide biological functions. Most available reagents dedicated to the protein delivery allow efficient crossing of the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the major disadvantage for these reagents is a weak release of the delivered protein into the cytoplasm. In this publication we demonstrate efficient protein delivery with a non-peptide based reagent, in human epithelial carcinoma HeLa cells and primary human skin fibroblasts. Using a fluorescent protein in combination with fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting analysis, we show that the delivered protein is indeed released effectively in the cytoplasm, as expected for a dedicated carrier. Furthermore, we present a step-by-step method to optimize conditions for successful intracellular protein delivery. PMID:19002840

  17. Oral delivery of proteins: progress and prognostication.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rakhi B; Ahsan, Fakhrul; Khan, Mansoor A

    2002-01-01

    The delivery of proteins has gained momentum with the development of biotechnology sector that provided large-scale availability of therapeutic proteins. The availability is mostly due to the advances in recombinant DNA technology. The low oral bioavailability, however, continues to be a problem for several proteins because of their large molecular size, low permeation through biological membranes, and susceptibility to molecular changes in both biological and physical environments. The demand for effective delivery of proteins by the oral route has brought a tremendous thrust in recent years both in the scope and complexity of drug delivery technology. The important therapeutic proteins and peptides being explored for oral delivery include insulin, calcitonin, interferons, human growth hormone, glucagons, gonadotropin-releasing hormones, enkephalins, vaccines, enzymes, hormone analogs, and enzyme inhibitors. This article reviews the progress in oral delivery of these proteins, provides comments on the strategies to improve their oral bioavailability, and highlights their current market trends. PMID:12197608

  18. Mineralized cyclodextrin nanoparticles for sustained protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Maharajan; Thambi, Thavasyappan; Park, Jae Hyung

    2013-09-12

    The extensive therapeutic potential of protein drugs has been severely limited by their instability and short biological half-lives in vivo. To prolong their therapeutic effects, a sustained delivery system is required. In this study, cyclodextrin-based polymeric nanoparticles (CD-NPs), mineralized by calcium phosphate as the diffusion barrier, were developed as a carrier for sustained protein delivery. Spherical CD-NPs were readily prepared by a conjugate, composed of β-CD as the protein-binding moiety and carboxymethyl dextran as the substrate for mineralization in a physiological solution. Owing to the presence of carboxylic acids in CD-NPs, they were effectively mineralized by sequential addition of calcium nitrate and ammonium phosphate. The physicochemical characteristics of mineralized CD-NPs were characterized using FT-IR, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Mineralization reduced CD-NP particle size from 310 nm to 121 nm in PBS (pH 7.4) indicating the formation of compact nanoparticles. Carbonic anhydrase B (CAB), chosen as the model protein, was loaded into the mineralized CD-NPs with a high loading efficiency (80%) by a simple dialysis method. In vitro release tests showed that CAB was completely released from bare CD-NPs in 3 days. Interestingly, the mineralized CD-NPs released CAB in a sustained manner for 21 days, which was due to the stable calcium phosphate barrier inhibiting CAB release. The enzymatic activity of CAB, which was released from the nanoparticles, did not significantly deteriorate compared to native CAB. Overall, mineralized CD-NPs could be a promising carrier for sustained protein delivery. PMID:23911496

  19. Agile delivery of protein therapeutics to CNS.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2014-09-28

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  20. Agile Delivery of Protein Therapeutics to CNS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Manickam, Devika S.; Brynskikh, Anna; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of therapeutic proteins have shown potential to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Challenge to deliver these protein molecules to the brain is well known. Proteins administered through parenteral routes are often excluded from the brain because of their poor bioavailability and the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Barriers also exist to proteins administered through non-parenteral routes that bypass the BBB. Several strategies have shown promise in delivering proteins to the brain. This review, first, describes the physiology and pathology of the BBB that underscore the rationale and needs of each strategy to be applied. Second, major classes of protein therapeutics along with some key factors that affect their delivery outcomes are presented. Third, different routes of protein administration (parenteral, central intracerebroventricular and intraparenchymal, intranasal and intrathecal) are discussed along with key barriers to CNS delivery associated with each route. Finally, current delivery strategies involving chemical modification of proteins and use of particle-based carriers are overviewed using examples from literature and our own work. Whereas most of these studies are in the early stage, some provide proof of mechanism of increased protein delivery to the brain in relevant models of CNS diseases, while in few cases proof of concept had been attained in clinical studies. This review will be useful to broad audience of students, academicians and industry professionals who consider critical issues of protein delivery to the brain and aim developing and studying effective brain delivery systems for protein therapeutics. PMID:24956489

  1. Inhalation delivery of proteins from ethanol suspensions.

    PubMed

    Choi, W S; Murthy, G G; Edwards, D A; Langer, R; Klibanov, A M

    2001-09-25

    To circumvent inherent problems associated with pulmonary administration of aqueous-solution and dry-powder protein drugs, inhalation delivery of proteins from their suspensions in absolute ethanol was explored both in vitro and in vivo. Protein suspensions in ethanol of up to 9% (wt/vol) were readily aerosolized with a commercial compressor nebulizer. Experiments with enzymic proteins revealed that nebulization caused no detectable loss of catalytic activity; furthermore, enzyme suspensions in anhydrous ethanol retained their full catalytic activity for at least 3 weeks at room temperature. With the use of Zn(2+)-insulin, conditions were elaborated that produced submicron protein particles in ethanol suspensions. The latter (insulin/EtOH) afforded respirable-size aerosol particles after nebulization. A 40-min exposure of laboratory rats to 10 mg/ml insulin/EtOH aerosols resulted in a 2-fold drop in the blood glucose level and a marked rise in the serum insulin level. The bioavailability based on estimated deposited lung dose of insulin delivered by inhalation of ethanol suspension aerosols was 33% (relative to an equivalent s.c. injection), i.e., comparable to those observed in rats after inhalation administration of dry powder and aqueous solutions of insulin. Inhalation of ethanol in a relevant amount/time frame resulted in no detectable acute toxic effects on rat lungs or airways, as reflected by the absence of statistically significant inflammatory or allergic responses, damage to the alveolar/capillary barrier, and lysed and/or damaged cells. PMID:11562495

  2. Long-Term Delivery of Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Ravi; Khurana, Varun; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proteins are effective biotherapetics with applications in diverse ailments. Despite being specific and potent, their full clinical potential has not yet been realized. This can be attributed to short half-lives, complex structures, poor in vivo stability, low permeability frequent parenteral administrations and poor adherence to treatment in chronic diseases. A sustained release system, providing controlled release of proteins, may overcome many of these limitations. Areas covered This review focuses on recent development in approaches, especially polymer-based formulations, which can provide therapeutic levels of proteins over extended periods. Advances in particulate, gel based formulations and novel approaches for extended protein delivery are discussed. Emphasis is placed on dosage form, method of preparation, mechanism of release and stability of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Substantial advancements have been made in the field of extended protein delivery via various polymer-based formulations over last decade despite the unique delivery-related challenges posed by protein biologics. A number of injectable sustained-release formulations have reached market. However, therapeutic application of proteins is still hampered by delivery related issues. A large number of protein molecules are under clinical trials and hence there is an urgent need to develop new methods to deliver these highly potent biologics. PMID:25251334

  3. NANOMATERIALS FOR PROTEIN MEDIATED THERAPY AND DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Barry, John N.; Vertegel, Alexey A.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant amount of research done on liposomes and nanoparticles as drug carriers for protein drugs. Proteins and enzymes have been used both as targeting moieties and for their therapeutic potential. High specificity and rapid reaction rates make proteins and enzymes excellent candidates for therapeutic treatment, but some limitations exist. Many of these limitations can be addressed by a well studied nanotechnology based delivery system. Such a system can provide a medium for delivery, stabilization of the drugs, and enable site specific accumulation of drugs. Nanomedicines such as these have great potential to revolutionize the pharmaceutical industry and improve healthcare worldwide. PMID:25414730

  4. Enzyme-Responsive Delivery of Multiple Proteins with Spatiotemporal Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Suwei; Nih, Lina; Carmichael, S. Thomas; Lu, Yunfeng; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The growth of tissues and organs is regulated by orchestrated signals from biomolecules such as enzymes and growth factors. The ability to deliver signal molecules in response to particular biological events (e.g., enzyme expression and activation) holds great promise towards tissue healing and regeneration. The current delivery vehicles mainly rely on hydrolysable scaffolds and thin films of protein-containing polymers, which cannot be programmed to respond to biological signals. We report herein an injectable delivery platform based on enantiomeric protein nanocapsules, which can deliver multiple proteins with spatiotemporal control in response to the tissue proteases secreted during wound healing. Exemplified by stroke and diabetic wound healing in mice, sequential delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) greatly enhances tissue revascularization and vessel maturation, providing effective delivery vehicles for tissue engineering and reparative medicine. PMID:25962336

  5. Graphene Nanoribbons Elicit Cell Specific Uptake and Delivery Via Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Enhanced by Human PapillomaVirus E5 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Mannepalli, Prady; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Ligands such as peptides, antibodies or other epitopes bind and activate specific cell receptors, and are employed for targeted cellular delivery of pharmaceuticals such as drugs, genes and imaging agents. Herein, we show that oxidized graphene nanoribbons, non-covalently functionalized with PEG-DSPE (1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N[amino(polyethyleneglycol)]) (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). This activation generates predominantly dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like response, and results in significant O-GNR-PEG-DSPE uptake into cells with high EGFR expression. Cells with an integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) genome also show increased uptake due to the modulation of the activated EFGR by the viral protein E5. We demonstrate that this cell specific uptake of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE can be exploited to achieve significantly enhanced drug efficacies even in drug resistant cells. These results have implications towards the development of active targeting and delivery agents without ligand functionalization for use in the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies that overexpress EGFR or mediated by HPV. PMID:24980059

  6. Emerging hydrogel designs for controlled protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2016-08-19

    Hydrogels have evolved into indispensable biomaterials in the fields of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. This minireview aims to highlight the recent advances in the hydrogel design for controlled release of bioactive proteins. The latest developments of enzyme-responsive and externally regulated drug delivery systems are summarized. The design strategies and applications of phase-separated hydrogel systems are also described. We expect that these emerging approaches will enable expanded use of hydrogels in biomedicine and healthcare. PMID:27374633

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Transdermal Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitragotri, Samir; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    1995-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers a potential method of drug administration. However, its application has been limited to a few low molecular weight compounds because of the extremely low permeability of human skin. Low-frequency ultrasound was shown to increase the permeability of human skin to many drugs, including high molecular weight proteins, by several orders of magnitude, thus making transdermal administration of these molecules potentially feasible. It was possible to deliver and control therapeutic doses of proteins such as insulin, interferon γ, and erythropoeitin across human skin. Low-frequency ultrasound is thus a potential noninvasive substitute for traditional methods of drug delivery, such as injections.

  8. Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins as Secretable TAT Fusion Products

    PubMed Central

    Flinterman, Marcella; Farzaneh, Farzin; Habib, Nagy; Malik, Farooq; Gäken, Joop; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2008-01-01

    The trans-acting activator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (PTD) mediates the transduction of peptides and proteins into target cells. The TAT-PTD has an important potential as a tool for the delivery of therapeutic agents. The production of TAT fusion proteins in bacteria, however, is problematic because of protein insolubility and the absence of eukaryotic post-translational modification. An attractive alternative, both for in vitro protein production and for in vivo applications, is the use of higher eukaryotic cells for secretion of TAT fusion proteins. However, the ubiquitous expression of furin endoprotease (PACE or SPC1) in the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum, and the presence of furin recognition sequences within TAT-PTD, results in the cleavage and loss of the TAT-PTD domain during its secretory transition through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. In this study, we show the development of a synthetic TATκ-PTD in which mutation of the furin recognition sequences, but retention of protein transduction activity, allows secretion of recombinant proteins, followed by successful uptake of the modified protein, by the target cells. This system was used to successfully secrete marker protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and apoptin, a protein with tumor-specific cytotoxicity. Detection of GFP, phosphorylation, and induction of cell death by TATκ-GFP-apoptin indicated that the secreted proteins were functional in target cells. This novel strategy therefore has important potential for the efficient delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19050698

  9. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  10. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  11. Cry Protein Crystals: A Novel Platform for Protein Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A.; Dean, Donald H.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Burry, Richard W.; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Chan, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer’s patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues. PMID:26030844

  12. Caged Protein Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Nicholas M.; Wang, Szu-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Caged protein nanoparticles possess many desirable features for drug delivery, such as ideal sizes for endocytosis, non-toxic biodegradability, and the ability to functionalize at three distinct interfaces (external, internal, and inter-subunit) using the tools of protein engineering. Researchers have harnessed these attributes by covalently and non-covalently loading therapeutic molecules through mechanisms that facilitate release within specific microenvironments. Effective delivery depends on several factors, including specific targeting, cell uptake, release kinetics, and systemic clearance. The innate ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to proteins has recently been exploited to deliver therapeutic compounds with these platforms for immunomodulation. The diversity of drugs, loading/release mechanisms, therapeutic targets, and therapeutic efficacy are discussed in this review. PMID:24832078

  13. Electrically-assisted delivery of an anionic protein across intact skin: cathodal iontophoresis of biologically active ribonuclease T1.

    PubMed

    Dubey, S; Kalia, Y N

    2011-06-30

    Cathodal iontophoresis of anionic macromolecules has been considered a major challenge owing to (i) the presence of a negative charge on the skin under physiological conditions and (ii) the electroosmotic solvent flow in the (opposite) anode-to-cathode direction. Moreover, electroosmosis, and not electromigration, was considered as the likely electrotransport mechanism for high molecular weight cations. However, it was recently shown that electromigration governed anodal iontophoretic transport of Cytochrome c (12.4 kDa) and Ribonuclease A (RNAse A; 13.6 kDa). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of iontophoresing a negatively charged protein, the enzyme Ribonuclease T1 (RNAse T1, 11.1 kDa), from the cathode across intact skin. Cumulative permeation and skin deposition of RNAse T1 were investigated as a function of current density (0.15, 0.3 and 0.5 mA/cm(2) applied for 8h) using porcine ear skin and quantified by an enzymatic activity assay. Although RNAse T1 permeation was dependent upon current density (22.41 ± 8.10, 76.41 ± 56.98 and 142.19 ± 62.23μg/cm(2), respectively), no such relationship was observed with respect to skin deposition (9.78 ± 2.39, 7.76 ± 4.34 and 8.70 ± 2.94 μg/cm(2), respectively). MALDI-TOF spectra and the activity assay confirmed that RNAse T1 retained structural integrity and enzymatic function post-iontophoresis. Acetaminophen iontophoresis demonstrated the anode-to-cathode directionality of electroosmotic solvent flow confirming that RNAse T1 electrotransport was due entirely to electromigration. Interestingly, despite its lower net charge and higher molecular weight, electromigration of cationic Ribonuclease A was superior to that of RNAse T1 after iontophoresis at 0.5 mA/cm(2) for 8h. These results provide further evidence that charge to mass ratio and hence electric mobility might not alone be sufficient to predict protein electrotransport across the skin; three dimensional structures and the

  14. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  15. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  16. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  17. PEGylated Albumin-Based Polyion Complex Micelles for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lu, Hongxu; Chen, Fan; Callari, Manuela; Pourgholami, Mohammad; Morris, David L; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-03-14

    An increasing amount of therapeutic agents are based on proteins. However, proteins as drug have intrinsic problems such as their low hydrolytic stability. Delivery of proteins using nanoparticles has increasingly been the focus of interest with polyion complex micelles, prepared from charged block copolymer and the oppositely charged protein, as an example of an attractive carrier for proteins. Inspired by this approach, a more biocompatible pathway has been developed here, which replaces the charged synthetic polymer with an abundant protein, such as albumin. Although bovine serum albumin (BSA) was observed to form complexes with positively charged proteins directly, the resulting protein nanoparticle were not stable and aggregated to large precipitates over the course of a day. Therefore, maleimide functionalized poly(oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (MI-POEGMEMA) (Mn = 26000 g/mol) was synthesized to generate a polymer-albumin conjugate, which was able to condense positively charged proteins, here lysozyme (Lyz) as a model. The PEGylated albumin polyion complex micelle with lysozyme led to nanoparticles between 15 and 25 nm in size depending on the BSA to Lyz ratio. The activity of the encapsulated protein was tested using Sprouty 1 (C-12; Spry1) proteins, which can act as an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor. Condensation of Spry1 with the PEGylated albumin could improve the anticancer efficacy of Spry1 against the breast cancer cells lowering the IC50 value of the protein. Furthermore, the high anticancer efficacy of the POEGMEMA-BSA/Spry1 complex micelle was verified by effectively inhibiting the growth of three-dimensional MCF-7 multicellular tumor spheroids. The PEGylated albumin complex micelle has great potential as a drug delivery vehicle for a new generation of cancer pharmaceuticals. PMID:26809948

  18. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects. PMID:27483234

  19. Novel non-invasive protein and peptide drug delivery approaches.

    PubMed

    Wallis, L; Kleynhans, E; Toit, T Du; Gouws, C; Steyn, D; Steenekamp, J; Viljoen, J; Hamman, J

    2014-01-01

    Protein and peptide based therapeutics are typically administered by injection due to their poor uptake when administered via enteral routes of drug administration. Unfortunately, chronic administration of these drugs through multiple injections presents certain patient related problems and it is difficult to mimic the normal physiological release patterns via this mode of drug administration. A need therefore exists to non-invasively deliver these drugs by means of alternative ways such as via the oral, pulmonary, nasal, transdermal and buccal administration routes. Although some attempts of needle free peptide and protein drug delivery have progressed to the clinical stage, relatively limited success has been achieved in terms of commercially available products. Despite the low frequency of clinical breakthroughs with noninvasive protein drug delivery this far, it remains an active research area with renewed interest not only due to its improved therapeutic potential, but also due to the attractive commercial outcomes it offers. It is the aim of this review article to reflect on the main strategies investigated to overcome the barriers against effective systemic protein drug delivery in different routes of drug administration. Approaches based on chemical modifications and pharmaceutical technologies are discussed with reference to examples of drugs and devices that have shown potential, while attempts that have failed are also briefly outlined. PMID:25106909

  20. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kiaw Kiaw; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Sofiman Othman, Ahmad; Kigawa, Takanori; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa) was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa) into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa) conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa) into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology. PMID:27100681

  1. Bioreducible Lipid-like Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Carlos Luis

    Protein-based therapy is one of the most direct ways to manipulate cell function and treat human disease. Although protein therapeutics has made its way to clinical practice, with five of the top fifteen global pharmaceuticals being peptide or protein-based drugs, one common limitation is that the effects of protein therapy are only achieved through the targeting of cell surface receptors and intracellular domains. Due to the impermeability of the cell membrane to most foreign materials, entire classes of potentially therapeutic proteins cannot thoroughly be studied without a safe and efficient method of transporting proteins into the cytosol. We report the use of a combinatorially-designed bioreducible lipid-like material (termed "lipidoid") - based protein delivery platform for the transfection of human cancer cell lines. Lipidoid nanoparticles are synthesized through a thin film dispersion method. The degradation of the bioreducible nanoparticles was observed when exposed to glutathione, a highly reductive compound present in the cytosol. We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are capable of transfecting a dose-dependent concentration of our model protein, beta-galactosidase into HeLa cells. Furthermore, formulations of the lipidoid containing the cytotoxic proteins saporin and RNase-A are both capable of inhibiting tumor cell proliferation as observed in in vitro treatment of different human cancer cell lines. There was no observed loss in protein activity after lyophilization and long--term storage, indicating the potential of pre-clinical applications. Overall, we demonstrate an effective approach to protein formulation and intracellular delivery. We believe that our formulations will lead to the study of a whole class of previously untapped therapeutics that may generate new solutions for previously untreatable diseases.

  2. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles.

    PubMed

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-03-01

    Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  3. A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Niren; Xu, Mingcheng; Schuck, Stephany; Kunisawa, Jun; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of protein-based vaccines remains a major challenge in the fields of immunology and drug delivery. Although numerous protein antigens have been identified that can generate immunity to infectious pathogens, the development of vaccines based on protein antigens has had limited success because of delivery issues. In this article, an acid-sensitive microgel material is synthesized for the development of protein-based vaccines. The chemical design of these microgels is such that they degrade under the mildly acidic conditions found in the phagosomes of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The rapid cleavage of the microgels leads to phagosomal disruption through a colloid osmotic mechanism, releasing protein antigens into the APC cytoplasm for class I antigen presentation. Ovalbumin was encapsulated in microgel particles, 200–500 nm in diameter, prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization with a synthesized acid-degradable crosslinker. Ovalbumin is released from the acid-degradable microgels in a pH-dependent manner; for example, microgels containing ovalbumin release 80% of their encapsulated proteins after 5 h at pH 5.0, but release only 10% at pH 7.4. APCs that phagocytosed the acid-degradable microgels containing ovalbumin were capable of activating ovalbumin-specific cytoxic T lymphocytes. The acid-degradable microgels developed in this article should therefore find applications as delivery vehicles for vaccines targeted against viruses and tumors, where the activation of cytoxic T lymphocytes is required for the development of immunity. PMID:12704236

  4. Stimuli-Responsive Nanomaterials for Therapeutic Protein Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yue; Sun, Wujin; Gu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have emerged as a significant role in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases, including cancer, metabolic disorders and autoimmune diseases. The efficacy of protein therapeutics, however, is limited by their instability, immunogenicity and short half-life. In order to overcome these barriers, tremendous efforts have recently been made in developing controlled protein delivery systems. Stimuli-triggered release is an appealing and promising approach for protein delivery and has made protein delivery with both spatiotemporal- and dosage-controlled manners possible. This review surveys recent advances in controlled protein delivery of proteins or peptides using stimuli-responsive nanomaterials. Strategies utilizing both physiological and external stimuli are introduced and discussed. PMID:25151983

  5. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  6. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  7. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  8. Serum insensitive, intranuclear protein delivery by the multipurpose cationic lipid SAINT-2.

    PubMed

    van der Gun, Bernardina T F; Monami, Amélie; Laarmann, Sven; Raskó, Tamás; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Weinhold, Elmar; Wasserkort, Reinhold; de Leij, Lou F M H; Ruiters, Marcel H J; Kiss, Antal; McLaughlin, Pamela M J

    2007-11-20

    Cationic liposomal compounds are widely used to introduce DNA and siRNA into viable cells, but none of these compounds are also capable of introducing proteins. Here we describe the use of a cationic amphiphilic lipid SAINT-2:DOPE for the efficient delivery of proteins into cells (profection). Labeling studies demonstrated equal delivery efficiency for protein as for DNA and siRNA. Moreover, proteins complexed with Saint-2:DOPE were successfully delivered, irrespective of the presence of serum, and the profection efficiency was not influenced by the size or the charge of the protein:cationic liposomal complex. Using beta-galactosidase as a reporter protein, enzymatic activity was detected in up to 98% of the adherent cells, up to 83% of the suspension cells and up to 70% of the primary cells after profection. A delivered antibody was detected in the cytoplasm for up to 7 days after profection. Delivery of the methyltransferase M.SssI resulted in DNA methylation, leading to a decrease in E-cadherin expression. The lipid-mediated multipurpose transport system reported here can introduce proteins into the cell with an equal delivery efficiency as for nucleotides. Delivery is irrespective of the presence of serum, and the protein can exert its function both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Furthermore, DNA methylation by M.SssI delivery as a novel tool for gene silencing has potential applications in basic research and therapy. PMID:17884225

  9. Liposome-Mediated Cellular Delivery of Active gp91phox

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Bruno; Liguori, Lavinia; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Villegas-Mendéz, Ana; Rothe, Romy; Morel, Françoise; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Background Gp91phox is a transmembrane protein and the catalytic core of the NADPH oxidase complex of neutrophils. Lack of this protein causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe and recurrent infections due to the incapacity of phagocytes to kill microorganisms. Methodology Here we optimize a prokaryotic cell-free expression system to produce integral mammalian membrane proteins. Conclusions Using this system, we over-express truncated forms of the gp91phox protein under soluble form in the presence of detergents or lipids resulting in active proteins with a “native-like” conformation. All the proteins exhibit diaphorase activity in the presence of cytosolic factors (p67phox, p47phox, p40phox and Rac) and arachidonic acid. We also produce proteoliposomes containing gp91phox protein and demonstrate that these proteins exhibit activities similar to their cellular counterpart. The proteoliposomes induce rapid cellular delivery and relocation of recombinant gp91phox proteins to the plasma membrane. Our data support the concept of cell-free expression technology for producing recombinant proteoliposomes and their use for functional and structural studies or protein therapy by complementing deficient cells in gp91phox protein. PMID:17848987

  10. Basics and recent advances in peptide and protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Benjamin J; Miller, Geoffrey D; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    While the peptide and protein therapeutic market has developed significantly in the past decades, delivery has limited their use. Although oral delivery is preferred, most are currently delivered intravenously or subcutaneously due to degradation and limited absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, absorption enhancers, enzyme inhibitors, carrier systems and stability enhancers are being studied to facilitate oral peptide delivery. Additionally, transdermal peptide delivery avoids the issues of the gastrointestinal tract, but also faces absorption limitations. Due to proteases, opsonization and agglutination, free peptides are not systemically stable without modifications. This review discusses oral and transdermal peptide drug delivery, focusing on barriers and solutions to absorption and stability issues. Methods to increase systemic stability and site-specific delivery are also discussed. PMID:24228993

  11. Mechanisms allowing protein delivery in nasal mucosa using NPL nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, B; Carpentier, R; Lantier, I; Ducournau, C; Dimier-Poisson, I; Betbeder, D

    2016-06-28

    The intranasal administration of proteins using nanoparticles is a promising approach for several applications, especially for mucosal vaccines. Delivery of protein within the epithelial barrier is a key point to elicit an immune response and nano-carrier has to show no toxicity. The aim of this work was to elucidate the interactions of cationic porous nanoparticles loaded with protein delivery for antigen delivery in the nose. We investigated the loading, the cellular delivery and the epithelial transcytosis of proteins associated to these nanoparticles containing an anionic lipid in their core (NPL). NPL were highly endocytosed by airway epithelial cells and significantly improved the protein delivery into the cell. In vitro transcytosis studies showed that NPL did not modify the in vitro epithelial permeability suggesting no toxicity of these carriers. Moreover protein and NPL did not translocate the epithelial barrier. In vivo studies demonstrated that NPL prolonged the nasal residence time of the protein and no NPL were found beyond the epithelial barrier in vivo, precluding a negative side effect. All together these results establish the NPL as a bio-eliminable and optimal vaccine carrier. PMID:27080572

  12. Characterization of carbohydrate-protein matrices for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yankun; Roos, Yrjö H

    2011-05-01

    Amorphous carbohydrates may show glass transition and crystallization as a result of thermal or water plasticization. Proteins often affect the state transitions of carbohydrates in carbohydrate-protein systems. Water sorption behavior and effects of water on glass transition and crystallization in freeze-dried lactose, trehalose, lactose-casein (3: 1), lactose-soy protein isolate (3:1), trehalose-casein (3:1), and trehalose-soy protein isolate (3:1) systems were studied. Water sorption was determined gravimetrically as a function of time, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) models were fitted to the experimental data. Glass transition temperature (T(g)) and instant crystallization temperature (T(ic)) in anhydrous and water plasticized systems were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The Gordon-Taylor equation was used to model water content dependence of the T(g) values. The critical water content and water activity (a(w)) at 24 °C were calculated and crystallization of lactose and trehalose in the systems was followed at and above 0.54 a(w). Carbohydrate-protein systems showed higher amounts of sorbed water and less rapid sugar crystallization than pure sugars. A greater sugar crystallization delay was found in carbohydrate-casein systems than in carbohydrate-soy protein isolate systems. The T(g) and T(ic) values decreased with increasing water content and a(w). However, higher T(ic) values for lactose-protein systems were found than for lactose at the same a(w). Trehalose showed lower T(ic) value than lactose at 0.44 a(w) but no instant crystallization was measured below 0.44 a(w). State diagrams for each system are useful in selecting processing parameters and storage conditions in nutrient delivery applications. PMID:22417357

  13. Noninvasive Routes of Proteins and Peptides Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jitendra; Sharma, P. K.; Bansal, Sumedha; Banik, Arunabha

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of pharmaceutical biotechnology have led to the formulation of many protein and peptide-based drugs for therapeutic and clinical application. The route of administration has a significant impact on the therapeutic outcome of a drug. The needle and syringe is a well established choice of protein and peptide delivery which has some drawback related to patient and to formulation such as pain, cost, sterility etc. Thus, the noninvasive routes which were of minor importance as parts of drug delivery in the past have assumed added importance in protein and peptide drug delivery and these include nasal, ophthalmic, buccal, vaginal, transdermal and pulmonary routes. The pharmaceutical scientists have some approaches to develop the formulations for protein and peptide delivery by noninvasive routes. But, due to the physiochemical instability and enzymatic barrier of proteins and peptides there are several hurdle to develop suitable formulation. So there is need of penetration enhancers, enzyme inhibitors and suitable vehicles for noninvasive delivery to increase the bioavailability. In this review, the aim is to focus on the approaches to formulation of protein and peptide based drug administration by noninvasive route. PMID:22707818

  14. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  15. Protein Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Carriers for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Wang, Liying; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have increasingly been used for a variety of applications, most notably for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. A large number of nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been developed for cancer treatment and various materials have been explored as drug delivery agents to improve the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. Natural biomolecules such as proteins are an attractive alternative to synthetic polymers which are commonly used in drug formulations because of their safety. In general, protein nanoparticles offer a number of advantages including biocompatibility and biodegradability. They can be prepared under mild conditions without the use of toxic chemicals or organic solvents. Moreover, due to their defined primary structure, protein-based nanoparticles offer various possibilities for surface modifications including covalent attachment of drugs and targeting ligands. In this paper, we review the most significant advancements in protein nanoparticle technology and their use in drug delivery arena. We then examine the various sources of protein materials that have been used successfully for the construction of protein nanoparticles as well as their methods of preparation. Finally, we discuss the applications of protein nanoparticles in cancer therapy. PMID:24772414

  16. Efficient delivery of nuclease proteins for genome editing in human stem cells and primary cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Nan; Shui, Sailan; Kim, Sojung; Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Kim, Jin-Soo; Barbas, Carlos F

    2015-11-01

    Targeted nucleases, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have provided researchers with the ability to manipulate nearly any genomic sequence in human cells and model organisms. However, realizing the full potential of these genome-modifying technologies requires their safe and efficient delivery into relevant cell types. Unlike methods that rely on expression from nucleic acids, the direct delivery of nuclease proteins to cells provides rapid action and fast turnover, leading to fewer off-target effects while maintaining high rates of targeted modification. These features make nuclease protein delivery particularly well suited for precision genome engineering. Here we describe procedures for implementing protein-based genome editing in human embryonic stem cells and primary cells. Protocols for the expression, purification and delivery of ZFN proteins, which are intrinsically cell-permeable; TALEN proteins, which can be internalized via conjugation with cell-penetrating peptide moieties; and Cas9 ribonucleoprotein, whose nucleofection into cells facilitates rapid induction of multiplexed modifications, are described, along with procedures for evaluating nuclease protein activity. Once they are constructed, nuclease proteins can be expressed and purified within 6 d, and they can be used to induce genomic modifications in human cells within 2 d. PMID:26492140

  17. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Mach, Nicolas; Schneider, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines. PMID:26006227

  18. Proteolistics: a biolistic method for intracellular delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ortigosa, Susana; Wang, Kan

    2014-10-01

    In this work, an intracellular protein delivery methodology termed "proteolistics" is described. This method utilizes a biolistic gun apparatus and involves a simple protein/projectile preparation step. The protein to be delivered is mixed with a gold particle microprojectile suspension and is placed onto a gene gun cartridge, where it is dehydrated using either lyophilization or room-temperature air-drying. Subsequent intracellular protein delivery is achieved in plant and mammalian tissues upon bombardment. Because the method does not require modification of delivery agents or cargo biomolecules and involves a simple physical deposition of the protein onto the microprojectiles, there is no restriction on protein type in terms of molecular weight, isoelectric point or tertiary structure. Because the method delivers protein through the widely used gene gun system, it can be readily applied to any tissue or organism amenable to biolistics. A variety of proteins with molecular weight ranging from 24 to 68 kDa and isoelectric point from 4.8 to 10.1 were tested in this work. It is anticipated that this simple and versatile technique will offer biologists a powerful tool for basic research in areas such as understanding of cell and gene functions and for biotechnological applications such as genome editing. PMID:25092532

  19. Oral colon-specific drug delivery of protein and peptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V; Singh, Asmita; Kumar, Ruchita V; Singh, Sanjay; Kumria, Rachana; Bhinge, J

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of new technologies and radical growth in the field of biotechnology, dozens of protein and peptide drugs have been marketed. However, there are several challenges for successful delivery of such molecules. A number of routes have been used for the delivery of these fragile molecules by exploring various novel delivery technologies, including microspheres, liposomes, gel spheres, nano-spheres, niosomes, microemulsions, use of permeation enhancers, use of protease inhibitors, etc. But the route that has attracted the attention of worldwide drug delivery scientists is the oral route due to its various advantages. Even though the proteolytic activity is higher in a few segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), this route has certain segments that have lower proteolytic activity, for example, the colon. The colon has captured attention as a site for the delivery of these molecules because of its greater responsiveness to absorption enhancers, protease inhibitors, and novel bioadhesive and biodegradable polymers. Although the success rate of these approaches, when used alone is pretty low, when used in combinations, these agents have demonstrated wonders in increasing the drug bioavailability. This review focuses on the challenges, pharmaceutical concepts, and approaches involved in the delivery of these fragile molecules, specifically to the colon. This review also includes studies conducted on colonic targeting of such drugs. Further studies may lead to improvements in therapy using protein/peptide drugs and refinements in the technology of colon-specific drug delivery. PMID:17430100

  20. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  1. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Protein and DNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Ravikumar, Priya; Pise, Amruta; Gyawali, Dipendra; Hsia, Connie C.W.; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are promising carriers of biological agents to lung due to advantages including biocompatibility, ease of surface modification, localized action and reduced systemic toxicity. However, there have been no studies extensively characterizing and comparing the behavior of polymeric NPs for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery both in vitro and in vivo. We screened six polymeric NPs: gelatin, chitosan, alginate, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA-chitosan, and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PEG), for inhalational protein/ DNA delivery. All NPs except PLGA-PEG and alginate were <300 nm in size with bi-phasic core compound release profile. Gelatin, PLGA NPs and PLGA-PEG NPs remained stable in deionized water, serum, saline and simulated lung fluid (Gamble’s solution) over 5 days. PLGA-based NPs and natural polymer NPs exhibited highest cytocompatibility and dose-dependent in vitro uptake respectively by human alveolar type-1 epithelial cells. Based on these profiles, gelatin and PLGA NPs were used to encapsulate a) plasmid DNA encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or b) rhodamine-conjugated erythropoietin (EPO) for inhalational delivery to rats. Following a single inhalation, widespread pulmonary EPO distribution persisted for up to 10 days while increasing YFP expression was observed for at least 7 days for both NPs. The overall results support both PLGA and gelatin NPs as promising carriers for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery. PMID:24512977

  2. A rationale for delivery of osteoinductive proteins.

    PubMed

    Brekke, J H

    1996-01-01

    Highly pure, recombinant human osteoinductive proteins make it possible to consider programmable osteoneogenesis. Until recently, it was believed that a bioresorbable excipient or physiologic solution would suffice to transport osteoinductive agents from source to wound. After considering surgical requirements, particular bone wound circumstances, scarcity of collateral circulation, phenotype plasticity of mesenchymal progenitor cells, and the morphogens' pleiotrophic effects, it becomes clear that the issue of controlled, programmable osteoneogenesis is a more complicated proposition than can be addressed solely by application of osteoinductive protein. The essential characteristics of a manufactured bone graft substitute (BGS) device are dictated by demands placed on such a device by the surgeons who will employ them and the cells that will occupy them. This review outlines a design process for BGS devices that (1) begins by surveying BGS requirements gathered from the literature from 1991 to 1995, (2) briefly reviews recent in vitro studies of rhBMP-2 and OP- 1, (3) describes commonly encountered circumstances of recipient wound beds, (4) describes behaviors of mesenchymal cells involved in connective tissue repair and regeneration, and (5) concludes with a rationale for design of an osteoinductive bone graft substitute. Emerging from this process is a composite device consisting of a bioresorbable structural polymer, a filamentous velour of hyaluronan (HY), and an osteoinductive protein. The structural polymer, D,D-L,L-polylactic acid, fabricated in the architecture of cancellous bone, is capable of maintaining its structural and architectural properties after being thoroughly saturated with water. Within its interstices is located a filamentous velour of hyaluronan which, when fully hydrated, becomes a viscoelastic gel. It is anticipated that the osteoinductive protein will either be carried on the dried hyaluronic acid velour or in solution via the

  3. Efficient Delivery of Genome-Editing Proteins In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zuris, John A.; Thompson, David B.; Shu, Yilai; Guilinger, John P.; Bessen, Jeffrey L.; Hu, Johnny H.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Joung, J. Keith; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient intracellular delivery of proteins is needed to fully realize the potential of protein therapeutics. Current methods of protein delivery commonly suffer from low tolerance for serum, poor endosomal escape, and limited in vivo efficacy. Here we report that common cationic lipid nucleic acid transfection reagents can potently deliver proteins that are fused to negatively supercharged proteins, that contain natural anionic domains, or that natively bind to anionic nucleic acids. This approach mediates the potent delivery of nM concentrations of Cre recombinase, TALE- and Cas9-based transcriptional activators, and Cas9:sgRNA nuclease complexes into cultured human cells in media containing 10% serum. Delivery of Cas9:sgRNA complexes resulted in up to 80% genome modification with substantially higher specificity compared to DNA transfection. This approach also mediated efficient delivery of Cre recombinase and Cas9:sgRNA complexes into the mouse inner ear in vivo, achieving 90% Cre-mediated recombination and 20% Cas9-mediated genome modification in hair cells. PMID:25357182

  4. Synthetic materials and macromolecular assemblies for control over the delivery of DNA and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Christopher M.

    The work described in this thesis is focused on the design, characterization, and application of synthetic materials that can be used to manipulate and control the delivery of biomacromolecules such as DNA and proteins to cells. The work described herein was conducted in two primary contexts: (1) the fabrication and characterization of multilayered films comprised of DNA and degradable polyamines, with applications to the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins, and (2) the formation of self-assembled aggregates of DNA and redox-active lipids that could allow active control over the delivery of DNA. The first approach described in this thesis is based on the layer-by-layer assembly and characterization of thin films fabricated from hydrolytically-degradable polyamines and biomacromolecules. When contacted with cells in culture, these assemblies permit the surface-mediated delivery of DNA and proteins and may prove useful in the development of methods seeking the localized delivery of therapeutics. Additional work involving DNA-containing multilayered films deposited on the surfaces of biomedical devices such as intravascular stents has demonstrated that these assemblies are able to withstand mechanical stresses similar to those associated with stent deployment in vivo, and further, that film-coated stents are able to mediate high levels of cell transfection in vitro. The second approach described in this thesis demonstrates that lipoplexes formed from DNA and a ferrocene-containing, redox-active cationic lipid can be used to control the delivery of DNA to cells in ways that depend critically upon the redox-state of the lipid. Additional studies demonstrate that these assemblies can be chemically transformed from an inactive state (e.g., a state this is unable to mediate cell transfection) to an active state (e.g., a state that mediates high levels of cell transfection) using a chemical reducing agent. This approach could thus serve as a platform for exerting

  5. Nanodiamonds as Carriers for Address Delivery of Biologically Active Substances

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Surface of detonation nanodiamonds was functionalized for the covalent attachment of immunoglobulin, and simultaneously bovine serum albumin and Rabbit Anti-Mouse Antibody. The nanodiamond-IgGI125 and RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complexes are stable in blood serum and the immobilized proteins retain their biological activity. It was shown that the RAM-nanodiamond-BSAI125 complex is able to bind to the target antigen immobilized on the Sepharose 6B matrix through antibody–antigen interaction. The idea can be extended to use nanodiamonds as carriers for delivery of bioactive substances (i.e., drugs) to various targets in vivo. PMID:20672079

  6. Nanodiamonds as Carriers for Address Delivery of Biologically Active Substances.

    PubMed

    Purtov, K V; Petunin, A I; Burov, A E; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2010-01-01

    Surface of detonation nanodiamonds was functionalized for the covalent attachment of immunoglobulin, and simultaneously bovine serum albumin and Rabbit Anti-Mouse Antibody. The nanodiamond-IgG(I125) and RAM-nanodiamond-BSA(I125) complexes are stable in blood serum and the immobilized proteins retain their biological activity. It was shown that the RAM-nanodiamond-BSA(I125) complex is able to bind to the target antigen immobilized on the Sepharose 6B matrix through antibody-antigen interaction. The idea can be extended to use nanodiamonds as carriers for delivery of bioactive substances (i.e., drugs) to various targets in vivo. PMID:20672079

  7. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein-protein interaction module.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Heo, Won Do; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named 'exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein-protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein-protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues. PMID:27447450

  8. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  9. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  10. Systemic delivery of recombinant proteins by genetically modified myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, E.; Leiden, J.M. )

    1991-12-06

    The ability to stably deliver recombinant proteins to the systemic circulation would facilitate the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited diseases. To explore the feasibility of the use of genetically engineered myoblasts as a recombinant protein delivery system, stable transfectants of the murine C2C12 myoblast cell line were produced that synthesize and secrete high levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in vitro. Mice injected with hGH-transfected myoblasts had significant levels of hGH in both muscle and serum that were stable for at least 3 weeks after injection. Histological examination of muscles injected with {beta}-galactosidase-expressing C2C12 myoblasts demonstrated that many of the injected cells had fused to form multinucleated myotubes. Thus, genetically engineered myoblasts can be used for the stable delivery of recombinant proteins into the circulation.

  11. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  12. 77 FR 65900 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket... and other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Delivery... concerning the following information collection: Title: Delivery Ticket. OMB Number: 1651-0081. Form...

  13. Nanoparticle Delivery Enhancement With Acoustically Activated Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Mullin, Lee B; Phillips, Linsey C; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The application of microbubbles and ultrasound to deliver nanoparticle carriers for drug and gene delivery is an area that has expanded greatly in recent years. Under ultrasound exposure, microbubbles can enhance nanoparticle delivery by increasing cellular and vascular permeability. In this review, the underlying mechanisms of enhanced nanoparticle delivery with ultrasound and microbubbles and various proposed delivery techniques are discussed. Additionally, types of nanoparticles currently being investigated in preclinical studies, as well as the general limitations and benefits of a microbubble-based approach to nanoparticle delivery are reviewed. PMID:23287914

  14. Effective polymer adjuvants for sustained delivery of protein subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Adams, Justin R; Haughney, Shannon L; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2015-03-01

    We have synthesized thermogelling cationic amphiphilic pentablock copolymers that have the potential to act as injectable vaccine carriers and adjuvants that can simultaneously provide sustained delivery and enhance the immunogenicity of released antigen. While these pentablock copolymers have shown efficacy in DNA delivery in past studies, the ability to deliver both DNA and protein for subunit vaccines using the same polymeric carrier can provide greater flexibility and efficacy. We demonstrate the ability of these pentablock copolymers, and the parent triblock Pluronic copolymers to slowly release structurally intact and antigenically stable protein antigens in vitro, create an antigen depot through long-term injection-site persistence and enhance the in vivo immune response to these antigens. We show release of the model protein antigen ovalbumin in vitro from the thermogelling block copolymers with the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of the released protein unchanged compared to the native protein, and its antigenicity preserved upon release. The block copolymers form a gel at physiological temperatures that serves as an antigenic depot and persists in vivo at the site of injection for over 50days. The pentablock copolymers show a significant fivefold enhancement in the immune response compared to soluble protein alone, even 6weeks after the administration, based on measurement of antibody titers. These results demonstrate the potential of these block copolymers hydrogels to persist for several weeks and sustain the release of antigen with minimal effects on protein stability and antigenicity; and their ability to be used simultaneously as a sustained delivery device as well as a subunit vaccine adjuvant platform. PMID:25484331

  15. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  16. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood-brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery. PMID:27378236

  17. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  18. Targeted gene knockout by direct delivery of ZFN proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Thomas; Guo, Jing; Kato, Yoshio; Sirk, Shannon J.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are versatile reagents that have redefined genome engineering. Realizing the full potential of this technology requires the development of safe and effective methods for delivering ZFNs into cells. We demonstrate the intrinsic cell-penetrating capabilities of the standard ZFN architecture and show that direct delivery of ZFNs as proteins leads to efficient endogenous gene disruption in a variety of mammalian cell types with minimal off-target effects. PMID:22751204

  19. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Delivery of TALEN Proteins via Bioconjugation for Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Patterson, James T.; Sirk, Shannon J.; Barbas III, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) have enabled the introduction of targeted genetic alterations into a broad range of cell lines and organisms. These customizable nucleases are comprised of programmable sequence-specific DNA-binding modules derived from TAL effector proteins fused to the non-specific FokI cleavage domain. Delivery of these nucleases into cells has proven challenging as the large size and highly repetitive nature of the TAL effector DNA-binding domain precludes their incorporation into many types of viral vectors. Furthermore, viral and non-viral gene delivery methods carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis and have been shown to increase the off-target activity of site-specific nucleases. We previously demonstrated that direct delivery of zinc-finger nuclease proteins enables highly efficient gene knockout in a variety of mammalian cell types with reduced off-target effects. Here we show that conjugation of cell-penetrating poly-Arg peptides to a surface-exposed Cys residue present on each TAL effector repeat imparted cell-penetrating activity to purified TALEN proteins. These modifications are reversible under reducing conditions and enabled TALEN-mediated gene knockout of the human CCR5 and BMPR1A genes at rates comparable to those achieved with transient transfection of TALEN expression vectors. These findings demonstrate that direct protein delivery, facilitated by conjugation of chemical functionalities onto the TALEN protein surface, is a promising alternative to current non-viral and viral-based methods for TALEN delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:24465685

  20. NMR techniques in drug delivery: application to zein protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F F O; Luzardo-Álvarez, Asteria; Blanco-Méndez, José; Martín-Pastor, Manuel

    2012-12-15

    Zein is a protein containing a large amount of nonpolar amino acids, which has shown the ability to form aggregates and entrap solutes, such as drugs and amino acids. NMR techniques were used to detect binding interactions and measure affinity between zein and three different drugs: tetracycline, amoxicillin and indomethacin. The release study of zein microparticle formulations containing any of these drugs was confronted with the affinity results, showing a remarkable correlation. The feasible methodology employed, focused in the functionality of the protein-drug interaction, can be very promising for the rational design of appropriate drug vehicles for drug delivery. PMID:23041651

  1. Genetic engineering, expression, and activity of a chimeric monoclonal antibody-avidin fusion protein for receptor-mediated delivery of biotinylated drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-fang; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-03-01

    The genetic engineering, expression, and validation of a fusion protein of avidin (AV) and a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR) is described. The 15 kDa avidin monomer was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the HIRMAb. The fusion protein heavy chain reacted with antibodies specific for human IgG and avidin, and had the same affinity for binding to the HIR extracellular domain as the original chimeric HIRMAb. The fusion protein qualitatively bound biotinylated ligands, but was secreted fully saturated with biotin by COS cells, owing to the high level of biotin in tissue culture medium. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were permanently transfected with a tandem vector expressing the fusion protein genes, and high expressing cell lines were isolated by methotrexate amplification and dilutional cloning. The product expressed by CHO cells had high binding to the HIR, and migrated as a homogeneous species in size exclusion HPLC and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The CHO cells were adapted to a 4 week culture in biotin depleted medium, and the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein expressed under these conditions had 1 unoccupied biotin binding site per molecule, based on a [3H]-biotin ultrafiltration assay. The HIRMAb-AV increased biotin uptake by human cells >15-fold, and mediated the endocytosis of fluorescein-biotin, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. In summary, the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug targeting system for humans that can be adapted to monobiotinylated drugs or nucleic acids. PMID:18278853

  2. Clinical impact of serum proteins on drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Felix; Elsadek, Bakheet

    2012-07-20

    Among serum proteins albumin and transferrin have attracted the most interest as drug carriers in the past two decades. Prior to that, their potential use was overshadowed by the advent of monoclonal antibodies that was initiated by Milstein and Koehler in 1975. Meanwhile intensive pursuit of exploiting transferrin, but above all albumin as an exogenous or endogenous carrier protein for treating various diseases, primarily cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes and hepatitis has resulted in several marketed products and numerous clinical trials. While the use of transferrin has clinically been primarily restricted to immunotoxins, albumin-based drug delivery systems ranging from albumin drug nanoparticles, albumin fusion protein, prodrugs and peptide derivatives that bind covalently to albumin as well as physically binding antibody fragments and therapeutically active peptides are in advanced clinical trials or approved products. For treating diabetes, Levemir and Victoza that are myristic acid derivatives of human insulin or glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) act as long-acting peptides by binding to the fatty acid binding sites on circulating albumin to control glucose levels. Levemir from Novo Nordisk has already developed into a blockbuster since its market approval in 2004. Abraxane, an albumin paclitaxel nanoparticle as a water-soluble galenic formulation avoiding the use of cremophor/ethanol, transports paclitaxel through passive targeting as an albumin paclitaxel complex to the tumor site and is superior to conventional Taxol against metastatic breast cancer. INNO-206, an albumin-binding doxorubicin prodrug that also accumulates in solid tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect but releases the parent drug through acid cleavage, either intra- or extracellularly, is entering phase II studies against sarcoma. An expanding field is the use of albumin-binding antibody moieties which do not contain the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion

  3. Photo-synthesis of protein-based nanoparticles and the application in drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Jinbing; Wang, Hongyang; Cao, Yi; Qin, Meng Wang, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Recently, protein-based nanoparticles as drug delivery systems have attracted great interests due to the excellent behavior of high biocompatibility and biodegradability, and low toxicity. However, the synthesis techniques are generally costly, chemical reagents introduced, and especially present difficulties in producing homogeneous monodispersed nanoparticles. Here, we introduce a novel physical method to synthesize protein nanoparticles which can be accomplished under physiological condition only through ultraviolet (UV) illumination. By accurately adjusting the intensity and illumination time of UV light, disulfide bonds in proteins can be selectively reduced and the subsequent self-assembly process can be well controlled. Importantly, the co-assembly can also be dominated when the proteins mixed with either anti-cancer drugs, siRNA, or active targeting molecules. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that our synthesized protein–drug nanoparticles (drug-loading content and encapsulation efficiency being ca. 8.2% and 70%, respectively) not only possess the capability of traditional drug delivery systems (DDS), but also have a greater drug delivery efficiency to the tumor sites and a better inhibition of tumor growth (only 35% of volume comparing to the natural growing state), indicating it being a novel drug delivery system in tumor therapy.

  4. Delivery of neurotrophic factors and therapeutic proteins for retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Chris; Emerich, Dwaine

    2005-11-01

    Neurotrophic factors have the ability to protect and initiate growth of neurons. In the central nervous system, neurotrophic factors are neuroprotective in a wide range of disease states. Similarly, disease pathologies of the neurosensory retina respond favourably in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa, macular degeneration, glaucoma and others. With advances in drug delivery and cell therapy, an almost universal increase in efficacy is being realised. Now, repeated injections of neurotrophic factors are being replaced by controlled delivery of cell-mediated factor secretion, reducing the number of potential acute side effects. Tissue engineering strategies in conjunction with gene-modulated protein therapy or gene transfer are creating a unique treatment niche and are quickly gaining acclaim in the clinic. This review surveys the founding and current work on neurotrophic factors such as CNTF, BDNF, GDNF, LEDGF, PEDF and others. Ongoing clinical trials and successful preclinical studies are summarised as well. PMID:16255648

  5. Reduced active thyroid hormone levels after delivery.

    PubMed

    Banovac, K; Kekić, M; Bzik, L; Skreb, F; Sekso, M

    1981-01-01

    The effect of delivery on the serum concentration of thyroid hormones was studied in 25 euthyroid women. After delivery serum free and total T3 and T4 fell transiently with a simultaneous increase in reverse T3 while serum TSH and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG) concentrations showed no significant variation. These data suggest that i) similar to what happens in other stressful situations, delivery influences peripheral T4 metabolism, and ii) an elevation of TBG in serum in the early puerperium does not prevent these changes. PMID:6798093

  6. Role of Nanotechnology in Delivery of Protein and Peptide Drugs.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sushilkumar; Vhora, Imran; Amrutiya, Jitendra; Lalani, Rohan; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2015-01-01

    The advent of recombinant DNA technology and computational designing has fueled the emergence of proteins and peptides as a new class of modern therapeutics such as vaccines, antigens, antibodies and hormones. Demand for such therapeutics has increased recently due to their distinct pharmacodynamic characteristics of specificity of action and high potency. However, their potential clinical applications are often hindered by involvement of factors which impact their therapeutic potential negatively. Large size, low permeability, conformational fragility, immunogenicity, metabolic degradation and short half-life results in poor bioavailability and inferior efficacy. These challenges have encouraged researchers to devise strategies for effective delivery of proteins and peptides. Recent advances made in nanotechnology are being sought to overcome aforesaid problems and to offer advantages such as higher drug loading, improved stability, sustained release, amenability for non-parenteral administration and targeting through surface modifications. This review focuses on elaborating the role of nanotechnology based formulations and associated challenges in protein and peptide delivery, their clinical outlook and future perspective. PMID:26323432

  7. Transient Expression of Proteins by Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  8. Transient expression of proteins by hydrodynamic gene delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Kovacsics, Daniella; Raper, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Efficient expression of transgenes in vivo is of critical importance in studying gene function and developing treatments for diseases. Over the past years, hydrodynamic gene delivery (HGD) has emerged as a simple, fast, safe and effective method for delivering transgenes into rodents. This technique relies on the force generated by the rapid injection of a large volume of physiological solution to increase the permeability of cell membranes of perfused organs and thus deliver DNA into cells. One of the main advantages of HGD is the ability to introduce transgenes into mammalian cells using naked plasmid DNA (pDNA). Introducing an exogenous gene using a plasmid is minimally laborious, highly efficient and, contrary to viral carriers, remarkably safe. HGD was initially used to deliver genes into mice, it is now used to deliver a wide range of substances, including oligonucleotides, artificial chromosomes, RNA, proteins and small molecules into mice, rats and, to a limited degree, other animals. This protocol describes HGD in mice and focuses on three key aspects of the method that are critical to performing the procedure successfully: correct insertion of the needle into the vein, the volume of injection and the speed of delivery. Examples are given to show the application of this method to the transient expression of two genes that encode secreted, primate-specific proteins, apolipoprotein L-I (APOL-I) and haptoglobin-related protein (HPR). PMID:24837006

  9. Controllable dual protein delivery through electrospun fibrous scaffolds with different hydrophilicities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weijie; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineered scaffolds should actively participate not only in structural support but also in functional tissue regeneration. Thus, novel smart biomaterial scaffolds have been developed, which incorporate a variety of bioactive molecules to accelerate neo-tissue formation. The effective delivery of multiple bioactive molecules with distinct kinetics to target sites at an appropriate concentration and in a timely manner is desired to drive tissue development to completion. To achieve effective, controllable delivery of multiple factors, a dual protein delivery system has been developed by electrospinning poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with different hydrophilicities. Bovine serum albumin or myoglobin was incorporated into and released gradually from these electrospun fibrous PLGA scaffolds. All the scaffolds exhibited similar loading efficiencies of approximately 80% of the target proteins. The introduction of Pluronic F-127 (PF127) dramatically increased scaffold hydrophilicity, which affected the release kinetics of these proteins from the scaffolds. Furthermore, distinct protein release patterns were achieved when using dual protein-loaded scaffolds with different hydrophilicities when these scaffolds were fabricated by co-electrospinning. This system may be useful as a method for delivering multiple bioactive vehicles for tissue engineering applications. PMID:23353662

  10. High-yield production of biologically active recombinant protein in shake flask culture by combination of enzyme-based glucose delivery and increased oxygen transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the combined use of an enzyme-based glucose release system (EnBase®) and high-aeration shake flask (Ultra Yield Flask™). The benefit of this combination is demonstrated by over 100-fold improvement in the active yield of recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase expressed in E. coli. Compared to Terrific Broth and ZYM-5052 autoinduction medium, the EnBase system improved yield mainly through increased productivity per cell. Four-fold increase in oxygen transfer by the Ultra Yield Flask contributed to higher cell density with EnBase but not with the other tested media, and consequently the product yield per ml of EnBase culture was further improved. PMID:22152005

  11. Engineering and Identifying Supercharged Proteins for Macromolecule Delivery into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Cronican, James J.; Liu, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged proteins are a class of engineered or naturally occurring proteins with unusually high net positive or negative theoretical charge. Both supernegatively and superpositively charged proteins exhibit a remarkable ability to withstand thermally or chemically induced aggregation. Superpositively charged proteins are also able to penetrate mammalian cells. Associating cargo with these proteins, such as plasmid DNA, siRNA, or other proteins, can enable the functional delivery of these macromolecules into mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo. The potency of functional delivery in some cases can exceed that of other current methods for macromolecule delivery, including the use of cell-penetrating peptides such as Tat, and adenoviral delivery vectors. This chapter summarizes methods for engineering supercharged proteins, optimizing cell penetration, identifying naturally occurring supercharged proteins, and using these proteins for macromolecule delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:22230574

  12. DNA Binding Proteins and Drug Delivery Vehicles: Tales of Elephants and Snakes.

    PubMed

    Karpel, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    We compare the DNA-interactive properties of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) with those of crotamine, a component of the venom of the South American rattlesnake. Gene 32 protein is a classical single-stranded DNA binding protein that has served as a model for this class of proteins. We discuss its biological functions, structure, binding specificities, and how it controls its own expression. In addition, we delineate the roles of the structural domains of gp32 and how they regulate the protein's various activities. Crotamine, a component of the venom of the South American rattlesnake, is probably not a DNA binding protein in nature, but clearly shows significant DNA binding in vitro. Crotamine has been shown to selectively disrupt rapidly dividing cells and this specificity has been demonstrated for crotamine-facilitated delivery of plasmid DNA Thus, crotamine, or a variant of the protein, could have important clinical and/or diagnostic roles. Understanding its DNA binding properties may therefore lead to more effective drug delivery vehicles. PMID:25961400

  13. On prilled Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral Systems for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    de Kruif, Jan Kendall; Ledergerber, Gisela; Garofalo, Carla; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Newly discovered active macromolecules are highly promising for therapy, but poor bioavailability hinders their oral use. Microencapsulation approaches, such as protein prilling into microspheres, may enable protection from gastrointestinal (GI) enzymatic degradation. This would increase bioavailability mainly for local delivery to GI lumen or mucosa. This work's purpose was to design a novel architecture, namely a Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral System, by prilling for protein delivery. Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) were selected as orally acceptable clay particles and their lumen was enlarged by alkaline etching. This chemical modification increased the luminal volume to a mean of 216.3μLg(-1) (+40.8%). After loading albumin as model drug, the HNT were entrapped in microgels by prilling. The formation of Nanoparticles-in-Microsphere Oral System (NiMOS) yielded entrapment efficiencies up to 63.2%. NiMOS shape was spherical to toroidal, with a diameter smaller than 320μm. Release profiles depended largely on the employed system and HNT type. Protein stability was determined throughout prilling and after in vitro enzymatic degradation. Prilling did not harm protein structure, and NiMOS demonstrated higher enzymatic protection than pure nanotubes or microgels, since up to 82% of BSA remained unscathed after in vitro digestion. Therefore, prilled NiMOS was shown to be a promising and flexible multi-compartment system for oral (local) macromolecular delivery. PMID:26851504

  14. A bacterial type III secretion assay for delivery of fungal effector proteins into wheat.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mago, Rohit; Staskawicz, Brian J; Ayliffe, Michael A; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-03-01

    Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole-genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. Although Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here, we show that a nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens engineered to express the type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens can deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) avirulence (Avr) proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with P. fluorescens makes it more suitable than X. translucens for detecting a hypersensitive response (HR) induced by an effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localization to the plasma membrane which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR, indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus, the modified AvrRpm1:effector-Pseudomonas fluorescens system is an effective tool for large-scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat. PMID:24156769

  15. Emerging therapeutic delivery capabilities and challenges utilizing enzyme/protein packaged bacterial vesicles.

    PubMed

    Alves, Nathan J; Turner, Kendrick B; Medintz, Igor L; Walper, Scott A

    2015-07-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are poised to play a critical role in treating disease. These complex multifunctional drug delivery vehicles provide for the passive and active targeted delivery of numerous small molecule, peptide and protein-derived pharmaceuticals. This article will first discuss some of the current state of the art nanoparticle classes (dendrimers, lipid-based, polymeric and inorganic), highlighting benefits/drawbacks associated with their implementation. We will then discuss an emerging class of nanoparticle therapeutics, bacterial outer membrane vesicles, that can provide many of the nanoparticle benefits while simplifying assembly. Through molecular biology techniques; outer membrane vesicle hijacking potentially allows for stringent control over nanoparticle production allowing for targeted protein packaged nanoparticles to be fully synthesized by bacteria. PMID:26228777

  16. A fusogenic peptide from a sea urchin fertilization protein promotes intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules by facilitating endosomal escape.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Keisuke; Horisawa, Kenichi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2015-08-28

    The low efficiency of endosomal escape has been considered a bottleneck for the cytosolic delivery of biomacromolecules such as proteins and DNA. Although fusogenic peptides (FPs) such as HA2 have been employed to improve the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules, the FPs studied thus far are not adequately efficient in enabling endosomal escape; therefore, novel FPs with higher activity are required. In this context, we focused on FPs derived from a sea urchin fertilization protein, bindin, which is involved in gamete recognition (B18, residues 103-120 and B55, residues 83-137 of mature bindin). We show that enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused B55 peptide binds to plasma membranes more strongly than EGFP-B18 and promotes the intracellular delivery of dextrans, which were co-administered using the trans method in a pH-dependent manner without affecting cell viability and proliferation, whereas conventional EGFP-HA2 did not affect dextran internalization. Furthermore, EGFP-B55 promoted the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules such as antibodies, ribonuclease and plasmidic DNA using the trans method. Because the promotion of intracellular delivery by EGFP-B55 was suppressed by endocytosis inhibitors, EGFP-B55 is considered to have facilitated the endosomal escape of co-administered cargos. These results suggested that an FP that promotes the intracellular delivery of a variety of biomacromolecules with no detectable cytotoxicity should be useful for the cytosolic delivery of membrane-impermeable molecules for biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:26091921

  17. Aerosol delivery of programmed cell death protein 4 using polysorbitol-based gene delivery system for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Xing, Lei; Chen, Bao-An; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Zhang, Can

    2014-11-01

    The development of a safe and effective gene delivery system is the most challenging obstacle to the broad application of gene therapy in the clinic. In this study, we report the development of a polysorbitol-based gene delivery system as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy. The copolymer was prepared by a Michael addition reaction between sorbitol diacrylate (SD) and spermine (SPE); the SD-SPE copolymer effectively condenses with DNA on the nanoscale and protects it from nucleases. SD-SPE/DNA complexes showed excellent transfection with low toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, and aerosol delivery of SD-SPE complexes with programmed cell death protein 4 DNA significantly suppressed lung tumorigenesis in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results demonstrate that SD-SPE has great potential as a gene delivery system based on its excellent biocompatibility and high gene delivery efficiency for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:24983766

  18. Self-assembling polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced intra-articular anti-inflammatory protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Rachel Elisabeth

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 26 million Americans, or approximately 14% of the adult population. The incidence of OA is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 20 years as the US grows older and the rate of obesity continues to increase. There are currently no clinical interventions that cure OA. Current biomaterial delivery systems exhibit several limitations. First, most drug-delivery particles are hydrophobic, which is not optimal for hydrophilic protein encapsulation. Second, hydrophobic particles, such as PLGA, could cause wear damage to the already-fragile OA cartilage structure. Additionally, these particles usually suffer from non-specific protein adsorption, which causes increased phagocytosis and can lead to increased inflammation. New therapies that increase the effectiveness of OA treatments or reverse OA disease progression will greatly decrease the economic costs and individual pain associated with this disease. The goal of this thesis was to develop a new drug-delivering material to deliver anti-inflammatory protein for treating OA. Our central hypothesis for this work is that a controlled release/presentation system will more effectively deliver anti-inflammatory protein therapies to the OA joint. The primary goal of this work was to synthesize a block copolymer that could self-assemble into injectable, sub-micron-scale particles and would allow an anti-inflammatory protein, IL-1ra, to be tethered to its surface for efficient protein delivery. The block copolymer incorporated an oligo-ethylene monomer for tissue compatibility and non-fouling behavior, a 4-nitrophenol group for efficient protein tethering, and cyclohexyl methacrylate, a hydrophobic monomer, for particle stability. We engineered the copolymer and tested it in both in vitro culture experiments and an in vivo model to evaluate protein retention in the knee joint. The rationale for this project was that the rational design and synthesis of a new drug- and protein

  19. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery. PMID:20639882

  20. Protein Delivery System Containing a Nickel-Immobilized Polymer for Multimerization of Affinity-Purified His-Tagged Proteins Enhances Cytosolic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Desplancq, Dominique; Orlov, Igor; Arntz, Youri; Spehner, Danièle; Mely, Yves; Klaholz, Bruno P; Schultz, Patrick; Weiss, Etienne; Zuber, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant proteins with cytosolic or nuclear activities are emerging as tools for interfering with cellular functions. Because such tools rely on vehicles for crossing the plasma membrane we developed a protein delivery system consisting in the assembly of pyridylthiourea-grafted polyethylenimine (πPEI) with affinity-purified His-tagged proteins pre-organized onto a nickel-immobilized polymeric guide. The guide was prepared by functionalization of an ornithine polymer with nitrilotriacetic acid groups and shown to bind several His-tagged proteins. Superstructures were visualized by electron and atomic force microscopy using 2 nm His-tagged gold nanoparticles as probes. The whole system efficiently carried the green fluorescent protein, single-chain antibodies or caspase 3, into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of the protease caspase 3 induced apoptosis in two cancer cell lines, demonstrating that this new protein delivery method could be used to interfere with cellular functions. PMID:26230624

  1. Cleavable carbamate linkers for controlled protein delivery from hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Nadine; Brandl, Ferdinand P; Kirchhof, Susanne; Goepferich, Achim M

    2014-06-10

    The reversible attachment of proteins to polymers is one potential strategy to control protein release from hydrogels. In this study, we report the reversible attachment of lysozyme to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) by degradable carbamate linkers. Phenyl groups with different substituents were used to control the rate of carbamate hydrolysis and the resulting protein release. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed modification with 1-3 PEG chains per lysozyme molecule. Protein PEGylation and PEG chain elimination occurred without changes in secondary protein structure, as demonstrated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The lytic activity of lysozyme was restored to 73.4±1.7%-92.5±1.2% during PEG chain elimination. Attached PEG chains were eliminated within 24h to 28days, depending on the used linker molecule. When formulated into hydrogels, a maximum of about 60% of the initial dose was released within 7days to 21days. Linker elimination occurs 'traceless', so that the protein is released in its native, unmodified form. Altogether, we believe that tethering proteins by degradable carbamate linkers is a promising strategy to control their release from hydrogels. PMID:24680687

  2. Recent Advances in Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: A Special Emphasis on Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly employed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transdermal, and ocular administrations. PMID:25106908

  3. A designed recombinant fusion protein for targeted delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohamed Mohamed; Dar, Ghulam Hassan; Jeyalakshmi, Durga; Venkatraman, Uthra; Saba, Kamal; Rangaraj, Nandini; Patel, Anant Bahadur; Gopal, Vijaya

    2016-04-28

    RNA interference represents a novel therapeutic approach to modulate several neurodegenerative disease-related genes. However, exogenous delivery of siRNA restricts their transport into different tissues and specifically into the brain mainly due to its large size and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To overcome these challenges, we developed here a strategy wherein a peptide known to target specific gangliosides was fused to a double-stranded RNA binding protein to deliver siRNA to the brain parenchyma. The designed fusion protein designated as TARBP-BTP consists of a double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) of human Trans Activation response element (TAR) RNA Binding Protein (TARBP2) fused to a brain targeting peptide that binds to monosialoganglioside GM1. Conformation-specific binding of TARBP2 domain to siRNA led to the formation of homogenous serum-stable complex with targeting potential. Further, uptake of the complex in Neuro-2a, IMR32 and HepG2 cells analyzed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting, revealed selective requirement of GM1 for entry. Remarkably, systemic delivery of the fluorescently labeled complex (TARBP-BTP:siRNA) in ΑβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) led to distinctive localization in the cerebral hemisphere. Further, the delivery of siRNA mediated by TARBP-BTP led to significant knockdown of BACE1 in the brain, in both ΑβPP-PS1 mice and wild type C57BL/6. The study establishes the growing importance of fusion proteins in delivering therapeutic siRNA to brain tissues. PMID:26948382

  4. The kinetics of ER fusion protein activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Catherine H.; Gamper, Ivonne; Perfetto, Alessandra; Auw, Jeremy; Littlewood, Trevor D.; Evan, Gerard I.

    2014-01-01

    Reversibly switchable proteins are powerful tools with which to explore protein function in vitro and in vivo. For example, the activity of many proteins fused to the hormone-binding domain of the modified estrogen receptor (ERTAM) can be regulated by provision or removal of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Despite the widespread use of ERTAM fusions in vivo, inadequate data are available as to the most efficacious routes for systemic tamoxifen delivery. In this study, we have used two well-characterised ERTAM fusion proteins, both reversibly activated by 4-OHT, to compare the effectiveness and kinetics of 4-OHT delivery in mice in vivo by either tamoxifen in food or by intraperitoneal injection. Our data indicate that dietary tamoxifen offers an effective, facile and ethically preferable means for long term activation of ERTAM fusion proteins in vivo. PMID:24662815

  5. GFP-complementation assay to detect functional CPP and protein delivery into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Milech, Nadia; Longville, Brooke AC; Cunningham, Paula T; Scobie, Marie N; Bogdawa, Heique M; Winslow, Scott; Anastasas, Mark; Connor, Theresa; Ong, Ferrer; Stone, Shane R; Kerfoot, Maria; Heinrich, Tatjana; Kroeger, Karen M; Tan, Yew-Foon; Hoffmann, Katrin; Thomas, Wayne R; Watt, Paul M; Hopkins, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cargo uptake is essential for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) therapeutics, which deliver widely diverse cargoes by exploiting natural cell processes to penetrate the cell’s membranes. Yet most current CPP activity assays are hampered by limitations in assessing uptake, including confounding effects of conjugated fluorophores or ligands, indirect read-outs requiring secondary processing, and difficulty in discriminating internalization from endosomally trapped cargo. Split-complementation Endosomal Escape (SEE) provides the first direct assay visualizing true cytoplasmic-delivery of proteins at biologically relevant concentrations. The SEE assay has minimal background, is amenable to high-throughput processes, and adaptable to different transient and stable cell lines. This split-GFP-based platform can be useful to study transduction mechanisms, cellular imaging, and characterizing novel CPPs as pharmaceutical delivery agents in the treatment of disease. PMID:26671759

  6. Transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins from macrophages to epithelial cells blunts inflammatory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bourdonnay, Emilie; Zasłona, Zbigniew; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Speth, Jennifer M.; Schneider, Daniel J.; Przybranowski, Sally; Swanson, Joel A.; Mancuso, Peter; Freeman, Christine M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    JAK-STAT signaling mediates the actions of numerous cytokines and growth factors, and its endogenous brake is the family of SOCS proteins. Consistent with their intracellular roles, SOCS proteins have never been identified in the extracellular space. Here we report that alveolar macrophages can secrete SOCS1 and -3 in exosomes and microparticles, respectively, for uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent inhibition of STAT activation. Secretion is tunable and occurs both in vitro and in vivo. SOCS secretion into lung lining fluid was diminished by cigarette smoking in humans and mice. Secretion and transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins thus represent a new model for the control of inflammatory signaling, which is subject to dysregulation during states of inflammation. PMID:25847945

  7. Transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins from macrophages to epithelial cells blunts inflammatory signaling.

    PubMed

    Bourdonnay, Emilie; Zasłona, Zbigniew; Penke, Loka Raghu Kumar; Speth, Jennifer M; Schneider, Daniel J; Przybranowski, Sally; Swanson, Joel A; Mancuso, Peter; Freeman, Christine M; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2015-05-01

    JAK-STAT signaling mediates the actions of numerous cytokines and growth factors, and its endogenous brake is the family of SOCS proteins. Consistent with their intracellular roles, SOCS proteins have never been identified in the extracellular space. Here we report that alveolar macrophages can secrete SOCS1 and -3 in exosomes and microparticles, respectively, for uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent inhibition of STAT activation. Secretion is tunable and occurs both in vitro and in vivo. SOCS secretion into lung lining fluid was diminished by cigarette smoking in humans and mice. Secretion and transcellular delivery of vesicular SOCS proteins thus represent a new model for the control of inflammatory signaling, which is subject to dysregulation during states of inflammation. PMID:25847945

  8. Integration of Drug, Protein, and Gene Delivery Systems with Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lorden, Elizabeth R.; Levinson, Howard M.; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine has the potential to drastically change the field of health care from reactive to preventative and restorative. Exciting advances in stem cell biology and cellular reprogramming have fueled the progress of this field. Biochemical cues in the form of small molecule drugs, growth factors, zinc finger protein transcription factors and nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, monoclonal antibodies, plasmid DNA, aptamers, or RNA interference agents can play an important role to influence stem cell differentiation and the outcome of tissue regeneration. Many of these biochemical factors are fragile and must act intracellularly at the molecular level. They require an effective delivery system, which can take the form of a scaffold (e.g. hydrogels and electrospun fibers), carrier (viral and nonviral), nano- and micro-particle, or genetically modified cell. In this review, we will discuss the history and current technologies of drug, protein and gene delivery in the context of regenerative medicine. Next we will present case examples of how delivery technologies are being applied to promote angiogenesis in non-healing wounds or prevent angiogenesis in age related macular degeneration. Finally, we will conclude with a brief discussion of the regulatory pathway from bench-to-bedside for the clinical translation of these novel therapeutics. PMID:25787742

  9. Exosome engineering for efficient intracellular delivery of soluble proteins using optically reversible protein–protein interaction module

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Nambin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Kyungsun; Lee, Kwang Ryeol; Lee, Seunghee; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jeongjin; Shaker, Mohammed R.; Sun, Woong; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Daesoo; Do Heo, Won; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of functional macromolecules is a promising method for treating a variety of human diseases. Among nanoparticles, cell-derived exosomes have recently been highlighted as a new therapeutic strategy for the in vivo delivery of nucleotides and chemical drugs. Here we describe a new tool for intracellular delivery of target proteins, named ‘exosomes for protein loading via optically reversible protein–protein interactions' (EXPLORs). By integrating a reversible protein–protein interaction module controlled by blue light with the endogenous process of exosome biogenesis, we are able to successfully load cargo proteins into newly generated exosomes. Treatment with protein-loaded EXPLORs is shown to significantly increase intracellular levels of cargo proteins and their function in recipient cells in vitro and in vivo. These results clearly indicate the potential of EXPLORs as a mechanism for the efficient intracellular transfer of protein-based therapeutics into recipient cells and tissues. PMID:27447450

  10. Tailor-made pentablock copolymer based formulation for sustained ocular delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sulabh P; Vaishya, Ravi; Mishra, Gyan Prakash; Tamboli, Viral; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research article is to report the synthesis and evaluation of novel pentablock copolymers for controlled delivery of macromolecules in the treatment of posterior segment diseases. Novel biodegradable PB copolymers were synthesized by sequential ring-opening polymerization. Various ratios and molecular weights of each block (polyglycolic acid, polyethylene glycol, polylactic acid, and polycaprolactone) were selected for synthesis and to optimize release profile of FITC-BSA, IgG, and bevacizumab from nanoparticles (NPs) and thermosensitive gel. NPs were characterized for particle size, polydispersity, entrapment efficiency, and drug loading. In vitro release study of proteins from NPs alone and composite formulation (NPs suspended in thermosensitive gel) was performed. Composite formulations demonstrated no or negligible burst release with continuous near zero-order release in contrast to NPs alone. Hydrodynamic diameter of protein therapeutics and hydrophobicity of PB copolymer exhibited significant effect on entrapment efficiency and in vitro release profile. CD spectroscopy confirmed retention of structural conformation of released protein. Biological activity of released bevacizumab was confirmed by in vitro cell proliferation and cell migration assays. It can be concluded that novel PB polymers can serve a platform for sustained delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:25045540

  11. Hydrodynamic Delivery of Cre Protein to Lineage-Mark or Time-Stamp Mouse Hepatocytes In situ

    PubMed Central

    Sonsteng, Katherine M.; Prigge, Justin R.; Talago, Emily A.; June, Ronald K.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Cre-responsive fluorescent marker alleles are powerful tools for cell lineage tracing in mice; however their utility is limited by regulation of Cre activity. When targeting hepatocytes, hydrodynamic delivery of a Cre-expression plasmid can convert Cre-responsive alleles without inducing the intracellular or systemic antiviral responses often associated with viral-derived Cre-expression vectors. In this method, rapid high-volume intravenous inoculation induces hepatocyte-targeted uptake of extracellular molecules. Here we tested whether hydrodynamic delivery of Cre protein or Cre fused to the HIV-TAT cell-penetrating peptide could convert Cre-responsive reporters in hepatocytes of mice. Hydrodynamic delivery of 2 nmol of either Cre or TAT-Cre protein converted the reporter allele in 5 to 20% of hepatocytes. Neither protein gave detectable Cre activity in endothelia, non-liver organs, or non-hepatocyte cells in liver. Using mice homozygous for a Cre-responsive marker that directs red- (Cre-naïve) or green- (Cre-converted) fluorescent proteins to the nucleus, we assessed sub-saturation Cre-activity. One month after hydrodynamic inoculation with Cre protein, 58% of hepatocyte nuclei that were green were also red, indicating that less than half of the hepatocytes that had obtained enough Cre to convert one marker allele to green were able to convert all alleles. For comparison, one month after hydrodynamic delivery of a Cre-expression plasmid with a weak promoter, only 26% of the green nuclei were also red. Our results show that hydrodynamic delivery of Cre protein allows rapid allelic conversion in hepatocytes, but Cre-activity is sub-saturating so many cells will not convert multiple Cre-responsive alleles. PMID:24626158

  12. Cuboplexes: Topologically Active siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojun; Leal, Cecilia

    2015-10-27

    RNAi technology is currently experiencing a revival due to remarkable improvements in efficacy and viability through oligonucleotide chemical manipulations and/or via their packaging into nanoscale carriers. At present, there is no FDA-approved system for siRNA technology in humans. The design of the next generation of siRNA carriers requires a deep understanding of how a nanoparticle's physicochemical properties truly impart biological stability and efficiency. For example, we now know that nanoparticles need to be sterically stabilized in order to meet adequate biodistribution profiles. At present, targeting, uptake, and, in particular, endosomal escape are among the most critical challenges impairing RNAi technologies. The disruption of endosomes encompasses membrane transformations (for example, pore formation) that cost significant elastic energy. Nanoparticle size and shape have been identified as relevant parameters impacting tissue accumulation and cellular uptake. In this paper, we demonstrate that the internal structure of lipid-based particles offers a different handle to promote endosomal membrane topological disruptions that enhance siRNA delivery. Specifically, we designed sterically stabilized lipid-based particles that differ from traditional liposomal systems by displaying highly ordered bicontinuous cubic internal structures that can be loaded with large amounts of siRNA. This system differs from traditional siRNA-containing liposomes (lipoplexes) as the particle-endosomal membrane interactions are controlled by elasticity energetics and not by electrostatics. The resulting "PEGylated cuboplex" has the ability to deliver siRNA and specifically knockdown genes with efficiencies that surpass those achieved by traditional lipoplex systems. PMID:26390340

  13. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  14. Protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Denecke, M

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for the separation of protein originating from activated sludge were compared. In one method, the total protein was isolated out of the activated sludge (crude extract). These samples included all dissolved proteins originating from the bacterial cells and biofilm made up of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Every time polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was done, the protein bands from samples of crude extract were covered by polymeric substances including carbohydrates, uronic acids or humic compounds. Using the immunoblot technique it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the heat shock protein HSP70 in crude extracts of activated sludge. The comparison of protein fingerprints required that clear and distinct bands appear on the PAGE analysis. To this end, a procedure to separates bacterial cells from the EPS was developed. Bacterial cells were separated by incubation with EDTA and subsequent filtration. The isolated cells were directly incubated in a sample buffer. PMID:16898150

  15. Bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Stephansen, Karen; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Nano-microfibers were made from cod (Gadus morhua) sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) (Mw<200kDa) using the electrospinning technique. The FSP fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy, and the fiber morphology was found to be strongly dependent on FSP concentration. Interestingly, the FSP fibers were insoluble in water. However, when exposed to proteolytic enzymes, the fibers were degraded. The degradation products of the FSP fibers proved to be inhibitors of the diabetes-related enzyme DPP-IV. The FSP fibers may have biomedical applications, among others as a delivery system. To demonstrate this, a dipeptide (Ala-Trp) was encapsulated into the FSP fibers, and the release properties were investigated in gastric buffer and in intestinal buffer. The release profile showed an initial burst release, where 30% of the compound was released within the first minute, after which an additional 40% was released (still exponential) within the next 30min (gastric buffer) or 15min (intestinal buffer). The remaining 30% was not released in the timespan of the experiment. PMID:25033436

  16. An injectable hyaluronic acid-tyramine hydrogel system for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fan; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2009-03-19

    Previously, we reported the independent tuning of mechanical strength (crosslinking density) and gelation rate of an injectable hydrogel system composed of hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tyr) conjugates. The hydrogels were formed through the oxidative coupling of tyramines which was catalyzed by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Herein, we studied the encapsulation and release of model proteins using the HA-Tyr hydrogel. It was shown that the rapid gelation achieved by an optimal concentration of HRP could effectively encapsulate the proteins within the hydrogel network and thus prevented the undesired leakage of proteins into the surrounding tissues after injection. Hydrogels with different mechanical strengths were formed by changing the concentration of H(2)O(2) while maintaining the rapid gelation rate. The mechanical strength of the hydrogel controlled the release rate of proteins: stiff hydrogels released proteins slower compared to weak hydrogels. In phosphate buffer saline, alpha-amylase (negatively charged) was released sustainably from the hydrogel. Conversely, the release of lysozyme (positively charged) discontinued after the fourth hour due to electrostatic interactions with HA. In the presence of hyaluronidase, lysozymes were released continuously and completely from the hydrogel due to degradation of the hydrogel network. The activities of the released proteins were mostly retained which suggested that the HA-Tyr hydrogel is a suitable injectable and biodegradable system for the delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19121348

  17. Chitosan based nanoparticles as protein carriers for efficient oral antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Xia, Guixue; Bao, Zixian; Feng, Chao; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of nanoparticles based on chitosan as a vehicle for oral antigen delivery in fish vaccination. Carboxymethyl chitosan/chitosan nanoparticles (CMCS/CS-NPs) loaded extracellular products (ECPs) of Vibrio anguillarum were successfully developed by ionic gelation method. The prepared ECPs-loaded CMCS/CS-NPs were characterized for various parameters including morphology, particle size (312±7.18nm), zeta potential (+17.4±0.38mV), loading efficiency (57.8±2.54%) and stability under the simulated gastrointestinal (GI) tract conditions in turbot. The in vitro profile showed that the cumulative release of ECPs from nanoparticles was higher in pH 7.4 (58%) than in pH 2.0 (37%) and pH 4.5 (29%) after 48h. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) was used as model protein antigen and encapsulated in CMCS/CS-NPs for investigating the biodistribution of antigen after oral delivery to turbot in 24h. Oral immunization of ECPs-loaded CMCS/CS-NPs group in turbot showed elevated specific antibody and higher concentrations of lysozyme activity and complement activity in fish serum than ECPs solution. CMCS/CS-NPs loaded with ECPs could enhance both adaptive and innate immune responses than the group treated with ECPs solution and suggested to be a potential antigen delivery system. PMID:27287772

  18. Surface functionalization of polyketal microparticles with nitrilotriacetic acid-nickel complexes for efficient protein capture and delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Jay C.; Phelps, Edward A.; García, Andrés J.; Murthy, Niren; Davis, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Microparticle drug delivery systems have been used for over twenty years to deliver a variety of drugs and therapeutics. However, effective microencapsulation of proteins has been limited by low encapsulation efficiencies, large required amounts of protein, and risk of protein denaturation. In this work, we have adapted a widely used immobilized metal affinity protein purification strategy to non-covalently attach proteins to the surface of microparticles. Polyketal microparticles were surface modified with nitrilotriacetic acid-nickel complexes which have a high affinity for sequential histidine tags on proteins. We demonstrate that this high affinity interaction can efficiently capture proteins from dilute solutions with little risk of protein denaturation. Proteins that bound to the Ni-NTA complex retain activity and can diffuse away from the microparticles to activate cells from a distance. In addition, this surface modification can also be used for microparticle targeting by tethering cell-specific ligands to the surface of the particles, using VE-Cadherin and endothelial cells as a model. In summary, we show that immobilized metal affinity strategies have the potential to improve targeting and protein delivery via degradable polymer microparticles. PMID:20346498

  19. 78 FR 1219 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... (77 FR 65900) on October 31, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows for an... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Delivery Ticket AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice...

  20. DepoFoam technology: a vehicle for controlled delivery of protein and peptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Q; Asherman, J; Stevenson, M; Brownson, E; Katre, N V

    2000-02-14

    A major challenge in the development of sustained-release formulations for protein and peptide drugs is to achieve high drug loading sufficient for prolonged therapeutic effect coupled with a high recovery of the protein/peptide. This challenge has been successfully met in the formulation of several peptide and protein drugs using the DepoFoam, multivesicular lipid-based drug delivery system. DepoFoam technology consists of novel multivesicular liposomes characterized by their unique structure of multiple non-concentric aqueous chambers surrounded by a network of lipid membranes. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that DepoFoam technology can be used to develop sustained-release formulations of therapeutic proteins and peptides with high loading. DepoFoam formulations of a protein such as insulin, and peptides such as leuprolide, enkephalin and octreotide have been developed and characterized. The data show that these formulations have high drug loading, high encapsulation efficiency, low content of free drug in the suspension, little chemical change in the drug caused by the formulation process, narrow particle size distribution, and spherical particle morphology. Drug release assays conducted in vitro in biological suspending media such as human plasma indicate that these formulations provide sustained release of encapsulated drug over a period from a few days to several weeks, and that the rate of release can be modulated. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies in rats also show a sustained therapeutic effect over a prolonged period. These results demonstrate that the DepoFoam system is capable of efficiently encapsulating therapeutic proteins and peptides and effectively providing controlled delivery of these biologically active macromolecules. PMID:10640654

  1. Calcium alginate/dextran methacrylate IPN beads as protecting carriers for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Di Meo, Chiara; Pescosolido, Laura; Coviello, Tommasina; Alhaique, Franco; Matricardi, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, mechanical and protein delivery properties of a system based on the interpenetration of calcium-alginate (Ca-Alg) and dextran-methacrylate (Dex-MA) networks are shown. Interpenetrated hydrogels beads were prepared by means of the alginate chains crosslinking with calcium ions, followed by the exposure to UV light that allows the Dex-MA network formation. Optical microscope analysis showed an average diameter of the IPN beads (Ca-Alg/Dex-MA) of 2 mm. This dimension was smaller than that of Ca-Alg beads because of the Dex-MA presence. Moreover, the strength of the IPN beads, and of their corresponding hydrogels, was influenced by the Dex-MA concentration and the crosslinking time. Model proteins (BSA and HRP) were successfully entrapped into the beads and released at a controlled rate, modulated by changing the Dex-MA concentration. The enzymatic activity of HRP released from the beads was maintained. These novel IPN beads have great potential as protein delivery system. PMID:22528076

  2. Selecting Improved Peptidyl Motifs for Cytosolic Delivery of Disparate Protein and Nanoparticle Materials

    PubMed Central

    Boeneman, Kelly; Delehanty, James B.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Huston, Alan L.; Dawson, Glyn; Ingale, Sampat; Walters, Ryan; Domowicz, Miriam; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Algar, W. Russ; DiMaggio, Stassi; Manono, Janet; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Thompson, Darren; Jennings, Travis L.; Dawson, Philip E.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides facilitate efficient intracellular uptake of diverse materials ranging from small contrast agents to larger proteins and nanoparticles. However, a significant impediment remains in the subsequent compartmentalization/endosomal sequestration of most of these cargoes. Previous functional screening suggested that a modular peptide originally designed to deliver palmitoyl-protein thioesterase inhibitors to neurons could mediate endosomal escape in cultured cells. Here, we detail properties relevant to this peptide’s ability to mediate cytosolic delivery of quantum dots (QDs) to a wide range of cell-types, brain tissue culture and a developing chick embryo in a remarkably non-toxic manner. The peptide further facilitated efficient endosomal escape of large proteins, dendrimers and other nanoparticle materials. We undertook an iterative structure-activity relationship analysis of the peptide by discretely modifying key components including length, charge, fatty acid content and their order using a comparative, semi-quantitative assay. This approach allowed us to define the key motifs required for endosomal escape, to select more efficient escape sequences, along with unexpectedly identifying a sequence modified by one methylene group that specifically targeted QDs to cellular membranes. We interpret our results within a model of peptide function and highlight implications for in vivo labeling and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery by using different peptides to co-deliver cargoes to cells and engage in multifunctional labeling. PMID:23710591

  3. [Active periodontitis as a potential risk factor of preferm delivery].

    PubMed

    Bilińska, Maria; Osmola, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    The influence of active periodontitis on the incidence of preterm delivery has been widely described in numerous scientific papers. Studies suggest that an implementation of a periodontal treatment during pregnancy is not only safe for both, the mother and the child, but it also has a beneficial effect on the pregnancy and embryo-fetal development, consequently reducing morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Therefore, mandatory dental examinations in pregnant women may facilitate early implementation of periodontal treatment and reduce the rates of preterm delivery PMID:25011221

  4. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation.

    PubMed

    Dzamukova, Maria R; Naumenko, Ekaterina A; Lvov, Yuri M; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  5. Enzyme-activated intracellular drug delivery with tubule clay nanoformulation

    PubMed Central

    Dzamukova, Maria R.; Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication of stimuli-triggered drug delivery vehicle s is an important milestone in treating cancer. Here we demonstrate the selective anticancer drug delivery into human cells with biocompatible 50-nm diameter halloysite nanotube carriers. Physically-adsorbed dextrin end stoppers secure the intercellular release of brilliant green. Drug-loaded nanotubes penetrate through the cellular membranes and their uptake efficiency depends on the cells growth rate. Intercellular glycosyl hydrolases-mediated decomposition of the dextrin tube-end stoppers triggers the release of the lumen-loaded brilliant green, which allowed for preferable elimination of human lung carcinoma cells (А549) as compared with hepatoma cells (Hep3b). The enzyme-activated intracellular delivery of brilliant green using dextrin-coated halloysite nanotubes is a promising platform for anticancer treatment. PMID:25976444

  6. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  7. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  8. Catalytic Mesoporous Janus Nanomotors for Active Cargo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synergy between catalytic propulsion and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for the design of Janus nanomotors as active cargo delivery systems with sizes <100 nm (40, 65, and 90 nm). The Janus asymmetry of the nanomotors is given by electron beam (e-beam) deposition of a very thin platinum (2 nm) layer on MSNPs. The chemically powered Janus nanomotors present active diffusion at low H2O2 fuel concentration (i.e., <3 wt %). Their apparent diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 100% compared to their Brownian motion. Due to their mesoporous architecture and small dimensions, they can load cargo molecules in large quantity and serve as active nanocarriers for directed cargo delivery on a chip. PMID:25844893

  9. Catalytic mesoporous Janus nanomotors for active cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Hahn, Kersten; Sanchez, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We report on the synergy between catalytic propulsion and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for the design of Janus nanomotors as active cargo delivery systems with sizes <100 nm (40, 65, and 90 nm). The Janus asymmetry of the nanomotors is given by electron beam (e-beam) deposition of a very thin platinum (2 nm) layer on MSNPs. The chemically powered Janus nanomotors present active diffusion at low H2O2 fuel concentration (i.e., <3 wt %). Their apparent diffusion coefficient is enhanced up to 100% compared to their Brownian motion. Due to their mesoporous architecture and small dimensions, they can load cargo molecules in large quantity and serve as active nanocarriers for directed cargo delivery on a chip. PMID:25844893

  10. Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins via Extracellular Vesicles: Review and Potential Treatments for Parkinson's Disease, Glioma, and Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Hall, Justin; Prabhakar, Shilpa; Balaj, Leonora; Lai, Charles P; Cerione, Richard A; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles present an attractive delivery vehicle for therapeutic proteins. They intrinsically contain many proteins which can provide information to other cells. Advantages include reduced immune reactivity, especially if derived from the same host, stability in biologic fluids, and ability to target uptake. Those from mesenchymal stem cells appear to be intrinsically therapeutic, while those from cancer cells promote tumor progression. Therapeutic proteins can be loaded into vesicles by overexpression in the donor cell, with oligomerization and membrane sequences increasing their loading. Examples of protein delivery for therapeutic benefit in pre-clinical models include delivery of: catalase for Parkinson's disease to reduce oxidative stress and thus help neurons to survive; prodrug activating enzymes which can convert a prodrug which crosses the blood-brain barrier into a toxic chemotherapeutic drug for schwannomas and gliomas; and the apoptosis-inducing enzyme, caspase-1 under a Schwann cell specific promoter for schwannoma. This therapeutic delivery strategy is novel and being explored for a number of diseases. PMID:27017608

  11. A platform for actively loading cargo RNA to elucidate limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Michelle E.; Leonard, Joshua N.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate intercellular communication through transfer of RNA and protein between cells. Thus, understanding how cargo molecules are loaded and delivered by EVs is of central importance for elucidating the biological roles of EVs and developing EV-based therapeutics. While some motifs modulating the loading of biomolecular cargo into EVs have been elucidated, the general rules governing cargo loading and delivery remain poorly understood. To investigate how general biophysical properties impact loading and delivery of RNA by EVs, we developed a platform for actively loading engineered cargo RNAs into EVs. In our system, the MS2 bacteriophage coat protein was fused to EV-associated proteins, and the cognate MS2 stem loop was engineered into cargo RNAs. Using this Targeted and Modular EV Loading (TAMEL) approach, we identified a configuration that substantially enhanced cargo RNA loading (up to 6-fold) into EVs. When applied to vesicles expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) – gesicles – we observed a 40-fold enrichment in cargo RNA loading. While active loading of mRNA-length (>1.5 kb) cargo molecules was possible, active loading was much more efficient for smaller (~0.5 kb) RNA molecules. We next leveraged the TAMEL platform to elucidate the limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery of mRNA and protein to prostate cancer cells, as a model system. Overall, most cargo was rapidly degraded in recipient cells, despite high EV-loading efficiencies and substantial EV uptake by recipient cells. While gesicles were efficiently internalized via a VSVG-mediated mechanism, most cargo molecules were rapidly degraded. Thus, in this model system, inefficient endosomal fusion or escape likely represents a limiting barrier to EV-mediated transfer. Altogether, the TAMEL platform enabled a comparative analysis elucidating a key opportunity for enhancing EV-mediated delivery to prostate cancer cells, and this technology should be of

  12. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  13. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of membrane-impermeable proteins.

    PubMed

    Slowing, Igor I; Trewyn, Brian G; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2007-07-18

    An MCM-41-type mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) material with a large average pore diameter (5.4 nm) is synthesized and characterized. The in vitro uptake and release profiles of cytochrome c by the MSN were investigated. The enzymatic activity of the released protein was quantitatively analyzed and compared with that of the native cytochrome c in physiological buffer solutions. We found that the enzymes released from the MSNs are still functional and highly active in catalyzing the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) by hydrogen peroxide. In contrast to the fact that cytochrome c is a cell-membrane-impermeable protein, we discovered that the cytochrome c-encapsulated MSNs could be internalized by live human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and the protein could be released into the cytoplasm. We envision that these MSNs with large pores could serve as a transmembrane delivery vehicle for controlled release of membrane-impermeable proteins in live cells, which may lead to many important biotechnological applications including therapeutics and metabolic manipulation of cells. PMID:17589996

  14. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  15. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R; Martin, Ina V; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  16. Protein delivery into live cells by incubation with an endosomolytic agent

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Dayani, Laila; Wang, Ting-Yi; Johnson, Gregory A.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We report on how a dimer of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT, dfTAT, penetrates live cells by escaping from endosomes with a particularly high efficiency. By mediating endosomal leakage, dfTAT also delivers proteins into cultured cells after a simple co-incubation procedure. Cytosolic delivery is achieved in most cells in a culture and only a relatively small amount of material remains trapped inside endosomes. Delivery does not require binding interactions between dfTAT and a protein, multiple molecules can be delivered at once, and delivery can be repeated. Remarkably, dfTAT-mediated delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation, or gene expression. This new delivery strategy should be extremely useful for cell-based assays, cellular imaging applications, and the ex vivo manipulation of cells. PMID:24930129

  17. Assembly and intracellular delivery of quantum dot-fluorescent protein bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medintz, Igor L.; Pons, Thomas; Delehanty, James B.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dawson, Philip E.; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2008-02-01

    We have previously assembled semiconductor quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors that can specifically detect nutrients, explosives or enzymatic activity. These sensors utilized the inherent benefits of QDs as FRET donors to optimize signal transduction. In this report we functionalize QDs with the multi-subunit multi-chromophore b-phycoerythrin (b-PE) light harvesting complex using biotin-Streptavidin binding. FRET and gel electrophoretic analyses were used to characterize and confirm the QD-b-PE self-assembly. We found that immobilizing additional cell-penetrating peptides on the nanocrystal surface along with the b-PE was the key factor allowing the mixed surface QD-cargos to undergo endocytosis and intracellular delivery. Our findings on the intracellular uptake promoted by CPP were compared to those collected using microinjection technique, where QD-assemblies were delivered directly into the cytoplasm; this strategy allows bypassing of the endocytic uptake pathway. Intracellular delivery of multifunctional QD-fluorescent protein assemblies has potential applications for use in protein tracking, sensing and diagnostics.

  18. Bioengineered vaults: self-assembling protein shell-lipophilic core nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Daniel C; Marsden, Matthew D; Shen, Sean; Toso, Daniel B; Wu, Xiaomeng; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Wender, Paul A; Zack, Jerome A; Rome, Leonard H

    2014-08-26

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  19. Bioengineered Vaults: Self-Assembling Protein Shell–Lipophilic Core Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach to a new class of bioengineered, monodispersed, self-assembling vault nanoparticles consisting of a protein shell exterior with a lipophilic core interior designed for drug and probe delivery. Recombinant vaults were engineered to contain a small amphipathic α-helix derived from the nonstructural protein 5A of hepatitis C virus, thereby creating within the vault lumen a lipophilic microenvironment into which lipophilic compounds could be reversibly encapsulated. Multiple types of electron microscopy showed that attachment of this peptide resulted in larger than expected additional mass internalized within the vault lumen attributable to incorporation of host lipid membrane constituents spanning the vault waist (>35 nm). These bioengineered lipophilic vaults reversibly associate with a sample set of therapeutic compounds, including all-trans retinoic acid, amphotericin B, and bryostatin 1, incorporating hundreds to thousands of drug molecules per vault nanoparticle. Bryostatin 1 is of particular therapeutic interest because of its ability to potently induce expression of latent HIV, thus representing a preclinical lead in efforts to eradicate HIV/AIDS. Vaults loaded with bryostatin 1 released free drug, resulting in activation of HIV from provirus latency in vitro and induction of CD69 biomarker expression following intravenous injection into mice. The ability to preferentially and reversibly encapsulate lipophilic compounds into these novel bioengineered vault nanoparticles greatly advances their potential use as drug delivery systems. PMID:25061969

  20. Physical activities during pregnancy and type of delivery in nulliparae.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yi-Li; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lin, Pi-Chu

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in physical activity across pregnancy and the relationship between trimester-specific physical activity and unplanned caesarean sections (CSs). A cohort study design was carried out. A cohort of 150 pregnant women was established when they received prenatal care at 29-40 weeks of gestation at a medical centre in northern Taiwan. Participants were asked to recall the amounts of physical activity in which they had engaged in the three trimesters as assessed by the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire (PPAQ). Overall self-reported physical activity for the cohort decreased by 31% in the first trimester compared to the pre-gravid period, then increased in the second trimester and remained stable until delivery. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate the data and revealed significantly more physical activity during the second trimester than in the first and third trimesters (F = 36.471, P = 0.000). In addition, there was a significant difference between normal spontaneous delivery and unplanned CS groups (F = 4.770, P = 0.031). Logistic regression determined that the odds ratio of undergoing a CS increased by 0.644 (95% confidence interval: 0.429-0.968) for women in the third trimester who performed low levels of physical activity. Results support the benefits of physical activity, and professionals are encouraged to provide pregnant women with information on recommendations for physical activity, particularly in terms of reducing unplanned CSs. PMID:25837804

  1. Intranasal Delivery of Proteins and Peptides in the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meredith, M Elizabeth; Salameh, Therese S; Banks, William A

    2015-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major impediment to the therapeutic delivery of peptides and proteins to the brain. Intranasal delivery often provides a non-invasive means to bypass the BBB. Advantages of using intranasal delivery include minimizing exposure to peripheral organs and tissues, thus reducing systemic side effects. It also allows substances that typically have rapid degradation in the blood time to exert their effect. Intranasal delivery provides the ability to target proteins and peptides to specific regions of the brain when administered with substrates like cyclodextrins. In this review, we examined the use of intranasal delivery of various proteins and peptides that have implications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, focusing especially on albumin, exendin/GLP-1, GALP, insulin, leptin, and PACAP. We have described their rationale for use, distribution in the brain after intranasal injection, how intranasal administration differed from other modes of delivery, and their use in clinical trials, if applicable. Intranasal delivery of drugs, peptides, and other proteins could be very useful in the future for the prevention or treatment of brain related diseases. PMID:25801717

  2. Matrices for combined delivery of proteins and synthetic molecules.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Kelly A; Lampley, Michael W; Boyer, Cyrille; Harth, Eva

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing advancement of synergistic, multimodal approaches to influence the treatment of infectious and non-infectious diseases, we witness the development of enabling techniques merging necessary complexity with leaner designs and effectiveness. Systems- and polypharmacology ask for multi-potent drug combinations with many targets to engage with the biological system. These demand drug delivery designs for one single drug, dual drug release systems and multiple release matrices in which the macromolecular structure allows for higher solubilization, protection and sequential or combined release profiles. As a result, nano- and micromaterials have been evolved from mono- to dual drug carriers but are also an essential part to establish multimodality in polymeric matrices. Surface dynamics of particles creating interfaces between polymer chains and hydrogels inspired the development not only of biomedical adhesives but also of injectable hydrogels in which the nanoscale material is both, adhesive and delivery tool. These complex delivery systems are segmented into two delivery subunits, a polymer matrix and nanocarrier, to allow for an even higher tolerance of the incorporated drugs without adding further synthetic demands to the nanocarrier alone. The opportunities in these quite novel approaches for the delivery of small and biological therapeutics are remarkable and selected examples for applications in cancer and bone treatments are discussed. PMID:26656604

  3. Efficient delivery of genome-editing proteins using bioreducible lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Zuris, John A; Meng, Fantao; Rees, Holly; Sun, Shuo; Deng, Pu; Han, Yong; Gao, Xue; Pouli, Dimitra; Wu, Qi; Georgakoudi, Irene; Liu, David R; Xu, Qiaobing

    2016-03-15

    A central challenge to the development of protein-based therapeutics is the inefficiency of delivery of protein cargo across the mammalian cell membrane, including escape from endosomes. Here we report that combining bioreducible lipid nanoparticles with negatively supercharged Cre recombinase or anionic Cas9:single-guide (sg)RNA complexes drives the electrostatic assembly of nanoparticles that mediate potent protein delivery and genome editing. These bioreducible lipids efficiently deliver protein cargo into cells, facilitate the escape of protein from endosomes in response to the reductive intracellular environment, and direct protein to its intracellular target sites. The delivery of supercharged Cre protein and Cas9:sgRNA complexed with bioreducible lipids into cultured human cells enables gene recombination and genome editing with efficiencies greater than 70%. In addition, we demonstrate that these lipids are effective for functional protein delivery into mouse brain for gene recombination in vivo. Therefore, the integration of this bioreducible lipid platform with protein engineering has the potential to advance the therapeutic relevance of protein-based genome editing. PMID:26929348

  4. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  5. The Platin-X series: activation, targeting, and delivery.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer platinum (Pt) complexes have long been considered to be one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Yet there remains the hunt for the "magic bullet" which can satisfy the requirements of an effective chemotherapeutic drug formulation. Pt(iv) complexes are kinetically more inert than the Pt(ii) congeners and offer the opportunity to append additional functional groups/ligands for prodrug activation, tumor targeting, or drug delivery. The ultimate aim of functionalization is to enhance the tumor selective action and attenuate systemic toxicity of the drugs. Moreover, an increase in cellular accumulation to surmount the resistance of the tumor against the drugs is also of paramount importance in drug development and discovery. In this review, we will address the attempts made in our lab to develop Pt(iv) prodrugs that can be activated and delivered using targeted nanotechnology-based delivery platforms. PMID:27493131

  6. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farajollah; Khosravi, Afra; Nasser, Ahmad; Taghinejad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are exposed to different types of stress in their growth conditions. They have developed appropriate responses, modulated by the re-modeling of protein complexes and by phosphorylation dependent signal transduction systems, to adapt and to survive in a variety range of nature. Proteins are essential components for biologic activity in the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell. Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) have been identified from various organisms and have critical role in cell hemostasis. Chaperone can sense environment and have different potential role in the organism evolution. PMID:27134861

  7. A bacterial type III secretion-based protein delivery tool for broad applications in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon J.; Schmutz, Christoph; Kasper, Christoph A.; Amstutz, Marlise; Schmidt, Alexander; Sauteur, Loïc; Vigano, M. Alessandra; Low, Shyan Huey; Affolter, Markus; Cornelis, Guy R.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    Methods enabling the delivery of proteins into eukaryotic cells are essential to address protein functions. Here we propose broad applications to cell biology for a protein delivery tool based on bacterial type III secretion (T3S). We show that bacterial, viral, and human proteins, fused to the N-terminal fragment of the Yersinia enterocolitica T3S substrate YopE, are effectively delivered into target cells in a fast and controllable manner via the injectisome of extracellular bacteria. This method enables functional interaction studies by the simultaneous injection of multiple proteins and allows the targeting of proteins to different subcellular locations by use of nanobody-fusion proteins. After delivery, proteins can be freed from the YopE fragment by a T3S-translocated viral protease or fusion to ubiquitin and cleavage by endogenous ubiquitin proteases. Finally, we show that this delivery tool is suitable to inject proteins in living animals and combine it with phosphoproteomics to characterize the systems-level impact of proapoptotic human truncated BID on the cellular network. PMID:26598622

  8. Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-12-18

    With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

  9. Tunable Lipidoid-Telodendrimer Hybrid Nanoparticles for Intracellular Protein Delivery in Brain Tumor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Bodman, Alexa; Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Wang, Lili; Luo, Juntao; Hall, Walter A

    2016-08-01

    A strategy to precisely engineer lipidoid-telodendrimer binary hybrid nanoparticles that offer enhanced cell membrane permeability for therapeutic proteins to reach the intracellular targets is established. The highly controllable biochemical and physical properties of the nanoparticles make them promising for protein-based brain cancer treatment with the assistance of convection-enhanced delivery. PMID:27375237

  10. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, D.; Kalies, S.; Schomaker, M.; Ertmer, W.; Murua Escobar, H.; Meyer, H.; Ripken, T.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking.

  11. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  12. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  13. Self-assembling nanoparticles for intra-articular delivery of anti-inflammatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitmire, Rachel E.; Wilson, D. Scott; Singh, Ankur; Levenston, Marc E.; Murthy, Niren; García, Andrés J.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-articular delivery of therapeutics to modulate osteoarthritis (OA) is challenging. Delivery of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), the natural protein inhibitor of IL-1, to modulate IL-1-based inflammation through gene therapy or bolus protein injections has emerged as a promising therapy for OA. However, these approaches suffer from rapid clearance and reduced potency over time. Nano/microparticles represent a promising strategy for overcoming the shortcomings of intra-articular drug delivery. However, these delivery vehicles are limited for delivery of protein therapeutics due to their hydrophobic character, low drug loading efficiency, and harsh chemical conditions during particle processing. We designed a new block copolymer that assembles into submicron-scale particles and provides for covalently tethering proteins to the particle surface for controlled intra-articular protein delivery. This block copolymer self-assembles into 300 nm-diameter particles with a protein-tethering moiety for surface covalent conjugation of IL-1Ra protein. This copolymer particle system efficiently bound IL-1Ra and maintained protein bioactivity in vitro. Furthermore, particle-tethered IL-1Ra bound specifically to target synoviocyte cells via surface IL-1 receptors. Importantly, IL-1Ra-nanoparticles inhibited IL-1-mediated signaling to equivalent levels as soluble IL-1Ra. Finally, the ability of nanoparticles to retain IL-1Ra in the rat stifle joint was evaluated by in vivo imaging over 14 days. IL-1Ra-tethered nanoparticles significantly increased the retention time of IL-1Ra in the rat stifle joint over 14 days with enhanced IL-1Ra half-life (3.01 days) compared to that of soluble IL-1Ra (0.96 days) and without inducing degenerative changes in cartilage structure or composition. PMID:22818981

  14. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay. PMID:27317182

  15. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  16. Delivery of proteins to CNS as seen and measured by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Belov, V.; Fischman, A. J.; Belova, E.; Titus, J.; Gagne, M.; Gillooly, C.

    2013-01-01

    Presently, there are no effective treatments for several diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS). While several novel molecular approaches are being developed, many of them require delivery of macromolecular or supramolecular agents to the CNS tissues protected by the blood–brain and blood–arachnoid barriers. A variety of approaches that are being developed for overcoming or bypassing the barriers are based on complex transfer processes. The delivery of biopharmaceuticals and other macromolecules and particulates to the CNS, especially through the leptomeningeal (intrathecal) route, includes a variety of stages, such as leptomeningeal propagation, drainage to the systemic circulation, and penetration into the CNS. The investigation of complex pharmacokinetics that includes convective, as well as diffusional and active transfer processes, greatly benefit from real-time non-invasive in vivo monitoring of the drug transport. Pharmacological positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, which enables such monitoring, plays an increasingly significant role in drug delivery and biopharmacology. PET is a powerful tool for quantitative in vivo tracking of molecules labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides. The high sensitivity, format, and accuracy of the data (similar to those of conventional tissue sampling biodistribution studies) make PET a readily adoptable pharmacological technique. In contrast to the conventional studies, PET also allows for longitudinal nonterminal same-animal studies. The latter may not only improve the data statistics, but also enable preclinical studies (especially in large and/or rare animals) not feasible under the conventional approach. This paper is intended to demonstrate the character of data that can be obtained by PET and to demonstrate how the main patterns of the leptomeningeal route pharmacokinetics can be investigated using this method. Examples of data processing are taken from our recent studies of five model

  17. A Solvent-Free Thermosponge Nanoparticle Platform for Efficient Delivery of Labile Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein therapeutics have gained attention recently for treatment of a myriad of human diseases due to their high potency and unique mechanisms of action. We present the development of a novel polymeric thermosponge nanoparticle for efficient delivery of labile proteins using a solvent-free polymer thermo-expansion mechanism with clinical potential, capable of effectively delivering a range of therapeutic proteins in a sustained manner with no loss of bioactivity, with improved biological half-lives and efficacy in vivo. PMID:25333768

  18. Mechanisms of protein delivery to melanosomes in pigment cells

    PubMed Central

    Sitaram, Anand; Marks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells in the eye and skin are useful models for cell types that use specialized endosomal trafficking pathways to partition cargo proteins to unique lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes. This review describes current models of protein trafficking required for melanosome biogenesis in mammalian melanocytes. PMID:22505665

  19. Outer eggshell membrane as delivery vehicle for polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Fei; Du, Bingjian; Jiao, Tong; Zhang, Chunyue; Leng, Xiaojing

    2013-01-23

    This study investigates the features of a new type of delivery system prepared by combining a natural outer eggshell membrane (OESM) with emulsified microcapsules. The loading efficiency, controlled release properties, and forming mechanisms of the prepared system were studied. The polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E can be attached to highly cross-linked protein fiber networks of OESM. This attachment could be reinforced more than 2-fold using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The combined OESM/microcapsule delivery system significantly exhibited better controlled release properties than the microcapsules alone because of the steric blocking effect. Moreover, the OESM delivery system incorporated with microcapsules formed by pectin/protein as wall material showed more resistance against enzymatic attacks because of the formation of compact aggregates promoted by electrostatic effects. PMID:23244530

  20. Development and characterization of a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system for potential application in oral delivery of protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwu; Liu, Kaiyun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Wenxiu; Guo, Chunliang; Tang, Bin; Gu, Jiang; Zhang, Jinyong; Li, Haibo; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Background: The stability of protein drugs remains one of the key hurdles to their success in the market. The aim of the present study was to design a novel nanoemulsion drug-delivery system (NEDDS) that would encapsulate a standard-model protein drug – bovine serum albumin (BSA) – to improve drug stability. Methods: The BSA NEDDS was prepared using a phase-inversion method and pseudoternary phase diagrams. The following characteristics were studied: morphology, size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency. We also investigated the stability of the BSA NEDDS, bioactivity of BSA encapsulated within the NEDDS, the integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and specificity. Results: The BSA NEDDS consisted of Cremophor EL-35, propylene glycol, isopropyl myristate, and normal saline. The average particle diameter of the BSA NEDDS was about 21.8 nm, and the system showed a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) and an adequate drug-loading capacity (45 mg/mL). The thermodynamic stability of the system was investigated at different temperatures and pH levels and in room-temperature conditions for 180 days. BSA NEDDS showed good structural integrity and specificity for the primary, secondary, and tertiary structures, and good bioactivity of the loaded BSA. Conclusions: BSA NEDDS showed the properties of a good nanoemulsion-delivery system. NEDDS can greatly enhance the stability of the protein drug BSA while maintaining high levels of drug bioactivity, good specificity, and integrity of the primary, secondary, and tertiary protein structures. These findings indicate that the nanoemulsion is a potential formulation for oral administration of protein drugs. PMID:23118537

  1. Tat-mediated protein delivery in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Delom, Frederic; Fessart, Delphine; Caruso, Marie-Elaine; Chevet, Eric . E-mail: eric.chevet@mcgill.ca

    2007-01-19

    The Tat protein from HIV-1 fused with heterologous proteins traverses biological membranes in a transcellular process called: protein transduction. This has already been successfully exploited in various biological models, but never in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. TAT-eGFP or GST-eGFP proteins were fed to C. elegans worms, which resulted in the specific localization of Tat-eGFP to epithelial intestinal cells. This system represents an efficient tool for transcellular transduction in C. elegans intestinal cells. Indeed, this approach avoids the use of tedious purification steps to purify the TAT fusion proteins and allows for rapid analyses of the transduced proteins. In addition, it may represent an efficient tool to functionally analyze the mechanisms of protein transduction as well as to complement RNAi/KO in the epithelial intestinal system. To sum up, the advantage of this technology is to combine the potential of bacterial expression system and the Tat-mediated transduction technique in living worm.

  2. Polyvinylpyrrolidone microneedles enable delivery of intact proteins for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenchao; Araci, Zeynep; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Manickam, Sathish; Zhang, Xuexiang; Bruce, Marc A.; Marinkovich, M. Peter; Lane, Alfred T.; Milla, Carlos; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Butte, Manish J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method of fabricating microneedles from polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) that enables delivery of intact proteins (or peptides) to the dermal layers of the skin. PVP is known to self-assemble into branched hollow fibers in aqueous and alcoholic solutions; we utilized this property to develop dissolvable patches of microneedles. Proteins were dissolved in concentrated PVP solution in both alcohol and water, poured into polydimethylsiloxane templates shaped as microneedles and, upon evaporation of solvent, formed into concentric, fibrous, layered structures. This approach of making PVP microneedles overcomes problems in dosage, uniform delivery and stability of protein formulation as compared to protein-coated metallic microneedles or photopolymerized PVP microneedles. Here we characterize the PVP microneedles and measure the delivery of proteins into skin. We show that our method of fabrication preserves the protein conformation. These microneedles can serve as a broadly useful platform for delivering protein antigens and therapeutic proteins to the skin, for example for allergen skin testing or immunotherapy. PMID:23648574

  3. Past, Present, and Future Technologies for Oral Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, RAJESH; SINGH, SHAILESH; LILLARD, JAMES W.

    2015-01-01

    Biological drugs are usually complex proteins and cannot be orally delivered due to problems related to degradation in the acidic and protease-rich environment of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The high molecular weight of these drugs often results in poor absorption into the periphery when administered orally. The most common route of administration for these therapeutic proteins is injection. Most of these proteins have short serum half-lives and need to be administered frequently or in high doses to be effective. So, difficulties in the administration of protein-based drugs provides the motivation for developing drug delivery systems (DDSs) capable of maintaining therapeutic drug levels without side effects as well as traversing the deleterious mucosal environment. Employing a polymer as an entrapment matrix is a common feature among the different types of systems currently being pursued for protein delivery. Protein release from these matrices can occur through various mechanisms, such as diffusion through or erosion of the polymer matrix, and sometimes a combination of both. Encapsulation of proteins in liposomes has also been a widely investigated technology for protein delivery. All of these systems have merit and our worthy of pursuit. PMID:17918721

  4. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  5. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  6. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  7. Cell-penetrating DNA-binding protein as a safe and efficient naked DNA delivery carrier in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-Sung; Yang, Seung-Woo; Hong, Dong-Ki; Kim, Woo-Taek; Kim, Ho-Guen; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2010-01-29

    Non-viral gene delivery is a safe and suitable alternative to viral vector-mediated delivery to overcome the immunogenicity and tumorigenesis associated with viral vectors. Using the novel, human-origin Hph-1 protein transduction domain that can facilitate the transduction of protein into cells, we developed a new strategy to deliver naked DNA in vitro and in vivo. The new DNA delivery system contains Hph-1-GAL4 DNA-binding domain (DBD) fusion protein and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter plasmid that includes the five repeats of GAL4 upstream activating sequence (UAS). Hph-1-GAL4-DBD protein formed complex with plasmid DNA through the specific interaction between GAL4-DBD and UAS, and delivered into the cells via the Hph-1-PTD. The pEGFP DNA was successfully delivered by the Hph-1-GAL4 system, and the EGFP was effectively expressed in mammalian cells such as HeLa and Jurkat, as well as in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) plant cells. When 10 {mu}g of pEGFP DNA was intranasally administered to mice using Hph-1-GAL4 protein, a high level of EGFP expression was detected throughout the lung tissue for 7 days. These results suggest that an Hph-1-PTD-mediated DNA delivery strategy may be an useful non-viral DNA delivery system for gene therapy and DNA vaccines.

  8. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  9. Silk-elastin-like protein biomaterials for the controlled delivery of therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenwen; Rollett, Alexandra; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Genetically engineered biomaterials are useful for controlled delivery owing to their rational design, tunable structure-function, biocompatibility, degradability and target specificity. Silk-elastin-like proteins (SELPs), a family of genetically engineered recombinant protein polymers, possess these properties. Additionally, given the benefits of combining semicrystalline silk-blocks and elastomeric elastin-blocks, SELPs possess multi-stimuli responsive properties and tenability, thereby, becoming promising candidates for targeted cancer therapeutics delivery and controlled gene release. Areas covered An overview of SELP biomaterials for drug delivery and gene release is provided. Biosynthetic strategies used for SELP production, fundamental physicochemical properties, and self-assembly mechanisms are discussed. The review focuses on sequence-structure-function relationships, stimuli responsive features, and current and potential drug delivery applications. Expert opinion The tunable material properties allow SELPs to be pursued as promising biomaterials for nano-carriers and injectable drug release systems. Current applications of SELPs have focused on thermally-triggered biomaterial formats for the delivery of therapeutics, based on local hyperthermia in tumors or infections. Other prominent controlled release applications of SELPs as injectable hydrogels for gene release have also been pursued. Further biomedical applications that utilize other stimuli to trigger the reversible material responses of SELPs for targeted delivery, including pH, ionic strength, redox, enzymatic stimuli and electric field, are in progress. Exploiting these additional stimuli responsive features will provide a broader range of functional biomaterials for controlled therapeutics release and tissue regeneration. PMID:25476201

  10. Intraosseous Delivery of Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 Using a Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Matthew C; Monte, Felipe; Mehta, Manav; Kim, Harry K W

    2016-07-11

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a debilitating hip disorder, which often produces a permanent femoral head deformity and osteoarthritis. The local delivery of biological agents capable of stimulating bone healing offer potential new treatment options for patients with ONFH. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that a local intraosseous infusion of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) was effective in stimulating new bone formation in a piglet model of ischemic ONFH. However, infusion of BMP-2 solution was associated with unwanted dissemination of BMP-2 out of the femoral head and produced heterotopic ossification in the hip capsule. Injectable hydrogels offer a potential method to control the dissemination of biological molecules in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a peptide-based, self-assembling hydrogel called RADA16 to transition from a solution to a gel following infusion into the femoral head, thereby preventing backflow, as well as its potential use as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2. Cadaver pig femoral heads were used to study the backflow and the distribution of RADA16 following an intraosseous infusion. Microcomputed tomography analysis following the infusion of RADA16 mixed with a radiocontrast agent revealed a significant decrease in the amount of back flow of radiocontrast agent down the needle track compared to the soluble infusion of radiocontrast without RADA16. Furthermore, RADA16 mixed with radiocontrast agent showed good distribution within the femoral head. In addition, in vitro experiments revealed that higher concentrations of RADA16 decreased the rate of BMP-2 dissemination out of the hydrogel. The BMP-2 that was released from RADA16 maintains its biological activity, inducing the phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in pig primary bone marrow stromal cells. Lastly, pig primary bone marrow stromal cells showed significantly increased in vitro proliferation on RADA16 hydrogels over 1 week compared to tissue

  11. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  12. Non-destructively shattered mesoporous silica for protein drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Chenghong; Chen, Baowei; Li, Xiaolin; Qi, Wen N.; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-15

    Mesoporous silicas have been extensively used for entrapping small chemical molecules and biomacromolecules. We hypothesize that the loading density of biomacromlecules such as proteins in mesoporous silicas could be limited due to mesopore disorderness and depth because of some pore volume inaccessible. We innovatively shattered mesoporous silicas resulting in reduced particle sizes and improved intramesoporous structures in aqueous solution by a powerful sonication, where the mesoporous structures were still well maintained. The sonication-shattered mesoporous silicas can allow protein loading densities to be increased by more than 170%, demonstrating that significantly more mesoporous room of the silicas could become accessible for biomacromolecule loading after the sonication-shattering.

  13. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed. PMID:25787736

  14. Liposomal packaging generates Wnt protein with in vivo biological activity.

    PubMed

    Morrell, Nathan T; Leucht, Philipp; Zhao, Ludan; Kim, Jae-Beom; ten Berge, Derk; Ponnusamy, Karthik; Carre, A Lyonel; Dudek, Henryk; Zachlederova, Marie; McElhaney, Michael; Brunton, Shirley; Gunzner, Janet; Callow, Marinella; Polakis, Paul; Costa, Mike; Zhang, Xiaoyan M; Helms, Jill A; Nusse, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Wnt signals exercise strong cell-biological and regenerative effects of considerable therapeutic value. There are, however, no specific Wnt agonists and no method for in vivo delivery of purified Wnt proteins. Wnts contain lipid adducts that are required for activity and we exploited this lipophilicity by packaging purified Wnt3a protein into lipid vesicles. Rather than being encapsulated, Wnts are tethered to the liposomal surface, where they enhance and sustain Wnt signaling in vitro. Molecules that effectively antagonize soluble Wnt3a protein but are ineffective against the Wnt3a signal presented by a cell in a paracrine or autocrine manner are also unable to block liposomal Wnt3a activity, suggesting that liposomal packaging mimics the biological state of active Wnts. When delivered subcutaneously, Wnt3a liposomes induce hair follicle neogenesis, demonstrating their robust biological activity in a regenerative context. PMID:18698373

  15. Gene Delivery from Supercharged Coiled-coil Protein and Cationic Lipid Hybrid Complex

    PubMed Central

    More, Haresh T.; Frezzo, Joseph A.; Dai, Jisen; Yamano, Seiichi; Montclare, Jin K.

    2014-01-01

    A lipoproteoplex comprised of an engineered supercharged coiled-coil protein (CSP) bearing multiple arginines and the cationic lipid formulation FuGENE HD (FG) was developed for effective condensation and delivery of nucleic acids. The CSP was able to maintain helical structure and self-assembly properties while exhibiting binding to plasmid DNA. The ternary CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex complex demonstrated enhanced transfection of β-galactosidase DNA into MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts. The lipoproteoplexes showed significant increases in transfection efficiency when compared to conventional FG and an mTat•FG lipopolyplex with a 6- and 2.5-fold increase in transfection, respectively. The CSP•DNA(8:1)•FG lipoproteoplex assembled into spherical particles with a net positive surface charge, enabling efficient gene delivery. These results support the application of lipoproteoplexes with protein engineered CSP for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:24875765

  16. Nanoengineering of stimuli-responsive protein-based biomimetic protocells as versatile drug delivery tools.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fenfang; Shen, Guizhi; Chen, Chengjun; Xing, Ruirui; Zou, Qianli; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2014-06-01

    We present a general strategy to nanoengineer protein-based colloidal spheres (biomimetic protocells) as versatile delivery carriers with stimuli responsiveness by the electrostatic assembly of binary components (proteins and polypeptides) in association with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking. The size of the colloidal spheres, ranging from nanoscale to microscale, is readily tuned through parameters like protein and polypeptide concentration, the ratio between both, pH, and so on. Moreover, such colloidal spheres show versatile encapsulation of various guest molecules including small organic molecules and biomacromolecules. The pH and redox dual-responsiveness facilitates the rapid release of the payload in an acidic and reductant-enriched ambient such as in lysosomes. Thus, nanoengineering of protein-based biomimetic protocells opens a new alternative avenue for developing delivery vehicles with multifunctional properties towards a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:24828788

  17. Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery of CC Chemokine Binding Fc Fusion Proteins to Target Acute Vascular Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Eileen; Iqbal, Asif J.; White, Gemma E.; Patel, Jyoti; Greaves, David R.; Channon, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of CC chemokines is an attractive yet under utilized therapeutic strategy. We report the in vivo pharmacokinetics of a broad-spectrum vaccinia virus CC chemokine binding protein (35 K) fused to human IgG1 Fc. We demonstrate that the in vivo efficacy of the protein can be interrogated using hydrodynamic gene delivery of a standard mammalian expression plasmid. High plasma levels of the 35 K-Fc protein are maintained for at least 14 days post gene transfer, with the protein still detectable at 5 weeks. We confirm that the protein has biological activity in acute inflammation, causing a significant reduction in monocyte recruitment during zymosan induced peritonitis. The ability of 35 K-Fc to block more complex pathologies is demonstrated using aortic digests to assess angiotensin II mediated leukocyte recruitment to the aorta. Angiotensin II causes upregulation of mCCL2 in the aorta causing the accumulation of CCR2+ cells. Peak monocyte recruitment to the aorta occurs within 3 days and this process is CC chemokine dependent, being significantly reduced by hydrodynamic delivery of 35 K-Fc. PMID:26620767

  18. Light-activated, in situ forming gel for sustained suprachoroidal delivery of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Puneet; Barros, Matthew; Stansbury, Jeffrey W; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-08-01

    after release from the gel. As the cross-linking duration was increased to 10 min, the gel/antibody was better confined at the injection site in excised rabbit eye suprachoroidal space. Delivery of Alexa Fluor 488 dye conjugated bevacizumab was sustained for at least 60 days in the suprachoroidal space of SD rats. PCM and HEMA gel sustained bevacizumab release for 4 months and maintained the stability and VEGF-binding activity of bevacizumab. Therefore, light-activated PCM and HEMA gel is suitable for in situ gel formation and sustained protein delivery in the suprachoroidal space. PMID:23734705

  19. Nanoengineered particles for enhanced intra-articular retention and delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankur; Agarwal, Rachit; Diaz-Ruiz, Carlos A; Willett, Nick J; Wang, Peiyi; Lee, L Andrew; Wang, Qian; Guldberg, Robert E; García, Andrés J

    2014-10-01

    Localized intra-articular delivery of anti-inflammatory proteins can reduce inflammation in osteoarthritis but poses a challenge because of raid clearance within few hours of injection. A new class of polymer is developed that forms self-assembled nanoparticles ranging from 300 to 900 nm and demonstrates particle size dependent prolonged retention in intra-articular joint spaces compared to bolus protein over a period of 14 d. PMID:24687997

  20. Design and characterization of novel recombinant listeriolysin O-protamine fusion proteins for enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Hyung; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2015-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO-protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:25521817

  1. Controlled, sustained release of proteins via an injectable, mineral-coated microsphere delivery vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin-Ford, Travelle

    Hydroxyapatite interfaces have demonstrated strong protein binding and protein selection from a passing solution and can serve as a biocompatible carrier for controlled protein delivery. Hydroxyapatite is a major component of long bones and tooth enamel and is the most stable of all calcium phosphate isoforms in aqueous solutions at physiologic pH, providing a sensitive chromatographic mechanism for separating proteins. Here we describe an approach to create a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating through a biomimetic, heterogeneous nucleation from a modified simulated body fluid--supersaturated with calcium and phosphate ions on the surface of injectable polymer microspheres. We are able to bind and release bioactive growth factors into a variety of in vitro and in vivo conditions, demonstrating the functionality and advantage of the biomaterial. Creating a hydroxyapatite layer on the Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microsphere surface, avails the microsphere interior for another application that will not compete with protein binding and release. Encapsulating an imaging agent within the aqueous phase of the emulsion provides a visual reference for the injectable therapy upon microsphere fabrication. Another advantage of this system is that the mineral coating and subsequent protein binding is not compromised by the encapsulated imaging agent. This dual function delivery vehicle is not only advantageous for spatial tracking therapeutic applications, but also determining the longevity of the delivery vehicle once injected. In the broader sense, providing a mechanism to image and track our temporally controlled, sustained delivery system gives more evidence to support the effects of released protein on in vivo responses (bioactivity) and locate microspheres within different biological systems.

  2. Is Heparin Effective for the Controlled Delivery of High-Dose Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ri Youn; Lee, Beomseok; Park, Si-Nae; Ko, Jae-Hyung; Kim, In Sook; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2016-05-01

    Sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 by heparin-contained biomaterials is advantageous for bone tissue regeneration using low-dose BMP-2. However, its effect with high-dose BMP-2 is still unclear and should be clarified considering the clinical use of a high dose of BMP-2 in spine and oral surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a heparin-conjugated collagen sponge (HCS) with high-dose BMP-2 delivery by investigating in vivo initial osteogenic regulation and bone healing over 12 weeks in comparison with that of an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS). The in vitro BMP-2 release profile in the HCS exhibited a lower burst followed by a sustained release of BMP-2, whereas that of the ACS showed an initial burst phase only. As a result of a lower burst, the HCS-BMP group showed higher expression of bone-forming/resorbing markers and enhanced activation of osteoclasts than the ACS-BMP group within the scaffold of defect after 7 days, which is presumed to be because of retention of relatively higher amounts of BMP-2. However, the surrounding calvariae were less resorbed in the HCS-BMP group, compared with the aggressive resorptive response in the ACS-BMP group. Microcomputed tomography and histology revealed that HCS-BMP guided more effective bone regeneration of central defect over time inducing minor ossification at the defect exterior, whereas ACS-BMP exhibited excessive ossification at the defect exterior. These results showed that HCS-mediated BMP-2 delivery at a high dose has advantages over ACS, including less early resorption of surrounding bone tissue and higher efficacy in compact bone regeneration over a longer period, highlighting a clinical feasibility of this technology. PMID:27098389

  3. Dry powder pulmonary delivery of cationic PGA-co-PDL nanoparticles with surface adsorbed model protein.

    PubMed

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Alfagih, Iman M; Dennison, Sarah R; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Merchant, Zahra; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary delivery of macromolecules has been the focus of attention as an alternate route of delivery with benefits such as; large surface area, thin alveolar epithelium, rapid absorption and extensive vasculature. In this study, a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was adsorbed onto cationic PGA-co-PDL polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by a single emulsion solvent evaporation method using a cationic surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) at 2% w/w (particle size: 128.64±06.01 nm and zeta-potential: +42.32±02.70 mV). The optimum cationic NPs were then surface adsorbed with BSA, NP:BSA (100:4) ratio yielded 10.01±1.19 μg of BSA per mg of NPs. The BSA adsorbed NPs (5 mg/ml) were then spray-dried in an aqueous suspension of L-leucine (7.5 mg/ml, corresponding to a ratio of 1:1.5/NP:L-leu) using a Büchi-290 mini-spray dryer to produce nanocomposite microparticles (NCMPs) containing cationic NPs. The aerosol properties showed a fine particle fraction (FPF, dae<4.46 μm) of 70.67±4.07% and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 2.80±0.21 μm suggesting a deposition in the respiratory bronchiolar region of the lungs.The cell viability was 75.76±03.55% (A549 cell line) at 156.25 μg/ml concentration after 24 h exposure. SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism (CD) confirmed that the primary and secondary structure of the released BSA was maintained. Moreover, the released BSA showed 78.76±1.54% relative esterolytic activity compared to standard BSA. PMID:26169146

  4. Spatiotemporally synchronized cancer combination therapy using photo-activated nanoparticle drug delivery systems (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    This talk will introduce a new nanotechnology platform for cancer combination therapy that utilizes near infrared light activation not only for photodynamic damage but also as an extrinsic mechanism to initiate release of complimentary drugs to suppress dynamic bursts in molecular signaling networks that promote tumor cell survival and treatment escape. The goal is to achieve co-delivery with concomitant activity of photodynamic, molecular inhibitor and chemotherapeutic agents, selectively within the tumor. This approach overcomes challenges in achieving synergistic interactions using sequential drug delivery. Conventional drug delivery is compromised by the differential pharmacokinetics of individual agents and potentially antagonistic effects—such as vascular shutdown by one agent that limits delivery of the second. Here, photodynamic damage—which efficiently kills drug-resistant cells via damage of common proteins involved in drug-resistance (such as anti-apoptosis factors and drug-efflux transporters)—is synchronized spatially and temporally with the photo-initiated release of complimentary agents—to enable full interaction amongst the individual therapies. This spatiotemporal synchronization offers new prospects for exploiting time-sensitive synergistic interactions. Specific implementations of these concepts will be presented in preclinical models of cancer. Strategies to enable molecular-targeting of cancer cells via site-specific attachment of targeting moieties to the outer lipid shell of these nanovehicles will also be discussed. If successful in humans, this new paradigm for synchronized, tumor-focused combination therapy will ultimately supersede the present use of chronic drug injection by increasing efficacy per cycle whilst reducing systemic exposure to toxic drugs.

  5. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  6. Pokemon siRNA Delivery Mediated by RGD-Modified HBV Core Protein Suppressed the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Jianbo; Wu, Jinsheng; Wu, Ning; Chen, Jun; Fang, Fang

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly human malignant tumor that is among the most common cancers in the world, especially in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been well established as a high risk factor for hepatic malignance. Studies have shown that Pokemon is a master oncogene for HCC growth, suggesting it as an ideal therapeutic target. However, efficient delivery system is still lacking for Pokemon targeting treatment. In this study, we used core proteins of HBV, which is modified with RGD peptides, to construct a biomimetic vector for the delivery of Pokemon siRNAs (namely, RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA). Quantitative PCR and Western blot assays revealed that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA possessed the highest efficiency of Pokemon suppression in HCC cells. In vitro experiments further indicated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon-siRNA exerted a higher tumor suppressor activity on HCC cell lines, evidenced by reduced proliferation and attenuated invasiveness, than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Finally, animal studies demonstrated that RGD-HBc-Pokemon siRNA suppressed the growth of HCC xenografts in mice by a greater extent than Pokemon-siRNA or RGD-HBc alone. Based on the above results, Pokemon siRNA delivery mediated by RGD-modified HBV core protein was shown to be an effective strategy of HCC gene therapy. PMID:26356810

  7. Superporous polyacrylate/chitosan IPN hydrogels for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Erce, Deniz; Demirtaş, T Tolga

    2011-11-01

    In this study, poly(acrylamide), poly(AAm), and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid), poly(AAm-co-AA) superporous hydrogels (SPHs) were synthesized by radical polymerization in the presence of gas blowing agent, sodium bicarbonate. In addition, ionically crosslinked chitosan (CH) superporous hydrogels were synthesized to form interpenetrating superporous hydrogels, i.e. poly(AAm)-CH and poly(AAm-co-AA)-CH SPH-IPNs. The hydrogels have a structure of interconnected pores with pore sizes of approximately 100-150 μm. Although the extent of swelling increased when AA were incorporated to the poly(AAm) structure, the time to reach the equilibrium swelling (~30 s) was not affected so much. In the presence of chitosan network mechanical properties significantly improved when compared with SPHs, however, equilibrium swelling time (~30 min) was prolonged significantly as due to the lower porosities and pore sizes of SPH-IPNs than that of SPHs. Model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) was loaded into SPHs and SPH-IPNs by solvent sorption in very short time (<1 h) and very high capacities (~30-300 mg BSA/g dry gel) when compared to conventional hydrogels. BSA release profiles from SPHs and SPH-IPNs were characterized by an initial burst of protein during the first 20 min followed by a completed release within 1 h. However, total releasable amount of BSA from SPH-IPNs was lower than that of SPHs as due to the electrostatic interactions between chitosan and BSA. PMID:21901372

  8. Degradable lipid nanoparticles with predictable in vivo siRNA delivery activity.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Kathryn A; Dorkin, J Robert; Vegas, Arturo J; Chang, Philip H; Veiseh, Omid; Matthews, Jonathan; Fenton, Owen S; Zhang, Yunlong; Olejnik, Karsten T; Yesilyurt, Volkan; Chen, Delai; Barros, Scott; Klebanov, Boris; Novobrantseva, Tatiana; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in the development of clinically viable delivery systems for RNA interference therapeutics is to understand how molecular structures influence delivery efficacy. Here, we have synthesized 1,400 degradable lipidoids and evaluate their transfection ability and structure-function activity. We show that lipidoid nanoparticles mediate potent gene knockdown in hepatocytes and immune cell populations on IV administration to mice (siRNA EC50 values as low as 0.01 mg kg(-1)). We identify four necessary and sufficient structural and pKa criteria that robustly predict the ability of nanoparticles to mediate greater than 95% protein silencing in vivo. Because these efficacy criteria can be dictated through chemical design, this discovery could eliminate our dependence on time-consuming and expensive cell culture assays and animal testing. Herein, we identify promising degradable lipidoids and describe new design criteria that reliably predict in vivo siRNA delivery efficacy without any prior biological testing. PMID:24969323

  9. Degradable lipid nanoparticles with predictable in vivo siRNA delivery activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, Kathryn A.; Dorkin, J. Robert; Vegas, Arturo J.; Chang, Philip H.; Veiseh, Omid; Matthews, Jonathan; Fenton, Owen S.; Zhang, Yunlong; Olejnik, Karsten T.; Yesilyurt, Volkan; Chen, Delai; Barros, Scott; Klebanov, Boris; Novobrantseva, Tatiana; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2014-06-01

    One of the most significant challenges in the development of clinically viable delivery systems for RNA interference therapeutics is to understand how molecular structures influence delivery efficacy. Here, we have synthesized 1,400 degradable lipidoids and evaluate their transfection ability and structure-function activity. We show that lipidoid nanoparticles mediate potent gene knockdown in hepatocytes and immune cell populations on IV administration to mice (siRNA EC50 values as low as 0.01 mg kg-1). We identify four necessary and sufficient structural and pKa criteria that robustly predict the ability of nanoparticles to mediate greater than 95% protein silencing in vivo. Because these efficacy criteria can be dictated through chemical design, this discovery could eliminate our dependence on time-consuming and expensive cell culture assays and animal testing. Herein, we identify promising degradable lipidoids and describe new design criteria that reliably predict in vivo siRNA delivery efficacy without any prior biological testing.

  10. How different modes of child delivery influence abdominal muscle activities in the active straight leg raise.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yu-Jeong; Hyung, Eun-Ju; Yang, Kyung-Hye; Lee, Hyun-Ok

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the activities of the abdominal muscles of women who had experienced vaginal delivery in comparison with those who had experienced Cesarean childbirth. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 14 subjects (7 vaginal delivery, 7 Cesarean section) performed an active straight leg raise to 20 cm above the ground, and we measured the activities of the internal oblique abdominal muscle, the external oblique abdominal muscle, and the rectus abdominal muscle on both sides using electromyography. The effort required to raise the leg was scored on a Likert scale. Then, the subjects conducted maximum isometric contraction for hip joint flexion with the leg raised at 20 cm, and maximum torque and abdominal muscle activities were measured using electromyography. [Results] During the active straight leg raise, abdominal muscle activities were higher in the Cesarean section subjects. The Likert scale did not show a significant difference. The activities of the abdominal muscles and the maximum torque of the hip joint flexion at maximum isometric contraction were higher in the vaginal delivery subjects. [Conclusion] The abdominal muscles of Cesarean section subjects showed greater recruitment for maintaining pelvic stability during the active straight leg raising, but were relatively weaker when powerful force was required. Therefore, we consider that more abdominal muscle training is necessary for maintaining pelvic stability of Cesarean section subjects. PMID:25202194

  11. Delivery Mode, Duration of Labor, and Cord Blood Adiponectin, Leptin, and C-Reactive Protein: Results of the Population-Based Ulm Birth Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Chad A.; Thiel, Larissa; Bornemann, Rebecca; Koenig, Wolfgang; Reister, Frank; Brenner, Hermann; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Genuneit, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have reported associations between delivery mode and health outcomes in infancy and later life. Previous smaller studies indicated a relationship between delivery mode and newborn inflammation potentially constituting a mediating factor. We aimed to determine the influence of delivery mode and duration of labor on cord blood concentrations of adiponectin, leptin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Methods In the Ulm SPATZ Health Study, 934 singleton newborns and their mothers were recruited during their hospital stay in the University Medical Center Ulm, Southern Germany, from 04/2012-05/2013. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by ELISAs (n = 836). Delivery mode was analyzed categorically (elective cesarean (reference), active labor delivery: emergency cesarean, assisted vaginal, and spontaneous vaginal); duration of labor continuously. Following log-transformation, linear regression was used to estimate geometric means ratios (GMR) adjusted for potential confounders for the effects of delivery mode and duration of labor on each biomarker separately. Independent replication was sought in the similarly conducted Ulm Birth Cohort Study recruited from 11/2000-11/2001. Results Individually, active labor delivery modes as well as increasing duration of labor were associated with higher leptin and hs-CRP concentrations. After mutual adjustment, the associations with delivery modes were attenuated but those for duration of labor remained statistically significant (GMR (95%CI) 1.10 (1.00; 1.21) and 1.15 (1.04; 1.27) for leptin and hs-CRP per hour of labor, respectively). No significant adjusted associations were observed between delivery modes and adiponectin concentrations. These findings were replicated in an independent birth cohort study. Conclusions Cord blood leptin and hs-CRP concentrations were associated with duration of labor rather than delivery mode. Further research is warranted to investigate these associations

  12. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate. PMID:26249587

  13. Construction and evaluation of novel fusion proteins for targeted delivery of micro particles to cellulose surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Windust, John; Bushell, Donna; Parry, Neil

    2006-07-01

    The use of IgG antibodies and fragments has been limited to specific sectors of the biotechnology industry due to the high cost of producing large batches of product necessary for alternative applications. A novel class of Camelid antibodies, known as V(HH) offer a more economical opportunity to meet a wider application in industry. In this study, we report the evaluation of four llama V(HH)-cellulose binding domain fusion proteins displaying varying formats of V(HH) and CBD domains. Proteins were characterized in a targeted particle delivery system as a method of delivering agents such as perfume to laundry in the wash cycle. Fusion proteins were shown to be stable at high pH and in the presence of a detergent base. They were also shown to bind effectively to both the designated antigen, the azo-dye reactive-red 6 (either conjugated to BSA or attached to coacervate microparticles), and cellulose. Binding strength differences were observed between the different fusion protein formats using surface plasmon resonance. The effect of key laundry ingredients was also studied. Combining the fusion proteins and particles into a delivery and deposition study generated clear microscopy evidence for bifunctionality. Confirmation of this was validated by GC-MS analysis of retained fragrance. This research, reporting the construction and characterization of a variety of fusion proteins, illustrates that the single multidomain fusion protein route offers a new technology for successful targeted delivery of encapsulated benefit agents. Furthermore, the potential to modify or select for proteins to recognize a wide range of surfaces is also possible. PMID:16673421

  14. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented. PMID:26812004

  15. A review on the strategies for oral delivery of proteins and peptides and their clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Muheem, Abdul; Shakeel, Faiyaz; Jahangir, Mohammad Asadullah; Anwar, Mohammed; Mallick, Neha; Jain, Gaurav Kumar; Warsi, Musarrat Husain; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2016-07-01

    In the modern world, a number of therapeutic proteins such as vaccines, antigens, and hormones are being developed utilizing different sophisticated biotechnological techniques like recombinant DNA technology and protein purification. However, the major glitches in the optimal utilization of therapeutic proteins and peptides by the oral route are their extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism, degradation in the gastrointestinal tract (presence of enzymes and pH-dependent factors), large molecular size and poor permeation. These problems can be overcome by adopting techniques such as chemical transformation of protein structures, enzyme inhibitors, mucoadhesive polymers and permeation enhancers. Being invasive, parenteral route is inconvenient for the administration of protein and peptides, several research endeavors have been undertaken to formulate a better delivery system for proteins and peptides with major emphasis on non-invasive routes such as oral, transdermal, vaginal, rectal, pulmonary and intrauterine. This review article emphasizes on the recent advancements made in the delivery of protein and peptides by a non-invasive (peroral) route into the body. PMID:27330372

  16. Emulsomes meet S-layer proteins: an emerging targeted drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  17. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  18. SPE-39 family proteins interact with the HOPS complex and function in lysosomal delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M; Heilman, Craig J; Levey, Allan I; Faundez, Victor; L'hernault, Steven W

    2009-02-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39-like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  19. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39–like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  20. A novel method for the preparation of biodegradable microspheres for protein drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pareta, R; Edirisinghe, M.J

    2006-01-01

    Microspheres are potential candidates for the protein drug delivery. In this work, we prepared polymer-coated starch/bovine serum albumin (BSA) microspheres using co-axial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA). First, starch solution in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) was prepared and then an aqueous solution of BSA was added to it to make a starch–BSA solution. Subsequently, this solution was made to flow through the inner capillary, while the polymer, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), flowed through the outer capillary. On collection, filtration and subsequent drying, near-monodisperse microspheres of 5–6 μm in size were obtained. The microspheres were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cumulative BSA release was investigated by UV spectroscopy. BSA structure and activity was preserved in the microspheres and its release in 0.01 M phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was studied over a period of 8 days. There was an initial burst with 32 wt% of total BSA released in 2 h. Overall 75 wt% of BSA was released over a 7 day period. PMID:16849253

  1. Physical and chemical gels of lipid nanoparticles for controlled delivery of lipophilic drugs and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couffin, Anne-Claude; Delmas, Thomas; Thomann, Jean-Sébastien; Cheibani, Ismail; Bayma, Eric; Heinrich, Emilie; Escudé, Marie; Courant, Thomas; Hoang, Antoine; Auzély, Rachel; Texier, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    The controlled delivery of drugs and biologicals (proteins, antibodies, DNA and derivatives) is a growing need to take the full benefit of new therapeutic strategies. However these new molecules or biomolecules display solubility issues, or high degradation rates once injected. Therefore, both suitable delivery materials for their encapsulation and protection from the surrounding environment, and smart delivery devices (such as micro-needles or implanted pumps) are necessary to achieve controlled delivery of these precious therapeutic agents. We have developed bio-inspired gel materials, based on lipid nanoparticles which act as reservoirs for lipophilic drugs. The lipid nanoparticles, termed lipidots™, are biocompatible, colloidally stable, non-immunogenic, and obtained from a cheap and simple solvent-free process. The particles can be assembled to form physical or chemical gels, with tunable rheological properties. Physico-chemical studies have been carried out to determine the limits of the stability domains for colloidal and gel formulations (choice of surfactants for nanoparticle surface, and composition ratios of lipids, surfactants and co-surfactants). In particular, it is demonstrated that lipid nanoparticles keep their integrity in the gels. Gels of lipidots™ could therefore constitute biocompatible materials for the efficient encapsulation and tuned delivery of lipophilic drugs and biomolecules.

  2. Activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis by intracellular delivery of cytochrome c-based nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome c is an essential mediator of apoptosis when it is released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm. This process normally takes place in response to DNA damage, but in many cancer cells (i.e., cancer stem cells) it is disabled due to various mechanisms. However, it has been demonstrated that the targeted delivery of Cytochrome c directly to the cytoplasm of cancer cells selective initiates apoptosis in many cancer cells. In this work we designed a novel nano-sized smart Cytochrome c drug delivery system to induce apoptosis in cancer cells upon delivery. Results Cytochrome c was precipitated with a solvent-displacement method to obtain protein nanoparticles. The size of the Cytochrome c nanoparticles obtained was 100-300 nm in diameter depending on the conditions used, indicating good potential to passively target tumors by the Enhanced Permeability and Retention effect. The surface of Cytochrome c nanoparticles was decorated with poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid-SH via the linker succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate to prevent premature dissolution during delivery. The linker connecting the polymer to the protein nanoparticle contained a disulfide bond thus allowing polymer shedding and subsequent Cytochrome c release under intracellular reducing conditions. A cell-free caspase-3 assay revealed more than 80% of relative caspase activation by Cytochrome c after nanoprecipitation and polymer modification when compared to native Cytochrome c. Incubation of HeLa cells with the Cytochrome c based-nanoparticles showed significant reduction in cell viability after 6 hours while native Cytochrome c showed none. Confocal microscopy confirmed the induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells when they were stained with 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide after incubation with the Cytochrome c-based nanoparticles. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the coating with a hydrophobic polymer stabilizes Cytochrome c nanoparticles allowing

  3. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  4. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  5. Protein Needs of Physically Active Children.

    PubMed

    Volterman, Kimberly A; Atkinson, Stephanie A

    2016-05-01

    Current Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for protein for children and youth require revision as they were derived primarily on nitrogen balance data in young children or extrapolated from adult values; did not account for the possible influence of above average physical activity; and did not set an upper tolerable level of intake. Revision of the protein DRIs requires new research that investigates: 1) long-term dose-response to identify protein and essential amino acid requirements of both sexes at various pubertal stages and under differing conditions of physical activity; 2) the acute protein needs (quantity and timing) following a single bout of exercise; 3) the potential adverse effects of chronic high intakes of protein; and 4) new measurement techniques (i.e., IAAO or stable isotope methodologies) to improve accuracy of protein needs. While active individuals may require protein in excess of current DRIs, most active Canadian children and youth have habitual protein intakes that exceed current recommendations. PMID:27137165

  6. pH-responsive and enzymatically-responsive hydrogel microparticles for the oral delivery of therapeutic proteins: Effects of protein size, crosslinking density, and hydrogel degradation on protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Koetting, Michael Clinton; Guido, Joseph Frank; Gupta, Malvika; Zhang, Annie; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2016-01-10

    Two potential platform technologies for the oral delivery of protein therapeutics were synthesized and tested. pH-responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (P(IA-co-NVP)) hydrogel microparticles were tested in vitro with model proteins salmon calcitonin, urokinase, and rituximab to determine the effects of particle size, protein size, and crosslinking density on oral delivery capability. Particle size showed no significant effect on overall delivery potential but did improve percent release of encapsulated protein over the micro-scale particle size range studied. Protein size was shown to have a significant impact on the delivery capability of the P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel. We show that when using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles with 3 mol% tetra(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate crosslinker, a small polypeptide (salmon calcitonin) loads and releases up to 45 μg/mg hydrogel while the mid-sized protein urokinase and large monoclonal antibody rituximab load and release only 19 and 24 μg/mg hydrogel, respectively. We further demonstrate that crosslinking density offers a simple method for tuning hydrogel properties to variously sized proteins. Using 5 mol% TEGDMA crosslinker offers optimal performance for the small peptide, salmon calcitonin, whereas lower crosslinking density of 1 mol% offers optimal performance for the much larger protein rituximab. Finally, an enzymatically-degradable hydrogels of P(MAA-co-NVP) crosslinked with the peptide sequence MMRRRKK were synthesized and tested in simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. These hydrogels offer ideal loading and release behavior, showing no degradative release of encapsulated salmon calcitonin in gastric conditions while yielding rapid and complete release of encapsulated protein within 1h in intestinal conditions. PMID:26616761

  7. An overview on the delivery of antitumor drug doxorubicin by carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-07-01

    Serum proteins play an increasing role as drug carriers in the clinical settings. In this review, we have compared the binding modalities of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to three model carrier proteins, human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (β-LG) in order to determine the potential application of these model proteins in DOX delivery. Molecular modeling studies showed stronger binding of DOX with HSA than BSA and β-LG with the free binding energies of -10.75 (DOX-HSA), -9.31 (DOX-BSA) and -8.12kcal/mol (DOX-β-LG). Extensive H-boding network stabilizes DOX-protein conjugation and played a major role in drug-protein complex formation. DOX complexation induced major alterations of HSA and BSA conformations, while did not alter β-LG secondary structure. The literature review shows that these proteins can potentially be used for delivery of DOX in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27037051

  8. Cell Penetrating Peptide POD Mediates Delivery of Recombinant Proteins to Retina, Cornea and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leslie N.; Cashman, Siobhan M.; Read, Sarah Parker; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Recently we described a novel cell penetrating peptide, POD (peptide for ocular delivery) that could deliver small molecules including fluorescent dyes into retinal cells. The objective of the current study was to examine whether biologically relevant macromolecules such as proteins, genetically fused with POD could also be delivered into retinal tissues in vivo. We generated a POD-GFP fusion protein and examined its cell and tissue penetrating properties. We found that endogenously expressed POD-GFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus, suggesting that POD acts as a nuclear localization signal. Adenovirus (Ad) vectors expressing POD-GFP fusion protein were constructed and the recombinant protein was purified from Ad-infected human embryonic retinoblasts (HER). Exogenously supplied POD-GFP fusion protein rapidly transduced A549 and HER cells and colocalized in part with markers of late endosomes, from which it could escape. Following subretinal delivery, POD-GFP localized to the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptor cell bodies. When injected into the vitreous, POD-GFP localized to the ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer of the retina as well as the lens capsule. Topical application of POD-GFP to ocular surfaces resulted in uptake by the corneal epithelium. POD-GFP also transduced non-ocular tissues, including the epidermis of the skin following topical application. PMID:19733192

  9. Quantitative ToF-SIMS studies of protein drug release from biodegradable polymer drug delivery membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sarah A.; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2008-12-01

    Biodegradable polymers are of interest in developing strategies to control protein drug delivery. The protein that was used in this study is Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) which is a protein involved in the re-epithelialization process. The protein is stabilized in the biodegradable polymer matrix during formulation and over the course of polymer degradation with the use of an ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) which will encapsulate the protein in an aqueous environment. The release kinetics of the protein from the surface of these materials requires precise timing which is a crucial factor in the efficacy of this drug delivery system. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used in the same capacity to identify the molecular ion peak of the surfactant and polymer and use this to determine surface concentration. In the polymer matrix, the surfactant molecular ion peak was observed in the positive and negative mode at m/ z 467 and 421, respectively. These peaks were determined to be [AOT + Na +] and [AOT - Na +]. These methods are used to identify the surfactant and protein from the polymer matrix and are used to measure the rate of surface accumulation. The second step was to compare this accumulation rate with the release rate of the protein into an aqueous solution during the degradation of the biodegradable film. This rate is compared to that from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements using the protein autofluorescence from that released into aqueous solution [C.M. Mahoney, J. Yu, A. Fahey, J.A.J. Gardella, SIMS depth profiling of polymer blends with protein based drugs, Appl. Surf. Sci. 252 (2006), 6609-6614.].

  10. Protein-gold hybrid nanocubes for cell imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Han; Yang, Dongying; Zhao, Chen; Song, Zhuokun; Liu, Pengchang; Wang, Yu; Chen, Zhijun; Shen, Jiacong

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional biocompatible nanomaterials containing both fluorescent and vehicle functions are highly favored in bioimaging, therapeutic, and drug delivery applications. Nevertheless, the rational design and synthesis of highly biocompatible multifunctional materials remain challenging. We present here the development of novel protein-gold hybrid nanocubes (PGHNs), which were assembled using gold nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin, and tryptophan as building blocks. The green-synthesized PGHNs in this study are blue-emitting under UV exposure and cube-shaped with a size of approximately 100 nm. These hybrid nanomaterials are highly biocompatible as shown by cytotoxicity experiments and can be readily internalized by different types of cells. Moreover, PGHNs can act as nanovehicles that successfully deliver dyes or drugs into the cells. The protein-metal hybrid nanocubes can serve as a new type of dual-purpose tool: a blue-emitting cell marker in bioimaging investigation and a nanocarrier in drug delivery studies. PMID:25669930

  11. Engineered Protein Polymer-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials for Small Molecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Min; Frezzo, JA; Sharma, E; Chen, R; Singh, N; Yuvienco, C; Caglar, E; Xiao, S; Saxena, A; Montclare, JK

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated protein polymer-gold nanoparticle (P-GNP) nanocomposites that exhibit enhanced binding and delivery properties of the small hydrophobic molecule drug, curcumin, to the model breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. These hybrid biomaterials are constructed via in situ GNP templated-synthesis with genetically engineered histidine tags. The P-GNP nanocomposites exhibit enhanced small molecule loading, sustained release and increased uptake by MCF-7 cells. When compared to the proteins polymers alone, the P-GNPs demonstrate a greater than 7-fold increase in curcumin binding, a nearly 50% slower release profile and more than 2-fold increase in cellular uptake of curcumin. These results suggest that P-GNP nanocomposites serve as promising candidates for drug delivery vehicles. PMID:27081576

  12. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  13. Peptides and proteins used to enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to the brain: preclinical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Aguirre, Carolina; Morales, Francisco; Gallardo-Toledo, Eduardo; Guerrero, Simon; Giralt, Ernest; Araya, Eyleen; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2015-01-01

    An exciting and emerging field in nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the preclinical development of new strategies for the treatment and diagnosis of brain-related diseases such as neurodegeneration and cerebral tumors. The treatment of many brain-related disorders with AuNPs, which possess useful physical properties, is limited by the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The BBB highly regulates the substances that can permeate into the brain. Peptides and proteins may represent promising tools to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the central nervous system (CNS). In this review, we summarize the potential applications of AuNPs to CNS disorders, discuss different strategies based on the use of peptides or proteins to improve the delivery of AuNPs to the brain, and examine the intranasal administration route, which bypasses the BBB. We also analyze the potential neurotoxicity of AuNPs and the perspectives and new challenges concerning the use of peptides and proteins to enhance the delivery of AuNPs to the brain. The majority of the work described in this review is in a preclinical stage of experimentation, or in select cases, in clinical trials in humans. We note that the use of AuNPs still requires substantial study before being translated into human applications. However, for further clinical research, the issues related to the potential use of AuNPs must be analyzed. PMID:26300639

  14. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-01-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD. PMID:24196104

  15. Intracellular Protein Delivery and Gene Transfection by Electroporation Using a Microneedle Electrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-O; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    The impact of many biopharmaceuticals, including protein- and gene-based therapies, has been limited by the need for better methods of delivery into cells within tissues. Here, we present intracellular delivery of molecules and transfection with plasmid DNA by electroporation using a novel microneedle electrode array designed for targeted treatment of skin and other tissue surfaces. The microneedle array is molded out of polylactic acid. Electrodes and circuitry required for electroporation are applied to the microneedle array surface by a new metal-transfer micromolding method. The microneedle array maintains mechanical integrity after insertion into pig cadaver skin and is able to electroporate human prostate cancer cells in vitro. Quantitative measurements show that increasing electroporation pulse voltage increases uptake efficiency of calcein and bovine serum albumin, whereas increasing pulse length has lesser effects over the range studied. Uptake of molecules by up to 50 % of cells and transfection of 12 % of cells with a gene for green fluorescent protein is demonstrated at high cell viability. We conclude that the microneedle electrode array is able to electroporate cells, resulting in intracellular uptake of molecules, and has potential applications to improve intracellular delivery of proteins, DNA and other biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22328093

  16. Protein Nanocapsules Containing Doxorubicin as a pH-Responsive Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dongmei; Kratz, Felix; Wang, Szu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase has been engineered to form a caged, hollow dodecahedral protein assembly, and we have examined the feasibility of this scaffold to be used as a drug delivery system by introducing cysteines to the internal cavity (D381C). Fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532M) and the antitumor drug doxorubicin were coupled to this internal cavity through maleimides on the guest molecules. The virus-like particle’s structure and stability remained intact after binding of the molecules within the interior of the nanocapsule. The pH-dependent hydrolysis of a hydrazone linkage to doxorubicin allowed 90% drug release from the D381C scaffold within 72 hrs at pH 5.0. Fluorescence microscopy of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells indicated significant uptake of the D381C scaffold incorporating AF532M and doxorubicin and suggested internalization of the nanoparticles through endocytosis. We observed that the protein scaffold does not induce cell death, but doxorubicin encapsulated in D381C is indeed cytotoxic, yielding an IC50 of 1.3 ± 0.3 μM. While the majority of particulate-based drug delivery strategies encapsulates drugs within polymeric nanoparticles, our results show the potential of using macromolecular protein assemblies. This approach yields a promising new opportunity for designing highly-defined nanomaterials for therapeutic delivery. PMID:21456086

  17. A Universal Protein Tag for Delivery of SiRNA-Aptamer Chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong Yan; Gao, Xiaohu

    2013-11-01

    siRNA-aptamer chimeras have emerged as one of the most promising approaches for targeted delivery of siRNA due to the modularity of their diblock RNA structure, relatively lower cost over other targeted delivery approaches, and, most importantly, the outstanding potential for clinical translation. However, additional challenges must be addressed for efficient RNA interference (RNAi), in particular, endosomal escape. Currently, vast majority of siRNA delivery vehicles are based on cationic materials, which form complexes with negatively charged siRNA. Unfortunately, these approaches complicate the formulations again by forming large complexes with heterogeneous sizes, unfavorable surface charges, colloidal instability, and poor targeting ligand orientation. Here, we report the development of a small and simple protein tag that complements the therapeutic and targeting functionalities of chimera with two functional domains: a dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) for siRNA docking and a pH-dependent polyhistidine to disrupt endosomal membrane. The protein selectively tags along the siRNA block of individual chimera, rendering the overall size of the complex small, desirable for deep tissue penetration, and the aptamer block accessible for target recognition. More interestingly, we found that extending the c-terminal polyhistidine segment in the protein tag to 18 amino acids completely abolishes the RNA binding function of dsRBD.

  18. Multifunctional Delivery Systems for Advanced oral Uptake of Peptide/Protein Drugs.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Sun Jin; Kwag, Dong Sup; Kim, Sol; Park, Jeyoung; Youn, Yu Seok; Bae, You Han; Lee, Eun Seong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in biotechnology and protein engineering have enabled the production of large quantities of proteins and peptides as important therapeutic agents. Various researchers have used biocompatible functional polymers to prepare oral dosage forms of proteins and peptides for chronic use and for easier administration to enhance patient compliance. However, there is a need to enhance their safety and effectiveness further. Most macromolecules undergo severe denaturation at low pH and enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. The macromolecules' large molecular size and low lipophilicity cause low permeation through the intestinal membrane. The major strategies that have been used to overcome these challenges (in oral drug carrier systems) can be classified as follows: enteric coating or encapsulation with pH-sensitive polymers or mucoadhesive polymers, co-administration of protease inhibitors, incorporation of absorption enhancers, modification of the physicochemical properties of the macromolecules, and site-specific delivery to the colon. This review attempts to summarize the various advanced oral delivery carriers, including nanoparticles, lipid carriers, such as liposomes, nano-aggregates using amphiphilic polymers, complex coacervation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, and inorganic porous particles. The particles were formulated and/or surface modified with functional polysaccharides or synthetic polymers to improve oral bioavailability of proteins and peptides. We also discuss formulation strategies to overcome barriers, therapeutic efficacies in vivo, and potential benefits and issues for successful oral dosage forms of the proteins and peptides. PMID:26027575

  19. PEG-Immobilized Keratin for Protein Drug Sequestration and pH-Mediated Delivery

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Roche C.; Rabbany, Sina Y.

    2016-01-01

    Protein drugs like growth factors are promising therapeutics for damaged-tissue repair. Their local delivery often requires biomaterial carriers for achieving the therapeutic dose range while extending efficacy. In this study, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and keratin were crosslinked and used as sponge-like scaffolds (KTN-PEG) to absorb test proteins with different isoelectric points (pI): albumin (~5), hemoglobin (~7), and lysozyme (~11). The protein release kinetics was influenced by charge at physiological pH 7.4. The keratin network, with pI 5.3, electrostatically attracted lysozyme and repulsed albumin generating the release rate profile: albumin > hemoglobin > lysozyme. However, under acidic conditions (pH 4), all proteins including keratins were positively charged and consequently intermolecular repulsion altered the release hierarchy, now determined by size (MW) diffusion: lysozyme (14 kDa) > hemoglobin (64 kDa) > albumin (66 kDa). Vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C), with properties comparable to lysozyme, was absorbed into the KTN-PEG scaffold. Endothelial cells cultured on this substrate had significantly larger numbers than on scaffolds without VEGF-C suggesting that the ionically bound and retained growth factor at neutral pH indirectly increased acute cell attachment and viability. PEG and keratin based sequestrations of proteins with basic pIs are therefore a feasible strategy with potential applications for selective biologics delivery. PMID:26904294

  20. Expression of cholera toxin B-lumbrokinase fusion protein in Pichia pastoris--the use of transmucosal carriers in the delivery of therapeutic proteins to protect rats against thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chunfeng, Guan; Xiaozhou, Li; Gang, Wang; Jing, Ji; Chao, Jin; Josine, Tchouopou Lontchi

    2013-01-01

    Cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) has been widely used to facilitate antigen delivery by serving as an effective mucosal carrier molecule for the induction of oral tolerance. However, whether CTB can be used as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins has not been widely studied. Thus, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of lumbrokinase (LK) proteins which is an important fibrinolytic enzyme derived from earthworm. CTB and LK, separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via Pichia pastoris. The activity and proper folding of recombinant protein in yeast were confirmed by Western blot analysis, fibrin plate assays, and G(M1)-ganglioside ELISA. Following oral administration of recombinant protein, the thrombosis model of rats and mice revealed that the oral treatment of rCTB-LK has a more significant anti-thrombotic effect on animals compared with rLK. It is possible to conclude that CTB can successfully enhance its fusion protein LK to be absorbed. The use of CTB as a transmucosal carrier in the delivery of not only vaccines but also therapeutic proteins was supported. PMID:23269637

  1. Development of novel drug delivery systems using phage display technology for clinical application of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic proteins for cancer, hepatitis, and autoimmune conditions, but their clinical applications are limited, except in the cases of drugs based on erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interferon-alpha, and antibodies, owing to problems with fundamental technologies for protein drug discovery. It is difficult to identify proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets. Another problem in using bioactive proteins is pleiotropic actions through receptors, making it hard to elicit desired effects without side effects. Additionally, bioactive proteins have poor therapeutic effects owing to degradation by proteases and rapid excretion from the circulatory system. Therefore, it is essential to establish a series of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) to overcome these problems. Here, we review original technologies in DDS. First, we introduce antibody proteomics technology for effective selection of proteins useful as therapeutic seeds or targets and identification of various kinds of proteins, such as cancer-specific proteins, cancer metastasis-related proteins, and a cisplatin resistance-related protein. Especially Ephrin receptor A10 is expressed in breast tumor tissues but not in normal tissues and is a promising drug target potentially useful for breast cancer treatment. Moreover, we have developed a system for rapidly creating functional mutant proteins to optimize the seeds for therapeutic applications and used this system to generate various kinds of functional cytokine muteins. Among them, R1antTNF is a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant of TNF and is the first mutein converted from agonist to antagonist. We also review a novel polymer-conjugation system to improve the in vivo stability of bioactive proteins. Site-specific PEGylated R1antTNF is uniform at the molecular level, and its bioactivity is similar to that of unmodified R1antTNF. In the future, we hope that many innovative protein drugs will be

  2. IgG-loaded hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles for intradermal protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Juha; Reza Nejadnik, M; Baccouche, Khalil; Romeijn, Stefan; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-11-28

    Dissolving microneedles are an attractive approach for non-invasive delivery of drugs via the skin, particularly when the doses are in the microgram or low-milligram range. The aim of the study was to develop hyaluronan-based, monoclonal IgG-loaded microneedles for intradermal delivery enabling efficient penetration and rapid dissolution in the skin while preserving protein stability. Microscopic analysis showed successful preparation of sharp microneedles with the tip length of ~280 μm and with up to 10% (w/w) of IgG content. The water content of the microneedles was ~12% and was not affected by the protein content. The protein distribution was uniform within microneedle tips and individual arrays but some array-to-array variation of IgG level within a single preparation batch was detected. After dissolution of microneedle arrays in PBS, N80% of protein was recovered and no conformational changes were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. At submicron level, only weak and reversible interaction between HA and IgG was found by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation analysis after the dissolution of prepared microneedles. Although, the formation of insoluble micron-size particles was detected by flow imaging microscopy the IgG amount incorporated into these particles was negligible (b5%). Finally, microneedles were able to penetrate into the epidermis of ex vivo human skin followed by the rapid dissolution of the microneedle tips in the skin. After 10 min of application, the majority of the original tip length was dissolved and IgG and hyaluronan were co-deposited until a depth of 150-200 μm in the skin. In conclusion, developed hyaluronan-based dissolving microneedles allow rapid noninvasive intradermal protein delivery. PMID:26437262

  3. Lactococci and lactobacilli as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Food-grade Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) have been safely consumed for centuries by humans in fermented foods. Thus, they are good candidates to develop novel oral vectors, constituting attractive alternatives to attenuated pathogens, for mucosal delivery strategies. Herein, this review summarizes our research, up until now, on the use of LAB as mucosal delivery vectors for therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccines. Most of our work has been based on the model LAB Lactococcus lactis, for which we have developed efficient genetic tools, including expression signals and host strains, for the heterologous expression of therapeutic proteins such as antigens, cytokines and enzymes. Resulting recombinant lactococci strains have been tested successfully for their prophylactic and therapeutic effects in different animal models: i) against human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-induced tumors in mice, ii) to partially prevent a bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-allergic reaction in mice and iii) to regulate body weight and food consumption in obese mice. Strikingly, all of these tools have been successfully transposed to the Lactobacillus genus, in recent years, within our laboratory. Notably, anti-oxidative Lactobacillus casei strains were constructed and tested in two chemically-induced colitis models. In parallel, we also developed a strategy based on the use of L. lactis to deliver DNA at the mucosal level, and were able to show that L. lactis is able to modulate the host response through DNA delivery. Today, we consider that all of our consistent data, together with those obtained by other groups, demonstrate and reinforce the interest of using LAB, particularly lactococci and lactobacilli strains, to develop novel therapeutic protein mucosal delivery vectors which should be tested now in human clinical trials. PMID:21995317

  4. Designing Mimics of Membrane Active Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sgolastra, Federica; deRonde, Brittany M.; Sarapas, Joel M.; Som, Abhigyan; Tew, Gregory N.

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS As a semi-permeable barrier that controls the flux of biomolecules in and out the cell, the plasma membrane is critical in cell function and survival. Many proteins interact with the plasma membrane and modulate its physiology. Within this large landscape of membrane-active molecules, researchers have focused significant attention on two specific classes of peptides, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) because of their unique properties. In this account, we describe our efforts over the last decade to build and understand synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs). These endeavors represent one specific example of a much larger effort to understand how synthetic molecules interact with and manipulate the plasma membrane. Using both defined molecular weight oligomers and easier to produce, but heterogeneous, polymers, it has been possible to generate scaffolds with biological potency superior to the natural analogs. In one case, a compound has progressed through a phase II clinical trial for pan)staph infections. Modern biophysical assays highlighted the interplay between the synthetic scaffold and lipid composition leading to negative Gaussian curvature, a requirement for both pore formation and endosomal escape. The complexity of this interplay between lipids, bilayer components, and the scaffolds remains to be better resolved, but significant new insight has been provided. It is worthwhile to consider the various aspects of permeation and how these are related to ‘pore formation.’ More recently, our efforts have expanded toward protein transduction domains, or cell penetrating peptide, mimics. The combination of unique molecular scaffolds and guanidinium) rich side chains has produced an array of polymers with robust transduction (and delivery) activity. Being a new area, the fundamental interactions between these new scaffolds and the plasma membrane are just beginning to be understood. Negative Gaussian

  5. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins, Drugs, and Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsoo Seth

    Biomaterials are used to help regenerate or replace the structure and function of damaged tissues. In order to elicit desired therapeutic responses in vivo, biomaterials are often functionalized with bioactive agents, such as growth factors, small molecule drugs, or even stem cells. Therefore, the strategies used to incorporate these bioactive agents in the microstructures and nanostructures of biomaterials can strongly influence the their therapeutic efficacy. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures with improved interaction with three types of therapeutic agents: bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) which promotes osteogenic differentiation and bone growth, anti-inflammatory drug naproxen which is used to treat osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis, and neural stem cells that could differentiate into neurons to treat neurodegenerative diseases. For BMP-2 delivery, two specific systems were investigated with affinity for BMP-2: 1) heparin-binding nanofibers that display the natural ligand of the osteogenic protein, and 2) nanofibers that display a synthetic peptide ligand discovered in our laboratory through phage display to directly bind BMP-2. Both systems promoted enhanced osteoblast differentiation of pluripotent C2C12 cells and augmented bone regeneration in two in vivo models, a rat critical-size femur defect model and spinal arthrodesis model. The thesis also describes the use of PA nanofibers to improve the delivery of the anti-inflammatory drug naproxen. To promote a controlled release, naproxen was chemically conjugated to the nanofiber surface via an ester bond that would only be cleaved by esterases, which are enzymes found naturally in the body. In the absence of esterases, the naproxen remained conjugated to the nanofibers and was non-bioactive. On the other hand, in the presence of esterases, naproxen was slowly released and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity, an enzyme responsible

  6. Gene Delivery Mediated by Recombinant Silk Proteins Containing Cationic and Cell Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Hamasaki, Juliana; Subramanian, Balajikarthick; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-01

    Silk proteins are biodegradable and biocompatible, and can also be tailored to contain additional features via genetic engineering, suggesting utility for gene delivery. In the present study, novel silk-based block copolymers were bioengineered both with poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and RGD, to enhance cell-binding and transfection efficiency. Ionic complexes of these silk-polylysine-RGD block copolymers with pDNA were prepared, characterized and utilized for gene delivery to HeLa cells and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. The material systems were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis, zeta-potentialmeter, atomic force microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Sizes and charges of the pDNA complexes were regulated by the polymer/nucleotide molar ratio. Samples with 30-lysine residues and 11 RGD sequences, prepared at the ratio of number of amines/phosphates from pDNA (N/P) of 2, had an average solution diameter of 186 nm and showed the highest transfection efficiency. The intracellular distribution of complexes of Cy5-labeled pDNA was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The Cy5-labeled pDNA was distributed near the cell membrane and around the nuclei, indicating that the pDNA was transferred near the nucleus. The results demonstrated the potential of bioengineered silk proteins with additional functional features as a new family of highly tailored gene delivery systems. PMID:20457191

  7. Targeted delivery of siRNA to cell death proteins in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Brahmamdam, Pavan; Watanabe, Eizo; Unsinger, Jacqueline; Chang, Katherine C.; Schierding, William; Hoekzema, Andrew S.; Zhou, Tony T.; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Holemon, Heather; Heidel, Jeremy D.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Immune suppression is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the septic patient. Apoptotic loss of immune effector cells such as CD4 T and B cells is a key component in the loss immune competence in sepsis. Inhibition of lymphocyte apoptosis has led to improved survival in animal models of sepsis. Using qRT-PCR of isolated splenic CD4 T and B cells, we determined that Bim and PUMA, two key cell death proteins, are markedly up-regulated during sepsis. Lymphocytes have been notoriously difficult to transfect with siRNA. Consequently a novel, cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted, delivery vehicle was employed to co-administer siRNA to Bim and PUMA to mice immediately after cecal ligation and puncture. Anti-apoptotic siRNA based therapy markedly decreased lymphocyte apoptosis and prevented the loss of splenic CD4 T and B cells. Flow cytometry confirmed in vivo delivery of siRNA to CD4 T and B cells and also demonstrated decreases in intracellular Bim and PUMA protein. In conclusion, Bim and PUMA are two critical mediators of immune cell death in sepsis. Use of a novel cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted siRNA delivery vehicle enables effective administration of anti-apoptotic siRNAs to lymphocytes and reverses the immune cell depletion that is a hallmark of this highly lethal disorder. PMID:19033888

  8. Targeted delivery of siRNA to cell death proteins in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brahmamdam, Pavan; Watanabe, Eizo; Unsinger, Jacqueline; Chang, Katherine C; Schierding, William; Hoekzema, Andrew S; Zhou, Tony T; McDonough, Jacquelyn S; Holemon, Heather; Heidel, Jeremy D; Coopersmith, Craig M; McDunn, Jonathan E; Hotchkiss, Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Immune suppression is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the patients with sepsis. Apoptotic loss of immune effector cells such as CD4 T and B cells is a key component in the loss of immune competence in sepsis. Inhibition of lymphocyte apoptosis has led to improved survival in animal models of sepsis. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of isolated splenic CD4 T and B cells, we determined that Bim and PUMA, two key cell death proteins, are markedly upregulated during sepsis. Lymphocytes have been notoriously difficult to transfect with small interfering RNA (siRNA). Consequently a novel, cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted, delivery vehicle was used to coadminister siRNA to Bim and PUMA to mice immediately after cecal ligation and puncture. Antiapoptotic siRNA-based therapy markedly decreased lymphocyte apoptosis and prevented the loss of splenic CD4 T and B cells. Flow cytometry confirmed in vivo delivery of siRNA to CD4 T and B cells and also demonstrated decreases in intracellular Bim and PUMA protein. In conclusion, Bim and PUMA are two critical mediators of immune cell death in sepsis. Use of a novel cyclodextrin polymer-based, transferrin receptor-targeted siRNA delivery vehicle enables effective administration of antiapoptotic siRNAs to lymphocytes and reverses the immune cell depletion that is a hallmark of this highly lethal disorder. PMID:19033888

  9. Progress in nanoparticulate systems for peptide, proteins and nucleic acid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Gosecki, Mateusz

    2011-11-01

    Progress in many therapies, in particular in the therapies based on peptides, proteins and nucleic acids used as bioactive compounds, strongly depends on development of appropriate carriers which would be suitable for controlled delivery of the intact abovementioned compounds to required tissues, cells and intracellular compartments. This review presents last ten years' achievements and problems in development and application of synthetic polymer nanoparticulate carriers for oral, pulmonary and nasal delivery routes of oligopeptides and proteins. Whereas some traditional synthetic polymer carriers are only briefly recalled the main attention is concentrated on nanoparticles produced from functional copolymers mostly with hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups, suitable for immobilization of targeting moieties and for assuring prolonged circulation of nanoparticles in blood. Formulations of various nanoparticulate systems are described, including solid particles, polymer micelles, nanovesicles and nanogels, especially systems allowing drug release induced by external stimuli. Discussed are properties of these species, in particular stability in buffers and models of body fluids, loading with drugs and with drug models, drug release processes and results of biological studies. There are also discussed systems for gene delivery with special attention devoted to polymers suitable for compacting nucleic acids into nanoparticles as well as the relations between chemical structure of polymer carriers and ability of the latter for crossing cell membranes and for endosomal escape. PMID:21902630

  10. Novel pentablock copolymer-based nanoparticulate systems for sustained protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sulabh P; Vaishya, Ravi; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-04-01

    The design, synthesis, and application of novel biodegradable and biocompatible pentablock (PB) copolymers, i.e., polyglycolic acid-polycaprolactone-polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone-polyglycolic acid (PGA-PCL-PEG-PCL-PGA) and polylactic acid-polycaprolactone-polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone-polylactic acid (PLA-PCL-PEG-PCL-PLA) for sustained protein delivery, are reported. The PB copolymers can be engineered to generate sustained delivery of protein therapeutics to the posterior segment of the eye. PB copolymers with different block arrangements and molecular weights were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization and characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was selected as a model protein due to its structural similarity to bevacizumab. The influence of polymer molecular weight, composition, and isomerism on formulation parameters such as entrapment efficiency, drug loading, and in vitro release profile was delineated. Crystallinity and molecular weight of copolymers exhibited a substantial effect on formulation parameters. A secondary structure of released IgG was confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity, cell viability, and biocompatibility studies performed on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) and/or macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) demonstrated PB copolymers to be excellent biomaterials. Novel PB polymers may be the answer to the unmet need of a sustained release protein formulation. PMID:25319053

  11. A Systematic Study on Manufacturing of Prilled Microgels into Lipids for Oral Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    De Kruif, Jan Kendall; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Kuentz, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The development of novel systems with oral protein delivery as ultimate goal represents an important field of pharmaceutics. Prilling of protein-loaded polymeric solutions into lipid-based hardening baths could provide here an attractive formulating technology. As the obtained microgel dispersion can be directly capsule-filled, no drying step is required and thermal drug degradation is avoided. This study aims to find excipient combinations for the novel prilling process and investigate systematically diverse material and process factors. Bovine serum albumin and mono-N-carboxymethyl chitosan were selected as model protein and prilling polymer, respectively. The prilling suitability of 880 formulations was screened with 60 ternary phase diagrams comprising two co-solvents, 10 different glycerides, and three so-called complementary excipients. Preliminary capsule compatibility was tested for one month on 245 formulations in hard and soft capsules with different shell materials. Ternary phase diagrams' center points were used to evaluate morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and protein stability of the prilled microgels. As result, several formulations proved suitable for prilling and compatible for capsule filling. Statistical analysis using partial least square regression revealed significant factors regarding different quality attributes of microgel dispersions. Therefore, an improved understanding was obtained for this promising drug delivery approach. PMID:26108711

  12. Brain delivery of proteins via their fatty acid and block copolymer modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiang; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that hydrophobic small molecules penetrate cell membranes better than hydrophilic molecules. Amphiphilic molecules that dissolve both in lipid and aqueous phases are best suited for membrane transport. Transport of biomacromolecules across physiological barriers, e.g. the blood-brain barrier, is greatly complicated by the unique structure and function of such barriers. Two decades ago we adopted a simple philosophy that to increase protein delivery to the brain one needs to modify this protein with hydrophobic moieties. With this general idea we began modifying proteins (antibodies, enzymes, hormones, etc.) with either hydrophobic fatty acid residues or amphiphilic block copolymer moieties, such as poy(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (pluronics or poloxamers) and more recently, poly(2-oxasolines). This simple approach has resulted in impressive successes in CNS drug delivery. We present a retrospective overview of these works initiated in the Soviet Union in 1980s, and then continued in the United States and other countries. Notably some of the early findings were later corroborated by brain pharmacokinetic data. Industrial development of several drug candidates employing these strategies has followed. Overall modification by hydrophobic fatty acids residues or amphiphilic block copolymers represents a promising and relatively safe strategy to deliver proteins to the brain. PMID:24160902

  13. Solid state formulations composed by amphiphilic polymers for delivery of proteins: characterization and stability.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Fernanda; Fonte, Pedro; Oliva, Mireia; Videira, Mafalda; Ferreira, Domingos; Sarmento, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite powders composed by polymeric micelles as vehicles for delivery proteins were developed in this work, using insulin as model protein. Results showed that size and polydispersity of micelles were dependent on the amphiphilic polymer used, being all lower than 300 nm, while all the formulations displayed spherical shape and surface charge close to neutrality. Percentages of association efficiency and loading capacity up to 94.15 ± 3.92 and 8.56 ± 0.36, respectively, were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirmed that insulin was partially present at the hydrophilic shell of the micelles. Lyophilization did not significantly change the physical characteristics of micelles, further providing easily dispersion when in contact to aqueous medium. The native-like conformation of insulin was maintained at high percentages (around 80%) after lyophilization as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and far-UV circular dichroism (CD). Moreover, Raman spectroscopy did not evidenced significant interactions among the formulation components. The formulations shown to be physically stable upon storage up to 6 months both at room-temperature (20 °C) and fridge (4 °C), with only a slight loss (maximum of 15%) of the secondary structure of the protein. Among the polymers tested, Pluronic(®) F127 produced the carrier formulations more promising for delivery of proteins. PMID:25818062

  14. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  15. Cytoplasmic Delivery of Liposomes into MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Cell-Specific Phage Fusion Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2010-01-01

    Earlier, we have shown that doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (Doxil) modified with a chimeric phage fusion coat protein specific towards MCF-7 breast cancer cells identified from a phage landscape library demonstrated a significantly enhanced association with target cells and an increased cytotoxicity. Based on some structural similarities between the N-terminus of the phage potein and known fusogenic peptides, we hypothesized that, in addition to the specific targeting, the phage protein may possess endosome-escaping potential and an increased cytotoxicity of drug-loaded phage protein-targeted liposomes may be explained by an advantageous combination of both, cell targeting and endosomal escape of drug-loaded nanocarrier. The use of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique allowed us to clearly demonstrate the pH-dependent membrane fusion activity of the phage protein. Endosomal escape and cytosolic delivery of phage-liposomes was visualized with fluorescence microscopy. Endosome acidification inhibition by bafilomycin A 1 resulted in decreased cytotoxicity of the phage-Doxil, while the endosome disruption by chloroquine had a negligible effect on efficacy of phage-Doxil, confirming its endosomal escape. Our results demonstrated an endosome-escaping property of the phage protein and provided an insight on mechanism of the enhanced cytotoxicity of phage-Doxil. PMID:20438086

  16. Production of bioinspired and rationally designed polymer hydrogels for controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hye

    patterns of functional groups. However, heterogeneity in the composition and in the polydispersity of heparin has been problematic in controlled delivery system and thus motivated the development of homogeneous heparin mimics. Peptides of appropriate sequence and chemical function have therefore recently emerged as potential replacements for heparin in select applications. Studied was the assessment of the binding affinities of multiple sulfated peptides (SPs) for a set of heparin-binding peptides (HBPs) and for VEGF; these binding partners have application in the selective immobilization of proteins and in hydrogel formation through non-covalent interactions. Sulfated peptides were produced via solid-phase methods, and their affinity for the HBPs and VEGF was assessed via affinity liquid chromatography (ALC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and in select cases, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The shortest peptide, SPa, showed the highest affinity binding of HBPs and VEGF165 in both ALC and SPR measurements, with slight exceptions. Of the investigated HBPs, a peptide based on the heparin-binding domain of human platelet factor 4 showed greatest binding affinities toward all of the SPs, consistent with its stronger binding to heparin. The affinity between SPa and PF4ZIP was indicated via SPR ( KD = 5.27 muM) and confirmed via ITC (KD = 8.09 muM). The binding by SPa of both VEGF and HBPs suggests its use as a binding partner to multiple species, and the use of these interactions in assembly of materials. Given that the peptide sequences can be varied to control binding affinity and selectivity, opportunities are also suggested for the production of a wider array of matrices with selective binding and release properties useful for biomaterials applications. Hydrogel consisting of SPa was formed via a covalent Michael Addition reaction between maleimide- and thiol-terminated multi-arm PEGs and Cys-SPa. The mechanical property of hydrogel was tunable from ca. 186 to

  17. Long Wavelength Monitoring of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Nathan P.; Nguyen, Luong T.; Jernigan, Finith E.; Priestman, Melanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A family of long wavelength protein kinase fluorescent reporters is described in which the probing wavelength is pre-programmed using readily available fluorophores. These agents can assess protein kinase activity within the optical window of tissue, as exemplified by monitoring endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (1) in erythrocyte lysates and (2) in intact erythrocytes using a light-activatable reporter. PMID:24604833

  18. Synthesis and characterization of self-curing hydrophilic bone cements for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Franco-Marquès, E; Parra, J; Pèlach, M A; Méndez, J A

    2015-07-01

    New formulations of acrylic bone cements for bone defect reparation, based on self-hardening methyl methacrylate (MMA)/methacrylic acid (MAA), with a high capacity for protein delivery, have been developed. The self-curing formulations were prepared by partial substitution of solid phase PMMA microparticles by newly obtained PMAA microspheres. The PMAA microspheres were prepared by inverse suspension polymerization of their monomer and were cross-linked with N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBA) (10-15 wt %) to produce stable systems in contact with aqueous media. PMAA microspheres were loaded with hydrolyzed collagen (HC) as a model protein to simulate bone morphogenetic protein delivery useful for hard tissue reconstruction. Solid phase PMMA microparticles in the formulation were partially substituted by new PMAA-HC microspheres and were characterized to determine viability as an acrylic bone cement in minimally invasive surgery. The incorporation of PMAA-HC microspheres decreased peak temperature by 20°C, which minimized thermal necrotic risk after implantation. Mechanical compression tests revealed a behavior, under dry conditions, close to ISO 5833 standard requirements. However, a drastic drop in mechanical strength, ∼64%, was obtained after 15 days of immersion in simulated physiological conditions (37°C and pH 7.4) and was attributed to water absorption and a subsequent plasticizing effect. The increase in water uptake and retention enhanced the capability for controlled protein delivery. Finally, the biocompatibility of the cements was determined; some toxicity of the material during the first hours of culture incubation was observed. Later, toxicity was observed to decrease due to nonreacted monomer leaching, which ensured the low toxicity of the already polymerized phase. PMID:25209322

  19. Daunomycin-loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, magnetic targeting, cell cytotoxicity, and protein delivery research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chao; Jin, Shu-Fang; Zheng, Min; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Peng-Liang; Tang, Ding-Tong; Chen, Jiong; Lin, Jia-Qi; Wang, Xia-Hong; Zhao, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The clinical use of daunomycin is restricted by dose-dependent toxicity and low specificity against cancer cells. In the present study, modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were employed to load daunomycin and the drug-loaded nanospheres exhibited satisfactory size and smart pH-responsive release. The cellular uptake efficiency, targeted cell accumulation, and cell cytotoxicity experimental results proved that the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-loading process brings high drug targeting without decreasing the cytotoxicity of daunomycin. Moreover, a new concern for the evaluation of nanophase drug delivery's effects was considered, with monitoring the interactions between human serum albumin and the drug-loaded nanospheres. Results from the multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling calculation elucidate that the drug delivery has detectable deleterious effects on the frame conformation of protein, which may affect its physiological function. PMID:27288463

  20. Effective delivery of recombinant proteins to rod photoreceptors via lipid nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Dal Cortivo, Giuditta; Pontelli, Valeria; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Buffelli, Mario; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2015-06-12

    The potential of liposomes to deliver functional proteins in retinal photoreceptors and modulate their physiological response was investigated by two experimental approaches. First, we treated isolated mouse retinas with liposomes encapsulating either recoverin, an important endogenous protein operating in visual phototransduction, or antibodies against recoverin. We then intravitrally injected in vivo liposomes encapsulating either rhodamin B or recoverin and we investigated the distribution in retina sections by confocal microscopy. The content of liposomes was found to be released in higher amount in the photoreceptor layer than in the other regions of the retina and the functional effects of the release were in line with the current model of phototransduction. Our study sets the basis for quantitative investigations aimed at assessing the potential of intraocular protein delivery via biocompatible nanovesicles, with promising implications for the treatment of retinal diseases affecting the photoreceptor layer. PMID:25918020

  1. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  2. BBB-targeting, protein-based nanomedicines for drug and nucleic acid delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Peluffo, Hugo; Unzueta, Ugutz; Negro-Demontel, María Luciana; Xu, Zhikun; Váquez, Esther; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS) demands the urgent development of efficient drugs. While many of these medicines are already available, the Blood Brain Barrier and to a lesser extent, the Blood Spinal Cord Barrier pose physical and biological limitations to their diffusion to reach target tissues. Therefore, efforts are needed not only to address drug development but specially to design suitable vehicles for delivery into the CNS through systemic administration. In the context of the functional and structural versatility of proteins, recent advances in their biological fabrication and a better comprehension of the physiology of the CNS offer a plethora of opportunities for the construction and tailoring of plain nanoconjugates and of more complex nanosized vehicles able to cross these barriers. We revise here how the engineering of functional proteins offers drug delivery tools for specific CNS diseases and more transversally, how proteins can be engineered into smart nanoparticles or 'artificial viruses' to afford therapeutic requirements through alternative administration routes. PMID:25698504

  3. Enhanced protein delivery by multi-ion containing eggshell derived apatitic-alginate composite nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rajkamal, B; Zaheatha, S; Rajathi Malar, A; Alamelu Bai, S

    2014-11-01

    Eggshell is an attractive natural source of calcium for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HA) as it contains minor amounts of biologically relevant elements such as Mg, Sr, and Si. The mineral phase of the human bone is essentially a calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) which shows more bioactivities and absorbance than stoichiometric HA does. Hence, we have attempted to develop a protein delivery system based on eggshell derived CDHA (ECDHA) nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering. Nanoparticles with Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67, 1.61 and 1.51 to form CDHAs with compositions covering the properties of stable HA phase (Ca/P=1.67) to degradable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phase (Ca/P=1.5) were synthesized by microwave-accelerated wet chemical synthesis using eggshell as well as synthetic calcium hydroxide as calcium precursors. The delivery profiles of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein by the nanocarriers, were studied. Both eggshells derived and synthetic CDHA samples showed maximum amount of loading of 57% and 37%, respectively at a Ca/P ratio of 1.51, comparing to stoichiometric HA. ECDHA also showed a much more BSA release (25%) than synthetically derived CDHA (6.5%) did. To further improve the release profile, alginate coating was carried out on CDHA nanoparticles and the BSA release profiles were evaluated. A maximum release of 65% was observed for alginate coated ECDHA at a Ca/P ratio of 1.51 for a period of 2 days. The ECDHA nanoparticle with a Ca/P ratio similar to degradable TCP and with alginate coating seems to be an ideal protein delivery agent. PMID:25444657

  4. Expression, Delivery and Function of Insecticidal Proteins Expressed by Recombinant Baculoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Jeremy A.; Bonning, Bryony C.; Harrison, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of methods for inserting and expressing genes in baculoviruses, a line of research has focused on developing recombinant baculoviruses that express insecticidal peptides and proteins. These recombinant viruses have been engineered with the goal of improving their pesticidal potential by shortening the time required for infection to kill or incapacitate insect pests and reducing the quantity of crop damage as a consequence. A wide variety of neurotoxic peptides, proteins that regulate insect physiology, degradative enzymes, and other potentially insecticidal proteins have been evaluated for their capacity to reduce the survival time of baculovirus-infected lepidopteran host larvae. Researchers have investigated the factors involved in the efficient expression and delivery of baculovirus-encoded insecticidal peptides and proteins, with much effort dedicated to identifying ideal promoters for driving transcription and signal peptides that mediate secretion of the expressed target protein. Other factors, particularly translational efficiency of transcripts derived from recombinant insecticidal genes and post-translational folding and processing of insecticidal proteins, remain relatively unexplored. The discovery of RNA interference as a gene-specific regulation mechanism offers a new approach for improvement of baculovirus biopesticidal efficacy through genetic modification. PMID:25609310

  5. Dietary protein considerations to support active aging.

    PubMed

    Wall, Benjamin T; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-11-01

    Given our rapidly aging world-wide population, the loss of skeletal muscle mass with healthy aging (sarcopenia) represents an important societal and public health concern. Maintaining or adopting an active lifestyle alleviates age-related muscle loss to a certain extent. Over time, even small losses of muscle tissue can hinder the ability to maintain an active lifestyle and, as such, contribute to the development of frailty and metabolic disease. Considerable research focus has addressed the application of dietary protein supplementation to support exercise-induced gains in muscle mass in younger individuals. In contrast, the role of dietary protein in supporting the maintenance (or gain) of skeletal muscle mass in active older persons has received less attention. Older individuals display a blunted muscle protein synthetic response to dietary protein ingestion. However, this reduced anabolic response can largely be overcome when physical activity is performed in close temporal proximity to protein consumption. Moreover, recent evidence has helped elucidate the optimal type and amount of dietary protein that should be ingested by the older adult throughout the day in order to maximize the skeletal muscle adaptive response to physical activity. Evidence demonstrates that when these principles are adhered to, muscle maintenance or hypertrophy over prolonged periods can be further augmented in active older persons. The present review outlines the current understanding of the role that dietary protein occupies in the lifestyle of active older adults as a means to increase skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, and thus support healthier aging. PMID:25355192

  6. Low-activity waste feed delivery -- Minimum duration between successive batches

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.B.

    1998-08-25

    The purpose of this study is to develop a defensible basis for establishing what ``minimum duration`` will provide acceptable risk mitigation for low-activity waste feed delivery to the privatization vendors. The study establishes a probabilistic-based duration for staging of low-activity waste feed batches. A comparison is made of the durations with current feed delivery plans and potential privatization vendor facility throughput rates.

  7. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Price, Daniel L.; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Szalay, Aladar A.; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Methods Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. Results GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. Conclusion The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25244076

  8. Impaired Lysosomal Integral Membrane Protein 2-dependent Peroxiredoxin 6 Delivery to Lamellar Bodies Accounts for Altered Alveolar Phospholipid Content in Adaptor Protein-3-deficient pearl Mice.

    PubMed

    Kook, Seunghyi; Wang, Ping; Young, Lisa R; Schwake, Michael; Saftig, Paul; Weng, Xialian; Meng, Ying; Neculai, Dante; Marks, Michael S; Gonzales, Linda; Beers, Michael F; Guttentag, Susan

    2016-04-15

    The Hermansky Pudlak syndromes (HPS) constitute a family of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism and bleeding diathesis, often associated with lethal lung fibrosis. HPS results from mutations in genes of membrane trafficking complexes that facilitate delivery of cargo to lysosome-related organelles. Among the affected lysosome-related organelles are lamellar bodies (LB) within alveolar type 2 cells (AT2) in which surfactant components are assembled, modified, and stored. AT2 from HPS patients and mouse models of HPS exhibit enlarged LB with increased phospholipid content, but the mechanism underlying these defects is unknown. We now show that AT2 in the pearl mouse model of HPS type 2 lacking the adaptor protein 3 complex (AP-3) fails to accumulate the soluble enzyme peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) in LB. This defect reflects impaired AP-3-dependent trafficking of PRDX6 to LB, because pearl mouse AT2 cells harbor a normal total PRDX6 content. AP-3-dependent targeting of PRDX6 to LB requires the transmembrane protein LIMP-2/SCARB2, a known AP-3-dependent cargo protein that functions as a carrier for lysosomal proteins in other cell types. Depletion of LB PRDX6 in AP-3- or LIMP-2/SCARB2-deficient mice correlates with phospholipid accumulation in lamellar bodies and with defective intraluminal degradation of LB disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Furthermore, AP-3-dependent LB targeting is facilitated by protein/protein interaction between LIMP-2/SCARB2 and PRDX6 in vitro and in vivo Our data provide the first evidence for an AP-3-dependent cargo protein required for the maturation of LB in AT2 and suggest that the loss of PRDX6 activity contributes to the pathogenic changes in LB phospholipid homeostasis found HPS2 patients. PMID:26907692

  9. Poly(ether ester amide) microspheres for protein delivery: influence of copolymer composition on technological and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Ostacolo, Luisanna; Russo, Paola; De Rosa, Giuseppe; La Rotonda, Maria Immacolata; Maglio, Giovanni; Nese, Giuseppe; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Rengo, Sandro; Oliva, Adriana; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2008-07-01

    The production of PEEA microspheres with potential as carriers for protein oral delivery is described. PEEAs with different hydrophilicity were synthesized and characterized. Experiments showed that an increase in copolymer hydrophilicity gave particles less prone to cell interaction. BSA release profiles from PEEA microspheres demonstrated that an increase in polymer hydrophilicity was useful in limiting protein burst and modulating drug delivery rate by increasing PEEA degradability. These results show that fine-tuning of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties of PCL is essential for the formulation protein-loaded microspheres with specific properties. PMID:18412287

  10. Surfactant protein (SP)-A suppresses preterm delivery and inflammation via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Varkha; Smart, Keith; Jilling, Tamas; Hirsch, Emmet

    2013-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are pattern-recognition molecules that initiate the innate immune response to pathogens. Pulmonary surfactant protein (SP)-A is an endogenously produced ligand for TLR2 and TLR4. SP-A has been proposed as a fetally produced signal for the onset of parturition in the mouse. We examined the effect of interactions between SP-A and the pathogenic TLR agonists lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and polyinosinic:cytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) (ligands for TLR4, TLR2 and TLR3, respectively) on the expression of inflammatory mediators and preterm delivery. Three types of mouse macrophages (the cell line RAW 264.7, and fresh amniotic fluid and peritoneal macrophages, including macrophages from TLR4 and TLR2 knockout mice) were treated for up to 7 hours with pathogenic TLR agonists with or without SP-A. SP-A alone had no effect upon inflammatory mediators in mouse macrophages and did not independently induce preterm labor. SP-A significantly suppressed TLR ligand-induced expression of inflammatory mediators (interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the chemokine CCL5) via a TLR2 dependent mechanism. In a mouse inflammation-induced preterm delivery model, intrauterine administration of SP-A significantly inhibited preterm delivery, suppressed the expression of proinflammatory mediators and enhanced the expression of the CXCL1 and anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10. We conclude that SP-A acts via TLR2 to suppress TLR ligand-induced preterm delivery and inflammatory responses. PMID:23700442

  11. Impact of Absorption and Transport on Intelligent Therapeutics and Nano-scale Delivery of Protein Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Peppas, Nicholas A.; Carr, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    The combination of materials design and advances in nanotechnology has led to the development of new therapeutic protein delivery systems. The pulmonary, nasal, buccal and other routes have been investigated as delivery options for protein therapy, but none result in improved patient compliances and patient quality of life as the oral route. For the oral administration of these new systems, an understanding of protein transport is essential because of the dynamic nature of the gastrointestinal tract and the barriers to transport that exist. Models have been developed to describe the transport between the gastrointestinal lumen and the bloodstream, and laboratory techniques like cell culture provide a means to investigate the absorption and transport of many therapeutic agents. Biomaterials, including stimuli-sensitive complexation hydrogels, have been investigated as promising carriers for oral delivery. However, the need to develop models that accurately predict protein blood concentration as a function of the material structure and properties still exists. PMID:20161384

  12. Biocompatibility of a Coacervate-Based Controlled Release System for Protein Delivery to the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Rauck, Britta M.; Novosat, Tabitha L.; Oudega, Martin; Wang, Yadong

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of protein-based therapies for treating injured nervous tissue is limited by the short half-life of free proteins in the body. Affinity-based biomaterial delivery systems provide sustained release of proteins, thereby extending the efficacy of such therapies. Here, we investigated the biocompatibility of a novel coacervate delivery system based on poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride) (PEAD) and heparin in the damaged spinal cord. We found that the presence of the [PEAD:heparin] coacervate did not affect the macrophage response, glial scarring, or nervous tissue loss, which are hallmarks of spinal cord injury. Moreover, the density of axons, including serotonergic axons, at the injury site and the recovery of motor and sensorimotor function were comparable in rats with and without the coacervate. These results revealed the biocompatibility of our delivery system and supported its potential to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured nervous system. PMID:25266504

  13. Nanoporous membrane based on block copolymer thin film for protein drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung Yun; Yang, Jeong-A.; Kim, Eung-Sam; Jeon, Gumhye; Oh, Eun Ju; Choi, Kwan Yong; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Kim, Jin Kon

    2010-03-01

    We studied long term and controlled release of protein drugs by using nanoporous membranes with various pore sizes. Nanoporous membrane consists of the separation layer prepared by polystyrene-block-poly(methylmethacrylate) copolymer thin film and conventional microfiltration membrane as a support. We demonstrate a long-term constant in vitro release of bovine serum albumin (BSA)and human growth hormone ) (hGH) without their denaturation up to 2 months. A nearly constant serum concentration of hGH was maintained up to 3 weeks in SD rats. The long-term constant delivery based on this membrane for protein drugs within the therapeutic range can be highly appreciated for the patients with hormone- deficiency.

  14. Transferrin protein nanospheres: a nanoplatform for receptor-mediated cancer cell labeling and gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael A.; Spurlin, Tighe A.; Tona, Alessandro; Elliott, John T.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents preliminary results on the use of transferrin protein nanospheres (TfpNS) for targeting cancer cells in vitro. Protein nanospheres represent an easily prepared and modifiable nanoplatform for receptor-specific targeting, molecular imaging and gene delivery. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate conjugated TfpNS (RBITC-TfpNS) show significantly enhanced uptake in vitro in SK-MEL-28 human malignant melanoma cells known to overexpress transferrin receptors compared to controls. RBITCTfpNS labeling of the cancer cells is due to transferrin receptor-mediated uptake, as demonstrated by competitive inhibition with native transferrin. Initial fluorescence microscopy studies indicate GFP plasmid can be transfected into melanoma cells via GFP plasmid encapsulated by TfpNS.

  15. Nephrocystin proteins NPHP5 and Cep290 regulate BBSome integrity, ciliary trafficking and cargo delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barbelanne, Marine; Hossain, Delowar; Chan, David Puth; Peränen, Johan; Tsang, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functioning of cilia, hair-like structures responsible for sensation and locomotion, requires nephrocystin-5 (NPHP5) and a multi-subunit complex called the Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS)ome, but their precise relationship is not understood. The BBSome is involved in the trafficking of membrane cargos to cilia. While it is known that a loss of any single subunit prevents ciliary trafficking of the BBSome and its cargos, the mechanisms underlying ciliary entry of this complex are not well characterized. Here, we report that a transition zone protein NPHP5 contains two separate BBS-binding sites and interacts with the BBSome to mediate its integrity. Depletion of NPHP5, or expression of NPHP5 mutant missing one binding site, specifically leads to dissociation of BBS2 and BBS5 from the BBSome and loss of ciliary BBS2 and BBS5 without compromising the ability of the other subunits to traffic into cilia. Depletion of Cep290, another transition zone protein that directly binds to NPHP5, causes additional dissociation of BBS8 and loss of ciliary BBS8. Furthermore, delivery of BBSome cargos, smoothened, VPAC2 and Rab8a, to the ciliary compartment is completely disabled in the absence of single BBS subunits, but is selectively impaired in the absence of NPHP5 or Cep290. These findings define a new role of NPHP5 and Cep290 in controlling integrity and ciliary trafficking of the BBSome, which in turn impinge on the delivery of ciliary cargo. PMID:25552655

  16. A novel protocol allowing oral delivery of a protein complement inhibitor that subsequently targets to inflamed colon mucosa and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Elvington, M; Blichmann, P; Qiao, F; Scheiber, M; Wadsworth, C; Luzinov, I; Lucero, J; Vertegel, A; Tomlinson, S

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of a pathogenic role for complement in inflammatory bowel disease, there is also evidence for a protective role that relates to host defence and protection from endotoxaemia. There is thus concern regarding the use of systemic complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. Local delivery of a complement inhibitor to the colon by oral administration would ameliorate such concerns, but while formulations exist for oral delivery of low molecular weight drugs to the colon, they have not been used successfully for oral delivery of proteins. We describe a novel pellet formulation consisting of cross-linked dextran coated with an acrylic co-polymer that protects the complement inhibitor CR2-Crry from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract. CR2-Crry containing pellets administered by gavage, were characterized using a therapeutic protocol in a mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment of established colitis over a 5-day period significantly reduced mucosal inflammation and injury, with similar therapeutic benefit whether or not the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, was co-administered. Reduction in injury was associated with the targeting of CR2-Crry to the mucosal surface and reduced local complement activation. Treatment had no effect on systemic complement activity. This novel method for oral delivery of a targeted protein complement inhibitor will reduce systemic effects, thereby decreasing the risk of opportunistic infection, as well as lowering the required dose and treatment cost and improving patient compliance. Furthermore, the novel delivery system described here may provide similar benefits for administration of other protein-based drugs, such as anti-tumour necrosis factor-α antibodies. PMID:24730624

  17. Collagen peptide-based biomaterials for protein delivery and peptide-promoted self-assembly of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernenwein, Dawn M.

    2011-12-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly of peptides has driven the research progress for the following two projects: protein delivery vehicles of collagen microflorettes and the assembly of gold nanoparticles with coiled-coil peptides. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the mammals yet due to immunogenic responses, batch-to-batch variability and lack of sequence modifications, synthetic collagen has been designed to self-assemble into native collagen-like structures. In particular with this research, metal binding ligands were incorporated on the termini of collagen-like peptides to generate micron-sized particles, microflorettes. The over-arching goal of the first research project is to engineer MRI-active microflorettes, loaded with His-tagged growth factors with differential release rates while bound to stem cells that can be implemented toward regenerative cell-based therapies. His-tagged proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, have successfully been incorporated on the surface and throughout the microflorettes. Protein release was monitored under physiological conditions and was related to particle degradation. In human plasma full release was obtained within six days. Stability of the microflorettes under physiological conditions was also examined for the development of a therapeutically relevant delivery agent. Additionally, MRI active microflorettes have been generated through the incorporation of a gadolinium binding ligand, DOTA within the collagen-based peptide sequence. To probe peptide-promoted self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by non-covalent, charge complementary interactions, a highly anionic coiled-coil peptide was designed and synthesized. Upon formation of peptide-GNP interactions, the hydrophobic domain of the coiled-coil were shown to promote the self-assembly of peptide-GNPs clustering. Hydrophobic forces were found to play an important role in the assembly process, as a peptide with an equally overall negative charge, but lacking an

  18. Protein-resistant, reductively dissociable polyplexes for in vivo systemic delivery and tumor-targeting of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Seon; Oh, Mi Hwa; Park, Jae Yoon; Park, Tae Gwan; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2013-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been considered as a very attractive therapeutic alternative to chemical drugs; however, the chemical and biological instability and poor delivery efficiency of siRNA limit its success in clinical applications. Here we report a protein-resistant, reductively dissociable siRNA delivery system based on self-assembled polyelectrolyte complexes of dextran-siRNA conjugates linked by disulfide bonds. The prepared polyplexes exhibit excellent dispersion stability in the presence of serum because of the anti-fouling property of dextran exposed onto the complex surface. The enzymatic degradation of siRNA is also effectively suppressed within the complex. Folates are introduced as an active tumor-targeting moiety via the conjugation of folates to the hydroxyl groups of dextran. An in vivo investigation with a xenograft tumor mouse model shows that the folate-decorated dextran-siRNA conjugates are very efficiently targeted to cancer cells and induce sequence-specific gene silencing. PMID:23294546

  19. Consuming viscous prey: a novel protein-secreting delivery system in neotropical snail-eating snakes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Efficient venom delivery systems are known to occur only in varanoid lizards and advanced colubroidean snakes among squamate reptiles. Although components of these venomous systems might have been present in a common ancestor, the two lineages independently evolved strikingly different venom gland systems. In snakes, venom is produced exclusively by serous glands in the upper jaw. Within the colubroidean radiation, lower jaw seromucous infralabial glands are known only in two distinct lineages–the basal pareatids and the more advanced Neotropical dipsadines known as “goo-eating snakes”. Goo-eaters are a highly diversified, ecologically specialized clade that feeds exclusively on invertebrates (e.g., gastropod molluscs and annelids). Their evolutionary success has been attributed to their peculiar feeding strategies, which remain surprisingly poorly understood. More specifically, it has long been thought that the more derived Dipsadini genera Dipsas and Sibynomorphus use glandular toxins secreted by their infralabial glands to extract snails from their shells. Results Here, we report the presence in the tribe Dipsadini of a novel lower jaw protein-secreting delivery system effected by a gland that is not functionally related to adjacent teeth, but rather opens loosely on the oral epithelium near the tip of the mandible, suggesting that its secretion is not injected into the prey as a form of envenomation but rather helps control the mucus and assists in the ingestion of their highly viscous preys. A similar protein-secreting system is also present in the goo-eating genus Geophis and may share the same adaptive purpose as that hypothesized for Dipsadini. Our phylogenetic hypothesis suggests that the acquisition of a seromucous infralabial gland represents a uniquely derived trait of the goo-eating clade that evolved independently twice within the group as a functionally complex protein-secreting delivery system. Conclusions The acquisition by snail

  20. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  1. Heat shock protein-mediated cell penetration and cytosolic delivery of macromolecules by a telomerase-derived peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kim, Bu-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Won; Shon, Won-Jun; Lee, Na-Rae; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2013-10-01

    A reverse-transcriptase-subunit of telomerase (hTERT) derived peptide, GV1001, has been developed as a vaccine against various cancers. Here, we report an unexpected function of GV1001 as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). GV1001 was delivered into a variety of cells including various cancer cell lines and primary blood cells. Moreover, the delivered GV1001 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of the cells, while a significantly higher proportion of TAT peptide was localized in the nucleus. Macromolecules such as proteins, DNA and siRNA, which were linked to GV1001 by direct covalent conjugation or non-covalent complexation through poly-lysine, were successfully delivered into cells, indicating that GV1001 can be used as a carrier for macromolecules. Expression of the delivered DNA, and lowered expression of the target gene by the delivered siRNA, suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001. Pull-down analysis identified Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) and 70 (HSP70) as GV1001 interacting proteins. Treatment of Anti-HSP90 and HSP70 antibodies lowered the internalization of GV1001, indicating that the interaction is critical for the efficient internalization of GV1001. Collectively, the results of this study suggest the pharmaceutical potential of GV1001, already proven safe in clinical trials, as a carrier for the delivery of macromolecular therapeutics into cells, in addition to its own anti-cancer activity. PMID:23827187

  2. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Jorge E.; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Wagner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilized complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen’s benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants, but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25002086

  3. A heparin-mimicking reverse thermal gel for controlled delivery of positively charged proteins.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; Shandas, Robin; Park, Daewon

    2015-06-01

    Positively charged therapeutic proteins have been used extensively for biomedical applications. However, the safety and efficacy of proteins are mostly limited by their physical and chemical instability and short half-lives in physiological conditions. To this end, we created a heparin-mimicking sulfonated reverse thermal gel as a novel protein delivery system by sulfonation of a graft copolymer, poly(serinol hexamethylene urea)-co-poly(N-isopropylacylamide), or PSHU-NIPAAm. The net charge of the sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm was negative due to the presence of sulfonate groups. The sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm showed a typical temperature-dependent sol-gel phase transition, where polymer solutions turned to a physical gel at around 32°C and maintained gel status at body temperature. Both in vitro cytotoxicity tests using C2C12 myoblast cells and in vivo cytotoxicity tests by subcutaneous injections demonstrated excellent biocompatibility. In vitro release tests using bovine serum albumin revealed that the release from the sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm was more sustained than that from the plain PSHU-NIPAAm. Furthermore, this sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm system did not affect protein structure after 70-day observation periods. PMID:25294242

  4. A heparin-mimicking reverse thermal gel for controlled delivery of positively charged proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Brisa; Shandas, Robin; Park, Daewon

    2014-01-01

    Positively charged therapeutic proteins have been used extensively for biomedical applications. However, the safety and efficacy of proteins are mostly limited by their physical and chemical instability and short half-lives in physiological conditions. To this end, we created a heparin-mimicking sulfonated reverse thermal gel as a novel protein delivery system by sulfonation of a graft copolymer, poly(serinol hexamethylene urea)-co-poly(N-isopropylacylamide), or PSHU-NIPAAm. The net charge of the sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm was negative due to the presence of sulfonate groups. The sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm showed a typical temperature-dependent sol-gel phase transition, where polymer solutions turned to a physical gel at around 32°C and maintained gel status at body temperature. Both in vitro cytotoxicity tests using C2C12 myoblast cells and in vivo cytotoxicity tests by subcutaneous injections demonstrated excellent biocompatibility. In vitro release tests using bovine serum albumin (BSA) revealed that the release from the sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm was more sustained than that from the plain PSHU-NIPAAm. Furthermore, this sulfonated PSHU-NIPAAm system did not affect protein structure after 70-day observation periods. PMID:25294242

  5. Effective delivery of recombinant proteins to rod photoreceptors via lipid nanovesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Asteriti, Sabrina; Dal Cortivo, Giuditta; Pontelli, Valeria; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Buffelli, Mario; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-06-12

    The potential of liposomes to deliver functional proteins in retinal photoreceptors and modulate their physiological response was investigated by two experimental approaches. First, we treated isolated mouse retinas with liposomes encapsulating either recoverin, an important endogenous protein operating in visual phototransduction, or antibodies against recoverin. We then intravitrally injected in vivo liposomes encapsulating either rhodamin B or recoverin and we investigated the distribution in retina sections by confocal microscopy. The content of liposomes was found to be released in higher amount in the photoreceptor layer than in the other regions of the retina and the functional effects of the release were in line with the current model of phototransduction. Our study sets the basis for quantitative investigations aimed at assessing the potential of intraocular protein delivery via biocompatible nanovesicles, with promising implications for the treatment of retinal diseases affecting the photoreceptor layer. - Highlights: • Recombinant proteins encapsulated in nano-sized liposomes injected intravitreally reach retinal photoreceptors. • The phototransduction cascade in rods is modulated by the liposome content. • Mathematical modeling predicts the alteration of the photoresponses following liposome fusion.

  6. Self-assemblied nanocomplexes based on biomimetic amphiphilic chitosan derivatives for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minming; Dong, Hongwei; Guo, Kai; Zeng, Rong; Tu, Mei; Zhao, Jianhao

    2015-05-01

    A bio-inspired nanocarrier was developed for protein delivery based on biodegradable amphiphilic chitosan derivative (DCA-PCCs) with hydrophilic cell membrane mimic phosphorylcholine (PC) and hydrophobic deoxycholic acid (DCA) moieties, which was synthesized via the combination of Atherton-Todd reaction and carbodiimide coupling reaction. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, it was found that DCA-PCCs with suitable degree of substitution of PC and DCA moieties can load proteins by forming nanocomplexes via a solvent evaporation method. The physicochemical characteristics of BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes were investigated by Zetasizer, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro biological evaluation revealed BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes as blank DCA-PCCs nanoparticles had excellent cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility mainly due to the presence of cell membrane mimic phosphorylcholine. BSA release results suggested BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes showed a sustained release behavior following first order exponential decay kinetics. The results indicated DCA-PCCs provided a promising approach for effectively delivering therapeutic proteins. PMID:25659679

  7. Hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres as a device for controlled delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hailuo; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Brown, Roger F

    2011-03-01

    Hollow hydroxyapatite (HA) microspheres were prepared by reacting solid microspheres of Li(2)O-CaO-B(2)O(3) glass (106-150 μm) in K(2)HPO(4) solution, and evaluated as a controlled delivery device for a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Reaction of the glass microspheres for 2 days in 0.02 M K(2)HPO(4) solution (pH = 9) at 37°C resulted in the formation of biocompatible HA microspheres with a hollow core diameter equal to 0.6 the external diameter, high surface area (~100 m(2)/g), and a mesoporous shell wall (pore size ≈ 13 nm). After loading with a solution of BSA in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (5 mg BSA/ml), the release kinetics of BSA from the HA microspheres into a PBS medium were measured using a micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. Release of BSA initially increased linearly with time, but almost ceased after 24-48 h. Modification of the BSA release kinetics was achieved by modifying the microstructure of the as-prepared HA microspheres using a controlled heat treatment (1-24 h at 600-900°C). Sustained release of BSA was achieved over 7-14 days from HA microspheres heated for 5 h at 600°C. The amount of BSA released at a given time was dependent on the concentration of BSA initially loaded into the HA microspheres. These hollow HA microspheres could provide a novel inorganic device for controlled local delivery of proteins and drugs. PMID:21290170

  8. PLGA-Mesoporous Silicon Microspheres for the in Vivo Controlled Temporospatial Delivery of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Silvia; Pandolfi, Laura; Taraballi, Francesca; De Rosa, Enrica; Yazdi, Iman K; Liu, Xeuwu; Ferrari, Mauro; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-08-01

    In regenerative medicine, the temporospatially controlled delivery of growth factors (GFs) is crucial to trigger the desired healing mechanisms in the target tissues. The uncontrolled release of GFs has been demonstrated to cause severe side effects in the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to optimize a translational approach for the fine temporal and spatial control over the release of proteins, in vivo. Hence, we proposed a newly developed multiscale composite microsphere based on a core consisting of the nanostructured silicon multistage vector (MSV) and a poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA) outer shell. Both of the two components of the resulting composite microspheres (PLGA-MSV) can be independently tailored to achieve multiple release kinetics contributing to the control of the release profile of a reporter protein in vitro. The influence of MSV shape (hemispherical or discoidal) and size (1, 3, or 7 μm) on PLGA-MSV's morphology and size distribution was investigated. Second, the copolymer ratio of the PLGA used to fabricate the outer shell of PLGA-MSV was varied. The composites were fully characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ζ potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry, and their release kinetics over 30 days. PLGA-MSV's biocompatibility was assessed in vitro with J774 macrophages. Finally, the formulation of PLGA-MSV was selected, which concurrently provided the most consistent microsphere size and allowed for a zero-order release kinetic. The selected PLGA-MSVs were injected in a subcutaneous model in mice, and the in vivo release of the reporter protein was followed over 2 weeks by intravital microscopy, to assess if the zero-order release was preserved. PLGA-MSV was able to retain the payload over 2 weeks, avoiding the initial burst release typical of most drug delivery systems. Finally, histological evaluation assessed the

  9. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  10. DNA-based control of protein activity.

    PubMed

    Engelen, W; Janssen, B M G; Merkx, M

    2016-03-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  11. Microencapsulation of protein drugs for drug delivery: strategy, preparation, and applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guanghui

    2014-11-10

    Bio-degradable poly(lactide) (PLA)/poly(lactide-glycolide) (PLGA) and chitosan microspheres (or microcapsules) have important applications in Drug Delivery Systems (DDS) of protein/peptide drugs. By encapsulating protein/peptide drugs in the microspheres, the serum drug concentration can be maintained at a higher constant value for a prolonged time, or injection formulation can be changed to orally or mucosally administered formulation. PLA/PLGA and chitosan are most often used in injection formulation and oral formulation. However, in the preparation and applications of PLA/PLGA and chitosan microspheres containing protein/peptide drugs, the problems of broad size distribution and poor reproducibility of microspheres, and deactivation of protein during the preparation, storage and release, are still big challenges. In this article, the techniques for control of the diameter of microspheres and microcapsules will be introduced at first, then the strategies about how to maintain the bioactivity of protein drugs during preparation and drug release will be reviewed and developed in our research group. The membrane emulsification techniques including direct membrane emulsification and rapid membrane emulsification processes were developed to prepare uniform-sized microspheres, the diameter of microspheres can be controlled from submicron to 100μm by these two processes, and the reproducibility of products can be guaranteed. Furthermore, compared with conventional stirring method, the big advantages of membrane emulsification process were that the uniform microspheres with much higher encapsulation efficiency can be obtained, and the release behavior can be adjusted by selecting microsphere size. Mild membrane emulsification condition also can prevent the deactivation of proteins, which frequently occurred under high shear force in mechanical stirring, sonification, and homogenization methods. The strategies for maintaining the bioactivity of protein drug were

  12. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  13. ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan functionalized nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drug.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Choi, Won Il; Lee, Jae Young; Tae, Giyoong

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we developed a dual ligand functionalized pluronic-based nanocarrier (NC) for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan and zonula occludins toxin (ZOT)-derived, tight junction opening peptide were conjugated to NC to increase the permeability of loaded insulin across the small intestine through the paracellular pathway. Surface functionalized NC, either by chitosan or peptide, could modulate the tight junction (TJ) integrity in contrast to no effect of unmodified NC, as evidenced by the change in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and immunostaining of Claudin-4, a tight junction marker, in Caco-2 cell monolayer. On the other hand, dual ligand (chitosan and peptide) functionalized NC significantly further increased the permeation of insulin across Caco-2 cell monolayer. More importantly, insulin loaded, dual ligand functionalized NC could increase the plasma insulin level and efficiently regulate the glycemic response for a prolonged period of time (∼1 day) upon oral administration to diabetic rats, whereas delivery of insulin by single ligand functionalized NCs, either by chitosan or peptide, as well as by unmodified NC and free insulin, could not induce the effective regulation of the blood glucose level. The use of fluorescence dye labeled insulin (FITC-insulin) and Cy5.5 labeled NC revealed that both insulin and dual ligand functionalized NC were adequately penetrated across the whole intestine villi in contrast to limited adsorption of insulin and NC mainly onto the epithelial surface of the intestine for single ligand functionalized NCs. These results suggest that dual conjugation of ZOT-derived peptide and chitosan is a promising approach to functionalize the surface of nanocarrier for oral delivery of protein drugs. PMID:27380442

  14. Characterization of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 delivery from injectable hyaluronan-based hydrogels by means of 125I-radiolabelling.

    PubMed

    Piskounova, Sonya; Gedda, Lars; Hulsart-Billström, Gry; Hilborn, Jöns; Bowden, Tim

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a thorough in vitro and in vivo characterization of the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) from a hyaluronan-based hydrogel system. The in vitro release of BMP-2 from similar hydrogels has previously been studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), by which only a fraction of the loaded protein is detected. In the current study, (125) I radiolabelling was used instead to monitor BMP-2 in vitro and in vivo. To minimize protein loss during handling, (125) I-BMP-2 adsorption to different tubes was studied at different times and temperatures. The data showed that Protein LoBind tubes exhibited the lowest protein affinity. Furthermore, a biphasic release profile of biologically active BMP-2 was observed both in vitro and in vivo, with the initial fast phase during the first week, followed by a slower release during the remaining 3 weeks. The initial fast-release phase corresponded to the early bone formation observed after 8 days in an ectopic model in rats. Bone volume and mineral content increased until day 14, after which a decrease in bone volume was observed, possibly due to resorption in response to decreased amounts of released BMP-2. Overall, the results suggested that cautious protein handling and a reliable quantification technique are essential factors for successful design of a BMP-2 delivery system. PMID:22927307

  15. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel (`nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination.

  16. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel ('nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination. PMID:20562880

  17. Multilayered Graphene Nano-Film for Controlled Protein Delivery by Desired Electro-Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Moonhyun; Kim, Kyung-Geun; Heo, Jiwoong; Jeong, Hyejoong; Kim, Sung Yeol; Hong, Jinkee

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted the potential use of “smart” films, such as graphene sheets, that would allow for the controlled release of a variety of therapeutic drugs. Taking full advantage of these versatile conducting sheets, we investigated the novel concept of applying graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) materials as both barrier and conducting layers that afford controlled entrapment and release of any molecules of interest. We fabricated multilayered nanofilm architectures using a hydrolytically degradable cationic poly(β-amino ester) (PAE), a model protein antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) as a building block along with the GO and rGO. We successfully showed that these multilayer films are capable of blocking the initial burst release of OVA, and they can be triggered to precisely control the release upon the application of electrochemical potential. This new drug delivery platform will find its usefulness in various transdermal drug delivery devices where on-demand control of drug release from the surface is necessary. PMID:26621344

  18. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. •T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. •The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments C–C lyase activity. •Δ5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of Δ4- and Δ5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17α-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carbon–carbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional “Compound I” rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17’s physiological Δ4- and Δ5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing

  19. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  20. MiniTn7-transposon delivery vectors for inducible or constitutive fluorescent protein expression in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; Gisler, Pascal; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the generation and function of two sets of bacterial plasmids that harbor fluorescent genes encoding either blue, cyan, yellow or red fluorescent proteins. In the first set, protein expression is controlled by the strong and constitutive nptII promoter whereas in the second set, the strong tac promoter was chosen that underlies LacIq regulation. Furthermore, the plasmids are mobilizable, contain Tn7 transposons and a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. Using Escherichia coli S17-1 as donor strain, the plasmids allow fast and convenient Tn7-transposon delivery into many enterobacterial hosts, such as the here-used E. coli O157:H7. This procedure omits the need of preparing competent recipient cells and antibiotic resistances are only transiently conferred to the recipients. As the fluorescence proteins show little to no overlap in fluorescence emission, the constructs are well suited for the study of multicolored synthetic bacterial communities during biofilm production or in host colonization studies, e.g. of plant surfaces. Furthermore, tac promoter-reporter constructs allow the generation of so-called reproductive success reporters, which allow to estimate past doublings of bacterial individuals after introduction into environments, emphasizing the role of individual cells during colonization. PMID:27445318

  1. MiniTn7-transposon delivery vectors for inducible or constitutive fluorescent protein expression in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Gisler, Pascal; Drissner, David

    2016-08-01

    Here we present the generation and function of two sets of bacterial plasmids that harbor fluorescent genes encoding either blue, cyan, yellow or red fluorescent proteins. In the first set, protein expression is controlled by the strong and constitutive nptII promoter whereas in the second set, the strong tac promoter was chosen that underlies LacI(q) regulation. Furthermore, the plasmids are mobilizable, contain Tn7 transposons and a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. Using Escherichia coli S17-1 as donor strain, the plasmids allow fast and convenient Tn7-transposon delivery into many enterobacterial hosts, such as the here-used E. coli O157:H7. This procedure omits the need of preparing competent recipient cells and antibiotic resistances are only transiently conferred to the recipients. As the fluorescence proteins show little to no overlap in fluorescence emission, the constructs are well suited for the study of multicolored synthetic bacterial communities during biofilm production or in host colonization studies, e.g. of plant surfaces. Furthermore, tac promoter-reporter constructs allow the generation of so-called reproductive success reporters, which allow to estimate past doublings of bacterial individuals after introduction into environments, emphasizing the role of individual cells during colonization. PMID:27445318

  2. Mathematical model accurately predicts protein release from an affinity-based delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vulic, Katarina; Pakulska, Malgosia M; Sonthalia, Rohit; Ramachandran, Arun; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-01-10

    Affinity-based controlled release modulates the delivery of protein or small molecule therapeutics through transient dissociation/association. To understand which parameters can be used to tune release, we used a mathematical model based on simple binding kinetics. A comprehensive asymptotic analysis revealed three characteristic regimes for therapeutic release from affinity-based systems. These regimes can be controlled by diffusion or unbinding kinetics, and can exhibit release over either a single stage or two stages. This analysis fundamentally changes the way we think of controlling release from affinity-based systems and thereby explains some of the discrepancies in the literature on which parameters influence affinity-based release. The rate of protein release from affinity-based systems is determined by the balance of diffusion of the therapeutic agent through the hydrogel and the dissociation kinetics of the affinity pair. Equations for tuning protein release rate by altering the strength (KD) of the affinity interaction, the concentration of binding ligand in the system, the rate of dissociation (koff) of the complex, and the hydrogel size and geometry, are provided. We validated our model by collapsing the model simulations and the experimental data from a recently described affinity release system, to a single master curve. Importantly, this mathematical analysis can be applied to any single species affinity-based system to determine the parameters required for a desired release profile. PMID:25449806

  3. MiniTn7-transposon delivery vectors for inducible or constitutive fluorescent protein expression in Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; Gisler, Pascal; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the generation and function of two sets of bacterial plasmids that harbor fluorescent genes encoding either blue, cyan, yellow or red fluorescent proteins. In the first set, protein expression is controlled by the strong and constitutive nptII promoter whereas in the second set, the strong tac promoter was chosen that underlies LacIq regulation. Furthermore, the plasmids are mobilizable, contain Tn7 transposons and a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. Using Escherichia coli S17-1 as donor strain, the plasmids allow fast and convenient Tn7-transposon delivery into many enterobacterial hosts, such as the here-used E. coli O157:H7. This procedure omits the need of preparing competent recipient cells and antibiotic resistances are only transiently conferred to the recipients. As the fluorescence proteins show little to no overlap in fluorescence emission, the constructs are well suited for the study of multicolored synthetic bacterial communities during biofilm production or in host colonization studies, e.g. of plant surfaces. Furthermore, tac promoter-reporter constructs allow the generation of so-called reproductive success reporters, which allow to estimate past doublings of bacterial individuals after introduction into environments, emphasizing the role of individual cells during colonization.

  4. Ionically crosslinked alginate-carboxymethyl cellulose beads for the delivery of protein therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Sup; Park, Sang Jun; Gu, Bon Kang; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2012-12-01

    We developed Fe3+-crosslinked alginate-carboxymethyl cellulose (AC) beads in various volume ratios by dropping an AC solution into a ferric chloride solution to form protein therapeutic carrier beads. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the roughness and pore size of the crosslinked beads increased with the volume ratio of the carboxymethyl cellulose. Fourier transform-infrared analysis revealed the formation of a three-dimensional bonding structure between the anionic polymeric chains of AC and the Fe3+ ions. The degree of swelling and the release profile of albumin from the beads were investigated under simulated gastrointestinal conditions (pH 1.2, 4.5, and 7.4). The Fe3+-crosslinked AC beads displayed different degrees of swelling and albumin release for the various AC volume ratios and under various pH conditions. An in vitro release test was used to monitor the controlled release of albumin from the AC beads under simulated gastrointestinal conditions over 24 h. The Fe3+-crosslinked AC beads protected and controlled the release of protein, demonstrating that such beads present a promising protein therapeutic carrier for the oral delivery.

  5. Correlating In Vitro Splice Switching Activity With Systemic In Vivo Delivery Using Novel ZEN-modified Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Suzan M; McClorey, Graham; Nordin, Joel Z; Godfrey, Caroline; Stenler, Sofia; Lennox, Kim A; Smith, CI Edvard; Jacobi, Ashley M; Varela, Miguel A; Lee, Yi; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Andaloussi, Samir E L

    2014-01-01

    Splice switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) induce alternative splicing of pre-mRNA and typically employ chemical modifications to increase nuclease resistance and binding affinity to target pre-mRNA. Here we describe a new SSO non-base modifier (a naphthyl-azo group, “ZEN™”) to direct exon exclusion in mutant dystrophin pre-mRNA to generate functional dystrophin protein. The ZEN modifier is placed near the ends of a 2′-O-methyl (2′OMe) oligonucleotide, increasing melting temperature and potency over unmodified 2′OMe oligonucleotides. In cultured H2K cells, a ZEN-modified 2′OMe phosphorothioate (PS) oligonucleotide delivered by lipid transfection greatly enhanced dystrophin exon skipping over the same 2′OMePS SSO lacking ZEN. However, when tested using free gymnotic uptake in vitro and following systemic delivery in vivo in dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the same ZEN-modified SSO failed to enhance potency. Importantly, we show for the first time that in vivo activity of anionic SSOs is modelled in vitro only when using gymnotic delivery. ZEN is thus a novel modifier that enhances activity of SSOs in vitro but will require improved delivery methods before its in vivo clinical potential can be realized. PMID:25423116

  6. Delivery of siRNA to ovarian cancer cells using laser-activated carbon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aritra; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The RNAi-mediated knockdown of gene expression is an attractive tool for research and therapeutic purposes but its implementation is challenging. Here we report on a new method based on photoacoustic delivery of siRNA developed to address some of these challenges. Materials & methods Physical properties and photoacoustic emission of carbon black (CB) particles upon near-infrared laser irradiation were characterized. Next, ovarian cancer cells Hey A8-F8 were exposed to near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses in the presence of siRNA targeting EGFR gene and CB particles. The intracellular delivery of siRNA and silencing of the target gene were determined by specific qPCR assays. Results & conclusion Laser-activated CB nanoparticles generated photoacoustic emission and enabled intracellular delivery of siRNA and significant knockdown of its target EGFR mRNA. This physical method represents a new promising approach to targeted therapeutic delivery of siRNA. PMID:26080699

  7. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  8. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  9. EGFP-Based Protein Nanoparticles with Cell-Penetrating Peptide for Efficient siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xingang; Hu, Xiuli; Cui, Fengchao; Li, Yunqi; Jing, Xiabing; Xie, Zhigang

    2015-11-01

    Development of an innovative nucleic acid nanocarriers still represents a challenge. In this study, we develop a protein nanoparticle (H6-TatEGFP) and examine its siRNA condensing activity. Gel retardation assay show that protein nanoparticle can condense siRNA into stable nanoparticle/siRNA complexes. UsingCy3-labelled siRNA, we also evaluate siRNA transport characteristic of protein nanoparticles in tumor cells, the results indicate that H6-TatEGFP nanoparticle may be a potential nanocarrier for siRNA in tumor cells. PMID:26109167

  10. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized emulsions: Effect of polymer type and pH on release and topical delivery of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Johann; Otto, Anja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-06-01

    Emulsions are widely used as topical formulations in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. They are thermodynamically unstable and require emulsifiers for stabilization. Studies have indicated that emulsifiers could affect topical delivery of actives, and this study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of different polymers, applied as emulsifiers, as well as the effects of pH on the release and topical delivery of the active. O/w emulsions were prepared by the layer-by-layer technique, with whey protein forming the first layer around the oil droplets, while either chitosan or carrageenan was subsequently adsorbed to the protein at the interface. Additionally, the emulsions were prepared at three different pH values to introduce different charges to the polymers. The active ingredient, salicylic acid, was incorporated into the oil phase of the emulsions. Physical characterization of the resulting formulations, i.e., droplet size, zeta potential, stability, and turbidity in the water phase, was performed. Release studies were conducted, after which skin absorption studies were performed on the five most stable emulsions, by using Franz type diffusion cells and utilizing human, abdominal skin membranes. It was found that an increase in emulsion droplet charge could negatively affect the release of salicylic acid from these formulations. Contrary, positively charged emulsion droplets were found to enhance dermal and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from emulsions. It was hypothesized that electrostatic complex formation between the emulsifier and salicylic acid could affect its release, whereas electrostatic interaction between the emulsion droplets and skin could influence dermal/transdermal delivery of the active. PMID:24550100

  11. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  12. A phospholipase A1 antibacterial Type VI secretion effector interacts directly with the C-terminal domain of the VgrG spike protein for delivery.

    PubMed

    Flaugnatti, Nicolas; Le, Thi Thu Hang; Canaan, Stéphane; Aschtgen, Marie-Stéphanie; Nguyen, Van Son; Blangy, Stéphanie; Kellenberger, Christine; Roussel, Alain; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Journet, Laure

    2016-03-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a multiprotein machine that delivers protein effectors in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, allowing interbacterial competition and virulence. The mechanism of action of the T6SS requires the contraction of a sheath-like structure that propels a needle towards target cells, allowing the delivery of protein effectors. Here, we provide evidence that the entero-aggregative Escherichia coli Sci-1 T6SS is required to eliminate competitor bacteria. We further identify Tle1, a toxin effector encoded by this cluster and showed that Tle1 possesses phospholipase A1 and A2 activities required for the interbacterial competition. Self-protection of the attacker cell is secured by an outer membrane lipoprotein, Tli1, which binds Tle1 in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio with nanomolar affinity, and inhibits its phospholipase activity. Tle1 is delivered into the periplasm of the prey cells using the VgrG1 needle spike protein as carrier. Further analyses demonstrate that the C-terminal extension domain of VgrG1, including a transthyretin-like domain, is responsible for the interaction with Tle1 and its subsequent delivery into target cells. Based on these results, we propose an additional mechanism of transport of T6SS effectors in which cognate effectors are selected by specific motifs located at the C-terminus of VgrG proteins. PMID:26714038

  13. Light-Activated Nuclear Translocation of Adeno-Associated Virus Nanoparticles Using Phytochrome B for Enhanced, Tunable, and Spatially Programmable Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eric J; Gerhardt, Karl; Judd, Justin; Tabor, Jeffrey J; Suh, Junghae

    2016-01-26

    Gene delivery vectors that are activated by external stimuli may allow improved control over the location and the degree of gene expression in target populations of cells. Light is an attractive stimulus because it does not cross-react with cellular signaling networks, has negligible toxicity, is noninvasive, and can be applied in space and time with unparalleled precision. We used the previously engineered red (R)/far-red (FR) light-switchable protein phytochrome B (PhyB) and its R light dependent interaction partner phytochrome interacting factor 6 (PIF6) from Arabidopsis thaliana to engineer an adeno-associated virus (AAV) platform whose gene delivery efficiency is controlled by light. Upon exposure to R light, AAV engineered to display PIF6 motifs on the capsid bind to PhyB tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), resulting in significantly increased translocation of viruses into the host cell nucleus and overall gene delivery efficiency. By modulating the ratio of R to FR light, the gene delivery efficiency can be tuned to as little as 35% or over 600% of the unengineered AAV. We also demonstrate spatial control of gene delivery using projected patterns of codelivered R and FR light. Overall, our successful use of light-switchable proteins in virus capsid engineering extends these important optogenetic tools into the adjacent realm of nucleic acid delivery and enables enhanced, tunable, and spatially controllable regulation of viral gene delivery. Our current light-triggered viral gene delivery prototype may be broadly useful for genetic manipulation of cells ex vivo or in vivo in transgenic model organisms, with the ultimate prospect of achieving dose- and site-specific gene expression profiles for either therapeutic (e.g., regenerative medicine) or fundamental discovery research efforts. PMID:26618393

  14. Petunia nectar proteins have ribonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Melissa S; Liu, Xiaoteng; Liu, Guangyu; Thornburg, Robert W; Macintosh, Gustavo C

    2010-06-01

    Plants requiring an insect pollinator often produce nectar as a reward for the pollinator's visitations. This rich secretion needs mechanisms to inhibit microbial growth. In Nicotiana spp. nectar, anti-microbial activity is due to the production of hydrogen peroxide. In a close relative, Petunia hybrida, limited production of hydrogen peroxide was found; yet petunia nectar still has anti-bacterial properties, suggesting that a different mechanism may exist for this inhibition. The nectar proteins of petunia plants were compared with those of ornamental tobacco and significant differences were found in protein profiles and function between these two closely related species. Among those proteins, RNase activities unique to petunia nectar were identified. The genes corresponding to four RNase T2 proteins from Petunia hybrida that show unique expression patterns in different plant tissues were cloned. Two of these enzymes, RNase Phy3 and RNase Phy4 are unique among the T2 family and contain characteristics similar to both S- and S-like RNases. Analysis of amino acid patterns suggest that these proteins are an intermediate between S- and S-like RNases, and support the hypothesis that S-RNases evolved from defence RNases expressed in floral parts. This is the first report of RNase activities in nectar. PMID:20460362

  15. Petunia nectar proteins have ribonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Hillwig, Melissa S.; Liu, Xiaoteng; Liu, Guangyu; Thornburg, Robert W.; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2010-01-01

    Plants requiring an insect pollinator often produce nectar as a reward for the pollinator's visitations. This rich secretion needs mechanisms to inhibit microbial growth. In Nicotiana spp. nectar, anti-microbial activity is due to the production of hydrogen peroxide. In a close relative, Petunia hybrida, limited production of hydrogen peroxide was found; yet petunia nectar still has anti-bacterial properties, suggesting that a different mechanism may exist for this inhibition. The nectar proteins of petunia plants were compared with those of ornamental tobacco and significant differences were found in protein profiles and function between these two closely related species. Among those proteins, RNase activities unique to petunia nectar were identified. The genes corresponding to four RNase T2 proteins from Petunia hybrida that show unique expression patterns in different plant tissues were cloned. Two of these enzymes, RNase Phy3 and RNase Phy4 are unique among the T2 family and contain characteristics similar to both S- and S-like RNases. Analysis of amino acid patterns suggest that these proteins are an intermediate between S- and S-like RNases, and support the hypothesis that S-RNases evolved from defence RNases expressed in floral parts. This is the first report of RNase activities in nectar. PMID:20460362

  16. Macrophages offer a paradigm switch for CNS delivery of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Klyachko, Natalia L; Haney, Matthew J; Zhao, Yuling; Manickam, Devika S; Mahajan, Vivek; Suresh, Poornima; Hingtgen, Shawn D; Mosley, R Lee; Gendelman, Howard E; Kabanov, Alexander V; Batrakova, Elena V

    2013-01-01

    Aims Active targeted transport of the nanoformulated redox enzyme, catalase, in macrophages attenuates oxidative stress and as such increases survival of dopaminergic neurons in animal models of Parkinson’s disease. Optimization of the drug formulation is crucial for the successful delivery in living cells. We demonstrated earlier that packaging of catalase into a polyion complex micelle (‘nanozyme’) with a synthetic polyelectrolyte block copolymer protected the enzyme against degradation in macrophages and improved therapeutic outcomes. We now report the manufacture of nanozymes with superior structure and therapeutic indices. Methods Synthesis, characterization and therapeutic efficacy of optimal cell-based nanoformulations are evaluated. Results A formulation design for drug carriers typically works to avoid entrapment in monocytes and macrophages focusing on small-sized nanoparticles with a polyethylene glycol corona (to provide a stealth effect). By contrast, the best nanozymes for delivery in macrophages reported in this study have a relatively large size (~200 nm), which resulted in improved loading capacity and release from macrophages. Furthermore, the cross-linking of nanozymes with the excess of a nonbiodegradable linker ensured their low cytotoxicity, and efficient catalase protection in cell carriers. Finally, the ‘alternatively activated’ macrophage phenotype (M2) utilized in these studies did not promote further inflammation in the brain, resulting in a subtle but statistically significant effect on neuronal regeneration and repair in vivo. Conclusion The optimized cross-linked nanozyme loaded into macrophages reduced neuroinflammatory responses and increased neuronal survival in mice. Importantly, the approach for nanoformulation design for cell-mediated delivery is different from the common requirements for injectable formulations. PMID:24237263

  17. Genome activation by raspberry bushy dwarf virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Stuart A; McGavin, Wendy J

    2009-03-01

    Two sets of infectious cDNA clones of raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) have been constructed, enabling either the synthesis of infectious RNA transcripts or the delivery of infectious binary plasmid DNA by infiltration of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In whole plants and in protoplasts, inoculation of RBDV RNA1 and RNA2 transcripts led to a low level of infection, which was greatly increased by the addition of RNA3, a subgenomic RNA coding for the RBDV coat protein (CP). Agroinfiltration of RNA1 and RNA2 constructs did not produce a detectable infection but, again, inclusion of a construct encoding the CP led to high levels of infection. Thus, RBDV replication is greatly stimulated by the presence of the CP, a mechanism that also operates with ilarviruses and alfalfa mosaic virus, where it is referred to as genome activation. Mutation to remove amino acids from the N terminus of the CP showed that the first 15 RBDV CP residues are not required for genome activation. Other experiments, in which overlapping regions at the CP N terminus were fused to the monomeric red fluorescent protein, showed that sequences downstream of the first 48 aa are not absolutely required for genome activation. PMID:19218221

  18. CW/pulsed NIR irradiation of gold nanorods: effect on transdermal protein delivery mediated by photothermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hengmin; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Niidome, Yasuro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki; Niidome, Takuro

    2013-10-28

    Transdermal delivery is a useful and attractive method for drug delivery, even though the stratum corneum is a major barrier of protein translocation into the skin. To achieve protein delivery through the stratum corneum, we first cast gold nanorods, acting as a heating device in response to near-infrared light irradiation, onto the skin surface. After applying an aqueous solution of ovalbumin to the skin, the skin was irradiated by near-infrared laser light. Irradiation of the skin using a continuous-wave laser increased the skin temperature resulting in an efficient translocation of ovalbumin into the skin. Furthermore, migration of inflammation cells and induction heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were observed. Irradiation of the skin using a pulsed laser caused an enhanced permeability of the stratum corneum without an increase in skin temperature, migration of inflammation cells, or HSP70 induction. This effect is due to the pulsed-laser irradiation increasing the temperature of a limited part of the skin surface. Thus, the physiological response of skin is dependent on the type of laser light used. It is anticipated that this phenomenon will find wide application in such applications as, for example, general transdermal protein delivery and transdermal vaccination. PMID:23863449

  19. Protein-engineered block-copolymers as stem cell delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilshorn, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current delivery protocols are inadequate. Transplantation by direct injection, which is clinically preferred for its minimal invasiveness, commonly results in less than 5% cell viability, greatly inhibiting clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we show that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. Building on these fundamental studies, we have designed a reproducible, bio-resorbable, customizable hydrogel using protein-engineering technology. In our Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH), network assembly is driven by specific and stoichiometric peptide-peptide binding interactions. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the network crosslinking density, sol-gel phase behavior, and gel mechanics. This is in contrast to many other physical hydrogels, where predictable tuning of bulk mechanics from the molecular level remains elusive due to the reliance on non-specific and non-stoichiometric chain interactions for network formation. Furthermore, the hydrogel network can be easily modified to deliver a variety of bioactive payloads including growth factors, peptide drugs, and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, we demonstrate that these materials may significantly improve transplanted stem cell retention and function.

  20. Tragacanth as an oral peptide and protein delivery carrier: Characterization and mucoadhesion.

    PubMed

    Nur, M; Ramchandran, L; Vasiljevic, T

    2016-06-01

    Biopolymers such as tragacanth, an anionic polysaccharide gum, can be alternative polymeric carrier for physiologically important peptides and proteins. Characterization of tragacanth is thus essential for providing a foundation for possible applications. Rheological studies colloidal solution of tragacanth at pH 3, 5 or 7 were carried out by means of steady shear and small amplitude oscillatory measurements. Tragacanth mucoadhesivity was also analyzed using an applicable rheological method and compared to chitosan, alginate and PVP. The particle size and zeta potential were measured by a zetasizer. Thermal properties of solutions were obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry. The solution exhibited shear-thinning characteristics. The value of the storage modulus (G') and the loss modulus (G″) increased with an increase in angular frequency (Ω). In all cases, loss modulus values were higher than storage values (G″>G') and viscous character was, therefore, dominant. Tragacanth and alginate showed a good mucoadhesion. Tragacanth upon dispersion created particles of a submicron size with a negative zeta potential (-7.98 to -11.92mV). These properties were pH dependant resulting in acid gel formation at pH 3.5. Tragacanth has thus a potential to be used as an excipient for peptide/protein delivery. PMID:27083363

  1. Protein encapsulated magnetic carriers for micro/nanoscale drug delivery systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y.; Kaminski, M. D.; Mertz, C. J.; Finck, M. R.; Guy, S. G.; Chen, H.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2005-01-01

    Novel methods for drug delivery may be based on nanotechnology using non-invasive magnetic guidance of drug loaded magnetic carriers to the targeted site and thereafter released by external ultrasound energy. The key building block of this system is to successfully synthesize biodegradable, magnetic drug carriers. Magnetic carriers using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) as matrix materials were loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) by a double-emulsion technique. BSA-loaded magnetic microspheres were characterized for size, morphology, surface charge, and magnetization. The BSA encapsulation efficiency was determined by recovering albumin from the microspheres using dimethyl sulfoxide and 0.05N NaOH/0.5% SDS then quantifying with the Micro-BCA protein assay. BSA release profiles were also determined by the Micro-BCA protein assay. The microspheres had drug encapsulation efficiencies up to 90% depending on synthesis parameters. Particles were spherical with a smooth or porous surface having a size range less than 5 {mu}m. The surface charge (expressed as zeta potential) was near neutral, optimal for prolonged intravascular survival. The magnetization of these BSA loaded magnetic carriers was 2 to 6 emu/g, depending on the specific magnetic materials used during synthesis.

  2. Hydrogel Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Enhances Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Yang, Shu-Rui; Brey, Eric M.; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of bone tissue engineering for repairing bone defects has gradually shown some satisfactory progress. One of the concerns raising scientific attention is the poor supply of growth factors. A number of growth factor delivery approaches have been developed for promoting bone formation. However, there is no systematic comparison of those approaches on efficiency of neobone formation. In this study, the approaches using periosteum, direct supply of growth factors, or gene transfection of growth factors were evaluated to determine the osteogenic capacity on the repair of bone defect. Methods: In total, 42 male 21-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g were used as the bone defect model to evaluate the bone repair efficiency. Various tissue engineered constructs of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLLA) copolymer hydrogel with periosteum, with external supply of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), or with BMP2-transfected bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were filled in a 7-mm bone defect region. Animals were euthanized at 3 months, and the hydrogel constructs were harvested. The evaluation with histological staining and radiography analysis were performed for the volume of new bone formation. Results: The PEG-PLLA scaffold with BMMSCs promotes bone regeneration with the addition of periosteum. The group with BMP2-transfected BMMSCs demonstrated the largest volume of new bone among all the testing groups. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study provide the evidence that the combination of PEG-PLLA hydrogels with BMMSCs and sustained delivery of BMP2 resulted in the maximal bone regeneration. PMID:27622106

  3. Keratin sponge/hydrogel II, active agent delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Keratin sponge/hydrogels from oxidation and reduction hydrolysis of fine and coarse wool fibers were formed to behave as cationic hydrogels to swell and release active agents in the specific region of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Their porous, interpenetrating networks (IPN) were effective for...

  4. Nitroxide delivery system for Nrf2 activation and skin protection.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehuda Greenwald, Maya; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Soroka, Yoram; Sasson, Shmuel Ben; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet; Bitton, Ronit; Kohen, Ron

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic nitroxides are a large group of compounds composed of diverse stable radicals also known as synthetic antioxidants. Although nitroxides are valuable for use in several skin conditions, in in vivo conditions they have several drawbacks, such as nonspecific dispersion in normal tissue, preferential renal clearance and rapid reduction of the nitroxide to the corresponding hydroxylamine. However, these drawbacks can be easily addressed by encapsulating the nitroxides within microemulsions. This approach would allow nitroxide activity and therefore their valuable effects (e.g. activation of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway) to continue. In this work, nitroxides were encapsulated in a microemulsion composed of biocompatible ingredients. The nanometric size and shape of the vehicle microemulsion and nitroxide microemulsion displayed high similarity, indicating that the stability of the microemulsions was preserved. Our studies demonstrated that nitroxide microemulsions were more potent inducers of the Keap1-Nrf2-EpRE pathway than the free nitroxides, causing the activation of phase II enzymes. Moreover, microemulsions containing nitroxides significantly reduced UVB-induced cytotoxicity in the skin. Understanding the mechanism of this improved activity may expand the usage of many other Nrf2 modulating molecules in encapsulated form, as a skin protection strategy against oxidative stress-related conditions. PMID:25986586

  5. Protein Modification with Amphiphilic Block Copoly(2-oxazoline)s as a New Platform for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Luxenhofer, Robert; Yi, Xiang; Jordan, Rainer; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Several homo-, random and block copolymers based on poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) were synthesized and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using biodegradable and non-biodegradable linkers. These conjugates were characterized by amino group titration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), isoelectric focusing, enzymatic activity assay and conformation analysis. The conjugates contained on average from about one to two polymer chains per enzyme. From 70% to 90% of enzymatic activity was retained in most cases. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed that HRP modification affected the secondary structure of the apoprotein but did not affect the tertiary structure and heme environment. Enhanced cellular uptake was found in the conjugates of two block copolymers using both MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells, but not in the conjugates of random copolymer and homopolymer. Conjugation with a block copolymer of 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and 2-butyl-2-oxazoline led to the highest cellular uptake as compared to other conjugates. Our data indicates that modification with amphiphilic POx has the potential to modulate and enhance cellular delivery of proteins. PMID:20550191

  6. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood-brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders. PMID:26727042

  7. Protein Delivery of an Artificial Transcription Factor Restores Widespread Ube3a Expression in an Angelman Syndrome Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bailus, Barbara J; Pyles, Benjamin; McAlister, Michelle M; O'Geen, Henriette; Lockwood, Sarah H; Adams, Alexa N; Nguyen, Jennifer Trang T; Yu, Abigail; Berman, Robert F; Segal, David J

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological genetic disorder caused by loss of expression of the maternal copy of UBE3A in the brain. Due to brain-specific genetic imprinting at this locus, the paternal UBE3A is silenced by a long antisense transcript. Inhibition of the antisense transcript could lead to unsilencing of paternal UBE3A, thus providing a therapeutic approach for AS. However, widespread delivery of gene regulators to the brain remains challenging. Here, we report an engineered zinc finger-based artificial transcription factor (ATF) that, when injected i.p. or s.c., crossed the blood–brain barrier and increased Ube3a expression in the brain of an adult mouse model of AS. The factor displayed widespread distribution throughout the brain. Immunohistochemistry of both the hippocampus and cerebellum revealed an increase in Ube3a upon treatment. An ATF containing an alternative DNA-binding domain did not activate Ube3a. We believe this to be the first report of an injectable engineered zinc finger protein that can cause widespread activation of an endogenous gene in the brain. These observations have important implications for the study and treatment of AS and other neurological disorders. PMID:26727042

  8. Online Delivery as a Course Adjunct Promotes Active Learning and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, J. Scott; Harrison, Marissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Chickering and Gamson's notable summary of the best practices of undergraduate teaching include promoting active learning, cooperation, and student-faculty contact. The present study hypothesized that online delivery of lecture prior to course meetings allows more in-class time to achieve these goals. Students in a control group received a…

  9. Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular nanoparticles for gene delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Ravinathan, Screenath P; Xue, Lizhe; Li, Nan; Zhang, Yingjian; Zhou, Linzhu; Cao, Chengxi; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-06-28

    Dual-responsive aggregation-induced emission-active supramolecular fluorescent nanoparticles are reported, which have the ability to undergo a unique morphological transition combining with a cooperative optical variation in response to pH and light stimuli. The dynamic supramolecular nanoparticles show excellent biocompatibility and effective plasmid DNA condensation capability, further achieving efficient in vitro gene delivery and bioimaging. PMID:27251637

  10. 76 FR 82315 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry/Immediate Delivery Application and Simplified Entry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (76 FR 66740) on October 27, 2011, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry/Immediate Delivery Application and Simplified Entry AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department...

  11. Utilization of modified surfactant-associated protein B for delivery of DNA to airway cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Baatz, J E; Bruno, M D; Ciraolo, P J; Glasser, S W; Stripp, B R; Smyth, K L; Korfhagen, T R

    1994-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the airway epithelium and creates a potential barrier to successful transfection of the epithelium in vivo. Based on the functional properties of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) and the fact that this protein is neither toxic nor immunogenic in the airway, we hypothesized that SP-B could be modified to deliver DNA to airway cells. We have modified native bovine SP-B by the covalent linkage of poly(lysine) (average molecular mass of 3.3 or 10 kDa) to the N terminus of SP-B and formed complexes between a test plasmid and the modified SP-B. Transfection efficiency was determined by transfection of pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells (H441) in culture with the test plasmid pCPA-RSV followed by measurement of activity of the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfections were performed with DNA.protein complexes using poly(lysine)10kDa-SP-B ([Lys]10kDa-SP-B) or poly(lysine)3.3kDa-SP-B ([Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B), and results were compared with transfections using unmodified poly(lysine).DNA, unmodified SP-B.DNA, or DNA only. For [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV preparations, CAT activity was readily detectable above the background of [Lys]3.3kDa-SP-B or unmodified SP-B. The SP-B-poly(lysine) conjugates were effective over a broad range of protein-to-DNA molar ratios, although they were optimal at approximately 500:1-1000:1. Transfection efficiency varied with the tested cell line but was not specific to airway cells. Addition of replication-defective adenovirus to the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex enhanced CAT activity about 30-fold with respect to that produced by the [Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex alone. This increase suggests routing of the adenoviral.[Lys]10kDa-SP-B.pCPA-RSV complex through an endosomal pathway. Effects of covalent modification on the secondary structure of SP-B were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Results of FTIR indicated that the conformation of [Lys]10kDa-SP-B was

  12. Preparation, characterization, and safety evaluation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for protein delivery into macrophages.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Anne-Sophie; Kell, Arnold J; Barnes, Michael; Stals, Sandra; Gonçalves, David; Girard, Denis; Lavigne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Following infection, HIV establishes reservoirs within tissues that are inaccessible to optimal levels of antiviral drugs or within cells where HIV lies latent, thus escaping the action of anti-HIV drugs. Macrophages are a persistent reservoir for HIV and may contribute to the rebound viremia observed after antiretroviral treatment is stopped. In this study, we further investigate the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based nanocarriers as a new strategy to enhance penetration of therapeutic molecules into macrophages. We have prepared stable PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated their capacity to transport an active molecule into the human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a proof-of-concept compound. Intracellular localization of fluorescent BSA molecules encapsulated into PLGA NPs was monitored in live cells using confocal microscopy, and cellular uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. In vitro and in vivo toxicological studies were performed to further determine the safety profile of PLGA NPs including inflammatory effects. The size of the PLGA NPs carrying BSA (PLGA-BSA) in culture medium containing 10% serum was ~126 nm in diameter, and they were negatively charged at their surface (zeta potential =-5.6 mV). Our confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry data showed that these PLGA-BSA NPs are rapidly and efficiently taken up by THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) at low doses. We found that PLGA-BSA NPs increased cellular uptake and internalization of the protein in vitro. PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for THP-1 MDM cells, did not modulate neutrophil apoptosis in vitro, and did not show inflammatory effect in vivo in the murine air pouch model of acute inflammation. In contrast to BSA alone, BSA encapsulated into PLGA NPs increased leukocyte infiltration in vivo, suggesting the in vivo enhanced delivery and protection of the protein by the polymer nanocarrier. We demonstrated that PLGA

  13. Preparation, characterization, and safety evaluation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for protein delivery into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Anne-Sophie; Kell, Arnold J; Barnes, Michael; Stals, Sandra; Gonçalves, David; Girard, Denis; Lavigne, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Following infection, HIV establishes reservoirs within tissues that are inaccessible to optimal levels of antiviral drugs or within cells where HIV lies latent, thus escaping the action of anti-HIV drugs. Macrophages are a persistent reservoir for HIV and may contribute to the rebound viremia observed after antiretroviral treatment is stopped. In this study, we further investigate the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based nanocarriers as a new strategy to enhance penetration of therapeutic molecules into macrophages. We have prepared stable PLGA nanoparticles (NPs) and evaluated their capacity to transport an active molecule into the human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1 using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a proof-of-concept compound. Intracellular localization of fluorescent BSA molecules encapsulated into PLGA NPs was monitored in live cells using confocal microscopy, and cellular uptake was quantified by flow cytometry. In vitro and in vivo toxicological studies were performed to further determine the safety profile of PLGA NPs including inflammatory effects. The size of the PLGA NPs carrying BSA (PLGA-BSA) in culture medium containing 10% serum was ~126 nm in diameter, and they were negatively charged at their surface (zeta potential =−5.6 mV). Our confocal microscopy studies and flow cytometry data showed that these PLGA-BSA NPs are rapidly and efficiently taken up by THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) at low doses. We found that PLGA-BSA NPs increased cellular uptake and internalization of the protein in vitro. PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for THP-1 MDM cells, did not modulate neutrophil apoptosis in vitro, and did not show inflammatory effect in vivo in the murine air pouch model of acute inflammation. In contrast to BSA alone, BSA encapsulated into PLGA NPs increased leukocyte infiltration in vivo, suggesting the in vivo enhanced delivery and protection of the protein by the polymer nanocarrier. We demonstrated that PLGA

  14. Physical Activity Program Delivery by Professionals versus Volunteers: the TEAM Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Cynthia M.; Pruitt, Leslie A.; Buman, Matthew P.; King, Abby C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors. Design A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003–2008. Setting/participants: Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Intervention Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition. Main Outcome Measures: Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the CHAMPS Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery. Results At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content. Conclusions This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings. PMID:21553972

  15. Delivery of active agents from chewing gum for improved remineralization.

    PubMed

    Dodds, M W J; Chidichimo, D; Haas, M S

    2012-09-01

    Most surrogate measures of caries were developed to test products containing fluoride, typically at relatively high and closely controlled oral concentrations. However, since the primary mechanism for the remineralization of early enamel caries lesions by chewing gum is through stimulation of saliva, delivering Ca and Pi to the demineralized enamel lesion, established methods may lack the sensitivity to detect the additional benefit of an active agent without the strong remineralizing potential of fluoride. Issues related to the release of active agents from the gum matrix, dilution in the saliva, and limited oral retention time, along with taste, safety, regulatory, and cost concerns, impose further limitations. This paper reviews the efficacy of some active agents used in chewing gum for improved remineralization and includes results from in situ testing of calcium-containing gums, including calcium lactate, tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, calcium citrate/encapsulated phosphate, and a calcium lactate/sodium phosphate blend. Despite promising in vitro data from these agents, they did not provide consistently superior results from in situ testing. There is a need to develop better predictive in vitro models for chewing gum, as well as improved sensitivity of in situ models to discriminate relatively small amounts of remineralization against a background of high biological variability. PMID:22899681

  16. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  17. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  18. Quantitative Measurement of Protease-Activity with Correction of Probe Delivery and Tissue Absorption Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Fred; Tam, Jenny M.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of pathologies from heart disease to cancer. Quantitative measurement of protease activity is possible using a novel spectrally matched dual fluorophore probe and a small animal lifetime imager. The recorded fluorescence from an activatable fluorophore, one that changes its fluorescent amplitude after biological target interaction, is also influenced by other factors including imaging probe delivery and optical tissue absorption of excitation and emission light. Fluorescence from a second spectrally matched constant (non-activatable) fluorophore on each nanoparticle platform can be used to correct for both probe delivery and tissue absorption. The fluorescence from each fluorophore is separated using fluorescence lifetime methods. PMID:20161242

  19. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  20. [Mitogen-activated protein kinases in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bryk, Dorota; Olejarz, Wioletta; Zapolska-Downar, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades, in which MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinases) intermediate, are responsible for a biological response of a cell to an external stimulus. MAP kinases, which include ERK1/2 (extracellular signalling-regulated kinase), JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p 38 MAPK, regulate the activity of many proteins, enzymes and transcription factors and thus have a wide spectrum of biological effects. Many basic scientific studies have defined numerous details of their pathway organization and activation. There are also more and more studies suggesting that individual MAP kinases probably play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. They may mediate inflammatory processes, endothelial cell activation, monocyte/macrophage recruitment and activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and T-lymphocyte differentiation, all of which represent crucial mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The specific inhibition of an activity of the respective MAP kinases may prove a new therapeutic approach to attenuate atherosclerotic plaque formation in the future. In this paper, we review the current state of knowledge concerning MAP kinase-dependent cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis. PMID:24491891

  1. Potential of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein-Derived Protein Transduction Domains as Antigen Carriers for Nasal Vaccine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hae-Duck; Lee, Joohyun; Jin, Xing-Hai; Lee, Kyunglim

    2016-09-01

    Nasal vaccination offers a promising alternative to intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination because it can induce both mucosal and systemic immunity. However, its major drawback is poor absorption of large antigens in the nasal epithelium. Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides, have been proposed as vehicles for nasal delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. Here, we evaluated the potential of a mutant PTD derived from translationally controlled tumor protein (designated TCTP-PTD 13) as an antigen carrier for nasal vaccines. We first compared the l- and d-forms of TCTP-PTD 13 isomers (l- or d-TCTP-PTD 13) as antigen carriers. Studies in mice demonstrated that nasally administered mixtures of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) and d-TCTP-PTD 13 induced higher plasma IgG titers and secretory IgA levels in nasal washes than nasally administered OVA alone, OVA/l-TCTP-PTD 13, or i.m.-injected OVA. Plasma IgG subclass responses (IgG1 and IgG2a) of mice nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 showed that the predominant IgG subclass was IgG1, indicating a Th2-biased immune response. We also used synthetic CpG oligonucleotides (CpG) as a Th1 immune response-inducing adjuvant. Nasally administered CpG plus OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13 was superior in eliciting systemic and mucosal immune responses compared to those induced by nasally administered OVA/d-TCTP-PTD 13. Furthermore, the OVA/CpG/d-TCTP-PTD 13 combination skewed IgG1 and IgG2a profiles of humoral immune responses toward a Th1 profile. These findings suggest that TCTP-derived PTD is a suitable vehicle to efficiently carry antigens and to induce more powerful antigen-specific immune responses and a more balanced Th1/Th2 response when combined with a DNA adjuvant. PMID:27454469

  2. Acoustically active liposome-nanobubble complexes for enhanced ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An T; Wrenn, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is well known as a safe, reliable imaging modality. A historical limitation of ultrasound, however, was its inability to resolve structures at length scales less than nominally 20 µm, which meant that classical ultrasound could not be used in applications such as echocardiography and angiogenesis where one requires the ability to image small blood vessels. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents, or microbubbles, removed this limitation and ushered in a new wave of enhanced ultrasound applications. In recent years, the microbubbles have been designed to achieve yet another application, namely ultrasound-triggered drug delivery. Ultrasound contrast agents are thus tantamount to 'theranostic' vehicles, meaning they can do both therapy (drug delivery) and imaging (diagnostics). The use of ultrasound contrast agents as drug delivery vehicles, however, is perhaps less than ideal when compared to traditional drug delivery vehicles (e.g., polymeric microcapsules and liposomes) which have greater drug carrying capacities. The drawback of the traditional drug delivery vehicles is that they are not naturally acoustically active and cannot be used for imaging. The notion of a theranostic vehicle is sufficiently intriguing that many attempts have been made in recent years to achieve a vehicle that combines the echogenicity of microbubbles with the drug carrying capacity of liposomes. The attempts can be classified into three categories, namely entrapping, tethering, and nesting. Of these, nesting is the newest-and perhaps the most promising. PMID:24459007

  3. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    PubMed

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. PMID:27586341

  4. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  5. G-quartet oligonucleotide mediated delivery of proteins into photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium via intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Leaderer, Derek; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2016-04-01

    There is currently no available method to efficiently deliver proteins across the plasma membrane of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in vivo. Thus, current clinical application of recombinant proteins in ophthalmology is limited to the use of proteins that perform their biological function extracellularly. The ability to traverse biological membranes would enable the mobilization of a significantly larger number of proteins with previously well characterized properties. Nucleolin is abundantly present on the surface of rapidly dividing cells including cancer cells. Surprisingly, nucleolin is also present on the surface of photoreceptor cell bodies. Here we investigated whether nucleolin can be utilized as a gateway for the delivery of proteins into retinal cells following intravitreal injection. AS1411 is a G-quartet aptamer capable of targeting nucleolin. Subsequent to intravitreal injection, fluorescently labeled AS1411 localized to various retinal cell types including the photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411 linked to streptavidin (a ∼50 kDa protein) via a biotin bridge enabled the uptake of Streptavidin into photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411-Streptavidin conjugate applied topically to the cornea allowed for uptake of the conjugate into the nucleus and cytoplasm of corneal endothelial cells. Clinical relevance of AS1411 as a delivery vehicle was strongly indicated by demonstration of the presence of cell surface nucleolin on the photoreceptors, inner neurons and ganglion cells of human retina. These data support exploration of AS1411 as a means of delivering therapeutic proteins to diseased retina. PMID:26923800

  6. Awake Intranasal Insulin Delivery Modifies Protein Complexes and Alters Memory, Anxiety, and Olfactory Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Marks, D.R.; Tucker, K.; Cavallin, M.A.; Mast, T.G.; Fadool, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of Diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal co-morbidities. The insulin receptor kinase (IR) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb (OB), where it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a seven day intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and post-synaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor-discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made pre-diabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors. PMID:19458242

  7. A new biocompatible delivery scaffold containing heparin and bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    Thanyaphoo, Suphannee; Kaewsrichan, Jasadee

    2016-09-01

    Silicon-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) was developed in our laboratory as a biomaterial for delivery in bone tissue engineering. It was fabricated as a 3D-construct of scaffolds using chitosan-trisodium polyphosphate (TPP) cross-linked networks. In this study, heparin was covalently bonded to the residual -NH2 groups of chitosan on the scaffold applying carbodiimide chemistry. Bonded heparin was not leached away from scaffold surfaces upon vigorous washing or extended storage. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) was bound to conjugated scaffolds by ionic interactions between the negatively charged SO42- clusters of heparin and positively charged amino acids of rhBMP-2. The resulting scaffolds were inspected for bone regenerative capacity by subcutaneous implanting in rats. Histological observation and mineralization assay were performed after 4 weeks of implantation. Results from both in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest the potential of the developed scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications in the future. PMID:27383886

  8. Stimulation of bone healing by sustained bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) delivery.

    PubMed

    Faßbender, Mirja; Minkwitz, Susann; Strobel, Catrin; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein2 (BMP-2) incorporated in a polymeric implant coating on bone healing. In vitro analysis revealed a sustained, but incomplete BMP-2 release until Day 42. For the in vivo study, the rat tibia osteotomy was stabilized either with control or BMP-2 coated wires, and the healing progress was followed by micro computed tomography (µCT), biomechanical testing and histology at Days 10, 28, 42 and 84. MicroCT showed an accelerated formation of mineralized callus, as well as remodeling and an increase of mineralized/total callus volume (p=0.021) at Day 42 in the BMP-2 group compared to the control. Histology revealed an increased callus mineralization at Days 42 and 84 (p=0.006) with reduced cartilage at Day 84 (p=0.004) in the BMP-2 group. Biomechanical stiffness was significantly higher in the BMP-2 group (p=0.045) at Day 42. In summary, bone healing was enhanced after sustained BMP-2 application compared to the control. Using the same drug delivery system, but a burst release of BMP-2, a previous published study showed a similar positive effect on bone healing. Distinct differences in the healing outcome might be explained due to the different BMP release kinetics and dosages. However, further studies are necessary to adapt the optimal release profiles to physiological mechanisms. PMID:24830556

  9. Stimulation of Bone Healing by Sustained Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2) Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Faßbender, Mirja; Minkwitz, Susann; Strobel, Catrin; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Wildemann, Britt

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of a sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein2 (BMP-2) incorporated in a polymeric implant coating on bone healing. In vitro analysis revealed a sustained, but incomplete BMP-2 release until Day 42. For the in vivo study, the rat tibia osteotomy was stabilized either with control or BMP-2 coated wires, and the healing progress was followed by micro computed tomography (μCT), biomechanical testing and histology at Days 10, 28, 42 and 84. MicroCT showed an accelerated formation of mineralized callus, as well as remodeling and an increase of mineralized/total callus volume (p = 0.021) at Day 42 in the BMP-2 group compared to the control. Histology revealed an increased callus mineralization at Days 42 and 84 (p = 0.006) with reduced cartilage at Day 84 (p = 0.004) in the BMP-2 group. Biomechanical stiffness was significantly higher in the BMP-2 group (p = 0.045) at Day 42. In summary, bone healing was enhanced after sustained BMP-2 application compared to the control. Using the same drug delivery system, but a burst release of BMP-2, a previous published study showed a similar positive effect on bone healing. Distinct differences in the healing outcome might be explained due to the different BMP release kinetics and dosages. However, further studies are necessary to adapt the optimal release profiles to physiological mechanisms. PMID:24830556

  10. Drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D H; Mauger, J W

    1991-10-01

    New and emerging drug delivery systems for traditional drugs and the products of biotechnology are discussed, and the role of the pharmacist in ensuring the appropriate use of these systems is outlined. Advantages of advanced drug delivery systems over traditional systems are the ability to deliver a drug more selectively to a specific site; easier, more accurate, less frequent dosing; decreased variability in systemic drug concentrations; absorption that is more consistent with the site and mechanism of action; and reductions in toxic metabolites. Four basic strategies govern the mechanisms of advanced drug delivery: physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical. Oral drug delivery systems use natural and synthetic polymers to deliver the product to a specific region in the gastrointestinal tract in a timely manner that minimizes adverse effects and increases drug efficacy. Innovations in injectable and implantable delivery systems include emulsions, particulate delivery systems, micromolecular products and macromolecular drug adducts, and enzymatic-controlled delivery. Options for noninvasive drug delivery include the transdermal, respiratory, intranasal, ophthalmic, lymphatic, rectal, intravaginal, and intrauterine routes as well as topical application. Rapid growth is projected in the drug delivery systems market worldwide in the next five years. Genetic engineering has mandated the development of new strategies to deliver biotechnologically derived protein and peptide drugs and chemoimmunoconjugates. The role of the pharmacist in the era of advanced drug delivery systems will be broad based, including administering drugs, compounding, calculating dosages based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic monitoring, counseling, and research. The advent of advanced drug delivery systems offers pharmacists a new opportunity to assume an active role in patient care. PMID:1772110

  11. Detection of protein C activation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K A; Kass, B L; Beeler, D L; Rosenberg, R D

    1984-01-01

    We have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the dodecapeptide that is liberated from protein C when this zymogen is activated by thrombin bound to thrombomodulin present on the vascular endothelium. The protein C activation peptide (PCP) was synthesized using the solid-phase method of Merrifield. Antisera were raised in rabbits to the synthetic analogue coupled to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The antibody population obtained was used together with a 125I-labeled tyrosinated ligand and various concentrations of unlabeled PCP to construct a double antibody RIA capable of measuring as little as 10 pM of this component. We have established that the synthetic dodecapeptide has the same immunoreactivity as the native peptide and that the reactivity of protein C is less than 1/2,000 that of PCP on a molar basis. The extremely low levels of peptide in normal individuals as well as the nonspecific contributions of plasma constituents to the immunoreactive signal, necessitated the development of a procedure by which the PCP could be reproducibly extracted from plasma and concentrated approximately 20-fold. This methodology permitted us to demonstrate that the plasma PCP levels in 17 normal donors averaged 6.47 pM, and that elevations up to 180 pM were observed in individuals with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. The validity of these measurements of protein C activation is supported by the fact that, in both of these situations, the RIA signal migrates on reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography in a manner identical to that of the native dodecapeptide. We have also noted that the mean PCP concentration in seven patients fully anticoagulated with warfarin averaged 2.61 pM. Our studies also show that PCP is cleared from the plasma of primates with a t1/2 of approximately 5 min. Given that the t1/2 of activated protein C is estimated to be 10-15 min, the latter enzyme appears to exert its effects on the activated cofactors of the

  12. Local delivery of mutant CCL2 protein-reduced orthopaedic implant wear particle-induced osteolysis and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  13. Zwitterionic Phosphorylcholine-TPE Conjugate for pH-Responsive Drug Delivery and AIE Active Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangjun; Han, Haijie; Tong, Hongxin; Chen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Ji, Jian; Jin, Qiao

    2016-08-24

    Polymeric micelles have emerged as a promising nanoplatform for cancer theranostics. Herein, we developed doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulated pH-responsive polymeric micelles for combined aggregation induced emission (AIE) imaging and chemotherapy. The novel zwitterionic copolymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine-co-2-(4-formylphenoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (poly(MPC-co-FPEMA)) was synthesized via RAFT polymerization and further converted to PMPC-hyd-TPE after conjugation of tetraphenylethene (TPE, a typical AIE chromophore) via acid-cleavable hydrazone bonds. The AIE activatable copolymer PMPC-hyd-TPE could self-assemble into spherical PC-hyd-TPE micelles, and DOX could be loaded through hydrophobic interactions. The zwitterionic micelles exhibited excellent physiological stability and low protein adsorption due to the stealthy phosphorylcholine (PC) shell. In addition, the cleavage of hydrophobic TPE molecules under acidic conditions could induce swelling of micelles, which was verified by size changes with time at pH 5.0. The in vitro DOX release profile also exhibited accelerated release rate with pH value decreasing from 7.4 to 5.0. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry studies further demonstrated fast internalization and accumulation of drug loaded PC-hyd-TPE-DOX micelles in HepG2 cells, resulting in considerable time/dose-dependent cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, high-quality AIE imaging of PC-hyd-TPE micelles was confirmed in HepG2 cells. Notably, ex vivo imaging study exhibited efficient accumulation and drug release of PC-hyd-TPE-DOX micelles in the tumor tissue. Consequently, the multifunctional micelles with combined nonfouling surface, AIE active imaging, and pH-responsive drug delivery showed great potential as novel nanoplatforms for a new generation of cancer theranostics. PMID:27482632

  14. Crowding Activates Heat Shock Protein 90.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Jackson C; Huang, Bin; Sun, Ming; Street, Timothy O

    2016-03-18

    Hsp90 is a dimeric ATP-dependent chaperone involved in the folding, maturation, and activation of diverse target proteins. Extensive in vitro structural analysis has led to a working model of Hsp90's ATP-driven conformational cycle. An implicit assumption is that dilute experimental conditions do not significantly perturb Hsp90 structure and function. However, Hsp90 undergoes a dramatic open/closed conformational change, which raises the possibility that this assumption may not be valid for this chaperone. Indeed, here we show that the ATPase activity of Hsp90 is highly sensitive to molecular crowding, whereas the ATPase activities of Hsp60 and Hsp70 chaperones are insensitive to crowding conditions. Polymer crowders activate Hsp90 in a non-saturable manner, with increasing efficacy at increasing concentration. Crowders exhibit a non-linear relationship between their radius of gyration and the extent to which they activate Hsp90. This experimental relationship can be qualitatively recapitulated with simple structure-based volume calculations comparing open/closed configurations of Hsp90. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that crowding activation of Hsp90 is entropically driven, which is consistent with a model in which excluded volume provides a driving force that favors the closed active state of Hsp90. Multiple Hsp90 homologs are activated by crowders, with the endoplasmic reticulum-specific Hsp90, Grp94, exhibiting the highest sensitivity. Finally, we find that crowding activation works by a different mechanism than co-chaperone activation and that these mechanisms are independent. We hypothesize that Hsp90 has a higher intrinsic activity in the cell than in vitro. PMID:26797120

  15. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  16. Repeated in vivo electrochemical activation and the biological effects of microelectromechanical systems drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Shawgo, Rebecca S; Voskerician, Gabriela; Duc, Hong Linh Ho; Li, Yawen; Lynn, Aaron; MacEwan, Matthew; Langer, Robert; Anderson, James M; Cima, Michael J

    2004-12-15

    The repeated activation of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) drug delivery device was studied in vivo in rats to examine the effect of implantation on the device operation and the effect of electrochemical activation on the inflammatory and wound-healing response. The MEMS devices were fabricated from a silicon wafer into which reservoirs were etched and covered with gold membranes. The membranes were electrochemically removed when an anodic voltage was applied. Devices were implanted subcutaneously both with and without stainless steel mesh cages for 4, 7, 14, 21, or 28 days before activation. Devices were activated every other day for five activations. Leukocyte concentrations indicated that both the application of voltage and the gold corrosion products elevated the inflammatory response which was resolved within 48 h after each activation. The efficiency of gold membrane removal was not impaired throughout the implantation, although a bimodal distribution of background current densities was observed after long implantation times. The thickness of the fibrous capsule surrounding the MEMS devices was similar between activated and control devices explanted at each time point. It was concluded that the repeated activation of MEMS drug delivery devices was successful and the activation produced an acceptable biological response that resolved promptly. PMID:15508122

  17. Production of bioinspired and rationally designed polymer hydrogels for controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hye

    patterns of functional groups. However, heterogeneity in the composition and in the polydispersity of heparin has been problematic in controlled delivery system and thus motivated the development of homogeneous heparin mimics. Peptides of appropriate sequence and chemical function have therefore recently emerged as potential replacements for heparin in select applications. Studied was the assessment of the binding affinities of multiple sulfated peptides (SPs) for a set of heparin-binding peptides (HBPs) and for VEGF; these binding partners have application in the selective immobilization of proteins and in hydrogel formation through non-covalent interactions. Sulfated peptides were produced via solid-phase methods, and their affinity for the HBPs and VEGF was assessed via affinity liquid chromatography (ALC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and in select cases, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The shortest peptide, SPa, showed the highest affinity binding of HBPs and VEGF165 in both ALC and SPR measurements, with slight exceptions. Of the investigated HBPs, a peptide based on the heparin-binding domain of human platelet factor 4 showed greatest binding affinities toward all of the SPs, consistent with its stronger binding to heparin. The affinity between SPa and PF4ZIP was indicated via SPR ( KD = 5.27 muM) and confirmed via ITC (KD = 8.09 muM). The binding by SPa of both VEGF and HBPs suggests its use as a binding partner to multiple species, and the use of these interactions in assembly of materials. Given that the peptide sequences can be varied to control binding affinity and selectivity, opportunities are also suggested for the production of a wider array of matrices with selective binding and release properties useful for biomaterials applications. Hydrogel consisting of SPa was formed via a covalent Michael Addition reaction between maleimide- and thiol-terminated multi-arm PEGs and Cys-SPa. The mechanical property of hydrogel was tunable from ca. 186 to

  18. Activation and activities of the p53 tumour suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bálint, É; Vousden, K H

    2001-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein inhibits malignant progression by mediating cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or repair following cellular stress. One of the major regulators of p53 function is the MDM2 protein, and multiple forms of cellular stress activate p53 by inhibiting the MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. Mutations in p53, or disruption of the pathways that allow activation of p53, seem to be a general feature of all cancers. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathways that regulate p53 and the pathways that are induced by p53, as well as their implications for cancer therapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747320

  19. Gene disruption by cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of Cas9 protein and guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kwaku Dad, Abu-Bonsrah; Beloor, Jagadish; Gopalappa, Ramu; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-06-01

    RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs) derived from the CRISPR/Cas system represent an efficient tool for genome editing. RGENs consist of two components: Cas9 protein and guide RNA. Plasmid-mediated delivery of these components into cells can result in uncontrolled integration of the plasmid sequence into the host genome, and unwanted immune responses and potential safety problems that can be caused by the bacterial sequences. Furthermore, this delivery method requires transfection tools. Here we show that simple treatment with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-conjugated recombinant Cas9 protein and CPP-complexed guide RNAs leads to endogenous gene disruptions in human cell lines. The Cas9 protein was conjugated to CPP via a thioether bond, whereas the guide RNA was complexed with CPP, forming condensed, positively charged nanoparticles. Simultaneous and sequential treatment of human cells, including embryonic stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and embryonic carcinoma cells, with the modified Cas9 and guide RNA, leads to efficient gene disruptions with reduced off-target mutations relative to plasmid transfections, resulting in the generation of clones containing RGEN-induced mutations. Our CPP-mediated RGEN delivery process provides a plasmid-free and additional transfection reagent-free method to use this tool with reduced off-target effects. We envision that our method will facilitate RGEN-directed genome editing. PMID:24696462

  20. Low cost delivery of proteins bioencapsulated in plant cells to human non-immune or immune modulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuhong; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Hoffman, Brad E; Kamesh, Aditya; Jones, Noah T; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2016-02-01

    Targeted oral delivery of GFP fused with a GM1 receptor binding protein (CTB) or human cell penetrating peptide (PTD) or dendritic cell peptide (DCpep) was investigated. Presence of GFP(+) intact plant cells between villi of ileum confirm their protection in the digestive system from acids/enzymes. Efficient delivery of GFP to gut-epithelial cells by PTD or CTB and to M cells by all these fusion tags confirm uptake of GFP in the small intestine. PTD fusion delivered GFP more efficiently to most tissues or organs than the other two tags. GFP was efficiently delivered to the liver by all fusion tags, likely through the gut-liver axis. In confocal imaging studies of human cell lines using purified GFP fused with different tags, GFP signal of DCpep-GFP was only detected within dendritic cells. PTD-GFP was only detected within kidney or pancreatic cells but not in immune modulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic, T, B, or mast cells). In contrast, CTB-GFP was detected in all tested cell types, confirming ubiquitous presence of GM1 receptors. Such low-cost oral delivery of protein drugs to sera, immune system or non-immune cells should dramatically lower their cost by elimination of prohibitively expensive fermentation, protein purification cold storage/transportation and increase patient compliance. PMID:26706477

  1. Pulmonary Delivery of Butyrylcholinesterase as a Model Protein to the Lung.

    PubMed

    Rahhal, Tojan B; Fromen, Catherine A; Wilson, Erin M; Kai, Marc P; Shen, Tammy W; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery has great potential for delivering biologics to the lung if the challenges of maintaining activity, stability, and ideal aerosol characteristics can be overcome. To study the interactions of a biologic in the lung, we chose butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) as our model enzyme, which has application for use as a bioscavenger protecting against organophosphate exposure or for use with pseudocholinesterase deficient patients. In mice, orotracheal administration of free BuChE resulted in 72 h detection in the lungs and 48 h in the broncheoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Free BuChE administered to the lung of all mouse backgrounds (Nude, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) showed evidence of an acute cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α, MIP2, and KC) and cellular immune response that subsided within 48 h, indicating relatively safe administration of this non-native biologic. We then developed a formulation of BuChE using Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT). Aerosol characterization demonstrated biologically active BuChE 1 μm cylindrical particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 2.77 μm, indicative of promising airway deposition via dry powder inhalers (DPI). Furthermore, particulate BuChE delivered via dry powder insufflation showed residence time of 48 h in the lungs and BALF. The in vivo residence time, immune response, and safety of particulate BuChE delivered via a pulmonary route, along with the cascade impaction distribution of dry powder PRINT BuChE, showed promise in the ability to deliver active enzymes with ideal deposition characteristics. These findings provide evidence for the feasibility of optimizing the use of BuChE in the clinic; PRINT BuChE particles can be readily formulated for use in DPIs, providing a convenient and effective treatment option. PMID:27012934

  2. Microfluidic Directed Synthesis of Alginate Nanogels with Tunable Pore Size for Efficient Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bazban-Shotorbani, Salime; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Jacob, Karl I

    2016-05-17

    Alginate is a biopolymer with favorable pH-sensitive properties for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. However, conventional alginate nanogels have limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency because of drug leaching during bead preparation and burst release in high pH values. These shortcomings originate from large pore size of the nanogels. In this work, we proposed an on-chip hydrodynamic flow focusing approach for synthesis of alginate nanogels with adjustable pore size to achieve fine-tunable release profile of the encapsulated bioactive agents. It is demonstrated that the microstructure of nanogels can be controlled through adjusting flow ratio and mixing time directed on microfluidic platforms consisting of cross-junction microchannels. In this study, the average pore size of alginate nanogels (i.e., average molecular weight between cross-links, Mc) was related to synthesis parameters. Mc was calculated from equations based on equilibrium swelling theory and proposed methods to modify the theory for pH-sensitive nanogels. In the equations we derived, size and compactness of nanogels are key factors, which can be adjusted by controlling the flow ratio. It was found that increase in flow ratio increases the size of nanogels and decreases their compactness. The size of on-chip generated nanogels for flow ratio of 0.02-0.2 was measured to be in the range of 68-138 nm. Moreover, a method based on the Mie theory was implemented to estimate the aggregation number (Nagg) of polymer chains inside the nanogels as an indicator of compactness. According to the size and compactness results along with equations of modified swelling theory, Mc obtained to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 kDa. The proposed method could be considered as a promising approach for efficient polypeptides encapsulation and their sustained release. PMID:26938744

  3. Caffeic Acid-PLGA Conjugate to Design Protein Drug Delivery Systems Stable to Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Selmin, Francesca; Puoci, Francesco; Parisi, Ortensia I.; Franzé, Silvia; Musazzi, Umberto M.; Cilurzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the feasibility of caffeic acid grafted PLGA (g-CA-PLGA) to design biodegradable sterile microspheres for the delivery of proteins. Ovalbumin (OVA) was selected as model compound because of its sensitiveness of γ-radiation. The adopted grafting procedure allowed us to obtain a material with good free radical scavenging properties, without a significant modification of Mw and Tg of the starting PLGA (Mw PLGA = 26.3 ± 1.3 kDa vs. Mw g-CA-PLGA = 22.8 ± 0.7 kDa; Tg PLGA = 47.7 ± 0.8 °C vs. Tg g-CA-PLGA = 47.4 ± 0.2 °C). By using a W1/O/W2 technique, g-CA-PLGA improved the encapsulation efficiency (EE), suggesting that the presence of caffeic residues improved the compatibility between components (EEPLGA = 35.0% ± 0.7% vs. EEg-CA-PLGA = 95.6% ± 2.7%). Microspheres particle size distribution ranged from 15 to 50 µm. The zeta-potential values of placebo and loaded microspheres were −25 mV and −15 mV, respectively. The irradiation of g-CA-PLGA at the dose of 25 kGy caused a less than 1% variation of Mw and the degradation patterns of the non-irradiated and irradiated microspheres were superimposable. The OVA content in g-CA-PLGA microspheres decreased to a lower extent with respect to PLGA microspheres. These results suggest that g-CA-PLGA is a promising biodegradable material to microencapsulate biological drugs. PMID:25569163

  4. LASER ENGINEERED DISSOLVING MICRONEEDLES FOR ACTIVE TRANSDERMAL DELIVERY OF NADROPARIN CALCIUM

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Yasmine A.; Garland, Martin J.; McInnes, Fiona; El-Khordagui, Labiba K.; Wilson, Clive; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to replace the injection currently used for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) multi-dose therapy with a non-invasive delivery device. In this study, laser-engineered dissolving microneedle (DMN) arrays fabricated from aqueous blends of 15% w/w poly (methylvinylether co maleic anhydride) have been fabricated as a potential device for the active transdermal delivery of nadroparin calcium (NC) as a model LMWH. An array loading of 630 IU of NC was achieved without compromising the array mechanical strength or the drug bioactivity. Application of NC-DMNs to dermatomed human skin (DHS) using the single step “poke and release” approach allowed permeation of approximately 10.6 % of the total NC load over a 48 h-study period. The cumulative amount of NC that permeated DHS at 24 h and 48 h attained 12.28 ± 4.23 IU/cm2 and 164.84 ± 8.47 IU/cm2, respectively. Skin permeation of NC could be modulated by controlling the DMN array variables, such as MN length and array density as well as application force to meet various clinical requirements including adjustment for body mass and renal function. NC-loaded DMN offer potentials as a relatively low cost functional delivery system for the transdermal delivery of LMWH and other macromolecules. PMID:22836025

  5. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Ronald E.; Peart, John C.; Hawkins, Brian T.; Campos, Christopher R.; Miller, David S.

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-α) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, 3H-verapamil (threefold increase), 3H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and 3H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain 14C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  6. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  7. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  8. The Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKAPKs) in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Ugo; Kostenko, Sergiy; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are implicated in several cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell survival, cell motility, metabolism, stress response and inflammation. MAPK pathways transmit and convert a plethora of extracellular signals by three consecutive phosphorylation events involving a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. In turn MAPKs phosphorylate substrates, including other protein kinases referred to as MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Eleven mammalian MAPKAPKs have been identified: ribosomal-S6-kinases (RSK1-4), mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1-2), MAPK-interacting kinases (MNK1-2), MAPKAPK-2 (MK2), MAPKAPK-3 (MK3), and MAPKAPK-5 (MK5). The role of these MAPKAPKs in inflammation will be reviewed. PMID:24705157

  9. Determination of the composition, encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity in protein drug delivery systems using circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhili; Li, Shanghao; Han, Xu; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O; Bashammakh, Abdulaziz S; El-Shahawi, Mohammad S; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-21

    Peptides and proteins have become very promising drug candidates in recent decades due to their unique properties. However, the application of these drugs has been limited by their high enzymatic susceptibility, low membrane permeability and poor bioavailability when administered orally. Considerable efforts have been made to design and develop drug delivery systems that could transport peptides and proteins to targeted area. Although it is of great importance to determine the composition after loading a drug to the carrier, the ability to do so is significantly limited by current analytical methods. In this letter, five important proteins, α1-antitrypsin, hemoglobin human, human serum albumin, human transferrin and r-globulin were chemically conjugated to two model drug carriers, namely carbon dots and polymer O-(2-carboxyethyl) polyethylene glycol. A simple yet convenient method based on circular dichroism spectroscopy was developed to determine the compositions of the various protein-carrier conjugates. PMID:27590552

  10. Assembly of HE800 exopolysaccharide produced by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium into microgels for protein delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Zykwinska, Agata; Marquis, Mélanie; Sinquin, Corinne; Cuenot, Stéphane; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2016-05-20

    Assembly of biopolymers into microgels is an elegant strategy for bioencapsulation with various potential biomedical applications. Such biocompatible and biodegradable microassemblies are developed not only to protect the encapsulated molecule but also to ensure its sustained local delivery. The present study describes the fabrication of microassemblies from a marine HE800 exopolysaccharide (EPS), which displays a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-like structure and biological properties. HE800 EPS was assembled, through physical cross-linking with divalent ions, into microgel particles and microfibers using microfluidics. The microparticle morphology was highly affected by the polysaccharide concentration and its molecular weight. A model protein, namely Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was subsequently encapsulated within HE800 microparticles in one-step process using microfluidics. The protein release was tuned by the microparticle morphology with a lower protein amount released from the most homogeneous structures. Our findings demonstrate the high potential of HE800 EPS based microassemblies as innovative protein microcarriers for further biomedical applications. PMID:26917393

  11. A specific, transmembrane interface regulates fibroblast activation protein (FAP) homodimerization, trafficking and exopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Wonganu, Benjamaporn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-08-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell-surface serine protease which promotes invasiveness of certain epithelial cancers and is therefore a potential target for cancer drug development and delivery. Unlike dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), FAP exhibits prolyl endopeptidase activity and is active as a homodimer with specificity for type I collagen. The mechanism that regulates FAP homodimerization and its relation to prolyl endopeptidase activity is not completely understood. Here, we investigate key residues in the FAP TM domain that may be significant for FAP homodimerization. Mutations to predicted TM interfacial residues (G10L, S14L, and A18L) comprising a small-X3-small motif reduced FAP TM-CYTO dimerization relative to wild type as measured using the AraTM assay, whereas predicted off-interface residues showed no significant change from wild type. The results implied that the predicted small-X3-small dimer interface affect stabilization of FAP TM-CYTO homodimerization. Compared with FAPwild-type, the interfacial TM residue G10L significantly decreased FAP endopeptidase activity more than 25%, and also reduced cell-surface versus intracellular expression relative to other interfacial residues S14L and A18L. Thus, our results suggest FAP dimerization is important for both trafficking and protease activity, and is dependent on a specific TM interface. PMID:27155568

  12. Phospholipases as GTPase activity accelerating proteins (GAPs) in plants.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sona

    2016-05-01

    GTPase activity accelerating proteins (GAPs) are key regulators of the G-protein signaling cycle. By facilitating effective hydrolysis of the GTP bound on Gα proteins, GAPs control the timing and amplitude of the signaling cycle and ascertain the availability of the inactive heterotrimer for the next round of activation. Until very recently, the studies of GAPs in plants were focused exclusively on the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein. We now show that phospholipase Dα1 (PLDα1) is also a bona fide GAP in plants and together with the RGS protein controls the level of activeprotein. PMID:27124090

  13. Monooxygenase activity of type 3 copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2007-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of the monooxygenase (phenolase) activity of type 3 copper proteins has been examined in detail both in the model systems and in the enzymatic systems. The reaction of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) model compound ( A) and neutral phenols proceeds via a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) mechanism to generate phenoxyl radical species, which collapse each other to give the corresponding C-C coupling dimer products. In this reaction, a bis(mu-oxo)dicopper(III) complex ( B) generated by O-O bond homolysis of A is suggested to be a real active species. On the other hand, the reaction of lithium phenolates (deprotonated form of phenols) with the same side-on peroxo dicopper(II) complex proceeds via an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism to give the oxygenated products (catechols). The mechanistic difference between these two systems has been discussed on the basis of the Marcus theory of electron transfer and Hammett analysis. Mechanistic details of the monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase have also been examined using a simplified enzymatic reaction system to demonstrate that the enzymatic reaction mechanism is virtually the same as that of the model reaction, that is, an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. In addition, the monooxygenase activity of the oxygen carrier protein hemocyanin has been explored for the first time by employing urea as an additive in the reaction system. In this case as well, the ortho-hydroxylation of phenols to catechols has been demonstrated to involve the same ionic mechanism. PMID:17461541

  14. Improved mucoadhesion and cell uptake of chitosan and chitosan oligosaccharide surface-modified polymer nanoparticles for mucosal delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dyawanapelly, Sathish; Koli, Uday; Dharamdasani, Vimisha; Jain, Ratnesh; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of the present study was to compare mucoadhesion and cellular uptake efficiency of chitosan (CS) and chitosan oligosaccharide (COS) surface-modified polymer nanoparticles (NPs) for mucosal delivery of proteins. We have developed poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, surface-modified COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs, by using double emulsion solvent evaporation method, for encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Surface modification of NPs was confirmed using physicochemical characterization methods such as particle size and zeta potential, SEM, TEM and FTIR analysis. Both surface-modified PLGA NPs displayed a slow release of protein compared to PLGA NPs. Furthermore, we have explored the mucoadhesive property of COS as a material for modifying the surface of polymeric NPs. During in vitro mucoadhesion test, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs exhibited enhanced mucoadhesion, compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. This interaction was anticipated to improve the cell interaction and uptake of NPs, which is an important requirement for mucosal delivery of proteins. All nanoformulations were found to be safe for cellular delivery when evaluated in A549 cells. Moreover, intracellular uptake behaviour of FITC-BSA loaded NPs was extensively investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. As we hypothesized, positively charged COS-PLGA NPs and CS-PLGA NPs displayed enhanced intracellular uptake compared to negatively charged PLGA NPs. Our results demonstrated that CS- and COS-modified polymer NPs could be promising carriers for proteins, drugs and nucleic acids via nasal, oral, buccal, ocular and vaginal mucosal routes. PMID:27106502

  15. ACTIVE DELIVERY CABLE TUNED TO DEVICE DEPLOYMENT STATE: ENHANCED VISIBILITY OF NITINOL OCCLUDERS DURING PRE-CLINICAL INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Franson, Dominique N.; Sonmez, Merdim; Slack, Michael C.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active delivery system that enhances visualization of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during deployment under real-time MRI. Materials and Methods We constructed an active delivery cable incorporating a loopless antenna and a custom titanium microscrew to secure the occluder devices. The delivery cable was tuned and matched to 50Ω at 64 MHz with the occluder device attached. We used real-time balanced SSFP in a wide-bore 1.5T scanner. Device-related images were reconstructed separately and combined with surface-coil images. The delivery cable was tested in vitro in a phantom and in vivo in swine using a variety of nitinol cardiac occluder devices. Results In vitro, the active delivery cable provided little signal when the occluder device was detached and maximal signal with the device attached. In vivo, signal from the active delivery cable enabled clear visualization of occluder device during positioning and deployment. Device release resulted in decreased signal from the active cable. Post-mortem examination confirmed proper device placement. Conclusions The active delivery cable enhanced the MRI depiction of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during positioning and deployment, both in conventional and novel applications. We expect enhanced visibility to contribute to effectiveness and safety of new and emerging MRI-guided treatments. PMID:22707441

  16. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  17. Novel composite fiber structures to provide drug/protein delivery for medical implants and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of bioresorbable composite (core/shell) fiber structures loaded with bioactive agents was developed and studied. These unique polymeric structures are designed to combine good mechanical properties with a desired controlled release profile, in order to serve as scaffolds for tissue regeneration applications and as basic elements of medical implants. These core/shell fiber structures were formed by "coating" core polymer fibers with drug/protein-containing poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous structures. The shell preparation ("coating") was performed by the freeze-drying of water-in-oil emulsions. Both water soluble and water insoluble agents can be incorporated in these structures and their activity is preserved, since the fiber fabrication requires neither high temperatures nor harsh solvents in the vicinity of the bioactive agents. Examples for release profiles of protein (horseradish peroxidase) and drug (paclitaxel) are presented. We have demonstrated that appropriate selection of the emulsion's parameters can yield a variety of new core/shell fiber structures with desirable drug/protein release behavior. This will lead to the engineering of new implants and scaffolds, and will advance the field of tissue regeneration and medical implants. PMID:16956799

  18. In vivo delivery of bovine viral diahorrea virus, E2 protein using hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, D.; Cavallaro, A. S.; Mody, K. T.; Xiong, L.; Mahony, T. J.; Qiao, S. Z.; Mitter, N.

    2014-05-01

    Our work focuses on the application of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a combined delivery vehicle and adjuvant for vaccine applications. Here we present results using the viral protein, E2, from bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV). BVDV infection occurs in the target species of cattle and sheep herds worldwide and is therefore of economic importance. E2 is a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV and is an ideal candidate for the development of a subunit based nanovaccine using mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Hollow type mesoporous silica nanoparticles with surface amino functionalisation (termed HMSA) were characterised and assessed for adsorption and desorption of E2. A codon-optimised version of the E2 protein (termed Opti-E2) was produced in Escherichia coli. HMSA (120 nm) had an adsorption capacity of 80 μg Opti-E2 per mg HMSA and once bound E2 did not dissociate from the HMSA. Immunisation studies in mice with a 20 μg dose of E2 adsorbed to 250 μg HMSA was compared to immunisation with Opti-E2 (50 μg) together with the traditional adjuvant Quillaja saponaria Molina tree saponins (QuilA, 10 μg). The humoral responses with the Opti-E2/HMSA nanovaccine although slightly lower than those obtained for the Opti-E2 + QuilA group demonstrated that HMSA particles are an effective adjuvant that stimulated E2-specific antibody responses. Importantly the cell-mediated immune responses were consistently high in all mice immunised with Opti-E2/HMSA nanovaccine formulation. Therefore we have shown the Opti-E2/HMSA nanoformulation acts as an excellent adjuvant that gives both T-helper 1 and T-helper 2 mediated responses in a small animal model. This study has provided proof-of-concept towards the development of an E2 subunit nanoparticle based vaccine.Our work focuses on the application of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a combined delivery vehicle and adjuvant for vaccine applications. Here we present results using the viral protein, E2, from bovine viral

  19. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  20. Protein-protein interactions in plant mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2016-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) form tightly controlled signaling cascades that play essential roles in plant growth, development, and defense. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying MAPK cascades are still elusive, due largely to our poor understanding of how they relay the signals. Extensive effort has been devoted to characterization of MAPK-substrate interactions to illustrate phosphorylation-based signaling. The diverse MAPK substrates identified also shed light on how spatiotemporal-specific protein-protein interactions function in distinct MAPK cascade-mediated biological processes. This review surveys various technologies used for characterizing MAPK-substrate interactions and presents case studies of MPK4 and MPK6, highlighting the multiple functions of MAPKs. Mass spectrometry-based approaches in identifying MAPK-interacting proteins are emphasized due to their increasing utility and effectiveness. The potential for using MAPKs and their substrates in enhancing plant stress tolerance is also discussed. PMID:26646897

  1. Effect of penetration modifiers on the dermal and transdermal delivery of drugs and cosmetic active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Otto, A; Wiechers, J W; Kelly, C L; Hadgraft, J; du Plessis, J

    2008-01-01

    In this study the effect of 2 penetration modifiers, dimethyl isosorbide (DMI) and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DGME) on the skin delivery of hydroquinone (HQ), salicylic acid (SA) and octadecenedioic acid (DIOIC) was investigated. Ten percent DMI and DGME were separately formulated into oil-in-water emulsions containing 1.8% HQ, SA and DIOIC, respectively. Skin delivery and the flux across split-thickness human skin of the active ingredients were determined using Franz diffusion cells. An emulsion with 10% water incorporated instead of the water-soluble penetration modifiers served as a control. The study showed that neither 10% DMI nor 10% DGME significantly enhanced the skin permeation of the various lipophilic active ingredients or the uptake into the skin. It was hypothesized that the addition of the penetration modifiers to the emulsions not only enhanced the solubility of the various active ingredients in the skin but also in the formulation, resulting in a reduced thermodynamic activity and hence a weaker driving force for penetration. Therefore, the effect of DMI and DGME on the solubility of the active ingredients in the skin was counteracted by a simultaneous reduction in the thermodynamic activity in the formulation. PMID:18832865

  2. Targeted delivery of CCR2 antagonist to activated pulmonary endothelium prevents metastasis.

    PubMed

    Roblek, Marko; Calin, Manuela; Schlesinger, Martin; Stan, Daniela; Zeisig, Reiner; Simionescu, Maya; Bendas, Gerd; Borsig, Lubor

    2015-12-28

    Enhanced levels of the inflammatory chemokine CCL2 are known to correlate with increased tumorigenesis and metastases, and thereby poor prognosis for cancer patients. The CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis was shown to facilitate the metastatic initiation through the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and the activation of endothelial cells at metastatic sites. Both steps are required for efficient cancer cell trans-endothelial migration and seeding in the targeted tissue. The translation of preclinical evidence proved to be challenging due to systemic effects of chemokine inhibition and limited target specificity. Here we tested an approach of a targeted delivery of the CCR2 antagonist Teijin Compound 1 to metastatic sites. VCAM-1 binding peptide tagged liposomes carrying the CCR2 antagonist enabled a specific delivery to cancer cell-activated endothelium. The subsequent binding of target-sensitive liposomes triggered the release of the Teijin Compound 1 and thereby local inhibition of CCR2 in the lungs. Blocking of CCR2 resulted in reduced induction of the lungs vascular permeability, and thereby reduced tumor cell extravasation. However, the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the pre-metastatic lungs remained unaltered. Endothelial VCAM-1 targeted delivery of the CCR2 antagonist resulted in inhibition of pulmonary metastases both in a murine (MC-38GFP cells) and a human xenograft (patient-derived cells) model. Thus, timely- and spatially-defined inhibition of CCR2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of metastasis without affecting homeostatic functions. PMID:26522070

  3. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  4. Three-dimensionally presented anti-fouling zwitterionic motifs sequester and enable high-efficiency delivery of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pingsheng; Skelly, Jordan D.; Song, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Zwitterions are well known for their anti-biofouling properties. Past investigations of zwitterionic materials for biomedical uses have been centered on exploiting their ability to inhibit non-specific adsorption of proteins. Here, we report that zwitterionic motifs, when 3-dimensionally (3D) presented (e.g. in crosslinked hydrogels), could effectively sequester osteogenic bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The ionic interactions between rhBMP-2 and the 3D zwitterionic network enabled dynamic sequestering and sustained release of the protein with preserved bioactivity. We further demonstrated that the zwitterionic hydrogel confers high-efficiency in vivo local delivery of rhBMP-2. It can template the functional healing of critical-size femoral segmental defects in rats with rhBMP-2 at a loading dose substantially lower than those required for current natural or synthetic polymeric carriers. These findings reveal a novel function of zwitterionic materials beyond their commonly perceived anti-biofouling property, and may establish 3D zwitterionic matrices as novel high-efficiency vehicles for protein/ionic drug therapeutic delivery. PMID:24956565

  5. Gastroretentive carrier systems in the delivery of therapeutic actives: an updated patent review.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kamla; Akhtar, Nida; Singh, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Gastroretentive drug-delivery systems have the potential to prolong the gastric retention time and provide controlled/sustained release of a drug at the absorption site, thereby improving the bioavailability. Advantageous features include reduction in dose, side effects and dosing frequency. Research inputs have led to exploration of novel gastroretentive systems. The present review explores various patents issued on gastroretentive drug delivery on the basis of the therapeutic category of drugs. It traces US, EP and WIPO patents issued in the last 10 years. Various patents have revealed that gastrocarriers can effectively enhance therapeutic activity of a drug. Drugs acting on the CNS have been prominently investigated, followed by antimicrobials and locally acting drugs. Areas of future research can be drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. PMID:26580994

  6. Production of biologically active human thioredoxin 1 protein in lettuce chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soon; Ashida, Hiroki; Watanabe, Rie; Inai, Koji; Kim, Yun-Soo; Mukougawa, Keiko; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Tomizawa, Ken-ichi; Ushiyama, Kei-ichi; Asao, Hiroshi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Masutani, Hiroshi; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yodoi, Junji; Yokota, Akiho

    2011-07-01

    The production of human therapeutic proteins in plants provides opportunities for low-cost production, and minimizes the risk of contamination from potential human pathogens. Chloroplast genetic engineering is a particularly promising strategy, because plant chloroplasts can produce large amounts of foreign target proteins. Oxidative stress is a key factor in various human diseases. Human thioredoxin 1 (hTrx1) is a stress-induced protein that functions as an antioxidant against oxidative stress, and overexpression of hTrx1 has been shown to suppress various diseases in mice. Therefore, hTrx1 is a prospective candidate as a new human therapeutic protein. We created transplastomic lettuce expressing hTrx1 under the control of the psbA promoter. Transplastomic plants grew normally and were fertile. The hTrx1 protein accumulated to approximately 1% of total soluble protein in mature leaves. The hTrx1 protein purified from lettuce leaves was functionally active, and reduced insulin disulfides. The purified protein protected mouse insulinoma line 6 cells from damage by hydrogen peroxide, as reported previously for a recombinant hTrx1 expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first report of expression of the biologically active hTrx1 protein in plant chloroplasts. This research opens up possibilities for plant-based production of hTrx1. Considering that this expression host is an edible crop plant, this transplastomic lettuce may be suitable for oral delivery of hTrx1. PMID:21290168

  7. Alginate-whey protein dry powder optimized for target delivery of essential oils to the intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Gong, J; Yu, H; Guo, Q; Defelice, C; Hernandez, M; Yin, Y; Wang, Q

    2014-10-01

    In poultry production, there is a lack of effective and convenient approaches to deliver bioactive compounds such as some essential oils, which have been proposed as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. The objective of this research was to develop a method for target delivery of essential oils in feed to the lower intestines of chickens. Carvacrol was used as a model essential oil, and 2 food-grade biopolymers, alginate and whey protein, were selected to encapsulate carvacrol in microparticles. The effects of a medium molecular weight alginate, a low molecular weight alginate (LBA), and whey protein concentrations on the properties of carvacrol-loaded microparticles were investigated using response surface methodology. The encapsulation efficiencies for all the tested formulations were ≥ 98% and carvacrol content in the dry microparticles was 72 ± 2% (wt/wt). The microparticles showed good gastric resistance and rapid intestinal release under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Alginate concentrations had the strongest influence on the gastric resistance of microparticles, whereas whey protein was the dominant parameter in controlling the intestinal release. The concentration of LBA was found to be the critical factor affecting the mechanical strength of the microparticles. A predicted optimum formulation from in vitro optimization was tested in chickens. It was found that a negligible amount of carvacrol was detected in the intestines of chickens fed with unencapsulated carvacrol. Microparticles of predicted optimum formulation delivered a remarkably higher concentration of carvacrol to the jejunum and ileum regions. The high concentration was sustained for more than 3 h after oral administration. The in vivo release of carvacrol from the microparticles appeared faster than release from in vitro simulation. Nonetheless, the in vitro simulation provided good indications of the in vivo performance, and thus may serve as a useful tool for formula

  8. pH-Responsive Fe3O4 Nanopartilces-Capped Mesoporous Silica Supports for Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qi; Zhu, Jiaoyang; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of proteins and peptides with excellent bioactivity and controlled release still is a great challenge nowadays. In this study, a pH-responsive delivery system obtained by anchoring 8-nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) onto SBA-15 supports with a particle diameter in the range of 0.6-1 μm and a pore size of 6.2 nm was synthesized and investigated. The pH-stimulative response is based on the interaction between the tris(aminomethyl)ethane (TAE) groups anchored onto the pore outlet of mesoporous silica scaffolds and the carboxybenzaldehyde (CBA) groups coated on the Fe3O4 NPs, which can lead to a rapid release under the acid condition (pH = 5) and a zero release with the increase of pH value (pH = 7.4). With BMP-2 as a model protein, this Fe3O4 nanopartilces-capped mesoporous silica showed a rapid response to the change of pH for protein delivery. Furthermore, the released BMP-2 could still maintain its bioactivity and induce the osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs. Besides, the magnetic orientation mainly attributes to the Fe3O4 NPs served as the nanocaps. The excellent bio-compatibility is demonstrated by the MTT assay on BMSCs model cells. These results show that Fe3O4 NPs-capped SBA-15 materials have an effective load for large molecule size proteins, such as BMP-2, and show an excellent applied prospect in pH-responsive controlled release system. PMID:27427586

  9. Light-activated endosomal escape using upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced delivery of drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasammandhan, Muthu Kumara; Bansal, Akshaya; Zhang, Yong

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs has gained a lot of prominence recently but the main problem hampering efficient delivery of payload is the clearing or degradation of nanoparticles by endosomes. Various strategies have been used to overcome this issue and one such effective solution is Photochemical Internalization (PCI). This technique involves the activation of certain photosensitizing compounds by light, which accumulate specifically in the membranes of endocytic vesicles. The activated photosensitizers induce the formation of reactive oxygen species which in turn induces localized disruption of endosomal membranes. But the drawback of this technique is that it needs blue light for activation and hence confined to be used only in in-vitro systems due to the poor tissue penetration of blue light. Here, we report the use of Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) as a transducer for activation of the photosensitizer, TPPS 2a. NIR light has good tissue penetrating ability and thus enables PCI in greater depths. Highly monodisperse, uniformly-sized, sub-100 nm, biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized with a mesoporous silica coating. These UCNs activated TPPS 2a efficiently in solution and in cells. Paclitaxel, an anti-cancer drug was used as a model drug and was loaded into the mesoporous silica coating. B16F0 cells transfected with drug-loaded UCNs and irradiated with NIR showed significantly higher nanoparticle uptake and in turn higher cell death caused by the delivered drug. This technique can be used to enhance the delivery of any therapeutic molecule and thus increase the therapeutic efficiency considerably.

  10. Biodistribution and Efficacy of Targeted Pulmonary Delivery of a Protein Kinase C-δ Inhibitory Peptide: Impact on Indirect Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mondrinos, Mark J; Knight, Linda C; Kennedy, Paul A; Wu, Jichuan; Kauffman, Matthew; Baker, Sandy T; Wolfson, Marla R; Kilpatrick, Laurie E

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-induced lung injury remain a leading cause of death in intensive care units. We identified protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) as a critical regulator of the acute inflammatory response and demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition was lung-protective in a rodent sepsis model, suggesting that targeting PKCδ is a potential strategy for preserving pulmonary function in the setting of indirect lung injury. In this study, whole-body organ biodistribution and pulmonary cellular distribution of a transactivator of transcription (TAT)-conjugated PKCδ inhibitory peptide (PKCδ-TAT) was determined following intratracheal (IT) delivery in control and septic [cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] rats to ascertain the impact of disease pathology on biodistribution and efficacy. There was negligible lung uptake of radiolabeled peptide upon intravenous delivery [<1% initial dose (ID)], whereas IT administration resulted in lung retention of >65% ID with minimal uptake in liver or kidney (<2% ID). IT delivery of a fluorescent-tagged (tetramethylrhodamine-PKCδ-TAT) peptide demonstrated uniform spatial distribution and cellular uptake throughout the peripheral lung. IT delivery of PKCδ-TAT at the time of CLP surgery significantly reduced PKCδ activation (tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and cleavage) and acute lung inflammation, resulting in improved lung function and gas exchange. Importantly, peptide efficacy was similar when delivered at 4 hours post-CLP, demonstrating therapeutic relevance. Conversely, spatial lung distribution and efficacy were significantly impaired at 8 hours post-CLP, which corresponded to marked histopathological progression of lung injury. These studies establish a functional connection between peptide spatial distribution, inflammatory histopathology in the lung, and efficacy of this anti-inflammatory peptide. PMID:26243739

  11. Light-controlled active release of photocaged ciprofloxacin for lipopolysaccharide-targeted drug delivery using dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Shengzhuang; Mukherjee, Jhindan; Tang, Kenny; Gam, Kristina; Isham, Danielle; Murat, Claire; Sun, Rachel; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2016-08-16

    We report an active delivery mechanism targeted specifically to Gram(-) bacteria based on the photochemical release of photocaged ciprofloxacin carried by a cell wall-targeted dendrimer nanoconjugate. PMID:27476878

  12. A silk hydrogel-based delivery system of bone morphogenetic protein for the treatment of large bone defects.

    PubMed

    Diab, Tamim; Pritchard, Eleanor M; Uhrig, Brent A; Boerckel, Joel D; Kaplan, David L; Guldberg, Robert E

    2012-07-01

    The use of tissue grafting for the repair of large bone defects has numerous limitations including donor site morbidity and the risk of disease transmission. These limitations have prompted research efforts to investigate the effects of combining biomaterial scaffolds with biochemical cues to augment bone repair. The goal of this study was to use a critically-sized rat femoral segmental defect model to investigate the efficacy of a delivery system consisting of an electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber mesh tube with a silk fibroin hydrogel for local recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) delivery. Bilateral 8 mm segmental femoral defects were formed in 13-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. Perforated electrospun PCL nanofiber mesh tubes were fitted into the adjacent native bone such that the lumen of the tubes contained the defect (Kolambkar et al., 2011b). Silk hydrogels with or without BMP-2 were injected into the defect. Bone regeneration was longitudinally assessed using 2D X-ray radiography and 3D microcomputed topography (μCT). Following sacrifice at 12 weeks after surgery, the extracted femurs were either subjected to biomechanical testing or assigned for histology. The results demonstrated that silk was an effective carrier for BMP-2. Compared to the delivery system without BMP-2, the delivery system that contained BMP-2 resulted in more bone formation (p<0.05) at 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Biomechanical properties were also significantly improved in the presence of BMP-2 (p<0.05) and were comparable to age-matched intact femurs. Histological evaluation of the defect region indicated that the silk hydrogel has been completely degraded by the end of the study. Based on these results, we conclude that a BMP-2 delivery system consisting of an electrospun PCL nanofiber mesh tube with a silk hydrogel presents an effective strategy for functional repair of large bone defects. PMID:22658161

  13. Rapid and serum-insensitive endocytotic delivery of proteins using biotinylated polymers attached via multivalent hydrophobic anchors.

    PubMed

    Tobinaga, Kyohei; Li, Cuicui; Takeo, Masafumi; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Niidome, Takuro; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2014-03-10

    We have designed biotinylated polymers as synthetic receptors that have multiple alkyl groups for endocytotic delivery of target proteins. The polymers were stably attached to a cell surface via multivalent anchoring. The presented biotin was bound to streptavidin (SA) on the cell surface, and, via an endocytotic pathway, the cell rapidly internalized the biotinylated polymer/SA complex. The cell's uptake of the complex was not inhibited by the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, and its efficacy for the uptake of SA was the highest when compared with commercial reagents and single-anchored-type synthetic receptors. The synthetic receptor-mediated endocytosis can be used generally for other kind of protein by using SA as an adaptor molecule between a target protein and the cell-surface presented biotin. PMID:24389131

  14. Characterization, biorecognitive activity and stability of WGA grafted lipid nanostructures for the controlled delivery of Rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Tunki, Lakshmi; Kulhari, Hitesh; Reddy, Bharathi B; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-12-01

    Targeted nanomedicines improve the delivery of drugs by increasing the drug concentration at target site, protecting the premature degradation and releasing the encapsulated drug in controlled manner. To make rifampicin (RFN) delivery more effective, we designed and characterized wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) conjugated, RFN loaded solid-lipid nanoparticles (WRSN). Nanoparticles were prepared by solvent emulsification/evaporation and conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled WGA. Important characteristics, such as particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, conjugation efficiency and in vitro drug release behavior, were investigated. WGA conjugation to the nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis. Conjugation efficiency was determined by fluorescent spectroscopy and Bradford assay. RFN was released from nanoparticles via the diffusion-controlled, non-fickian and supercase II mechanism. A haemaglutination test confirmed that WGA retained its bio-recognition activity and sugar-binding specificity after it was coupled with the nanoparticles. In vitro experiments demonstrated that WRSN interacted more than non-conjugated nanoparticles with porcine mucin. WRSN were stable in the presence of electrolytes up to 1M concentration. Therefore, WGA-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles could be a promising tool for the controlled delivery of RFN or other anti-tubercular drugs. PMID:26409629

  15. Glyceryl monooleate-based otic delivery system of ofloxacin: release profile and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Samer; Abu-Dahab, Rana; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Sallam, Alsayyed

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the preparation and characterization of glyceryl monooleate- (GMO) based drug delivery system containing ofloxacin for the treatment of otitis externa. Acetate buffer (pH 4.5) containing dissolved ofloxacin was added to molten GMO as an aqueous phase, this resulted in the formation of a cubic and a reverse hexagonal phases. The release behavior of ofloxacin from the drug delivery system was studied using three different methods. The mechanism of drug release using paddles/dissolution apparatus and Franz diffusion cells followed Higuchi and Fickian diffusion models; whereas intrinsic release rate method showed zero-order kinetics. The intrinsic release rate was estimated and found to be 187.2 µg/cm(2)/h. The release mechanisms were similar irrespective of the loaded ofloxacin amount, however, the higher drug load displayed higher release rate. The drug delivery system was proven to be microbiologically effective by using agar diffusion method, against Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The GMO/ofloxacin formulation was stable for 6 months after preparation at room temperature as measured with respect to phase stability and antibacterial activity. PMID:24392877

  16. Temporal Changes of Protein Composition in Breast Milk of Chinese Urban Mothers and Impact of Caesarean Section Delivery.

    PubMed

    Affolter, Michael; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L; Vinyes-Pares, Gerard; Jenni, Rosemarie; Roggero, Iris; Avanti-Nigro, Ornella; de Castro, Carlos Antonio; Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu; Thakkar, Sagar K; Favre, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk (BM) protein composition may be impacted by lactation stage or factors related to geographical location. The present study aimed at assessing the temporal changes of BM major proteins over lactation stages and the impact of mode of delivery on immune factors, in a large cohort of urban mothers in China. 450 BM samples, collected in three Chinese cities, covering 8 months of lactation were analyzed for α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, serum albumin, total caseins, immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM and IgG) and transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and β2 content by microfluidic chip- or ELISA-based quantitative methods. Concentrations and changes over lactation were aligned with previous reports. α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, IgA, IgM and TGF-β1 contents followed similar variations characterized by highest concentrations in early lactation that rapidly decreased before remaining stable up to end of lactation. TGF-β2 content displayed same early dynamics before increasing again. Total caseins followed a different pattern, showing initial increase before decreasing back to starting values. Serum albumin and IgG levels appeared stable throughout lactation. In conclusion, BM content in major proteins of urban mothers in China was comparable with previous studies carried out in other parts of the world and C-section delivery had only very limited impact on BM immune factors. PMID:27548208

  17. Temporal Changes of Protein Composition in Breast Milk of Chinese Urban Mothers and Impact of Caesarean Section Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Affolter, Michael; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L.; Vinyes-Pares, Gerard; Jenni, Rosemarie; Roggero, Iris; Avanti-Nigro, Ornella; de Castro, Carlos Antonio; Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu; Thakkar, Sagar K.; Favre, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk (BM) protein composition may be impacted by lactation stage or factors related to geographical location. The present study aimed at assessing the temporal changes of BM major proteins over lactation stages and the impact of mode of delivery on immune factors, in a large cohort of urban mothers in China. 450 BM samples, collected in three Chinese cities, covering 8 months of lactation were analyzed for α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, serum albumin, total caseins, immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM and IgG) and transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 and β2 content by microfluidic chip- or ELISA-based quantitative methods. Concentrations and changes over lactation were aligned with previous reports. α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, IgA, IgM and TGF-β1 contents followed similar variations characterized by highest concentrations in early lactation that rapidly decreased before remaining stable up to end of lactation. TGF-β2 content displayed same early dynamics before increasing again. Total caseins followed a different pattern, showing initial increase before decreasing back to starting values. Serum albumin and IgG levels appeared stable throughout lactation. In conclusion, BM content in major proteins of urban mothers in China was comparable with previous studies carried out in other parts of the world and C-section delivery had only very limited impact on BM immune factors. PMID:27548208

  18. Design of an In Situ Cross-Linked Eutectic Tablet for Enhanced Delivery of Gastro-Sensitive Proteins and Peptides.

    PubMed

    Choonara, Bibi F; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a eutectic platform was designed as an in situ cross-linked eutectic tablet for structural protection, enhanced intestinal permeation, and controlled release of proteins after oral administration. Physicochemical and physicomechanical analyses of the eutectic tablets were undertaken to elucidate the in situ cross-linking mechanism, thermal transitions, crystallinity, ex vivo permeation, and in vitro release of the protein. Following thermal characterization, results revealed successful eutectic formation with a melting point to 37°C. Protein release from the formulation was controlled over 24 h with a maximum fractional release of ±0.8 for all formulations. The release pattern alternated between phases of burst and slow release which was attributed to the combined effects of swelling, surface erosion, and in situ cross-linking. Mathematical modeling of the protein release kinetics corresponded best with the Higuichi model with near zero-order (R(2) ≈ 0.9787) release. The permeation-enhancing effect of menthol contained within the eutectic powder blend was investigated and results showed an enhanced protein flux (0.0576-0.0720 mg·cm(-2) h(-1)) across the intestinal tissue model compared with a control formulation. Extensive in vitro characterization highlighted the successful design of the eutectic tablets as a potential oral delivery system for proteins with structural protection, enhanced intestinal permeation, and controlled release. PMID:27262202

  19. Influence of the primary emulsification procedure on the characteristics of small protein-loaded PLGA microparticles for antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Wischke, C; Borchert, H-H

    2006-06-01

    Microparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) using a W1/O/W2 double emulsion solvent evaporation method are suitable vehicles for the delivery of proteins to antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells. In this study, the influence of different techniques for the preparation of the primary W1/O emulsion was investigated with respect to the protein localization within the microparticles, morphological characteristics of these particles, protein burst release and the native state of the released protein. Bovine serum albumin bearing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-BSA) was used as model protein. A static micromixer was applied for the preparation of the W1/O/W2 double emulsion. Employing a rotor-stator homogenizer (Ultra-Turrax) for primary emulsification, microcapsules with a high burst release were produced, because nearly all FITC-BSA was attached to the outside of the particle wall. Using a high pressure homogenizer or an ultrasonic procedure resulted in the formation of microspheres with homogeneous protein distribution and a reduced burst release. PMID:16854818

  20. Nucleolar protein B23 has molecular chaperone activities.

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, A.; Olson, M. O.

    1999-01-01

    Protein B23 is an abundant, multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein whose activities are proposed to play a role in ribosome assembly. Szebeni et al. (1997) showed stimulation of nuclear import in vitro by protein B23 and suggested that this effect was due to a molecular chaperone-like activity. Protein B23 was tested for chaperone activities using several protein substrates. The temperature-dependent and -independent aggregation of the HIV-1 Rev protein was measured using a zero angle light scattering (turbidity) assay. Protein B23 inhibited the aggregation of the Rev protein, with the amount of inhibition proportional to the concentration of B23 added. This activity was saturable with nearly complete inhibition when the molar ratio of B23:Rev was slightly above one. Protein B23 also protected liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH), carboxypeptidase A, citrate synthase, and rhodanese from aggregation during thermal denaturation and preserved the enzyme activity of LADH under these conditions. In addition, protein B23 was able to promote the restoration of activity of LADH previously denatured with guanidine-HCl. Protein B23 preferentially bound denatured substrates and exposed hydrophobic regions when complexed with denatured proteins. Thus, by several criteria, protein B23 behaves like a molecular chaperone; these activities may be related to its role in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:10211837

  1. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins into Mouse Müller Glia Cells in vitro and in vivo Using Pep-1 Transfection Reagent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minhua H.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Direct protein transfection is a potentially valuable tool for studying protein function in basic and clinical research. A major challenge is to enable a sufficiently large amount of protein to penetrate the plasma membrane of the transfected cells. Pep-1, a protein transfection reagent, was evaluated for its ability and efficiency in delivering proteins and antibodies into mouse Müller cells in vitro and in vivo. Pep-1 delivered active beta-galactosidase enzyme and antibodies (non-specific IgG and Cy3 conjugated anti-vimentin) into cultured Müller cells with high efficiency. Transfection efficiency increased with increasing concentration of the protein in the complex and with incubation time. Following intravitreal injection of Pep-1/IgG complexes in vivo, retinal histology was preserved and immunostaining showed that the antibodies were distributed widely across the retinal surface, with the most intense staining located near the retino-vitreal border. For complexes using non-specific IgG, double staining with anti-glutamine synthetase identified many IgG-positive cells as Müller glia. IgG immunoreactivity was also detected in the cytoplasm and occasionally in the nuclei of inner retinal neurons. Dark-adapted flash electroretinogram (ERG) recordings from injected eyes were nearly identical to ERG recordings from control eyes, suggesting that injection of Pep-1/IgG complex has minimal effects on retinal function. Therefore, Pep-1 is a useful tool for intracellular delivery of antibodies to study the role of proteins in living cells. PMID:19056421

  2. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lithgow, Trevor; Martin, Lisandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of membrane proteins is often difficult to sustain following reconstitution, since the composition of the model phospholipid bilayer differs from that of the native cell membrane. This review will discuss the reconstitution of membrane protein activities in four different types of model membrane—monolayers, supported lipid bilayers, liposomes and nanodiscs, comparing their advantages in membrane protein reconstitution. Variation in the surrounding model environments for these four different types of membrane layer can affect the three-dimensional structure of reconstituted proteins and may possibly lead to loss of the proteins activity. We also discuss examples where the same membrane proteins have been successfully reconstituted into two or more model membrane systems with comparison of the observed activity in each system. Understanding of the behavioral changes for proteins in model membrane systems after membrane reconstitution is often a prerequisite to protein research. It is essential to find better solutions for retaining membrane protein activities for measurement and characterization in vitro. PMID:23344058

  3. Lipid activation of the signal recognition particle receptor provides spatial coordination of protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vinh Q.; Akopian, David; Rome, Michael; Henningsen, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that activate the bacterial SRP receptor FtsY and the SRP–FtsY complex. This leads to accelerated SRP–FtsY complex assembly, and allows the SRP–FtsY complex to more efficiently unload cargo proteins. Likewise, formation of an active SRP–FtsY GTPase complex exposes FtsY’s lipid-binding helix and enables stable membrane association of the targeting complex. Thus, membrane binding, complex assembly with SRP, and cargo unloading are inextricably linked to each other via conformational changes in FtsY. These allosteric communications allow the membrane delivery of cargo proteins to be efficiently coupled to their subsequent unloading and translocation, thus providing spatial coordination during protein targeting. PMID:20733058

  4. The Microsponge Delivery System (MDS): a topical delivery system with reduced irritancy incorporating multiple triggering mechanisms for the release of actives.

    PubMed

    Embil, K; Nacht, S

    1996-01-01

    The Microsponge Delivery System (MDS) is a unique technology for the controlled release of topical agents and consists of macroporous beads, typically 10-25 microns in diameter, loaded with active agent. When applied to the skin, the MDS releases its active ingredient on a time mode and also in response to other stimuli (rubbing, temperature, pH, etc). MDS technology is being used currently in cosmetics, over-the-counter (OTC) skin care, sunscreens and prescription products. By delivering the active gradually to the skin, MDS-benzoyl peroxide formulations, for example, have excellent efficacy with minimal irritation. These are typical benefits from the use of the MDS. PMID:8864994

  5. PLGA based drug delivery systems: Promising carriers for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique

    2016-03-01

    Wound treatment remains one of the most prevalent and economically burdensome healthcare issues in the world. Current treatment options are limited and require repeated administrations which led to the development of new therapeutics to satisfy the unmet clinical needs. Many potent wound healing agents were discovered but most of them are fragile and/or sensitive to in vivo conditions. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is a widely used biodegradable polymer approved by food and drug administration and European medicines agency as an excipient for parenteral administrations. It is a well-established drug delivery system in various medical applications. The aim of the current review is to elaborate the applications of PLGA based drug delivery systems carrying different wound healing agents and also present PLGA itself as a wound healing promoter. PLGA carriers encapsulating drugs such as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins/peptides, and nucleic acids targeting various phases/signaling cycles of wound healing, are discussed with examples. The combined therapeutic effects of PLGA and a loaded drug on wound healing are also mentioned. PMID:26749322

  6. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. PMID:26792989

  7. Recent insights into the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuee; Zhang, Wenji; Chen, Zirong; Shi, Zhi; He, Chengwei; Chen, Meiwan

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinones, the major lipid-soluble pharmacological constituents of the Chinese medicinal herb Tanshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), have attracted growing scientific attention because of the prospective biomedical applications of these compounds. Numerous pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and cardio-cerebrovascular protection activities, are exhibited by the three primary bioactive constituents among the tanshinones, ie, tanshinone I (TNI), tanshinone IIA (TNIIA), and cryptotanshinone (CPT). However, due to their poor solubility and low dissolution rate, the clinical applications of TNI, TNIIA, and CPT are limited. To solve these problems, many studies have focused on loading tanshinones into liposomes, nanoparticles, microemulsions, cyclodextrin inclusions, solid dispersions, and so on. In this review, we aim to offer an updated summary of the biological activities and drug delivery systems of tanshinones to provide a reference for these constituents in clinical applications. PMID:26792989

  8. Activator of G-Protein Signaling 3-Induced Lysosomal Biogenesis Limits Macrophage Intracellular Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Vural, Ali; Al-Khodor, Souhaila; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Shi, Chong-Shan; Srinivasan, Lalitha; McQuiston, Travis J; Hwang, Il-Young; Yeh, Anthony J; Blumer, Joe B; Briken, Volker; Williamson, Peter R; Otto, Michael; Fraser, Iain D C; Kehrl, John H

    2016-01-15

    Many intracellular pathogens cause disease by subverting macrophage innate immune defense mechanisms. Intracellular pathogens actively avoid delivery to or directly target lysosomes, the major intracellular degradative organelle. In this article, we demonstrate that activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3), an LPS-inducible protein in macrophages, affects both lysosomal biogenesis and activity. AGS3 binds the Gi family of G proteins via its G-protein regulatory (GoLoco) motif, stabilizing the Gα subunit in its GDP-bound conformation. Elevated AGS3 levels in macrophages limited the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, a sensor of cellular nutritional status. This triggered the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, a known activator of lysosomal gene transcription. In contrast, AGS3-deficient macrophages had increased mammalian target of rapamycin activity, reduced transcription factor EB activity, and a lower lysosomal mass. High levels of AGS3 in macrophages enhanced their resistance to infection by Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, whereas AGS3-deficient macrophages were more susceptible. We conclude that LPS priming increases AGS3 levels, which enhances lysosomal function and increases the capacity of macrophages to eliminate intracellular pathogens. PMID:26667172

  9. Activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) slows renal cystogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takiar, Vinita; Nishio, Saori; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; King, J Darwin; Li, Hui; Zhang, Li; Karihaloo, Anil; Hallows, Kenneth R; Somlo, Stefan; Caplan, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Renal cyst development and expansion in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) involves both fluid secretion and abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells. The chloride channel of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) participates in secretion of cyst fluid, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway may drive proliferation of cyst epithelial cells. CFTR and mTOR are both negatively regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin, a drug in wide clinical use, is a pharmacological activator of AMPK. We find that metformin stimulates AMPK, resulting in inhibition of both CFTR and the mTOR pathways. Metformin induces significant arrest of cystic growth in both in vitro and ex vivo models of renal cystogenesis. In addition, metformin administration produces a significant decrease in the cystic index in two mouse models of ADPKD. Our results suggest a possible role for AMPK activation in slowing renal cystogenesis as well as the potential for therapeutic application of metformin in the context of ADPKD. PMID:21262823

  10. Targeted drug delivery systems 6: Intracellular bioreductive activation, uptake and transport of an anticancer drug delivery system across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gharat, L; Taneja, R; Weerapreeyakul, N; Rege, B; Polli, J; Chikhale, P J

    2001-05-21

    We demonstrate transport across, intracellular accumulation and bioreductive activation of a conformationally constrained, anticancer drug delivery system (the CH(3)-TDDS) using Caco-2 cell monolayers (CCMs) as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosa. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled with UV detection was used to detect CH(3)-TDDS, the bioreduction product (lactone) and the released drug (melphalan methyl ester; MME). Upon incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS with the apical (AP) surface of 21-day-old CCM, we observed rapid decrease in the AP concentration of the CH(3)-TDDS (60%/hr) as a result of cellular uptake. Rapid intracellular accumulation of the CH(3)-TDDS was followed by bioreductive activation to deplete the cellular levels of CH(3)-TDDS. The drug part (MME) and lactone, as well as CH(3)-TDDS, were detected in the basolateral (BL) chamber. Intracellular Caco-2 levels of TDDS and lactone were also detectable. Bioreductive activation of the CH(3)-TDDS was additionally confirmed by formation of lactone after incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS in the presence of freshly prepared Caco-2 cell homogenates. During transport studies of melphalan or MME alone (as control), the intact drug was not detected in the intracellular compartment or in the BL chamber. These observations demonstrate that CH(3)-TDDS has potential for improving intestinal delivery of MME. TDDS could be useful in facilitating oral absorption of MME as well as the oral delivery of other agents. PMID:11337161

  11. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc’h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3–57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55–1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for

  12. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  13. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: Effect of different activation methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Gomes, Helena I; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Persulfate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for the remediation of organic polluted soils has gained much interest in last decade. However, the transportation of persulfate in low-permeability soil is very low, which limits its efficiency in degrading soil pollutants. Additionally, the oxidation-reduction process of persulfate with organic contaminants takes place slowly, while, the reaction will be greatly accelerated by the production of more powerful radicals once it is activated. Electrokinetic remediation (EK) is a good way for transporting persulfate in low-permeability soil. In this study, different activation methods, using zero-valent iron, citric acid chelated Fe(2+), iron electrode, alkaline pH and peroxide, were evaluated to enhance the activity of persulfate delivered by EK. All the activators and the persulfate were added in the anolyte. The results indicated that zero-valent iron, alkaline, and peroxide enhanced the transportation of persulfate at the first stage of EK test, and the longest delivery distance reached sections S4 or S5 (near the cathode) on the 6th day. The addition of activators accelerated decomposition of persulfate, which resulted in the decreasing soil pH. The mass of persulfate delivered into the soil declined with the continuous decomposition of persulfate by activation. The removal efficiency of PCBs in soil followed the order of alkaline activation > peroxide activation > citric acid chelated Fe(2+) activation > zero-valent iron activation > without activation > iron electrode activation, and the values were 40.5%, 35.6%, 34.1%, 32.4%, 30.8% and 30.5%, respectively. The activation effect was highly dependent on the ratio of activator and persulfate. PMID:26347936

  14. Intracellular Nucleic Acid Delivery by the Supercharged Dengue Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Freire, João Miguel; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Conceição, Thaís M.; Kowalczyk, Wioleta; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Andreu, David; Santos, Nuno C.; Da Poian, Andrea T.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Supercharged proteins are a recently identified class of proteins that have the ability to efficiently deliver functional macromolecules into mammalian cells. They were first developed as bioengineering products, but were later found in the human proteome. In this work, we show that this class of proteins with unusually high net positive charge is frequently found among viral structural proteins, more specifically among capsid proteins. In particular, the capsid proteins of viruses from the Flaviviridae family have all a very high net charge to molecular weight ratio (> +1.07/kDa), thus qualifying as supercharged proteins. This ubiquity raises the hypothesis that supercharged viral capsid proteins may have biological roles that arise from an intrinsic ability to penetrate cells. Dengue virus capsid protein was selected for a detailed experimental analysis. We showed that this protein is able to deliver functional nucleic acids into mammalian cells. The same result was obtained with two isolated domains of this protein, one of them being able to translocate lipid bilayers independently of endocytic routes. Nucleic acids such as siRNA and plasmids were delivered fully functional into cells. The results raise the possibility that the ability to penetrate cells is part of the native biological functions of some viral capsid proteins. PMID:24339931

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activates transglutaminase 2 leading to protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JIN-HAENG; JEONG, JAEHO; JEONG, EUI MAN; CHO, SUNG-YUP; KANG, JEONG WOOK; LIM, JISUN; HEO, JINBEOM; KANG, HYUNSOOK; KIM, IN-GYU; SHIN, DONG-MYUNG

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activation of transglutaminase 2 (TGase2) contributes to a variety of protein conformational disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cataracts. The accumulation of improperly folded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), which promotes either repair or degradation of the damaged proteins. Inadequate UPR results in protein aggregation that may contribute to the development of age-related degenerative diseases. TGase2 is a calcium-dependent enzyme that irreversibly modifies proteins by forming cross-linked protein aggregates. Intracellular TGase2 is activated by oxidative stress which generates large quantities of unfolded proteins. However, the relationship between TGase2 activity and UPR has not yet been established. In the present study, we demonstrated that ER stress activated TGase2 in various cell types. TGase2 activation was dependent on the ER stress-induced increase in the intracellular calcium ion concentration but not on the TGase2 protein expression level. Enzyme substrate analysis revealed that TGase2-mediated protein modification promoted protein aggregation concurrently with decreasing water solubility. Moreover, treatment with KCC009, a TGase2 inhibitor, abrogated ER stress-induced TGase2 activation and subsequent protein aggregation. However, TGase2 activation had no effect on ER stress-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that the accumulation of misfolded proteins activates TGase2, which further accelerates the formation of protein aggregates. Therefore, we suggest that inhibition of TGase2 may be a novel strategy by which to prevent the protein aggregation in age-related degenerative diseases. PMID:24481335

  16. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Hairong; Lee, Robert J.; Haura, Eric B.; Edwards, John G.; Dynan, William S.; Li Shuyi

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  17. Self-Assembled Modified Soy Protein/Dextran Nanogel Induced by Ultrasonication as a Delivery Vehicle for Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangzhong; Lin, Weiqin; Chen, Guangbin; Qiu, Riji

    2016-01-01

    A simple and green approach was developed to produce a novel nanogel via self-assembly of modified soy protein and dextran, to efficiently deliver riboflavin. First, modified soy protein was prepared by heating denaturation at 60 °C for 30 min or Alcalase hydrolysis for 40 min. Second, modified soy protein was mixed with dextran and ultrasonicated for 70 min so as to assemble nanogels. The modified soy protein-dextran nanogels were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ζ-potential studies to confirm the formation of NGs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the NGs to be spherical with core-shell structures, in the range of 32-40 nm size. The nanogels were stable against various environmental conditions. Furthermore, the particle size of the nanogels hardly changed with the incorporation of riboflavin. The encapsulation efficiency of nanogels was found to be up to 65.9% at a riboflavin concentration of 250 μg/mL. The nanogels exhibited a faster release in simulated intestine fluid (SIF) compared with simulated gastric fluid (SGF). From the results obtained it can be concluded that modified soy protein-dextran nanogels can be considered a promising carrier for drugs and other bioactive molecule delivery purposes. PMID:26999081

  18. Novel pH/Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels Based on Poly(β-Amino Ester) for Controlled Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Dai Phu; He, Chaoliang; Lee, Doo Sung

    The concept of this research was to use poly(β-amino ester) (PAE) as a bi-functional group for synthesis of the novel stimuli-sensitive injectable hydrogels for controlled drug/protein delivery. Firstly, PAE was used as a pH-sensitive moiety to conjugate with the temperature-sensitive biodegradable triblock copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)(PCL-PEG-PCL) or poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone-co-D,L-lactide) (PACL-PEG-PCLA). Secondly, the cationic nature of PAE was used as the second function to make ionic complexes with anionic biomolecules loaded onto the hydrogel such as insulin. As a result, the release of the drug/protein from the hydrogel device can be controlled by the degradation of the copolymer.

  19. Self-assembled virus-like particles from rotavirus structural protein VP6 for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinghuan; Chen, Weihong; Chen, Yuanding; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Jinping; Zhang, Zhijun

    2011-03-16

    Proteins of viral capsid may self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) that can find many biomedical applications such as platform for drug delivery. In this paper, we describe preparation of VLPs by self-assembly of VP6, a rotavirus capsid protein that was chemically conjugated with doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug. VP6 was first highly expressed in E. Coli, followed by purification and renaturation. DOX was then covalently attached to VP6 to form DOX-VP6 (DVP6) conjugates, which were subsequently self-assembled into VLPs under appropriate condition. Next, lactobionic acid (LA) was chemically linked to the surface of the VLPs. We demonstrated that the aforementioned nanosystem shows specific targeting to hepatoma cell line HepG2. The chemically functionalized VLPs, a kind of biological nanoparticles with excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, can be prepared in large scale from E. Coli through our method, which may find practical applications in biomedicine. PMID:21338097

  20. Transdermal delivery of biomacromolecules using lipid-like nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Evelyn A.

    The transdermal delivery of biomacromolecules, including proteins and nucleic acids, is challenging, owing to their large size and the penetration-resistant nature of the stratum corneum. Thus, an urgent need exists for the development of transdermal delivery methodologies. This research focuses on the use of cationic lipid-like nanoparticles (lipidoids) for the transdermal delivery of proteins, and establishes an in vitro model for the study. The lipidoids used were first combinatorially designed and synthesized; afterwards, they were employed for protein encapsulation in a vesicular system. A skin penetration study demonstrated that lipidoids enhance penetration depth in a pig skin model, overcoming the barrier that the stratum corneum presents. This research has successfully identified active lipidoids capable of efficiently penetrating the skin; therefore, loading proteins into lipidoid nanoparticles will facilitate the transdermal delivery of proteins. Membrane diffusion experiments were used to confirm the results. This research has confirmed that lipidoids are a suitable material for transdermal protein delivery enhancement.

  1. PolyMetformin combines carrier and anticancer activities for in vivo siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Wang, Wei; Guo, Shutao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Xiong, Yang; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a widely implemented anti-diabetic drug, exhibits potent anticancer efficacies. Herein a polymeric construction of Metformin, PolyMetformin (PolyMet) is successfully synthesized through conjugation of linear polyethylenimine (PEI) with dicyandiamide. The delocalization of cationic charges in the biguanide groups of PolyMet reduces the toxicity of PEI both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the polycationic properties of PolyMet permits capture of siRNA into a core-membrane structured lipid-polycation-hyaluronic acid (LPH) nanoparticle for systemic gene delivery. Advances herein permit LPH-PolyMet nanoparticles to facilitate VEGF siRNA delivery for VEGF knockdown in a human lung cancer xenograft, leading to enhanced tumour suppressive efficacy. Even in the absence of RNAi, LPH-PolyMet nanoparticles act similarly to Metformin and induce antitumour efficacy through activation of the AMPK and inhibition of the mTOR. In essence, PolyMet successfully combines the intrinsic anticancer efficacy of Metformin with the capacity to carry siRNA to enhance the therapeutic activity of an anticancer gene therapy. PMID:27264609

  2. New biodegradable dextran-based hydrogels for protein delivery: Synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Settimio; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Casadei, Maria Antonietta

    2015-08-01

    A new derivative of dextran grafted with polyethylene glycol methacrylate through a carbonate bond (DEX-PEG-MA) has been synthesized and characterized. The photo-crosslinking reaction of DEX-PEG-MA allowed the obtainment of biodegradable networks tested for their mechanical and release properties. The new hydrogels were compared with those made of dextran methacrylate (DEX-MA), often employed as drug delivery systems of small molecules. The inclusion of PEG as a spacer created additional interactions among the polymeric chains improving the extreme fragility and lack of hardness typical of gels made of DEX-MA. Moreover, the different behavior in terms of swelling and degradability of the networks was able to affect the release of a model macromolecule over time, making DEX-PEG-MA matrices suitable candidates for the delivery of high molecular weight peptides. Interestingly, the combination of the two dextran derivatives showed intermediate ability to modulate the release of high molecular weight macromolecules. PMID:25933541

  3. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Lenkov, Olga; Shaw, Aubie; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  4. Chitosan coated nanostructured lipid carriers for brain delivery of proteins by intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Gartziandia, Oihane; Herran, Enara; Pedraz, Jose Luis; Carro, Eva; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria

    2015-10-01

    The remarkable increase in the prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases has become a serious public health problem. Considering the lack of effective treatments to address these diseases and the difficulties in accessing the brain due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), to attain a successful strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, the administration route becomes a point of interest. The intranasal route provides a non-invasive method to bypass the BBB. Moreover, the development of new technologies for the protection and delivery of peptides is an interesting approach to consider. Thus, in this work, a suitable chitosan coated nanostructured lipid carrier (CS-NLC) formulation with the capacity to reach the brain after being intranasally administered was successfully developed and optimized. The optimal formulation displayed a particle size of 114 nm with a positive surface charge of +28 mV. The in vitro assays demonstrated the biocompatibility of the nanocarrier and its cellular uptake by 16HBE14o- cells. Furthermore, no haemagglutination or haemolysis processes were observed when the particles were incubated with erythrocytes, and no toxicity signals appeared in the nasal mucosa of mice after the administration of CS-NLCs. Finally, the biodistribution study of CS-NLC-DiR demonstrated an efficient brain delivery of the particles after intranasal administration. In conclusion, CS-NLC can be considered to be a safe and effective nanocarrier for nose-to-brain drug delivery; however, to obtain a higher concentration of the drug in the brain following intranasal administration, further modifications are warranted in the CS-NLC formulation. PMID:26209963

  5. Tobacco mosaic virus-based protein nanoparticles and nanorods for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruckman, Michael A; Czapar, Anna E; VanMeter, Allen; Randolph, Lauren N; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-06-10

    Drug delivery systems are required for drug targeting to avoid adverse effects associated with chemotherapy treatment regimes. Our approach is focused on the study and development of plant virus-based materials as drug delivery systems; specifically, this work focuses on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Native TMV forms a hollow, high aspect-ratio nanotube measuring 300×18nm with a 4nm-wide central channel. Heat-transformation can be applied to TMV yielding spherical nanoparticles (SNPs) measuring ~50nm in size. While bioconjugate chemistries have been established to modify the TMV rod, such methods have not yet been described for the SNP platform. In this work, we probed the reactivity of SNPs toward bioconjugate reactions targeting lysine, glutamine/aspartic acid, and cysteine residues. We demonstrate functionalization of SNPs using these chemistries yielding efficient payload conjugation. In addition to covalent labeling techniques, we developed encapsulation techniques, where the cargo is loaded into the SNP during heat-transition from rod-to-sphere. Finally, we developed TMV and SNP formulations loaded with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin, and we demonstrate the application of TMV rods and spheres for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer. PMID:26941034

  6. Enhanced delivery of an anti-dandruff active in a shampoo vehicle.

    PubMed

    Georgalas, Art

    2004-01-01

    Formulating a delivery vehicle to enhance activity can potentially give higher activity or allow for adjustment to a lesser percent of active. A study was conducted in which the anti-dandruff active, Octopirox, INCI Piroctone Olamine [1-Hydroxy-4-methyl-6-(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)-2(1H)-pyridinone], was incorporated into a simple shampoo base at two levels as well as in the same base with an added amphiphilic surfactant blend (Biobase SMC) at the lower level. A group of thirty (30) male subjects with moderate to severe dandruff were divided into three groups each of which evaluated one of three products for four weeks. Methods of evaluation included gravimetric determination of actual dandruff flakes, fluorescent staining of suspect yeast populations, blind evaluation by trained clinical personnel and panelist self assessment. The study demonstrated that the Octopirox at 0.2% active delivered in the amphiphile blend was superior to the same level in the simple shampoo base and equivalent in activity to a much higher level (0.5%) in the base only. A proposed mechanism postulates the formation of liposome-like association structures that solubilize and entrap the Octopirox and deposit is substantively to the scalp for enhanced longer lasting activity. PMID:15645098

  7. Comparing the Effects of Light- or Sonic-Activated Drug Delivery: Photochemical/Sonochemical Internalization.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Steen J; Gonzales, Jonathan; Zamora, Genesis; Berg, Kristian; Nair, Rohit Kumar; Hirschberg, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a technique that uses the photochemical properties of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the enhanced delivery of endolysosomal-trapped macromolecules into the cell cytoplasm. The released agent can therefore exert its full biological activity, in contrast to being degraded by lysosomal hydrolases. Activation of photosensitizers via ultrasound (US), called sonodynamic therapy (SDT), has been proposed as an alternative to light-activated PDT for the treatment of cancerous tumors. The use of focused US (FUS) to activate photosensitizers allows treatment at tumor sites buried deep within tissues, overcoming one of the main limitations of PDT/PCI. We have examined ultrasonic activation of photosensitizers together with the anticancer agent bleomycin (BLM) using sonochemical internalization (SCI), as an alternative to light-activated PCI. Our results indicate that, compared to drug or US treatment alone, US activation of the photosensitizer AlPcS2a together with BLM significantly inhibits the ability of treated glioma cells to form clonogenic colonies. PMID:27279586

  8. A mesoporous silica nanoparticle with charge-convertible pore walls for efficient intracellular protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Sung; Kim, Chan Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Hye Choi, Ji; Lee, Se Geun; Yun, Young-Pil; Kwon, Ick Chan; Lee, Seung Jin; Jeong, Seo Young; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2010-06-01

    We report a smart mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) with a pore surface designed to undergo charge conversion in intracellular endosomal condition. The surface of mesopores in the silica nanoparticles was engineered to have pH-hydrolyzable citraconic amide. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses confirmed the successful modification of the pore surfaces. MSNs (MSN-Cit) with citraconic amide functionality on the pore surfaces exhibited a negative zeta potential (-10 mV) at pH 7.4 because of the presence of carboxylate end groups. At cellular endosomal pH (~5.0), MSN-Cit have a positive zeta potential (16 mV) indicating the dramatic charge conversion from negative to positive by hydrolysis of surface citraconic amide. Cytochrome c (Cyt c) of positive charges could be incorporated into the pores of MSN-Cit by electrostatic interactions. The release of Cyt c can be controlled by adjusting the pH of the release media. At pH 7.4, the Cyt c release was retarded, whereas, at pH 5.0, MSN-Cit facilitated the release of Cyt c. The released Cyt c maintained the enzymatic activity of native Cyt c. Hemolytic activity of MSN-Cit over red blood cells (RBCs) was more pronounced at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0, indicating the capability of intracellular endosomal escape of MSN carriers. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies showed that MSN-Cit effectively released Cyt c in endosomal compartments after uptake by cancer cells. The MSN developed in this work may serve as efficient intracellular carriers of many cell-impermeable therapeutic proteins.

  9. Hetero-modification of TRAIL trimer for improved drug delivery and in vivo antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li-Qiang; Zhao, Wen-Bin; Lai, Jun; Ding, Ding; Wei, Xiao-Yue; Li, Yang-Yang; Liu, Wen-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yue; Xu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Poor pharmacokinetics and resistance within some tumor cell lines have been the major obstacles during the preclinical or clinical application of TRAIL (tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand). The half-life of TRAIL114-281 (114 to 281 amino acids) was revealed to be no more than 30 minutes across species. Therefore maleimido activated PEG (polyethylene glycol) and MMAE (Monomethyl Auristatin E) were applied to site-specifically conjugate with the mutated cysteines from different monomers of TRAIL successively, taking advantage of steric effects involved within TRAIL mutant conjugations. As a result, TRAIL trimer was hetero-modified for different purposes. And the resulting PEG-TRAIL-vcMMAE conjugate exhibited dramatically improved half-life (11.54 h), favourable in vivo targeting capability and antitumor activities while no sign of toxicity in xenograft models, suggesting it’s a viable therapeutic and drug delivery strategy. PMID:26445897

  10. [Gene delivery system based on low molecular weight polyethylenimine and its transfection activity in the skin tissue].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong Jun; Li, Ya Ping; Li, Jun; Jia, Jing Fen; Liu, Lei

    2004-04-01

    Low molecular weight polyethylenimine (LMW-PEI) was linked to an expressing plasmid contains a green fluorescence protein (GFP) reporter gene and effective gene transfer was observed in CM7221 cell line tested. We examined the relationship among the molecular weight, structure of PEI and their transfection activity and cytotoxicity on CM7221 cell line. We also examined the position and continuance time of the GFP reporter gene expressed in the skin tissue of mouse. Results showed that LMW-PEI/DNA complexes led to high levels of expression in the CM7221 cell line (about 55%). However, with the increasing of PEI molecular weight, the transfection activity of PEI was decreasing. There was an increasing cytotoxicity with the larger PEI molecules. Further research showed that LMW-PEI induced a significant and long-lasting (7 days) expression of the GFP reporter gene in the hair vesicle, sweat, gland, sebaceous gland in the mouse skin tissues. The LMW-PEI described here is a new, highly efficient and non-cytotoxic vector. It would be a useful non-viral vector for gene delivery technology, particular useful as simple skin-specific vehicles of therapeutic genes. PMID:15259980

  11. Efficacious delivery of protein drugs to prostate cancer cells by PSMA-targeted pH-responsive chimaeric polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Weijing; Zou, Yan; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-12-28

    Protein drugs as one of the most potent biotherapeutics have a tremendous potential in cancer therapy. Their application is, nevertheless, restricted by absence of efficacious, biocompatible, and cancer-targeting nanosystems. In this paper, we report that 2-[3-[5-amino-1-carboxypentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (Acupa)-decorated pH-responsive chimaeric polymersomes (Acupa-CPs) efficiently deliver therapeutic proteins into prostate cancer cells. Acupa-CPs had a unimodal distribution with average sizes ranging from 157-175 nm depending on amounts of Acupa. They displayed highly efficient loading of both model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome C (CC), affording high protein loading contents of 9.1-24.5 wt.%. The in vitro release results showed that protein release was markedly accelerated at mildly acidic pH due to the hydrolysis of acetal bonds in the vesicular membrane. CLSM and MTT studies demonstrated that CC-loaded Acupa10-CPs mediated efficient delivery of protein drugs into PSMA positive LNCaP cells leading to pronounced antitumor effect, in contrast to their non-targeting counterparts and free CC. Remarkably, granzyme B (GrB)-loaded Acupa10-CPs caused effective apoptosis of LNCaP cells with a low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.6 nM. Flow cytometry and CLSM studies using MitoCapture™ revealed obvious depletion of mitochondria membrane potential in LNCaP cells treated with GrB-loaded Acupa10-CPs. The preliminary in vivo experiments showed that Acupa-CPs had a long circulation time with an elimination phase half-life of 3.3h in nude mice. PSMA-targeted, pH-responsive, and chimaeric polymersomes have appeared as efficient protein nanocarriers for targeted prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26348387

  12. Modeling Protein Folding and Applying It to a Relevant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Allan; Goetze, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The different levels of protein structure that can be easily understood by creating a model that simulates protein folding, which can then be evaluated by applying it to a relevant activity, is presented. The materials required and the procedure for constructing a protein folding model are mentioned.

  13. Oral Delivery of a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Expressing Influenza A Virus Proteins Protects Mice against H5N1 and H1N1 Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoguang; Gong, Hao; Reeves, Michael; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Pan, Zishu; Liu, Fenyong; Wu, Jianguo; Lu, Sangwei

    2015-01-01

    Attenuated strains of invasive enteric bacteria, such as Salmonella, represent promising gene delivery agents for nucleic acid-based vaccines as they can be administrated orally. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. We showed that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient gene transfer activity for HA and NA expression and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we evaluated the immune responses and protection induced by the constructed Salmonella-based vaccine. Our study showed that the Salmonella-based vaccine induced significant production of anti-HA serum IgG and mucosal IgA, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells in orally vaccinated mice. Furthermore, mice orally vaccinated with the Salmonella vaccine expressing viral HA and NA proteins were completely protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5N1 as well as H1N1 influenza viruses while none of the animals treated with the Salmonella vaccine carrying the empty expression vector with no viral antigen expression was protected. These results suggest that the Salmonella-based vaccine elicits strong antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and provides effective immune protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel attenuated Salmonella strains as new oral vaccine vectors against influenza viruses. PMID:26083421

  14. Substrate delivery by the AAA+ ClpX and ClpC1 unfoldases activates the mycobacterial ClpP1P2 peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Karl R.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterial Clp-family proteases function via collaboration of the heteromeric ClpP1P2 peptidase with a AAA+ partner, ClpX or ClpC1. These enzymes are essential for M. tuberculosis viability and are validated antibacterial drug targets, but the requirements for assembly and regulation of functional proteolytic complexes are poorly understood. Here, we report the reconstitution of protein degradation by mycobacterial Clp proteases in vitro and describe novel features of these enzymes that distinguish them from orthologs in other bacteria. Both ClpX and ClpC1 catalyze ATP-dependent unfolding and degradation of native protein substrates in conjunction with ClpP1P2, but neither mediates protein degradation with just ClpP1 or ClpP2. ClpP1P2 alone has negligible peptidase activity, but is strongly stimulated by translocation of protein substrates into ClpP1P2 by either AAA+ partner. Interestingly, our results support a model in which both binding of a AAA+ partner and protein-substrate delivery are required to stabilize active ClpP1P2. Our model has implications for therapeutically targeting ClpP1P2 in dormant M. tuberculosis, and our reconstituted systems should facilitate identification of novel Clp protease inhibitors and activators. PMID:24976069

  15. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  16. Covalent attachment of cyclic TAT peptides to GFP results in protein delivery into live cells with immediate bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Herce, Henry D; Natale, Francesco; Bohlke, Nina; Budisa, Nediljko; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-02-01

    The delivery of free molecules into the cytoplasm and nucleus by using arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) has been limited to small cargoes, while large cargoes such as proteins are taken up and trapped in endocytic vesicles. Based on recent work, in which we showed that the transduction efficiency of arginine-rich CPPs can be greatly enhanced by cyclization, the aim was to use cyclic CPPs to transport full-length proteins, in this study green fluorescent protein (GFP), into the cytosol of living cells. Cyclic and linear CPP-GFP conjugates were obtained by using azido-functionalized CPPs and an alkyne-functionalized GFP. Our findings reveal that the cyclic-CPP-GFP conjugates are internalized into live cells with immediate bioavailability in the cytosol and the nucleus, whereas linear CPP analogues do not confer GFP transduction. This technology expands the application of cyclic CPPs to the efficient transport of functional full-length proteins into live cells. PMID:25521313

  17. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  18. 76 FR 66740 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry and Immediate Delivery Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... Delivery Application AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security... concerning the Entry and Immediate Delivery Application (Forms 3461 and 3461 ALT). This request for comment...: Title: Entry and Immediate Delivery Application. OMB Number: 1651-0024. Form Number: CBP Form 3461...

  19. Acoustically-Active Microbubbles Conjugated to Liposomes: Characterization of a Proposed Drug Delivery Vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Dayton, Paul A.; Lum, Aaron F. H.; Little, Erika; Paoli, Eric E.; Zheng, Hairong; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    A new acoustically-active delivery vehicle was developed by conjugating liposomes and microbubbles, using the high affinity interaction between avidin and biotin. Binding between microbubbles and liposomes each containing 5% DSPE-PEG2kBiotin was highly dependent on avidin concentration and observed above an avidin concentration of 10 nM. With an optimized avidin and liposome concentration, we measured and calculated as high as 1000 to 10,000 liposomes with average diameters of 200 and 100 nm, respectively, attached to each microbubble. Replacing avidin with neutravidin resulted in 3-fold higher binding, approaching the calculated saturation level. High-speed photography of this new drug delivery vehicle demonstrated that the liposome-bearing microbubbles oscillate in response to an acoustic pulse similar to microbubble contrast agents. Additionally, microbubbles carrying liposomes could be spatially concentrated on a monolayer of PC-3 cells at the focal point of ultrasound beam. As a result of cell-vehicle contact, the liposomes fused with the cells and internalization of NBD-cholesterol occurred shortly after incubation at 37°C, with internalization of NBD-cholesterol substantially enhanced in the acoustic focus. PMID:17300849

  20. The Effect of Transdermal Delivery of Fentanyl on Activity in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, LM; Augustsson, H; Jensen-Waern, M; Nyman, G

    2005-01-01

    Recently, decreased activity levels have been observed in pigs treated postoperatively with transdermal delivery of fentanyl (TD-fentanyl) after isoflurane anaesthesia. Whether the change in behaviour is related to opioid-induced sedation or to insufficient pain relief remains to be investigated. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate the effect of TD-fentanyl 50 μg h-1 on the activity level with and without isoflurane anaesthesia. Eight pigs (25.4 ± 5.2 kg) were submitted to a cross-over study and given two treatments; 1) fentanyl patch applied after 30 minutes of anaesthesia (treatment A/F) and 2) fentanyl patch without anaesthesia (treatment F). The pigs' behaviour was observed from a video recording instantaneously every 10 minutes for 24 h before treatments and up to 72 h after the patch attachment. Venous blood samples were taken 1, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after the patch application. The behaviour recordings showed that TD-fentanyl did not produce sedation in any pig. No differences were found between the two treatments in activity level, weight gain or serum fentanyl concentration. This concentration measured after 24 h was 0.27 ± 0.11 ng ml-1 and 0.47 ± 0.40 ng ml-1 in the A/F and F group, respectively. In conclusion, transdermal delivery of 50 μg h-1 fentanyl did not cause inactivity in growing pigs. However, the large variations in serum fentanyl concentration indicate that drug absorption from transdermal patches is unpredictable and sometimes deficient. PMID:16261927

  1. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. PMID:26739427

  2. Development of a long-acting, protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel formed by a polyion complex for local protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shiro; Kaneko, Junya; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer immunotherapies are attracting much attention, it is difficult to develop bioactive proteins owing to the severe systemic toxicity. To overcome the issue, we designed new local protein delivery system by using a protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel (RIG), which is formed by a polyion complex (PIC) comprising three components, viz., cationic polyamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-polyamine triblock copolymer possessing ROS-scavenging moieties as side chains; anionic poly(acrylic acid); and a protein. The mixture formed the protein-loaded PIC flower micelles at room temperature, which immediately converted to a gel with high mechanical strength upon exposure to physiological conditions. Because the protein electrostatically interacts with the PIC gel network, RIG provided a sustained release of the protein without a significant initial burst, regardless of the types of proteins in vitro, and much longer retention of the protein at the local injection site in mice than that of the naked protein. Subcutaneous injections of IL-12@RIG in the vicinity of tumor tissue showed remarkable tumor growth inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, compared to that observed with injection of IL-12 alone, suppressing adverse events caused by IL-12-induced ROS. Our results indicate that RIG has potential as a platform technology for an injectable sustained-release carrier for proteins. PMID:26828685

  3. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of Visual Cycle-Associated Proteins in RPE of rd12 Mice before and after RPE65 Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qinxiang; Ren, Yueping; Tzekov, Radouil; Hua, Shanshan; Li, Minghan; Pang, Jijing; Qu, Jia; Li, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the iTRAQ-based proteomic changes of visual cycle-associated proteins in RPE of rd12 mice before and after RPE65 gene delivery. Mehtods. The right eyes of rd12 mice underwent RPE65 gene delivery by subretinal injection at P14, leaving the left eyes as control. C57BL/6J mice were served as a wide-type control group. ERGs were recorded at P42, and RPE-choroid-sclera complex was collected to evaluate the proteomic changes in visual cycle-associated proteins by iTRAQ-based analysis. Western blot was used to confirm the changes in the differentially expressed proteins of interest. Results. ERG parameters improved dramatically at P42 after RPE65 delivery. The proteomics analysis identified a total 536 proteins with a global false discovery rate of 0.21%, out of which 7 were visual cycle-associated proteins. RALBP-1, RBP-1, and IRBP were reduced in the untreated rd12 eyes and the former two were improved after gene therapy, confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusions. RPE65 gene delivery restored retinal function at P42 and modified the expression of other functional proteins implicated in the visual cycle. The level of RALBP-1 was still below the normal level after gene therapy in rd12 mice, which may explain the delayed dark adaption in LCA patients undergoing similar therapy. PMID:26124962

  4. DIETARY PROTEIN AND LACTOSE INCREASE TRANSLATION INITIATION FACTOR ACTIVATION AND TISSUE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN NEONATAL PIGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein synthesis and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) activation are increased in muscle and liver of pigs parenterally infused with amino acids and insulin. To examine the effects of enteral protein and carbohydrate on protein synthesis, pigs (n = 42, 1.7 kg body wt) were fed isocaloric milk die...

  5. Construction of human LRIG1-TAT fusions and TAT-mediated LRIG1 protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuchun; Fu, Liqi; Liu, Bo; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Kai; Ye, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG1) is a tumor suppressor in animals and also functions as an endogenous suppressor in human tumor. The level of LRIG1 expression is highly associated with patient survival in clinic. The exploration of LRIG1 as a protein drug is an important task. HIV-1 transactivator of transcription peptide (TAT) is an excellent candidate for protein transduction. In this study, human LRIG1 was cloned and LRIG1-TAT fusion gene was constructed. The fusion proteins were produced by an Escherichia coli strain and purified by Ni(2+)-resin. Western blot assay and immunofluorescence microscopy were employed for monitoring LRIG1-TAT protein transduction into human neuroblastoma cells. Cell proliferation and invasion were measured for evaluating the effect of LRIG1-TAT on neuroblastoma cell. Our data showed that LRIG1 protein can be delivered into cells or organs in living animals by TAT. One-time transduction of LRIG1 proteins into human neuroblastoma cells enhanced cell proliferation and increased cell invasion. In vivo transduction showed that LRIG1-TAT protein can be presented in living animal organs. Our experiments provide a new vision on LRIG1 applications and also offer a therapy window for revealing the intrinsic function of LRIG1 on cells. PMID:25661388

  6. Protein nanocages for self-triggered nuclear delivery of DNA-targeted chemotherapeutics in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Michela; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Sommaruga, Silvia; Fiandra, Luisa; Truffi, Marta; Rizzuto, Maria A; Colombo, Miriam; Tortora, Paolo; Corsi, Fabio; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-12-28

    A genetically engineered apoferritin variant consisting of 24 heavy-chain subunits (HFn) was produced to achieve a cumulative delivery of an antitumor drug, which exerts its cytotoxic action by targeting the DNA at the nucleus of human cancer cells with subcellular precision. The rationale of our approach is based on exploiting the natural arsenal of defense of cancer cells to stimulate them to recruit large amounts of HFn nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin inside their nucleus in response to a DNA damage, which leads to a programmed cell death. After demonstrating the selectivity of HFn for representative cancer cells compared to healthy fibroblasts, doxorubicin-loaded HFn was used to treat the cancer cells. The results from confocal microscopy and DNA damage assays proved that loading of doxorubicin in HFn nanoparticles increased the nuclear delivery of the drug, thus enhancing doxorubicin efficacy. Doxorubicin-loaded HFn acts as a "Trojan Horse": HFn was internalized in cancer cells faster and more efficiently compared to free doxorubicin, then promptly translocated into the nucleus following the DNA damage caused by the partial release in the cytoplasm of encapsulated doxorubicin. This self-triggered translocation mechanism allowed the drug to be directly released in the nuclear compartment, where it exerted its toxic action. This approach was reliable and straightforward providing an antiproliferative effect with high reproducibility. The particular self-assembling nature of HFn nanocage makes it a versatile and tunable nanovector for a broad range of molecules suitable both for detection and treatment of cancer cells. PMID:25312541

  7. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed. PMID:24749983

  8. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  9. Mesoporous magnetic hollow nanoparticles—protein carriers for lysosome escaping and cytosolic delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xinglu; Meng, Xianwei; Tang, Fangqiong; Li, Linlin; Chen, Dong; Liu, Huiyu; Zhang, Yanqi; Ren, Jun

    2008-11-01

    It is important for a controlled release system to determine whether nanoparticles can penetrate cell membranes and deliver protein into the nuclear or cytosolic compartments of cells, and thus function as carriers. Here, we prepared different functionalized mesoporous magnetic hollow nanoparticles (MMHs) and chose bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein to detect the intracellular trafficking of MMHs. The results showed that MMHs modified with amino groups (AMMHs) were efficient in protein loading and that the loading was dependent on the pH, temperature and ionic strength. Furthermore, we found that the AMMHs not only transported BSA into the cells but also released the BSA carried into the nuclear or cytosolic compartments of the cells. In addition, the nanoparticles were biocompatible, and the encapsulation of BSA in AMMHs did not affect their bioactivity. Taken together, AMMHs are excellent carriers for releasing protein into the cytosol and nucleus, and they have the potential to be used in a controlled release system.

  10. Results from the Active for Life process evaluation: program delivery fidelity and adaptations.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sarah F; Wilcox, Sara; Ory, Marcia G; Lattimore, Diana; Leviton, Laura; Castro, Cynthia; Carpenter, Ruth Ann; Rheaume, Carol

    2010-04-01

    Active for Life((R)) (AFL) was a large (n = 8159) translational initiative to increase physical activity (PA) in midlife and older adults. Translational research calls for a shift in emphasis from just understanding what works (efficacy) to also understanding how it works in more 'real world' settings. This article describes the process evaluation design and findings, discuss how these findings were used to better understand the translational process and provide a set of process evaluation recommendations with community-based translational research. AFL community organizations across the United States implemented one of two evidence-based PA programs (Active Living Every Day-The Cooper Institute; Human Kinetics Inc. or Active Choices-Stanford University). Both programs were based on the transtheoretical model and social cognitive theory. Overall, the process evaluation revealed high-dose delivery and implementation fidelity by quite varied community organizations serving diverse adult populations. Findings reveal most variation occurred for program elements requiring more participant engagement. Additionally, the results show how a collaborative process allowed the organizations to 'fit' the programs to their specific participant base while maintaining fidelity to essential program elements. PMID:19325031

  11. Poliovirus protein 2C has ATPase and GTPase activities.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, P L; Carrasco, L

    1993-04-15

    Poliovirus protein 2C belongs to an expanding group of proteins containing a nucleotide binding motif in their sequence. We present evidence that poliovirus 2C has nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity and binds to RNA. Poliovirus 2C was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with the maltose binding protein (MBP). The fusion protein MBP-2C is efficiently cut by protease Xa within the 2C region. Thus, the fusion protein as such was used to assay for the putative activities of poliovirus 2C. Deletion mutants were constructed which lacked different portions of the 2C carboxyl terminus: mutant 2C delta 1 lacked the last 169 amino acids, whereas mutant 2C delta 2 had the last 74 amino acids deleted. The fusion proteins MBP-2C, MBP-2BC, and the mutant MBP-2C delta 2 that contained the first 255 amino acids of 2C had NTPase activity. Both ATPase and GTPase activities are inhibited by antibodies directed against the MBP-2C protein. Analysis of the ability of the different proteins to bind to labeled RNA indicates that MBP-2C and MBP-2BC form a complex, whereas none of the mutants interacted with RNA, indicating that the RNA binding domain lies beyond amino acid 255. None of the fusion proteins had detectable helicase activity. We suggest that poliovirus protein 2C shows similarities to the GTPases group involved in vesicular traffic and transports the viral RNA replication complexes. These results provide the first experimental evidence that poliovirus protein 2C is an NTPase and that this protein has affinity for nucleic acids. PMID:8385138

  12. In situ synthesis of new magnetite chitosan/carrageenan nanocomposites by electrostatic interactions for protein delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Long, Jie; Yu, Xiaoqin; Xu, Enbo; Wu, Zhengzong; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Jiao, Aiquan

    2015-10-20

    We present a simple method to develop magnetite chitosan/carrageenan nanocomposites by in situ synthesis under mild conditions, and then their potential for controlled release of macromolecules was also evaluated. The structural, morphological and magnetic properties of the as-prepared materials were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. With the varying mass ratio (chitosan to Fe3O4-carrageenan nanocomposite), the developed nanocarriers presented sizes within 73-355nm and zeta potentials of -42-32mV. Using bovine serum albumin as model protein, the adsorption and release behaviors were investigated. Nanocarriers evidenced excellent loading capacity of 181mgg(-1) at protein concentration of 0.2mgmL(-1), and demonstrated capacity to provide a sustained release up to 85% of adsorbed protein in 30min in intestinal medium rather than acidic medium. These results suggest that the developed magnetite chitosan/carrageenan nanocomposites are promising in the application of magnetically targeted delivery of therapeutic macromolecules. PMID:26256165

  13. Protein-protein interactions between SWCNT/chitosan/EGF and EGF receptor: a model of drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Kungwan, Nawee; Hannongbua, Supot

    2016-09-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was used as the targeting ligand to enhance the specificity of a cancer drug delivery system (DDS) via its specific interaction with the EGF receptor (EGFR) that is overexpressed on the surface of some cancer cells. To investigate the intermolecular interaction and binding affinity between the EGF-conjugated DDS and the EGFR, 50 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the complex of tethered EGFR and EGF linked to single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through a biopolymer chitosan wrapping the tube outer surface (EGFR·EGF-CS-SWCNT-Drug complex), and compared to the EGFR·EGF complex and free EGFR. The binding pattern of the EGF-CS-SWCNT-Drug complex to the EGFR was broadly comparable to that for EGF, but the binding affinity of the EGF-CS-SWCNT-Drug complex was predicted to be somewhat better than that for EGF alone. Additionally, the chitosan chain could prevent undesired interactions of SWCNT at the binding pocket region. Therefore, EGF connected to SWCNT via a chitosan linker is a seemingly good formulation for developing a smart DDS served as part of an alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26381241

  14. Comparative analysis of protein expression of three stem cell populations: models of cytokine delivery system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Roche, Stephane; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Gomez, L Adriana; Bouckenooghe, Thomas; Lehmann, Sylvain; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Schiller, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Several mechanisms mediate the regenerative and reparative capacity of stem cells, including cytokine secretion; therefore these cells can act as delivery systems of therapeutic molecules. Here we begin to address the molecular and cellular basis of their regenerative potential by characterizing the proteomic profile of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and marrow isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells, followed by analysis of the secretory profile of the latter stem cell population. Proteomic analysis establishes the closer relationship between hMSCs and MIAMI cells, while hESCs are more divergent. However, MIAMI cells appear to have more proteins in common with hESCs than hMSCs. Proteins characteristic of hMSCs include transgelin-2, phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1), Heat-Shock 20 kDa protein (HSP20/HSPβ6), and programmed cell death 6-interacting protein (PDC6I) among others. MIAMI cells are characterized by the high level expression of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isoenzyme L1 (UCHL1), 14-3-3 zeta, HSP27 (HSPβ1), and tropomyosin 4 and 3. For hESC, elongation factor Tu (EFTu), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) and the peroxiredoxins 1, 2, and 6 (PRDX1, PRDX2, and PRDX6) were the most characteristic. Secretome analysis indicates that MIAMI cells secrete higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Fractalkine, Interleukin-6, interlukin-8, and growth related oncogene (GRO), compared to hMSCs. These soluble mediators are known to play key roles in angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, atheroprotection, immunomodulation, neuroprotection, axonal growth, progenitor cell migration, and prevention of apoptosis. All these roles are consistent with a reparative pro-survival secretory phenotype. We further discuss the potential of these cells as therapeutic vehicles. PMID:22285475

  15. Protein determination in seeds by proton activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J. R.; Dinator, M. I.; Cerda, P.

    1989-04-01

    A proton beam of 6.6 MeV has been used to produce 11C and 13N in Araucaria Araucana seeds. Their positron decay allows determination of the N/C ratio. In seeds the nitrogen content is associated to proteins while carbon is spread in the organic material. Samples were irradiated for about 10 min with a beam intensity of 5 nA on areas of 1 mm 2. Slices of the seed were radially explored, showing a larger concentration of protein in the center.

  16. Nanoscale Drug Delivery Platforms Overcome Platinum-Based Resistance in Cancer Cells Due to Abnormal Membrane Protein Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xue; Hall, Matthew D.; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Paul C.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The development of cellular resistance to platinum-based chemotherapies is often associated with reduced intracellular platinum concentrations. In some models, this reduction is due to abnormal membrane protein trafficking, resulting in reduced uptake by transporters at the cell surface. Given the central role of platinum drugs in the clinic, it is critical to overcome cisplatin resistance by bypassing the plasma membrane barrier to significantly increase the intracellular cisplatin concentration enough to inhibit the proliferation of cisplatin-resistant cells. Therefore, rational design of appropriate nanoscale drug delivery platforms (nDDPs) loaded with cisplatin or other platinum analogs as payloads is a possible strategy to solve this problem. This review will focus on the known mechanism of membrane trafficking in cisplatin-resistant cells, and the development and employment of nDDPs to improve cell uptake of cisplatin. PMID:24219825

  17. Co-delivery and controlled release of stromal cell-derived factor-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2-driven osteogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HAIPENG; WANG, JINMING; DENG, FEILONG; LIU, YUN; ZHUANG, XIUMEI; XU, JIAYUN; LI, LONG

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable focus in investigations on the delivery systems and clinical applications of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) for novel bone formation. However, current delivery systems require high levels of BMP-2 to exert a biological function. There are several concerns in using of high levels of BMP-2, including safety and the high cost of treatment. Therefore, the development of strategies to decrease the levels of BMP-2 required in these delivery systems is required. In our previous studies, a controlled-release system was developed, which used Traut's reagent and the cross-linker, 4-(N-maleimi-domethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid 3-sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester sodium salt (Sulfo-SMCC), to chemically conjugate BMP-2 directly on collagen discs. In the current study, retention efficiency and release kinetics of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) cross-linked on collagen scaffolds were detected. In addition, the osteogenic activity of SDF-1α and suboptimal doses of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen discs following subcutaneous implantation in rats were evaluated. Independent two-tailed t-tests and one-way analysis of variance were used for analysis. In the present study, the controlled release of SDF-1α chemically conjugated on collagen scaffolds was demonstrated. By optimizing the concentrations of Traut's reagent and the Sulfo-SMCC cross-linker, a significantly higher level of SDF-1α was covalently retained on the collagen scaffold, compared with that retained using a physical adsorption method. Mesenchymal stem cell homing indicated that the biological function of the SDF-1α cross-linked on the collagen scaffolds remained intact. In rats, co-treatment with SDF-1α and a suboptimal dose of BMP-2 cross-linked on collagen scaffolds using this chemically conjugated method induced higher levels of ectopic bone formation, compared with the physical adsorption method. No ectopic bone formation was observed following treatment with a

  18. Targeted Drug Delivery with Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Using Acoustically-Activated Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cherry C.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. More homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  19. Monitoring G protein activation in cells with BRET

    PubMed Central

    Masuho, Ikuo; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Lambert, Nevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Live-cell assays based on fluorescence and luminescence are now indispensable tools for the study of G protein signaling. Assays based on fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) have been particularly valuable for monitoring changes in second messengers, protein-protein interactions, and protein conformation. Here we describe a BRET assay that monitors the release of free Gβγ dimers after activation of heterotrimers containing Gα subunits from all four G protein subfamilies. This assay provides useful kinetic and pharmacological information with reasonably high throughput using standard laboratory equipment. PMID:26260597

  20. Intracellular delivery of fluorescent protein into viable wheat microspores using cationic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bilichak, Andriy; Luu, Justin; Eudes, François

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are specialized generative cells with haploid genome that demonstrate the amenability toward embryogenesis under certain conditions. The induced microspore culture technique is largely exploited by the breeding programs of wheat and other crops due to its high efficiency for generation of the large number of haploid plants in the relatively short period of time. The ability to produce mature double haploid plant from a single cell has also attracted attention of the plant biotechnologists in the past few years. More importantly, the possibility to deliver proteins for improvement of embryogenesis and the genome modification purposes holds great potential for transgene-free wheat biotechnology. In the present study, we examined the ability of cationic and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to convey a covalently-linked mCherry protein inside the viable microspores. We demonstrate that the affinity of CPPs to the microspore cells dependents on their charge with the highest efficiency of CPP-mCherry binding to the cells achieved by cationic CPPs (penetratin and R9). Additionally, due to overall negative charge of the microspore cell wall, the successful uptake of the protein cargo by live microspore cells is attained by utilization of a reversible disulfide bond between the R9 CPP and mCherry protein. Overall, the approach proposed herein can be applied by the other biotechnology groups for the fast and efficient screening of the different CPP candidates for their ability to deliver proteins inside the viable plant cells. PMID:26379691

  1. In situ preparation and protein delivery of silicate–alginate composite microspheres with core-shell structure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Gelinsky, Michael; Xiao, Yin; Chang, Jiang; Friis, Thor; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2011-01-01

    The efficient loading and sustained release of proteins from bioactive microspheres remain a significant challenge. In this study, we have developed bioactive microspheres which can be loaded with protein and then have a controlled rate of protein release into a surrounding medium. This was achieved by preparing a bioactive microsphere system with core-shell structure, combining a calcium silicate (CS) shell with an alginate (A) core by a one-step in situ method. The result was to improve the microspheres' protein adsorption and release, which yielded a highly bioactive material with potential uses in bone repair applications. The composition and the core-shell structure, as well as the formation mechanism of the obtained CS–A microspheres, were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer dot and line-scanning analysis. The protein loading efficiency reached 75 per cent in CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure by the in situ method. This is significantly higher than that of pure A or CS–A microspheres prepared by non-in situ method, which lack a core-shell structure. CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure showed a significant decrease in the burst release of proteins, maintaining sustained release profile in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at both pH 7.4 and 4.3, compared with the controls. The protein release from CS–A microspheres is predominantly controlled by a Fickian diffusion mechanism. The CS–A microspheres with a core-shell structure were shown to have improved apatite-mineralization in simulated body fluids compared with the controls, most probably owing to the existence of bioactive CS shell on the surface of the microspheres. Our results indicate that the core-shell structure of CS–A microspheres play an important role in enhancing protein delivery and mineralization, which makes these composite materials promising candidates for application in bone

  2. Designer protein delivery: From natural to engineered affinity-controlled release systems.

    PubMed

    Pakulska, Malgosia M; Miersch, Shane; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-03-18

    Exploiting binding affinities between molecules is an established practice in many fields, including biochemical separations, diagnostics, and drug development; however, using these affinities to control biomolecule release is a more recent strategy. Affinity-controlled release takes advantage of the reversible nature of noncovalent interactions between a therapeutic protein and a binding partner to slow the diffusive release of the protein from a vehicle. This process, in contrast to degradation-controlled sustained-release formulations such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, is controlled through the strength of the binding interaction, the binding kinetics, and the concentration of binding partners. In the context of affinity-controlled release--and specifically the discovery or design of binding partners--we review advances in in vitro selection and directed evolution of proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides (aptamers), aided by computational design. PMID:26989257

  3. Delivery of a Protease-Activated Cytolytic Peptide Prodrug by Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jallouk, Andrew P; Palekar, Rohun U; Marsh, Jon N; Pan, Hua; Pham, Christine T N; Schlesinger, Paul H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-08-19

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from bee venom that inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. Although this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. Several groups have reported the development of cytolytic peptide prodrugs that only exhibit cytotoxicity following activation by site-specific proteases. However, systemic administration of these constructs has proven difficult because of their poor pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we present a platform for the design of protease-activated melittin derivatives that may be used in conjunction with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle delivery system. Although native melittin was substantially hemolytic (HD50: 1.9 μM) and cytotoxic (IC50: 2.4 μM), the prodrug exhibited 2 orders of magnitude less hemolytic activity (HD50: > 100 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: > 100 μM). Incubation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) led to cleavage of the prodrug at the expected site and restoration of hemolytic activity (HD50: 3.4 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: 8.1 μM). Incubation of the prodrug with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles led to stable loading of 10,250 peptides per nanoparticle. Nanoparticle-bound prodrug was also cleaved and activated by MMP-9, albeit at a fourfold slower rate. Intravenous administration of prodrug-loaded nanoparticles in a mouse model of melanoma significantly decreased tumor growth rate (p = 0.01). Because MMPs and other proteases play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis, this platform holds promise for the development of personalized cancer therapies directed toward a patient's individual protease expression profile. PMID:26083278

  4. Preparation of albumin based nanoparticles for delivery of fisetin and evaluation of its cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pooja; Singha Roy, Atanu; Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Jana, Saikat Kumar; Chaudhury, Koel; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-05-01

    Fisetin is a well known flavonoid that shows several properties such as antioxidant, antiviral and anticancer activities. Its use in the pharmaceutical field is limited due to its poor aqueous solubility which results in poor bioavailability and poor permeability. The aim of our present study is to prepare fisetin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles to improve its bioavailability. The nanoparticles were prepared by a desolvation method and characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The particles were smooth and spherical in nature with an average size of 220±8nm. The encapsulation efficiency was found to be 84%. The in vitro release profile showed a biphasic pattern and the release rate increases with increase in ionic strength of solution. We have also confirmed the antioxidant activity of the prepared nanoparticles by a DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Further its anticancer activity was evaluated using MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Our findings suggest that fisetin loaded HSA nanoparticles could be used to transfer fisetin to target areas under specific conditions and thus may find use as a delivery vehicle for the flavonoid. PMID:26820351

  5. New constitutive latex osmotin-like proteins lacking antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Cleverson D T; Silva, Maria Z R; Bruno-Moreno, Frederico; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Ramos, Márcio V

    2015-11-01

    Proteins that share similar primary sequences to the protein originally described in salt-stressed tobacco cells have been named osmotins. So far, only two osmotin-like proteins were purified and characterized of latex fluids. Osmotin from Carica papaya latex is an inducible protein lacking antifungal activity, whereas the Calotropis procera latex osmotin is a constitutive antifungal protein. To get additional insights into this subject, we investigated osmotins in latex fluids of five species. Two potential osmotin-like proteins in Cryptostegia grandiflora and Plumeria rubra latex were detected by immunological cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibodies produced against the C. procera latex osmotin (CpOsm) by ELISA, Dot Blot and Western Blot assays. Osmotin-like proteins were not detected in the latex of Thevetia peruviana, Himatanthus drasticus and healthy Carica papaya fruits. Later, the two new osmotin-like proteins were purified through immunoaffinity chromatography with anti-CpOsm immobilized antibodies. Worth noting the chromatographic efficiency allowed for the purification of the osmotin-like protein belonging to H. drasticus latex, which was not detectable by immunoassays. The identification of the purified proteins was confirmed after MS/MS analyses of their tryptic digests. It is concluded that the constitutive osmotin-like proteins reported here share structural similarities to CpOsm. However, unlike CpOsm, they did not exhibit antifungal activity against Fusarium solani and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. These results suggest that osmotins of different latex sources may be involved in distinct physiological or defensive events. PMID:26231325

  6. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems. PMID:26898739

  7. Role of chitosan co-formulation in enhancing interleukin-12 delivery and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lirong; Zaharoff, David A

    2013-05-01

    Local delivery systems that provide sustained, high concentrations of antitumor cytokines in the tumor microenvironment while minimizing systemic dissemination are needed to realize the potential of cytokine-based immunotherapies. Recently, co-formulations of cytokines with chitosan solutions have been shown to increase local cytokine retention and bioactivity. In particular, intratumoral (i.t.) injections of chitosan/IL-12 can eliminate established tumors and generate tumor-specific immune responses. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms by which chitosan potentiated IL-12's antitumor activity. The location of chitosan/IL-12 injection was found to be critical for optimal cytokine delivery. I.t. injections eliminated 9 of 10 MC38 adenocarcinomas while contralateral and peritumoral injections delayed tumor growth but could not eliminate tumors. Microdosing studies demonstrated that IL-12 depots, simulated through daily i.t. injections with IL-12 alone, were not as effective as weekly i.t. chitosan/IL-12. 50-75% of mice receiving daily IL-12 microdoses and 87.5% of mice receiving weekly chitosan/IL-12 were cured of MC38 tumors. Chitosan was found to increase IL-12-mediated leukocytic expansion in tumors and tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) by 40 and 100%, respectively. Immunophenotyping studies demonstrated that chitosan co-formulation amplified IL-12-induced increases in important effector populations, such as CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) and NKT cells, in tumors and dendritic cell populations in TDLNs. Remarkable increases in Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) tumor infiltrates were also observed in mice receiving chitosan or chitosan/IL-12. This population does not appear be suppressive and may facilitate the local antitumor response. Presented data suggest that chitosan-mediated depot formation and enhanced local cytokine retention is significantly, but not entirely, responsible for increased cytokine bioactivity. PMID:23453060

  8. Synthesis of hollow polymeric nanoparticles for protein delivery via inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Utama, Robert H; Guo, Yi; Zetterlund, Per B; Stenzel, Martina H

    2012-11-21

    Hollow polymeric nanoparticles with a hydrophilic liquid core have been synthesized in a one-pot approach via a novel inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization process. Successful encapsulation and release of a model protein is reported as a potential application. PMID:23041953

  9. [Successful delivery following subcutaneous heparin administration in a 7-weeks pregnant patient suffering from cerebral venous thrombosis due to secondary protein S deficiency].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Hiroaki; Naruse, Satoshi; Koike, Tadashi; Okuizumi, Yuzuru; Fujita, Nobuya; Nagai, Hiroko

    2006-03-01

    A 25-year-old, 7-weeks pregnant woman was admitted to the Nagaoka Red Cross Hospital in a state of confusion, following fever, headache and vomiting. Brain CT and MRI showed swelling in the bilateral thalami, basal ganglia and splenium of corpus callosum, and thrombosis of the internal cerebral veins and straight sinus. Initial treatment by intravenous heparin and glycerol was successful, and she regained her consciousness, leaving antegrade amnesia and childish character change. Her free protein S antigen was 32% (normal 60-127) and subsequently rose to 70% after delivery. She was diagnosed as having secondary protein S deficiency associated with pregnancy. Because warfarin can be teratogenic, subcutaneous heparin injection was prescribed in order to prevent thrombosis and the patient subsequently had a successful delivery. This was the first case in Japanese of successful delivery after subcutaneous heparin treatment in a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis. PMID:16642938

  10. A logical molecular circuit for programmable and autonomous regulation of protein activity using DNA aptamer-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Da; Zhu, Zhi; Wu, Cuichen; Peng, Lu; Zhou, Leiji; Gulbakan, Basri; Zhu, Guizhi; Williams, Kathryn R.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Researchers increasingly envision an important role for artificial biochemical circuits in biological engineering, much like electrical circuits in electrical engineering. Similar to electrical circuits, which control electromechanical devices, biochemical circuits could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expressions in vivo.1 As a consequence of their relative robustness and potential applicability for controlling a wide range of in vitro chemistries, synthetic cell-free biochemical circuits promise to be useful in manipulating the functions of biological molecules. Here we describe the first logical circuit based on DNA-protein interactions with accurate threshold control, enabling autonomous, self-sustained and programmable manipulation of protein activity in vitro. Similar circuits made previously were based primarily on DNA hybridization and strand displacement reactions. This new design uses the diverse nucleic acid interactions with proteins. The circuit can precisely sense the local enzymatic environment, such as the concentration of thrombin, and when it is excessively high, a coagulation inhibitor is automatically released by a concentration-adjusted circuit module. To demonstrate the programmable and autonomous modulation, a molecular circuit with different threshold concentrations of thrombin was tested as a proof of principle. In the future, owing to tunable regulation, design modularity and target specificity, this prototype could lead to the development of novel DNA biochemical circuits to control the delivery of aptamer-based drugs in smart and personalized medicine, providing a more efficient and safer therapeutic strategy. PMID:23194304

  11. A logical molecular circuit for programmable and autonomous regulation of protein activity using DNA aptamer-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Da; Zhu, Zhi; Wu, Cuichen; Peng, Lu; Zhou, Leiji; Gulbakan, Basri; Zhu, Guizhi; Williams, Kathryn R; Tan, Weihong

    2012-12-26

    Researchers increasingly envision an important role for artificial biochemical circuits in biological engineering, much like electrical circuits in electrical engineering. Similar to electrical circuits, which control electromechanical devices, biochemical circuits could be utilized as a type of servomechanism to control nanodevices in vitro, monitor chemical reactions in situ, or regulate gene expressions in vivo. (1) As a consequence of their relative robustness and potential applicability for controlling a wide range of in vitro chemistries, synthetic cell-free biochemical circuits promise to be useful in manipulating the functions of biological molecules. Here, we describe the first logical circuit based on DNA-protein interactions with accurate threshold control, enabling autonomous, self-sustained and programmable manipulation of protein activity in vitro. Similar circuits made previously were based primarily on DNA hybridization and strand displacement reactions. This new design uses the diverse nucleic acid interactions with proteins. The circuit can precisely sense the local enzymatic environment, such as the concentration of thrombin, and when it is excessively high, a coagulation inhibitor is automatically released by a concentration-adjusted circuit module. To demonstrate the programmable and autonomous modulation, a molecular circuit with different threshold concentrations of thrombin was tested as a proof of principle. In the future, owing to tunable regulation, design modularity and target specificity, this prototype could lead to the development of novel DNA biochemical circuits to control the delivery of aptamer-based drugs in smart and personalized medicine, providing a more efficient and safer therapeutic strategy. PMID:23194304

  12. CRISPRs for Optimal Targeting: Delivery of CRISPR Components as DNA, RNA, and Protein into Cultured Cells and Single-Cell Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kouranova, Evguenia; Forbes, Kevin; Zhao, Guojun; Warren, Joe; Bartels, Angela; Wu, Yumei; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of CRISPR technology greatly impacts the field of genetic engineering. The simplicity in design and generation of highly efficient CRISPR reagents allows more and more researchers to take on genome editing in different model systems in their own labs, even for those who found it daunting before. An active CRISPR complex contains a protein component (Cas9) and an RNA component (small guide RNA [sgRNA]), which can be delivered into cells in various formats. Cas9 can be introduced as a DNA expression plasmid, in vitro transcripts, or as a recombinant protein bound to the RNA portion in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), whereas the sgRNA can be delivered either expressed as a DNA plasmid or as an in vitro transcript. Here we compared the different delivery methods in cultured cell lines as well as mouse and rat single-cell embryos and view the RNPs as the most convenient and efficient to use. We also report the detection of limited off-targeting in cells and embryos and discuss approaches to lower that chance. We hope that researchers new to CRISPR find our results helpful to their adaptation of the technology for optimal gene editing. PMID:27094534

  13. CRISPRs for Optimal Targeting: Delivery of CRISPR Components as DNA, RNA, and Protein into Cultured Cells and Single-Cell Embryos.

    PubMed

    Kouranova, Evguenia; Forbes, Kevin; Zhao, Guojun; Warren, Joe; Bartels, Angela; Wu, Yumei; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of CRISPR technology greatly impacts the field of genetic engineering. The simplicity in design and generation of highly efficient CRISPR reagents allows more and more researchers to take on genome editing in different model systems in their own labs, even for those who found it daunting before. An active CRISPR complex contains a protein component (Cas9) and an RNA component (small guide RNA [sgRNA]), which can be delivered into cells in various formats. Cas9 can be introduced as a DNA expression plasmid, in vitro transcripts, or as a recombinant protein bound to the RNA portion in a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), whereas the sgRNA can be delivered either expressed as a DNA plasmid or as an in vitro transcript. Here we compared the different delivery methods in cultured cell lines as well as mouse and rat single-cell embryos and view the RNPs as the most convenient and efficient to use. We also report the detection of limited off-targeting in cells and embryos and discuss approaches to lower that chance. We hope that researchers new to CRISPR find our results helpful to their adaptation of the technology for optimal gene editing. PMID:27094534

  14. Protection and Delivery of Anthelmintic Protein Cry5B to Nematodes Using Mesoporous Silicon Particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Yan; Miller, Melanie; Aroian, Raffi V; Sailor, Michael J

    2015-06-23

    The ability of nano- and microparticles of partially oxidized mesoporous silicon (pSi) to sequester, protect, and deliver the anthelmintic pore-forming protein Cry5B to nematodes is assessed in vitro and in vivo. Thermally oxidized pSi particles are stable under gastric conditions and show relatively low toxicity to nematodes. Fluorescence images of rhodamine-labeled pSi particles within the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Ancylostoma ceylanicum show that ingestion is dependent on particle size: particles of a 0.4 ± 0.2 μm size are noticeably ingested by both species within 2 h of introduction in vitro, whereas 5 ± 2 μm particles are excluded from C. elegans but enter the pharynx region of A. ceylanicum after 24 h. The anthelmintic protein Cry5B, a pore-forming crystal (Cry) protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis, is incorporated into the pSi particles by aqueous infiltration. Feeding of Cry5B-loaded pSi particles to C. elegans leads to significant intoxication of the nematode. Protein-loaded particles of size 0.4 μm display the highest level of in vitro toxicity toward C. elegans on a drug-mass basis. The porous nanostructure protects Cry5B from hydrolytic and enzymatic (pepsin) degradation in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) for time periods up to 2 h. In vivo experiments with hookworm-infected hamsters show no significant reduction in worm burden with the Cry5B-loaded particles, which is attributed to slow release of the protein from the particles and/or short residence time of the particles in the duodenum of the animal. PMID:25950754

  15. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

    SciTech Connect

    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan; Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Schrott, Lisa; Caldito, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  16. Protein kinase activity associated with pancreatic zymogen granules.

    PubMed

    Burnham, D B; Munowitz, P; Thorn, N; Williams, J A

    1985-05-01

    Purified zymogen granules were prepared from rat pancreas by using an iso-osmotic Percoll gradient. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, phosphorylation of several granule proteins was induced by Ca2+, most notably a Mr-13 000 protein, whereas addition of cyclic AMP was without effect. When phosphatidylserine was also added, Ca2+ increased the phosphorylation of additional proteins, with the largest effect on a protein of Mr 62 000. Purified granules were also able to phosphorylate exogenous substrates. Ca2+-induced phosphorylation of lysine-rich histone was enhanced over 3-fold in the presence of phosphatidylserine, and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase activity was revealed with mixed histone as substrate. The concentrations of free Ca2+ and cyclic AMP required for half-maximal phosphorylation of both endogenous and exogenous proteins were 1-3 microM and 57 nM respectively. Treatment of granules with 0.25 M-KCl resulted in the release of phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase activity into a high-speed granule supernatant. In contrast, granule-protein substrates of Ca2+-activated kinase activity were resistant to KCl extraction, and in fact were present in purified granule membranes. Kinase activity activated by cyclic AMP was not extracted by KCl treatment. It is concluded that phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins in the zymogen granule can be induced by one or more Ca2+-activated protein kinases. Such a reaction is a potential mechanism by which exocytosis may be regulated in the exocrine pancreas by Ca2+-mediated secretagogues. PMID:4004796

  17. Protein kinase activity associated with pancreatic zymogen granules.

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, D B; Munowitz, P; Thorn, N; Williams, J A

    1985-01-01

    Purified zymogen granules were prepared from rat pancreas by using an iso-osmotic Percoll gradient. In the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, phosphorylation of several granule proteins was induced by Ca2+, most notably a Mr-13 000 protein, whereas addition of cyclic AMP was without effect. When phosphatidylserine was also added, Ca2+ increased the phosphorylation of additional proteins, with the largest effect on a protein of Mr 62 000. Purified granules were also able to phosphorylate exogenous substrates. Ca2+-induced phosphorylation of lysine-rich histone was enhanced over 3-fold in the presence of phosphatidylserine, and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase activity was revealed with mixed histone as substrate. The concentrations of free Ca2+ and cyclic AMP required for half-maximal phosphorylation of both endogenous and exogenous proteins were 1-3 microM and 57 nM respectively. Treatment of granules with 0.25 M-KCl resulted in the release of phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase activity into a high-speed granule supernatant. In contrast, granule-protein substrates of Ca2+-activated kinase activity were resistant to KCl extraction, and in fact were present in purified granule membranes. Kinase activity activated by cyclic AMP was not extracted by KCl treatment. It is concluded that phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins in the zymogen granule can be induced by one or more Ca2+-activated protein kinases. Such a reaction is a potential mechanism by which exocytosis may be regulated in the exocrine pancreas by Ca2+-mediated secretagogues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:4004796

  18. Chemically modified inulin microparticles serving dual function as a protein antigen delivery vehicle and immunostimulatory adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gallovic, Matthew D; Montjoy, Douglas G; Collier, Michael A; Do, Clement; Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Bachelder, Eric M; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2016-02-23

    To develop a new subunit vaccine adjuvant, we chemically modified a naturally-occurring, immunostimulatory inulin polysaccharide to produce an acid-sensitive biopolymer (acetalated inulin, Ace-IN). Various hydrophobic Ace-IN polymers were formed into microparticles (MPs) by oil-in-water emulsions followed by solvent evaporation These Ace-IN MPs possessed tunable degradation characteristics that, unlike polyesters used in FDA-approved microparticulate formulations, had only pH-neutral hydrolytic byproducts. Macrophages were passively targeted with cytocompatible Ace-IN MPs. TNF-α production by macrophages treated with Ace-IN MPs could be altered by adjusting the polymers' chemistry. Mice immunized with Ace-IN MPs encapsulating a model ovalbumin (OVA) antigen showed higher production of anti-OVA IgG antibody levels relative to soluble antigen. The antibody titers were also comparable to an alum-based formulation. This proof-of-concept establishes the potential for chemically-modified inulin MPs to simultaneously enable dual functionality as a stimuli-controlled antigen delivery vehicle and immunostimulatory adjuvant. PMID:26753184

  19. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai; Wu, Weihui; Terada, Naohiro; Jin, Shouguang

    2015-08-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. PMID:26062981

  20. COMBINED USE OF A WATER-INSOLUBLE CHEMICAL DELIVERY SYSTEM AND A METABOLIC ACTIVATION SYSTEM IN WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated water insoluble chemical delivery/metabolic activation/rat embryo culture system is described. In initial studies corn oil was used as the solvent and diallate as the substrate. Increasing concentrations of diallate dissolved in corn oil caused embryonic growth reta...

  1. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    SciTech Connect

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-09-22

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant.

  2. Size controlled protein nanoemulsions for active targeting of folate receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Eugénia; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Abreu, Ana S; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Guebitz, Georg; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Preto, Ana; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization with a tri-block copolymer (Poloxamer 407), which presents a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (PPO) and two identical lateral hydrophilic chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG). We observed a linear correlation between tri-block copolymer concentration and size - the use of 5mg/mL of Poloxamer 407 yields nanoemulsions smaller than 100nm. Molecular dynamics and fluorescent tagging of the tri-block copolymer highlight their mechanistic role on the size of emulsions. This novel method enables the fabrication of highly stable albumin emulsions in the nano-size range, highly desirable for controlled drug delivery. Folic Acid (FA)-tagged protein nanoemulsions were shown to promote specific folate receptor (FR)-mediated targeting in FR positive cells. The novel strategy presented here enables the construction of size controlled, functionalized protein-based nanoemulsions with excellent characteristics for active targeting in cancer therapy. PMID:26241920

  3. Microfluidics-assisted engineering of polymeric microcapsules with high encapsulation efficiency for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pessi, Jenni; Santos, Hélder A; Miroshnyk, Inna; JoukoYliruusi; Weitz, David A; Mirza, Sabiruddin

    2014-09-10

    In this study, microfluidic technology was employed to develop protein formulations. The microcapsules were produced with a biphasic flow to create water-oil-water (W/O/W) double emulsion droplets with ultrathin shells. Optimized microcapsule formulations containing 1% (w/w) bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the inner phase were prepared with poly(vinyl alcohol), polycaprolactone and polyethylene glycol. All the particles were found to be intact and with a particle size of 23-47 μm. Furthermore, the particles were monodisperse, non-porous and stable up to 4 weeks. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA in the microcapsules was 84%. The microcapsules released 30% of their content within 168 h. This study demonstrates that microfluidics is a powerful technique for engineering formulations for therapeutic proteins. PMID:24928131

  4. Effect of silk protein processing on drug delivery from silk films.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Eleanor M; Hu, Xiao; Finley, Violet; Kuo, Catherine K; Kaplan, David L

    2013-03-01

    Sericin removal from the core fibroin protein of silkworm silk is a critical first step in the use of silk for biomaterial-related applications, but degumming can affect silk biomaterial properties, including molecular weight, viscosity, diffusivity and degradation behavior. Increasing the degumming time (10, 30, 60, and 90 min) decreases the average molecular weight of silk protein in solution, silk solution viscosity, and silk film glass-transition temperature, and increases the rate of degradation of a silk film by protease. Model compounds spanning a range of physical-chemical properties generally show an inverse relationship between degumming time and release rate through a varied degumming time silk coating. Degumming provides a useful control point to manipulate silk's material properties. PMID:23349062

  5. Delivery of membrane proteins into small and giant unilamellar vesicles by charge-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Biner, Olivier; Schick, Thomas; Müller, Yannic; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    One of the current challenges in synthetic biology is the production of stable membrane mimetic systems and the insertion of components in these systems. Here, we employ fusion of oppositely charged liposomes to deliver separately reconstituted membrane proteins into a common lipid bilayer. After a systematic evaluation of different lipid compositions by lipid mixing and size distribution analysis, suitable conditions were further investigated for proteoliposome fusion. With this technique, we functionally coreconstituted bo3 oxidase and ATP synthase from Escherichia coli into unilamellar liposomes ranging from 100 nm to 50 μm in size. The presented method is a simple and versatile tool for oriented membrane protein reconstitution to produce biomimetic systems with increased complexity. PMID:27264202

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of novel ammonium glycyrrhizinate/niosomes delivery system: human and murine models.

    PubMed

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Federica; Mastriota, Marica; Pieretti, Stefano; Trapasso, Elena; Paolino, Donatella; Carafa, Maria

    2012-11-28

    Today there is a very great deal of interest among members of the global natural products community in investigating new plant constituents. Recent studies demonstrate that liquorice extracts are useful in the treatment of dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis, with an efficacy comparable to that of corticosteroids. In this work, niosomes made up of surfactants (Tween 85 and Span 20) and cholesterol at various concentrations were prepared to investigate the potential application of niosomes for the delivery of ammonium glycyrrhizinate (AG), useful for the treatment of various inflammatory based diseases. Vesicles were characterized evaluating dimensions, ζ potential, anisotropy, drug entrapment efficiency, stability, cytotoxicity evaluation and skin tolerability. Release profiles of ammonium glycyrrhizinate/niosomes were evaluated in vitro using cellulose membranes. The best formulation was used to evaluate the in vitro/in vivo efficacy of the ammonium glycyrrhizinate/niosomes in murine and human models of inflammation. The AG-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles showed no toxicity, good skin tolerability and were able to improve the drug anti-inflammatory activity in mice. Furthermore, an improvement of the anti-inflammatory activity of the niosome delivered drug was observed on chemically induced skin erythema in humans. PMID:23041542