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Sample records for protein hydrophobic dressing

  1. Site-directed analysis on protein hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2014-07-01

    Hydrophobicity of a protein is considered to be one of the major intrinsic factors dictating the protein aggregation propensity. Understanding how protein hydrophobicity is determined is, therefore, of central importance in preventing protein aggregation diseases and in the biotechnological production of human therapeutics. Traditionally, protein hydrophobicity is estimated based on hydrophobicity scales determined for individual free amino acids, assuming that those scales are unaltered when amino acids are embedded in a protein. Here, we investigate how the hydrophobicity of constituent amino acid residues depends on the protein context. To this end, we analyze the hydration free energy-free energy change on hydration quantifying the hydrophobicity-of the wild-type and 21 mutants of amyloid-beta protein associated with Alzheimer's disease by performing molecular dynamics simulations and integral-equation calculations. From detailed analysis of mutation effects on the protein hydrophobicity, we elucidate how the protein global factor such as the total charge as well as underlying protein conformations influence the hydrophobicity of amino acid residues. Our results provide a unique insight into the protein hydrophobicity for rationalizing and predicting the protein aggregation propensity on mutation, and open a new avenue to design aggregation-resistant proteins as biotherapeutics. PMID:24817476

  2. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  3. Contribution of Hydrophobic Interactions to Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R.; Shirley, Bret A.; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin head piece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compare our results with previous studies and reach the following conclusions. 1. Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mole per –CH2– group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6 ± 0.3 kcal/mol per –CH2– group). 2. Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kcal/mol): Phe 18 (3.9), Met 13 (3.1), Phe 7 (2.9), Phe 11 (2.7), and Leu 21 (2.7). 3. Based on Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔGtr values from water to cyclohexane. 5. For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60 ± 4% and hydrogen bonds 40 ± 4% to protein stability. 6. Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominately by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  4. Contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability.

    PubMed

    Pace, C Nick; Fu, Hailong; Fryar, Katrina Lee; Landua, John; Trevino, Saul R; Shirley, Bret A; Hendricks, Marsha McNutt; Iimura, Satoshi; Gajiwala, Ketan; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the contribution of hydrophobic interactions to protein stability. We measured the change in conformational stability, Δ(ΔG), for hydrophobic mutants of four proteins: villin headpiece subdomain (VHP) with 36 residues, a surface protein from Borrelia burgdorferi (VlsE) with 341 residues, and two proteins previously studied in our laboratory, ribonucleases Sa and T1. We compared our results with those of previous studies and reached the following conclusions: (1) Hydrophobic interactions contribute less to the stability of a small protein, VHP (0.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group), than to the stability of a large protein, VlsE (1.6±0.3 kcal/mol per -CH(2)- group). (2) Hydrophobic interactions make the major contribution to the stability of VHP (40 kcal/mol) and the major contributors are (in kilocalories per mole) Phe18 (3.9), Met13 (3.1), Phe7 (2.9), Phe11 (2.7), and Leu21 (2.7). (3) Based on the Δ(ΔG) values for 148 hydrophobic mutants in 13 proteins, burying a -CH(2)- group on folding contributes, on average, 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The experimental Δ(ΔG) values for aliphatic side chains (Ala, Val, Ile, and Leu) are in good agreement with their ΔG(tr) values from water to cyclohexane. (5) For 22 proteins with 36 to 534 residues, hydrophobic interactions contribute 60±4% and hydrogen bonds contribute 40±4% to protein stability. (6) Conformational entropy contributes about 2.4 kcal/mol per residue to protein instability. The globular conformation of proteins is stabilized predominantly by hydrophobic interactions. PMID:21377472

  5. Charges in the hydrophobic interior of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Cannon, Brian R.; Velu, Priya D.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand

    2010-01-01

    Charges are inherently incompatible with hydrophobic environments. Presumably for this reason, ionizable residues are usually excluded from the hydrophobic interior of proteins and are found instead at the surface, where they can interact with bulk water. Paradoxically, ionizable groups buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins play essential roles, especially in biological energy transduction. To examine the unusual properties of internal ionizable groups we measured the pKa of glutamic acid residues at 25 internal positions in a stable form of staphylococcal nuclease. Two of 25 Glu residues titrated with normal pKa near 4.5; the other 23 titrated with elevated pKa values ranging from 5.2–9.4, with an average value of 7.7. Trp fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism were used to monitor the effects of internal charges on conformation. These data demonstrate that although charges buried in proteins are indeed destabilizing, charged side chains can be buried readily in the hydrophobic core of stable proteins without the need for specialized structural adaptations to stabilize them, and without inducing any major conformational reorganization. The apparent dielectric effect experienced by the internal charges is considerably higher than the low dielectric constants of hydrophobic matter used to represent the protein interior in electrostatic continuum models of proteins. The high thermodynamic stability required for proteins to withstand the presence of buried charges suggests a pathway for the evolution of enzymes, and it underscores the need to mind thermodynamic stability in any strategy for engineering novel or altered enzymatic active sites in proteins. PMID:20798341

  6. Charges in the hydrophobic interior of proteins.

    PubMed

    Isom, Daniel G; Castañeda, Carlos A; Cannon, Brian R; Velu, Priya D; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2010-09-14

    Charges are inherently incompatible with hydrophobic environments. Presumably for this reason, ionizable residues are usually excluded from the hydrophobic interior of proteins and are found instead at the surface, where they can interact with bulk water. Paradoxically, ionizable groups buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins play essential roles, especially in biological energy transduction. To examine the unusual properties of internal ionizable groups we measured the pK(a) of glutamic acid residues at 25 internal positions in a stable form of staphylococcal nuclease. Two of 25 Glu residues titrated with normal pK(a) near 4.5; the other 23 titrated with elevated pK(a) values ranging from 5.2-9.4, with an average value of 7.7. Trp fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism were used to monitor the effects of internal charges on conformation. These data demonstrate that although charges buried in proteins are indeed destabilizing, charged side chains can be buried readily in the hydrophobic core of stable proteins without the need for specialized structural adaptations to stabilize them, and without inducing any major conformational reorganization. The apparent dielectric effect experienced by the internal charges is considerably higher than the low dielectric constants of hydrophobic matter used to represent the protein interior in electrostatic continuum models of proteins. The high thermodynamic stability required for proteins to withstand the presence of buried charges suggests a pathway for the evolution of enzymes, and it underscores the need to mind thermodynamic stability in any strategy for engineering novel or altered enzymatic active sites in proteins. PMID:20798341

  7. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins strongly induce negative curvature.

    PubMed

    Chavarha, Mariya; Loney, Ryan W; Rananavare, Shankar B; Hall, Stephen B

    2015-07-01

    The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C greatly accelerate the adsorption of vesicles containing the surfactant lipids to form a film that lowers the surface tension of the air/water interface in the lungs. Pulmonary surfactant enters the interface by a process analogous to the fusion of two vesicles. As with fusion, several factors affect adsorption according to how they alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, suggesting that adsorption proceeds via a rate-limiting structure with negative curvature, in which the hydrophilic face of the phospholipid leaflets is concave. In the studies reported here, we tested whether the surfactant proteins might promote adsorption by inducing lipids to adopt a more negative curvature, closer to the configuration of the hypothetical intermediate. Our experiments used x-ray diffraction to determine how the proteins in their physiological ratio affect the radius of cylindrical monolayers in the negatively curved, inverse hexagonal phase. With binary mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), the proteins produced a dose-related effect on curvature that depended on the phospholipid composition. With DOPE alone, the proteins produced no change. With an increasing mol fraction of DOPC, the response to the proteins increased, reaching a maximum 50% reduction in cylindrical radius at 5% (w/w) protein. This change represented a doubling of curvature at the outer cylindrical surface. The change in spontaneous curvature, defined at approximately the level of the glycerol group, would be greater. Analysis of the results in terms of a Langmuir model for binding to a surface suggests that the effect of the lipids is consistent with a change in the maximum binding capacity. Our findings show that surfactant proteins can promote negative curvature, and support the possibility that they facilitate adsorption by that mechanism. PMID:26153706

  8. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  13. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  14. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  15. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane-associate proteins: glycoprotein (G), fusion (F), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins. Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain para...

  16. Hydrophobicity – Shake Flasks, Protein Folding and Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are some of the most important interactions in nature. They are the primary driving force in a number of phenomena. This is mostly an entropic effect and can account for a number of biophysical events such as protein-protein or protein-ligand binding that are of immense importance in drug design. The earliest studies on this phenomenon can be dated back to the end of the 19th century when Meyer and Overton independently correlated the hydrophobic nature of gases to their anesthetic potency. Since then, significant progress has been made in this realm of science. This review briefly traces the history of hydrophobicity research along with the theoretical estimation of partition coefficients. Finally, the application of hydrophobicity estimation methods in the field of drug design and protein folding is discussed. PMID:19929828

  17. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  18. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  19. Spectrofluorimetric assessment of the surface hydrophobicity of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cardamone, M; Puri, N K

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of the apolar fluorescent dye 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate (ANS) to bacteriorhodopsin, BSA, chicken egg lysozyme, ovalbumin, porcine somatotrophin (PST) and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNAase) was quantitatively evaluated using Scatchard- and Klotz-plot analyses. On the basis of the average association constant for ANS binding sites (Ka), the proteins could be ranked in order of surface hydrophobicity as: Bacteriorhodopsin greater than BSA greater than ovalbumin greater than PST greater than lysozyme greater than RNAase. The number of protein-ANS binding sites was determined as 54, 10, 3, 1, 2 and 1 respectively. The ANS-based assessment of the surface hydrophobicity of these proteins was generally in agreement with the average hydrophobicity based on amino acid sequence [Bigelow (1967) J. Theor. Biol. 16, 187-211], except for results with PST and ovalbumin. The proteins were also analysed by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. using C1 and C8 columns. There was no significant correlation between ANS and reversed-phase-h.p.l.c. assessment of hydrophobicity, with the results obtained by h.p.l.c. being dependent upon the column used. ANS-based measurement of surface hydrophobicity appears to be the most appropriate means for assessing proteins such as to reflect their overall three-dimensional structure in solution. PMID:1546973

  20. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. PMID:26467442

  1. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed

    Tanford, C

    1997-06-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  2. How protein chemists learned about the hydrophobic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Tanford, C.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted today that the hydrophobic force is the dominant energetic factor that leads to the folding of polypeptide chains into compact globular entities. This principle was first explicitly introduced to protein chemists in 1938 by Irving Langmuir, past master in the application of hydrophobicity to other problems, and was enthusiastically endorsed by J.D. Bernal. But both proposal and endorsement came in the course of a debate about a quite different structural principle, the so-called "cyclol hypothesis" proposed by D. Wrinch, which soon proved to be theoretically and experimentally unsupportable. Being a more tangible idea, directly expressed in structural terms, the cyclol hypothesis received more attention than the hydrophobic principle and the latter never actually entered the mainstream of protein science until 1959, when it was thrust into the limelight in a lucid review by W. Kauzmann. A theoretical paper by H.S. Frank and M. Evans, not itself related to protein folding, probably played a major role in the acceptance of the hydrophobicity concept by protein chemists because it provided a crude but tangible picture of the origin of hydrophobicity per se in terms of water structure. PMID:9194199

  3. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition). PMID:26658743

  4. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  5. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  6. De novo design of the hydrophobic cores of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Desjarlais, J. R.; Handel, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed and experimentally tested a novel computational approach for the de novo design of hydrophobic cores. A pair of computer programs has been written, the first of which creates a "custom" rotamer library for potential hydrophobic residues, based on the backbone structure of the protein of interest. The second program uses a genetic algorithm to globally optimize for a low energy core sequence and structure, using the custom rotamer library as input. Success of the programs in predicting the sequences of native proteins indicates that they should be effective tools for protein design. Using these programs, we have designed and engineered several variants of the phage 434 cro protein, containing five, seven, or eight sequence changes in the hydrophobic core. As controls, we have produced a variant consisting of a randomly generated core with six sequence changes but equal volume relative to the native core and a variant with a "minimalist" core containing predominantly leucine residues. Two of the designs, including one with eight core sequence changes, have thermal stabilities comparable to the native protein, whereas the third design and the minimalist protein are significantly destabilized. The randomly designed control is completely unfolded under equivalent conditions. These results suggest that rational de novo design of hydrophobic cores is feasible, and stress the importance of specific packing interactions for the stability of proteins. A surprising aspect of the results is that all of the variants display highly cooperative thermal denaturation curves and reasonably dispersed NMR spectra. This suggests that the non-core residues of a protein play a significant role in determining the uniqueness of the folded structure. PMID:8535237

  7. Consistent Treatment of Hydrophobicity in Protein Lattice Models Accounts for Cold Denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, Erik; Varilly, Patrick; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-02-01

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavorable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here, we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  8. Consistent Treatment of Hydrophobicity in Protein Lattice Models Accounts for Cold Denaturation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Erik; Varilly, Patrick; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Frenkel, Daan; Abeln, Sanne

    2016-02-19

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavorable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here, we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins. PMID:26943560

  9. Exchange Kinetics of a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, Jeff; Stone, Martin

    2002-03-01

    Conformational fluctuations of proteins are thought to be important for determining the functional roles in biological activity. In some cases, the rates of these conformational changes may be directly correlated to, for example, the rates of catalysis or ligand binding. We are studying the role of conformational fluctuations in the binding of small volatile hydrophobic pheromones by the mouse major urinary proteins (MUPs). Communication among mice occurs, in part, with the MUP-1 protein. This urinary protein binds pheromones as a way to increase the longevity of the pheromone in an extracellular environment. Of interest is that the crystal structure of MUP-1 with a pheromone ligand shows the ligand to be completely occluded from the solvent with no obvious pathway to enter or exit. This suggests that conformational exchange of the protein may be required for ligand binding and release to occur. We hypothesize that the rate of conformational exchange may be a limiting factor determining the rate of ligand association and dissociation. By careful measurement of the on- and off-rates of ligand binding and the rates of conformational changes of the protein, a more defined picture of the interplay between protein structure and function can be obtained. To this end, heteronuclear saturation transfer, ^15N-exchange and ^15N dynamics experiments have been employed to probe the kinetics of ligand binding to MUP-1.

  10. Hydrophobic Surfactant Proteins Induce a Phosphatidylethanolamine to Form Cubic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavarha, Mariya; Khoojinian, Hamed; Schulwitz, Leonard E.; Biswas, Samares C.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C promote rapid adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air/water interface. Previous evidence suggests that they achieve this effect by facilitating the formation of a rate-limiting negatively curved stalk between the vesicular bilayer and the interface. To determine whether the proteins can alter the curvature of lipid leaflets, we used x-ray diffraction to investigate how the physiological mixture of these proteins affects structures formed by 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, which by itself undergoes the lamellar-to-inverse hexagonal phase transition at 71°C. In amounts as low as 0.03% (w:w) and at temperatures as low as 57°C, the proteins induce formation of bicontinuous inverse cubic phases. The proteins produce a dose-related shift of diffracted intensity to the cubic phases, with minimal evidence of other structures above 0.1% and 62°C, but no change in the lattice-constants of the lamellar or cubic phases. The induction of the bicontinuous cubic phases, in which the individual lipid leaflets have the same saddle-shaped curvature as the hypothetical stalk-intermediate, supports the proposed model of how the surfactant proteins promote adsorption. PMID:20409474

  11. What makes a protein a protein? Hydrophobic core designs that specify stability and structural properties.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Fleming, K. G.; Nagi, A. D.; O'Brien, R.; Sturtevant, J. M.; Regan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Here we describe how the systematic redesign of a protein's hydrophobic core alters its structure and stability. We have repacked the hydrophobic core of the four-helix-bundle protein, Rop, with altered packing patterns and various side chain shapes and sizes. Several designs reproduce the structure and native-like properties of the wild-type, while increasing the thermal stability. Other designs, either with similar sizes but different shapes, or with decreased sizes of the packing residues, destabilize the protein. Finally, overpacking the core with the larger side chains causes a loss of native-like structure. These results allow us to further define the roles of tight residue packing and the burial of hydrophobic surface area in the construction of native-like proteins. PMID:8844848

  12. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  13. The Hydrophobic Insertion Mechanism of Membrane Curvature Generation by Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Campelo, Felix; McMahon, Harvey T.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    A wide spectrum of intracellular processes is dependent on the ability of cells to dynamically regulate membrane shape. Membrane bending by proteins is necessary for the generation of intracellular transport carriers and for the maintenance of otherwise intrinsically unstable regions of high membrane curvature in cell organelles. Understanding the mechanisms by which proteins curve membranes is therefore of primary importance. Here we suggest, for the first time to our knowledge, a quantitative mechanism of lipid membrane bending by hydrophobic or amphipathic rodlike inclusions which simulate amphipathic α-helices—structures shown to sculpt membranes. Considering the lipid monolayer matrix as an anisotropic elastic material, we compute the intramembrane stresses and strains generated by the embedded inclusions, determine the resulting membrane shapes, and the accumulated elastic energy. We characterize the ability of an inclusion to bend membranes by an effective spontaneous curvature, and show that shallow rodlike inclusions are more effective in membrane shaping than are lipids having a high propensity for curvature. Our computations provide experimentally testable predictions on the protein amounts needed to generate intracellular membrane shapes for various insertion depths and membrane thicknesses. We also predict that the ability of N-BAR domains to produce membrane tubules in vivo can be ascribed solely to insertion of their amphipathic helices. PMID:18515373

  14. Energetics of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in a Hydrophobic Protein Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Baergen, Alyson; Michelsen, Klaus; Kitova, Elena N.; Schnier, Paul D.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-05-01

    This work explores the energetics of intermolecular H-bonds inside a hydrophobic protein cavity. Kinetic measurements were performed on the gaseous deprotonated ions (at the -7 charge state) of complexes of bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and three monohydroxylated analogs of palmitic acid (PA): 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3-OHPA), 7-hydroxypalmitic acid (7-OHPA), and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (16-OHPA). From the increase in the activation energy for the dissociation of the (Lg + X-OHPA)7- ions, compared with that of the (Lg + PA)7- ion, it is concluded that the -OH groups of the X-OHPA ligands participate in strong (5 - 11 kcal mol-1) intermolecular H-bonds in the hydrophobic cavity of Lg. The results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that the -OH groups of 3-OHPA and 16-OHPA act as H-bond donors and interact with backbone carbonyl oxygens, whereas the -OH group of 7-OHPA acts as both H-bond donor and acceptor with nearby side chains. The capacity for intermolecular H-bonds within the Lg cavity, as suggested by the gas-phase measurements, does not necessarily lead to enhanced binding in aqueous solution. The association constant (Ka) measured for 7-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 105 M-1] is similar to the value for the PA [(3.8 ± 0.1) × 105 M-1]; Ka for 3-OHPA [(1.1 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1] is approximately three-times larger, whereas Ka for 16-OHPA [(2.3 ± 0.2) × 104 M-1] is an order of magnitude smaller. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the energetic penalty to desolvating the ligand -OH groups, which is necessary for complex formation, is similar in magnitude to the energetic contribution of the intermolecular H-bonds.

  15. Production of hydrophobic amino acids from biobased resources: wheat gluten and rubber seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Widyarani; Sari, Yessie W; Ratnaningsih, Enny; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2016-09-01

    Protein hydrolysis enables production of peptides and free amino acids that are suitable for usage in food and feed or can be used as precursors for bulk chemicals. Several essential amino acids for food and feed have hydrophobic side chains; this property may also be exploited for subsequent separation. Here, we present methods for selective production of hydrophobic amino acids from proteins. Selectivity can be achieved by selection of starting material, selection of hydrolysis conditions, and separation of achieved hydrolysate. Several protease combinations were applied for hydrolysis of rubber seed protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). High degree of hydrolysis (>50 %) could be achieved. Hydrophobic selectivity was influenced by the combination of proteases and by the extent of hydrolysis. Combination of Pronase and Peptidase R showed the highest selectivity towards hydrophobic amino acids, roughly doubling the content of hydrophobic amino acids in the products compared to the original substrates. Hydrophobic selectivity of 0.6 mol-hydrophobic/mol-total free amino acids was observed after 6 h hydrolysis of wheat gluten and 24 h hydrolysis of rubber seed proteins and BSA. The results of experiments with rubber seed proteins and wheat gluten suggest that this process can be applied to agro-industrial residues. PMID:27118013

  16. Heating and reduction affect the reaction with tannins of wine protein fractions differing in hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Vincenzi, Simone; Lucchetta, Marco; Curioni, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    During the storage, bottled white wines can manifest haziness due to the insolubilisation of the grape proteins that may 'survive' in the fermentation process. Although the exact mechanism of this occurrence is not fully understood, proteins and tannins are considered two of the key factors involved in wine hazing, since their aggregation leads to the formation of insoluble particles. To better understand this complex interaction, proteins and tannins from the same unfined Pinot grigio wine were separated. Wine proteins were then fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). A significant correlation between hydrophobicity of the wine protein fractions and the haze formed after reacting with wine tannins was found, with the most reactive fractions revealing (by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC analyses) the predominant presence of thaumatin-like proteins. Moreover, the effects of both protein heating and disulfide bonds reduction (with dithiotreithol) on haze formation in the presence of tannins were assessed. These treatments generally resulted in an improved reactivity with tannins, and this phenomenon was related to both the surface hydrophobicity and composition of the protein fractions. Therefore, haze formation in wines seems to be related to hydrophobic interactions occurring among proteins and tannins. These interactions should occur on hydrophobic tannin-binding sites, whose exposition on the proteins can depend on both protein heating and reduction. PMID:20103151

  17. Wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Lionelli, Gerald T; Lawrence, W Thomas

    2003-06-01

    There are currently hundreds of dressings on the market to aid in wound management. Before selecting a dressing for a particular wound, a practitioner must assess carefully the needs of the wound to understand which dressing would provide maximal benefit. Frequently, there is not one clear best choice, and it is crucial that the pros and cons of each dressing modality be understood. This article has provided a framework to assist in dressing assessment. PMID:12822729

  18. BODIPY-Based Fluorescent Probes for Sensing Protein Surface-Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Dorh, Nethaniah; Zhu, Shilei; Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit; Luo, Fen-Tair; Liu, Haiying; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Mapping surface hydrophobic interactions in proteins is key to understanding molecular recognition, biological functions, and is central to many protein misfolding diseases. Herein, we report synthesis and application of new BODIPY-based hydrophobic sensors (HPsensors) that are stable and highly fluorescent for pH values ranging from 7.0 to 9.0. Surface hydrophobic measurements of proteins (BSA, apomyoglobin, and myoglobin) by these HPsensors display much stronger signal compared to 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS), a commonly used hydrophobic probe; HPsensors show a 10- to 60-fold increase in signal strength for the BSA protein with affinity in the nanomolar range. This suggests that these HPsensors can be used as a sensitive indicator of protein surface hydrophobicity. A first principle approach is used to identify the molecular level mechanism for the substantial increase in the fluorescence signal strength. Our results show that conformational change and increased molecular rigidity of the dye due to its hydrophobic interaction with protein lead to fluorescence enhancement. PMID:26679512

  19. Small-Molecule Hydrophobic Tagging Induced Degradation of HaloTag Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Neklesa, Taavi K.; Tae, Hyun Seop; Schneekloth, Ashley R.; Stulberg, Michael J.; Corson, Timothy W.; Sundberg, Thomas B.; Raina, Kanak; Holley, Scott A.; Crews, Craig M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to regulate any protein of interest in living systems with small molecules remains a challenge. We hypothesized that appending a hydrophobic moiety to the surface of a protein would mimic the partially denatured state of the protein, thus engaging the cellular quality control machinery to induce its proteasomal degradation. We designed and synthesized bifunctional small molecules that bind a bacterial dehalogenase (HaloTag protein) and present a hydrophobic group on its surface. Remarkably, hydrophobic tagging of the HaloTag protein with an adamantyl moiety induced the degradation of cytosolic, isoprenylated, and transmembrane fusion proteins in cell culture. We demonstrated the in vivo utility of hydrophobic tagging by degrading proteins expressed in zebrafish embryos and by inhibiting RasG12V-driven tumor progression in mice. Therefore, hydrophobic tagging of HaloTag fusion proteins affords small molecule control over any protein of interest, making it an ideal system for validating potential drug targets in disease models. PMID:21725302

  20. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  1. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  2. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments. PMID:25494795

  3. Topology and cellular localization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type II integral membrane protein that is packaged into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses including metapneumovirus. In addition to a highly divergent primary sequence, SH proteins vary significantly in size among the different viruses. Hu...

  4. Tolerance of a protein to multiple polar-to-hydrophobic surface substitutions.

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, M. H.; Sauer, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrophobic substitutions at solvent-exposed positions in two alpha-helical regions of the bacteriophage P22 Arc repressor were introduced by combinatorial mutagenesis. In helix A, hydrophobic residues were tolerated individually at each of the five positions examined, but multiple substitutions were poorly tolerated as shown by the finding that mutants with more than two additional hydrophobic residues were biologically inactive. Several inactive helix A variants were purified and found to have reduced thermal stability relative to wild-type Arc, with a rough correlation between the number of polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions and the magnitude of the stability defect. Quite different results were obtained in helix B, where variants with as many as five polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions were found to be biologically active and one variant with three hydrophobic substitutions had a t(m) 6 degrees C higher than wild-type. By contrast, a helix A mutant with three similar polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions was 23 degrees C less stable than wild-type. Also, one set of three polar-to-hydrophobic substitutions in helix B was tolerated when introduced into the wild-type background but not when introduced into an equally active mutant having a nearly identical structure. Context effects occur both when comparing different regions of the same protein and when comparing the same region in two different homologues. PMID:10048325

  5. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  6. Canine distemper virus envelope protein interactions modulated by hydrophobic residues in the fusion protein globular head.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mislay; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Alves, Lisa; Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Bringolf, Fanny; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-01-15

    Membrane fusion for morbillivirus cell entry relies on critical interactions between the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) envelope glycoproteins. Through extensive mutagenesis of an F cavity recently proposed to contribute to F's interaction with the H protein, we identified two neighboring hydrophobic residues responsible for severe F-to-H binding and fusion-triggering deficiencies when they were mutated in combination. Since both residues reside on one side of the F cavity, the data suggest that H binds the F globular head domain sideways. PMID:25355896

  7. Protein folding in hydrophobic-polar lattice model: a flexible ant-colony optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Jing; Li, Yun

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a flexible ant colony (FAC) algorithm for solving protein folding problems based on the hydrophobic-polar square lattice model. Collaborations of novel pheromone and heuristic strategies in the proposed algorithm make it more effective in predicting structures of proteins compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:18537736

  8. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  9. Protein 2B of Coxsackievirus B3 Induces Autophagy Relying on Its Transmembrane Hydrophobic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng; Zhai, Xia; Chen, Yang; Wang, Ruixue; Lin, Lexun; Chen, Sijia; Wang, Tianying; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Fengmin; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B (CVB) belongs to Enterovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family, and it is one of the most common causative pathogens of viral myocarditis in young adults. The pathogenesis of myocarditis caused by CVB has not been completely elucidated. In CVB infection, autophagy is manipulated to facilitate viral replication. Here we report that protein 2B, one of the non-structural proteins of CVB3, possesses autophagy-inducing capability. The autophagy-inducing motif of protein 2B was identified by the generation of truncated 2B and site-directed mutagenesis. The expression of 2B alone was sufficient to induce the formation of autophagosomes in HeLa cells, while truncated 2B containing the two hydrophobic regions of the protein also induced autophagy. In addition, we demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution (56V→A) in the stem loop in between the two hydrophobic regions of protein 2B abolished the formation of autophagosomes. Moreover, we found that 2B and truncated 2B with autophagy-inducting capability were co-localized with LC3-II. This study indicates that protein 2B relies on its transmembrane hydrophobic regions to induce the formation of autophagosomes, while 56 valine residue in the stem loop of protein 2B might exert critical structural influence on its two hydrophobic regions. These results may provide new insight for understanding the molecular mechanism of autophagy triggered by CVB infection. PMID:27187444

  10. Fluorescence based assessment of SDS induced hydrophobic collapse in globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunath, S.; Makani, Venkata Krishna Kanth; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Bhat, Gopalkrishna; Kanth, Akriti Baby; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of interaction between SDS and proteins is not clearly understood so far. According to the current knowledge SDS is known to interact with the hydrophobic regions of the proteins. Tryptophan and tyrosine are hydrophobic and hydrophilic aromatic amino acids respectively, which are also known for their intrinsic fluorescence nature in proteins. By observing the autofluorescence of both these hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids upon SDS treatment, information about SDS-protein interactions could be obtained. In the present study we have recorded the autofluorescence spectra of five globular proteins [Bovine serum albumin (BSA), Human serum albumin (HSA), Ribonuclease A (RNase A), Lysozyme and Trypsin] by the sequential excitation from 260nm to 295nm at every 5nm intervals. The results obtained clearly indicated BSA and HSA undergone hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties due to the increased folding of their secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment. Trypsin on the other hand showed complete unfolding upon treatment with SDS. Lysozyme and RNase A did not show any difference in their autofluorescence upon SDS treatment may be due to the stability and fluorophores composition in them. The above results obtained with specific UV excitations clearly shown the tertiary folding and ensembles of the secondary and tertiary structures upon SDS treatment is governed by their stability and bonds stabilizing the proteins.

  11. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated gold surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.

  12. Effect of surface hydrophobicity on the function of the immobilized biomineralization protein Mms6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Xunpei; Zhang, Honghu; Nayak, Srikanth; Parada, German; Anderegg, James; Feng, Shuren; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Akinc, Mufit; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-08-13

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes in nature, which has inspired in vitro synthesis of uniformly sized magnetite nanocrystals under mild conditions. Mms6, a biomineralization protein from magnetotactic bacteria with a hydrophobic N-terminal domain and a hydrophilic C-terminal domain, can promote formation of magnetite nanocrystals in vitro with well-defined shape and size in gels under mild conditions. Here we investigate the role of surface hydrophobicity on the ability of Mms6 to template magnetite nanoparticle formation on surfaces. Our results confirmed that Mms6 can form a protein network structure on a monolayer of hydrophobic octadecanethiol (ODT)-coated goldmore » surfaces and facilitate magnetite nanocrystal formation with uniform sizes close to those seen in nature, in contrast to its behavior on more hydrophilic surfaces. We propose that this hydrophobicity effect might be due to the amphiphilic nature of the Mms6 protein and its tendency to incorporate the hydrophobic N-terminal domain into the hydrophobic lipid bilayer environment of the magnetosome membrane, exposing the hydrophilic C-terminal domain that promotes biomineralization. Supporting this hypothesis, the larger and well-formed magnetite nanoparticles were found to be preferentially located on ODT surfaces covered with Mms6 as compared to control samples, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. A C-terminal domain mutant of this protein did not form the same network structure as wild-type Mms6, suggesting that the network structure is important for the magnetite nanocrystal formation. This article provides valuable insights into the role of surface hydrophilicity on the action of the biomineralization protein Mms6 to synthesize magnetic nanocrystals and provides a facile route to controlling bioinspired nanocrystal synthesis in vitro.« less

  13. Inflammatory inert poly(ethylene glycol)--protein wound dressing improves healing responses in partial- and full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Shingel, Kirill I; Di Stabile, Liliana; Marty, Jean-Paul; Faure, Marie-Pierre

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a novel soft hydrogel system based on the poly(ethylene glycol)-protein conjugates was evaluated as an occlusive wound dressing material. The hydrogel material, referred by the name of BioAquacare, contains up to 96% of the liquid and is formulated with phosphate-buffered saline and safe preservative to control bacterial load in the open wounds. Performance of the BioAquacare as a wound dressing material was assessed in partial- and full-thickness wounds in pigs. Wound analysis comprised macroscopic determination of the wound size, histological examination of the healing tissues and biochemical characterisation of wound exudates. The wounds treated with BioAquacare healed without any signs of inflammation, skin irritation, oedema or erythema. Cellular composition of the reepithelialised wounds was very similar to that of the normal skin, with a well-developed stratum corneum and epithelial layer. It was observed that BioAquacare plays the role of a liquid compartment, which provides pronounced hydration effect and helps maintain a natural moist environment of the healing tissues. BioAquacare showed relatively low protein-absorbing activity, absorbing predominantly low-molecular-weight molecules, including interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, transforming growth factor-beta1 and products of haemoglobin degradation. It is concluded that application of the moist BioAquacare dressing promotes fast reepithelialisation by creating favourable environment for keratinocytes proliferation and it also reduces scarring. The results show that BioAquacare can be considered as a safe, biocompatible and inflammatory inert wound dressing material. PMID:17199768

  14. Breaking and Restoring the Hydrophobic Core of a Centromere-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Sadia; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Warwicker, Jim; Hayes, Finbarr

    2015-01-01

    The ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) superfamily of DNA-binding proteins is dispersed widely in procaryotes. The dimeric RHH fold is generated by interlocking of two monomers into a 2-fold symmetrical structure that comprises four α-helices enwrapping a pair of antiparallel β-strands (ribbon). Residues in the ribbon region are the principal determinants of DNA binding, whereas the RHH hydrophobic core is assembled from amino acids in both the α-helices and ribbon element. The ParG protein encoded by multiresistance plasmid TP228 is a RHH protein that functions dually as a centromere binding factor during segrosome assembly and as a transcriptional repressor. Here we identify residues in the α-helices of ParG that are critical for DNA segregation and in organization of the protein hydrophobic core. A key hydrophobic aromatic amino acid at one position was functionally substitutable by other aromatic residues, but not by non-aromatic hydrophobic amino acids. Nevertheless, intramolecular suppression of the latter by complementary change of a residue that approaches nearby from the partner monomer fully restored activity in vivo and in vitro. The interactions involved in assembling the ParG core may be highly malleable and suggest that RHH proteins are tractable platforms for the rational design of diverse DNA binding factors useful for synthetic biology and other purposes. PMID:25713077

  15. Structural reorganization triggered by charging of Lys residues in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Michael S; Khangulov, Victor S; Robinson, Aaron C; Heroux, Annie; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, Bertrand

    2012-06-01

    Structural consequences of ionization of residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins were examined systematically in 25 proteins with internal Lys residues. Crystal structures showed that the ionizable groups are buried. NMR spectroscopy showed that in 2 of 25 cases studied, the ionization of an internal Lys unfolded the protein globally. In five cases, the internal charge triggered localized changes in structure and dynamics, and in three cases, it promoted partial or local unfolding. Remarkably, in 15 proteins, the ionization of the internal Lys had no detectable structural consequences. Highly stable proteins appear to be inherently capable of withstanding the presence of charge in their hydrophobic interior, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. The extent of structural reorganization paralleled loosely with global thermodynamic stability, suggesting that structure-based pK(a) calculations for buried residues could be improved by calculation of thermodynamic stability and by enhanced conformational sampling. PMID:22632835

  16. Structural Reorganization Triggered by Charging of Lys Residues in the Hydrophobic Interior of a Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Michael S.; Khangulov, Victor S.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Heroux, Annie; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L.; Bertrand García-Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Structural consequences of ionization of residues buried in the hydrophobic interior of proteins were examined systematically in 25 proteins with internal Lys residues. Crystal structures showed that the ionizable groups are buried. NMR spectroscopy showed that in 2 of 25 cases studied the ionization of an internal Lys unfolded the protein globally. In 5 cases the internal charge triggered localized changes in structure and dynamics, and in 3 cases they promoted partial or local unfolding. Remarkably, in 15 proteins the ionization of the internal Lys resulted in no detectable structural consequences. Highly stable proteins appear to be inherently capable of withstanding the presence of charge in their hydrophobic interior, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. The extent of structural reorganization paralleled loosely with global thermodynamic stability, suggesting that structure-based pKa calculations for buried residues could be improved by calculation of thermodynamic stability and by enhanced conformational sampling. PMID:22632835

  17. Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gibbins, Betty M.

    2000-01-01

    Protein losses in ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction HPLC were examined. The supports were allnon-porous, packed in columns of identical dimensions. Two ion-exchange chromatography (IEC), anion and cation, as well as a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) columns were tested. Proteins included cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin (BSA), immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen. Temperature effects on HIC supports were studied for cytochrome c and BSA. Both retention times and recoveries of the proteins were measured. The influence of column residence time on the recovery of proteins were also investigated. We found a linear relationship between the amount of protein recovered and the log of the molecular mass. Retention times also generally increased with temperature for both HIC and IEC. Other trends in retention behavior and recoveries are discussed.

  18. Towards a structural biology of the hydrophobic effect in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Camilloni, Carlo; Bonetti, Daniela; Morrone, Angela; Giri, Rajanish; Dobson, Christopher M; Brunori, Maurizio; Gianni, Stefano; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a major driving force in protein folding. A complete understanding of this effect requires the description of the conformational states of water and protein molecules at different temperatures. Towards this goal, we characterise the cold and hot denatured states of a protein by modelling NMR chemical shifts using restrained molecular dynamics simulations. A detailed analysis of the resulting structures reveals that water molecules in the bulk and at the protein interface form on average the same number of hydrogen bonds. Thus, even if proteins are 'large' particles (in terms of the hydrophobic effect, i.e. larger than 1 nm), because of the presence of complex surface patterns of polar and non-polar residues their behaviour can be compared to that of 'small' particles (i.e. smaller than 1 nm). We thus find that the hot denatured state is more compact and richer in secondary structure than the cold denatured state, since water at lower temperatures can form more hydrogen bonds than at high temperatures. Then, using Φ-value analysis we show that the structural differences between the hot and cold denatured states result in two alternative folding mechanisms. These findings thus illustrate how the analysis of water-protein hydrogen bonds can reveal the molecular origins of protein behaviours associated with the hydrophobic effect. PMID:27461719

  19. Towards a structural biology of the hydrophobic effect in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Camilloni, Carlo; Bonetti, Daniela; Morrone, Angela; Giri, Rajanish; Dobson, Christopher M.; Brunori, Maurizio; Gianni, Stefano; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect is a major driving force in protein folding. A complete understanding of this effect requires the description of the conformational states of water and protein molecules at different temperatures. Towards this goal, we characterise the cold and hot denatured states of a protein by modelling NMR chemical shifts using restrained molecular dynamics simulations. A detailed analysis of the resulting structures reveals that water molecules in the bulk and at the protein interface form on average the same number of hydrogen bonds. Thus, even if proteins are ‘large’ particles (in terms of the hydrophobic effect, i.e. larger than 1 nm), because of the presence of complex surface patterns of polar and non-polar residues their behaviour can be compared to that of ‘small’ particles (i.e. smaller than 1 nm). We thus find that the hot denatured state is more compact and richer in secondary structure than the cold denatured state, since water at lower temperatures can form more hydrogen bonds than at high temperatures. Then, using Φ-value analysis we show that the structural differences between the hot and cold denatured states result in two alternative folding mechanisms. These findings thus illustrate how the analysis of water-protein hydrogen bonds can reveal the molecular origins of protein behaviours associated with the hydrophobic effect. PMID:27461719

  20. Computer simulation of protein solvation, hydrophobic mapping, and the oxygen effect in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Hydrophobic effects are central to the structural stability of biomolecules, particularly proteins, in solution but are not understood at a molecular level. This project developed a new theoretical approach to calculation of hydrophobic effects. This information theory approach can be implemented with experimental, including computer simulation-experimental, information. The new theory is consistent with, builds upon, and subsumes previous integral equation and scaled particle statistical thermodynamic modes of hydrophobic effects. the new theory is sufficiently simple to permit application directly to complex biomolecules in solution and to permit further expansion to incorporate more subtle effects.

  1. Novel Hydrophobic Surface Binding Protein, HsbA, Produced by Aspergillus oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaki, Shinsaku; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Yamagata, Youhei; Hasegawa, Fumihiko; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakajima, Tasuku; Abe, Keietsu

    2006-01-01

    Hydrophobic surface binding protein A (HsbA) is a secreted protein (14.5 kDa) isolated from the culture broth of Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 grown in a medium containing polybutylene succinate-co-adipate (PBSA) as a sole carbon source. We purified HsbA from the culture broth and determined its N-terminal amino acid sequence. We found a DNA sequence encoding a protein whose N terminus matched that of purified HsbA in the A. ozyzae genomic sequence. We cloned the hsbA genomic DNA and cDNA from A. oryzae and constructed a recombinant A. oryzae strain highly expressing hsbA. Orthologues of HsbA were present in animal pathogenic and entomopathogenic fungi. Heterologously synthesized HsbA was purified and biochemically characterized. Although the HsbA amino acid sequence suggests that HsbA may be hydrophilic, HsbA adsorbed to hydrophobic PBSA surfaces in the presence of NaCl or CaCl2. When HsbA was adsorbed on the hydrophobic PBSA surfaces, it promoted PBSA degradation via the CutL1 polyesterase. CutL1 interacts directly with HsbA attached to the hydrophobic QCM electrode surface. These results suggest that when HsbA is adsorbed onto the PBSA surface, it recruits CutL1, and that when CutL1 is accumulated on the PBSA surface, it stimulates PBSA degradation. We previously reported that when the A. oryzae hydrophobin RolA is bound to PBSA surfaces, it too specifically recruits CutL1. Since HsbA is not a hydrophobin, A. oryzae may use several types of proteins to recruit lytic enzymes to the surface of hydrophobic solid materials and promote their degradation. PMID:16597938

  2. Hydrophobic collapse induces changes in the collective protein and hydration low frequency modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung Quan; Xu, Yao; Bründermann, Erik; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-05-01

    Rapid kinetic terahertz absorption spectroscopy (KITA) was used to directly probe changes in the collective protein-solvent dynamics during protein folding subsequent to a temperature jump. We monitored changes in the low frequency absorption of the solvated protein λ6-85* with a time resolution of less than 50 μs. Absorption at low frequency yields information about the collective protein-solvent interaction. The spectral changes below 2 THz are correlated with the hydrophobic collapse of λ6-85*, while there is no indication of any correlation with secondary structure formation, which is an order of magnitude faster.

  3. A Model of Protein Association Based on Their Hydrophobic and Electric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape. PMID:25329830

  4. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  5. A model of protein association based on their hydrophobic and electric interactions.

    PubMed

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H), and electric pseudo-dipole (D) moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a) open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies); b) closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers) or closed (fixed number of monomers). Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape. PMID:25329830

  6. Polar interactions trump hydrophobicity in stabilizing the self-inserting membrane protein Mistic.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Jana; Fiedler, Sebastian; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    Canonical integral membrane proteins are attached to lipid bilayers through hydrophobic transmembrane helices, whose topogenesis requires sophisticated insertion machineries. By contrast, membrane proteins that, for evolutionary or functional reasons, cannot rely on these machineries need to resort to driving forces other than hydrophobicity. A striking example is the self-inserting Bacillus subtilis protein Mistic, which is involved in biofilm formation and has found application as a fusion tag supporting the recombinant production and bilayer insertion of other membrane proteins. Although this unusual protein contains numerous polar and charged residues and lacks characteristic membrane-interaction motifs, it is tightly bound to membranes in vivo and membrane-mimetic systems in vitro. Therefore, we set out to quantify the contributions from polar and nonpolar interactions to the coupled folding and insertion of Mistic. To this end, we defined conditions under which the protein can be unfolded completely and reversibly from various detergent micelles by urea in a two-state equilibrium and where the unfolded state is independent of the detergent used for solubilizing the folded state. This enabled equilibrium unfolding experiments previously used for soluble and β-barrel membrane proteins, revealing that polar interactions with ionic and zwitterionic headgroups and, presumably, the interfacial dipole potential stabilize the protein much more efficiently than nonpolar interactions with the micelle core. These findings unveil the forces that allow a protein to tightly interact with a membrane-mimetic environment without major hydrophobic contributions and rationalize the differential suitability of detergents for the extraction and solubilization of Mistic-tagged membrane proteins. PMID:25177765

  7. Automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column selection for use in protein purification.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Stone, Orrin J; Anderson, Michelle E

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein (1). The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH(4;))(2;)SO(4;)). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) (2). As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter (3). Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining

  8. Correlation of average hydrophobicity, water/air interface surface rheological properties and foaming properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Medrano, A; Abirached, C; Araujo, A C; Panizzolo, L A; Moyna, P; Añón, M C

    2012-04-01

    A comparative study on the behavior in the air-water interface of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactoalbumin, glycinin and β-conglycinin was performed. The behavior at the interface was evaluated by equilibrium surface tension and surface rheological properties of adsorbed films. There were significant differences (α ≤ 0.05) in the values of the constants of adsorption to the interface of the four proteins. The glycinin had the slowest rate of adsorption, due to its low average hydrophobicity, low molecular flexibility and large molecular size. Smaller proteins like β-lactoglobulin and α-lactoalbumin tended to greater equilibrium pressure values than the larger proteins because of its higher rate of adsorption to the interface. The foam capacity of proteins showed a positive correlation with the average hydrophobicity; the maximal retained liquid volume or the initial rate of passage of liquid to foam were significantly lower (α ≤ 0.05) when protein was glycinin. The dilatational modulus of glycinin was the lowest, which implies lowest resistance to disruption of the film. Glycinin protein has lower proportion of gravitational drainage and higher disproportionation having perhaps a less resistant film. In conclusion, β-conglycinin and whey proteins showed a similar behavior, so β-conglycinin might be the best soybean protein to replace milk proteins in food formulations. PMID:22414931

  9. PEGylated protein separation using different hydrophobic interaction supports: Conventional and monolithic supports.

    PubMed

    Mayolo-Deloisa, Karla; González-Valdez, José; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Protein hydrophobicity can be modified after a PEGylation process. However, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has been used to separate PEGylation reaction products less frequently than other techniques. In this context, chromatographic monoliths represent a good alternative to continue exploring the separation of PEGylated proteins with HIC. In this work, the separation of PEGylated proteins using C4 A monolith as well as Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose was analyzed. Three proteins were used as models: RNase A, β-lactoglobulin, and lysozyme. All proteins were PEGylated in the N-terminal amino groups with 20 kDa methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) propionaldehyde. The concentration of ammonium sulfate (1 M) used was the same for all stationary phases. The results obtained demonstrated that the C4 A monolith could better resolve all protein PEGylation reaction mixtures, since the peaks of mono- and di-PEGylated proteins can be clearly distinguished in the chromatographic profiles. On the contrary, while using Butyl Sepharose media only the PEGylation reaction mixtures of RNase A could be partially separated at 35 and 45 CVs. PEGylated proteins of β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme could not be resolved when Toyopearl Butyl 650C and Butyl Sepharose were used. It is then clear that monoliths are an excellent choice to explore the purification process of PEGylated proteins exploiting the advantages of HIC. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:702-707, 2016. PMID:26918888

  10. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  11. A molecular model for lipid-protein interaction in membranes: the role of hydrophobic mismatch.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, D R; Ben-Shaul, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction free energy between a hydrophobic, transmembrane, protein and the surrounding lipid environment is calculated based on a microscopic model for lipid organization. The protein is treated as a rigid hydrophobic solute of thickness dP, embedded in a lipid bilayer of unperturbed thickness doL. The lipid chains in the immediate vicinity of the protein are assumed to adjust their length to that of the protein (e.g., they are stretched when dP > doL) in order to bridge over the lipid-protein hydrophobic mismatch (dP-doL). The bilayer's hydrophobic thickness is assumed to decay exponentially to its asymptotic, unperturbed, value. The lipid deformation free energy is represented as a sum of chain (hydrophobic core) and interfacial (head-group region) contributions. The chain contribution is calculated using a detailed molecular theory of chain packing statistics, which allows the calculation of conformational properties and thermodynamic functions (in a mean-field approximation) of the lipid tails. The tails are treated as single chain amphiphiles, modeled using the rotational isometric state scheme. The interfacial free energy is represented by a phenomenological expression, accounting for the opposing effects of head-group repulsions and hydrocarbon-water surface tension. The lipid deformation free energy delta F is calculated as a function of dP-doL. Most calculations are for C14 amphiphiles which, in the absence of a protein, pack at an average area per head-group ao approximately equal to 32 A2 (doL approximately 24.5 A), corresponding to the fluid state of the membrane. When dP = doL, delta F > 0 and is due entirely to the loss of conformational entropy experienced by the chains around the protein. When dP > doL, the interaction free energy is further increased due to the enhanced stretching of the tails. When dP < doL, chain flexibility (entropy) increases, but this contribution to delta F is overcounted by the increase in the interfacial free energy

  12. Hydrophobic Variations of N-Oxide Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Manipulation: Importance of Non-hydrocarbon Groups in the Hydrophobic Portion

    PubMed Central

    Aiman, Sadaf; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces several N-oxide amphiphiles evaluated for a large membrane protein assembly. Among these N-oxide amphiphiles, cholate-based agents (CAO and CAO-1) displayed the most favorable behaviors for membrane protein stabilization. This result raises the possibility that the identity and number of non-hydrocarbon groups present in the hydrophobic region plays a critical role in determining detergent properties. PMID:24347070

  13. Protein folding simulations of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic model by combining tabu search with genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tianzi; Cui, Qinghua; Shi, Guihua; Ma, Songde

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid algorithm combining genetic algorithms and tabu search is presented. In the proposed hybrid algorithm, the idea of tabu search is applied to the crossover operator. We demonstrate that the hybrid algorithm can be applied successfully to the protein folding problem based on a hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model. The results show that in all cases the hybrid algorithm works better than a genetic algorithm alone. A comparison with other methods is also made.

  14. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  15. Affinity Labeling of Highly Hydrophobic Integral Membrane Proteins for Proteome-Wide Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael B.; Blonder, Josip; Smith, Richard D.

    2003-03-01

    The ability to identify and quantify integral membrane proteins is an analytical challenge for mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The use of surfactants to solubilize and derivatize these proteins can suppress peptide ionization and interfere with chromatographic separations during microcapillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry. To circumvent the use of surfactants and increase proteome coverage, an affinity labeling method has been developed to target highly hydrophobic integral membrane proteins using organic-assisted extraction and solubilization followed by cysteinyl-specific labeling using biotinylation reagents. As demonstrated on the membrane subproteome of Deinococcus radiodurans, specific and quantitative labeling of integral membrane proteins was achieved using a 60% methanol-aqueous buffer system and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine as the cysteinyl-alkylating reagent. From a total of 220 unique Cys-labeled peptides, 89 proteins were identified of which 40 were integral membrane proteins containing from 1 to 9 mapped transmembrane domains with a maximum positive GRAVY of 1.08. The protocol described can be used with other stable isotope labeling reagents (e.g. ICAT) to enable comparative measurements to be made on differentially expressed hydrophobic membrane proteins from various organisms (e.g. pathogenic bacteria) and cell types and provide a viable method for comparative proteome-wide analyses.

  16. Assay of Protein and Peptide Adducts of Cholesterol Ozonolysis Products by Hydrophobic and Click Enrichment Methods

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods—Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)—were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide–seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and asthma. PMID:25185119

  17. Dynamic hydration shell restores Kauzmann's 1959 explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Kauzmann's explanation of how the hydrophobic factor drives protein folding is reexamined. His explanation said that hydrocarbon hydration shells are formed, possibly of clathrate water, and they explain why hydrocarbons have uniquely low solubilities in water. His explanation was not universally accepted because of skepticism about the clathrate hydration shell. A revised version is given here in which a dynamic hydration shell is formed by van der Waals (vdw) attraction, as proposed in 1985 by Jorgensen et al. [Jorgensen WL, Gao J, Ravimohan C (1985) J Phys Chem 89:3470–3473]. The vdw hydration shell is implicit in theories of hydrophobicity that contain the vdw interaction between hydrocarbon C and water O atoms. To test the vdw shell model against the known hydration energetics of alkanes, the energetics should be based on the Ben-Naim standard state (solute transfer between fixed positions in the gas and liquid phases). Then the energetics are proportional to n, the number of water molecules correlated with an alkane by vdw attraction, given by the simulations of Jorgensen et al. The energetics show that the decrease in entropy upon hydration is the root cause of hydrophobicity; it probably results from extensive ordering of water molecules in the vdw shell. The puzzle of how hydrophobic free energy can be proportional to nonpolar surface area when the free energy is unfavorable and the only known interaction (the vdw attraction) is favorable, is resolved by finding that the unfavorable free energy is produced by the vdw shell. PMID:25157156

  18. Effects of Polymer Hydrophobicity on Protein Structure and Aggregation Kinetics in Crowded Milieu.

    PubMed

    Breydo, Leonid; Sales, Amanda E; Frege, Telma; Howell, Mark C; Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-05-19

    We examined the effects of water-soluble polymers of various degrees of hydrophobicity on the folding and aggregation of proteins. The polymers we chose were polyethylene glycol (PEG) and UCON (1:1 copolymer of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol). The presence of additional methyl groups in UCON makes it more hydrophobic than PEG. Our earlier analysis revealed that similarly sized PEG and UCON produced different changes in the solvent properties of water in their solutions and induced morphologically different α-synuclein aggregates [Ferreira, L. A., et al. (2015) Role of solvent properties of aqueous media in macromolecular crowding effects. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn., in press]. To improve our understanding of molecular mechanisms defining behavior of proteins in a crowded environment, we tested the effects of these polymers on secondary and tertiary structure and aromatic residue solvent accessibility of 10 proteins [five folded proteins, two hybrid proteins; i.e., protein containing ordered and disordered domains, and three intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs)] and on the aggregation kinetics of insulin and α-synuclein. We found that effects of both polymers on secondary and tertiary structures of folded and hybrid proteins were rather limited with slight unfolding observed in some cases. Solvent accessibility of aromatic residues was significantly increased for the majority of the studied proteins in the presence of UCON but not PEG. PEG also accelerated the aggregation of protein into amyloid fibrils, whereas UCON promoted aggregation to amyloid oligomers instead. These results indicate that even a relatively small change in polymer structure leads to a significant change in the effect of this polymer on protein folding and aggregation. This is an indication that protein folding and especially aggregation are highly sensitive to the presence of other macromolecules, and an excluded volume effect is insufficient to describe their effect. PMID:25919930

  19. Adhesion and structure properties of protein nanomaterials containing hydrophobic and charged amino acids.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Mo, Xiaoqun; Moore, Robyn; Frazier, Shawnalea J; Iwamoto, Takeo; Tomich, John M; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2006-03-01

    Protein polymers are being used or considered for biobased adhesives and coating materials. Most adhesives derived from macro protein molecules work through receptors or cross-links to bring about adhesion. The adhesion mechanism of protein polymers would lead to better understanding of adhesives and the discovery of new practical properties of protein polymers at both nano- and macro-scales. The objective of this research work was to study adhesion properties of protein polymers at nanoscale (a peptide adhesive with nanometer-scale units that range in size of several nanometers, defined as protein nanomaterial). Seven protein nanomaterial samples with different degrees of adhesive strength were designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All protein nanomaterials contain a common hydrophobic core flanked by charged amino acid sequences. The adhesion properties of the protein nanomaterials were investigated at different pH values and curing temperatures. The protein nanomaterials self aggregate and interact with the wood surface. The protein nanomaterial KKK-FLIVIGSII-KKK identified in this study had high adhesive strength toward wood. It had the highest shear strength at pH 12, with an amino acid sequence that was very hydrophobic and uncharged. This protein nanomaterial underwent structural analyses using circular dichroism, laser-Fourier transform infrared, and laser desorption mass spectrometry. At pH 12 this peptide adopted a pH-induced beta-like conformation. Adhesive strength reflects contributions of both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Ionic and covalent bonds do not appear to be significant factors for adhesion in this study. PMID:16573147

  20. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  1. Acceleration through passive destabilization: protein folding in a weak hydrophobic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Andrew; Baumketner, Andrij; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2004-03-01

    The GroEL chaperonin is a biomolecule which assists the folding of an extremely diverse range of proteins in Eubacteria. Some proteins undergo many rounds of ATP-regulated binding and dissociation from GroEL/ES before folding. It has been proposed that transient stress from ATP-regulated binding and release from GroEL/ES frees frustrated proteins from misfolded conformations. However recent evidence suggests that chaperonin-accelerated protein folding can take place entirely within a mutated GroEL+ES cavity that is unable to open and release the protein. Using molecular dynamics, we demonstrate that static confinement within a weakly hydrophobic (attractive) cavity (similar to the interior of the cavity formed by the GroEL+ES complex) is sufficient to significantly accelerate the folding of a highly frustrated protein-like heteropolymer. Our frustrated molecule benifits kinetically from a static hydrophobic environment that destabilizes misfolded conformations. This may shed light on the mechanisms used by other chaperones which do not depend on ATP.

  2. Lateral Diffusion of Membrane Proteins: Consequences of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Lipid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Ria; Krasnikov, Victor V.; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins in model membranes. The trimeric glutamate transporter (GltT) and the monomeric lactose transporter (LacY) were reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of unsaturated phosphocholine lipids of varying acyl chain length (14–22 carbon atoms) and various ratios of DOPE/DOPG/DOPC lipids. The lateral mobility of the proteins and of a fluorescent lipid analog was determined as a function of the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer (h) and lipid composition, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of LacY decreased with increasing thickness of the bilayer, in accordance with the continuum hydrodynamic model of Saffman-Delbrück. For GltT, the mobility had its maximum at diC18:1 PC, which is close to the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer in vivo. The lateral mobility decreased linearly with the concentration of DOPE but was not affected by the fraction of anionic lipids from DOPG. The addition of DOPG and DOPE did not affect the activity of GltT. We conclude that the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer is a major determinant of molecule diffusion in membranes, but protein-specific properties may lead to deviations from the Saffman-Delbrück model. PMID:20816060

  3. The role of hydrophobic microenvironments in modulating pKa shifts in proteins.

    PubMed

    Mehler, E L; Fuxreiter, M; Simon, I; Garcia-Moreno, E B

    2002-08-01

    The screened Coulomb potential (SCP) method, combined with a quantitative description of the microenvironments around titratable groups, based on the Hydrophobic Fragmental Constants developed by Rekker, has been applied to calculate the pK(a) values of groups embedded in extremely hydrophobic microenvironments in proteins. This type of microenvironment is not common; but constitutes a small class, where the protein's architecture has evolved to lend special properties to the embedded residue. They are of significant interest because they are frequently important in catalysis and in proton and electron transfer reactions. In the SCP treatment these special cases are treated locally and therefore do not affect the accuracy of the pK(a) values calculated for other residues in less hydrophobic environments. Here the calibration of the algorithm is extended with the help of earlier results from lysozyme and of three mutants of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) that were specially designed to measure the energetics of ionization of titratable groups buried in extremely hydrophobic microenvironments. The calibrated algorithm was subsequently applied to a fourth mutant of SNase and then to a very large dimeric amine oxidase of 1284 residues, where 334 are titratable. The observed pK(a) shifts of the buried residues are large (up to 4.7 pK units), and all cases are well reproduced by the calculations with a root mean square error of 0.22. These results support the hypothesis that protein electrostatics can only be described correctly and self-consistently if the inherent heterogeneity of these systems is properly accounted for. PMID:12112696

  4. Hydrophobic Blocks Facilitate Lipid Compatibility and Translocon Recognition of Transmembrane Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity

  5. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  6. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    PubMed Central

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in series during sample application, and subsequent elution of detached columns in parallel, additional separation of bound proteins was achieved. Further low-abundance, physiologically active proteins could be highly enriched and detected by ESI-MS/MS. PMID:22740472

  7. Soybean hydrophobic protein response to external electric field: a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashutosh; Orsat, Valérie; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    The molecular dynamic (MD) modeling approach was applied to evaluate the effect of an external electric field on soybean hydrophobic protein and surface properties. Nominal electric field strengths of 0.002 V/nm and 0.004 V/nm had no major effect on the structure and surface properties of the protein isolate but the higher electric field strength of 3 V/nm significantly affected the protein conformation and solvent accessible surface area. The response of protein isolate to various external field stresses demonstrated that it is necessary to gain insight into protein dynamics under electromagnetic fields in order to be able to develop the techniques utilizing them for food processing and other biological applications. PMID:24970163

  8. Protein PEGylation attenuates adsorption and aggregation on a negatively charged and moderately hydrophobic polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sheetal S; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Covalent grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) chains to proteins ("PEGylation") is emerging as an effective technique to increase the in vivo circulation time and efficacy of protein drugs. PEGylated protein adsorption at a variety of solid/aqueous interfaces is a critical aspect of their manufacture, storage, and delivery. A special category of block copolymer, PEGylated proteins have one or more water-soluble linear polymer (PEG) blocks and a single globular protein block that each exert distinct intermolecular and surface interaction forces. We report the impact of PEGylation on protein adsorption at the interface between aqueous solutions and solid films of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a moderately hydrophobic and negatively charged polymer. Using the model protein lysozyme with controlled degrees of PEGylation, we employ total internal reflection fluorescence techniques to measure adsorption isotherms, adsorption reversibility, and the extent of surface-induced aggregation. Lysozyme PEGylation reduces the extent of protein adsorption and surface-induced aggregation and increases the reversibility of adsorption compared to the unconjugated protein. Results are interpreted in terms of steric forces among grafted PEG chains and their effects on protein-protein interactions and protein orientation on the surface. PMID:21067142

  9. High tolerance for ionizable residues in the hydrophobic interior of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Daniel G.; Cannon, Brian R.; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Robinson, Aaron; García-Moreno E., Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Internal ionizable groups are quite rare in water-soluble globular proteins. Presumably, this reflects the incompatibility between charges and the hydrophobic environment in the protein interior. Here we show that proteins can have an inherently high tolerance for internal ionizable groups. The 25 internal positions in staphylococcal nuclease were substituted one at a time with Lys, Glu, or Asp without abolishing enzymatic activity and without detectable changes in the conformation of the protein. Similar results with substitutions of 6 randomly chosen internal positions in ribonuclease H with Lys and Glu suggest that the ability of proteins to tolerate internal ionizable groups might be a property common to many proteins. Eighty-six of the 87 substitutions made were destabilizing, but in all but one case the proteins remained in the native state at neutral pH. By comparing the stability of each variant protein at two different pH values it was established that the pKa values of most of the internal ionizable groups are shifted; many of the internal ionizable groups are probably neutral at physiological pH values. These studies demonstrate that special structural adaptations are not needed for ionizable groups to exist stably in the hydrophobic interior of proteins. The studies suggest that enzymes and other proteins that use internal ionizable groups for functional purposes could have evolved through the random accumulation of mutations that introduced ionizable groups at internal positions, followed by evolutionary adaptation and optimization to modulate stability, dynamics, and other factors necessary for function. PMID:19004768

  10. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography in dual salt system increases protein binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Senczuk, Anna M; Klinke, Ralph; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Vedantham, Ganesh; Yigzaw, Yinges

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uses weakly hydrophobic resins and requires a salting-out salt to promote protein-resin interaction. The salting-out effects increase with protein and salt concentration. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) is dependent on the binding constant, as well as on the flow characteristics during sample loading. DBC increases with the salt concentration but decreases with increasing flow rate. Dynamic and operational binding capacity have a major raw material cost/processing time impact on commercial scale production of monoclonal antibodies. In order to maximize DBC the highest salt concentration without causing precipitation is used. We report here a novel method to maintain protein solubility while increasing the DBC by using a combination of two salting-out salts (referred to as dual salt). In a series of experiments, we explored the dynamic capacity of a HIC resin (TosoBioscience Butyl 650M) with combinations of salts. Using a model antibody, we developed a system allowing us to increase the dynamic capacity up to twofold using the dual salt system over traditional, single salt system. We also investigated the application of this novel approach to several other proteins and salt combinations, and noted a similar protein solubility and DBC increase. The observed increase in DBC in the dual salt system was maintained at different linear flow rates and did not impact selectivity. PMID:19382248

  11. Detergent binding as a sensor of hydrophobicity and polar interactions in the binding cavities of proteins.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Véronique; Lair, Virginie; André, Virginie; le Maire, Guerric; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; le Maire, Marc; Møller, Jesper V

    2005-09-13

    To evaluate the role of hydrophobic and electrostatic or other polar interactions for protein-ligand binding, we studied the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) and beta-lactoglobulin with various aliphatic (C10-C14) cationic and zwitterionic detergents. We find that cationic detergents, at levels that do not cause unfolding, interact with a single site on beta-lactoglobulin and with two primary and five to six secondary sites on HSA with an affinity that is approximately the same as that with which zwitterionic (dimethylamineoxide) detergents interact, suggesting the absence of significant electrostatic interactions in the high-affinity binding of these compounds. The binding affinity for all of the groups of compounds was dependent upon hydrocarbon chain length, suggesting the predominant role of hydrophobic forces, supported by polar interactions at the protein surface. A distinct correlation between the binding energy and the propensity for micelle formation within the group of cationic or noncharged (nonionic and zwitterionic) detergents indicated that the critical micellar concentration (CMC) for each of these detergent groups, rather than the absolute length of the hydrocarbon chain, can be used to compare their hydrophobicities during their interaction with protein. Intrinsic fluorescence data suggest that the two primary binding sites on serum albumin for the zwitterionic and cationic compounds are located in the C-terminal part of the albumin molecule, possibly in the Sudlow II binding region. Comparisons with previous binding data on anionic amphiphiles emphasize the important contribution of ion bond formation and other polar interactions in the binding of fatty acids and dodecyl sulfate (SDS) by HSA but not by beta-lactoglobulin. Electrostatic interactions by cationic detergents played a significant role in destabilizing the protein structure at high binding levels, with beta-lactoglobulin being more susceptible to unfolding than HSA. Zwitterionic

  12. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-12-01

    A long standing problem in molecular biology is to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein, given its amino acid sequence. A variety of simplifying models have been proposed abstracting only the {open_quotes}essential physical properties{close_quotes} of real proteins. In these models, the three dimensional space is often represented by a lattice. Residues which are adjacent in the primary sequence (i.e. covalently linked) must be placed at adjacent points in the lattice. A conformation of a protein is simply a self-avoiding walk along the lattice. The protein folding problem STRING-FOLD is that of finding a conformation of the protein sequence on the lattice such that the overall energy is minimized, for some reasonable definition of energy. This formulation leaves open the choices of a lattice and an energy function. Once these choices are made, one may then address the algorithmic complexity of optimizing the energy function for the lattice. For a variety of such simple models, this minimization problem is in fact NP-hard. In this paper, we consider the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) Model introduced by Dill. The HP model abstracts the problem by grouping the 20 amino acids into two classes: hydrophobic (or non-polar) residues and hydrophilic (or polar) residues. For concreteness, we will take our input to be a string from (H,P){sup +}, where P represents polar residues, and H represents hydrophobic residues. Dill et.al. survey the literature analyzing this model. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Contribution of hydrophobicity, DNA and proteins to the cytotoxicity of cationic PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Halets, Inessa; Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Klajnert, Barbara; Bryszewska, Maria

    2013-09-15

    In most articles, cytotoxicity of cationic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers toward red blood cells has been exclusively explained by their surface charge. We have focused on dendrimer hydrophobicity as a second possible factor that determines this cytotoxicity. Using PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers from the 3rd to the 6th generations and PAMAM-NH2-C12(25%) dendrimer of the 4th generation bearing 25% acyl groups, these induced hemolysis that increased with their surface charge and hydrophobicity. Interaction of PAMAM-NH2-C12(25%) G4 dendrimer with blood proteins (γ-globulin, α-thrombin, human serum albumin) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) significantly reduced their cytotoxicity toward red blood cells. PMID:23831196

  14. Simulations of HIV Capsid Protein Dimerization Reveal the Effect of Chemistry and Topography on the Mechanism of Hydrophobic Protein Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiyin; Hagan, Michael F.

    2012-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While the wild type protein remains wet until contact, we identify a set of in silico mutations, in which three hydrophilic amino acids are replaced with nonpolar residues, that leads to dewetting prior to association. The existence of dewetting depends on the size and relative locations of substituted residues separated by nm length scales, indicating long range cooperativity and a sensitivity to surface topography. These observations identify important details which are missing from descriptions of protein association based on buried hydrophobic surface area.

  15. Lateral Protein-Protein Interactions at Hydrophobic and Charged Surfaces as a Function of pH and Salt Concentration.

    PubMed

    Hladílková, Jana; Callisen, Thomas H; Lund, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    Surface adsorption of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL)-a widely used industrial biocatalyst-is studied experimentally and theoretically at different pH and salt concentrations. The maximum achievable surface coverage on a hydrophobic surface occurs around the protein isoelectric point and adsorption is reduced when either increasing or decreasing pH, indicating that electrostatic protein-protein interactions in the adsorbed layer play an important role. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, where proteins are coarse grained to the amino acid level, we estimate the protein isoelectric point in the vicinity of charged surfaces as well as the lateral osmotic pressure in the adsorbed monolayer. Good agreement with available experimental data is achieved and we further make predictions of the protein orientation at hydrophobic and charged surfaces. Finally, we present a perturbation theory for predicting shifts in the protein isoelectric point due to close proximity to charged surfaces. Although this approximate model requires only single protein properties (mean charge and its variance), excellent agreement is found with MC simulations. PMID:26815664

  16. High-throughput protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography: salt effects and thermodynamic interrelation.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Beckley K; Hylkema, Nienke N; Wiedhaup, Koenraad R; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Ottens, Marcel

    2011-12-01

    Salt-induced protein precipitation and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) are two widely used methods for protein purification. In this study, salt effects in protein precipitation and HIC were investigated for a broad combination of proteins, salts and HIC resins. Interrelation between the critical thermodynamic salting out parameters in both techniques was equally investigated. Protein precipitation data were obtained by a high-throughput technique employing 96-well microtitre plates and robotic liquid handling technology. For the same protein-salt combinations, isocratic HIC experiments were performed using two or three different commercially available stationary phases-Phenyl Sepharose low sub, Butyl Sepharose and Resource Phenyl. In general, similar salt effects and deviations from the lyotropic series were observed in both separation methods, for example, the reverse Hofmeister effect reported for lysozyme below its isoelectric point and at low salt concentrations. The salting out constant could be expressed in terms of the preferential interaction parameter in protein precipitation, showing that the former is, in effect, the net result of preferential interaction of a protein with water molecules and salt ions in its vicinity. However, no general quantitative interrelation was found between salting out parameters or the number of released water molecules in protein precipitation and HIC. In other words, protein solubility and HIC retention factor could not be quantitatively interrelated, although for some proteins, regular trends were observed across the different resins and salt types. PMID:21868020

  17. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    PubMed

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties. PMID:27338140

  18. [Debridement dressings].

    PubMed

    Faure, Christine; Meaume, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    For any wound, necrosis is an obstacle to the formation of granulation tissue and creates an environment which is particularly favourable to the proliferation of bacteria. Mechanical debridement, carried out by a doctor or nurse, or surgical debridement, is usually necessary. It is completed by autolytic debridement using technical dressings. Among the many modern dressings designed on the principle of the moist healing environment, some are more adapted to the debridement phase and are recommended by the French National Authority for Health. PMID:26763564

  19. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  20. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenases reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  1. Comparison between the behavior of different hydrophobic peptides allowing membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lhor, Mustapha; Bernier, Sarah C; Horchani, Habib; Bussières, Sylvain; Cantin, Line; Desbat, Bernard; Salesse, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Membrane binding of proteins such as short chain dehydrogenase reductases or tail-anchored proteins relies on their N- and/or C-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane segment. In this review, we propose guidelines to characterize such hydrophobic peptide segments using spectroscopic and biophysical measurements. The secondary structure content of the C-terminal peptides of retinol dehydrogenase 8, RGS9-1 anchor protein, lecithin retinol acyl transferase, and of the N-terminal peptide of retinol dehydrogenase 11 has been deduced by prediction tools from their primary sequence as well as by using infrared or circular dichroism analyses. Depending on the solvent and the solubilization method, significant structural differences were observed, often involving α-helices. The helical structure of these peptides was found to be consistent with their presumed membrane binding. Langmuir monolayers have been used as membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions. The values of maximum insertion pressure obtained for all peptides using a monolayer of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DOPE) are larger than the estimated lateral pressure of membranes, thus suggesting that they bind membranes. Polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the structure and orientation of these peptides in the absence and in the presence of a DOPE monolayer. This lipid induced an increase or a decrease in the organization of the peptide secondary structure. Further measurements are necessary using other lipids to better understand the membrane interactions of these peptides. PMID:24560216

  2. Protein Adsorption Alters Hydrophobic Surfaces Used for Suspension Culture of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Steven J.; Stieg, Adam Z.; Richardson, Wade; Guo, Shuling; Powers, David N.; Wohlschlegel, James; Dunn, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This Letter examines the physical and chemical changes that occur at the interface of methyl-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) after exposure to cell culture media used to derive embryoid bodies (EBs) from pluripotent stem cells. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of the SAMs indicates that protein components within the EB cell culture medium preferentially adsorb at the hydrophobic interface. In addition, we examined the adsorption process using surface plasmon resonance and atomic force microscopy. These studies identify the formation of a porous, mat-like adsorbed protein film with an approximate thickness of 2.5 nm. Captive bubble contact angle analysis reveals a shift toward superhydrophilic wetting behavior at the cell culture interface due to adsorption of these proteins. These results show how EBs are able to remain in suspension when derived on hydrophobic materials, which carries implications for the rational design of suspension culture interfaces for lineage specific stem-cell differentiation. PMID:26261952

  3. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  4. Soybean Hydrophobic Protein is Present in a Matrix Secreted by the Endocarp Epidermis during Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Enstone, Daryl E.; Peterson, Carol A.; Gijzen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS) is present in soybean dust and is an allergen (Gly m 1) that causes asthma in allergic individuals. Past studies have shown that HPS occurs on the seed surface. To determine the microscopic localization of HPS during seed development, monoclonal antibodies to HPS were used to visualize the protein by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Seed coat and endocarp sections were also examined for pectin, cellulose, callose, starch, and protein by histochemical staining. HPS is present in the endocarp epidermal cells at 18 to 28 days post anthesis. At later stages of seed development, HPS occurs in extracellular secretions that accumulate unevenly on the endocarp epidermis and seed surface. HPS is synthesized by the endocarp epidermis and deposited on the seed surface as part of a heterogeneous matrix. PMID:26455712

  5. Optimal Hydrophobicity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Protein Mimics Required for siRNA Internalization.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Posey, Nicholas D; Otter, Ronja; Caffrey, Leah M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-06-13

    Exploring the role of polymer structure for the internalization of biologically relevant cargo, specifically siRNA, is of critical importance to the development of improved delivery reagents. Herein, we report guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs) based on a ring-opening metathesis polymerization scaffold containing tunable hydrophobic moieties that promote siRNA internalization. Structure-activity relationships using Jurkat T cells and HeLa cells were explored to determine how the length of the hydrophobic block and the hydrophobic side chain compositions of these PTDMs impacted siRNA internalization. To explore the hydrophobic block length, two different series of diblock copolymers were synthesized: one series with symmetric block lengths and one with asymmetric block lengths. At similar cationic block lengths, asymmetric and symmetric PTDMs promoted siRNA internalization in the same percentages of the cell population regardless of the hydrophobic block length; however, with 20 repeat units of cationic charge, the asymmetric block length had greater siRNA internalization, highlighting the nontrivial relationships between hydrophobicity and overall cationic charge. To further probe how the hydrophobic side chains impacted siRNA internalization, an additional series of asymmetric PTDMs was synthesized that featured a fixed hydrophobic block length of five repeat units that contained either dimethyl (dMe), methyl phenyl (MePh), or diphenyl (dPh) side chains and varied cationic block lengths. This series was further expanded to incorporate hydrophobic blocks consisting of diethyl (dEt), diisobutyl (diBu), and dicyclohexyl (dCy) based repeat units to better define the hydrophobic window for which our PTDMs had optimal activity. High-performance liquid chromatography retention times quantified the relative hydrophobicities of the noncationic building blocks. PTDMs containing the MePh, diBu, and dPh hydrophobic blocks were shown to have superior

  6. Protein binding mediation of biomaterial-dependent monocyte activation on a degradable polar hydrophobic ionic polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Kyle G; Labow, Rosalind S; Santerre, J Paul

    2012-11-01

    Protein adsorption is an important phenomenon influencing the cellular response to biomaterials. Previous studies comparing monocyte activation on a degradable polar hydrophobic ionic polyurethane (D-PHI) indicated a reduced pro-inflammatory monocyte response relative to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) substrates. The present study investigated the influence of protein binding in order to gain further insight into the observed differential monocyte activation. Several proteins, identified in different relative amounts within the bound protein layers on D-PHI vs. PLGA and TCPS, were evaluated for their effect on monocyte activation. It was found that, in general, both non-coated and protein pre-adsorbed D-PHI supported a reduced pro-inflammatory response relative to PLGA, as indicated by lower levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release. An initial increase in TNF-α release occurred when α(2)-macroglobulin (A2M) was pre-adsorbed to D-PHI, which was shown to involve the α(2)-macroglobulin receptor and was active on D-PHI but not on the two other biomaterials. This response was not observed during competitive protein binding in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), suggesting that a more complex arrangement of the bound proteins and their interactions with one another, as well as with the surface chemistry of the individual biomaterials, resulted in the low-activating character of D-PHI when interacting with human monocytes. PMID:22940217

  7. The contribution of entropy, enthalpy, and hydrophobic desolvation to cooperativity in repeat-protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cooperativity is a defining feature of protein folding, but its thermodynamic and structural origins are not completely understood. By constructing consensus ankyrin repeat protein arrays that have nearly identical sequences, we quantify cooperativity by resolving stability into intrinsic and interfacial components. Heteronuclear NMR and CD spectroscopy show that these constructs adopt ankyrin repeat structures. Applying a one-dimensional Ising model to a series of constructs chosen to maximize information content in unfolding transitions, we quantify stabilities of the terminal capping repeats, and resolve the effects of denaturant into intrinsic and interfacial components. Reversible thermal denaturation resolves interfacial and intrinsic free energies into enthalpic, entropic, and heat capacity terms. Intrinsic folding is entropically disfavored, whereas interfacial interaction is entropically favored and attends a decrease in heat capacity. These results suggest that helix formation and backbone ordering occurs upon intrinsic folding, whereas hydrophobic desolvation occurs upon interfacial interaction, contributing to cooperativity. PMID:21397186

  8. Reconciling the understanding of 'hydrophobicity' with physics-based models of proteins.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-03-01

    The idea that a 'hydrophobic energy' drives protein folding, aggregation, and binding by favoring the sequestration of bulky residues from water into the protein interior is widespread. The solvation free energies (ΔGsolv) of small nonpolar solutes increase with surface area (A), and the free energies of creating macroscopic cavities in water increase linearly with A. These observations seem to imply that there is a hydrophobic component (ΔGhyd) of ΔGsolv that increases linearly with A, and this assumption is widely used in implicit solvent models. However, some explicit-solvent molecular dynamics studies appear to contradict these ideas. For example, one definition (ΔG(LJ)) of ΔGhyd is that it is the free energy of turning on the Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions between the solute and solvent. However, ΔG(LJ) decreases with A for alanine and glycine peptides. Here we argue that these apparent contradictions can be reconciled by defining ΔGhyd to be a near hard core insertion energy (ΔGrep), as in the partitioning proposed by Weeks, Chandler, and Andersen. However, recent results have shown that ΔGrep is not a simple function of geometric properties of the molecule, such as A and the molecular volume, and that the free energy of turning on the attractive part of the LJ potential cannot be computed from first-order perturbation theory for proteins. The theories that have been developed from these assumptions to predict ΔGhyd are therefore inadequate for proteins. PMID:26836518

  9. Effect of subdomain interactions on methyl group dynamics in the hydrophobic core of villin headpiece protein

    PubMed Central

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Do, Tien; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqianq

    2014-01-01

    Thermostable villin headpiece protein (HP67) consists of the N-terminal subdomain (residues 10–41) and the autonomously folding C-terminal subdomain (residues 42–76) which pack against each other to form a structure with a unified hydrophobic core. The X-ray structures of the isolated C-terminal subdomain (HP36) and its counterpart in HP67 are very similar for the hydrophobic core residues. However, fine rearrangements of the free energy landscape are expected to occur because of the interactions between the two subdomains. We detect and characterize these changes by comparing the µs-ms time scale dynamics of the methyl-bearing side chains in isolated HP36 and in HP67. Specifically, we probe three hydrophobic side chains at the interface of the two subdomains (L42, V50, and L75) as well as at two residues far from the interface (L61 and L69). Solid-state deuteron NMR techniques are combined with computational modeling for the detailed characterization of motional modes in terms of their kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The effect of interdomain interactions on side chain dynamics is seen for all residues but L75. Thus, changes in dynamics because of subdomain interactions are not confined to the site of perturbation. One of the main results is a two-to threefold increase in the value of the activation energies for the rotameric mode of motions in HP67 compared with HP36. Detailed analysis of configurational entropies and heat capacities complement the kinetic view of the degree of the disorder in the folded state. PMID:24243806

  10. Constructing Fluorogenic Bacillus Spores (F-Spores) via Hydrophobic Decoration of Coat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferencko, Linda; Rotman, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacterial spores are protected by a coat consisting of about 60 different proteins assembled as a biochemically complex structure with intriguing morphological and mechanical properties. Historically, the coat has been considered a static structure providing rigidity and mainly acting as a sieve to exclude exogenous large toxic molecules, such as lytic enzymes. Over recent years, however, new information about the coat's architecture and function have emerged from experiments using innovative tools such as automated scanning microscopy, and high resolution atomic force microscopy. Principal Findings Using thin-section electron microscopy, we found that the coat of Bacillus spores has topologically specific proteins forming a layer that is identifiable because it spontaneously becomes decorated with hydrophobic fluorogenic probes from the milieu. Moreover, spores with decorated coat proteins (termed F-spores) have the unexpected attribute of responding to external germination signals by generating intense fluorescence. Fluorescence data from diverse experimental designs, including F-spores constructed from five different Bacilli species, indicated that the fluorogenic ability of F-spores is under control of a putative germination-dependent mechanism. Conclusions This work uncovers a novel attribute of spore-coat proteins that we exploited to decorate a specific layer imparting germination-dependent fluorogenicity to F-spores. We expect that F-spores will provide a model system to gain new insights into structure/function dynamics of spore-coat proteins. PMID:20174569

  11. Hydrophobic carboxy-terminal residues dramatically reduce protein levels in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Christopher J.; Uthandi, Sivakumar; Puentes, Jose A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis is important not only to cell physiology but also to the successful development of biocatalysts. While a wide-variety of signals are known to trigger protein degradation in bacteria and eukaryotes, these mechanisms are poorly understood in archaea, known for their ability to withstand harsh conditions. Here we present a systematic study in which single C-terminal amino acid residues were added to a reporter protein and shown to influence its levels in an archaeal cell. All 20 amino acid residues were examined for their impact on protein levels, using the reporter protein soluble modified red-shifted GFP (smRS-GFP) expressed in the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Addition of hydrophobic residues, including Leu, Cys, Met, Phe, Ala, Tyr, Ile and Val, gave the most pronounced reduction in smRS-GFP levels compared with the addition of either neutral or charged hydrophilic residues. In contrast to the altered protein levels, the C-terminal alterations had no influence on smRS-GFP-specific transcript levels, thus revealing that the effect is post-transcriptional. PMID:19850616

  12. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases which are serious neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals occur in various of species. Unlike many other neurodegenerative diseases affected by amyloid, prion diseases can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in many species. In humans, prion diseases include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Strussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Kuru etc. In animals, prion diseases are related to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) found in deer and elk, and scrapie seen in sheep and goats, etc. More seriously, the fact that transmission of the prion diseases across the species barrier to other species such as humans has caused a major public health concern worldwide. For example, the BSE in Europe, the CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK. Fortunately, it is discovered that the hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions (PrP(Sc)), which provide some clues in control of such diseases. This article provides a detailed survey of recent studies with respect to the PrP hydrophobic region of human PrP(110-136) using molecular dynamics studies. PMID:25373387

  13. Preparation of a silica-based high-performance hydrophobic interaction chromatography stationary phase for protein separation and renaturation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yicong; Qu, Qian; Li, Weimin; Yuan, Jie; Ren, Yi; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    In this work, based on the structural characteristics of bio-membrane molecules, a novel type of high-performance hydrophobic interaction chromatography stationary phase was prepared using cholesterol as a ligand. Investigating the separation performance of this stationary phase, the effect of pH and salt concentration of the mobile phase on the retention time, the absorption capacity, and the hydrophobic ability revealed that this stationary phase had a high loading capacity and moderate hydrophobic interactions compared with four different hydrophobic interaction chromatography stationary phase ligands. Five types of standard proteins could be baseline separated with a great selection for protein separation. When 3.0 M urea was added to the mobile phase, it could be refolded with simultaneous purification of denatured lysozyme by one-step chromatography. The mass recovery of lysozyme reached 89.5%, and the active recovery was 96.8%. Compared with traditional hydrophobic interaction chromatography, this new stationary phase has a good hydrophobic ability and a significant refolding efficiency. PMID:27159821

  14. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  15. Thermostability of salt bridges versus hydrophobic interactions in proteins probed by statistical potentials.

    PubMed

    Folch, Benjamin; Rooman, Marianne; Dehouck, Yves

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the interactions that stabilize protein structures is a long-standing issue, the elucidation of which would enable the prediction and the rational modification of the thermostability of a target protein. It is tackled here by deriving distance-dependent amino acid pair potentials from four datasets of proteins with increasing melting temperatures (Tm). The temperature dependence of the interactions is determined from the differences in the shape of the potentials derived from the four datasets. Note that, here, we use an unusual dataset definition, which is based on the Tm values, rather than on the living temperature of the host organisms. Our results show that the stabilizing weight of hydrophobic interactions (between Ile, Leu, and Val) remains constant as the temperature increases, compared to the other interactions. In contrast, the two minima of the Arg--Glu and Arg--Asp salt bridge potentials show a significant Tm dependence. These two minima correspond to two geometries: the fork--fork geometry, where the side chains point toward each other, and the fork--stick geometry, which involves the N(epsilon) side chain atom of Arg. These two types of salt bridges were determined to be significantly more stabilizing at high temperature. Moreover, a preference for more-compact salt bridges is noticeable in heat-resistant proteins, especially for the fork--fork geometry. The Tm-dependent potentials that have been defined here should be useful for predicting thermal stability changes upon mutation. PMID:18161956

  16. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14.

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, Maria; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-12-28

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera's OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  17. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  18. Optimization of hydrophobic interaction chromatography using a mathematical model of elution curves of a protein mixture.

    PubMed

    Lienqueo, María Elena; Shene, Carolina; Asenjo, Juan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for optimizing performance of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) for protein mixtures in which Rate Model simulations and evaluation of cost function are used. The system under study was HIC of a two-protein mixture (alpha-chymotrypsin and alpha-amylase), carried out with different conditions (gradient steepness, salt, concentration, volume of sample, pH, type of matrix, and flow rates). Parameters in the rate model were obtained from different sources. Mass transfer parameters (Reynolds, Peclet, and Biot numbers) were calculated using empirical correlations. Under the experimental conditions Re number was small (0.23) and axial dispersion negligible (PeL>300). Mass transfer was controlled by intraparticle diffusion (Bi>50). The model assumes that equilibrium constant (b) in the Langmuir isotherm was salt concentration (I) dependent [b(I)]. Parameters in the relationship for b(I) were estimated from experimental single protein elution curves and used to simulate protein mixtures. Rate model simulations showed that if protein sample load to the column was below 1 mg, displacement effects were negligible; in other cases protein interactions would limit the proposed mathematical description of HIC. The calibrated Rate Model successfully predicted elution curves of the protein mixture with deviations lower than 6x10(-4) absorbance units. The model was also able to predict that the Butyl Sepharose--NaCl 4 M system allowed to obtain the highest resolution (>1) for the two-protein mixture evaluated. The cost function built for optimizing the performance of HIC considers yield, purity, concentration, and the time needed to accomplish the separation. This function contains two types of parameters that have to be determined. The ones dependent on the HIC system and process conditions were obtained from simulations of elution curves of the two-protein mixture, by the calibrated Rate Model. The other parameters are dependent on

  19. Peptide nanofibers modified with a protein by using designed anchor molecules bearing hydrophobic and functional moieties.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Ayaka; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Sachiko; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2010-06-11

    Self-assembly of peptides and proteins is a key feature of biological functions. Short amphiphilic peptides designed with a beta-sheet structure can form sophisticated nanofiber structures, and the fibers are available as nanomaterials for arranging biomolecules. Peptide FI (H-PKFKIIEFEP-OH) self-assembles into nanofibers with a coiled fine structure, as reported in our previous work. We have constructed anchor molecules that have both a binding moiety for the fiber structure and a functional unit capable of capturing target molecules, with the purpose of arranging proteins on the designed peptide nanofibers. Designed anchors containing an alkyl chain as a binding unit and biotin as a functional moiety were found to bind to peptide fibers FI and F2i (H-ALEAKFAAFEAKLA-NH(2)). The surface-exposed biotin moiety on the fibers could capture an anti-biotin antibody. Moreover, hydrophobic dipeptide anchor units composed of iminodiacetate connected to Phe-Phe or Ile-Ile and a peptide composed of six histidine residues connected to biotin could also connect FI peptide fibers to the anti-biotin antibody through the chelation of Ni(2+) ions. This strategy of using designed anchors opens a novel approach to constructing nanoscale protein arrays on peptide nanomaterials. PMID:20419712

  20. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  1. Signal Recognition Particle and SecA Cooperate during Export of Secretory Proteins with Highly Hydrophobic Signal Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufan; Ueda, Takuya; Müller, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The Sec translocon of bacterial plasma membranes mediates the linear translocation of secretory proteins as well as the lateral integration of membrane proteins. Integration of many membrane proteins occurs co-translationally via the signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent targeting of ribosome-associated nascent chains to the Sec translocon. In contrast, translocation of classical secretory proteins across the Sec translocon is a post-translational event requiring no SRP but the motor protein SecA. Secretory proteins were, however, reported to utilize SRP in addition to SecA, if the hydrophobicity of their signal sequences exceeds a certain threshold value. Here we have analyzed transport of this subgroup of secretory proteins across the Sec translocon employing an entirely defined in vitro system. We thus found SecA to be both necessary and sufficient for translocation of secretory proteins with hydrophobic signal sequences, whereas SRP and its receptor improved translocation efficiency. This SRP-mediated boost of translocation is likely due to the early capture of the hydrophobic signal sequence by SRP as revealed by site-specific photo cross-linking of ribosome nascent chain complexes. PMID:24717922

  2. Purification of heat shock protein 90 from calf uterus and rat liver and characterization of the highly hydrophobic region.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, M; Saito, H; Yamamoto, M; Korach, K S; Hirogome, T; Sugano, H

    1989-07-21

    Heat shock protein 90 was purified from calf uterus and rat liver. Both heat shock protein 90s had similar molecular weights, as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, of Mr 87,000 and 88,000, isoelectric points of 5.2, and Stokes radii of 6.7 and 6.5 nm, respectively. Heat shock protein 90 bound to phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B even at low ionic strength, and also bound to butyl-Toyopearl at high ionic strength. Heat shock protein 90 bound to phenyl-Sepharose could be eluted with a buffer containing organic solvents or detergents such as 2-propanol, dioxane, dimethylformamide, methyl cellosolve, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate or Triton X-100, but not with ionic salts such as 1 M KCl. These results suggest that heat shock protein 90 possesses a significant hydrophobic region on the surface of the molecule. Hydrophobicities of heat shock protein 90 and 4S calf uterine estrogen receptor were both decreased by formation of a 8 S estrogen receptor complex. The role of the hydrophobic region of heat shock protein 90 in the interaction with estrogen receptor and other proteins is discussed. PMID:2752033

  3. Designability and cooperative folding in a four-letter hydrophobic-polar model of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Guang; Tang, Lei-Han

    2006-11-01

    The two-letter hydrophobic-polar (HP) model of Lau and Dill [Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] has been widely used in theoretical studies of protein folding due to its conceptual and computational simplicity. Despite its success in elucidating various aspects of the sequence-structure relationship, thermodynamic behavior of the model is not in agreement with a sharp two-state folding transition of many single-domain proteins. To gain a better understanding of this discrepancy, we consider an extension of the HP model by including an “antiferromagnetic” (AF) interaction in the contact potential that favors amino acid residues with complementary attributes. With an enlarged four-letter alphabet, the density of states on the low energy side can be significantly decreased. Computational studies of the four-letter HP model are performed on 36-mer sequences on a square lattice. It is found that the designability of folded structures in the extended model exhibits strong correlation with that of the two-letter HP model, while the AF interaction alone selects a very different class of structures that resembles the Greek key motif for beta sheets. A procedure is introduced to select sequences which have the largest energy gap to the native state. Based on density of states and specific heat calculations in the full configuration space, we show that the optimized sequence is able to fold nearly as cooperatively as a corresponding Gō model.

  4. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation. PMID:25497915

  5. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, includingmore » membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.« less

  6. Enrichment of hydrophobic proteins via Triton X-114 phase partitioning and hydroxyapatite column chromatography for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wissing, J; Heim, S; Flohé, L; Bilitewski, U; Frank, R

    2000-07-01

    Membrane proteins are the starting point of several signal transduction pathways. Therefore, the separation and identification of these proteins are of great interest in proteome analysis. However, the specific properties of membrane proteins seriously impede their analysis. We present an effective and highly reproducible method for the two-dimensional separation of extremely hydrophobic proteins and demonstrate the advantages of special preseparation procedures for the identification of proteins which have very similar Mr and p/. Using the example of the integral membrane protein very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor (NCBI Acc. # 1730111) and the soluble heat shock protein (HSP) 90 (NCBI Acc. # 386786) we present the applicability of a phase-separation system with Triton X-114. Using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) of the protein spots after 2-D separation of the hydrophilic and the strongly hydrophobic protein fraction of human endothelial cells (ECV cell line), we were able to distinguish both proteins. PMID:10949134

  7. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie L.; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-06-25

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. It is thought that this interaction is membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins; proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitansproteins. We show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. Moreover, these gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  8. Multiple Binding Poses in the Hydrophobic Cavity of Bee Odorant Binding Protein AmelOBP14

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the first step of olfaction, odorants are bound and solubilized by small globular odorant binding proteins (OBPs) which shuttle them to the membrane of a sensory neuron. Low ligand affinity and selectivity at this step enable the recognition of a wide range of chemicals. Honey bee Apis mellifera’s OBP14 (AmelOBP14) binds different plant odorants in a largely hydrophobic cavity. In long molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of ligand eugenol, we observe a highly dynamic C-terminal region which forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity, and the ligand drifts away from its crystallized orientation. Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations, allowing exchanges of conformations sampled by the real ligand with those sampled by a noninteracting dummy molecule and several intermediates, suggest an alternative, quite different ligand pose which is adopted immediately and which is stable in long simulations. Thermodynamic integration yields binding free energies which are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. PMID:26633245

  9. Adsorption of a Protein Monolayer via Hydrophobic Interactions Prevents Nanoparticle Aggregation under Harsh Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Blankenburg, Jan; Olson, Jana; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We find that citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles aggregate and precipitate in saline solutions below the NaCl concentration of many bodily fluids and blood plasma. Our experiments indicate that this is due to complexation of the citrate anions with Na+ cations in solution. A dramatically enhanced colloidal stability is achieved when bovine serum albumin is adsorbed to the gold nanoparticle surface, completely preventing nanoparticle aggregation under harsh environmental conditions where the NaCl concentration is well beyond the isotonic point. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism of the formation of this albumin ‘corona’ and find that monolayer protein adsorption is most likely ruled by hydrophobic interactions. As for many nanotechnology-based biomedical and environmental applications, particle aggregation and sedimentation are undesirable and could substantially increase the risk of toxicological side-effects, the formation of the BSA corona presented here provides a low-cost bio-compatible strategy for nanoparticle stabilization and transport in highly ionic environments. PMID:23914342

  10. The effect of geometrical presentation of multimodal cation-exchange ligands on selective recognition of hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Brown, Matthew R; Heden, Ryan; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-09-18

    The effects of spatial organization of hydrophobic and charged moieties on multimodal (MM) cation-exchange ligands were examined by studying protein retention behavior on two commercial chromatographic media, Capto™ MMC and Nuvia™ cPrime™. Proteins with extended regions of surface-exposed aliphatic residues were found to have enhanced retention on the Capto MMC system as compared to the Nuvia cPrime resin. The results further indicated that while the Nuvia cPrime ligand had a strong preference for interactions with aromatic groups, the Capto MMC ligand appeared to interact with both aliphatic and aromatic clusters on the protein surfaces. These observations were formalized into a new set of protein surface property descriptors, which quantified the local distribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic potentials as well as distinguishing between aromatic and aliphatic properties. Using these descriptors, high-performing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models (R(2)>0.88) were generated for both the Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime datasets at pH 5 and pH 6. Descriptors of electrostatic properties were generally common across the four models; however both Capto MMC models included descriptors that quantified regions of aliphatic-based hydrophobicity in addition to aromatic descriptors. Retention was generally reduced by lowering the ligand densities on both MM resins. Notably, elution order was largely unaffected by the change in surface density, but smaller and more aliphatic proteins tended to be more affected by this drop in ligand density. This suggests that modulating the exposure, shape and density of the hydrophobic moieties in multimodal chromatographic systems can alter the preference for surface exposed aliphatic or aromatic residues, thus providing an additional dimension for modulating the selectivity of MM protein separation systems. PMID:26292626

  11. Hydrophobic and Ionic-Interactions in Bulk and Confined Water with Implications for Collapse and Folding of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Chen, Jie; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-10-01

    Water and water-mediated interactions determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding, protein aggregation and self-assembly in confined spaces. To obtain insights into the role of water in the context of folding problems, we describe computer simulations of a few related model systems. The dynamics of collapse of eicosane shows that upon expulsion of water the linear hydrocarbon chain adopts an ordered helical hairpin structure with 1.5 turns. The structure of dimer of eicosane molecules has two well ordered helical hairpins that are stacked perpendicular to each other. As a prelude to studying folding in confined spaces we used simulations to understand changes in hydrophobic and ionic interactions in nano-sized water droplets. Solvation of hydrophobic and charged species change drastically in nano-scale water droplets. Hydrophobic species are localized at the boundary. The tendency of ions to be at the boundary where water density is low increases as the charge density decreases. The interactions between hydrophobic, polar, and charged residue are also profoundly altered in confined spaces. Using the results of computer simulations and accounting for loss of chain entropy upon confinement we argue and then demonstrate, using simulations in explicit water, that ordered states of generic amphiphilic peptide sequences should be stabilized in cylindrical nanopores.

  12. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  13. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties. PMID:26497062

  14. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  15. The Outer Membrane Protein OmpW Forms an Eight-Stranded beta-Barrel with a Hydrophobic Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Hong,H.; Patel, D.; Tamm, L.; van den Berg, B.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli OmpW belongs to a family of small outer membrane (OM) proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Their functions are unknown, but recent data suggest that they may be involved in the protection of bacteria against various forms of environmental stress. In order to gain insight into the function of these proteins we have determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli OmpW to 2.7 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that OmpW forms an eight-stranded beta-barrel with a long and narrow hydrophobic channel that contains a bound LDAO detergent molecule. Single channel conductance experiments show that OmpW functions as an ion channel in planar lipid bilayers. The channel activity can be blocked by the addition of LDAO. Taken together, the data suggest that members of the OmpW family could be involved in the transport of small hydrophobic molecules across the bacterial OM.

  16. Fusion protein of the paramyxovirus simian virus 5: nucleotide sequence of mRNA predicts a highly hydrophobic glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R G; Harris, T J; Lamb, R A

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the mRNA coding for the fusion glycoprotein (F) of the paramyxovirus, simian virus 5, has been obtained. There is a single large open reading frame on the mRNA that encodes a protein of 529 amino acids with a molecular weight of 56,531. The proteolytic cleavage/activation site of F, to yield F2 and F1, contains five arginine residues. Six potential glycosylation sites were identified in the protein, two on F2 and four on F1. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that F is extensively hydrophobic over the length of the polypeptide chain. Three regions are very hydrophobic and could interact directly with membranes: these are the NH2-terminal putative signal peptide, the COOH-terminal putative membrane anchorage domain, and the NH2-terminal region of F1. Images PMID:6093114

  17. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2′-modifications and enhances antisense activity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Nichols, Joshua G.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2′-modifications in 2–5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2′-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2′-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2′-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2′-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2′ modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5′-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5′-LNA or 5′-cEt wings, but not with 5′-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. PMID:26945041

  18. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction

    Membrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  19. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Aaron C; Castañeda, Carlos A; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, E Bertrand

    2014-08-12

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu-Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu-Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu-Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. PMID:25074910

  20. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Aaron C.; Castañeda, Carlos A.; Schlessman, Jamie L.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu–Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu–Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu–Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations. PMID:25074910

  1. A Hydrophobic Pocket in the Active Site of Glycolytic Aldolase Mediates Interactions with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein

    SciTech Connect

    St-Jean,M.; Izard, T.; Sygusch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aldolase plays essential catalytic roles in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, aldolase is a highly abundant protein that is remarkably promiscuous in its interactions with other cellular proteins. In particular, aldolase binds to highly acidic amino acid sequences, including the C-terminus of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor. Here we report the crystal structure of tetrameric rabbit muscle aldolase in complex with a C-terminal peptide of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Aldolase recognizes a short, 4-residue DEWD motif (residues 498-501), which adopts a loose hairpin turn that folds about the central aromatic residue, enabling its tryptophan side chain to fit into a hydrophobic pocket in the active site of aldolase. The flanking acidic residues in this binding motif provide further interactions with conserved aldolase active site residues, Arg-42 and Arg-303, aligning their side chains and forming the sides of the hydrophobic pocket. The binding of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein to aldolase precludes intramolecular interactions of its C-terminus with its active site, and is competitive with substrate as well as with binding by actin and cortactin. Finally, based on this structure a novel naphthol phosphate-based inhibitor of aldolase was identified and its structure in complex with aldolase demonstrated mimicry of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-aldolase interaction. The data support a model whereby aldolase exists in distinct forms that regulate glycolysis or actin dynamics.

  2. Microscopic significance of hydrophobic residues in the protein-stabilizing effect of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanmei; Mu, Yuguang; Li, Weifeng

    2016-08-10

    Although it is widely known that trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes the native structure of proteins, the underlying mechanism of its action is poorly documented. To obtain an in-depth understanding of this important osmolyte molecule, we conducted large-scale molecular dynamic simulations of model proteins, namely, wild-type villin headpiece protein HP35 and its doubly norleucine-substituent mutant (Lys24/29Nle) HP35NN in pure urea and urea + TMAO mixed solutions for direct comparison. From extensive sampling, the protective capability of TMAO was well captured in the simulations, where HP35NN demonstrated a significantly more stable native structure than HP35 in the presence of TMAO, whereas in pure urea solution, the former denatured in a shorter time. These findings highlight the importance of the two norleucine residues that regulates the interactions of proteins with urea and TMAO. By accessing the hydration and conformational dynamics of both proteins, we were able to directly probe how TMAO compensates the denaturing effect of urea at the atomic level. The accumulation of urea around hydrophobic residues is clearly suppressed, which indicates that the van der Waals interactions between urea and proteins are weakened by TMAO. As a consequence, the hydrophobic core of protein is preferentially protected by TMAO against urea attack. Although the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) between proteins and urea are suppressed by TMAO, this plays a very minor role than expected in the enhanced protein stability. In addition, TMAO was found to be always excluded from the protein surface and incapable of forming H-bonds with proteins. Thus, the present study provides solid evidence to support the indirect mechanism of TMAO counteracting the denaturing effects of urea. PMID:27147501

  3. Renaturation of Recombinant Treponema pallidum Rare Outer Membrane Protein 1 into a Trimeric, Hydrophobic, and Porin-Active Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei H.; Blanco, David R.; Exner, Maurice M.; Shang, Ellen S.; Champion, Cheryl I.; Phillips, Martin L.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously observed that while native Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane protein 1 (Tromp1) is hydrophobic and has porin activity, recombinant forms of Tromp1 do not possess these properties. In this study we show that these properties are determined by conformation and can be replicated by proper renaturation of recombinant Tromp1. Native Tromp1, but not the 47-kDa lipoprotein, extracted from whole organisms by using Triton X-114, was found to lose hydrophobicity after treatment in 8 M urea, indicating that Tromp1’s hydrophobicity is conformation dependent. Native Tromp1 was purified from 0.1% Triton X-100 extracts of whole organisms by fast-performance liquid chromatography (FPLC) and shown to have porin activity in planar lipid bilayers. Cross-linking studies of purified native Tromp1 with an 11 Å cross-linking agent showed oligomeric forms consistent with dimers and trimers. For renaturation studies of recombinant Tromp1 (rTromp1), a 31,109-Da signal-less construct was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by FPLC. FPLC-purified rTromp1 was denatured in 8 M urea and then renatured in the presence of 0.5% Zwittergent 3,14 during dialysis to remove the urea. Renatured rTromp1 was passed through a Sephacryl S-300 gel exclusion column previously calibrated with known molecular weight standards. While all nonrenatured rTromp1 eluted from the column at approximately the position of the carbonic anhydrase protein standard (29 kDa), all renatured rTromp1 eluted at the position of the phosphorylase b protein standard (97 kDa), suggesting a trimeric conformation. Trimerization was confirmed by using an 11 Å cross-linking agent which showed both dimers and trimers similar to that of native Tromp1. Triton X-114 phase separations showed that all of renatured rTromp1, but none of nonrenatured rTromp1, phase separated exclusively into the hydrophobic detergent phase, similar to native Tromp1. Circular dichroism of nonrenatured and renatured rTromp1

  4. Hydrophobic photolabeling as a new method for structural characterization of molten globule and related protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, P. R.; Lala, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in attempts to unravel the protein folding mechanism have indicated the need to identify the folding intermediates. Despite their transient nature, in a number of cases it has been possible to detect and characterize some of the equilibrium intermediates, for example, the molten globule (MG) state. The key features of the MG state are retention of substantial secondary structure of the native state, considerable loss of tertiary structure leading to increased hydrophobic exposure, and a compact structure. NMR, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopies have been most useful in characterizing such intermediates. We report here a new method for structural characterization of the MG state that involves probing the exposed hydrophobic sites with a hydrophobic photoactivable reagent--2[3H]diazofluorene. This carbene-based reagent binds to hydrophobic sites, and on photolysis covalently attaches itself to the neighboring amino acid side chains. The reagent photolabels alpha-lactalbumin as a function of pH (3-7.4), the labeling at neutral pH being negligible and maximal at pH 3. Chemical and proteolytic fragmentation of the photolabeled protein followed by peptide sequencing permitted identification of the labeled residues. The results obtained indicate that the sequence corresponding to B (23-34) and C (86-98) helix of the native structure are extensively labeled. The small beta-domain (40-50) is poorly labeled, Val42 being the only residue that is significantly labeled. Our data, like NMR data, indicate that in the MG state of alpha-lactalbumin, the alpha-domain has a greater degree of persistent structure than the beta-domain. However, unlike the NMR method, the photolabeling method is not limited by the size of the protein and can provide information on several new residues, for example, Leu115. The current method using DAF thus allows identification of stable and hydrophobic exposed regions in folding intermediates as the reagent binds and on

  5. Protein-based emulsion electrosprayed micro- and submicroparticles for the encapsulation and stabilization of thermosensitive hydrophobic bioactives.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mascaraque, Laura G; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2016-03-01

    This work shows the potential of emulsion electrospraying of proteins using food-grade emulsions for the microencapsulation and enhanced protection of a model thermosensitive hydrophobic bioactive. Specifically, gelatin, a whey protein concentrate (WPC) and a soy protein isolate (SPI) were compared as emulsion stabilizers and wall matrices for encapsulation of α-linolenic acid. In a preliminary stage, soy bean oil was used as the hydrophobic component for the implementation of the emulsion electrospraying process, investigating the effect of protein type and emulsion protocol used (i.e. with or without ultrasound treatment) on colloidal stability. This oil was then substituted by the ω-3 fatty acid and the emulsions were processed by electrospraying and spray-drying, comparing both techniques. While the latter resulted in massive bioactive degradation, electrospraying proved to be a suitable alternative, achieving microencapsulation efficiencies (MEE) of up to ∼70%. Although gelatin yielded low MEEs due to the need of employing acetic acid for its processing by electrospraying, SPI and WPC achieved MEEs over 60% for the non-sonicated emulsions. Moreover, the degradation of α-linolenic acid at 80°C was significantly delayed when encapsulated within both matrices. Whilst less than an 8% of its alkene groups were detected after 27h of thermal treatment for free α-linolenic acid, up to 43% and 67% still remained intact within the electrosprayed SPI and WPC capsules, respectively. PMID:26674243

  6. High-performance liquid chromatography as a technique to determine protein adsorption onto hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tongtong; Anselme, Karine; Sarrailh, Segolene; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-01-30

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) setup for quantification of adsorbed proteins on various type of plane substrates with limited area (<3 cm(2)). Protein quantification was investigated with a liquid chromatography chain equipped with a size exclusion column or a reversed-phase column. By evaluating the validation of the method according to guidelines of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH), all the results obtained by HPLC were reliable. By simple adsorption test at the contact of hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane: PDMS) surfaces, kinetics of adsorption were determined and amounts of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and lysozyme were obtained: as expected for each protein, the amount adsorbed at the plateau on glass (between 0.15 μg/cm(2) and 0.4 μg/cm(2)) is lower than for hydrophobic PDMS surfaces (between 0.45 μg/cm(2) and 0.8 μg/cm(2)). These results were consistent with bicinchoninic acid protein determination. According to ICH guidelines, both Reversed Phase and Size Exclusion HPLC can be validated for quantification of adsorbed protein. However, we consider the size exclusion approach more interesting in this field because additional informations can be obtained for aggregative proteins. Indeed, monomer, dimer and oligomer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were observed in the chromatogram. On increasing the temperature, we found a decrease of peak intensity of bovine serum albumin as well as the fraction of dimer and oligomer after contact with PDMS and glass surface. As the surface can act as a denaturation parameter, these informations can have a huge impact on the elucidation of the interfacial behavior of protein and in particular for aggregation processes in pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26621686

  7. [Modern wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Planinsek Rucigaj, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    Chronic wounds are, due to the slow healing, a major clinical problem. In addition to classic materials, a great number of supportive wound dressings for chronic wound treatment, developed on the basis of new knowledge about the pathophysiological events in non-healing wounds, are available on the market. Today we know that modern wound dressings provide the best local environment for optimal healing (moisture, warmth, appropriate pH). Wound dressings control the amount of exudate from the wound and bacterial load, thus protecting local skin from the wound exudate and the wound from secondary infections from the environment. Using supportive wound dressings makes sense only when the wound has been properly assessed, the etiologic factors have been clarified and the obstacles making the wound chronic identified. The choice of dressing is correlated with the characteristics of the wound, the knowledge and experience of the medical staff, and the patient's needs. We believe that the main advantage of modern wound dressing versus conventional dressing is more effective wound cleaning, simple dressing application, painless bandaging owing to reduced adhesion to the wound, and increased absorption of the wound exudate. Faster wound granulation shortens the length of patient hospitalization, and eventually facilitates the work of medical staff. The overall cost of treatment is a minor issue due to faster wound healing despite the fact that modern supportive wound dressings are more expensive than conventional bandaging. The article describes different types of modern supportive wound dressings, as well as their characteristics and indications for use. PMID:24371980

  8. Defining the minimum size of a hydrophobic cluster in two-stranded α-helical coiled-coils: Effects on protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Stephen M.; Hodges, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    in the hydrophobic core of coiled-coils is extremely context dependent and clustering is an important aspect of protein folding and stability. PMID:14978309

  9. [Improper use of dressings].

    PubMed

    Candas, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Neither nurses nor doctors receive initial training in wounds and the use of dressings. They are however required in their daily practice to provide this type of care. Advances in wound healing techniques and the appearance of "modern" dressings offer a wide range of solutions to caregivers. Professionals must acquire skills in this area and make the best possible use of the dressings at their disposal to optimise the controlled wound healing. PMID:26763571

  10. Novel Asymmetric Wettable AgNPs/Chitosan Wound Dressing: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Donghui; Lu, Zhong; Yang, Hao; Gao, Jingting; Chen, Rong

    2016-02-17

    A novel silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/chitosan composite dressing with asymmetric wettability surfaces was successfully prepared via a simple two-step method for biomedical applications as wound healing materials. First, AgNPs were assembled into the chitosan sponge which was prepared by lyophilization process. Then one side of the sponge was modified by a thin layer of stearic acid. The incorporation of AgNPs into chitosan dressing could enhance the antibacterial activity against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. The asymmetric surface modification endows the dressing with both highly hydrophobic property and inherent hydrophilic nature of chitosan. The hydrophobic surface of the dressing shows waterproof and antiadhesion for contaminant properties, whereas the hydrophilic surface preserves its water-absorbing capability and efficiently inhibits the growth of bacteria. Furthermore, the AgNPs/chitosan composite dressing displays improved moisture retention and blood clotting ability compared to the unmodified dressings. Cytocompatibility test evaluated in vitro and in a wound infection model illustrates the nontoxic nature of the composite dressing. More importantly, the in vivo wound healing model evaluation in mice reveals that the asymmetric AgNPs/chitosan dressing promotes the wound healing and accelerates the reepithelialization and collagen deposition. The silver accumulation in mice body treated by the composite dressing is far lower than that of the clinically used Acasin nanosilver dressing treated mice. This work indicates the huge potential of the novel AgNPs/chitosan wound dressing with asymmetrical wettability for clinical use. PMID:26800283

  11. Contribution of the hydrophobic effect to protein stability: analysis based on simulations of the Ile-96----Ala mutation in barnase.

    PubMed Central

    Prevost, M; Wodak, S J; Tidor, B; Karplus, M

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to compute the difference in the unfolding free energy between wild-type barnase and the mutant in which Ile-96 is replaced by alanine. The simulations yield results (-3.42 and -5.21 kcal/mol) that compare favorably with experimental values (-3.3 and -4.0 kcal/mol). The major contributions to the free energy difference arise from bonding terms involving degrees of freedom of the mutated side chain and from nonbonded interactions of that side chain with its environment in the folded protein. By comparison with simulations of an extended peptide in the absence of solvent, used as a reference state, hydration effects are shown to play a minor role in the overall free energy balance for the Ile----Ala transformation. The implications of these results for our understanding of the hydrophobic effect and its contribution to protein stability are discussed. Images PMID:1961758

  12. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Christopher M; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N; Desai, Keshal V; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J Michael; Desai, Prashant J

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP-GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present - indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP-GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP-His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP-GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP-GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP-MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  13. A hydrophobic domain within the small capsid protein of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is required for assembly

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Christopher M.; Grzesik, Peter; Kreitler, Dale; Pryce, Erin N.; Desai, Keshal V.; Coombs, Gavin; McCaffery, J. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) capsids can be produced in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses for protein expression. All six capsid proteins are required for this process to occur and, unlike for alphaherpesviruses, the small capsid protein (SCP) ORF65 is essential for this process. This protein decorates the capsid shell by virtue of its interaction with the capsomeres. In this study, we have explored the SCP interaction with the major capsid protein (MCP) using GFP fusions. The assembly site within the nucleus of infected cells was visualized by light microscopy using fluorescence produced by the SCP–GFP polypeptide, and the relocalization of the SCP to these sites was evident only when the MCP and the scaffold protein were also present – indicative of an interaction between these proteins that ensures delivery of the SCP to assembly sites. Biochemical assays demonstrated a physical interaction between the SCP and MCP, and also between this complex and the scaffold protein. Self-assembly of capsids with the SCP–GFP polypeptide was evident. Potentially, this result can be used to engineer fluorescent KSHV particles. A similar SCP–His6 polypeptide was used to purify capsids from infected cell lysates using immobilized affinity chromatography and to directly label this protein in capsids using chemically derivatized gold particles. Additional studies with SCP–GFP polypeptide truncation mutants identified a domain residing between aa 50 and 60 of ORF65 that was required for the relocalization of SCP–GFP to nuclear assembly sites. Substitution of residues in this region and specifically at residue 54 with a polar amino acid (lysine) disrupted or abolished this localization as well as capsid assembly, whereas substitution with non-polar residues did not affect the interaction. Thus, this study identified a small conserved hydrophobic domain that is important for the SCP–MCP interaction. PMID:24824860

  14. Influence of binding pH and protein solubility on the dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Pascal; Baumgartner, Kai; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is one of the most frequently used purification methods in biopharmaceutical industry. A major drawback of HIC, however, is the rather low dynamic binding capacity (DBC) obtained when compared to e.g. ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The typical purification procedure for HIC includes binding at neutral pH, independently of the proteins nature and isoelectric point. Most approaches to process intensification are based on resin and salt screenings. In this paper a combination of protein solubility data and varying binding pH leads to a clear enhancement of dynamic binding capacity. This is shown for three proteins of acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric points. High-throughput solubility screenings as well as miniaturized and parallelized breakthrough curves on Media Scout RoboColumns (Atoll, Germany) were conducted at pH 3-10 on a fully automated robotic workstation. The screening results show a correlation between the DBC and the operational pH, the protein's isoelectric point and the overall solubility. Also, an inverse relationship of DBC in HIC and the binding kinetics was observed. By changing the operational pH, the DBC could be increased up to 30% compared to the standard purification procedure performed at neutral pH. As structural changes of the protein are reported during HIC processes, the applied samples and the elution fractions were proven not to be irreversibly unfolded. PMID:25911386

  15. Dress Codes and Uniforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Linda; Miller, Gabriel

    2002-01-01

    Students do not always make choices that adults agree with in their choice of school dress. Dress-code issues are explored in this Research Roundup, and guidance is offered to principals seeking to maintain a positive school climate. In "Do School Uniforms Fit?" Kerry White discusses arguments for and against school uniforms and summarizes the…

  16. Antimicrobial activity and hydrophobicity of edible whey protein isolate films formulated with nisin and/or glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Murillo-Martínez, María M; Tello-Solís, Salvador R; García-Sánchez, Miguel A; Ponce-Alquicira, Edith

    2013-04-01

    The use of edible antimicrobial films has been reported as a means to improve food shelf life through gradual releasing of antimicrobial compounds on the food surface. This work reports the study on the incorporation of 2 antimicrobial agents, nisin (N), and/or glucose oxidase (GO), into the matrix of Whey protein isolate (WPI) films at pH 5.5 and 8.5. The antimicrobial activity of the edible films was evaluated against Listeria innocua (ATCC 33090), Brochothrix thermosphacta (NCIB10018), Escherichia coli (JMP101), and Enterococcus faecalis (MXVK22). In addition, the antimicrobial activity was related to the hydrophobicity and water solubility of the WPI films. The greatest antibacterial activity was observed in WPI films containing only GO. The combined addition of N and GO resulted in films with lower antimicrobial activity than films with N or GO alone. In most cases, a pH effect was observed as greater antimicrobial response at pH 5.5 as well as higher film matrix hydrophobicity. WPI films supplemented with GO can be used in coating systems suitable for food preservation. PMID:23488765

  17. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Holinga IV, George Joseph

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  18. Semi-Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Scouting Used in the Two-Step Purification of Recombinant Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Methods and Results Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conclusions Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in

  19. Signatures of protein thermal denaturation and local hydrophobicity in domain specific hydration behavior: a comparative molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Prathit; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2016-04-22

    We investigate, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the association of surface hydration accompanying local unfolding in the mesophilic protein Yfh1 under a series of thermal conditions spanning its cold and heat denaturation temperatures. The results are benchmarked against the thermally stable protein, Ubq, and behavior at the maximum stability temperature. Local unfolding in Yfh1, predominantly in the beta sheet regions, is in qualitative agreement with recent solution NMR studies; the corresponding Ubq unfolding is not observed. Interestingly, all domains, except for the beta sheet domains of Yfh1, show increased effective surface hydrophobicity with increase in temperature, as reflected by the density fluctuations of the hydration layer. Velocity autocorrelation functions (VACF) of oxygen atoms of water within the hydration layers and the corresponding vibrational density of states (VDOS) are used to characterize alteration in dynamical behavior accompanying the temperature dependent local unfolding. Enhanced caging effects accompanying transverse oscillations of the water molecules are found to occur with the increase in temperature preferentially for the beta sheet domains of Yfh1. Helical domains of both proteins exhibit similar trends in VDOS with changes in temperature. This work demonstrates the existence of key signatures of the local onset of protein thermal denaturation in solvent dynamical behavior. PMID:26876051

  20. Human metapneumovirus small hydrophobic (SH) protein downregulates type I IFN pathway signaling by affecting STAT1 expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Andrew K; Amato, Katherine R; Wen, Sherry C; Peterson, Laura S; Williams, John V

    2016-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is a key mediator of antiviral immunity. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) inhibits IFN signaling, but does not encode homologues of known IFN antagonists. We tested the hypothesis that a specific viral protein prevents type I IFN signaling by targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). We found that human airway epithelial cells (capable of expressing IFNs) became impaired for STAT1 phosphorylation even without direct infection due to intrinsic negative feedback. HMPV-infected Vero cells (incapable of expressing IFN) displayed lower STAT1 expression and impaired STAT1 phosphorylation in response to type I IFN treatment compared to mock-infected cells. Transient overexpression of HMPV small hydrophobic (SH) protein significantly inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation and signaling, and recombinant virus lacking SH protein was unable to inhibit STAT1 phosphorylation. Our results indicate a role for the SH protein of HMPV in the downregulation of type I IFN signaling through the targeting of STAT1. PMID:27131212

  1. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Kostsin, Dzmitry G.; Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Imanaka, Tsuneo; Morita, Masashi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  2. Displacement chromatography of proteins using a retained pH front in a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Pinto, N D S; Frey, Douglas D

    2015-03-27

    The chromatographic separation of two proteins into a displacement train of two adjoined rectangular bands was accomplished using a novel method for hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) which employs a self-sharpening pH front as the displacer. This method exploits the fact that protein elution in HCIC is promoted by a pH change, but is relatively independent of salt effects, so that a retained pH front can be used in place of a traditional displacer in displacement chromatography. The retained pH front was produced using the two adsorbed buffering species tricine and acetic acid. The separation of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A into adjoined, rectangular bands was accomplished with overall recoveries based on the total mass injected greater than 90 and 70%, respectively. The addition of urea to the buffer system increased the sharpness of the pH front by 36% while the yields of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A based on the total mass eluted increased from 76% to 99% and from 37% to 85%, respectively, when the purities of both proteins in their product fractions were fixed at 85%. The results demonstrate that the method developed in this study is a useful variant of HCIC and is also a useful alternative to other displacement chromatography methods. PMID:25702080

  3. [Healing "booster" dressings].

    PubMed

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Téot, Luc; Meaume, Sylvie

    2011-09-01

    The relationship between the dressing and the wound is vital to clinical effectiveness. The more-or-less standard wound-surface coverings have been replaced with initial dressings, referred to as modern dressings, which contain an oily and sticky compound. They provide a moist medium by applying the basic mechanistic principles (liquid absorption and release). Other types of products and techniques modify the behaviour of wound cells by acting directly through irritation, biochemical stimulation or genetic modification of the cells, which accelerates the healing process. PMID:22003786

  4. Protein denaturants at aqueous-hydrophobic interfaces: self-consistent correlation between induced interfacial fluctuations and denaturant stability at the interface.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shu-Ching; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    The notion of direct interaction between denaturing cosolvent and protein residues has been proposed in dialogue relevant to molecular mechanisms of protein denaturation. Here we consider the correlation between free energetic stability and induced fluctuations of an aqueous-hydrophobic interface between a model hydrophobically associating protein, HFBII, and two common protein denaturants, guanidinium cation (Gdm(+)) and urea. We compute potentials of mean force along an order parameter that brings the solute molecule close to the known hydrophobic region of the protein. We assess potentials of mean force for different relative orientations between the protein and denaturant molecule. We find that in both cases of guanidinium cation and urea relative orientations of the denaturant molecule that are parallel to the local protein-water interface exhibit greater stability compared to edge-on or perpendicular orientations. This behavior has been observed for guanidinium/methylguanidinium cations at the liquid-vapor interface of water, and thus the present results further corroborate earlier findings. Further analysis of the induced fluctuations of the aqueous-hydrophobic interface upon approach of the denaturant molecule indicates that the parallel orientation, displaying a greater stability at the interface, also induces larger fluctuations of the interface compared to the perpendicular orientations. The correlation of interfacial stability and induced interface fluctuation is a recurring theme for interface-stable solutes at hydrophobic interfaces. Moreover, observed correlations between interface stability and induced fluctuations recapitulate connections to local hydration structure and patterns around solutes as evidenced by experiment (Cooper et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 2014, 118, 5657.) and high-level ab initio/DFT calculations (Baer et al., Faraday Discuss 2013, 160, 89). PMID:25536388

  5. Protein Aggregation/Folding: The Role of Deterministic Singularities of Sequence Hydrophobicity as Determined by Nonlinear Signal Analysis of Acylphosphatase and Aβ(1–40)

    PubMed Central

    Zbilut, Joseph P.; Colosimo, Alfredo; Conti, Filippo; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Manetti, Cesare; Valerio, MariaCristina; Webber, Charles L.; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    The problem of protein folding vs. aggregation was investigated in acylphosphatase and the amyloid protein Aβ(1–40) by means of nonlinear signal analysis of their chain hydrophobicity. Numerical descriptors of recurrence patterns provided the basis for statistical evaluation of folding/aggregation distinctive features. Static and dynamic approaches were used to elucidate conditions coincident with folding vs. aggregation using comparisons with known protein secondary structure classifications, site-directed mutagenesis studies of acylphosphatase, and molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid protein, Aβ(1–40). The results suggest that a feature derived from principal component space characterized by the smoothness of singular, deterministic hydrophobicity patches plays a significant role in the conditions governing protein aggregation. PMID:14645049

  6. An ant colony optimisation algorithm for the 2D and 3D hydrophobic polar protein folding problem

    PubMed Central

    Shmygelska, Alena; Hoos, Holger H

    2005-01-01

    Background The protein folding problem is a fundamental problems in computational molecular biology and biochemical physics. Various optimisation methods have been applied to formulations of the ab-initio folding problem that are based on reduced models of protein structure, including Monte Carlo methods, Evolutionary Algorithms, Tabu Search and hybrid approaches. In our work, we have introduced an ant colony optimisation (ACO) algorithm to address the non-deterministic polynomial-time hard (NP-hard) combinatorial problem of predicting a protein's conformation from its amino acid sequence under a widely studied, conceptually simple model – the 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) hydrophobic-polar (HP) model. Results We present an improvement of our previous ACO algorithm for the 2D HP model and its extension to the 3D HP model. We show that this new algorithm, dubbed ACO-HPPFP-3, performs better than previous state-of-the-art algorithms on sequences whose native conformations do not contain structural nuclei (parts of the native fold that predominantly consist of local interactions) at the ends, but rather in the middle of the sequence, and that it generally finds a more diverse set of native conformations. Conclusions The application of ACO to this bioinformatics problem compares favourably with specialised, state-of-the-art methods for the 2D and 3D HP protein folding problem; our empirical results indicate that our rather simple ACO algorithm scales worse with sequence length but usually finds a more diverse ensemble of native states. Therefore the development of ACO algorithms for more complex and realistic models of protein structure holds significant promise. PMID:15710037

  7. Concentration-dependent displacement of cholesterol in micelles by hydrophobic rice bran protein hydrolysates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent production of rice bran oil in Asia and the U.S. has resulted in large quantities of defatted rice bran as a low-value byproduct. Peptides from soy, milk, and other foods have been shown to have the potential hypocholesterolemic property and rice bran protein (RBP) may also contain bioact...

  8. Protein Denaturants at Aqueous–Hydrophobic Interfaces: Self-Consistent Correlation between Induced Interfacial Fluctuations and Denaturant Stability at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The notion of direct interaction between denaturing cosolvent and protein residues has been proposed in dialogue relevant to molecular mechanisms of protein denaturation. Here we consider the correlation between free energetic stability and induced fluctuations of an aqueous–hydrophobic interface between a model hydrophobically associating protein, HFBII, and two common protein denaturants, guanidinium cation (Gdm+) and urea. We compute potentials of mean force along an order parameter that brings the solute molecule close to the known hydrophobic region of the protein. We assess potentials of mean force for different relative orientations between the protein and denaturant molecule. We find that in both cases of guanidinium cation and urea relative orientations of the denaturant molecule that are parallel to the local protein–water interface exhibit greater stability compared to edge-on or perpendicular orientations. This behavior has been observed for guanidinium/methylguanidinium cations at the liquid–vapor interface of water, and thus the present results further corroborate earlier findings. Further analysis of the induced fluctuations of the aqueous–hydrophobic interface upon approach of the denaturant molecule indicates that the parallel orientation, displaying a greater stability at the interface, also induces larger fluctuations of the interface compared to the perpendicular orientations. The correlation of interfacial stability and induced interface fluctuation is a recurring theme for interface-stable solutes at hydrophobic interfaces. Moreover, observed correlations between interface stability and induced fluctuations recapitulate connections to local hydration structure and patterns around solutes as evidenced by experiment (Cooper et al., J. Phys. Chem. A2014, 118, 5657.) and high-level ab initio/DFT calculations (Baer et al., Faraday Discuss2013, 160, 89). PMID:25536388

  9. Salts employed in hydrophobic interaction chromatography can change protein structure - insights from protein-ligand interaction thermodynamics, circular dichroism spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Komaromy, Andras Z; Kulsing, Chadin; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-03-01

    Key requirements of protein purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) are preservation of the tertiary/quaternary structure, maintenance of biological function, and separation of the correctly folded protein from its unfolded forms or aggregates. This study examines the relationship between the HIC retention behavior of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in high concentrations of several kosmotropic salts and its conformation, assessed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Further, the physicochemical properties of HEWL in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and magnesium chloride were investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at different temperatures. Radii of gyration were extrapolated from Guinier approximations and the indirect transform program GNOM with protein-protein interaction and contrast variation taken into account. A bead model simulation provided information on protein structural changes using ab initio reconstruction with GASBOR. These results correlated to the secondary structure content obtained from CD spectroscopy of HEWL. These changes in SAXS and CD data were consistent with heat capacity ΔCp -values obtained from van't Hoff plot analyses of the retention data. Collectively, these insights enable informed decisions to be made on the choice of chromatographic conditions, leading to improved separation selectivity and opportunities for innovative column-assisted protein refolding methods. PMID:25690783

  10. Wound dressings - a review.

    PubMed

    Dhivya, Selvaraj; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Santhini, Elango

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process which requires suitable environment to promote healing process. With the advancement in technology, more than 3000 products have been developed to treat different types of wounds by targeting various aspects of healing process. The present review traces the history of dressings from its earliest inception to the current status and also discusses the advantage and limitations of the dressing materials. PMID:26615539

  11. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  12. Small Hydrophobic Protein of Human Metapneumovirus Does Not Affect Virus Replication and Host Gene Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Miranda; Herfst, Sander; Aarbiou, Jamil; Burgers, Peter C.; Zaaraoui-Boutahar, Fatiha; Bijl, Maarten; van IJcken, Wilfred; Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Luider, Theo M.; Scholte, Bob J.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Andeweg, Arno C.

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) encodes a small hydrophobic (SH) protein of unknown function. HMPV from which the SH open reading frame was deleted (HMPVΔSH) was viable and displayed similar replication kinetics, cytopathic effect and plaque size compared with wild type HMPV in several cell-lines. In addition, no differences were observed in infection efficiency or cell-to-cell spreading in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HPBEC) cultured at an air-liquid interphase. Host gene expression was analyzed in A549 cells infected with HMPV or HMPVΔSH using microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS) based techniques at multiple time points post infection. Only minor differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression levels. A possible function of HMPV SH as apoptosis blocker, as proposed for several members of the family Paramyxoviridae, was rejected based on this analysis. So far, a clear phenotype of HMPV SH deletion mutants in vitro at the virus and host levels is absent. PMID:23484037

  13. The chaplins: a family of hydrophobic cell-surface proteins involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Marie A.; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Huang, Jianqiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Kao, Camilla M.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor differentiates by forming specialized, spore-bearing aerial hyphae that grow into the air. Using microarrays, we identified genes that are down-regulated in a mutant unable to erect aerial hyphae. Through this route, we identified a previously unknown layer of aerial mycelium surface proteins (the “chaplins”). The chaplins share a hydrophobic domain of ∼40 residues (the “chaplin domain”), and all have a secretion signal. The five short chaplins (ChpD,E,F,G,H) have one chaplin domain, whereas the three long chaplins (ChpA,B,C) have two chaplin domains and a C-terminal “sorting signal” that targets them for covalent attachment to the cell wall by sortase enzyme. Expression of the two chaplin genes examined (chpE, chpH) depended on aerial hyphae formation but not sporulation, and egfp fusions showed their expression localized to aerial structures. Mass spectrometry of cell wall extracts confirmed that the short chaplins localized to the cell surface. Deletion of chaplin genes caused severe delays in aerial hyphae formation, a phenotype rescued by exogenous application of chaplin proteins. These observations implicate the chaplins in aerial mycelium formation, and suggest that coating of the envelope by the chaplins is required for aerial hyphae to grow out of the aqueous environment of the substrate mycelium into the air. PMID:12832397

  14. Microsecond Rearrangements of Hydrophobic Clusters in an Initially Collapsed Globule Prime Structure Formation during the Folding of a Small Protein.

    PubMed

    Goluguri, Rama Reddy; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2016-07-31

    Determining how polypeptide chain collapse initiates structure formation during protein folding is a long standing goal. It has been challenging to characterize experimentally the dynamics of the polypeptide chain, which lead to the formation of a compact kinetic molten globule (MG) in about a millisecond. In this study, the sub-millisecond events that occur early during the folding of monellin from the guanidine hydrochloride-unfolded state have been characterized using multiple fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes. The kinetic MG is shown to form in a noncooperative manner from the unfolded (U) state as a result of at least three different processes happening during the first millisecond of folding. Initial chain compaction completes within the first 37μs, and further compaction occurs only after structure formation commences at a few milliseconds of folding. The transient nonnative and native-like hydrophobic clusters with side chains of certain residues buried form during the initial chain collapse and the nonnative clusters quickly disassemble. Subsequently, partial chain desolvation occurs, leading to the formation of a kinetic MG. The initial chain compaction and subsequent chain rearrangement appear to be barrierless processes. The two structural rearrangements within the collapsed globule appear to prime the protein for the actual folding transition. PMID:27370109

  15. A key hydrophobic patch identified in an AAA⁺ protein essential for its in trans inhibitory regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Simpson, Timothy; Lawton, Edward; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Joly, Nicolas; Burrows, Patricia; Buck, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are a subclass of the AAA(+) (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) protein family. They are responsible for σ(54)-dependent transcription activation during infection and function under many stressful growth conditions. The majority of bEBPs are regulated in their formation of ring-shaped hexameric self-assemblies via an amino-terminal domain through its phosphorylation or ligand binding. In contrast, the Escherichia coli phage shock protein F (PspF) is negatively regulated in trans by phage shock protein A (PspA). Up to six PspA subunits suppress PspF hexamer action. Here, we present biochemical evidence that PspA engages across the side of a PspF hexameric ring. We identify three key binding determinants located in a surface-exposed 'W56 loop' of PspF, which form a tightly packed hydrophobic cluster, the 'YLW' patch. We demonstrate the profound impact of the PspF W56 loop residues on ATP hydrolysis, the σ(54) binding loop 1, and the self-association interface. We infer from single-chain studies that for complete PspF inhibition to occur, more than three PspA subunits need to bind a PspF hexamer with at least two binding to adjacent PspF subunits. By structural modelling, we propose that PspA binds to PspF via its first two helical domains. After PspF binding-induced conformational changes, PspA may then share structural similarities with a bEBP regulatory domain. PMID:23659791

  16. An in-gel digestion procedure that facilitates the identification of highly hydrophobic proteins by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Ramos, Yassel; Huerta, Vivian

    2005-07-01

    A procedure is described for in-gel tryptic digestion of proteins that allows the direct analysis of eluted peptides in electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometers without the need of a postdigestion desalting step. It is based on the following principles: (a) a thorough desalting of the protein in-gel before digestion that takes advantage of the excellent properties of acrylamide polymers for size exclusion separations, (b) exploiting the activity of trypsin in water, in the absence of inorganic buffers, and (c) a procedure for peptide extraction using solvents of proven efficacy with highly hydrophobic peptides. Quality of spectra and sequence coverage are equivalent to those obtained after digestion in ammonium bicarbonate for hydrophilic proteins detected with Coomassie blue, mass spectrometry-compatible silver or imidazole-zinc but are significantly superior for highly hydrophobic proteins, such as membrane proteins with several transmembrane domains. ATPase subunit 9 (GRAVY 1.446) is a membrane protein channel, lipid-binding protein for which both the conventional in-gel digestion protocol and in solution digestion failed. It was identified with very high sequence coverage. Sample handling after digestion is notably simplified as peptides are directly loaded into the ESI source without postdigestion processing, increasing the chances for the identification of hydrophobic peptides. PMID:15952229

  17. Hydrophobic-domain-dependent protein-protein interactions mediate the localization of GPAT enzymes to ER subdomains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic network that consists of numerous regions or subdomains with discrete morphological features and functional properties, including those involved in protein and oil-body formation, anterograde transport of secretory proteins, the exchange of macromolecules ...

  18. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  19. Identification of a cell envelope protein (MtrF) involved in hydrophobic antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Veal, Wendy L; Shafer, William M

    2003-01-01

    The mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae provides gonococci with a mechanism to resist structurally diverse antimicrobial hydrophobic agents (HAs). Strains of N. gonorrhoeae that display hypersusceptibility to HAs often contain mutations in the efflux pump genes, mtrCDE. Such strains frequently contain a phenotypically suppressed mutation in mtrR, a gene that encodes a repressor (MtrR) of mtrCDE gene expression, and one that would normally result in HA resistance. We have recently examined HA-hypersusceptible clinical isolates of gonococci that contain such phenotypically suppressed mtrR mutations, in order to determine whether genes other than mtrCDE are involved in HA resistance. These studies led to the discovery of a gene that we have designated mtrF, located downstream of the mtrR gene, that is predicted to encode a 56.1 kDa cytoplasmic membrane protein containing 12 transmembrane domains. Expression of mtrF was enhanced in a strain deficient in MtrR production, indicating that this gene, together with the closely linked mtrCDE operon, is subject to MtrR-dependent transcriptional control. Orthologues of mtrF were identified in a number of diverse bacteria. Except for the AbgT protein of Escherichia coli, their products have been identified as hypothetical proteins with unknown function(s). Genetic evidence is presented that MtrF is important in the expression of high-level detergent resistance by gonococci. We propose that MtrF acts in conjunction with the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux pump, to confer on gonococci high-level resistance to certain HAs. PMID:12493784

  20. Structural origins of high apparent dielectric constants experienced by ionizable groups in the hydrophobic core of a protein

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Michael S.; Castaneda, Carlos A.; Majumdar, Ananya; Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, E.

    2012-01-01

    The side chains of Lys-66, Asp-66, and Glu-66 in staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) are fully buried and surrounded mainly by hydrophobic matter, save for internal water molecules associated with carboxylic oxygen atoms. These ionizable side chains titrate with pKa values of 5.7, 8.8 and 8.9, respectively. To reproduce these pKa values with continuum electrostatics calculations the protein has to be treated with high dielectric constants. We have examined structural origins of these high apparent dielectric constants by using NMR spectroscopy to characterize the structural response to the ionization of these internal side chains. Substitution of Val-66 with Lys-66 and Asp-66 led to increased conformational fluctuations in the microenvironments surrounding these groups, even under conditions of pH where Lys-66 and Asp-66 are neutral. When Lys-66, Asp-66 and Glu-66 are charged the proteins remain almost fully folded but resonances for a few backbone amides adjacent to the internal ionizable residues are broadened. This suggests that the ionization of the internal groups promotes a local increase in dynamics on the intermediate timescale, consistent with either partial unfolding or increased backbone fluctuations in helix-1 near residue 66, or, less likely, with increased fluctuations of the charges side chains at position 66. These experiments confirm that the high apparent dielectric constants reported by the internal Lys-66, Asp-66 and Glu-66 reflect localized changes in conformational fluctuations without incurring detectable, global structural reorganization. To improve structure-based pKa calculations in proteins this coupling between ionization of internal groups and local changes in conformational fluctuations will have to be treated explicitly. PMID:21059359

  1. Wound dressings for a proteolytic-rich environment.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-04-01

    Wound dressings have experienced continuous and significant changes over the years based on the knowledge of the biochemical events associated with chronic wounds. The development goes from natural materials used to just cover and conceal the wound to interactive materials that can facilitate the healing process, addressing specific issues in non-healing wounds. These new types of dressings often relate with the proteolytic wound environment and the bacteria load to enhance the healing. Recently, the wound dressing research is focusing on the replacement of synthetic polymers by natural protein materials to delivery bioactive agents to the wounds. This article provides an overview on the novel protein-based wound dressings such as silk fibroin keratin and elastin. The improved properties of these dressings, like the release of antibiotics and growth factors, are discussed. The different types of wounds and the effective parameters of healing process will be reviewed. PMID:21360151

  2. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining. PMID:14595675

  3. NPPD: A Protein-Protein Docking Scoring Function Based on Dyadic Differences in Networks of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Amino Acid Residues

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Edward S. C.; Hwang, Ming-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking (PPD) predictions usually rely on the use of a scoring function to rank docking models generated by exhaustive sampling. To rank good models higher than bad ones, a large number of scoring functions have been developed and evaluated, but the methods used for the computation of PPD predictions remain largely unsatisfactory. Here, we report a network-based PPD scoring function, the NPPD, in which the network consists of two types of network nodes, one for hydrophobic and the other for hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the nodes are connected when the residues they represent are within a certain contact distance. We showed that network parameters that compute dyadic interactions and those that compute heterophilic interactions of the amino acid networks thus constructed allowed NPPD to perform well in a benchmark evaluation of 115 PPD scoring functions, most of which, unlike NPPD, are based on some sort of protein-protein interaction energy. We also showed that NPPD was highly complementary to these energy-based scoring functions, suggesting that the combined use of conventional scoring functions and NPPD might significantly improve the accuracy of current PPD predictions. PMID:25811640

  4. Energy-landscape paving for prediction of face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Liu, Zhaoxia; Huang, Weibo; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is a classical NP-hard problem in computational biology. The energy-landscape paving (ELP) method is a class of heuristic global optimization algorithm, and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems with complex energy landscapes in the continuous space. By putting forward a new update mechanism of the histogram function in ELP and incorporating the generation of initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood search strategy based on pull moves into ELP, an improved energy-landscape paving (ELP+) method is put forward. Twelve general benchmark instances are first tested on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice models. The lowest energies by ELP+ are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. Then, five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D FCC HP lattice model are tested. The proposed algorithm finds lower energies than those by the five other methods in literature. Not unexpectedly, this is particularly pronounced for the longer sequences considered. Computational results show that ELP+ is an effective method for PSP on the fcc HP lattice model.

  5. 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein related protein (P70R/ABCD4) localizes to endoplasmic reticulum not peroxisomes, and NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic property determines the subcellular localization of ABC subfamily D proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Seki, Midori; Yasui, Akina; Murasaki, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Masashi; Yamashita, Yukari; Sakaguchi, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2009-01-15

    70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein related protein (P70R/ABCD4) is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein subfamily D. ABC subfamily D proteins are also known as peroxisomal ABC proteins. Therefore, P70R is thought to be a peroxisomal membrane protein. However, the subcellular localization of P70R is not extensively investigated. In this study, we transiently expressed P70R in fusion with HA (P70R-HA) in CHO cells and examined subcellular localization by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, P70R-HA was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), not to peroxisomes. To examine the ER-targeting property of P70R, we expressed various NH{sub 2}-terminal deletion constructs of P70R. Among the NH{sub 2}-terminal deletion constructs, mutant proteins starting with hydrophobic transmembrane segment (TMS) were localized to ER, but the ones containing the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic cytosolic domain were not. ABC subfamily D proteins destined for peroxisomes have NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic region adjacent to TMS1. However, only P70R lacks the region and is translated with NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic TMS1. Furthermore, attachment of the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic domain to the NH{sub 2}-terminus of P70R excluded P70R from the ER-targeting pathway. These data suggest that P70R resides in the ER but not the peroxisomal membranes, and the hydrophobic property of NH{sub 2}-terminal region determines the subcellular localization of ABC subfamily D proteins.

  6. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... To change your dressings, you will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, ... paper towel. Put on a pair of clean gloves. Gently peel off the old dressing and Biopatch. ...

  7. Altering Hydrophobic Sequence Lengths Shows That Hydrophobic Mismatch Controls Affinity for Ordered Lipid Domains (Rafts) in the Multitransmembrane Strand Protein Perfringolysin O*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that mismatch between transmembrane (TM) length and bilayer width controls TM protein affinity for ordered lipid domains (rafts) was tested using perfringolysin O (PFO), a pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin. PFO forms a multimeric barrel with many TM segments. The properties of PFO mutants with lengthened or shortened TM segments were compared with that of PFO with wild type TM sequences. Both mutant and wild type length PFO exhibited cholesterol-dependent membrane insertion. Maximal PFO-induced pore formation occurred in vesicles with wider bilayers for lengthened TM segments and in thinner bilayers for shortened TM segments. In diC18:0 phosphatidylcholine (PC)/diC14:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which form ordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer, affinity for ordered domains was greatest with lengthened TM segments and least with shortened TM segments as judged by FRET. Similar results were observed by microscopy in giant vesicles containing sphingomyelin in place of diC18:0 PC. In contrast, in diC16:0 PC/diC14:0 PC/diC20:1 PC/cholesterol vesicles, which should form ordered domains with a relatively thin bilayer and disordered domains with a relatively thick bilayer, relative affinity for ordered domains was greatest with shortened TM segments and least with lengthened TM segments. The inability of multi-TM segment proteins (unlike single TM segment proteins) to adapt to mismatch by tilting may explain the sensitivity of raft affinity to mismatch. The difference in width sensitivity for single and multi-TM helix proteins may link raft affinity to multimeric state and thus control the assembly of multimeric TM complexes in rafts. PMID:23150664

  8. Localization of Membrane-Associated Proteins in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Use of Hydrophobic Membrane Probes and Cross-Linking Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Zakowski, Jack J.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of membrane-associated proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus was investigated by using two monofunctional and three bifunctional probes that differ in the degree to which they partition into membranes and in their specific group reactivity. Two hydrophobic aryl azide probes, [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide and [3H]pyrenesulfonylazide, readily partitioned into virion membrane and, when activated to nitrenes by UV irradiation, formed stable covalent adducts to membrane constituents. Both of these monofunctional probes labeled the glyco-protein G and matrix M proteins, but [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide also labeled the nucleocapsid N protein and an unidentified low-molecular-weight component. Protein labeling of intact virions was unaffected by the presence of cytochrome c or glutathione, but disruption of membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate greatly enhanced the labeling of all viral proteins except G. Labeling of G protein was essentially restricted to the membrane-embedded, thermolysin-resistant tail fragment. Three bifunctional reagents, tartryl diazide, dimethylsuberimidate, and 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide, were tested for their capacity to cross-link proteins to membrane phospholipids of virions grown in the presence of [3H]palmitate. Only G and M proteins of intact virions were labeled with 3H-phospholipid by these cross-linkers; the reactions were not affected by cytochrome c but were abolished by disruption of virus with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Dimethylsuberimidate, which reacts with free amino groups, cross-linked 3H-phospholipid to both G and M protein. In contrast, the hydrophilic tartryl diazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the M protein, whereas the hydrophobic 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the intrinsic G protein. These data support the hypothesis that the G protein traverses the virion membrane and that the M protein is membrane associated but does not penetrate very deeply, if at all. PMID:6255216

  9. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: Insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation = 0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. PMID:24519901

  10. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a ‘holding trap’ rather than a ‘folding trap’ mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16177.001 PMID:27343349

  11. Mia40 is a trans-site receptor that drives protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by hydrophobic substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Peleh, Valentina; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins of the mitochondrial IMS contain conserved cysteines that are oxidized to disulfide bonds during their import. The conserved IMS protein Mia40 is essential for the oxidation and import of these proteins. Mia40 consists of two functional elements: an N-terminal cysteine-proline-cysteine motif conferring substrate oxidation, and a C-terminal hydrophobic pocket for substrate binding. In this study, we generated yeast mutants to dissect both Mia40 activities genetically and biochemically. Thereby we show that the substrate-binding domain of Mia40 is both necessary and sufficient to promote protein import, indicating that trapping by Mia40 drives protein translocation. An oxidase-deficient Mia40 mutant is inviable, but can be partially rescued by the addition of the chemical oxidant diamide. Our results indicate that Mia40 predominantly serves as a trans-site receptor of mitochondria that binds incoming proteins via hydrophobic interactions thereby mediating protein translocation across the outer membrane by a 'holding trap' rather than a 'folding trap' mechanism. PMID:27343349

  12. Dresses Make the Girl: Gender and Identity from "The Hundred Dresses" to "10,000 Dresses"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulders, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a close reading of two works, Eleanor Estes' "The Hundred Dresses" (1944) and Marcus Ewert's "10,000 Dresses" (2008), that feature in current anti-bullying campaigns. Starting with "The Hundred Dresses," this essay examines how Estes' use of the school story not only exposes the social dynamics of…

  13. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  14. Periodontal Dressing: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Baghani, Zahra; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the commercially available periodontal dressings, their physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility and therapeutic effects. Electronic search of scientific papers from 1956 to 2012 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley InterScience search engines using the searched terms periodontal dressing, periodontal pack. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have evaluated various properties of periodontal dressings. Physical and chemical properties of dressings are directly related to their dimensional changes and adhesion properties. Their biocompatibility and therapeutic effect are among the other factors evaluated in the literature. Chlorhexidine is the most commonly used antibacterial agent in studies. In general, when comparing the advantages with the disadvantages, application of periodontal dressing seems to be beneficial. Numerous factors are involved in selection of an optimal dressing such as surgeon’s intention, required time for the dressing to remain on the surgery site and its dimensional changes. PMID:24578815

  15. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  16. Physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Yamdech, Rungnapha; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-04-01

    The physical and biological assessments of the innovative bilayered wound dressing made of silk and gelatin that we have developed previously were performed to evaluate its efficacy for clinical applications. The absorption ability and dehydration rate of the dressing were assessed using the split-thickness skin graft and leg ulcer wound bed models. The bioactivities of the bilayered wound dressing were evaluated. The bilayered dressing showed continuous absorption rate of wound exudate, providing the suitability for the wound with extended inflammation phase. The dehydration rate of the bilayered dressing was comparable to the commercially available dressing of which the moisture maintenance capability is claimed. The bilayered dressing showed good conformability, as can be seen by the homogeneous distribution pattern of bromophenol blue absorbed. In terms of biological activities, the bilayered dressing was less toxic to skin cells than the commercially available dressing. The bilayered dressing was also shown to promote cell migration and collagen production due to the bioactive protein components. We here concluded that the superior properties of the bilayered dressing over the commercially available dressing were the conformability and biological activities to accelerate the wound healing, while the other properties were comparable to those of commercially available dressing. The data obtained in this study would be very useful for the further evaluation of the bilayered dressing in clinical trial. PMID:25391444

  17. DRESS syndrome in ophthalmic patients.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Jacqueline Martins de; Nascimento, Heloisa; Belfort, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, and multiple organ injury. A number of pharmacological agents are known to cause DRESS syndrome such as allopurinol, anticonvulsants, vancomycin, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine. Here, we describe two patients who developed DRESS syndrome during ocular treatment. The first case was being treated for late postoperative endophthalmitis with topical antibiotics, intravenous cephalothin, meropenem, and intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime before symptoms developed. We were unable to identify the causal drug owing to the large number of medications concurrently administered. The second case presented with DRESS syndrome symptoms during ocular toxoplasmosis treatment. In this case, a clearer association with pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine was observed. As a result of the regular prescription of pharmacological agents associated with DRESS syndrome, ophthalmologists should be aware of the potentially serious complications of DRESS syndrome. PMID:27463633

  18. Molecular Orbital Study of the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding of a Ligand Molecule in a Protein Aromatic Hydrophobic Pocket.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Jun; Gouda, Hiroaki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The natural product argadin is a cyclopentapeptide chitinase inhibitor that binds to chitinase B (ChiB) from the pathogenic bacteria Serratia marcescens. N(ω)-Acetyl-L-arginine and L-aminoadipic acid of argadin form intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB. We performed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations to elucidate the role of this intramolecular hydrogen bonding on intermolecular interactions between argadin and ChiB. We found that argadin accrues large stabilization energies from the van der Waals dispersion interactions, such as CH-π, π-π, and π-lone pair interactions, in the aromatic hydrophobic pocket of ChiB, although intramolecular hydrogen bonding within argadin might result in loss of entropy. The intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonding formation canceled local molecular charges and provided good van der Waals interactions with surrounding aromatic residues. PMID:27373666

  19. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: from Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-28

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water. PMID:24182086

  20. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: From Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water.

  1. Sequence-specific transitions of the torsion angle gamma change the polar-hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves: implication for indirect protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhitnikova, Mariia Yu; Boryskina, Olena P; Shestopalova, Anna V

    2014-01-01

    Variations of the shape and polarity of the DNA grooves caused by changes of the DNA conformation play an important role in the DNA readout. Despite the fact that non-canonical trans and gauche- conformations of the DNA backbone angle γ (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') are frequently found in the DNA crystal structures, their possible role in the DNA recognition has not been studied systematically. In order to fill in this gap, we analyze the available high-resolution crystal structures of the naked and complexed DNA. The analysis shows that the non-canonical γ angle conformations are present both in the naked and bound DNA, more often in the bound vs. naked DNA, and in the nucleotides with the A-like vs. the B-like sugar pucker. The alternative angle γ torsions are more frequently observed in the purines with the A-like sugar pucker and in the pyrimidines with the B-like sugar conformation. The minor groove of the nucleotides with non-canonical γ angle conformation is more polar, while the major groove is more hydrophobic than in the nucleotides with the classical γ torsions due to variations in exposure of the polar and hydrophobic groups of the DNA backbone. The propensity of the nucleotides with different γ angle conformations to participate in the protein-nucleic acid contacts in the minor and major grooves is connected with their sugar pucker and sequence-specific. Our findings imply that the angle γ transitions contribute to the process of the protein-DNA recognition due to modification of the polar/hydrophobic profile of the DNA grooves. PMID:23998351

  2. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  3. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  4. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or non-sterile device intended to cover a wound, to absorb wound exudate, to control bleeding or...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or non-sterile device intended to cover a wound, to absorb wound exudate, to control bleeding or...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or non-sterile device intended to cover a wound, to absorb wound exudate, to control bleeding or...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or non-sterile device intended to cover a wound, to absorb wound exudate, to control bleeding or...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or non-sterile device intended to cover a wound, to absorb wound exudate, to control bleeding or...

  9. Molecular mechanisms of enhanced wound healing by copper oxide-impregnated dressings.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey; Dardik, Rima; Eidelman, Arthur I; Lavie, Yossi; Grunfeld, Yona; Ikher, Sergey; Huszar, Monica; Zatcoff, Richard C; Marikovsky, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Copper plays a key role in angiogenesis and in the synthesis and stabilization of extracellular matrix skin proteins, which are critical processes of skin formation. We hypothesized that introducing copper into wound dressings would enhance wound repair. Application of wound dressings containing copper oxide to wounds inflicted in genetically engineered diabetic mice (C57BL/KsOlaHsd-Lepr(db)) resulted in increased gene and in situ up-regulation of proangiogenic factors (e.g., placental growth factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, and vascular endothelial growth factor), increased blood vessel formation (p<0.05), and enhanced wound closure (p<0.01) as compared with control dressings (without copper) or commercial wound dressings containing silver. This study proves the capacity of copper oxide-containing wound dressings to enhance wound healing and sheds light onto the molecular mechanisms by which copper oxide-impregnated dressings stimulate wound healing. PMID:20409151

  10. Subunit interactions in ABC transporters: a conserved sequence in hydrophobic membrane proteins of periplasmic permeases defines an important site of interaction with the ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Mourez, M; Hofnung, M; Dassa, E

    1997-06-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane proteins of bacterial binding protein-dependent transporters belong to the superfamily of ABC transporters. The hydrophobic proteins display a conserved, at least 20 amino acid EAA---G---------I-LP region exposed in the cytosol, the EAA region. We mutagenized the EAA regions of MalF and MalG proteins of the Escherichia coli maltose transport system. Substitutions at the same positions in MalF and MalG have different phenotypes, indicating that EAA regions do not act symmetrically. Mutations in malG or malF that slightly affect or do not affect transport, determine a completely defective phenotype when present together. This suggests that EAA regions of MalF and MalG may interact during transport. Maltose-negative mutants fall into two categories with respect to the cellular localization of the MalK ATPase: in the first, MalK is membrane-bound, as in wild-type strains, while in the second, it is cytosolic, as in strains deleted in the malF and malG genes. From maltose-negative mutants of the two categories, we isolated suppressor mutations within malK that restore transport. They map mainly in the putative helical domain of MalK, suggesting that EAA regions may constitute a recognition site for the ABC ATPase helical domain. PMID:9214624

  11. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  12. The Overriding Roles of Concentration and Hydrophobic Effect on Structure and Stability of Heme Protein Induced by Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Jha, Indrani; Kumar, Awanish; Venkatesu, Pannuru

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopic and molecular docking investigations were carried out to characterize the effect of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) with varying chain length of the cation on the thermal stability as well as spectroscopic behavior of heme protein hemoglobin (Hb). The goal of this work is to investigate the role of concentration of ILs, the effect of alkyl chain length of the cation, and the related Hofmeister series on the structure of Hb. To achieve this goal, a series of ILs possessing same Cl(-) anion and a set of cation [Cnmim](+) with increasing chain length such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Emim][Cl]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Hmim][Cl]), and 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Dmim][Cl]) were used in this study. It was observed that the stability of the protein was concentration dependent as well as the hydrophobic interactions between [Cnmim](+) of ILs, and the amino acid residues in the protein played a major role in protein unfolding. As a consequence, the destabilization tendency of the ILs toward the Hb increases with increasing chain length of the cation of ILs. Additionally, the cations of the ILs obeyed the Hofmeister series when arranged in the order of providing stability to Hb structure. PMID:26069954

  13. [Dressing and wound care pain].

    PubMed

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2006-12-01

    Wound care is an important step for promoting wound healing. Nevertheless it is also a major source of pain for patients with wounds. The results of a survey showed that not only burn patients but also non-burn ones suffered from wound care pain which occurred in inpatients and outpatients. One of the significant factors causing wound care pain was that the dressing adhered to the wound bed. Although some agencies claimed that particular dressings with low adhesion can result in painless removal, the actual effects needed to be verified. Results of clinical trials revealed that for relieving wound care pain of certain kinds of wound, it was recommended to use particular dressings, such as banana leaf dressing, boiled potato peel bandage, Acticoat, Mepital or Mefix. PMID:17160873

  14. Teacher Dress Codes in Employee Handbooks: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Jane E.; Freeburg, Beth Winfrey

    2010-01-01

    This study used role theory to analyze dress codes for teachers to discern what dress items expressed role embracement and role distance. Inductive content analysis of teacher dress codes in 103 U.S. K-12 school handbooks revealed three categories of dress: (a) conventional dress (mentioned in 97.1% of the dress codes); (b) casual dress (mentioned…

  15. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25680964

  16. Characterization of the Tupaia Rhabdovirus Genome Reveals a Long Open Reading Frame Overlapping with P and a Novel Gene Encoding a Small Hydrophobic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Springfeld, Christoph; Darai, Gholamreza; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses are negative-stranded RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales and have been isolated from vertebrates, insects, and plants. Members of the genus Lyssavirus cause the invariably fatal disease rabies, and a member of the genus Vesiculovirus, Chandipura virus, has recently been associated with acute encephalitis in children. We present here the complete genome sequence and transcription map of a rhabdovirus isolated from cultivated cells of hepatocellular carcinoma tissue from a moribund tree shrew. The negative-strand genome of tupaia rhabdovirus is composed of 11,440 nucleotides and encodes six genes that are separated by one or two intergenic nucleotides. In addition to the typical rhabdovirus genes in the order N-P-M-G-L, a gene encoding a small hydrophobic putative type I transmembrane protein of approximately 11 kDa was identified between the M and G genes, and the corresponding transcript was detected in infected cells. Similar to some Vesiculoviruses and many Paramyxovirinae, the P gene has a second overlapping reading frame that can be accessed by ribosomal choice and encodes a protein of 26 kDa, predicted to be the largest C protein of these virus families. Phylogenetic analyses of the tupaia rhabdovirus N and L genes show that the virus is distantly related to the Vesiculoviruses, Ephemeroviruses, and the recently characterized Flanders virus and Oita virus and further extends the sequence territory occupied by animal rhabdoviruses. PMID:15890917

  17. The Bactofilin Cytoskeleton Protein BacM of Myxococcus xanthus Forms an Extended β-Sheet Structure Likely Mediated by Hydrophobic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kefang; Engelhardt, Harald; Bosch, Jürgen; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2015-01-01

    Bactofilins are novel cytoskeleton proteins that are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. Myxococcus xanthus, an important predatory soil bacterium, possesses four bactofilins of which one, BacM (Mxan_7475) plays an important role in cell shape maintenance. Electron and fluorescence light microscopy, as well as studies using over-expressed, purified BacM, indicate that this protein polymerizes in vivo and in vitro into ~3 nm wide filaments that further associate into higher ordered fibers of about 10 nm. Here we use a multipronged approach combining secondary structure determination, molecular modeling, biochemistry, and genetics to identify and characterize critical molecular elements that enable BacM to polymerize. Our results indicate that the bactofilin-determining domain DUF583 folds into an extended β-sheet structure, and we hypothesize a left-handed β-helix with polymerization into 3 nm filaments primarily via patches of hydrophobic amino acid residues. These patches form the interface allowing head-to-tail polymerization during filament formation. Biochemical analyses of these processes show that folding and polymerization occur across a wide variety of conditions and even in the presence of chaotropic agents such as one molar urea. Together, these data suggest that bactofilins are comprised of a structure unique to cytoskeleton proteins, which enables robust polymerization. PMID:25803609

  18. Recombinant protein purification using gradient-assisted simulated moving bed hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Part I: selection of chromatographic system and estimation of adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Palani, Sivakumar; Gueorguieva, Ludmila; Rinas, Ursula; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Jayaraman, Guhan

    2011-09-16

    The design of gradient simulated moving bed (SMB) chromatographic processes requires an appropriate selection of the chromatographic system followed by the determination of adsorption isotherm parameters in the relevant range of mobile phase conditions. The determination of these parameters can be quite difficult for recombinant target proteins present in complex protein mixtures. The first part of this work includes the estimation of adsorption isotherm parameters for streptokinase and a lumped impurity fraction present in an Escherichia coli cell lysate for a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) matrix. Perturbation experiments were carried out using a Butyl Sepharose matrix with purified recombinant protein on buffer equilibrated columns as well as with crude cell lysate saturated columns. The Henry constants estimated for streptokinase were found to exhibit in a wide range a linear dependence on the salt concentration in the mobile phase. These parameters were applied in subsequent investigations to design a simulated moving bed (SMB) process capable to purify in a continuous manner recombinant streptokinase from the E. coli cell lysate. PMID:21816402

  19. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants. PMID:26938884

  20. Ectopic Expression of an Atypical Hydrophobic Group 5 LEA Protein from Wild Peanut, Arachis diogoi Confers Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Dilip; Kumar, Sumit; Rampuria, Sakshi; Reddy, Attipalli R.; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a group of hydrophilic proteins, which accumulate in plants under varied stress conditions like drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and oxidative stress suggesting their role in the protection of plants against these stresses. A transcript derived fragment (TDF) corresponding to LEA gene, which got differentially expressed in wild peanut, Arachis diogoi against the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata was used in this study. We have cloned its full length cDNA by RACE-PCR, which was designated as AdLEA. AdLEA belongs to the atypical Group 5C of LEA protein family as confirmed by sequence analysis. Group 5C LEA protein subfamily contains Pfam LEA_2 domain and is highly hydrophobic. In native conditions, expression of AdLEA was upregulated considerably upon hormonal and abiotic stress treatments emphasizing its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Subcellular localization studies showed that AdLEA protein is distributed in both nucleus and cytosol. Ectopic expression of AdLEA in tobacco resulted in enhanced tolerance of plants to dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress with the transgenic plants showing higher chlorophyll content and reduced lipid peroxidation as compared to wild type plants. Overexpressed AdLEA tobacco plants maintained better photosynthetic efficiency under drought conditions as demonstrated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. These plants showed enhanced transcript accumulation of some stress-responsive genes. Our study also elucidates that ROS levels were significantly reduced in leaves and stomatal guard cells of transgenic plants upon stress treatments. These results suggest that AdLEA confers multiple stress tolerance to plants, which make it a potential gene for genetic modification in plants. PMID:26938884

  1. Rapid and serum-insensitive endocytotic delivery of proteins using biotinylated polymers attached via multivalent hydrophobic anchors.

    PubMed

    Tobinaga, Kyohei; Li, Cuicui; Takeo, Masafumi; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Niidome, Takuro; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2014-03-10

    We have designed biotinylated polymers as synthetic receptors that have multiple alkyl groups for endocytotic delivery of target proteins. The polymers were stably attached to a cell surface via multivalent anchoring. The presented biotin was bound to streptavidin (SA) on the cell surface, and, via an endocytotic pathway, the cell rapidly internalized the biotinylated polymer/SA complex. The cell's uptake of the complex was not inhibited by the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, and its efficacy for the uptake of SA was the highest when compared with commercial reagents and single-anchored-type synthetic receptors. The synthetic receptor-mediated endocytosis can be used generally for other kind of protein by using SA as an adaptor molecule between a target protein and the cell-surface presented biotin. PMID:24389131

  2. A prospective comparison of a new, synthetic donor site dressing versus an impregnated gauze dressing.

    PubMed

    Hickerson, W L; Kealey, G P; Smith, D J; Thomson, P D

    1994-01-01

    Three institutions enrolled 38 patients who required bilateral skin graft donor sites into a safety and efficacy study of a new synthetic donor site dressing. Bilateral donor sites were randomized to receive either a new, synthetic donor site dressing or an impregnated gauze dressing. Wounds were assessed by time to healing, pain, and patient preference. Synthetic dressing wounds were treated 7.9 days compared with 10.2 days for gauze dressing wounds (p < 0.001), and synthetic dressing wounds were more completely epithelialized. Visual analogue pain analysis revealed significantly less donor site pain with synthetic dressing (2.94) versus gauze dressing (4.64) (p < 0.001). Synthetic dressing had fewer treatment-related adverse experiences than gauze dressing (2 vs 7) and was judged by recipients to be superior to gauze dressing in comfort, pain relief, cosmetic appeal, ease of ambulation, and overall acceptance. PMID:7929519

  3. The respective roles of polar/nonpolar binary patterns and amino acid composition in protein regular secondary structures explored exhaustively using hydrophobic cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Rebehmed, Joseph; Quintus, Flavien; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have highlighted the leading role of the sequence periodicity of polar and nonpolar amino acids (binary patterns) in the formation of regular secondary structures (RSS). However, these were based on the analysis of only a few simple cases, with no direct mean to correlate binary patterns with the limits of RSS. Here, HCA-derived hydrophobic clusters (HC) which are conditioned binary patterns whose positions fit well those of RSS, were considered. All the HC types, defined by unique binary patterns, which were commonly observed in three-dimensional (3D) structures of globular domains, were analyzed. The 180 HC types with preferences for either α-helices or β-strands distinctly contain basic binary units typical of these RSS. Therefore a general trend supporting the "binary pattern preference" assumption was observed. HC for which observed RSS are in disagreement with their expected behavior (discordant HC) were also examined. They were separated in HC types with moderate preferences for RSS, having "weak" binary patterns and versatile RSS and HC types with high preferences for RSS, having "strong" binary patterns and then displaying nonpolar amino acids at the protein surface. It was shown that in both cases, discordant HC could be distinguished from concordant ones by well-differentiated amino acid compositions. The obtained results could, thus, help to complement the currently available methods for the accurate prediction of secondary structures in proteins from the only information of a single amino acid sequence. This can be especially useful for characterizing orphan sequences and for assisting protein engineering and design. Proteins 2016; 84:624-638. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868538

  4. Cytotoxicity of silver dressings on diabetic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shi-Bo; Yoon, Won-Young; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Cui, Zheng-Jun; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2013-06-01

    A large number of silver-based dressings are commonly used in the management of chronic wounds that are at risk of infection, including diabetic foot ulcers. However, there are still controversies regarding the toxicity of silver dressings on wound healing. The purpose of this study was to objectively test the cytotoxicity of silver dressings on human diabetic fibroblasts. Human diabetic fibroblasts were obtained from the foot skin of four diabetic foot ulcer patients and cultured. The effect of five silver-containing dressing products (Aquacel Ag, Acticoat*Absorbent, Medifoam Ag, Biatain Ag and PolyMem Ag) and their comparable silver-free dressing products on morphology, proliferation and collagen synthesis of the cultured human diabetic fibroblasts were compared in vitro. In addition, extracts of each dressing were tested in order to examine the effect of other chemical components found in the dressings on cytotoxicity. The diabetic fibroblasts cultured with each silver-free dressing adopted the typical dendritic and fusiform shape. On the other hand, the diabetic fibroblasts did not adopt this typical morphology when treated with the different silver dressings. All silver dressings tested in the study reduced the viability of the diabetic fibroblasts and collagen synthesis by 54-70 and 48-68%, respectively, when compared to silver-free dressings. Silver dressings significantly changed the cell morphology and decreased cell proliferation and collagen synthesis of diabetic fibroblasts. Therefore, silver dressings should be used with caution when treating diabetic wounds. PMID:22533495

  5. DRESS Syndrome Presents as Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tonekaboni, Seyed Hasan; Jafari, Narjes; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is a potentially life-threatening syndrome, which reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, presenting by generalized skin rash, fever, eosinophilia, atypical lymphocytosis, and internal organ involvement. Herein a 21-month old male infant with DRESS and Encephalopathy syndrome is presented who complicated after phenobarbital usage that persisted due to phenytoin cream usage. The case received phenobarbital after a seizure disorder presented as "status epilepticus". He developed drug eruption, fever, hepatosplenomegaly, increased liver enzymes, encephalopathy and progressive loss of consciousness with extensive hyperintense white matter lesions in brain MRI. After discontinuation of phenobarbital and phenytoin, all symptoms were resolved, while brain MRI became normal after two months. To our best knowledge, this is the first reported case that developed leukoencephalopathy along with DRESS syndrome. PMID:27411428

  6. Wound dressings: selecting the most appropriate type.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Karen C; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner

    2013-12-01

    Appropriate wound dressing selection is guided by an understanding of wound dressing properties and an ability to match the level of drainage and depth of a wound. Wounds should be assessed for necrosis and infection, which need to be addressed prior to selecting an ideal dressing. Moisture-retentive dressings include films, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, alginates, and hydrofibers and are useful in a variety of clinical settings. Antimicrobial-impregnated dressings can be useful in wounds that are superficially infected or are at higher risk for infection. For refractory wounds that need more growth stimulation, tissue-engineered dressings have become a viable option in the past few decades, especially those that have been approved for burns, venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers. As wounds heal, the ideal dressing type may change, depending on the amount of exudate and depth of the wound; thus success in wound dressing selection hinges on recognition of the changing healing environment. PMID:24062083

  7. Fournier's Gangrene: Conventional Dressings versus Dressings with Dakin's Solution

    PubMed Central

    Altunoluk, Bülent; Resim, Sefa; Efe, Erkan; Eren, Mustafa; Benlioglu, Can; Kankilic, Nazim; Baykan, Halit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Fournier's gangrene is a fulminant and destructive inflammation of the scrotum, penis, and perineum. The objective of this study was to compare 2 different approaches to wound management after aggressive surgical debridement. Methods. Data from 14 patients with Fournier's gangrene were retrospectively collected (2005–2011). Once the patients were stabilized following surgery, they were treated with either daily antiseptic (povidone iodine) dressings (group I, n = 6) or dressings with dakin's solution (sodium hypochloride) (group II, n = 8). Results. The mean age of the patients was 68.2 ± 7.8 (55–75) years in group I and 66.9 ± 10.2 (51–79) years in group II. Length of hospital stay was 13 ± 3.5 (7–16) days in group I and 8.9 ± 3.0 (4–12) days in group II (P < 0.05). The number and rate of mortality was 1/6 (16.7%) in group I, and 1/8 (12.5%) in group II. Conclusions. The hospitalization time can be reduced with the use of dakin's solution for the dressings in the treatment of FG. Also, dressings with dakin's solution seems to have favorable effects on morbidity and mortality. Consequently dakin's solution may alter the treatment of this disastrous disease by reducing cost, morbidity and mortality. PMID:22567424

  8. Independent of Their Localization in Protein the Hydrophobic Amino Acid Residues Have No Effect on the Molten Globule State of Apomyoglobin and the Disulfide Bond on the Surface of Apomyoglobin Stabilizes This Intermediate State

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Tatiana N.; Majorina, Maria A.; Larina, Daria S.; Kashparov, Ivan A.; Samatova, Ekaterina N.; Glukhov, Anatoly S.; Melnik, Bogdan S.

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to “strengthen” the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  9. Independent of their localization in protein the hydrophobic amino acid residues have no effect on the molten globule state of apomyoglobin and the disulfide bond on the surface of apomyoglobin stabilizes this intermediate state.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Tatiana N; Majorina, Maria A; Larina, Daria S; Kashparov, Ivan A; Samatova, Ekaterina N; Glukhov, Anatoly S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2014-01-01

    At present it is unclear which interactions in proteins reveal the presence of intermediate states, their stability and formation rate. In this study, we have investigated the effect of substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues in the hydrophobic core of protein and on its surface on a molten globule type intermediate state of apomyoglobin. It has been found that independent of their localization in protein, substitutions of hydrophobic amino acid residues do not affect the stability of the molten globule state of apomyoglobin. It has been shown also that introduction of a disulfide bond on the protein surface can stabilize the molten globule state. However in the case of apomyoglobin, stabilization of the intermediate state leads to relative destabilization of the native state of apomyoglobin. The result obtained allows us not only to conclude which mutations can have an effect on the intermediate state of the molten globule type, but also explains why the introduction of a disulfide bond (which seems to "strengthen" the protein) can result in destabilization of the protein native state of apomyoglobin. PMID:24892675

  10. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  11. School Dress Codes and Uniform Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell

    2002-01-01

    Opinions abound on what students should wear to class. Some see student dress as a safety issue; others see it as a student-rights issue. The issue of dress codes and uniform policies has been tackled in the classroom, the boardroom, and the courtroom. This Policy Report examines the whole fabric of the debate on dress codes and uniform policies…

  12. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Matthew B; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins. PMID:27215816

  13. Molecular Shape and the Hydrophobic Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyer, Matthew B.; Gibb, Bruce C.

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on papers published since 2000 on the topic of the properties of solutes in water. More specifically, it evaluates the state of the art of our understanding of the complex relationship between the shape of a hydrophobe and the hydrophobic effect. To highlight this, we present a selection of references covering both empirical and molecular dynamics studies of small (molecular-scale) solutes. These include empirical studies of small molecules, synthetic hosts, crystalline monolayers, and proteins, as well as in silico investigations of entities such as idealized hard and soft spheres, small solutes, hydrophobic plates, artificial concavity, molecular hosts, carbon nanotubes and spheres, and proteins.

  14. Redressing Cross-Dressed Shakespeare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Thomas L.; Pesta, Duke

    2003-01-01

    Gender critics obsess over the boy actors who played female roles on the Elizabethan stage. But, in their far-fetched interpretation of Shakespearean drama as a spectacle of cross dressing, these new historicists lose sight of a fundamental principle of theater. Thomas Martin and Duke Pesta argue that with their prurient chatter of "the…

  15. Dress Codes and Gang Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluckman, Ivan B.

    1996-01-01

    Concern with school violence and efforts to reduce gang visibility at school have led to controversy about students' constitutional rights to freedom of expression. This document outlines legal precedents and offers guidelines for developing a sound school policy on dress codes. It answers the following questions: (1) Are gang clothing and symbols…

  16. Syntheses and self-assembly of novel asparagine-derived amphiphiles: Applications in the encapsulation of proteins, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic drug models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mfuh, Adelphe Mbufung

    This thesis focuses mainly on the synthesis, characterization, and self-assembly of a novel series of asparagine-derived amphiphiles and their use in the preparation and stabilization of nano and microcapsules for the encapsulation of proteins, and hydrophilic and hydrophobic drug models. Chapter 1 gives a brief literature overview of lipid molecular assembly, which covers some aspects of morphological analyses, encapsulation of chemical entity and some reported characterization techniques of supramolecular assemblies. It introduces the scope of this dissertation and contains some information on stimulus responsive liposomal systems for controlled release of drug models. Chapter 2 introduces a novel asparagine-derived lipid bearing two fatty chains (C11 and C17) and a tetrahydropyrimidinone head group. It presents information on the synthesis and characterization of this lipid and describes the self-assembly and effects of this lipid in distearoyl phosphatidyl choline bilayer. Chapter 3 presents the synthesis and characterization of a series of ALAn,m (where n and m represent the length of the hydrocarbon chains on the asparagine-derived, heterocyclic head group). It contains data on the effect of chain length, solvent media and head group ionization on the conformational equilibrium about a tertiary amide bond in ALAn,m. The chapter also examines the influence of chain length on ALAn,m on the colloidal stability of DSPC liposomes. Chapter 4 presents the first example of an N,N-acetal linkage in a novel pH responsive nanocarrier system obtained from the cyclocondensation of dodecanal with sodium asparaginate. Data is presented on the spontaneous self-assembly, encapsulation studies and morphological characterization of the nano-systems with the inclusion of cholesterol as additive. Chapter 5 presents the development of a photoresponsive nanocarrier via the self- assembly of an asparagine-derived lipid containing a coumarin unit in the hydrophobic domain. The

  17. Flavodoxin-mediated electron transfer from photosystem I to ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase in Anabaena: role of flavodoxin hydrophobic residues in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Guillermina; Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Hervás, Manuel; Peregrina, José Ramón; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Navarro, José A; Medina, Milagros

    2008-01-29

    Three surface hydrophobic residues located at the Anabaena flavodoxin (Fld) putative complex interface with its redox partners were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these replacements on Fld interaction with both its physiological electron donor, photosystem I (PSI), and its electron acceptor, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR), were analyzed. Trp57, Ile59, and Ile92 contributed to the optimal orientation and tightening of the FNR:Fld and PSI:Fld complexes. However, these side chains did not appear to be involved in crucial specific interactions, but rather contributed to the obtainment of the optimal orientation and distance of the redox centers required for efficient electron transfer. This supports the idea that the interaction of Fld with its partners is less specific than that of ferredoxin and that more than one orientation is efficient for electron transfer in these transient complexes. Additionally, for some of the analyzed processes, WT Fld seems not to be the most optimized molecular species. Therefore, subtle changes at the isoalloxazine environment not only influence the Fld binding abilities, but also modulate the electron exchange processes by producing different orientations and distances between the redox centers. Finally, the weaker apoflavodoxin interaction with FNR suggests that the solvent-accessible region of FMN plays a role either in complex formation with FNR or in providing the adequate conformation of the FNR binding region in Fld. PMID:18177021

  18. (15)N CSA tensors and (15)N-(1)H dipolar couplings of protein hydrophobic core residues investigated by static solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Fu, Riqiang

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we assess the usefulness of static (15)N NMR techniques for the determination of the (15)N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensor parameters and (15)N-(1)H dipolar splittings in powder protein samples. By using five single labeled samples of the villin headpiece subdomain protein in a hydrated lyophilized powder state, we determine the backbone (15)N CSA tensors at two temperatures, 22 and -35 °C, in order to get a snapshot of the variability across the residues and as a function of temperature. All sites probed belonged to the hydrophobic core and most of them were part of α-helical regions. The values of the anisotropy (which include the effect of the dynamics) varied between 130 and 156 ppm at 22 °C, while the values of the asymmetry were in the 0.32-0.082 range. The Leu-75 and Leu-61 backbone sites exhibited high mobility based on the values of their temperature-dependent anisotropy parameters. Under the assumption that most differences stem from dynamics, we obtained the values of the motional order parameters for the (15)N backbone sites. While a simple one-dimensional line shape experiment was used for the determination of the (15)N CSA parameters, a more advanced approach based on the "magic sandwich" SAMMY pulse sequence (Nevzorov and Opella, 2003) was employed for the determination of the (15)N-(1)H dipolar patterns, which yielded estimates of the dipolar couplings. Accordingly, the motional order parameters for the dipolar interaction were obtained. It was found that the order parameters from the CSA and dipolar measurements are highly correlated, validating that the variability between the residues is governed by the differences in dynamics. The values of the parameters obtained in this work can serve as reference values for developing more advanced magic-angle spinning recoupling techniques for multiple labeled samples. PMID:26367322

  19. Novel silk fibroin/elastin wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-08-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) and elastin (EL) scaffolds were successfully produced for the first time for the treatment of burn wounds. The self-assembly properties of SF, together with the excellent chemical and mechanical stability and biocompatibility, were combined with elastin protein to produce scaffolds with the ability to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM). Porous scaffolds were obtained by lyophilization and were further crosslinked with genipin (GE). Genipin crosslinking induces the conformational transition from random coil to β-sheet of SF chains, yielding scaffolds with smaller pore size and reduced swelling ratios, degradation and release rates. All results indicated that the composition of the scaffolds had a significant effect on their physical properties, and that can easily be tuned to obtain scaffolds suitable for biological applications. Wound healing was assessed through the use of human full-thickness skin equivalents (EpidermFT). Standardized burn wounds were induced by a cautery and the best re-epithelialization and the fastest wound closure was obtained in wounds treated with 50SF scaffolds; these contain the highest amount of elastin after 6 days of healing in comparison with other dressings and controls. The cytocompatibility demonstrated with human skin fibroblasts together with the healing improvement make these SF/EL scaffolds suitable for wound dressing applications. PMID:22546517

  20. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  1. Production of recombinant non-structural protein-3 hydrophobic domain deletion (NS3ΔHD) protein of bluetongue virus from prokaryotic expression system as an efficient diagnostic reagent.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Nihar Nalini; Chacko, Nirmal; Biswas, Sanchay Kumar; Chand, Karam; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Mondal, Bimalendu; Hemadri, Divakar; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2016-09-01

    Serological diagnostics for bluetongue (BT), which is an infectious, non-contagious and arthropod-borne virus disease of ruminants, are primarily dependent on availability of high quality native or recombinant antigen(s) based on either structural/non-structural proteins in sufficient quantity. Non-structural proteins (NS1-NS4) of BT virus are presumed candidate antigens in development of DIVA diagnostics. In the present study, NS3 fusion gene encoding for NS3 protein containing the N- and C-termini with a deletion of two hydrophobic domains (118A to S141 aa and 162S to A182 aa) and intervening variable central domain (142D to K161 aa) of bluetongue virus 23 was constructed, cloned and over-expressed using prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant NS3ΔHD fusion protein (∼38 kDa) including hexa-histidine tag on its both termini was found to be non-cytotoxic to recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified rNS3ΔHD fusion protein was found to efficiently detect BTV-NS3 specific antibodies in indirect-ELISA format with diagnostic sensitivity (DSn = 94.4%) and specificity (DSp = 93.9%). The study indicated the potential utility of rNS3ΔHD fusion protein as candidate diagnostic reagent in developing an indirect-ELISA for sero-surveillance of animals for BTV antibodies under DIVA strategy, wherever monovalent/polyvalent killed BT vaccine formulations devoid of NS proteins are being practiced for immunization. PMID:27448505

  2. Preparation of hydrophobic coatings

    DOEpatents

    Branson, Eric D.; Shah, Pratik B.; Singh, Seema; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2009-02-03

    A method for preparing a hydrophobic coating by preparing a precursor sol comprising a metal alkoxide, a solvent, a basic catalyst, a fluoroalkyl compound and water, depositing the precursor sol as a film onto a surface, such as a substrate or a pipe, heating, the film and exposing the film to a hydrophobic silane compound to form a hydrophobic coating with a contact angle greater than approximately 150.degree.. The contact angle of the film can be controlled by exposure to ultraviolet radiation to reduce the contact angle and subsequent exposure to a hydrophobic silane compound to increase the contact angle.

  3. Nitrofurantoin: cause of DRESS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Barreto, Paulo; Leão, Ricardo R; Ribeiro, José Vaz

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common pathological entity among elderly patients. The widespread use of antibiotics for uncomplicated UTIs has gained many opponents mainly due to the increasing drug resistance observed. Nitrofurantoin is a commonly used antibacterial drug because it has low side effects and a good antiurinary bacterial profile. However, in this paper, we present a case of a nitrofurantoin-induced DRESS (drug reaction/rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) syndrome in a 77-year-old woman. During UTI treatment, the patient developed an acute skin rash which spread all over the body and a considerable decrease in urine volume. At the emergency department, we found her developing eosinophilic pneumonia, anaemia and renal impairment that we relate to nitrofurantoin administration. To our knowledge, this is the second published case report which evokes nitrofurantoin as a possible cause of DRESS syndrome. PMID:23661654

  4. Prediction of coal hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Labuschagne, B.C.J.; Wheelock, T.D.; Guo, R.K.; David, H.T.; Markuszewski, R.

    1988-12-31

    Many coals exhibit a certain degree of native hydrophobicity. The more hydrophobic coals (the higher-rank coals) are easily beneficiated by froth flotation or oil agglomeration, while the more hydrophilic coals (the lower-rank coals) are floated or agglomerated with difficulty. Coals of different ranks and often even of the same rank sometimes differ greatly in hydrophobicity as measured by contact angle or natural floatability. Although the degree of hydrophobicity of a coal is related to its rank and has been correlated with other surface properties of the coal , the known information is still not sufficient to allow a good estimation to be made of the hydrophobicity of a given coal and does not explain the variation of coal hydrophobicity as a function of rank. A statistical analysis of previously published data, as well as newly acquired data, shows that coal hydrophobicity correlates better with moisture content than with carbon content, and better with the moisture/carbon molar ratio than with the hydrogen/carbon or oxygen/carbon atomic ratios. These findings indicate that there is a strong association between hydrophobicity and coal moisture content.

  5. A silver-coated antimicrobial barrier dressing used postoperatively on meshed autografts: a dressing comparison study.

    PubMed

    Silver, Geoffrey M; Robertson, Symanthia W; Halerz, Marcia M; Conrad, Peggie; Supple, Kathy G; Gamelli, Richard L

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to optimize the management of freshly grafted burn wounds, a silver-coated, low-adherence dressing, Acticoat (Smith & Nephew Inc., Largo, FL), was compared with 5% sulfamylon-soaked Exu-Dry burn wound dressings. Twenty subjects admitted to the Loyola University Medical Center were randomized to either Acticoat dressings or 5% sulfamylon-soaked burn wound dressings. Dressings were applied immediately after grafting in the operating room. Acticoat dressings were left in place for 3 days and then changed every 3 days thereafter. Sulfamylon-soaked dressings were changed at 48 hours and then every day. Subjects continued to have dressing changes on a twice-daily basis to wounds that were not grafted managed. Subjects were assessed for graft take, time to wound healing, and the number of dressings required until healing. Hospital charges and labor costs were retrospectively tabulated, yielding an expense estimate for each group. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to age, %TBSA, %TBSA of the grafted test sites, graft take, time to graft healing, or infectious complications. The median number of dressing changes to the test site was significantly less in the Acticoat group (P < .05). The average expense per dressing change was not significantly different between the two groups; however, the average total expense per patient was significantly lower for the Acticoat group because of the reduced number of dressing changes. Acticoat and 5% sulfamylon-soaked burn wound dressings were equivalent with respect to wound healing and infectious complications. The use of Acticoat was found to be a safe alternative to the use of 5% sulfamylon as a postsurgical dressing in this group of subjects. Because of the reduced number of dressing changes, the use of Acticoat was a less expensive alternative to 5% sulfamylon dressing changes in this study. PMID:17667837

  6. Dressed qubits in nuclear spin baths

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Lianao

    2010-04-15

    We present a method to encode a dressed qubit into the product state of an electron spin localized in a quantum dot and its surrounding nuclear spins via a dressing transformation. In this scheme, the hyperfine coupling and a portion of a nuclear dipole-dipole interaction become logic gates, while they are the sources of decoherence in electron-spin qubit proposals. We discuss errors and corrections for the dressed qubits. Interestingly, the effective Hamiltonian of nuclear spins is equivalent to a pairing Hamiltonian, which provides the microscopic mechanism to protect dressed qubits against decoherence.

  7. A Comparative Study of Colostrum Dressing Versus Conventional Dressing in Deep Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Ashok Y.; Gupta, Vaibhav; Pednekar, Akshay S.; Mahna, Abhishek; Patankar, Ritvij; Shaikh, Ashar; Nagur, Basavraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deep wounds are extending deeper, across deep fascia into muscles or deeper structures. Understanding of nutrition, immunology, psychological issues, the physiology and the metabolic interactions require for optimal treatment of deep wounds. Wound dressing plays one of the important roles in wound healing. Newer type of wound dressings - Biological dressings like colostrum powder, collagen granules create the physiological interface between the wound surface and environment which is impermeable to bacteria. Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of colostrum dressing and conventional dressing in deep wounds. Materials and Methods: Data was collected from all patients with deep wounds (stage II-IV), admitted during the period of April 2013 to March 2014, considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Less number of dressings, short healing time, rapid healing and decrease pain seen in colostrum dressing group compared to conventional dressing group. Conclusion: Colostrum powder dressings are safe, promoter of wound healing, more patient compliance in terms of less pain, less number of dressing required. This treatment though found to be more expensive than conventional dressings; results indicate that colostrum powder dressings may be used as an adjunct in management of deep wound. PMID:26023589

  8. Protein partition between the different phases comprising poly(ethylene glycol)-salt aqueous two-phase systems, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and precipitation: a generic description in terms of salting-out effects.

    PubMed

    Huddleston, J; Abelaira, J C; Wang, R; Lyddiatt, A

    1996-05-17

    The solution behaviour of selected proteins has been studied under conditions promoting precipitation, binding to mildly hydrophobic adsorbents or partition. Solvophobic theory may be used to describe these forms of protein partition. The tendency of a protein to partition therein is dependent upon surface properties of the protein solute mediated by the concentration and nature of added salts. As applied to partitioning in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-salt systems this implies that linear (Brönsted) relationships apply only to proteins partitioned close to the critical point. At longer tie-line lengths protein partitioning is increasingly influenced by salting-out forces. This is confirmed by the observed behaviour of the proteins. The point at which this behaviour changes has been unambiguously defined enabling the direct comparison of phase transition of proteins during partition in all systems. The results obtained show that phase transition during adsorption and partition occur at similar concentrations of salt. This is less than that required to promote precipitation. It appears, from these limited studies, that top-phase preferring proteins are partitioned at salt concentrations above those required to cause adsorption. Proteins preferring the lower phase are partitioned at salt concentrations close to or below those required for adsorption. This raises questions regarding the solvated molecular form of the partitioned proteins and the definition of the partition coefficient. PMID:8798879

  9. Surface modified BaTiO3 nanoparticles as the matrix for phospholipids and as extracting probes for LLME of hydrophobic proteins in Escherichia coli by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2013-09-30

    In this paper, we report the dual function of 12-hydroxy octadecanoic acid (HOA)-modified barium titanate nanoparticles (BaTiO3 NPs) as the matrix for phospholipids (PLs) and as hydrophobic affinity probes for liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) of hydrophobic proteins in Escherichia coli prior to their identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). FT-IR, SEM and TEM were used for the characterization of the HOA-modified BaTiO3 NPs. The surface modified BaTiO3 NPs acted as multifunctional probes (as extracting probes and as the matrix) for the analysis of PLs by MALDI-MS. Compared to 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), the HOA-modified BaTiO3 NPs provided good PLs mass spectra with similar or improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which demonstrated the potentiality of HOA-modified BaTiO3 NPs as a PLs purpose matrix. This method was found to be linear in concentration ranges of 1.0-5.0 μM and 1.0-10.0 μM for L-A-phosphatidyl-l-serine (PS) and L-A-phsophatidic acid sodium (PA) with correlation coefficient (R(2)) values from 0.9905 to 0.9987. The detection limits were 0.20-0.35 μM and 0.25-0.40 μM for PS and PA, respectively. We also demonstrated the HOA-modified BaTiO3 NPs as extracting and as preconcentrating probes for the LLME of hydrophobic proteins in E. coli prior to their identification by MALDI-MS. Thus, the surface modified BaTiO3 NPs-assisted LLME coupled with MALDI-MS provides a simple methodology for the efficient extraction and determination of hydrophobic molecules in biological samples. PMID:23953472

  10. Hadronic Structure from Perturbative Dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Firooz

    2005-09-01

    Perturbative dressing of a valence quark in QCD produces the internal structure of an extended object, the so-called Valon. The valon structure is universal and independent of the hosting hadron. Polarized and unpolarized proton and pion structure functions are calculated in the valon representation. One finds that although all the available data on g1p,n,d are easily reproduced, a sizable orbital angular momentum associated with the partonic structure of the valon is required in order to have a spin 1/2 valon.