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Sample records for protein ii differential

  1. DNA Topoisomerase II Is Involved in Regulation of Cyst Wall Protein Genes and Differentiation in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bo-Chi; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Chan, Nei-Li; Li, Tsai-Kun; Wang, Hsin-Chih; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia differentiates into infectious cysts within the human intestinal tract for disease transmission. Expression of the cyst wall protein (cwp) genes increases with similar kinetics during encystation. However, little is known how their gene regulation shares common mechanisms. DNA topoisomerases maintain normal topology of genomic DNA. They are necessary for cell proliferation and tissue development as they are involved in transcription, DNA replication, and chromosome condensation. A putative topoisomerase II (topo II) gene has been identified in the G. lamblia genome. We asked whether Topo II could regulate Giardia encystation. We found that Topo II was present in cell nuclei and its gene was up-regulated during encystation. Topo II has typical ATPase and DNA cleavage activity of type II topoisomerases. Mutation analysis revealed that the catalytic important Tyr residue and cleavage domain are important for Topo II function. We used etoposide-mediated topoisomerase immunoprecipitation assays to confirm the binding of Topo II to the cwp promoters in vivo. Interestingly, Topo II overexpression increased the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Microarray analysis identified up-regulation of cwp and specific vsp genes by Topo II. We also found that the type II topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide has growth inhibition effect on Giardia. Addition of etoposide significantly decreased the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that Topo II has been functionally conserved during evolution and that Topo II plays important roles in induction of the cwp genes, which is key to Giardia differentiation into cysts. PMID:23696909

  2. Characterization and differential expression of protein kinase C isoforms in PC12 cells. Differentiation parallels an increase in PKC beta II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, M W; Seibenhener, M L; Soh, Y; Ewald, S J; White, K R; Lloyd, E D; Olivier, A; Parker, P J

    1992-02-17

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment of PC12 cells induced a 2.8-fold increase in protein kinase C activity concomitant with differentiation and acquisition of neuritis. PKC protein isoforms were separated by sequential chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel/hydroxylapatite. A broad peak of PKC activity eluted which corresponded to the alpha PKC isoform. In control cells, message for all six PKC isoforms was detected and expressed as epsilon greater than zeta = gamma greater than delta greater than beta greater than alpha. Western blot of whole cell lysates revealed a large increase in the beta II, while slight changes were observed for the other five PKC isoforms during treatment (1-14 days) with NGF (50 ng/ml). In parallel, coordinate changes in the expression of the individual transcripts for the six isoforms occurred during NGF treatment. Induction and accumulation of PKC beta II may play a role in maintenance of neuronal morphology. PMID:1544425

  3. Differential protein expression of peroxiredoxin I and II by benzo(a)pyrene and quercetin treatment in 22Rv1 and PrEC prostate cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Amit; Pechan, Tibor; Willett, Kristine L. . E-mail: kwillett@olemiss.edu

    2007-04-15

    Mechanisms of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-mediated toxicity and chemopreventative potential of quercetin in prostate cancer are poorly understood. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to map the differences in protein expression in BaP (1 {mu}M)- and quercetin (5 {mu}M)-treated 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. As compared to DMSO, 26 proteins in BaP and 41 proteins in quercetin were found to be differentially expressed ({+-} 2-fold). Western blots confirmed that BaP increased peroxiredoxin (Prx) Prx I and decreased Prx II in 22Rv1 cells. Similar results were found in PrEC normal prostate epithelial cells. Quercetin (up to 10 {mu}M) upregulated Prx II without altering Prx I levels in 22Rv1 cells whereas in PrEC cells, it did not alter the constitutive protein expression of Prx I or II. The lack of quercetin-mediated changes in Prx expression suggests that quercetin does not interfere with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels, and thus may have no deleterious effect in normal prostate cells. Quercetin inhibited both BaP-mediated effects on Prx I and II in 22Rv1 cells. In PrEC cells, quercetin inhibited BaP-mediated upregulation of Prx I and had tendency to neutralize BaP-mediated downregulation of Prx II. Quercetin also inhibited BaP-induced concentrations of reactive oxygen species in both 22Rv1 and PrEC cells. These results suggest that Prx I and II may be involved in BaP-mediated toxicity and the potential chemopreventative mechanisms of quercetin.

  4. Differential stimulation by CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha isoforms of the estrogen-activated promoter of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Calkhoven, C F; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1997-10-01

    The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins alpha and beta (C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta) are highly expressed in liver and are believed to function in maintaining the differentiated state of the hepatocytes. C/EBP alpha appears to be a critical regulator of genes involved in metabolic processes. We are interested in the roles of C/EBP in the expression of the very-low-density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDL II) gene. This gene encodes an avian yolk protein, is induced by estrogens and is only expressed in liver. To examine the role of C/EBP in apoVLDL II expression, footprinting and electromobility-shift analysis were performed. For three of the protein-binding sites in the apoVLDL II promoter region, C/EBP alpha and C/EBP beta were identified as the major DNA-binding activities. For one of the C/EBP genes, C/EBP alpha, the effect of the gene products on apoVLDL II transcription was examined. From transfection experiments we conclude that maximal estrogen-dependent activity of the apoVLDL II promoter requires the dual action of the estrogen receptor and C/EBP. The level of activity is different depending on the nature of the C/EBP alpha translational isoform transfected, the full-length C/EBP alpha polypeptide being the most active isoform and the N-terminally truncated isoform being moderately active. The present results suggest a role of C/EBP alpha translational isoform ratio in the modulation of expression of C/EBP target genes, such as those involved in metabolic processes. PMID:9363761

  5. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  6. Differential Reovirus-Specific and Herpesvirus-Specific Activator Protein 1 Activation of Secretogranin II Leads to Altered Virus Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Alicia R.; Severini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses utilize host cell machinery for propagation and manage to evade cellular host defense mechanisms in the process. Much remains unknown regarding how the host responds to viral infection. We recently performed global proteomic screens of mammalian reovirus TIL- and T3D-infected and herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus 1 [HSV-1])-infected HEK293 cells. The nonenveloped RNA reoviruses caused an upregulation, whereas the enveloped DNA HSV-1 caused a downregulation, of cellular secretogranin II (SCG2). SCG2, a member of the granin family that functions in hormonal peptide sorting into secretory vesicles, has not been linked to virus infections previously. We confirmed SCG2 upregulation and found SCG2 phosphorylation by 18 h postinfection (hpi) in reovirus-infected cells. We also found a decrease in the amount of reovirus secretion from SCG2 knockdown cells. Similar analyses of cells infected with HSV-1 showed an increase in the amount of secreted virus. Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK)/Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway indicated that each virus activates different pathways leading to activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation, which is the known SCG2 transcription activator. We conclude from these experiments that the negative correlation between SCG2 quantity and virus secretion for both viruses indicates a virus-specific role for SCG2 during infection. IMPORTANCE Mammalian reoviruses affect the gastrointestinal system or cause respiratory infections in humans. Recent work has shown that all mammalian reovirus strains (most specifically T3D) may be useful oncolytic agents. The ubiquitous herpes simplex viruses cause common sores in mucosal areas of their host and have coevolved with hosts over many years. Both of these virus species are prototypical representatives of their viral families, and investigation of these viruses can lead to further knowledge of how they and the other more pathogenic members of their respective

  7. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor.

    PubMed

    Amsalem, Ayelet R; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-15

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and -SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3' terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  8. Differential regulation of translation and endocytosis of alternatively spliced forms of the type II bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor

    PubMed Central

    Amsalem, Ayelet R.; Marom, Barak; Shapira, Keren E.; Hirschhorn, Tal; Preisler, Livia; Paarmann, Pia; Knaus, Petra; Henis, Yoav I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The expression and function of transforming growth factor-β superfamily receptors are regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms. The type II BMP receptor (BMPRII) is expressed as two alternatively spliced forms, a long and a short form (BMPRII-LF and –SF, respectively), which differ by an ∼500 amino acid C-terminal extension, unique among TGF-β superfamily receptors. Whereas this extension was proposed to modulate BMPRII signaling output, its contribution to the regulation of receptor expression was not addressed. To map regulatory determinants of BMPRII expression, we compared synthesis, degradation, distribution, and endocytic trafficking of BMPRII isoforms and mutants. We identified translational regulation of BMPRII expression and the contribution of a 3’ terminal coding sequence to this process. BMPRII-LF and -SF differed also in their steady-state levels, kinetics of degradation, intracellular distribution, and internalization rates. A single dileucine signal in the C-terminal extension of BMPRII-LF accounted for its faster clathrin-mediated endocytosis relative to BMPRII-SF, accompanied by mildly faster degradation. Higher expression of BMPRII-SF at the plasma membrane resulted in enhanced activation of Smad signaling, stressing the potential importance of the multilayered regulation of BMPRII expression at the plasma membrane. PMID:26739752

  9. Role of growth differentiation factor-5 and bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in the development of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Fan; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Liang, Chao-Ge; Hui, Yao-Ming; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Qiu, WenJun; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of growth differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) in the development of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). A total of 24 patients with lumbar IDD (experiment group) and 6 patients with lumbar vertebral fracture (control group) were enrolled in the study. Tissue samples of IVD from the experiment group and control group were obtained during lumbar fusion operation, respectively. Fixation and decalcification of IVD tissue were performed, and then HE staining was carried out to observe the morphological changes of the lumbar IVD tissues. The expression of GDF-5 and BMPRII in human lumbar IVD was detected by immunohistochemical staining. HE staining results showed that non- and minimal degeneration was found in 11 cases (score range, 0-3), moderate degeneration in 12 cases (score range, 4-8), and severe degeneration in 7 cases (score range, 9-12). According to the immunohistochemical results, the positive expression rates of GDF-5 and BMPRII in NP were higher than those in AF of the non- and minimal degeneration group, moderate degeneration group and severe degeneration group (all P < 0.05). However, no significant difference in GDF-5 or BMPRII positive expression was observed among the normal, non- and minimal, moderate and severe degeneration groups in neither NP area nor AF area (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that GDF-5 and BMPRII expressed both in normal and degenerated IVD tissues, and GDF-5 might have an inhibition effect on degenerated lumbar IVD, suggesting that gene therapy may be a useful approach in producing physiological effects during early- and late-phase of lumbar IDD. PMID:25755766

  10. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  11. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells. PMID:26112903

  12. Estrogen-responsive genes encoding egg yolk proteins vitellogenin and apolipoprotein II in chicken are differentially regulated by selective estrogen receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    Ratna, Warren N; Bhatt, Vrushank D; Chaudhary, Kawshik; Bin Ariff, Ammar; Bavadekar, Supriya A; Ratna, Haran N

    2016-02-01

    In a hen, large quantities of the egg yolk proteins, apolipoprotein II (apo-II) and vitellogenin (VG), are expressed in the liver and transported to the oviduct during egg production. Estrogenic stimulation of the hepatic expression of apo-II and VG is due to both transcriptional increase and mRNA stabilization. The nucleolytic degradation of apo-II messenger RNA (mRNA) is prevented by estrogen-regulated mRNA-stabilizing factor (E-RmRNASF). Gene-specific effects of a select panel of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) on the hepatic expression of the estrogen-responsive genes encoding apo-II, VG, and E-RmRNASF in the chicken liver were investigated. In the present study, 6-week-old roosters were treated with the vehicle, estrogen, the SERMs genistein, resveratrol, tamoxifen, pterostilbene, raloxifene, catechin, and clomiphene or a combination of estrogen and a 200-fold excess of each of the SERMs. Results from mRNA stabilization studies conducted to investigate the stimulation of expression of E-RmRNASF in the liver by these agents showed that the expression of E-RmRNASF in the liver was stimulated by estrogen and the SERMs genistein, resveratrol, tamoxifen, pterostilbene, and catechin but not by the vehicle, clomiphene or raloxifene. The expression of apo-II and VG from the aforementioned treatments was determined by Northern blot analysis, RNase protection assays, and Western blot analysis. The transcription and protein expression of both apo-II and VG genes were seen in response to treatment with estrogen but not with the SERMs or combinations of estrogen and each of the SERMs. The SERMs that stimulated the expression of E-RmRNASF antagonized the stimulation of the expression of both apo-II and VG by estrogen, demonstrating a gene-specific, selective regulation of the aforementioned genes in the chicken liver by the SERMs. The above panel of SERMs may likely have adverse effects on egg production. PMID:26452509

  13. D1-protein dynamics in photosystem II: the lingering enigma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The D1/D2 heterodimer core dominates the photosystem II reaction center. A characteristic feature of this heterodimer is the differentially rapid, light-dependent degradation of the D1 protein. The D1 protein is possibly the most researched photosynthetic polypeptide, with aspects of structure–funct...

  14. An eight-year epidemiologic study based on baculovirus-expressed type-specific spike proteins for the differentiation of type I and II feline coronavirus infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). FCoVs are divided into two serotypes with markedly different infection rates among cat populations around the world. A baculovirus-expressed type-specific domain of the spike proteins of FCoV was used to survey the infection of the two viruses over the past eight years in Taiwan. Results An immunofluorescence assay based on cells infected with the recombinant viruses that was capable of distinguishing between the two types of viral infection was established. A total of 833 cases from a teaching hospital was surveyed for prevalence of different FCoV infections. Infection of the type I FCoV was dominant, with a seropositive rate of 70.4%, whereas 3.5% of cats were infected with the type II FCoV. In most cases, results derived from serotyping and genotyping were highly agreeable. However, 16.7% (4/24) FIP cats and 9.8% (6/61) clinically healthy cats were found to possess antibodies against both viruses. Moreover, most of the cats (84.6%, 22/26) infected with a genotypic untypable virus bearing a type I FCoV antibody. Conclusion A relatively simple serotyping method to distinguish between two types of FCoV infection was developed. Based on this method, two types of FCoV infection in Taiwan was first carried out. Type I FCoV was found to be predominant compared with type II virus. Results derived from serotyping and genotyping support our current understanding of evolution of disease-related FCoV and transmission of FIP. PMID:25123112

  15. Dynamics of protein secretion during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Muroya, Susumu; Nishimura, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    The major functions of adipocytes include both lipid storage and the production of secretory factors. However, the type of proteins released from mouse 3T3-L1 cells during adipocyte differentiation remains poorly understood. We examined the dynamics of secreted proteins during adipocyte differentiation using mass spectrometry (MS) combined with an iTRAQ (®) labeling method that enables the simultaneous analysis of relative protein expression levels. A total of 215 proteins were identified and quantified from approximately 10 000 MS/MS spectra. Of these, approximately 38% were categorized as secreted proteins based on gene ontology classification. Adipokine secretion levels were increased with the progression of differentiation. By contrast, levels of fibril collagen components, such as subunits of type I and III collagens, were decreased during differentiation. Basement membrane components attained their peak levels at day 4 when small lipid droplets accumulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Simultaneously, peak levels of collagen microfibril components that comprise type V and VI collagen subunits were also observed. Our data demonstrated that extracellular matrix components were predominantly released during the early and middle stages of adipocyte differentiation, with a subsequent increase in the secretion of adipokines. This suggests that 3T3-L1 cells secrete adipokines after their ECM is constructed during adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27516960

  16. Group II Introns and Their Protein Collaborators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solem, Amanda; Zingler, Nora; Pyle, Anna Marie; Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer

    Group II introns are an abundant class of autocatalytic introns that excise themselves from precursor mRNAs. Although group II introns are catalytic RNAs, they require the assistance of proteins for efficient splicing in vivo. Proteins that facilitate splicing of organellar group II introns fall into two main categories: intron-encoded maturases and host-encoded proteins. This chapter will focus on the host proteins that group II introns recruited to ensure their function. It will discuss the great diversity of these proteins, define common features, and describe different strategies employed to achieve specificity. Special emphasis will be placed on DEAD-box ATPases, currently the best studied example of host-encoded proteins with a role in group II intron splicing. Since the exact mechanisms by which splicing is facilitated is not known for any of the host proteins, general mechanistic strategies for protein-mediated RNA folding are described and assessed for their potential role in group II intron splicing.

  17. Class II virus membrane fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kielian, Margaret . E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-01-05

    Enveloped animal viruses fuse their membrane with a host cell membrane, thus delivering the virus genetic material into the cytoplasm and initiating infection. This critical membrane fusion reaction is mediated by a virus transmembrane protein known as the fusion protein, which inserts its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the cell membrane and refolds to drive the fusion reaction. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Inhibition of the fusion protein refolding reaction confirms its importance in fusion and suggests new antiviral strategies for these medically important viruses.

  18. Nonparametric Bayesian evaluation of differential protein quantification

    PubMed Central

    Cansizoglu, A. Ertugrul; Käll, Lukas; Steen, Hanno

    2013-01-01

    Arbitrary cutoffs are ubiquitous in quantitative computational proteomics: maximum acceptable MS/MS PSM or peptide q–value, minimum ion intensity to calculate a fold change, the minimum number of peptides that must be available to trust the estimated protein fold change (or the minimum number of PSMs that must be available to trust the estimated peptide fold change), and the “significant” fold change cutoff. Here we introduce a novel experimental setup and nonparametric Bayesian algorithm for determining the statistical quality of a proposed differential set of proteins or peptides. By comparing putatively non-changing case-control evidence to an empirical null distribution derived from a control-control experiment, we successfully avoid some of these common parameters. We then apply our method to evaluating different fold change rules and find that, for our data, a 1.2-fold change is the most permissive of the plausible fold change rules. PMID:24024742

  19. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-06-27

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  20. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    PubMed Central

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions. PMID:26144227

  1. Mössbauer Properties of the Diferric Cluster and the Differential Iron(II)-Binding Affinity of the Iron Sites in Protein R2 of Class Ia Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase: A DFT/Electrostatics Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wen-Ge; Sandala, Gregory M.; Giammona, Debra Ann; Bashford, Donald; Noodleman, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The R2 subunit of class-Ia ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) from Escherichia coli (E. coli) contains a diiron active site. Starting from the apo-protein and Fe(II) in solution at low Fe(II)/apoR2 ratios, mononuclear Fe(II) binding is observed indicating possible different Fe(II) binding affinities for the two alternative sites. Further, based on their Mössbauer spectroscopy and two-iron-isotope reaction experiments, Bollinger et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1997, 119, 5976–5977) proposed that the site Fe1, which bonds to Asp84, should be associated with the higher observed 57Fe Mössbauer quadrupole splitting (2.41 mm s−1) and lower isomer shift (0.45 mm s−1) in the Fe(III)Fe(III) state, site Fe2, which is further from Tyr122, should have a greater affinity for Fe(II) binding than site Fe1, and Fe(IV) in the intermediate X state should reside at site Fe2. In this paper, using density functional theory (DFT) incorporated with the conductor like screening (COSMO) solvation model and with the finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann self-consistent reaction field (PB-SCRF) methodologies, we have demonstrated that the observed large quadrupole splitting for the diferric state R2 does come from site Fe1(III) and it is mainly caused by the binding position of the carboxylate group of Asp84 sidechain. Further, a series of active site clusters with mononuclear Fe(II) binding at either site Fe1 or Fe2 have been studied, which show that with single dielectric medium outside the active site quantum region, there is no energetic preference for Fe(II) binding at one site over another. However, when including the explicit extended protein environment in the PB-SCRF model, the reaction field favors the Fe(II) binding at site Fe2 rather than at site Fe1 by ~9 kcal mol−1. Therefore our calculations support the proposal of the previous Mössbauer spectroscopy and two-iron-isotope reaction experiments by Bollinger et al. PMID:21837345

  2. Protein separation by differential drainage from foam.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S B; Lyddiatt, A

    1994-11-20

    Commercially available beer, which is a dilute solution containing components of yeast, malt, and hop used in the manufacture of the beer, was used as a model system to demonstrate the potential of foam fractionation beyond the primary foaming stage. Most of the components present in the beer concentrated in the initial foam, but they drained differentially in the subsequent collapsed foam collected over a period of 30 min. This resulted in further enrichment, in particular, of components which were present in low concentration in the original beer, Preferential drainage from foam, hence, might provide a novel way of fractionating further the proteins concentrated initially in the liquid films of foam. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18618553

  3. The highly dynamic oligomeric structure of bradavidin II is unique among avidin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leppiniemi, Jenni; Meir, Amit; Kähkönen, Niklas; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Määttä, Juha A; Ojanen, Markus; Jänis, Janne; Kulomaa, Markku S; Livnah, Oded; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2013-01-01

    Bradavidin II is a biotin-binding protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that resembles chicken avidin and bacterial streptavidin. A biophysical characterization was carried out using dynamic light scattering, native mass spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and isothermal titration calorimetry combined with structural characterization using X-ray crystallography. These observations revealed that bradavidin II differs from canonical homotetrameric avidin protein family members in its quaternary structure. In contrast with the other avidins, bradavidin II appears to have a dynamic (transient) oligomeric state in solution. It is monomeric at low protein concentrations but forms higher oligomeric assemblies at higher concentrations. The crystal structure of bradavidin II revealed an important role for Phe42 in shielding the bound ligand from surrounding water molecules, thus functionally replacing the L7,8 loop essential for tight ligand binding in avidin and streptavidin. This bradavidin II characterization opens new avenues for oligomerization-independent biotin-binding protein development. PMID:23661323

  4. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2015-05-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  5. Pro-survival effects of 17β-estradiol on osteocytes are mediated by nitric oxide/cGMP via differential actions of cGMP-dependent protein kinases I and II.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Nisha; Rangaswami, Hema; Zhuang, Shunhui; Boss, Gerry R; Pilz, Renate B

    2012-01-01

    Estrogens promote bone health in part by increasing osteocyte survival, an effect that requires activation of the protein kinases Akt and ERK1/2, but the molecular mechanisms involved are only partly understood. Because estrogens increase nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and NO can have anti-apoptotic effects, we examined the role of NO/cGMP signaling in estrogen regulation of osteocyte survival. Etoposide-induced death of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, assessed by trypan blue staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL assays, was completely prevented when cells were pre-treated with 17β-estradiol. This protective effect was mimicked when cells were pre-treated with a membrane-permeable cGMP analog and blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of NO synthase, soluble guanylate cyclase, or cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs), supporting a requirement for NO/cGMP/PKG signaling downstream of 17β-estradiol. siRNA-mediated knockdown and viral reconstitution of individual PKG isoforms demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic effects of estradiol and cGMP were mediated by PKG Iα and PKG II. Akt and ERK1/2 activation by 17β-estradiol required PKG II, and cGMP mimicked the effects of estradiol on Akt and ERK, including induction of ERK nuclear translocation. cGMP induced BAD phosphorylation on several sites, and experiments with phosphorylation-deficient BAD mutants demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic effects of cGMP and 17β-estradiol required BAD phosphorylation on Ser(136) and Ser(155); these sites were targeted by Akt and PKG I, respectively, and regulate BAD interaction with Bcl-2. In conclusion, 17β-estradiol protects osteocytes against apoptosis by activating the NO/cGMP/PKG cascade; PKG II is required for estradiol-induced activation of ERK and Akt, and PKG Iα contributes to pro-survival signaling by directly phosphorylating BAD. PMID:22117068

  6. Spectral Monitoring of Surfactant Clearance during Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Robin J.; Kemp, Sarah J.; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetley, Teresa D.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we report on the noninvasive identification of spectral markers of alveolar type II (ATII) cell differentiation in vitro using Raman microspectroscopy. ATII cells are progenitor cells for alveolar type I (ATI) cells in vivo, and spontaneously differentiate toward an ATI-like phenotype in culture. We analyzed undifferentiated and differentiated primary human ATII cells, and correlated Raman spectral changes to cellular changes in morphology and marker protein synthesis (surfactant protein C, alkaline phosphatase, caveolin-1). Undifferentiated ATII cells demonstrated spectra with strong phospholipid vibrations, arising from alveolar surfactant stored within cytoplasmic lamellar bodies (Lbs). Differentiated ATI-like cells yielded spectra with significantly less lipid content. Factor analysis revealed a phospholipid-dominated spectral component as the main discriminator between the ATII and ATI-like phenotypes. Spectral modeling of the data revealed a significant decrease in the spectral contribution of cellular lipids—specifically phosphatidyl choline, the main constituent of surfactant, as ATII cells differentiate. These observations were consistent with the clearance of surfactant from Lbs as ATII cells differentiate, and were further supported by cytochemical staining for Lbs. These results demonstrate the first spectral characterization of primary human ATII cells, and provide insight into the biochemical properties of alveolar surfactant in its unperturbed cellular environment. PMID:18820234

  7. Microsomal membrane proteome of low grade diffuse astrocytomas: Differentially expressed proteins and candidate surveillance biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Gautam, Poonam; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Gowda, Harsha; Renu, Durairaj; Shivakumar, Bhadravathi Marigowda; Lakshmikantha, Akhila; Mariswamappa, Kiran; Ankathi, Praveen; Purohit, Aniruddh K.; Uppin, Megha S.; Sundaram, Challa; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse astrocytoma (DA; WHO grade II) is a low-grade, primary brain neoplasm with high potential of recurrence as higher grade malignant form. We have analyzed differentially expressed membrane proteins from these tumors, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 2803 proteins were identified, 340 of them differentially expressed with minimum of 2 fold change and based on ≥2 unique peptides. Bioinformatics analysis of this dataset also revealed important molecular networks and pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, mTOR signaling pathway being a major pathway identified. Comparison of 340 differentially expressed proteins with the transcript data from Grade II diffuse astrocytomas reported earlier, revealed about 190 of the proteins correlate in their trends in expression. Considering progressive and recurrent nature of these tumors, we have mapped the differentially expressed proteins for their secretory potential, integrated the resulting list with similar list of proteins from anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Grade III) tumors and provide a panel of proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, as a resource that would be useful for investigation as circulatory plasma markers for post-treatment surveillance of DA patients. PMID:27246909

  8. Microsomal membrane proteome of low grade diffuse astrocytomas: Differentially expressed proteins and candidate surveillance biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Gautam, Poonam; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Gowda, Harsha; Renu, Durairaj; Shivakumar, Bhadravathi Marigowda; Lakshmikantha, Akhila; Mariswamappa, Kiran; Ankathi, Praveen; Purohit, Aniruddh K; Uppin, Megha S; Sundaram, Challa; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse astrocytoma (DA; WHO grade II) is a low-grade, primary brain neoplasm with high potential of recurrence as higher grade malignant form. We have analyzed differentially expressed membrane proteins from these tumors, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 2803 proteins were identified, 340 of them differentially expressed with minimum of 2 fold change and based on ≥2 unique peptides. Bioinformatics analysis of this dataset also revealed important molecular networks and pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, mTOR signaling pathway being a major pathway identified. Comparison of 340 differentially expressed proteins with the transcript data from Grade II diffuse astrocytomas reported earlier, revealed about 190 of the proteins correlate in their trends in expression. Considering progressive and recurrent nature of these tumors, we have mapped the differentially expressed proteins for their secretory potential, integrated the resulting list with similar list of proteins from anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Grade III) tumors and provide a panel of proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, as a resource that would be useful for investigation as circulatory plasma markers for post-treatment surveillance of DA patients. PMID:27246909

  9. Loss of CRABP-II Characterizes Human Skin Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Favors DMBA/TPA-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Tarquini, Chiara; Costanza, Gaetana; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Agostinelli, Sara; Campione, Elena; Di Stefani, Alessandro; Giunta, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Retinol and its derivatives play an important role in epidermal growth and differentiation and represent chemopreventive agents in nonmelanoma skin cancer. Retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) is a cytoplasmic receptor that critically regulates all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) trafficking. We documented the marked reduced expression of CRABP-II and its promoter methylation in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. To investigate the role of CRABP-II in skin carcinogenesis we used skin lesion induction by dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in CRABP-II-knockout C57BL/6 mice. We observed earlier and more diffuse epidermal dysplasia, greater incidence and severity of tumors, reduced expression of cytokeratin 1/cytokeratin 10 and involucrin, increased proliferation, and impaired ATRA inhibition of tumor promotion compared with wild-type animals. CRABP-II-transfected HaCaT, FaDu, and A431 cells showed expression of differentiation markers, retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling, ATRA sensitivity, and suppression of EGFR/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT) pathways in a fatty acid binding protein 5/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-δ-independent manner. The opposite was true in keratinocytes isolated from CRABP-II-knockout mice. Finally, CRABP-II accumulation induced ubiquitination-associated reduction of EGFR. Our results showed reduced CRABP-II expression in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, and its gene deletion favored experimental skin carcinogenesis and impaired ATRA antitumor efficacy, likely modulating EGFR/AKT pathways and retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring CRABP-II-mediated signaling may amplify therapeutic retinoid efficacy in nonmelanoma skin cancer. PMID:26945879

  10. Preferential elevation of protein kinase C isoform beta II and diacylglycerol levels in the aorta and heart of diabetic rats: differential reversibility to glycemic control by islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Inoguchi, T; Battan, R; Handler, E; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W; King, G L

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we have measured protein kinase C (PKC) specific activities and total diacylglycerol (DAG) level in the aorta and heart of rats, which showed that after 2 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, membranous PKC specific activity and total DAG content were increased significantly by 88% and 40% in the aorta and by 21% and 72% in the heart, respectively. Hyperglycemia was identified as being a causal factor since elevated glucose levels increased DAG levels in cultured aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Analysis by immunoblotting revealed that only alpha and beta II PKC isoenzymes are detected in these two tissues and vascular cells among those studied. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, beta II isoenzyme is preferentially increased in both aorta and heart, whereas PKC alpha did not change significantly. The increases in membranous PKC specific activity and DAG level are observed in both spontaneous diabetes-prone diabetic BB rats as well as in STZ-induced diabetic BB and Sprague-Dawley rats, which persisted for up to 5 weeks. After 2 weeks of diabetes without treatment, the normalization of blood glucose levels for up to 3 weeks with islet cell transplants in STZ-induced diabetic BB rats reversed the biochemical changes only in the heart, but not in the aorta. These results suggest that PKC activity and DAG level may be persistently activated in the macrovascular tissues from diabetic animals and indicate a possible role for these biochemical parameters in the development of diabetic chronic vascular complications. Images PMID:1438315

  11. Preferential elevation of protein kinase C isoform beta II and diacylglycerol levels in the aorta and heart of diabetic rats: differential reversibility to glycemic control by islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Inoguchi, T; Battan, R; Handler, E; Sportsman, J R; Heath, W; King, G L

    1992-11-15

    In the present study, we have measured protein kinase C (PKC) specific activities and total diacylglycerol (DAG) level in the aorta and heart of rats, which showed that after 2 weeks of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, membranous PKC specific activity and total DAG content were increased significantly by 88% and 40% in the aorta and by 21% and 72% in the heart, respectively. Hyperglycemia was identified as being a causal factor since elevated glucose levels increased DAG levels in cultured aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Analysis by immunoblotting revealed that only alpha and beta II PKC isoenzymes are detected in these two tissues and vascular cells among those studied. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, beta II isoenzyme is preferentially increased in both aorta and heart, whereas PKC alpha did not change significantly. The increases in membranous PKC specific activity and DAG level are observed in both spontaneous diabetes-prone diabetic BB rats as well as in STZ-induced diabetic BB and Sprague-Dawley rats, which persisted for up to 5 weeks. After 2 weeks of diabetes without treatment, the normalization of blood glucose levels for up to 3 weeks with islet cell transplants in STZ-induced diabetic BB rats reversed the biochemical changes only in the heart, but not in the aorta. These results suggest that PKC activity and DAG level may be persistently activated in the macrovascular tissues from diabetic animals and indicate a possible role for these biochemical parameters in the development of diabetic chronic vascular complications. PMID:1438315

  12. Expression, sorting, and segregation of Golgi proteins during germ cell differentiation in the testis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Catherine E.; Hermo, Louis; Byrne, Elliot; Smirle, Jeffrey; Fazel, Ali; Simon, Paul H. G.; Kearney, Robert E.; Cameron, Pamela H.; Smith, Charles E.; Vali, Hojatollah; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Ma, Kewei; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of changes in structure, cellular location, and function of the Golgi apparatus during male germ cell differentiation is unknown. To deduce cognate Golgi proteins, we isolated germ cell Golgi fractions, and 1318 proteins were characterized, with 20 localized in situ. The most abundant protein, GL54D of unknown function, is characterized as a germ cell–specific Golgi-localized type II integral membrane glycoprotein. TM9SF3, also of unknown function, was revealed to be a universal Golgi marker for both somatic and germ cells. During acrosome formation, several Golgi proteins (GBF1, GPP34, GRASP55) localize to both the acrosome and Golgi, while GL54D, TM9SF3, and the Golgi trafficking protein TMED7/p27 are segregated from the acrosome. After acrosome formation, GL54D, TM9SF3, TMED4/p25, and TMED7/p27 continue to mark Golgi identity as it migrates away from the acrosome, while the others (GBF1, GPP34, GRASP55) remain in the acrosome and are progressively lost in later steps of differentiation. Cytoplasmic HSP70.2 and the endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein-folding enzyme PDILT are also Golgi recruited but only during acrosome formation. This resource identifies abundant Golgi proteins that are expressed differentially during mitosis, meiosis, and postacrosome Golgi migration, including the last step of differentiation. PMID:25808494

  13. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    computation, thanks to the equivalence of the Laplace-Beltrami operator in the two representations. The coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved with an iterative procedure to reach a steady state, which delivers desired solvent-solute interface and electrostatic potential for problems of interest. These quantities are utilized to evaluate the solvation free energies and protein-protein binding affinities. A number of computational methods and algorithms are described for the interconversion of Lagrangian and Eulerian representations, and for the solution of the coupled PDE system. The proposed approaches have been extensively validated. We also verify that the mean curvature flow indeed gives rise to the minimal molecular surface and the proposed variational procedure indeed offers minimal total free energy. Solvation analysis and applications are considered for a set of 17 small compounds and a set of 23 proteins. The salt effect on protein-protein binding affinity is investigated with two protein complexes by using the present model. Numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and to those obtained by using other theoretical methods in the literature. PMID:21279359

  14. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wei, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    the purpose of computation, thanks to the equivalence of the Laplace-Beltrami operator in the two representations. The coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved with an iterative procedure to reach a steady state, which delivers desired solvent-solute interface and electrostatic potential for problems of interest. These quantities are utilized to evaluate the solvation free energies and protein-protein binding affinities. A number of computational methods and algorithms are described for the interconversion of Lagrangian and Eulerian representations, and for the solution of the coupled PDE system. The proposed approaches have been extensively validated. We also verify that the mean curvature flow indeed gives rise to the minimal molecular surface (MMS) and the proposed variational procedure indeed offers minimal total free energy. Solvation analysis and applications are considered for a set of 17 small compounds and a set of 23 proteins. The salt effect on protein-protein binding affinity is investigated with two protein complexes by using the present model. Numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and to those obtained by using other theoretical methods in the literature. PMID:21279359

  15. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  16. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  17. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  18. Neuroendocrine Differentiation Is a Prognostic Factor for Stage II Poorly Differentiated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Xu, Jinghong; Jiao, Yurong; Hu, Yeting; Yi, Chenghao; Li, Qiong; Tong, Zhou; Wang, Xiaowei; Hu, Lifeng; Li, Jun; Ding, Kefeng

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) in colorectal cancer is an indistinct phenomenon and may define a new cancer subtype, especially in the poorly differentiated colorectal cancer (PDCRC). The clinical features of PDCRC with NED remain controversial, thus confusing the implementation of individualized treatment. This study included 171 patients who underwent surgery from 2000 to 2011 and had pathology-confirmed PDCRC. Each sample was examined by immunohistochemistry for the biological markers of NED, synaptophysin (Syn), and chromogranin (CgA). Patients with Syn(+) and/or CgA(+) cells were classified as NED(+); otherwise, they were NED(−). Data were collected for patients who were followed up for at least two years. NED(+) staining was present in 71 (41.5%) patients. The median survival time was 36.9 months. No survival differences existed between the NED(−) and NED(+) groups (P > 0.05). However, stage II NED(+) patients had a significantly worse prognosis than NED(−) patients (P = 0.018). For the NED(+) group, the median survival was 38.56 months, and the 5-year survival was 65%. For the NED(−) group, the median survival was 53.18 months, and the 5-year survival was 90%. NED is a common event in primary PDCRC. For stage II PDCRC, NED(+) indicates a poor prognosis. PMID:25093184

  19. High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry of a Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Use of elevated electric fields and helium-rich gases has recently enabled differential IMS with resolving power up to R ~ 300. Here we applied that technique to a protein (namely, ubiquitin), achieving R up to ~80 and separating many previously unresolved conformers. While still limited by conformational multiplicity, this resolution is some four times greater than that previously reported using either conventional (drift-tube or traveling-wave) or differential IMS. The capability for fine resolution of protein conformers may open new avenues for proteoform separations in top-down and intact-protein proteomics. PMID:23244633

  20. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  1. Differential protein occupancy profiling of the mRNA transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) mediate mRNA biogenesis, translation and decay. We recently developed an approach to profile transcriptome-wide RBP contacts on polyadenylated transcripts by next-generation sequencing. A comparison of such profiles from different biological conditions has the power to unravel dynamic changes in protein-contacted cis-regulatory mRNA regions without a priori knowledge of the regulatory protein component. Results We compared protein occupancy profiles of polyadenylated transcripts in MCF7 and HEK293 cells. Briefly, we developed a bioinformatics workflow to identify differential crosslinking sites in cDNA reads of 4-thiouridine crosslinked polyadenylated RNA samples. We identified 30,000 differential crosslinking sites between MCF7 and HEK293 cells at an estimated false discovery rate of 10%. 73% of all reported differential protein-RNA contact sites cannot be explained by local changes in exon usage as indicated by complementary RNA-seq data. The majority of differentially crosslinked positions are located in 3′ UTRs, show distinct secondary-structure characteristics and overlap with binding sites of known RBPs, such as ELAVL1. Importantly, mRNA transcripts with the most significant occupancy changes show elongated mRNA half-lives in MCF7 cells. Conclusions We present a global comparison of protein occupancy profiles from different cell types, and provide evidence for altered mRNA metabolism as a result of differential protein-RNA contacts. Additionally, we introduce POPPI, a bioinformatics workflow for the analysis of protein occupancy profiling experiments. Our work demonstrates the value of protein occupancy profiling for assessing cis-regulatory RNA sequence space and its dynamics in growth, development and disease. PMID:24417896

  2. Differential effects and glucocorticoid potentiation of bone morphogenetic protein action during rat osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boden, S D; McCuaig, K; Hair, G; Racine, M; Titus, L; Wozney, J M; Nanes, M S

    1996-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce cartilage and bone differentiation in vivo and promote osteoblast differentiation from calvarial and marrow stromal cell preparations. Functional differences between BMP-2, -4, and -6 are not well understood. Recent investigations find that these three closely related osteoinductive proteins may exert different effects in primary rat calvarial cell cultures, suggesting the possibility of unique functions in vivo. In this study, we use a fetal rat secondary calvarial cell culture system to examine the differential effects of BMP-2, -4, and -6 on early osteoblast differentiation. These cells do not spontaneously differentiate into osteoblasts, as do cells in primary calvarial cultures, but rather require exposure to a differentiation initiator such as glucocorticoid or BMP. We determined that BMP-6 is a 2- to 2.5-fold more potent inducer of osteoblast differentiation than BMP-2 or -4. BMP-6 induced the formation of more and larger bone nodules as well as increased osteocalcin secretion. The effects of all three of these BMPs were potentiated up to 10-fold by cotreatment or pretreatment with the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (Trm). The Trm effects were synergistic with those of BMP-2 or -4, suggesting that this glucocorticoid may increase the cell responsiveness to these BMPs. Finally, BMP-6 did not require either cotreatment or pretreatment with Trm to achieve greater amounts of osteoblast differentiation than seen with BMP-2 or BMP-4 treatment, suggesting that BMP-6 may act at an earlier stage of cell differentiation. PMID:8754767

  3. Angiotensin II stimulates melanogenesis via the protein kinase C pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI-HONG; FAN, XIN; XIA, ZHI-KUAN; AN, XU-XI; YANG, RONG-YA

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a physiological process that results in the synthesis of melanin pigments, which serve a crucial function in hyperpigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on melanogenesis and to elucidate the molecular events of Ang II-induced melanogenesis. Experiments were performed on human melanocytes to elucidate the pigmenting effect of Ang II and the underlying mechanisms. The elements involved in melanogenesis, including melanin content, tyrosinase (TYR) activity, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and TYR expression at the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated. Melanin content and TYR activity increased in response to Ang II treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. MITF and TYR mRNA and protein expression levels were increased significantly in response to Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. The Ang II-induced increase in melanin synthesis was reduced significantly in response to co-treatment with Ro-32-0432, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, whereas co-treatment with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, did not attenuate the Ang II-induced increase in melanin levels. These results suggest that PKC is required for Ang II-induced pigmentation in human melanocytes and that the mechanism involves the PKC pathway and MITF upregulation. PMID:26622519

  4. Identification of novel proteins differentially expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Kei; Watanabe-Susaki, Kanako; Kowno, Megumi; Takada, Hitomi; Intoh, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Sugino, Hiromu; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian pluripotent stem cells possess properties of self-renewal and pluripotency. These abilities are maintained by the strict regulation of pluripotent stem cell-specific transcription factor network and unique properties of chromatin in the stem cells. Although these major signaling pathways robustly control the characteristics of stem cells, other regulatory factors, such as metabolic pathways, are also known to modulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we fractionated protein samples from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells cultured with or without the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Protein expression was quantified by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). In total, 44 proteins were identified as being differentially expressed in the pluripotent stem cells and the differentiated cells. Surprisingly, half of the identified proteins were the proteins localized in mitochondria, which supply cellular energy and regulate cell cycle, development, and cell death. Some of these identified proteins are involved in the metabolic function and the regulation of pluripotency. Further analysis of the identified proteins could provide new information for the manipulation of pluripotency in ES cells. PMID:26399336

  5. In Vivo Probe of Lipid II-Interacting Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sourav; Libby, Elizabeth A; Pidgeon, Sean E; Dworkin, Jonathan; Pires, Marcos M

    2016-07-11

    β-Lactams represent one of the most important classes of antibiotics discovered to date. These agents block Lipid II processing and cell wall biosynthesis through inactivation of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). PBPs enzymatically load cell wall building blocks from Lipid II carrier molecules onto the growing cell wall scaffold during growth and division. Lipid II, a bottleneck in cell wall biosynthesis, is the target of some of the most potent antibiotics in clinical use. Despite the immense therapeutic value of this biosynthetic pathway, the PBP-Lipid II association has not been established in live cells. To determine this key interaction, we designed an unnatural d-amino acid dipeptide that is metabolically incorporated into Lipid II molecules. By hijacking the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery, photoaffinity probes were installed in combination with click partners within Lipid II, thereby allowing, for the first time, demonstration of PBP interactions in vivo with Lipid II. PMID:27225706

  6. Orf-I and Orf-II-Encoded Proteins in HTLV-1 Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Dustin; Fenizia, Claudio; Gold, Heather; de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Buchmann, Cody; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-01-01

    The 3′ end of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type-1 (HTLV-1) genome contains four overlapping open reading frames (ORF) that encode regulatory proteins. Here, we review current knowledge of HTLV-1 orf-I and orf-II protein products. Singly spliced mRNA from orf-I encodes p12, which can be proteolytically cleaved to generate p8, while differential splicing of mRNA from orf-II results in production of p13 and p30. These proteins have been demonstrated to modulate transcription, apoptosis, host cell activation and proliferation, virus infectivity and transmission, and host immune responses. Though these proteins are not essential for virus replication in vitro, p8, p12, p13, and p30 have an important role in the establishment and maintenance of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:21994758

  7. Differentiation of HL60 cells: involvement of protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Spearman, T.N.; Fontana, J.A.; Butcher, F.R.; Durham, J.P.

    1986-05-01

    The addition of retinoic acid (RA) to the human promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL60 in culture results in the cessation of growth and the acquisition of a more mature phenotype. Previous work in these laboratories has demonstrated a concomitant increase in the activity of calcium-dependent, phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase (PK-C). HL60 cells were incubated with /sup 32/P-P/sub i/ in the absence and presence of RA, homogenized, and aliquots subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. A comparison of autoradiograms made from these gels revealed several phosphoproteins whose radiolabeling was affected by RA. The radiolabeling of one particular phosphoprotein (49kd, pI 4.8) was found to be increased prior to phenotypic evidence of differentiation. It was demonstrated via incubating HL60 cytosol with /sup 32/P -ATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ in the absence and presence of phosphatidylserine and resolving the labeled proteins as above that this protein is phosphorylated by PK-C. The labeling of this protein was also increased by RA in other leukemic cell lines which showed phenotypic evidence of differentiation while no effect was seen in HL60 sublines resistant to RA or in mature neutrophils (the end product of myeloid differentiation). These results suggest that this protein may be an important intermediate in myeloid differentiation.

  8. Signal-transduction protein P(II) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 senses low adenylate energy charge in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Herrmann, Christina; Forchhammer, Karl

    2011-11-15

    P(II) proteins belong to a family of highly conserved signal-transduction proteins that occurs widely in bacteria, archaea and plants. They respond to the central metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-OG (2-oxoglutarate), and control enzymes, transcription factors and transport proteins involved in nitrogen metabolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of ADP on in vitro P(II)-signalling properties for the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, a model for oxygenic phototrophic organisms. Different ADP/ATP ratios strongly affected the properties of P(II) signalling. Increasing ADP antagonized the binding of 2-OG and directly affected the interactions of P(II) with its target proteins. The resulting P(II)-signalling properties indicate that, in mixtures of ADP and ATP, P(II) trimers are occupied by mixtures of adenylate nucleotides. Binding and kinetic activation of NAGK (N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase), the controlling enzyme of arginine biosynthesis, by P(II) was weakened by ADP, but relief from arginine inhibition remained unaffected. On the other hand, ADP enhanced the binding of P(II) to PipX, a co-activator of the transcription factor NtcA and, furthermore, antagonized the inhibitory effect of 2-OG on P(II)-PipX interaction. These results indicate that S. elongatus P(II) directly senses the adenylate energy charge, resulting in target-dependent differential modification of the P(II)-signalling properties. PMID:21774788

  9. Screening for Differentially Expressed Proteins Relevant to the Differential Diagnosis of Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhou, Ying; Li, Qiu-Hong; Li, Yan; Du, Yu-Kui; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Weng, Dong; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, we sought to identify differentially expressed proteins in the serum of patients with sarcoidosis or tuberculosis and to evaluate these proteins as markers for the differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis and sputum-negative tuberculosis. Methods Using protein microarrays, we identified 3 proteins exhibiting differential expression between patients with sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. Elevated expression of these proteins was verified using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, logistic regression analysis, parallel, and serial tests were used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of the proteins. Results Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1(ICAM-1) and leptin were screened for differentially expressed proteins relevant to sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. Using ROC curves, we found that ICAM-1 (cutoff value: 57740 pg/mL) had an area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity of 0.718, 62.3%, and 79.5% respectively, while leptin (cutoff value: 1193.186 pg/mL) had an AUC, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.763, 88.3%, and 65.8%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AUC, sensitivity, and specificity of combined leptin and ICAM-1 were 0.787, 89.6%, and 65.8%, respectively, while those of combined leptin, ICAM-1, and body mass index (BMI) were 0.837, 90.9%, and 64.4%, respectively, which had the greatest diagnostic value. Parallel and serial tests indicated that the BMI-leptin parallel with the ICAM-1 serial was the best diagnostic method, achieving a sensitivity and specificity of 86.5% and 73.1%, respectively. Thus, our results identified elevated expression of ICAM-1 and leptin in serum and granulomas of sarcoidosis patients. Conclusions ICAM-1 and leptin were found to be potential markers for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and differential diagnosis of sarcoidosis and sputum-negative tuberculosis. PMID:26368286

  10. Differential protein network analysis of the immune cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Trevor; Hovig, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen) completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks. PMID:25309909

  11. The Ets protein Pointed prevents both premature differentiation and dedifferentiation of Drosophila intermediate neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yonggang; Li, Xiaosu; Deng, Xiaobing; Hou, Yanjun; O'Hara, Krysten; Urso, Andreacarola; Peng, Ying; Chen, Li; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-09-01

    Intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) need to avoid both dedifferentiation and differentiation during neurogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In Drosophila, the Ets protein Pointed P1 (PntP1) is required to generate INPs from type II neuroblasts. Here, we investigated how PntP1 promotes INP generation. By generating pntP1-specific mutants and using RNAi knockdown, we show that the loss of PntP1 leads to both an increase in type II neuroblast number and the elimination of INPs. The elimination of INPs results from the premature differentiation of INPs due to ectopic Prospero expression in newly generated immature INPs (imINPs), whereas the increase in type II neuroblasts results from the dedifferentiation of imINPs due to loss of Earmuff at later stages of imINP development. Furthermore, reducing Buttonhead enhances the loss of INPs in pntP1 mutants, suggesting that PntP1 and Buttonhead act cooperatively to prevent premature INP differentiation. Our results demonstrate that PntP1 prevents both the premature differentiation and the dedifferentiation of INPs by regulating the expression of distinct target genes at different stages of imINP development. PMID:27510969

  12. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development. GLIA 2016;64:1021-1033. PMID:26988125

  13. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients' life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life. PMID:25072053

  14. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  15. Giardia mitosomal protein import machinery differentially recognizes mitochondrial targeting signals.

    PubMed

    Nyindodo-Ogari, Lilian; Schwartzbach, Steven D; Estraño, Carlos E

    2014-01-01

    Giardia lamblia mitosomes are believed to be vestigial mitochondria which lack a genome. Similar to higher eukaryotes, mitosomal proteins possess either N-terminal or internal mitosomal targeting sequences. To date, some components of the higher eukaryote archetypal mitochondrial protein import apparatus have been identified and characterized in Giardia mitosomes; therefore, it is expected that mitochondrial signals will be recognized by the mitosomal protein import system. To further determine the level of conservation of the Giardia mitosome protein import apparatus, we expressed mitochondrial proteins from higher eukaryotes in Giardia. These recombinant proteins include Tom20 and Tom22; two components of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. Our results indicate that N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence is recognized by the mitosomal protein import machinery; however, interestingly the internal mitochondrial targeting sequences of higher eukaryotes are not recognized by the mitosome. Our results indicate that Giardia mitosome protein transport machinery shows differential recognition of higher eukaryotic mitochondria transfer signals, suggesting a divergence of the transport system in G. lamblia. Therefore, our data support the hypothesis that the protein import machinery in Giardia lamblia mitosome is an incomplete vestigial derivative of mitochondria components. PMID:25159305

  16. The miR-200 family and its targets regulate type II cell differentiation in human fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Pierce, Brianne M; Mendelson, Carole R

    2015-09-11

    Type II cell differentiation and expression of the major surfactant protein, SP-A, in mid-gestation human fetal lung (HFL) are induced by cAMP and inhibited by TGF-β. cAMP induction of SP-A promoter activity is mediated by increased phosphorylation and DNA binding of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1/Nkx2.1), a master regulator of lung development. To further define mechanisms for developmental induction of surfactant synthesis in HFL, herein, we investigated the potential roles of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs). To identify and characterize differentially regulated miRNAs in mid-gestation HFL explants during type II pneumocyte differentiation in culture, we performed miRNA microarray of RNA from epithelial cells isolated from mid-gestation HFL explants before and after culture with or without Bt2cAMP. Interestingly, the miR-200 family was significantly up-regulated during type II cell differentiation; miR-200 induction was inversely correlated with expression of known targets, transcription factors ZEB1/2 and TGF-β2. miR-200 antagonists inhibited TTF-1 and surfactant proteins and up-regulated TGF-β2 and ZEB1 expression in type II cells. Overexpression of ZEB1 in type II cells decreased DNA binding of endogenous TTF-1, blocked cAMP stimulation of surfactant proteins, and inhibited miR-200 expression, whereas cAMP markedly inhibited ZEB1/2 and TGF-β. Importantly, overexpression of ZEB1 or miR-200 antagonists in HFL type II cells also inhibited LPCAT1 and ABCA3, enzymes involved in surfactant phospholipid synthesis and trafficking, and blocked lamellar body biogenesis. Our findings suggest that the miR-200 family and ZEB1, which exist in a double-negative feedback loop regulated by TGF-β, serve important roles in the developmental regulation of type II cell differentiation and function in HFL. PMID:26203191

  17. Progress in nonhistone protein research. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Bekhor, I.

    1985-01-01

    This volume focuses on how nonhistones participate in the control of gene function, and provides information on HMG proteins, specific nuclear antigens, a specific phosphoprotein, salt soluble and insoluble nonhistones, hormone interactions with DNA, nonhistones with enzyme functions, nonhistones binding carcinogens, and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen. The nuclear matrix salt insoluble nonhistones, methods for analysis of nonhistones in both normal and malignant cells, and the use of monoclonal antibodies to study functions of nonhistones are examined.

  18. RNA-binding proteins in pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    GUALLAR, Diana; WANG, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and somatic cell reprogramming require the interplay of multiple pluripotency factors, epigenetic remodelers, and extracellular signaling pathways. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved in a wide range of regulatory pathways, from RNA metabolism to epigenetic modifications. In recent years we have witnessed more and more studies on the discovery of new RBPs and the assessment of their functions in a variety of biological systems, including stem cells. We review the current studies on RBPs and focus on those that have functional implications in pluripotency, differentiation, and/or reprogramming in both the human and mouse systems. PMID:25554730

  19. Differentially Expressed Proteins in Nitric Oxide-Stimulated NIH/3T3 Fibroblasts: Implications for Inhibiting Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dong Hwi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence shows that nitric oxide (NO) may exhibit both pro-cancer and anti-cancer activities. The present study aimed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in NO-treated NIH/3T3 fibroblasts in order to investigate whether NO induces proteins with pro-cancer or anti-cancer effects. Materials and Methods The cells were treated with 300 µM of an NO donor 3,3-bis-(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (NOC-18) for 12 h. The changed protein patterns, which were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis using pH gradients of 4-7, were conclusively identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis of the peptide digests. Results Seventeen differentially expressed proteins were identified in NOC-18-treated cells. Nine proteins [vinculin protein, keratin 19, ubiquitous tropomodulin, F-actin capping protein (α1 subunit), tropomyosin 3, 26S proteasome-associated pad1 homolog, T-complex protein 1 (ε subunit) NG-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase, and heat shock protein 90] were increased and eight proteins (heat shock protein 70, glucosidase II, lamin B1, calreticulin, nucleophosmin 1, microtubule-associated protein retinitis pigmentosa/end binding family member 1, 150 kD oxygen-regulated protein precursor, and heat shock 70-related protein albino or pale green 2) were decreased by NOC-18 in the cells. Thirteen proteins are related to the suppression of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis while two proteins (heat shock protein 90 and NG-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase) are related to carcinogenesis. The functions of 150 kD oxygen-regulated protein precursor and T-complex protein 1 (ε subunit) are unknown in relation to carcinogenesis. Conclusion Most proteins differentially expressed by NOC-18 are involved in inhibiting cancer development. PMID:25684010

  20. Novel protein in human epidermal keratinocytes: regulation of expression during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; van Muijen, G.N.; van Pelt-Heerschap, H.; van de Putte, P.

    1988-05-01

    Recently, two groups of cDNA clones have been isolated from human epidermal keratinocytes; the clones correspond to genes whose expression is stimulated by exposure of the cells to UV light or treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. The proteins predicted by the nucleotide sequence of both groups of cDNAs are small (8 to 10 kilodaltons), are exceptionally rich in proline, glutamine, and cysteine, and contain repeating elements with a common sequence, PK PEPC. These proteins were designated sprI and sprII (small, proline rich). Here we describe the characterization of the sprIa protein, which is encoded by one of the group 1 cDNAs. The expression of this protein during keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and the distribution of the sprIa protein in some human tissues was studied by using a specific rabbit antiserum directed against a synthetic polypeptide corresponding to the 30 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the sprIa gene product. The results indicate that the expression of the sprIa protein is stimulated during keratinocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Differential Protein Expression in Honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) Larvae: Underlying Caste Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianke; Wu, Jing; Begna Rundassa, Desalegn; Song, Feifei; Zheng, Aijuan; Fang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Honeybee (Apis mellifera) exhibits divisions in both morphology and reproduction. The queen is larger in size and fully developed sexually, while the worker bees are smaller in size and nearly infertile. To better understand the specific time and underlying molecular mechanisms of caste differentiation, the proteomic profiles of larvae intended to grow into queen and worker castes were compared at 72 and 120 hours using two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), network, enrichment and quantitative PCR analysis. There were significant differences in protein expression between the two larvae castes at 72 and 120 hours, suggesting the queen and the worker larvae have already decided their fate before 72 hours. Specifically, at 72 hours, queen intended larvae over-expressed transketolase, aldehyde reductase, and enolase proteins which are involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, imaginal disc growth factor 4 which is a developmental related protein, long-chain-fatty-acid CoA ligase and proteasome subunit alpha type 5 which metabolize fatty and amino acids, while worker intended larvae over-expressed ATP synthase beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase, thioredoxin peroxidase 1 and peroxiredoxin 2540, lethal (2) 37 and 14-3-3 protein epsilon, fatty acid binding protein, and translational controlled tumor protein. This differential protein expression between the two caste intended larvae was more pronounced at 120 hours, with particular significant differences in proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. Functional enrichment analysis suggests that carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and anti-oxidation proteins play major roles in the formation of caste divergence. The constructed network and validated gene expression identified target proteins for further functional study. This new finding is in contrast to the existing notion that 72 hour old larvae has bipotential and can develop into either queen or worker based on

  2. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  3. Differential Incorporation of β-actin as A Component of RNA Polymerase II into Regulatory Regions of Stemness/Differentiation Genes in Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiated Human Embryonic Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falahzadeh, Khadijeh; Shahhoseini, Maryam; Afsharian, Parvaneh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nuclear actin is involved in transcription regulation by recruitment of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers to the regulatory regions of active genes. In recent years, further attention has been focused on the role of actin as a nuclear protein in transcriptional processes. In the current study, the epigenetic role of nuclear actin on transcription regulation of two stemness (OCT4 and NANOG) and two differentiation) NESTIN and PAX6) marker genes was evaluated in a human embryonal carcinoma cell line (NT2) before and after differentiation induction. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, differentiation of embryonal cells was induced by retinoic acid (RA), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to evaluate differential expression of marker genes before and 3 days after RA- induced differentiation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with real-time PCR was then undertaken to monitor the incorporation of β-actin, as a functional component of RNA polymerase II, in the regulatory regions of marker genes. Results Data showed significant change in nuclear actin incorporation into the promoter regions of NESTIN and PAX6 after RA-induction. Conclusion We emphasize the dynamic functional role of nuclear actin in differentiation of embryonal cells and its role as a subunit of RNA polymerase II. PMID:27540526

  4. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  5. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing

  6. Protein kinase A signaling during bidirectional axenic differentiation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, Sabine; Witztum, Ronit; Tsigankov, Polina; Koren, Roni; Boshart, Michael; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cycle between the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages, where they proliferate as intracellular amastigotes, and the midgut of female sand flies, where they proliferate as extracellular promastigotes. Shifting between the two environments induces signaling pathway-mediated developmental processes that enable adaptation to both host and vector. Developmentally regulated expression and phosphorylation of protein kinase A subunits in Leishmania and in Trypanosoma brucei point to an involvement of protein kinase A in parasite development. To assess this hypothesis in Leishmania donovani, we determined proteome-wide changes in phosphorylation of the conserved protein kinase A phosphorylation motifs RXXS and RXXT, using a phospho-specific antibody. Rapid dephosphorylation of these motifs was observed upon initiation of promastigote to amastigote differentiation in culture. No phosphorylated sites were detected in axenic amastigotes. To analyse the kinetics of (re)phosphorylation during axenic reverse differentiation from L. donovani amastigotes to promastigotes, we first established a map of this process with morphological and molecular markers. Upon initiation, the parasites rested for 6-12h before proliferation of an asynchronous population resumed. After early changes in cell shape, the major changes in molecular marker expression and flagella biogenesis occurred between 24 and 33h after initiation. RXXS/T re-phosphorylation and expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1 correlated with promastigote maturation, indicating a promastigote-specific function of protein kinase A signaling. This is supported by the localization of PKAR1 to the flagellum, an organelle reduced to a remnant in amastigote forms. We conclude that a significant increase in protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation is part of the ordered changes that characterise the amastigote to promastigote differentiation

  7. Differential Nanosecond Protein Dynamics in Homologous Calcium Sensors.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jörg; Brauer, Jens; Sulmann, Stefan; Marino, Valerio; Dell'Orco, Daniele; Lienau, Christoph; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm

    2015-10-16

    Shaping the temporal response of photoreceptors is facilitated by a well-balanced second messenger cascade, in which two neuronal Ca(2+)-sensor proteins operate in a sequential relay mechanism. Although they share structurally similar sensing units, they differentially activate the same target protein. Here, as a prototypical case in Ca(2+)-mediated signal processing, we investigate differential cellular responsiveness in protein conformational dynamics on a nanosecond time scale. For this, we have site-specifically labeled cysteine residues in guanylate cyclase-activating protein GCAP1 by the fluorescent dye Alexa647 and probed its local environment via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence lifetime and rotational anisotropy measurements reveal a distinct structural movement of the polypeptide chain around position 106 upon release of Ca(2+). This is supported by analyzing the diffusional dye motion in a wobbling-in-a-cone model and by molecular dynamics simulations. We conclude that GCAP1 and its cellular cognate GCAP2 operate by distinctly different switching mechanisms despite their high structural homology. PMID:26204433

  8. Genetic transformation of genes for protein II in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Schwalbe, R S; Cannon, J G

    1986-01-01

    The protein II (PII) outer membrane proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are a family of heat-modifiable proteins that are subject to phase variation, in which the synthesis of different PII species is turned on and off at a high frequency. Transformation of PII genes from a donor gonococcal strain into a recipient strain was detected with monoclonal antibodies specific for the PII proteins of the donor. Individual PII protein-expressing transformants generally bound only one donor-specific PII monoclonal antibody. Recovery of transformants expressing a donor-specific PII protein depended on the PII protein expression state of the donor: the transformed population bound only monoclonal antibodies specific for PII proteins that were expressed in the donor. Colony variants with an altered frequency of switching of PII protein expression were isolated, but the altered switch phenotype did not cotransform with the PII structural gene. These results provide genetic evidence that PII proteins are the products of different genes and that expressed and unexpressed forms of the PII gene are different from each other. Images PMID:3087951

  9. Proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins by airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Seul Ki; Jeon, Yu Mi; Son, Bu Soon; Youn, Hyung Sun; Lee, Mi Young

    2011-07-01

    Airborne nanoparticles with thermodynamic diameters less than 56 nm (PM(0.056)) were collected using a Moudi cascade impactor, and the differentially expressed proteins upon exposure to the airborne nanoparticles were identified in human bronchial epithelial cells. More than 600 protein spots were detected on the two-dimensional gel, and the identified 13 of these proteins showed notable changes. Nine were up-regulated and four were down-regulated following treatment with the airborne nanoparticles. Notably, malignant transformation-associated multiple forms of keratins, epigenetic regulation-related MBD1-containing chromatin associated factor 2, epithelial malignancy-related vimentin and exocytosis-related annexin A2 were changed upon exposure to airborne nanoparticle PM(0.056). PMID:21491466

  10. A unique tool to selectively detect the chondrogenic IIB form of human type II procollagen protein.

    PubMed

    Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Mayer, Nathalie; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Pagnon, Aurélie; Hartmann, Daniel; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    Type II collagen, the major fibrillar collagen of cartilage, is synthesized as precursor forms (procollagens) containing N- and C-terminal propeptides. Three splice variants are thought to be translated to produce procollagen II isoforms (IIA/D and IIB) which differ in their amino propeptide parts. The IIA and IID are transient embryonic isoforms that include an additional cysteine-rich domain encoded by exon 2. The IIA and IID transcripts are co-expressed during chondrogenesis then decline and the IIB isoform is the only one expressed and synthesized in fully differentiated chondrocytes. Additionally, procollagens IIA/D can be re-expressed by dedifferentiating chondrocytes and in osteoarthritic cartilage. Therefore, it is an important point to determine which isoform(s) is (are) synthesized in vivo in normal and pathological situations and in vitro, to fully assess the phenotype of cells producing type II collagen protein. Antibodies directed against the cysteine-rich extra domain found in procollagens IIA and IID are already available but antibodies detecting only the chondrogenic IIB form of type II procollagen were missing so far. A synthetic peptide encompassing the junction between exon 1 and exon 3 of the human sequence was used as immunogen to produce rabbit polyclonal antibodies to procollagen IIB. After affinity purification on immobilized peptide their absence of crossreaction with procollagens IIA/D and with the fibrillar procollagens I, III and V was demonstrated by Western blotting. These antibodies were used to reveal at the protein level that the treatment of dedifferentiated human chondrocytes by bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 induces the synthesis of the IIB (chondrocytic) isoform of procollagen II. In addition, immunohistochemical staining of bovine cartilage demonstrates the potential of these antibodies in the analysis of the differential spatiotemporal distribution of N-propeptides of procollagens IIA/D and IIB during normal development and

  11. Amyloid precursor protein expression and processing are differentially regulated during cortical neuron differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Petra; Agholme, Lotta; Nazir, Faisal Hayat; Satir, Tugce Munise; Toombs, Jamie; Wellington, Henrietta; Strandberg, Joakim; Bontell, Thomas Olsson; Kvartsberg, Hlin; Holmström, Maria; Boreström, Cecilia; Simonsson, Stina; Kunath, Tilo; Lindahl, Anders; Blennow, Kaj; Hanse, Eric; Portelius, Erik; Wray, Selina; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its cleavage product amyloid β (Aβ) have been thoroughly studied in Alzheimer’s disease. However, APP also appears to be important for neuronal development. Differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) towards cortical neurons enables in vitro mechanistic studies on human neuronal development. Here, we investigated expression and proteolytic processing of APP during differentiation of human iPSCs towards cortical neurons over a 100-day period. APP expression remained stable during neuronal differentiation, whereas APP processing changed. α-Cleaved soluble APP (sAPPα) was secreted early during differentiation, from neuronal progenitors, while β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPPβ) was first secreted after deep-layer neurons had formed. Short Aβ peptides, including Aβ1-15/16, peaked during the progenitor stage, while processing shifted towards longer peptides, such as Aβ1-40/42, when post-mitotic neurons appeared. This indicates that APP processing is regulated throughout differentiation of cortical neurons and that amyloidogenic APP processing, as reflected by Aβ1-40/42, is associated with mature neuronal phenotypes. PMID:27383650

  12. New quantitative total protein S-assay system for diagnosing protein S type II deficiency: clinical application of the screening system for protein S type II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Tomohide; Jin, Xiuri; Tsuda, Hiroko; Ieko, Masahiro; Morishita, Eriko; Adachi, Tomoko; Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) incidence is rising rapidly in Japan with lifestyle westernization and aging. Deficiency of protein S, an important blood coagulation regulator, is a risk factor for VTE. Protein S deficiency prevalence in Asians is approximately 10 times that in Caucasians and that of protein S type II deficiency, associated with the protein S Tokushima mutation (K155E), is quite high in Japan. However, currently available methods for measuring protein S are not precise enough for detection of this deficiency. We developed a novel assay system for precise simultaneous determinations of total protein S activity and total protein S antigen level, using a general-purpose automated analyzer, allowing protein S-specific activity (ratio of total protein S activity to total protein S antigen level) to be calculated. Mean specific activity was 0.99 for samples from healthy individuals but 0.69 or less (mean-3SD) in protein S type II-deficient and warfarin-treated samples, but was 1.0 in an estrogen-treated sample with significantly decreased protein S antigen. Protein S gene analyses in healthy individuals with specific activity 0.69 or less revealed the K155E mutation in all three. These results show our new assay system to be an effective screening tool for protein S type II deficiency. This system can also be used in an automated analyzer, facilitating numerous sample measurements, and is, thus, applicable to regular medical checkups and diagnosing VTE. Such applications would potentially contribute to early detection of protein S type II deficiency, and, thereby, to thrombosis prevention. PMID:22157257

  13. Protein Expression Analysis of Melanocyte Differentiation Antigen TRP-2.

    PubMed

    Avogadri, Francesca; Gnjatic, Sacha; Tassello, Jodie; Frosina, Denise; Hanson, Nicole; Laudenbach, Megan; Ritter, Erika; Merghoub, Taha; Busam, Klaus J; Jungbluth, Achim A

    2016-03-01

    Melanocyte differentiation antigens, such as gp100, tyrosinase, and Melan-A and their corresponding antibodies HMB45, T311, and A103, are major diagnostic tools in surgical pathology. Little is known about tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2, or dopachrome tautomerase/DCT) another melanocyte differentiation antigen, which is an enzymatic component of melanogenesis. We identified a commercial reagent to TRP-2, monoclonal antibody (mAb) C-9 and undertook a comprehensive analysis to assess its specificity and usefulness for surgical pathology. Subsequently, we analyzed panels of normal tissues and tumors. We show that TRP-2 is regularly expressed in melanocytes of the normal skin. In cutaneous nevi, TRP-2 is present in junctional as well as in dermal nevocytes. In malignant tumors, C-9 reactivity is restricted to melanocytic and related lesions and present in 84% and 58% of primary and metastatic melanomas, respectively. Ten primary melanomas of the anorectal mucosa were all positive. Like the other melanocyte differentiation antigens, TRP-2 was absent in 6 desmoplastic melanomas. Also, only 2 of 9 angiomyolipomas were TRP-2 positive. We conclude that mAb C-9 is a valuable reagent for the analysis of TRP-2 expression in archival surgical pathology material. The expression pattern of TRP-2 in melanocytic and related lesions appears to parallel other melanocyte differentiation antigens, although the overall incidence is lower than other antigens, such as Melan-A or gp100. PMID:26894771

  14. Primary photoinduced protein response in bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Gross, Ruth; Wolf, Matthias M N; Schumann, Christian; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Li, Lin; Engelhard, Martin; Trentmann, Oliver; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Diller, Rolf

    2009-10-21

    Essential for the biological function of the light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), and the light sensor, sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), is the coupling of the activated retinal chromophore to the hosting protein moiety. In order to explore the dynamics of this process we have performed ultrafast transient mid-infrared spectroscopy on isotopically labeled BR and SRII samples. These include SRII in D(2)O buffer, BR in H(2)(18)O medium, SRII with (15)N-labeled protein, and BR with (13)C(14)(13)C(15)-labeled retinal chromophore. Via observed shifts of infrared difference bands after photoexcitation and their kinetics we provide evidence for nonchromophore bands in the amide I and the amide II region of BR and SRII. A band around 1550 cm(-1) is very likely due to an amide II vibration. In the amide I region, contributions of modes involving exchangeable protons and modes not involving exchangeable protons can be discerned. Observed bands in the amide I region of BR are not due to bending vibrations of protein-bound water molecules. The observed protein bands appear in the amide I region within the system response of ca. 0.3 ps and in the amide II region within 3 ps, and decay partially in both regions on a slower time scale of 9-18 ps. Similar observations have been presented earlier for BR5.12, containing a nonisomerizable chromophore (R. Gross et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 7851-7860). Thus, the results suggest a common mechanism for ultrafast protein response in the artificial and the native system besides isomerization, which could be induced by initial chromophore polarization. PMID:19778046

  15. Differential diagnosis of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Alessandro; Claps, Alessia; Dahdah, Lamia; Brindisi, Giulia; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Martelli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To assess all the possible differential diagnosis of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES), both in acute and chronic presentation, reviewing the data reported in published studies. Recent findings There is an increase of reported cases of FPIES in recent years. As the disease presents with nonspecific symptoms, it can be misunderstood in many ways. The differential diagnosis includes, in acute presentations, the following: sepsis, other infectious diseases, acute gastrointestinal episodes, surgical emergencies, food allergies. In its chronic forms, FPIES may mimic malabsorption syndromes, metabolic disorders, primary immunodeficiencies, neurological conditions, coagulation defects, and other types of non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Summary A thorough clinical evaluation, including symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings, is necessary to lead the clinicians toward the diagnosis of FPIES. The major reason for delayed diagnosis appears to be the lack of knowledge of the disease. PMID:24739227

  16. Preliminary identification of differentially expressed tear proteins in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Valerie C.; Pye, David C.; Willcox, Mark D. P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To examine the proteins differentially expressed in the tear film of people with keratoconus and normal subjects. Methods Unstimulated tears from people with keratoconus (KC) and controls (C) were collected using a capillary tube. Tear proteins from people with KC and controls were partitioned using a novel in-solution electrophoresis, Microflow 10 (ProteomeSep), and analyzed using linear ion trap quadrupole fourier transform mass spectrometry. Spectral counting was used to quantify the individual tear proteins. Results Elevated levels of cathepsin B (threefold) were evident in the tears of people with KC. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (ninefold), fibrinogen alpha chain (eightfold), cystatin S (twofold), and cystatin SN (twofold) were reduced in tears from people with KC. Keratin type-1 cytoskeletal-14 and keratin type-2 cytoskeletal-5 were present only in the tears of people with KC. Conclusions The protein changes in tears, that is, the decrease in protease inhibitors and increase in proteases, found in the present and other previously published studies reflect the pathological events involved in KC corneas. Further investigations into tear proteins may help elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of KC, which could result in better treatment options. PMID:24194634

  17. Differential polarization imaging. II. Symmetry properties and calculations.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M; Ulibarri, L; Bustamante, C

    1987-01-01

    Various differential polarization images or Mueller images of model objects are generated using the equations derived in the previous paper (paper I of this series). These calculated images include models of the higher-order organization of metaphase chromosomes, and show the applicability of the differential polarization imaging method to the elucidation of complex molecular organizations. Then, the symmetry behavior of the Mueller matrix elements upon infinitesimal rotations of the optical components about the optical axis of the imaging system is presented. It is shown that the rotational properties of the Mueller images can be used to eliminate the linear polarization contributions to the M14 and M44 images, which appear when these images are generated with imperfect circular polarizations. The relationships between the 16 bright-field Mueller images for four different media, i.e., linearly and circularly isotropic, circularly anisotropic, linearly anisotropic, and linearly and circularly anisotropic, are also derived. For the first three cases simple relationships between the Mueller images are found and phenomenological equations in terms of the optical coefficients are derived. In the last case there are no specific relationships between the Mueller images and instead we briefly present Schellman and Jensen's method for treating this type of medium. The criterion of spatial resolution between adjacent domains of different optical anisotropy is then derived. It is found that in transitions between domains of opposite anisotropy the classical Rayleigh limit must be replaced by a magnitude criterion which depends on the limits of the sensitivity of the detection. Finally, the feasibility of optical sectioning in differential polarization imaging is demonstrated. PMID:3427200

  18. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  19. NRPB3, the third largest subunit of RNA polymerase II, is essential for stomatal patterning and differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Xu, Fan; Wu, Zhongliang; Wu, Yujun; He, Kai; Gou, Xiaoping; Li, Jia; Hou, Suiwen

    2016-05-01

    Stomata are highly specialized epidermal structures that control transpiration and gas exchange between plants and the environment. Signal networks underlying stomatal development have been previously uncovered but much less is known about how signals involved in stomatal development are transmitted to RNA polymerase II (Pol II or RPB), which plays a central role in the transcription of mRNA coding genes. Here, we identify a partial loss-of-function mutation of the third largest subunit of nuclear DNA-dependent Pol II (NRPB3) that exhibits an increased number of stomatal lineage cells and paired stomata. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that NRPB3 is not only required for correct stomatal patterning, but is also essential for stomatal differentiation. Protein-protein interaction assays showed that NRPB3 directly interacts with two basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, FAMA and INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION1 (ICE1), indicating that NRPB3 serves as an acceptor for signals from transcription factors involved in stomatal development. Our findings highlight the surprisingly conserved activating mechanisms mediated by the third largest subunit of Pol II in eukaryotes. PMID:26989174

  20. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  1. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  2. Characterization of Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Morgan, Brandie R; Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Sharma, Ajay; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Rieger, Frank G

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are DNA-binding transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation, migration, inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis. However, their expression and role in the cornea is unknown. The present study was undertaken to characterize the expression of Id proteins and their interactions with the pro-fibrotic cytokine Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) and anti-fibrotic cytokine, bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in human cornea. Human donor corneas procured from Eye Bank were used. Id proteins were localized in human corneal sections using immunofluorescence. Primary cultures of human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) were established and treated with either TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) or BMP7 (10 ng/ml) for 24 h in serum free medium. Expression of Id's in response to TGFβ1, BMP7 and TGFβ1 + BMP7 was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Id1 and Id2 proteins were ubiquitously expressed in the epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes in human cornea. The Id1 was localized to the basal epithelial cells as seen by immunohistochemistry. HCF expressed all known mammalian Id genes (Id1-Id4). In addition, Id1 and Id2 are selectively expressed in HCF. Treatment of human recombinant TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) to serum-starved HCF showed a significant increase in Id genes (Id1, Id2 and Id4) at 2 h time point compared to BMP7 treatment, which showed time dependent increase in the expression of Id1-Id3 at 24-48 h. Combined treatment with TGFβ1 + BMP7 to HCF showed a significant increase in Id1 transcript and an increasing trend in Id3 and Id4 expression. The results of this study suggest that Id family of genes (Id1-Id4) are localized in the human cornea and expressed in the corneal fibroblasts. Also, Id's were differentially regulated with TGFβ1 and/or BMP7 in a time dependent manner and might serve as a therapeutic target in corneal fibrosis. PMID:26712606

  3. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Differential regulation of actin microfilaments by human MICAL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Rohn, Jennifer L.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster MICAL protein is essential for the neuronal growth cone machinery that functions through plexin- and semaphorin-mediated axonal signaling. Drosophila MICAL is also involved in regulating myofilament organization and synaptic structures, and serves as an actin disassembly factor downstream of plexin-mediated axonal repulsion. In mammalian cells there are three known isoforms, MICAL1, MICAL2 and MICAL3, as well as the MICAL-like proteins MICAL-L1 and MICAL-L2, but little is known of their function, and information comes almost exclusively from neural cells. In this study we show that in non-neural cells human MICALs are required for normal actin organization, and all three MICALs regulate actin stress fibers. Moreover, we provide evidence that the generation of reactive oxygen species by MICAL proteins is crucial for their actin-regulatory function. However, although MICAL1 is auto-inhibited by its C-terminal coiled-coil region, MICAL2 remains constitutively active and affects stress fibers. These data suggest differential but complementary roles for MICAL1 and MICAL2 in actin microfilament regulation. PMID:22331357

  5. Ca(2+) and Na(+) contribute to the swelling of differentiated neuroblastoma cells induced by equinatoxin-II.

    PubMed

    Meunier, F A; Frangez, R; Benoit, E; Ouanounou, G; Rouzaire-Dubois, B; Suput, D; Molgó, J

    2000-11-01

    Equinatoxin-II (EqTx-II), a cytotoxic protein (mol.wt 20 kDa) isolated from the sea anemone Actinia equina, was found to consistently increase the three-dimensional projected area of differentiated neuroblastoma (NG108-15) cells provided Ca(2+) was present in the medium. No swelling was detected when external NaCl was replaced by sucrose, but replacement of NaCl by Na-isethionate did not prevent the swelling, as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, microspectrofluorometric measurements in cells preloaded with the Ca(2+) indicator fura-2/AM revealed that EqTx-II (100 nM) markedly increased the fluorescence (F(340)/F(380)) ratio indicating a rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) exhibited two components that seem to be related to the kinetics of EqTx-II-induced Ca(2+) entry since pretreatment of cells with Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (thapsigargin), Ca(2+) channel blockers (nifedipine and Gd(3+)) or prolonged exposure to a high K(+) (75 mM) medium did not alter EqTx-II-induced Ca(2+) signals. As far as we know, this is the first demonstration that EqTx-II causes swelling of neuroblastoma cells and that this effect is correlated both with an increase of [Ca(2+)](i) and needs the presence of extracellular Na(+). It is suggested that EqTx-II has the ability to insert into the plasma membrane of neuroblastoma cells and to form pores altering the membrane permeability and the intracellular osmolality, inducing a marked influx of water into the cells. PMID:10775755

  6. The Immunologic Properties of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptor IB Positive Subpopulation before and after Osteogenic Differentiation in Mouse Dermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Jia-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that human dermal bone morphogenic protein receptor (BMPR) IB positive subpopulation had a high osteogenic differentiation potential and may be a promising cell source for allogeneic bone tissue engineering. In this study, the immunologic properties of dermal BMPR-IB+ subpopulation before and after osteogenic differentiation were reported. The results confirmed that dermal BMPR-IB+ cells possessed a similar osteogenic differentiation potential with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in a mouse model. Furthermore, the expression of immune rejection-related surface antigens such as major histocompatibility class II and co-stimulatory proteins (CD40, CD80, and CD86) were absent on dermal BMPRIB+ cells. Dermal BMPRIB+ cells elicited no proliferation of allogeneic splenocytes and suppressed the proliferation of stimulated immune cells. Interestingly, osteogenic differentiation in vitro had no adverse effect on the immunological features of these cells. Most importantly, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was involved in immunoregulatory effects by undifferentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts, whereas indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity was related to mediating immunomodulatory function by osteogenic differentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts. In conclusion, dermal BMPRIB+ cells have a low immunogenicity and possess immunosuppressive capacity before and after osteogenic differentiation in vitro, which would facilitate the allotransplantation in the future. However, mechanisms mediating immunoregulatory property between undifferentiated and osteogenic differentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts may be different and need further investigation. PMID:27552226

  7. The Immunologic Properties of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptor IB Positive Subpopulation before and after Osteogenic Differentiation in Mouse Dermis.

    PubMed

    He, Jin-Guang; Wang, Ting-Liang; Wang, Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Jia-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that human dermal bone morphogenic protein receptor (BMPR) IB positive subpopulation had a high osteogenic differentiation potential and may be a promising cell source for allogeneic bone tissue engineering. In this study, the immunologic properties of dermal BMPR-IB+ subpopulation before and after osteogenic differentiation were reported. The results confirmed that dermal BMPR-IB+ cells possessed a similar osteogenic differentiation potential with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in a mouse model. Furthermore, the expression of immune rejection-related surface antigens such as major histocompatibility class II and co-stimulatory proteins (CD40, CD80, and CD86) were absent on dermal BMPRIB+ cells. Dermal BMPRIB+ cells elicited no proliferation of allogeneic splenocytes and suppressed the proliferation of stimulated immune cells. Interestingly, osteogenic differentiation in vitro had no adverse effect on the immunological features of these cells. Most importantly, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was involved in immunoregulatory effects by undifferentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts, whereas indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity was related to mediating immunomodulatory function by osteogenic differentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts. In conclusion, dermal BMPRIB+ cells have a low immunogenicity and possess immunosuppressive capacity before and after osteogenic differentiation in vitro, which would facilitate the allotransplantation in the future. However, mechanisms mediating immunoregulatory property between undifferentiated and osteogenic differentiated BMPRIB+ fibroblasts may be different and need further investigation. PMID:27552226

  8. Proteomic analysis reveals down-regulation of surfactant protein B in murine type II pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Kebaabetswe, Lemme P.; Haick, Anoria K.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Matzke, Melissa M.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Miura, Tanya A.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells by influenza A viruses (IAV) correlates with severe respiratory disease in humans and mice. To understand pathogenic mechanisms during IAV infection of ATII cells, murine ATII cells were cultured to maintain a differentiated phenotype, infected with IAV-PR8, which causes severe lung pathology in mice, and proteomics analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PR8 infection increased levels of proteins involved in interferon signaling, antigen presentation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteins involved in mitochondrial membrane permeability, energy metabolism, and chromatin formation had reduced levels in PR8-infected cells. Phenotypic markers of ATII cells in vivo were identified, confirming the differentiation status of the cultures. Surfactant protein B had decreased levels in PR8-infected cells, which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Analysis of ATII cell protein profiles will elucidate cellular processes in IAV pathogenesis, which may provide insight into potential therapies to modulate disease severity. PMID:25965799

  9. Phosphorylation of Fe65 amyloid precursor protein-binding protein in response to neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, Niina A; Bacanu, Smaranda; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2016-02-01

    Fe65 is a brain enriched multi domain adaptor protein involved in diverse cellular functions. One of its binding partners is the amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP), which after sequential proteolytic processing by secretases gives rise to the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Fe65 binds to the APP intracellular domain (AICD). Several studies have indicated that Fe65 binding promotes the amyloidogenic processing of APP. It has previously been shown that expression of APP increases concomitantly with a shift of its processing to the non-amyloidogenic pathway during neuronal differentiation. In this study we wanted to investigate the effects of neuronal differentiation on Fe65 expression. We observed that differentiation of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells induced by retinoic acid (RA), the phorbol ester PMA, or the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT resulted in an electrophoretic mobility shift of Fe65. Similar effects were observed in rat PC6.3 cells treated with nerve growth factor. The electrophoretic mobility shift was shown to be due to phosphorylation. Previous studies have shown that Fe65 phosphorylation can prevent the APP-Fe65 interaction. We propose that phosphorylation is a way to modify the functions of Fe65 and to promote the non-amyloidogenic processing of APP during neuronal differentiation. PMID:26742640

  10. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  11. Differential effects of viroporin inhibitors against feline infectious peritonitis virus serotypes I and II.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Nakano, Kenta; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIP virus: FIPV), a feline coronavirus of the family Coronaviridae, causes a fatal disease called FIP in wild and domestic cat species. The genome of coronaviruses encodes a hydrophobic transmembrane protein, the envelope (E) protein. The E protein possesses ion channel activity. Viral proteins with ion channel activity are collectively termed "viroporins". Hexamethylene amiloride (HMA), a viroporin inhibitor, can inhibit the ion channel activity of the E protein and replication of several coronaviruses. However, it is not clear whether HMA and other viroporin inhibitors affect replication of FIPV. We examined the effect of HMA and other viroporin inhibitors (DIDS [4,4'-disothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulphonic acid] and amantadine) on infection by FIPV serotypes I and II. HMA treatment drastically decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2 in a dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146. In contrast, DIDS treatment decreased the titer of FIPV serotype II strain 79-1146 in dose-dependent manner, but it only slightly decreased the titers of FIPV serotype I strains Black and KU-2. We investigated whether there is a difference in ion channel activity of the E protein between viral serotypes using E. coli cells expressing the E protein of FIPV serotypes I and II. No difference was observed, suggesting that a viroporin other than the E protein influences the differences in the actions of HMA and DIDS on FIPV serotypes I and II. PMID:25701212

  12. Differential Expression of Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins during Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Philipp, Mario T.

    1998-01-01

    In an earlier paper we described the transcriptionally regulated differential levels of expression of two lipoproteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, P35 and P7.5, during growth of the spirochetes in culture from logarithmic phase to stationary phase (K. J. Indest, R. Ramamoorthy, M. Solé, R. D. Gilmore, B. J. B. Johnson, and M. T. Philipp, Infect. Immun. 65:1165–1171, 1997). Here we further assess this phenomenon by investigating whether the expression of other antigens of B. burgdorferi, including some well-characterized ones, are also regulated in a growth-phase-dependent manner in vitro. These studies revealed 13 additional antigens, including OspC, BmpD, and GroEL, that were upregulated 2- to 66-fold and a 28-kDa protein that was downregulated 2- to 10-fold, during the interval between the logarithmic- and stationary-growth phases. Unlike with these in vitro-regulated proteins, the levels of expression of OspA, OspB, P72, flagellin, and BmpA remained unchanged throughout growth of the spirochetes in culture. Furthermore, ospAB, bmpAB, groEL, and fla all exhibited similar mRNA profiles, which is consistent with the constitutive expression of these genes. By contrast, the mRNA and protein profiles of ospC and bmpD indicated regulated expression of these genes. While bmpD exhibited a spike in mRNA expression in early stationary phase, ospC maintained a relatively higher level of mRNA throughout culture. These findings demonstrate that there are additional genes besides P7.5 and P35 whose regulated expression can be investigated in vitro and which may thus serve as models to facilitate the study of regulatory mechanisms in an organism that cycles between an arthropod and a vertebrate host. PMID:9784512

  13. Targeting of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Colbran, Roger J

    2004-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has diverse roles in virtually all cell types and it is regulated by a plethora of mechanisms. Local changes in Ca2+ concentration drive calmodulin binding and CaMKII activation. Activity is controlled further by autophosphorylation at multiple sites, which can generate an autonomously active form of the kinase (Thr286) or can block Ca2+/calmodulin binding (Thr305/306). The regulated actions of protein phosphatases at these sites also modulate downstream signalling from CaMKII. In addition, CaMKII targeting to specific subcellular microdomains appears to be necessary to account for the known signalling specificity, and targeting is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin and autophosphorylation. The present review focuses on recent studies revealing the diversity of CaMKII interactions with proteins localized to neuronal dendrites. Interactions with various subunits of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) subtype of glutamate receptor have attracted the most attention, but binding of CaMKII to cytoskeletal and several other regulatory proteins has also been reported. Recent reports describing the molecular basis of each interaction and their potential role in the normal regulation of synaptic transmission and in pathological situations are discussed. These studies have revealed fundamental regulatory mechanisms that are probably important for controlling CaMKII functions in many cell types. PMID:14653781

  14. Cinnamomin: a multifunctional type II ribosome-inactivating protein.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Jun; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2003-07-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a group of toxic proteins that can irreversibly inactivate ribosomes by specifically removing the conserved adenine base from the "Sarcin/Ricin domain" of the 28S RNA in ribosome. Cinnamomin is a novel type II RIP isolated in our laboratory from the mature seeds of camphor tree. Besides site-specific deadenylation of the A4324 in the Sarcin/Ricin domain of rat ribosome, this protein could also release the adenine base from DNA molecules at multiple sites and from AMP, ADP, dAMP and adenosine. Furthermore, cinnamomin displays cytotoxicity to carcinoma cells and insect larvae by modifying their ribosomal RNA. These functions possessed by cinnamomin shed a new light on the possible application of cinnamomin in the field of immunotoxin design and transgenic reagents. In this review, we introduce the major recent results on cinnamomin obtained in our laboratory, including purification of this protein, characterization of its enzymatic mechanism, structure and function, gene pattern, physiological role and its biological implications in cytotoxicity. PMID:12672471

  15. IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL LOCALIZATION OF CALCIUM/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE II IN RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is a prominent enzyme in mammalian brain capable of phosphorylating a variety of substrate proteins. In the present investigation, the subcellular and regional distribution of CaM kinase II has been studied by light a...

  16. Differentially expressed proteins associated with Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum, substantially reduces wheat grain yield and quality worldwide. Proteins play important roles in defense against the fungal infection. This study characterized differentially expressed proteins between near-isogenic lines (NILs) contr...

  17. Interactions between the Class II Transactivator and CREB Binding Protein Increase Transcription of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Fontes, Joseph D.; Kanazawa, Satoshi; Jean, Dickson; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1999-01-01

    Class II major histocompatibility (class II) genes are regulated in a B-cell-specific and gamma interferon-inducible fashion. The master switch for the expression of these genes is the class II transactivator (CIITA). In this report, we demonstrate that one of the functions of CIITA is to recruit the CREB binding protein (CBP) to class II promoters. Not only functional but also specific binding interactions between CIITA and CBP were demonstrated. Moreover, a dominant negative form of CBP decreased the activity of class II promoters and levels of class II determinants on the surface of cells. Finally, the inhibition of class II gene expression by the glucocorticoid hormone could be attributed to the squelching of CBP by the glucocorticoid receptor. We conclude that CBP, a histone acetyltransferase, plays an important role in the transcription of class II genes. PMID:9858618

  18. Overview of the protein-protein interaction annotation extraction task of BioCreative II

    PubMed Central

    Krallinger, Martin; Leitner, Florian; Rodriguez-Penagos, Carlos; Valencia, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Background: The biomedical literature is the primary information source for manual protein-protein interaction annotations. Text-mining systems have been implemented to extract binary protein interactions from articles, but a comprehensive comparison between the different techniques as well as with manual curation was missing. Results: We designed a community challenge, the BioCreative II protein-protein interaction (PPI) task, based on the main steps of a manual protein interaction annotation workflow. It was structured into four distinct subtasks related to: (a) detection of protein interaction-relevant articles; (b) extraction and normalization of protein interaction pairs; (c) retrieval of the interaction detection methods used; and (d) retrieval of actual text passages that provide evidence for protein interactions. A total of 26 teams submitted runs for at least one of the proposed subtasks. In the interaction article detection subtask, the top scoring team reached an F-score of 0.78. In the interaction pair extraction and mapping to SwissProt, a precision of 0.37 (with recall of 0.33) was obtained. For associating articles with an experimental interaction detection method, an F-score of 0.65 was achieved. As for the retrieval of the PPI passages best summarizing a given protein interaction in full-text articles, 19% of the submissions returned by one of the runs corresponded to curator-selected sentences. Curators extracted only the passages that best summarized a given interaction, implying that many of the automatically extracted ones could contain interaction information but did not correspond to the most informative sentences. Conclusion: The BioCreative II PPI task is the first attempt to compare the performance of text-mining tools specific for each of the basic steps of the PPI extraction pipeline. The challenges identified range from problems in full-text format conversion of articles to difficulties in detecting interactor protein pairs and then

  19. Promotion of osteoblastic differentiation and osteogenic transcription factor expression on a microgroove titanium surface with immobilized fibronectin or bone sialoprotein II.

    PubMed

    Im, Byung-Jin; Lee, Sang Cheon; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Leesungbok, Richard; Ahn, Su-Jin; Kang, Yoon-Goo; Lee, Do Yun; Yoon, Joon-Ho; Lee, Suk Won

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a composite surface of microgroove titanium (Ti) with immobilized fibronectin (FN) or bone sialoprotein II (BSP2) promotes osteoblastic differentiation and osteogenic transcription factor expression in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Comparisons made between smooth microgrooves, microgrooves with silanization and microgrooves with matrix protein (FN or BSP2)-immobilization Ti surfaces revealed a significant promotion of in vitro osteogenic activity and osteoblastic differentiation at various timelines of culture. An even more significant increase was verified on microgrooves with a matrix protein-immobilization Ti surface in 28 d time-dependent gene expression of the main osteogenic transcription factors, such as ARF4, FRA1, RUNX2, and OSX. As a result, a synergestic effect regarding the promotion of osteogenic transcription factor expression and osteoblastic differentiation in the matrix protein-microgroove Ti composite surface was confirmed. From a multiple regression analysis using various timelines of osteogenic culture as independent variables, day 13 was verified as the most prominent influential timeline for the promotion of osteoblastic differentiation induced by the matrix protein-microgroove Ti composite surface. The FN- or BSP2-microgroove Ti composite surface resulting from silanization can strongly induce the promotion of osteoblastic differentiation in human MSCs. The proposed surface is expected to be useful in the development of a variety of osteogenic biomaterial surfaces. PMID:27327854

  20. Differentiated Type II Pneumocytes Can Be Reprogrammed by Ectopic Sox2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kapere Ochieng, Joshua; Schilders, Kim; Kool, Heleen; Buscop-van Kempen, Marjon; Boerema-De Munck, Anne; Grosveld, Frank; Wijnen, Rene; Tibboel, Dick; Rottier, Robbert J.

    2014-01-01

    The adult lung contains several distinct stem cells, although their properties and full potential are still being sorted out. We previously showed that ectopic Sox2 expression in the developing lung manipulated the fate of differentiating cells. Here, we addressed the question whether fully differentiated cells could be redirected towards another cell type. Therefore, we used transgenic mice to express an inducible Sox2 construct in type II pneumocytes, which are situated in the distal, respiratory areas of the lung. Within three days after the induction of the transgene, the type II cells start to proliferate and form clusters of cuboidal cells. Prolonged Sox2 expression resulted in the reversal of the type II cell towards a more embryonic, precursor-like cell, being positive for the stem cell markers Sca1 and Ssea1. Moreover, the cells started to co-express Spc and Cc10, characteristics of bronchioalveolar stem cells. We demonstrated that Sox2 directly regulates the expression of Sca1. Subsequently, these cells expressed Trp63, a marker for basal cells of the trachea. So, we show that the expression of one transcription factor in fully differentiated, distal lung cells changes their fate towards proximal cells through intermediate cell types. This may have implications for regenerative medicine, and repair of diseased and damaged lungs. PMID:25210856

  1. Cleavage of recombinant proteins at poly-His sequences by Co(II) and Cu(II)

    PubMed Central

    Andberg, Martina; Jäntti, Jussi; Heilimo, Sara; Pihkala, Päivi; Paananen, Arja; Koskinen, Ari M.P.; Söderlund, Hans; Linder, Markus B.

    2007-01-01

    Improved ways to cleave peptide chains at engineered sites easily and specifically would form useful tools for biochemical research. Uses of such methods include the activation or inactivation of enzymes or the removal of tags for enhancement of recombinant protein expression or tags used for purification of recombinant proteins. In this work we show by gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy that salts of Co(II) and Cu(II) can be used to cleave fusion proteins specifically at sites where sequences of His residues have been introduced by protein engineering. The His residues could be either consecutive or spaced with other amino acids in between. The cleavage reaction required the presence of low concentrations of ascorbate and in the case of Cu(II) also hydrogen peroxide. The amount of metal ions required for cleavage was very low; in the case of Cu(II) only one to two molar equivalents of Cu(II) to protein was required. In the case of Co(II), 10 molar equivalents gave optimal cleavage. The reaction occurred within minutes, at a wide pH range, and efficiently at temperatures ranging from 0°C to 70°C. The work described here can also have implications for understanding protein stability in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17600148

  2. Differential expression and glycative damage affect specific mitochondrial proteins with aging in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Bakala, Hilaire; Ladouce, Romain; Baraibar, Martin A; Friguet, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    Aging is accompanied by the gradual deterioration of cell functions. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction, associated with an accumulation of damaged proteins, is of key importance due to the central role of these organelles in cellular metabolism. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in such impairment have not been completely elucidated. In the present study, proteomic analyses looking at both changes at the expression level as well as to glycative modifications of the mitochondrial proteome were performed. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed 16 differentially expressed proteins with aging. Thirteen exhibited a decreased expression and are crucial enzymes related to OXPHOS chain complex I/V components, TCA cycle or fatty acid β-oxidation reaction. On the other hand, 2 enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation cycle were increased in aged mitochondria. Immunodetection and further identification of glycated proteins disclosed a set of advanced glycation end product-modified proteins, including 6 enzymes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation process, and 2 enzymes of the TCA/urea cycles. A crucial antioxidant enzyme, catalase, was among the most strongly glycated proteins. In addition, several AGE-damaged enzymes (aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and 3-ketoacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) exhibited a decreased activity with age. Taken together, these data suggest that liver mitochondria in old rats suffer from a decline in their capacity for energy production, due to (i) decreased expression of OXPHOS complex I/V components and (ii) glycative damage to key fatty acid β-oxidation and TCA/urea cycle enzymes. PMID:23906978

  3. Differentially expressed proteins in the skin mucus of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) upon natural infection with Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibriosis caused by V. anguillarum is a commonly encountered disease in Atlantic cod farms and several studies indicate that the initiation of infection occurs after the attachment of the pathogen to the mucosal surfaces (gut, skin and gills) of fish. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the role of different mucosal components in fish upon V. anguillarum infection. The present study has two parts; in the first part we analyzed the differential expression of skin mucus proteins from Atlantic cod naturally infected with V. anguillarum using two dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. In the second part, a separate bath challenge experiment with V. anguillarum was conducted to assess the mRNA levels of the genes in skin tissue, corresponding to the selected proteins identified in the first part. Results Comparative proteome analysis of skin mucus of cod upon natural infection with V. anguillarum revealed key immune relevant proteins like calpain small subunit 1, glutathione-S-transferase omega 1, proteasome 26S subunit, 14-kDa apolipoprotein, beta 2-tubulin, cold inducible RNA binding protein, malate dehydrogenase 2 (mitochondrial) and type II keratin that exhibited significant differential expression. Additionally a number of protein spots which showed large variability amongst individual fish were also identified. Some of the proteins identified were mapped to the immunologically relevant JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinases) signalling pathway that is connected to cellular events associated with pathogenesis. A bath challenge experiment with V. anguillarum showed differential expression of beta 2-tubulin, calpain small subunit 1, cold inducible RNA binding protein, flotillin1, and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 transcripts in the skin tissue of cod during early stages of infection. Conclusions Differentially expressed proteins identified in the cod skin mucus point towards their possible involvement in V. anguillarum pathogenesis

  4. The Differential Response of Proteins to Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Candotti, Michela; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    The habitat in which proteins exert their function contains up to 400 g/L of macromolecules, most of which are proteins. The repercussions of this dense environment on protein behavior are often overlooked or addressed using synthetic agents such as poly(ethylene glycol), whose ability to mimic protein crowders has not been demonstrated. Here we performed a comprehensive atomistic molecular dynamic analysis of the effect of protein crowders on the structure and dynamics of three proteins, namely an intrinsically disordered protein (ACTR), a molten globule conformation (NCBD), and a one-fold structure (IRF-3) protein. We found that crowding does not stabilize the native compact structure, and, in fact, often prevents structural collapse. Poly(ethylene glycol) PEG500 failed to reproduce many aspects of the physiologically-relevant protein crowders, thus indicating its unsuitability to mimic the cell interior. Instead, the impact of protein crowding on the structure and dynamics of a protein depends on its degree of disorder and results from two competing effects: the excluded volume, which favors compact states, and quinary interactions, which favor extended conformers. Such a viscous environment slows down protein flexibility and restricts the conformational landscape, often biasing it towards bioactive conformations but hindering biologically relevant protein-protein contacts. Overall, the protein crowders used here act as unspecific chaperons that modulate the protein conformational space, thus having relevant consequences for disordered proteins. PMID:27471851

  5. SIGNATURE OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN SUN-AS-A-STAR Ca II K MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bertello, L.; Pietarila, A.; Pevtsov, A. A. E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu

    2012-12-10

    The characterization of solar surface differential rotation (SDR) from disk-integrated chromospheric measurements has important implications for the study of differential rotation and dynamo processes in other stars. Some chromospheric lines, such as Ca II K, are very sensitive to the presence of activity on the disk and are an ideal choice for investigating SDR in Sun-as-a-star observations. Past studies indicate that when the activity is low, the determination of Sun's differential rotation from integrated-sunlight measurements becomes uncertain. However, our study shows that using the proper technique, SDR can be detected from these type of measurements even during periods of extended solar minima. This paper describes results from the analysis of the temporal variations of Ca II K line profiles observed by the Integrated Sunlight Spectrometer during the declining phase of Cycle 23 and the rising phase of Cycle 24, and discusses the signature of SDR in the power spectra computed from time series of parameters derived from these profiles. The methodology described is quite general, and could be applied to photometric time series of other main-sequence stars for detecting differential rotation.

  6. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jessica H.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C.; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  7. The coat protein complex II, COPII, protein Sec13 directly interacts with presenilin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2009-10-23

    Mutations in the human gene encoding presenilin-1, PS1, account for most cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. PS1 has nine transmembrane domains and a large loop orientated towards the cytoplasm. PS1 locates to cellular compartments as endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus, vesicular structures, and plasma membrane, and is an integral member of {gamma}-secretase, a protein protease complex with specificity for intra-membranous cleavage of substrates such as {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. Here, an interaction between PS1 and the Sec13 protein is described. Sec13 takes part in coat protein complex II, COPII, vesicular trafficking, nuclear pore function, and ER directed protein sequestering and degradation control. The interaction maps to the N-terminal part of the large hydrophilic PS1 loop and the first of the six WD40-repeats present in Sec13. The identified Sec13 interaction to PS1 is a new candidate interaction for linking PS1 to secretory and protein degrading vesicular circuits.

  8. Normal protein content but abnormally inhibited enzyme activity in muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Diana; Zierz, Stephan

    2014-04-15

    The biochemical consequences of the disease causing mutations of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency are still enigmatic. Therefore, CPT II was characterized in muscle biopsies of nine patients with genetically proven muscle CPT II deficiency. Total CPT activity (CPT I+CPT II) of patients was not significantly different from that of controls. Remaining activities upon inhibition by malonyl-CoA and Triton X-100 were significantly reduced in patients. Immunohistochemically CPT II protein was predominantly expressed in type-I-fibers with the same intensity in patients as in controls. Western blot showed the same CPT II staining intensity ratio in patients and controls. CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations estimated by ELISA were not significantly different in patients and in controls. Citrate synthase activity in patients was significantly increased. Total CPT activity significantly correlated with both CPT I and CPT II protein concentrations in patients and controls. This implies (i) that normal total CPT activity in patients with muscle CPT II deficiency is not due to compensatory increase of CPT I activity and that (ii) the mutant CPT II is enzymatically active. The data further support the notion that in muscle CPT II deficiency enzyme activity and protein content are not reduced, but rather abnormally inhibited when fatty acid metabolism is stressed. PMID:24602495

  9. Analysis of differentially expressed proteins in colorectal cancer using hydroxyapatite column and SDS-PAGE.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shi-Rou; Gooi, Boon-Hui; Singh, Manjit; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2011-11-01

    Limitation on two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis technique causes some proteins to be under presented, especially the extreme acidic, basic, or membrane proteins. To overcome the limitation of 2D electrophoresis, an analysis method was developed for identification of differentially expressed proteins in normal and cancerous colonic tissues using self-pack hydroxyapatite (HA) column. Normal and cancerous colon tissues were homogenized and proteins were extracted using sodium phosphate buffer at pH 6.8. Protein concentration was determined and the proteins were loaded unto the HA column. HA column reduced the complexity of proteins mixture by fractionating the proteins according to their ionic strength. Further protein separation was accomplished by a simple and cost effective sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis method. The protein bands were subjected to in-gel digestion and protein analysis was performed using electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap mass spectrometer. There were 17 upregulated proteins and seven downregulated proteins detected with significant differential expression. Some of these proteins were low abundant proteins or proteins with extreme pH that were usually under presented in 2D gel analysis. We have identified brain mitochondrial carrier protein 1, T-cell surface glycoprotein CD1a, SOSS complex subunit B2, and Protein Jade 1 which were previously not detected in 2D gel analysis method. PMID:21863284

  10. Differential expression of proteins in monozygotic twins with discordance of infantile esotropic phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haiqing; Yan, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuna; Li, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify strabismus-related proteins, we performed proteome analysis in monozygotic twins with discordance of congenital esotropic phenotypes and in normal children. Methods Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology was used to detect changes in protein expression in a pair of twins with discordant esotropic phenotypes (twin A is orthotropic and twin B is esotropic). In addition, two non-twin esotropic children and two orthotropic children of the same age were chosen. The differentially expressed proteome obtained was validated in twelve non-twin esotropic children and eighteen orthotropic children and compared to the protein database. Results We detected four differentially expressed proteins in monozygotic twins with discordance of congenital esotropic phenotypes. The corresponding molecular weights were 4,146 Da, 4,801 Da, 7,786 Da, and 5,859 Da, respectively. Among these 4 proteins, the first three proteins were down-regulated and the last was upregulated. The initial characterization of these detected proteins via protein library revealed that their characteristics were similar to those of the glucagon precursor, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), camp-dependent protein kinase inhibitor α, and anti-metastasis gene (antigen), respectively. Conclusions There were differentially expressed proteins between monozygotic twins with discordance of congenital esotropic phenotypes and normal children. These differentially expressed proteins were mainly down-regulated in the strabismus patients and may be involved in the occurrence and development of congenital esotropia. PMID:21738391

  11. Efficacy of several candidate protein biomarkers in the differentiation of vaginal from buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Simons, Joanne L; Vintiner, Sue K

    2012-11-01

    Currently, there is no accurate method to differentiate vaginal epithelial cells from buccal epithelial cells in biological samples typically encountered in forensic casework. This study tested the expression of a selection of candidate proteins in buccal and vaginal epithelial cells. We investigated six candidate biomarkers, such as loricrin, vimentin, stratifin, cytokeratin 4, cytokeratin 13, small proline-rich protein 2, and involucrin, using Western blot analysis on whole protein extracts and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on intact cells in an attempt to identify cell-specific markers that would differentiate these cells by microscopy. Involucrin, loricrin, and stratifin showed differential expression during Western blot analysis and were carried through to IHC. Although proteins unique to vaginal epithelial cells and buccal epithelial cells were not identified from among the proteins tested, the increased expression levels of two proteins, loricrin and stratifin in vaginal cells, when compared to buccal cells, do provide encouraging results in the search for epithelial cell-specific markers. PMID:22612601

  12. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ARSENITE BY DIFFERENTIAL PULSE POLAROGRAPHY IN THE PRESENCE OF LEAD(II) AND THALLIUM(I)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interference from Pb(II) and T1(I) in the differential pulse polarographic determination of arsenite is eliminated by chromatography on a chelating ion exchange resin. Strong ligands prevent the removal of Pb, but addition of Cu(II) before chromatography results in successful ana...

  13. rFN/Cad-11-Modified Collagen Type II Biomimetic Interface Promotes the Adhesion and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongfeng; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zhengsheng; Kang, Fei; Yang, Bo; Kang, Xia; Wen, Can; Yan, Yanfei; Jiang, Bo; Fan, Yujiang

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the cell-material interface are determining factors in the successful function of cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Currently, cell adhesion is commonly promoted through the use of polypeptides; however, due to their lack of complementary or modulatory domains, polypeptides must be modified to improve their ability to promote adhesion. In this study, we utilized the principle of matrix-based biomimetic modification and a recombinant protein, which spans fragments 7–10 of fibronectin module III (heterophilic motif ) and extracellular domains 1–2 of cadherin-11 (rFN/Cad-11) (homophilic motif ), to modify the interface of collagen type II (Col II) sponges. We showed that the designed material was able to stimulate cell proliferation and promote better chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro than both the FN modified surfaces and the negative control. Further, the Col II/rFN/Cad-11-MSCs composite stimulated cartilage formation in vivo; the chondrogenic effect of Col II alone was much less significant. These results suggested that the rFN/Cad-11-modified collagen type II biomimetic interface has dual biological functions of promoting adhesion and stimulating chondrogenic differentiation. This substance, thus, may serve as an ideal scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering, enhancing repair of injured cartilage in vivo. PMID:23919505

  14. Effect of angiotensin II on proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem cells into mesodermal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II enhanced LIF-induced DNA synthesis of mouse iPS cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the DNA synthesis via induction of superoxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with angiotensin II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II enhanced differentiation into mesodermal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Angiotensin II may enhance the differentiation via activation of p38 MAPK. -- Abstract: Previous studies suggest that angiotensin receptor stimulation may enhance not only proliferation but also differentiation of undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, in the present study, we determined the involvement of the angiotensin receptor in the proliferation and differentiation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Stimulation with angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in mouse iPS cells cultured in a medium with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Pretreatment of the cells with either candesartan (a selective Ang II type 1 receptor [AT{sub 1}R] antagonist) or Tempol (a cell-permeable superoxide scavenger) significantly inhibited Ang II-induced DNA synthesis. Treatment with Ang II significantly increased JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. Pretreatment with candesartan significantly inhibited Ang II- induced JAK/STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, induction of mouse iPS cell differentiation into Flk-1-positive mesodermal progenitor cells was performed in type IV collagen (Col IV)- coated dishes in a differentiation medium without LIF. When Col IV-exposed iPS cells were treated with Ang II for 5 days, the expression of Flk-1 was significantly increased compared with that in the cells treated with the vehicle alone. Pretreatment of the cells with both candesartan and SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the Ang II- induced increase in Flk-1 expression

  15. The network of P(II) signalling protein interactions in unicellular cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    P(II) signalling proteins constitute a large superfamily of signal perception and transduction proteins, which is represented in all domains of life and whose members play central roles in coordinating nitrogen assimilation. Generally, P(II) proteins act as sensors of the cellular adenylylate energy charge and 2-oxoglutarate level, and in response to these signals, they regulate central nitrogen assimilatory processes at various levels of control (from nutrient transport to gene expression) through protein-protein interactions with P(II) receptor proteins. An examination of the phylogeny of cyanobacteria reveals that specific functions of P(II) signalling evolved in this microbial lineage, which are not found in other prokaryotes. At least one of these functions, regulation of arginine biosynthesis by controlling the key enzyme N-acetyl-L: -glutamate kinase (NAGK), was transmitted by the ancestral cyanobacterium, which gave rise to chloroplasts, into the eukaryotic domain and was conserved during the evolution of planta. We have investigated in some detail the P(II) signalling protein, its signal perception and its interactions with receptors in the unicellular cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and Synechocystis PCC 6803 and have performed comparative analysis with Arabidopsis thaliana P(II)-NAGK interaction. This chapter will summarize these studies and will describe the emerging picture of a complex network of P(II) protein interactions in the unicellular cyanobacteria. PMID:20532736

  16. Identification of differential protein interactors of lamin A and progerin.

    PubMed

    Kubben, Nard; Voncken, Jan Willem; Demmers, Jeroen; Calis, Chantal; van Almen, Geert; Pinto, Yigal; Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is an interconnected meshwork of intermediate filament proteins underlying the nuclear envelope. The lamina is an important regulator of nuclear structural integrity as well as nuclear processes, including transcription, DNA replication and chromatin remodeling. The major components of the lamina are A- and B-type lamins. Mutations in lamins impair lamina functions and cause a set of highly tissue-specific diseases collectively referred to as laminopathies. The phenotypic diversity amongst laminopathies is hypothesized to be caused by mutations affecting specific protein interactions, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. Current technologies to identify interaction partners of lamin A and its mutants are hampered by the insoluble nature of lamina components. To overcome the limitations of current technologies, we developed and applied a novel, unbiased approach to identify lamin A-interacting proteins. This approach involves expression of the high-affinity OneSTrEP-tag, precipitation of lamin-protein complexes after reversible protein cross-linking and subsequent protein identification by mass spectrometry. We used this approach to identify in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cardiac myocyte NklTAg cell lines proteins that interact with lamin A and its mutant isoform progerin, which causes the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We identified a total of 313 lamina-interacting proteins, including several novel lamin A interactors, and we characterize a set of 35 proteins which preferentially interact with lamin A or progerin. PMID:21327095

  17. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes. PMID:26961174

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Increases Occludin Expression via the Upregulation of Adipose Differentiation-Related Protein

    PubMed Central

    Branche, Emilie; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Parisot, Clotilde; Bedert, Ludmila; Lévy, Pierre L.; Bartosch, Birke

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle is closely associated with lipid metabolism. In particular, HCV assembly initiates at the surface of lipid droplets. To further understand the role of lipid droplets in HCV life cycle, we assessed the relationship between HCV and the adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a lipid droplet-associated protein. Different steps of HCV life cycle were assessed in HCV-infected human Huh-7 hepatoma cells overexpressing ADRP upon transduction with a lentiviral vector. HCV infection increased ADRP mRNA and protein expression levels by 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively. The overexpression of ADRP led to an increase of (i) the surface of lipid droplets, (ii) the total cellular neutral lipid content (2.5- and 5-fold increase of triglycerides and cholesterol esters, respectively), (iii) the cellular free cholesterol level (5-fold) and (iv) the HCV particle production and infectivity (by 2- and 3.5-fold, respectively). The investigation of different steps of the HCV life cycle indicated that the ADRP overexpression, while not affecting the viral replication, promoted both virion egress and entry (~12-fold), the latter possibly via an increase of its receptor occludin. Moreover, HCV infection induces an increase of both ADRP and occludin expression. In HCV infected cells, the occludin upregulation was fully prevented by the ADRP silencing, suggesting a specific, ADRP-dependent mechanism. Finally, in HCV-infected human livers, occludin and ADRP mRNA expression levels correlated with each other. Alltogether, these findings show that HCV induces ADRP, which in turns appears to confer a favorable environment to viral spread. PMID:26731658

  19. Is Melanoma a stem cell tumor? Identification of neurogenic proteins in trans-differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Suraiya; Mao, Zisu; Chan, Jane MC; Chan, Linda S

    2005-01-01

    Background Although several genes and proteins have been implicated in the development of melanomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of these tumors are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between the cell growth, tumorigenesis and differentiation, we have studied a highly malignant cat melanoma cell line that trans-differentiates into neuronal cells after exposure to a feline endogenous retrovirus RD114. Methods To define the repertoire of proteins responsible for the phenotypic differences between melanoma and its counterpart trans-differentiated neuronal cells we have applied proteomics technology and compared protein profiles of the two cell types and identified differentially expressed proteins by 2D-gel electrophoresis, image analyses and mass spectrometry. Results The melanoma and trans-differentiated neuronal cells could be distinguished by the presence of distinct sets of proteins in each. Although approximately 60–70% of the expressed proteins were shared between the two cell types, twelve proteins were induced de novo after infection of melanoma cells with RD114 virus in vitro. Expression of these proteins in trans-differentiated cells was significantly associated with concomitant down regulation of growth promoting proteins and up-regulation of neurogenic proteins (p = < 0.001). Based on their physiologic properties, >95% proteins expressed in trans-differentiated cells could be associated with the development, differentiation and regulation of nervous system cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the cat melanoma cells have the ability to differentiate into distinct neuronal cell types and they express proteins that are essential for self-renewal. Since melanocytes arise from the neural crest of the embryo, we conclude that this melanoma arose from embryonic precursor stem cells. This model system provides a unique opportunity to identify domains of interactions between the expressed

  20. Interaction of Cu(II) and Ni(II) with Ypk9 Protein Fragment via NMR Studies

    PubMed Central

    Peana, Massimiliano Francesco; Medici, Serenella; Ledda, Alessia; Nurchi, Valeria Marina; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    P1D2E3K4H5E6L7 (PK9-H), a fragment of Ypk9, the yeast homologue of the human Park9 protein, was studied for its coordination abilities towards Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions through mono- and bi-dimensional NMR techniques. Both proteins are involved in the transportation of metal ions, including manganese and nickel, from the cytosol to the lysosomal lumen. Ypk9 showed manganese detoxification role, preventing a Mn-induced Parkinsonism (PD) besides mutations in Park9, linked to a juvenile form of the disease. Here, we tested PK9-H with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions, the former because it is an essential element ubiquitous in the human body, so its trafficking should be strictly regulated and one cannot exclude that Ypk9 may play a role in it, and the latter because, besides being a toxic element for many organisms and involved in different pathologies and inflammation states, it seems that the protein confers protection against it. NMR experiments showed that both cations can bind PK9-H in an effective way, leading to complexes whose coordination mode depends on the pH of the solution. NMR data have been used to build a model for the structure of the major Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes. Structural changes in the conformation of the peptide with organized side chain orientation promoted by nickel coordination were detected. PMID:24790577

  1. Collective Dynamics Differentiates Functional Divergence in Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Glembo, Tyler J.; Farrell, Daniel W.; Gerek, Z. Nevin; Thorpe, M. F.; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2012-01-01

    Protein evolution is most commonly studied by analyzing related protein sequences and generating ancestral sequences through Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods, and/or by resurrecting ancestral proteins in the lab and performing ligand binding studies to determine function. Structural and dynamic evolution have largely been left out of molecular evolution studies. Here we incorporate both structure and dynamics to elucidate the molecular principles behind the divergence in the evolutionary path of the steroid receptor proteins. We determine the likely structure of three evolutionarily diverged ancestral steroid receptor proteins using the Zipping and Assembly Method with FRODA (ZAMF). Our predictions are within ∼2.7 Å all-atom RMSD of the respective crystal structures of the ancestral steroid receptors. Beyond static structure prediction, a particular feature of ZAMF is that it generates protein dynamics information. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of diverged proteins by obtaining the most collective motion through essential dynamics. Strikingly, our analysis shows that evolutionarily diverged proteins of the same family do not share the same dynamic subspace, while those sharing the same function are simultaneously clustered together and distant from those, that have functionally diverged. Dynamic analysis also enables those mutations that most affect dynamics to be identified. It correctly predicts all mutations (functional and permissive) necessary to evolve new function and ∼60% of permissive mutations necessary to recover ancestral function. PMID:22479170

  2. Towards a Proteomic Catalogue and Differential Annotation of Salivary Gland Proteins in Blood Fed Malaria Vector Anopheles culicifacies by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Ritu; Vijay, Sonam; Kadian, Kavita; Singh, Jagbir; Pande, Veena; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the importance of functional proteins in mosquito behavior, following blood meal, a baseline proteomic dataset is essential for providing insights into the physiology of blood feeding. Therefore, in this study as first step, in solution and 1-D electrophoresis digestion approach combined with tandem mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS) and computational bioinformatics for data mining was used to prepare a baseline proteomic catalogue of salivary gland proteins of sugar fed An. culicifacies mosquitoes. A total of 106 proteins were identified and analyzed by SEQUEST algorithm against mosquito protein database from Uniprot/NCBI. Importantly, D7r1, D7r2, D7r4, salivary apyrase, anti-platelet protein, calreticulin, antigen 5 family proteins were identified and grouped on the basis of biological and functional roles. Secondly, differential protein expression and annotations between salivary glands of sugar fed vs blood fed mosquitoes was analyzed using 2-Delectrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The alterations in the differential expression of total 38 proteins was observed out of which 29 proteins like beclin-1, phosphorylating proteins, heme oxygenase 1, ferritin, apoptotic proteins, coagulation and immunity like, serine proteases, serpins, c-type lectin and protein in regulation of blood feeding behavior were found to be up regulated while 9 proteins related to blood feeding, juvenile hormone epoxide hydrolase ii, odorant binding proteins and energy metabolic enzymes were found to be down regulated. To our knowledge, this study provides a first time baseline proteomic dataset and functional annotations of An. culicifacies salivary gland proteins that may be involved during the blood feeding. Identification of differential salivary proteins between sugar fed and blood fed mosquitoes and their plausible role may provide insights into the physiological processes associated with feeding behavior and sporozoite transmission during the

  3. EVALUATION OF PROTEIN MARKERS FOR NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN PC12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical-induced injury of the developing nervous system can be manifested as a change in the differentiation or growth of neurons. The present study evaluated the use of proteins associated with axonal growth and synaptogenesis as markers for neuronal differentiation in vitro. ...

  4. Topological studies of spinach 22 kDa protein of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Pichersky, E; Yocum, C F

    1994-12-30

    An intrinsic 22 kDa polypeptide is associated with the O2-evolving Photosystem II core complex in a variety of green plants, although it does not appear to be required for O2 evolution. Digestion of thylakoid membranes and isolated Photosystem II preparations with trypsin, followed by immunoblotting using spinach anti-22 kDa antibodies, leads to two observations: (1) the domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane helices of the 22 kDa protein is stromally exposed, and (2) only in a reaction center complex preparation, lacking the chlorophyll a/b-light harvesting complex II, is there extensive proteolytic cleavage of the 22 kDa protein. We also found that after, but not prior to, selective extraction of the 22 and 10 kDa proteins from Photosystem II membranes, the chlorophyll a/b-light harvesting complex II can be separated from the Photosystem II reaction center core by precipitation with MgCl2. This result suggests that the 22 kDa polypeptide is located between the Photosystem II reaction center polypeptides and light-harvesting complex II; it is possible that the protein serves as a link between the two protein complexes. The presence of the 22 kDa protein in several species was also examined by immunoblotting with polyclonal spinach anti-22 kDa antibodies. PMID:7803450

  5. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  6. Identification of differentially expressed serum proteins in gastric adenocarcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Mir, Sartaj Ahmad; Renuse, Santosh; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Puttamallesh, Vinuth N.; Solanki, Hitendra Singh; Manju, H.C.; Syed, Nazia; Sharma, Rakesh; Christopher, Rita; Vijayakumar, M.; Kumar, K.V. Veerendra; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha V.; Chatterjee, Aditi; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with poor prognosis. Blood based biomarkers of gastric cancer have the potential to improve diagnosis and monitoring of these tumors. Proteins that show altered levels in the circulation of gastric cancer patients could prove useful as putative biomarkers. We used an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify proteins that show altered levels in the sera of patients with gastric cancer. Our study resulted in identification of 643 proteins, of which 48 proteins showed increased levels and 11 proteins showed decreased levels in serum from gastric cancer patients compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. Proteins that showed increased expression in gastric cancer included inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4), Mannose-binding protein C (MBL2), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), serum amyloid A protein (SAA1), Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1) and extracellular superoxide dismutase [Cu–Zn] (SOD3). We used multiple reaction monitoring assays and validated elevated levels of ITIH4 and SAA1 proteins in serum from gastric cancer patients. Biological significance Gastric cancer is a highly aggressive cancer associated with high mortality. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable interest in diagnosis and monitoring of various diseases including cancers. Gastric cancer is often diagnosed at advanced stages resulting in poor prognosis and high mortality. Pathological diagnosis using biopsy specimens remains the gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Serum-based biomarkers are of considerable importance as they are minimally invasive. In this study, we carried out quantitative proteomic profiling of serum from gastric cancer patients to identify proteins that show altered levels in gastric cancer patients. We identified more than 50 proteins that showed altered levels in gastric cancer patient sera. Validation in a large cohort of well

  7. A STUDY OF DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION ON II PEGASI VIA PHOTOMETRIC STARSPOT IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Harmon, Robert O.; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Henry, Gregory W.

    2011-04-15

    We present the results of a study of differential rotation on the K2 IV primary of the RS CVn binary II Pegasi (HD 224085) performed by inverting light curves to produce images of the dark starspots on its surface. The data were obtained in the standard Johnson B and V filter passbands via the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m Automated Photometric Telescope from JD 2447115.8086-2455222.6238 (1987 November 16-2010 January 26). The observations were subdivided into 79 data sets consisting of pairs of B and V light curves, which were then inverted using a constrained nonlinear inversion algorithm that makes no a priori assumptions regarding the number of spots or their shapes. The resulting surface images were then assigned to 24 groups corresponding to time intervals over which we could observe the evolution of a given group of spots (except for three groups consisting of single data sets). Of these 24 groups, six showed convincing evidence of differential rotation over time intervals of several months. For the others, the spot configuration was such that differential rotation was neither exhibited nor contraindicated. The differential rotation we infer is in the same sense as that on the Sun: lower latitudes have shorter rotation periods. From plots of the range in longitude spanned by the spotted regions versus time, we obtain estimates of the differential rotation coefficient k defined as in earlier work by Henry et al. and show that our results for its value are consistent with the value obtained therein.

  8. A Study of Differential Rotation on II Pegasi via Photometric Starspot Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Harmon, Robert O.; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Henry, Gregory W.

    2011-04-01

    We present the results of a study of differential rotation on the K2 IV primary of the RS CVn binary II Pegasi (HD 224085) performed by inverting light curves to produce images of the dark starspots on its surface. The data were obtained in the standard Johnson B and V filter passbands via the Tennessee State University T3 0.4 m Automated Photometric Telescope from JD 2447115.8086-2455222.6238 (1987 November 16-2010 January 26). The observations were subdivided into 79 data sets consisting of pairs of B and V light curves, which were then inverted using a constrained nonlinear inversion algorithm that makes no a priori assumptions regarding the number of spots or their shapes. The resulting surface images were then assigned to 24 groups corresponding to time intervals over which we could observe the evolution of a given group of spots (except for three groups consisting of single data sets). Of these 24 groups, six showed convincing evidence of differential rotation over time intervals of several months. For the others, the spot configuration was such that differential rotation was neither exhibited nor contraindicated. The differential rotation we infer is in the same sense as that on the Sun: lower latitudes have shorter rotation periods. From plots of the range in longitude spanned by the spotted regions versus time, we obtain estimates of the differential rotation coefficient k defined as in earlier work by Henry et al. and show that our results for its value are consistent with the value obtained therein.

  9. HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 chimera: 2 new spliced transcripts and proteins induced by keratinocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chye Ling; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lai, Deborah; Carthagena, Laetitia; Wang, Qian; Xue, Yue Zhen; Quek, Ling Shih; Doorbar, John; Bachelerie, Francoise; Thierry, Francoise; Bellanger, Sophie

    2012-07-20

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E4 is known to be synthesized as an E1circumflexE4 fusion resulting from splice donor and acceptor sites conserved across HPV types. Here we demonstrate the existence of 2 HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 transcripts resulting from 2 splice donor sites in the 5 Prime part of E2, while the splice acceptor site is the one used for E1circumflexE4. Both E2circumflexE4 transcripts are up-regulated by keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and can be detected in clinical samples containing low-grade HPV-18-positive cells from Pap smears. They give rise to two fusion proteins in vitro, E2circumflexE4-S and E2circumflexE4-L. Whereas we could not differentiate E2circumflexE4-S from E1circumflexE4 in vivo, E2circumflexE4-L could be formally identified as a 23 kDa protein in raft cultures in which the corresponding transcript was also found, and in a biopsy from a patient with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stage I-II (CINI-II) associated with HPV-18, demonstrating the physiological relevance of E2circumflexE4 products.

  10. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in Penaeus monodon hemocytes after Vibrio harveyi infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Viral and bacterial diseases can cause mass mortalities in commercial shrimp aquaculture. In contrast to studies on the antiviral response, the responses of shrimps to bacterial infections by high throughput techniques have been reported only at the transcriptional level and not at the translational level. In this study, a proteomic analysis of shrimp hemocytes to identify differentially expressed proteins in response to a luminous bacterium Vibrio harveyi was evaluated for its feasibility and is reported for the first time. Results The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) patterns of the hemocyte proteins from the unchallenged and V. harveyi challenged shrimp, Penaeus monodon, at 24 and 48 h post infection were compared. From this, 27 differentially expressed protein spots, and a further 12 weakly to non-differentially regulated control spots, were selected for further analyses by the LC-ESI-MS/MS. The 21 differentially expressed proteins that could be identified by homologous annotation were comprised of proteins that are directly involved in the host defense responses, such as hemocyanin, prophenoloxidase, serine proteinase-like protein, heat shock protein 90 and alpha-2-macroglobulin, and those involved in signal transduction, such as the14-3-3 protein epsilon and calmodulin. Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of hemocyanin expression upon bacterial infection. The expression of the selected proteins which were the representatives of the down-regulated proteins (the 14-3-3 protein epsilon and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and of the up-regulated proteins (hemocyanin) was further assessed at the transcription level using real-time RT-PCR. Conclusions This work suggests the usefulness of a proteomic approach to the study of shrimp immunity and revealed hemocyte proteins whose expression were up regulated upon V. harveyi infection such as hemocyanin, arginine kinase and down regulated such as alpha-2-macroglobulin, calmodulin and 14

  11. Interferon-induced Transmembrane Protein 3 Is a Type II Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles C.; Kondur, Hema R.; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins are a family of small membrane proteins that inhibit the cellular entry of several genera of viruses. These proteins had been predicted to adopt a two-pass, type III transmembrane topology with an intracellular loop, two transmembrane helices (TM1 and TM2), and extracellular N and C termini. Recent work, however, supports an intramembrane topology for the helices with cytosolic orientation of both termini. Here we determined the topology of murine Ifitm3. We found that the N terminus of Ifitm3 could be stained by antibodies at the cell surface but that this conformation was cell type-dependent and represented a minority of the total plasma membrane pool. In contrast, the C terminus was readily accessible to antibodies at the cell surface and extracellular C termini comprised most or all of those present at the plasma membrane. The addition of a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention motif to Ifitm3 resulted in sequestration of Ifitm3 in the ER, demonstrating an ER-luminal orientation of the C terminus. C-terminal, but not N-terminal, epitope tags were also degraded within lysosomes, consistent with their luminal orientation. Furthermore, epitope-tagged Ifitm3 TM2 functioned as a signal anchor sequence when expressed in isolation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a type II transmembrane topology for Ifitm3 and will provide insight into its interaction with potential targets and cofactors. PMID:24067232

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates expression of surfactant protein in alveolar type II cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoko; Ahmad, Aftab; Kewley, Emily; Mason, Robert J

    2011-11-01

    Alveolar type II (ATII) cells cultured at an air-liquid (A/L) interface maintain differentiation, but they lose these properties when they are submerged. Others showed that an oxygen tension gradient develops in the culture medium as ATII cells consume oxygen. Therefore, we wondered whether hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling could explain differences in the phenotypes of ATII cells cultured under A/L interface or submerged conditions. ATII cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured on inserts coated with a mixture of rat-tail collagen and Matrigel, in medium including 5% rat serum and 10 ng/ml keratinocyte growth factor, with their apical surfaces either exposed to air or submerged. The A/L interface condition maintained the expression of surfactant proteins, whereas that expression was down-regulated under the submerged condition, and the effect was rapid and reversible. Under submerged conditions, there was an increase in HIF1α and HIF2α in nuclear extracts, mRNA levels of HIF inducible genes, vascular endothelial growth factor, glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1), and the protein level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme-1. The expression of surfactant proteins was suppressed and GLUT1 mRNA levels were induced when cells were cultured with 1 mM dimethyloxalyl glycine. The expression of surfactant proteins was restored under submerged conditions with supplemented 60% oxygen. HIF signaling and oxygen tension at the surface of cells appears to be important in regulating the phenotype of rat ATII cells. PMID:21454802

  13. Protein secondary structural types are differentially coded on messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Thanaraj, T. A.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tricodon regions on messenger RNAs corresponding to a set of proteins from Escherichia coli were scrutinized for their translation speed. The fractional frequency values of the individual codons as they occur in mRNAs of highly expressed genes from Escherichia coli were taken as an indicative measure of the translation speed. The tricodons were classified by the sum of the frequency values of the constituent codons. Examination of the conformation of the encoded amino acid residues in the corresponding protein tertiary structures revealed a correlation between codon usage in mRNA and topological features of the encoded proteins. Alpha helices on proteins tend to be preferentially coded by translationally fast mRNA regions while the slow segments often code for beta strands and coil regions. Fast regions correspondingly avoid coding for beta strands and coil regions while the slow regions similarly move away from encoding alpha helices. Structural and mechanistic aspects of the ribosome peptide channel support the relevance of sequence fragment translation and subsequent conformation. A discussion is presented relating the observation to the reported kinetic data on the formation and stabilization of protein secondary structural types during protein folding. The observed absence of such strong positive selection for codons in non-highly expressed genes is compatible with existing theories that mutation pressure may well dominate codon selection in non-highly expressed genes. PMID:8897597

  14. Retinoic acid promotes primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cell proliferation and differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui-wei; Kong, Xiang-yong; Zhu, Xiao-xi; Zhu, Guo-qing; Ma, Jin-shuai; Liu, Xiu-xiang

    2015-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in lung development and maturation. Many stimuli can induce alveolar epithelial cell damage which will result in the injury of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of RA on the proliferation and differentiation of primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells (fAECIIs). Primary fAECIIs were isolated from fetal rats at 19 d of gestation and purified by a differential centrifugation and adhesion method. The cells were randomly divided into control (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and RA groups. Cell proliferation, viability, apoptosis, cycle, and expression of target protein were examined at 24, 48, and 72 h. We found that the proliferation and viability of cells in the RA-exposed group significantly increased compared with the DMSO control group. The proportion (%) of cells in the G2 and S phases in the RA group was significantly higher than that in control group cells. The proportion (%) of both early apoptotic cells and late apoptotic cells decreased significantly in cells exposed to RA compared with cells exposed to DMSO. RA significantly enhanced the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5). The expression level of pulmonary surfactant C (SPC) was elevated after cells were exposed to RA for 24 and 72 h but was inhibited when cells were exposed to RA for 48 h. These results suggest that RA promotes fAECII proliferation by improving cell viability, promoting S phase entry and inhibiting apoptosis and RA promotes fAECIIs differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells (AECIs). PMID:25515249

  15. Differential mobility of pigment-protein complexes in granal and agranal thylakoid membranes of C₃ and C₄ plants.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Helmut; Sharpe, Richard M; Herbstova, Miroslava; Yarbrough, Robert; Edwards, Gerald E

    2013-01-01

    The photosynthetic performance of plants is crucially dependent on the mobility of the molecular complexes that catalyze the conversion of sunlight to metabolic energy equivalents in the thylakoid membrane network inside chloroplasts. The role of the extensive folding of thylakoid membranes leading to structural differentiation into stacked grana regions and unstacked stroma lamellae for diffusion-based processes of the photosynthetic machinery is poorly understood. This study examines, to our knowledge for the first time, the mobility of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in unstacked thylakoid regions in the C₃ plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts of the C₄ plants sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and maize (Zea mays) by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In unstacked thylakoid membranes, more than 50% of the protein complexes are mobile, whereas this number drops to about 20% in stacked grana regions. The higher molecular mobility in unstacked thylakoid regions is explained by a lower protein-packing density compared with stacked grana regions. It is postulated that thylakoid membrane stacking to form grana leads to protein crowding that impedes lateral diffusion processes but is required for efficient light harvesting of the modularly organized photosystem II and its light-harvesting antenna system. In contrast, the arrangement of the photosystem I light-harvesting complex I in separate units in unstacked thylakoid membranes does not require dense protein packing, which is advantageous for protein diffusion. PMID:23148078

  16. Type II pneumocyte-restricted green fluorescent protein expression after lentiviral transduction of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Gruh, Ina; Winkler, Monica E; Beier, Jennifer; Radtke, Kerstin; Schmiedl, Andreas; Groos, Stephanie; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial (AT2) cell-specific reporter expression has been highly useful in the study of embryology and alveolar regeneration in transgenic mice. Technologies enabling efficient gene transfer and cell type-restricted transgene expression in AT2 cells would allow for correction of AT2 cell-based diseases such as genetic surfactant deficiencies. Moreover, such approaches are urgently required to investigate differentiation of AT2 cells from adult and embryonic stem cells of other species than mouse. Using a human surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter fragment, we have constructed lentiviral vectors enabling AT2-restricted transgene expression and identification of stem cell-derived AT2 cells. Lung epithelial cell lines M3E3/C3, H441, RLE-6TN, A549, MLE-12, and MLE-15 were characterized at the molecular and ultrastructural levels to identify cell lines useful to assess the cell type specificity of our vector constructs. After transduction, no green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was observed in nontarget cells including bronchial H441 cells, pulmonary A549 cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. In contrast, and in correlation with endogenous SP-C expression, lentiviral transduction resulted in stable GFP expression in MLE-12 and MLE-15 AT2 cells. In conclusion, we have constructed a lentiviral vector mediating SP-C promoter-dependent GFP expression. Transgene expression strictly corresponds with an AT2 phenotype of the transduced cells. In particular, the generated vector should facilitate local alveolar gene therapy and investigation of alveolar regeneration and stem cell differentiation. PMID:18052721

  17. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  18. Three-dimensional scaffold of type II collagen promote the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells into a nucleus pulposus-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaopeng; Tao, Yiqing; Wang, Jingkai; Liu, Dongyu; Liang, Chengzhen; Li, Hao; Chen, Qixin

    2016-07-01

    Type II collagen is reported to have the capability of guiding adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to differentiate towards a nucleus pulposus (NP)-like phenotype. So this study aimed to establish a three-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffold using N,N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethyl carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDAC/NHS) to increase the efficiency of ADSC differentiation into NP-like cells. Physical properties, such as porosity, biodegradation, and microstructure, and biological characteristics such as cytotoxicity, cell proliferation, and expression of relevant genes and proteins were measured to evaluate the efficacy of different scaffolds. Collagen scaffolds cross-linked with EDAC/NHS exhibited higher biological stability, better spatial structure, and higher gene and protein expression of functional markers such as aggrecan, SOX9 and COL2 than those of other groups. Based on the results, freeze-dried type II collagen cross-linked with EDAC/NHS formed the best 3D scaffold, for inducing ADSC proliferation and differentiation toward a NP-like phenotype. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1687-1693, 2016. PMID:26940048

  19. Serum immune-related proteins are differentially expressed during hibernation in the American black bear.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Donahue, Seth W; Vaughan, Michael R; McConkey, Brendan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears) and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears. PMID:23825529

  20. Serum Immune-Related Proteins are Differentially Expressed during Hibernation in the American Black Bear

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian A.; Donahue, Seth W.; Vaughan, Michael R.; McConkey, Brendan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears) and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears. PMID:23825529

  1. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celej, Maria Soledad; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical description of thermal protein unfolding coupled to ligand binding is presented. The thermodynamic concepts are independent of the method used to monitor protein unfolding but a differential scanning calorimetry is being used as a tool for examining the unfolding process.

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  3. Schisandrae fructus enhances myogenic differentiation and inhibits atrophy through protein synthesis in human myotubes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cy Hyun; Shin, Jin-Hong; Hwang, Sung Jun; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Kim, Cheol Min

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrae fructus (SF) has recently been reported to increase skeletal muscle mass and inhibit atrophy in mice. We investigated the effect of SF extract on human myotube differentiation and its acting pathway. Various concentrations (0.1-10 μg/mL) of SF extract were applied on human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Myotube area and fusion index were measured to quantify myotube differentiation. The maximum effect was observed at 0.5 μg/mL of SF extract, enhancing differentiation up to 1.4-fold in fusion index and 1.6-fold in myotube area at 8 days after induction of differentiation compared to control. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, which initiate translation as downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, was upregulated in early phases of differentiation after SF treatment. SF also attenuated dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In conclusion, we show that SF augments myogenic differentiation and attenuates atrophy by increasing protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin/70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 signaling pathway in human myotubes. SF can be a useful natural dietary supplement in increasing skeletal muscle mass, especially in the aged with sarcopenia and the patients with disuse atrophy. PMID:27330287

  4. Schisandrae fructus enhances myogenic differentiation and inhibits atrophy through protein synthesis in human myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cy Hyun; Shin, Jin-Hong; Hwang, Sung Jun; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Dae-Seong; Kim, Cheol Min

    2016-01-01

    Schisandrae fructus (SF) has recently been reported to increase skeletal muscle mass and inhibit atrophy in mice. We investigated the effect of SF extract on human myotube differentiation and its acting pathway. Various concentrations (0.1–10 μg/mL) of SF extract were applied on human skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Myotube area and fusion index were measured to quantify myotube differentiation. The maximum effect was observed at 0.5 μg/mL of SF extract, enhancing differentiation up to 1.4-fold in fusion index and 1.6-fold in myotube area at 8 days after induction of differentiation compared to control. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase, which initiate translation as downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, was upregulated in early phases of differentiation after SF treatment. SF also attenuated dexamethasone-induced atrophy. In conclusion, we show that SF augments myogenic differentiation and attenuates atrophy by increasing protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin/70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 signaling pathway in human myotubes. SF can be a useful natural dietary supplement in increasing skeletal muscle mass, especially in the aged with sarcopenia and the patients with disuse atrophy. PMID:27330287

  5. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs. PMID:25173649

  6. Reduction of a 4q35-encoded nuclear envelope protein in muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, Cecilia; Guan, Tinglu; Figlewicz, Denise A.; Hays, Arthur P.; Worman, Howard J.; Gerace, Larry; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2009-11-13

    Muscular dystrophy and peripheral neuropathy have been linked to mutations in genes encoding nuclear envelope proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these disorders remain unresolved. Nuclear envelope protein p19A is a protein of unknown function encoded by a gene at chromosome 4q35. p19A levels are significantly reduced in human muscle as cells differentiate from myoblasts to myotubes; however, its levels are not similarly reduced in all differentiation systems tested. Because 4q35 has been linked to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and some adjacent genes are reportedly misregulated in the disorder, levels of p19A were analyzed in muscle samples from patients with FSHD. Although p19A was increased in most cases, an absolute correlation was not observed. Nonetheless, p19A downregulation in normal muscle differentiation suggests that in the cases where its gene is inappropriately re-activated it could affect muscle differentiation and contribute to disease pathology.

  7. Differential expression of hemolymph proteins between susceptible and insecticide-resistant Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Wang, X J; Huang, Y H; Zhao, Z G; Zhang, S S; Gong, X S; Xie, L; Kang, D M; Jing, X

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach combining two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry was used to compare hemolymph expression profiles of a beta-cypermethrin-resistant Blattella germanica L. strain and a beta-cypermethrin-susceptible strain. Twenty-eight hemolymph proteins were differentially expressed in the resistant cockroach strain; 19 proteins were upregulated and 9 proteins were downregulated compared with the susceptible strain. Protein identification indicated that expression of putative cuticular protein, nitric oxide synthase, triosephosphate isomerase, alpha-amylase, ABC transporter, and Per a 3 allergen was elevated, and expression of arginine kinase and glycosidase was reduced. The differential expression of these proteins reflects the overall change in cellular structure and metabolism related to the resistance of pyrethroid insecticides. PMID:25182623

  8. A Hybrid Approach to Protein Differential Expression in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuan; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2012-04-19

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein's associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics data sets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. Results: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of 'presence/ absence,' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amendable to quantitative analysis; e.g., 'one-state' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/ absence analysis of a given data set in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single associated FDR.

  9. Differential expression of CaMK-II genes during early zebrafish embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sarah C; Lister, James A; Tombes, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    CaMK-II is a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed throughout the lifespan of all vertebrates. During early development, CaMK-II regulates cell cycle progression and "non-canonical" Wnt-dependent convergent extension. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, CaMK-II activity rises within 2 hr after fertilization. At the time of somite formation, zygotic expression from six genes (camk2a1, camk2b1, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, camk2d2) results in a second phase of increased activity. Zebrafish CaMK-II genes are 92-95% identical to their human counterparts in the non-variable regions. During the first three days of development, alternative splicing yields at least 20 splice variants, many of which are unique. Whole-mount in situ hybridization reveals that camk2g1 comprises the majority of maternal expression. All six genes are expressed strongly in ventral regions at the 18-somite stage. Later, camk2a1 is expressed in anterior somites, heart, and then forebrain. Camk2b1 is expressed in somites, mid- and forebrain, gut, retina, and pectoral fins. Camk2g1 appears strongly along the midline and then in brain, gut, and pectoral fins. Camk2g2 is expressed early in the midbrain and trunk and exhibits the earliest retinal expression. Camk2d1 is elevated early at somite boundaries, then epidermal tissue, while camk2d2 is expressed in discrete anterior locations, steadily increasing along either side of the dorsal midline and then throughout the brain, including the retina. These findings reveal a complex pattern of CaMK-II gene expression consistent with pleiotropic roles during development. PMID:17103413

  10. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  11. Differential Expression of Vitreous Proteins in Young and Mature New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Dufresne, Craig P.; Semba, Richard D.; Edward, Deepak P.

    2016-01-01

    Different anatomical regions have been defined in the vitreous humor including central vitreous, basal vitreous, vitreous cortex, vitreoretinal interface and zonule. In this study we sought to characterize changes in the proteome of vitreous humor (VH) related to compartments or age in New Zealand white rabbits (NZW). Vitreous humor was cryo-collected from young and mature New Zealand white rabbit eyes, and dissected into anterior and posterior compartments. All samples were divided into 4 groups: Young Anterior (YA), Young Posterior (YP), Mature Anterior (MA) and Mature Posterior (MP) vitreous. Tryptic digests of total proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Spectral count was used to determine the relative protein abundances and identify proteins with statistical differences between compartment and age groups. Western blotting was performed to validate some of the differentially expressed proteins. Our results showed that 231, 375, 273 and 353 proteins were identified in the YA, YP, MA and MP respectively. Fifteen proteins were significantly differentially expressed between YA and YP, and 11 between MA and MP. Carbonic anhydrase III, lambda crystallin, alpha crystallin A and B, beta crystallin B1 and B2 were more abundant in the anterior region, whereas vimentin was less abundant in the anterior region. For comparisons between age groups, 4 proteins were differentially expressed in both YA relative to MA and YP relative to MP. Western blotting confirmed the differential expression of carbonic anhydrase III, alpha crystallin B and beta crystallin B2. The protein profiles of the vitreous humor showed age- and compartment-related differences. This differential protein profile provides a baseline for understanding the vitreous compartmentalization in the rabbit and suggests that further studies profiling proteins in different compartments of the vitreous in other species may be warranted. PMID:27089221

  12. Analysis of Differential Proteins in Two Wing-Type Females of Sogatella furcifera (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zi-Qiang; Song, Shao-Yun; Liang, Shi-Ke; Wang, Fang-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Sogatella furcifera (Horvath) is an important rice pest with the wing dimorphism, including macropterous and brachypterous morphs. The protein expression profiles in two wing-type adults and two wing-type disc fifth-instar nymphs were analyzed using two-dimensional gel protein electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. In adults and fifth-instar nymphs, 127 and 162 protein spots were detected, respectively. Fifty-five differentially expressed protein spots were identified between the long-winged adults and the short-winged adults, and 62 differentially expressed protein spots were found between the long-winged disc fifth-instar nymphs and short-winged disc fifth-instar nymphs. In long-winged and short-winged adults, six and seven specific protein spots were identified, respectively, with five and seven protein spots having more than threefold increased level, respectively. In long-winged and short-winged disc morph nymphs, 8 and 12 specific protein spots were identified, respectively, with 11 and 17 spots containing more than threefold increased level, respectively. Among the 16 identified proteins, five proteins are associated with muscle function, suggesting that muscle is a main tissue where the genes were differentially expressed between the two wing types. In addition, the content of a peptidase with an insulinase domain was higher (by 3.02 ± 0.59 fold) in the short-winged fifth-instar nymphs than in the long-winged fifth-instar nymphs, which suggests that this peptidase may be involved in wing differentiation by regulating insulin receptors. The results of this study provide some genetic clues for the wing differential development in S. furcifera and provide more references for future studies. PMID:27044649

  13. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Retinoic acid differentially affects in vitro proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of two fish bone-derived cell lines: different gene expression of nuclear receptors and ECM proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Tiago, Daniel M; Laizé, Vincent; Leonor Cancela, M; Gisbert, Enric

    2014-03-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active metabolite of vitamin A, regulates vertebrate morphogenesis through signaling pathways not yet fully understood. Such process involves the specific activation of retinoic acid and retinoid X receptors (RARs and RXRs), which are nuclear receptors of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. Teleost fish are suitable models to study vertebrate development, such as skeletogenesis. Cell systems capable of in vitro mineralization have been developed for several fish species and may provide new insights into the specific cellular and molecular events related to vitamin A activity in bone, complementary to in vivo studies. This work aims at investigating the in vitro effects of RA (0.5 and 12.5 μM) on proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization of two gilthead seabream bone-derived cell lines (VSa13 and VSa16), and at identifying molecular targets of its action through gene expression analysis. RA induced phenotypic changes and cellular proliferation was inhibited in both cell lines in a cell type-dependent manner (36-59% in VSa13 and 17-46% in VSa16 cells). While RA stimulated mineral deposition in VSa13 cell cultures (50-62% stimulation), it inhibited the mineralization of extracellular matrix in VSa16 cells (11-57% inhibition). Expression of hormone receptor genes (rars and rxrs), and extracellular matrix-related genes such as matrix and bone Gla proteins (mgp and bglap), osteopontin (spp1) and type I collagen (col1a1) were differentially regulated upon exposure to RA in proliferating, differentiating and mineralizing cultures of VSa13 and VSa16 cells. Altogether, our results show: (i) RA affects proliferative and mineralogenic activities in two fish skeletal cell types and (ii) that during phenotype transitions, specific RA nuclear receptors and bone-related genes are differentially expressed in a cell type-dependent manner. PMID:24291400

  15. PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN33, a protein conserved in the plastid lineage, is associated with the chloroplast thylakoid membrane and provides stability to photosystem II supercomplexes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fristedt, Rikard; Herdean, Andrei; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Mamedov, Fikret; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Last, Robert L; Lundin, Björn

    2015-02-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a multiprotein complex that catalyzes the light-driven water-splitting reactions of oxygenic photosynthesis. Light absorption by PSII leads to the production of excited states and reactive oxygen species that can cause damage to this complex. Here, we describe Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) At1g71500, which encodes a previously uncharacterized protein that is a PSII auxiliary core protein and hence is named PHOTOSYSTEM II PROTEIN33 (PSB33). We present evidence that PSB33 functions in the maintenance of PSII-light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) supercomplex organization. PSB33 encodes a protein with a chloroplast transit peptide and one transmembrane segment. In silico analysis of PSB33 revealed a light-harvesting complex-binding motif within the transmembrane segment and a large surface-exposed head domain. Biochemical analysis of PSII complexes further indicates that PSB33 is an integral membrane protein located in the vicinity of LHCII and the PSII CP43 reaction center protein. Phenotypic characterization of mutants lacking PSB33 revealed reduced amounts of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes, very low state transition, and a lower capacity for nonphotochemical quenching, leading to increased photosensitivity in the mutant plants under light stress. Taken together, these results suggest a role for PSB33 in regulating and optimizing photosynthesis in response to changing light levels. PMID:25511433

  16. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  17. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Erica M.; Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann; Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  18. Differentially Expressed Proteins Associated with Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianghui; Fu, Jianming; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Pan, Hongyu; Bai, Guihua

    2013-01-01

    Background Fusarium head blight (FHB), mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum, substantially reduces wheat grain yield and quality worldwide. Proteins play important roles in defense against the fungal infection. This study characterized differentially expressed proteins between near-isogenic lines (NILs) contrasting in alleles of Fhb1, a major FHB resistance gene in wheat, to identify proteins underlining FHB resistance of Fhb1. Methods The two-dimensional protein profiles were compared between the Fusarium-inoculated spikes of the two NILs collected 72 h after inoculation. The protein profiles of mock- and Fusarium-inoculated Fhb1+NIL were also compared to identify pathogen-responsive proteins. Results Eight proteins were either induced or upregulated in inoculated Fhb1+NIL when compared with mock-inoculated Fhb1+NIL; nine proteins were either induced or upregulated in the Fusarium-inoculated Fhb1+NIL when compared with Fusarium-inoculated Fhb1−NIL. Proteins that were differentially expressed in the Fhb1+NIL, not in the Fhb1−NIL, after Fusarium inoculation included wheat proteins for defending fungal penetration, photosynthesis, energy metabolism, and detoxification. Conclusions Coordinated expression of the identified proteins resulted in FHB resistance in Fhb1+NIL. The results provide insight into the pathway of Fhb1-mediated FHB resistance. PMID:24376514

  19. A Study of Differential Rotation on II Pegasi Using Starspot Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, Rachael M.; Harmon, R. O.; Vutisalchavakul, N.; Henry, G.

    2009-01-01

    II Pegasi is an RS CVn binary consisting of a main-sequence star and a K2 subgiant which are tidally locked and orbit one another with a 6.724333-day period. The subgiant is known to exhibit exceptionally large dark starspots on its surface. In this study B- and V- filter light curves obtained from 1987-2007 via the Vanderbilt/Tennessee State 0.4-m Automated Photometric Telescope on Mount Hopkins, AZ were inverted to produce images of the starspots to look for evidence of latitude-dependent differential rotation on the spotted star's surface. The surface maps presented here provide convincing evidence that the star's equatorial regions rotate with a shorter period than do higher latitudes, as is observed on the Sun. We acknowledge the support of Ohio Wesleyan and Lehigh Universities.

  20. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed. PMID:26408650

  1. Continuous infusion of angiotensin II modulates hypertrophic differentiation and apoptosis of chondrocytes in cartilage formation in a fracture model mouse.

    PubMed

    Kawahata, Hirohisa; Sotobayashi, Daisuke; Aoki, Motokuni; Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Ogihara, Toshio; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-06-01

    Although components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are reported to be expressed in cultured chondrocytes and cartilage, little is known about the precise function of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in chondrocytes. In this study, we employed a rib fracture model mouse to investigate the effect of Ang II on chondrocytes. Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) was expressed in chondrocytes in the growth plate of mouse tibia. Continuous infusion of Ang II to rib-fractured mice resulted in a significant increase in the volume of cartilage, suggesting Ang II-induced hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. It was also confirmed by a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Sox9 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which are genes related to chondrocyte differentiation, and type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which are hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific molecular markers. Chondrocyte hypertrophy with upregulation of these genes was attenuated by administration of olmesartan, an AT1R blocker, but not by hydralazine. Moreover, Ang II infusion significantly suppressed apoptosis of chondrocytes, accompanied by significant induction of mRNA expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL. Olmesartan, but not hydralazine, significantly attenuated the reduction of apoptotic cells and the increase in anti-apoptotic genes induced by Ang II infusion. Overall, the present study demonstrated that Ang II promoted hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and reduced apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes independently of high blood pressure. The present data indicate the role of Ang II in cartilage, and might provide a new concept for treatment of cartilage diseases. PMID:25693858

  2. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  3. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  4. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus coelomocytes after Vibrio splendidus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Chenghua; Li, Ye; Zhang, Pengjuan; Shao, Yina; Jin, Chunhua; Li, Taiwu

    2014-06-01

    Skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) was the main limitation in the development of Apostichopus japonicus culture industries. To better understand how Vibrio splendidus modulates SUS outbreak, the immune response of A. japonicus coelomocytes after the pathogen challenge were investigated through comparative proteomics approach, and differentially expressed proteins were screened and characterized in the present study. A total of 40 protein spots representing 30 entries were identified at 24, 72 and 96 h post-infection. Of these proteins, 32 were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in the V. splendidus challenged samples compared to those of control. These differentially expressed proteins were mainly classified into four categories by GO analysis, in which approximate 33% of proteins showed to be related to immunity response. The mRNA expression levels of 6 differentially expressed proteins were further validated by qRT-PCR. Similar protein-mRNA-level expression patterns were detected in genes of phospholipase (spot 4), G protein (spot 20), annexin (spot 30) and filamin (spot 31). Whilst the levels of ficolin (spot 12) and calumenin (spot 14) transcripts were not corresponded with those of their translation products. These data provide a new insight to understand the molecular immune mechanism of sea cucumber responsive towards pathogen infection. PMID:24468075

  5. Protein-protein interactions within the Fatty Acid Synthase-II system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for mycobacterial viability.

    PubMed

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Guerrini, Olivier; Mourey, Lionel; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2004-12-01

    Despite the existence of efficient chemotherapy, tuberculosis remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. New drugs are urgently needed to reduce the potential impact of the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The front-line antibiotic isoniazid (INH), and several other drugs, target the biosynthesis of mycolic acids and especially the Fatty Acid Synthase-II (FAS-II) elongation system. This biosynthetic pathway is essential and specific for mycobacteria and still represents a valuable system for the search of new anti-tuberculous agents. Several data, in the literature, suggest the existence of protein-protein interactions within the FAS-II system. These interactions themselves might serve as targets for a new generation of drugs directed against Mtb. By using an extensive in vivo yeast two-hybrid approach and in vitro co-immunoprecipitation, we have demonstrated the existence of both homotypic and heterotypic interactions between the known components of FAS-II. The condensing enzymes KasA, KasB and mtFabH interact with each other and with the reductases MabA and InhA. Furthermore, we have designed and constructed point mutations of the FAS-II reductase MabA, able to disrupt its homotypic interactions and perturb the interaction pattern of this protein within FAS-II. Finally, we showed by a transdominant genetic approach that these mutants are dominant negative in both non-pathogenic and pathogenic mycobacteria. These data allowed us to draw a dynamic model of the organization of FAS-II. They also represent an important step towards the design of a new generation of anti-tuberculous agents, as being inhibitors of essential protein-protein interactions. PMID:15554959

  6. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  7. Identification of Differentiation-Related Proteins in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Tissues by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Yao, Kun; Zhang, Lang; Zhang, Ying; Han, Yin; Liu, Hui-Ling; Liu, Xiang-Wen; Su, Gang; Yuan, Wen-Zhen; Wei, Xiao-Dong; Guan, Quan-Lin; Zhu, Bing-Dong

    2016-10-01

    There is a significant correlation between the degree of tumor differentiation and the survival of patients with gastric cancers. In this report, we compared proteomic differences between poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma tissues in order to identify differentiation-related proteins that may be closely correlated with differentiation of gastric cancer pathogenesis. We identified 7 proteins, of which calreticulin precursor, tapasinERP57 heterodimer, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2, class Pi glutathione S-transferase, and chain A crystal structure of human enolase 1 were upregulated in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma compared with well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma, while myosin-11 isoform SM2A and actin alpha cardiac were downregulated. Two of them, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 are enzymes involved in glycolytic pathway. The upregulation of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma was confirmed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we observed 107 cases with gastric adenocarcinoma and found that the high expression of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 correlates with tumor size (P = .0001 and P = .0017, respectively), depth of invasion (P = .0024 and P = .0261, respectively), and poor prognosis of patients. In conclusion, with this proteomic analysis, pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 were identified upregulated in poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma comparing with well-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma. The expression level of pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 isoform M2 and enolase 1 was significantly correlated with overall survival. Some of them would be differentiation-related cancer biomarkers and are associated with tumor metastasis, invasion, and prognosis. PMID:27624754

  8. Differential regulation of RNA polymerases I, II, and III by the TBP-binding repressor Dr1.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Khoo, B C; Inostroza, J A; Reinberg, D; Jackson, S P

    1994-10-21

    RNA polymerases I, II, and III each use the TATA-binding protein (TBP). Regulators that target this shared factor may therefore provide a means to coordinate the activities of the three nuclear RNA polymerases. The repressor Dr1 binds to TBP and blocks the interaction of TBP with polymerase II- and polymerase III-specific factors. This enables Dr1 to coordinately regulate transcription by RNA polymerases II and III. Under the same conditions, Dr1 does not inhibit polymerase I transcription. By selectively repressing polymerases II and III, Dr1 may shift the physiological balance of transcriptional output in favor of polymerase I. PMID:7939686

  9. Detecting differential protein expression in large-scale population proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Soyoung; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2014-06-17

    Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput quantitative proteomics shows great potential in clinical biomarker studies, identifying and quantifying thousands of proteins in biological samples. However, methods are needed to appropriately handle issues/challenges unique to mass spectrometry data in order to detect as many biomarker proteins as possible. One issue is that different mass spectrometry experiments generate quite different total numbers of quantified peptides, which can result in more missing peptide abundances in an experiment with a smaller total number of quantified peptides. Another issue is that the quantification of peptides is sometimes absent, especially for less abundant peptides and such missing values contain the information about the peptide abundance. Here, we propose a Significance Analysis for Large-scale Proteomics Studies (SALPS) that handles missing peptide intensity values caused by the two mechanisms mentioned above. Our model has a robust performance in both simulated data and proteomics data from a large clinical study. Because varying patients’ sample qualities and deviating instrument performances are not avoidable for clinical studies performed over the course of several years, we believe that our approach will be useful to analyze large-scale clinical proteomics data.

  10. p300/β-Catenin Interactions Regulate Adult Progenitor Cell Differentiation Downstream of WNT5a/Protein Kinase C (PKC).

    PubMed

    Rieger, Megan E; Zhou, Beiyun; Solomon, Nicola; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Li, Changgong; Nguyen, Cu; Liu, Yixin; Pan, Jie-Hong; Minoo, Parviz; Crandall, Edward D; Brody, Steven L; Kahn, Michael; Borok, Zea

    2016-03-18

    Maintenance of stem/progenitor cell-progeny relationships is required for tissue homeostasis during normal turnover and repair. Wnt signaling is implicated in both maintenance and differentiation of adult stem/progenitor cells, yet how this pathway serves these dichotomous roles remains enigmatic. We previously proposed a model suggesting that specific interaction of β-catenin with either of the homologous Kat3 co-activators, p300 or CREB-binding protein, differentially regulates maintenance versus differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Limited knowledge of endogenous mechanisms driving differential β-catenin/co-activator interactions and their role in adult somatic stem/progenitor cell maintenance versus differentiation led us to explore this process in defined models of adult progenitor cell differentiation. We focused primarily on alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells, progenitors of distal lung epithelium, and identified a novel axis whereby WNT5a/protein kinase C (PKC) signaling regulates specific β-catenin/co-activator interactions to promote adult progenitor cell differentiation. p300/β-catenin but not CBP/β-catenin interaction increases as AT2 cells differentiate to a type I (AT1) cell-like phenotype. Additionally, p300 transcriptionally activates AT1 cell-specific gene Aqp-5. IQ-1, a specific inhibitor of p300/β-catenin interaction, prevents differentiation of not only primary AT2 cells, but also tracheal epithelial cells, and C2C12 myoblasts. p300 phosphorylation at Ser-89 enhances p300/β-catenin interaction, concurrent with alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. WNT5a, a traditionally non-canonical WNT ligand regulates Ser-89 phosphorylation and p300/β-catenin interactions in a PKC-dependent manner, likely involving PKCζ. These studies identify a novel intersection of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling in adult progenitor cell differentiation that has important implications for targeting β-catenin to modulate adult progenitor cell

  11. Differential protein expression in human corneal endothelial cells cultured from young and older donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Rawe, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To establish a baseline protein fingerprint of cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC), to determine whether the protein profiles exhibit age-related differences, and to identify proteins differentially expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Methods Corneas were obtained from five young (<30 years old) and five older donors (>50 years old). HCEC were cultured, and protein was extracted from confluent passage 3 cells. Extracts from each age group were pooled to form two samples. Proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2-D) gels and stained with SyproRuby. Resultant images were compared to identify protein spots that were either similarly expressed or differentially expressed by at least twofold. Protein spots were then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Results Protein spots were well resolved, and patterns were reproducible on 2-D gels using either pH 3–10 or pH 4–7 IPG strips. Two-dimensional gels prepared with pH 4–7 IPG strips were used for differential display analysis, which was reproduced on three separate pairs of gels. MALDI-TOF identified 58 proteins with similar expression; 30 proteins were expressed twofold higher in HCEC from young donors; five proteins were expressed twofold higher in cells from older donors; and 10 proteins were identified in gels from young donors that did not match in gels from older donors. Several proteins expressed at higher levels in younger donors support metabolic activity, protect against oxidative damage, or mediate protein folding or degradation. Conclusions This is the first proteomic comparison of proteins expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Although restricted to proteins with isoelectric points between pH 4.0 and pH 7.0, the data obtained represent an initial step in the investigation of molecular mechanisms that underlie physiologically important age-related differences in cultured HCEC

  12. Molecular force probe measurement of antigen I/II-matrix protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Soell, Martine; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Hannig, Matthias; Haïkel, Youssef; Sano, Hidehiko; Selimovic, Denis

    2010-12-01

    Viridans streptococci possess a family of immunologically and structurally related cell-surface proteins, termed antigen I/II, which may function as adhesins and enable oral streptococci to adhere to saliva-coated surfaces and matrix proteins. Here we used atomic force microscopy in the molecular force mode to measure the specific interaction forces between antigen I/II and two matrix proteins, collagen and fibronectin. These matrix proteins provide important binding sites for adherence of oral streptococcal in dentinal caries and endocarditis, respectively. Antigen I/II-coated cantilever tips were brought into contact with collagen- or fibronectin-coated silica coverslips. For the protein I/II-fibronectin interaction experiments, the mean strength of the last ruptures was 216 pN, with most of the detachments located around 125 pN. In antigen I/II-collagen interaction experiments, the mean strength of the last rupture forces corresponded to 136 pN, with the most frequent unbinding force around 75 pN. Thus, our findings definitely suggest that, under the present experimental conditions, antigen I/II binds more strongly to fibronectin than to type I collagen. This might be of relevance for the attachment of viridians streptococci to surfaces exposed to strong hydrodynamic shearing forces under in vivo conditions. PMID:21083620

  13. Cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins enhance the osteogenic protein-1-induced osteoblastic cell differentiation of C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lee-Chuan C; Tsai, Alicia D; Zavala, Michelle C; Lee, John C

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1; also known as BMP-7) induces differentiation of the pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C2C12 into osteoblastic cells. OP-1 also alters the steady-state levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding for the cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins (CDMPs) in C2C12 cells. In the present study, the effects of exogenous CDMPs on bone cell differentiation induced by OP-1 in C2C12 cells were examined. Exogenous CDMP-1, -2, and -3 synergistically and dose-dependently enhanced OP-1 action in stimulating alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and osteocalcin (OC) mRNA expression. AP staining studies revealed that the combination of OP-1 and CDMP enhanced OP-1 action by stimulating those cells that had responded to OP-1 and not by activating additional cells. The combination did not change the mRNA expression of the BMPs and their receptors. CDMP-1 enhanced the suppression of the OP-1-induced expression of the myogeneic differentiation regulator MyoD. CDMP-1 and OP-1 alone stimulated Smad5 protein expression, but the combination of OP-1 and CDMP-1 stimulated synergistically Smad5 protein expression. Thus, one mechanism of the observed synergy involved enhancement of the induced Smad5 protein expression. At the same protein concentration, CDMP-1 is most potent in enhancing OP-1 activity in inducing osteoblastic cell differentiation of C2C12 cells. CDMP-3 is about 80% as potent as CDMP-1, and CDMP-2 is the least potent (about 50% of CDMP-1). PMID:15389555

  14. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-01-01

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity. PMID:26213934

  15. The RNA binding protein RBM38 (RNPC1) regulates splicing during late erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Heinicke, Laurie A; Nabet, Behnam; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; van Zalen, Sebastiaan; Cieply, Benjamin; Russell, J Eric; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P

    2013-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a prevalent mechanism in mammals that promotes proteomic diversity, including expression of cell-type specific protein isoforms. We characterized a role for RBM38 (RNPC1) in regulation of alternative splicing during late erythroid differentiation. We used an Affymetrix human exon junction (HJAY) splicing microarray to identify a panel of RBM38-regulated alternatively spliced transcripts. Using microarray databases, we noted high RBM38 expression levels in CD71(+) erythroid cells and thus chose to examine RBM38 expression during erythroid differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells, detecting enhanced RBM38 expression during late erythroid differentiation. In differentiated erythroid cells, we validated a subset of RBM38-regulated splicing events and determined that RBM38 regulates activation of Protein 4.1R (EPB41) exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation. Using Epb41 minigenes, Rbm38 was found to be a robust activator of exon 16 splicing. To further address the mechanism of RBM38-regulated alternative splicing, a novel mammalian protein expression system, followed by SELEX-Seq, was used to identify a GU-rich RBM38 binding motif. Lastly, using a tethering assay, we determined that RBM38 can directly activate splicing when recruited to a downstream intron. Together, our data support the role of RBM38 in regulating alternative splicing during erythroid differentiation. PMID:24250749

  16. The RNA Binding Protein RBM38 (RNPC1) Regulates Splicing during Late Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Laurie A.; Nabet, Behnam; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; van Zalen, Sebastiaan; Cieply, Benjamin; Russell, J. Eric; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a prevalent mechanism in mammals that promotes proteomic diversity, including expression of cell-type specific protein isoforms. We characterized a role for RBM38 (RNPC1) in regulation of alternative splicing during late erythroid differentiation. We used an Affymetrix human exon junction (HJAY) splicing microarray to identify a panel of RBM38-regulated alternatively spliced transcripts. Using microarray databases, we noted high RBM38 expression levels in CD71+ erythroid cells and thus chose to examine RBM38 expression during erythroid differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells, detecting enhanced RBM38 expression during late erythroid differentiation. In differentiated erythroid cells, we validated a subset of RBM38-regulated splicing events and determined that RBM38 regulates activation of Protein 4.1R (EPB41) exon 16 during late erythroid differentiation. Using Epb41 minigenes, Rbm38 was found to be a robust activator of exon 16 splicing. To further address the mechanism of RBM38-regulated alternative splicing, a novel mammalian protein expression system, followed by SELEX-Seq, was used to identify a GU-rich RBM38 binding motif. Lastly, using a tethering assay, we determined that RBM38 can directly activate splicing when recruited to a downstream intron. Together, our data support the role of RBM38 in regulating alternative splicing during erythroid differentiation. PMID:24250749

  17. Integral and differential form of the protein folding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, Anna

    2004-07-01

    The availability of the complete genomic sequences of many species, including human, has raised enormous expectations in medicine, pharmacology, ecology, biotechnology and forensic sciences. However, knowledge is only a first step toward understanding, and we are only at the early stage of a scientific process that might lead us to satisfy all the expectations raised by the genomic projects. In this review I will discuss the present status of computational methods that attempt to infer the unique three-dimensional structure of proteins from their amino acid sequences. Although this problem has been defined as the “holy grail” of biology, it represents only one of the many hurdles in our path towards the understanding of life at a molecular level.

  18. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  19. TMEM120A and B: Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Important for Adipocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose I.; Czapiewski, Rafal; Mouras, Rabah; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the nuclear envelope is a major signaling node for the cell that can influence tissue differentiation processes. Here we present two nuclear envelope trans-membrane proteins TMEM120A and TMEM120B that are paralogs encoded by the Tmem120A and Tmem120B genes. The TMEM120 proteins are expressed preferentially in fat and both are induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Knockdown of one or the other protein altered expression of several genes required for adipocyte differentiation, Gata3, Fasn, Glut4, while knockdown of both together additionally affected Pparg and Adipoq. The double knockdown also increased the strength of effects, reducing for example Glut4 levels by 95% compared to control 3T3-L1 cells upon pharmacologically induced differentiation. Accordingly, TMEM120A and B knockdown individually and together impacted on adipocyte differentiation/metabolism as measured by lipid accumulation through binding of Oil Red O and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS). The nuclear envelope is linked to several lipodystrophies through mutations in lamin A; however, lamin A is widely expressed. Thus it is possible that the TMEM120A and B fat-specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins may play a contributory role in the tissue-specific pathology of this disorder or in the wider problem of obesity. PMID:26024229

  20. Identification of differentially expressed plasma proteins in atherosclerotic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Lobina, Omar; Rocchiccioli, Silvia; Nieddu, Gabriele; Ucciferri, Nadia; De Muro, Pierina; Idini, Michela; Nguyen, Hai Quy Tram; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    Besides hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, several factors are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many of them being closely related to each other owing to common origins or pathways. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunctions in diabetes include reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, increased ROS and prothrombotic factors production, as well as activation of receptors for advanced glycation end-products. These alterations contribute to create a pro-inflammatory/thrombotic state that ultimately leads to plaque formation and complication. This study aimed at identifying differentially expressed plasma proteins between T2DM and non-diabetic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS. Before analysis, plasma samples were enriched in low-expression proteins through combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries. Both mono- and two-dimensional western blotting were performed for data validation. Differentially expressed proteins were mapped onto STRING v10 to build a protein-protein interaction network. Sixteen differentially expressed spots were identified with a high score. Among them, there were fibrinogen beta and gamma chains, complement C1r, C3 and C4-B subcomponents, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), vitronectin and CD5 antigen-like. Protein-Protein interaction analysis evidenced a network among differentially expressed proteins in which vitronectin seems to represent a potentially pivotal node among fibrinolysis, complement dependent immune responses and inflammation in accordance with a number of in vitro and in vivo evidences for a contributory role of these proteins to the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27037039

  1. HNF4α Regulates Claudin-7 Protein Expression during Intestinal Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Attila E.; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Gerner-Smidt, Christian; Powell, Doris R.; Vertino, Paula M.; Koval, Michael; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a dynamic barrier that maintains the distinct environments of intestinal tissue and lumen. Epithelial barrier function is defined principally by tight junctions, which, in turn, depend on the regulated expression of claudin family proteins. Claudins are expressed differentially during intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) differentiation. However, regulatory mechanisms governing claudin expression during epithelial differentiation are incompletely understood. We investigated the molecular mechanisms regulating claudin-7 during IEC differentiation. Claudin-7 expression is increased as epithelial cells differentiate along the intestinal crypt–luminal axis. By using model IECs we observed increased claudin-7 mRNA and nascent heteronuclear RNA levels during differentiation. A screen for potential regulators of the CLDN7 gene during IEC differentiation was performed using a transcription factor/DNA binding array, CLDN7 luciferase reporters, and in silico promoter analysis. We identified hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α as a regulatory factor that bound endogenous CLDN7 promoter in differentiating IECs and stimulated CLDN7 promoter activity. These findings support a role of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α in controlling claudin-7 expression during IEC differentiation. PMID:26216285

  2. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the class II transactivator and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells1

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyesuk; Scharer, Christopher D.; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W.; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when Blimp-1, the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. ShRNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in reexpression of CIITA and I-A. Compared to conditional Blimp-1 knock out and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knock out mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression. PMID:22851713

  3. Bayesian identification of protein differential expression in multi-group isobaric labelled mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Jow, Howsun; Boys, Richard J; Wilkinson, Darren J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we develop a Bayesian statistical inference approach to the unified analysis of isobaric labelled MS/MS proteomic data across multiple experiments. An explicit probabilistic model of the log-intensity of the isobaric labels' reporter ions across multiple pre-defined groups and experiments is developed. This is then used to develop a full Bayesian statistical methodology for the identification of differentially expressed proteins, with respect to a control group, across multiple groups and experiments. This methodology is implemented and then evaluated on simulated data and on two model experimental datasets (for which the differentially expressed proteins are known) that use a TMT labelling protocol. PMID:25153608

  4. Upc2p-associated differential protein expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hoehamer, Christopher F; Cummings, Edwin D; Hilliard, George M; Morschhäuser, Joachim; David Rogers, Phillip

    2009-10-01

    The gain-of-function mutation G648D in UPC2 causes ERG11 up-regulation and increased fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans. In this study, we performed 2-DE and PMF to identify proteomic alterations in an ERG11-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate compared with its fluconazole-susceptible parent strain. We identified 23 differentially expressed proteins, and among them, seven became differentially expressed in a C. albicans wild-type strain after the introduction of a UPC2 allele carrying this mutation. These Upc2p-regulated proteins may contribute to fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. PMID:19750515

  5. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor promotes adipocyte differentiation and restores adipocyte size in high-fat/high-fructose diet-induced insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Shum, Michaël; Pinard, Sandra; Guimond, Marie-Odile; Labbé, Sébastien M; Roberge, Claude; Baillargeon, Jean-Patrice; Langlois, Marie-France; Alterman, Mathias; Wallinder, Charlotta; Hallberg, Anders; Carpentier, André C; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    This study was aimed at establishing whether specific activation of angiotensin II (ANG II) type 2 receptor (AT2R) modulates adipocyte differentiation and function. In primary cultures of subcutaneous (SC) and retroperitoneal (RET) preadipocytes, both AT2R and AT1R were expressed at the mRNA and protein level. Cells were stimulated with ANG II or the AT2R agonist C21/M24, alone or in the presence of the AT1R antagonist losartan or the AT2R antagonist PD123,319. During differentiation, C21/M24 increased PPARγ expression in both RET and SC preadipocytes while the number of small lipid droplets and lipid accumulation solely increased in SC preadipocytes. In mature adipocytes, C21/M24 decreased the mean size of large lipid droplets. Upon abolishment of AT2R expression using AT2R-targeted shRNAs, expressions of AT2R, aP2, and PPARγ remained very low, and cells were unable to differentiate. In Wistar rats fed a 6-wk high-fat/high-fructose (HFHF) diet, a significant shift toward larger adipocytes was observed in RET and SC adipose tissue depots. C21/M24 treatments for 6 wk restored normal adipocyte size distribution in both these tissue depots. Moreover, C21/M24 and losartan decreased hyperinsulinemia and improved insulin sensitivity impaired by HFHF diet. A strong correlation between adipocyte size area and glucose infusion rate during euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was observed. These results indicate that AT2R is involved in early adipocyte differentiation, while in mature adipocytes and in a model of insulin resistance AT2R activation restores normal adipocyte morphology and improves insulin sensitivity. PMID:23149621

  6. Role of heterodimerization of c-Fos and Fra1 proteins in osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Takada, Yasunari; Radolf, Martin; Eferl, Robert; Yaniv, Moshe; Wagner, Erwin F; Matsuo, Koichi

    2007-04-01

    Bone resorbing osteoclasts are specialized macrophages that cannot differentiate in the absence of c-Fos, a member of the dimeric transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein-1). However, osteoclast differentiation in the absence of c-Fos can be rescued in vitro and in vivo by Fra1, a Fos-like protein and transcriptional target of c-Fos. To enable AP-1 proteins binding to DNA, c-Fos or Fra1 must heterodimerize with a partner such as c-Jun, JunB and JunD. In this study, we investigated the dimerization partners of c-Fos and Fra1 required for osteoclast differentiation using synthetic "single-chain" AP-1 dimers in which c-Fos or Fra1 is tethered via a linker to Jun proteins. When c-Fos was analyzed in combination with any Jun protein, including a c-Jun mutant lacking major phosphorylation sites for c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), osteoclasts were efficiently formed from c-Fos-deficient hematopoietic precursors. However, Fra1 in combination with any Jun protein could not rescue osteoclastogenesis. The ability to rescue was compared to transcriptional activity measured in transient transfection assays using promoters driven by consensus AP-1 sites or a composite AP-1/NFAT binding site. These data show that a single Jun/c-Fos dimer is sufficient for osteoclast differentiation, likely due to its transactivation ability for a broader range of promoters, in particular consensus AP-1 sites. We propose that Fra1 together with a dimerization partner different from Jun proteins can rescue osteoclast differentiation in c-Fos-deficient precursors. PMID:17189721

  7. Differential proteomics analysis of proteins from human diabetic and age-related cataractous lenses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Shao, Jun; Yao, Yong; Chu, Zhao Dong; Yu, Qian Qian; Zhao, Wei; Lin, Qing; Zhang, Zi Yin

    2013-01-01

    Backgound: To investigate the differential lens proteomics between diabetic cataract, age-related cataract, and natural subjects. Materials and Methods: Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), mass spectrometry (MS), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed. Total soluble proteins in lenses of type I diabetic cataract, age-related cataract (nondiabetic) patients, and normal control were extracted and subjected to 2-DE. The differential protein spots were recovered, digested with trypsin, and further applied to MALDI-TOF-MS. ELISA analysis was used to determine the levels of differential proteins in lenses of three groups. Results: 2-DE analysis reflected that lens proteins of normal control, diabetic, and age-related cataract subjects were in the section of pH 5-9 and the relative molecular weights were 14-97 kDa, while relative molecular weight of more abundant crystallines was localized at 20-31 kDa. five differential protein spots were detected and identified using MALDI-TOF-MS, including beta-crystallin A3, alpha-crystallin B chain, chain A of crystal structure of truncated human beta-B1-crystallin, beta-crystallin B1, and an interesting unnamed protein product highly similar to alpha-crystallin B chain, respectively. ELISA analysis revealed that lenses of diabetic cataract patients should contain significantly more concentrations of beta-crystallin A3, alpha-crystallin B chain, and beta-crystallin B1 than those of age-related cataract patients and normal control. Conclusion: This study clearly reflected the differential proteins of diabetic cataract, age-related cataract lenses compared with natural subjects, and it is helpful for the further research on the principles and mechanisms of different types of cataract. PMID:24520233

  8. The desmosomal protein Desmoglein 1 aids recovery of epidermal differentiation after acute ultraviolet light exposure

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jodi L.; Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Sirico, Anna; Agidi, Ada T.; Antonini, Dario; Missero, Caterina; Green, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal structure is damaged by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light but the molecular mechanisms governing structural repair are largely unknown. UVB (290-320 nm wavelengths) exposure prior to induction of differentiation reduced expression of differentiation-associated proteins, including Desmoglein 1 (Dsg1), Desmocollin 1 (Dsc1) and Keratins 1 and 10 (K1/K10) in a dose-dependent manner in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs). The UVB- induced reduction in both Dsg1 transcript and protein was associated with reduced binding of the p63 transcription factor to previously unreported enhancer regulatory regions of the Dsg1 gene. Since Dsg1 promotes epidermal differentiation in addition to participating in cell-cell adhesion, the role of Dsg1 in aiding differentiation after UVB damage was tested. Compared to controls, depleting Dsg1 via shRNA resulted in further reduction of Dsc1 and K1/K10 expression in monolayer NHEK cultures and in abnormal epidermal architecture in organotypic skin models recovering from UVB exposure. Ectopic expression of Dsg1 in keratinocyte monolayers rescued the UVB-induced differentiation defect. Treatment of UVB-exposed monolayer or organotypic cultures with Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, partially restored differentiation marker expression, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for reversing UV-induced impairment of epidermal differentiation after acute sun exposure. PMID:24594668

  9. Combining size-exclusion chromatography with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange to study protein conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Alexey A; Helmy, Roy

    2016-01-29

    Methods for protein characterization are being actively developed based on the growing importance of protein therapies and applications. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the use of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) in combination with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) to compare protein global conformational changes at different solution conditions. Using chaotropic mobile phase additive, differential HDX was used to detect a number of solvent accessible labile protons of protein on-column at pH and temperature conditions which provided unrestricted intrinsic H/D exchange (all-or-nothing approach). Varying SEC on-column conditions allowed for protein conformational changes to be observed. Temperature and pressure were independently studied with regards to their effect on the proteins' (insulin, cytochrome C, ubiquitin, and myoglobin) conformational changes in the solution. The obtained ΔHDX profiles revealed protein conformational changes in solution under varied conditions manifested as the difference in the number of protons exchanged to deuterons, or vice-versa. The approach described in this manuscript could prove useful for protein batch-to-batch comparisons, for optimization of chemical reactions with enzyme as catalyst or for protein chemical modification reactions. PMID:26763301

  10. Label-Free Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals a Panel of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nai-Jun; Gao, Jiang-Ling; Liu, Yan; Song, Wei; Zhang, Zhan-Yang; Gao, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers involved in CRC, a shotgun proteomic method was applied to identify soluble proteins in three CRCs and matched normal mucosal tissues using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Label-free protein profiling of three CRCs and matched normal mucosal tissues were then conducted to quantify and compare proteins. Results showed that 67 of the 784 identified proteins were linked to CRC (28 upregulated and 39 downregulated). Gene Ontology and DAVID databases were searched to identify the location and function of differential proteins that were related to the biological processes of binding, cell structure, signal transduction, cell adhesion, and so on. Among the differentially expressed proteins, tropomyosin-3 (TPM3), endoplasmic reticulum resident protein 29 (ERp29), 18 kDa cationic antimicrobial protein (CAMP), and heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (HSPA8) were verified to be upregulated in CRC tissue and seven cell lines through western blot analysis. Furthermore, the upregulation of TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 was validated in 69 CRCs byimmunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Combination of TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 can identify CRC from matched normal mucosal achieving an accuracy of 73.2% using IHC score. These results suggest that TPM3, ERp29, CAMP, and HSPA8 are great potential IHC diagnostic biomarkers for CRC. PMID:25699276

  11. Inhibition of protein kinase C induces differentiation in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miñana, M D; Felipo, V; Grisolía, S

    1990-01-01

    1-(5-Isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H7), a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C, induced neuritogenesis in Neuro-2a cells, whereas N-(2-guanidinoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (HA 1004), which inhibits more efficiently cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases, did not. The effect, noticeable after 3 hr, was maximum (13-fold increase at 500 microM H7) between 1 and 3 days and was maintained over 2 months. In controls, 90% of the cells were undifferentiated, whereas after 3 hr with 500 microM H7 only 25% of the cells remained undifferentiated. DNA synthesis decreased as the number of differentiated cells increased. Differentiation is also functional since acetylcholinesterase activity increased approximately 7-fold after 48 hr with 500 microM H7. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a specific activator of protein kinase C, prevented or reversed the induction of neuritogenesis and the inhibition of DNA synthesis by H7. There is a good correlation between the level of protein kinase C and the percentage of differentiated cells. The results indicate that protein kinase C may play a key role in the control of differentiation of neural cells. Some possible clinical implications are briefly discussed. Images PMID:1693437

  12. Iron(II) Initiation of Lipid and Protein Oxidation in Pork: The Role of Oxymyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feibai; Jongberg, Sisse; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Weizheng; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Iron(II), added as FeSO4·7H2O, was found to increase the rate of oxygen depletion as detected electrochemically in a pork homogenate from Longissimus dorsi through an initial increase in metmyoglobin formation from oxymyoglobin and followed by formation of primary and secondary lipid oxidation products and protein oxidation as detected as thiol depletion in myofibrillar proteins. Without added iron(II), under the same conditions at 37 °C, oxygen consumption corresponded solely to the slow oxymyoglobin autoxidation. Long-lived myofibrillar protein radicals as detected by ESR spectroscopy in the presence of iron(II) were formed subsequently to oxymyoglobin oxidation, and their level was increased by lipid oxidation when oxygen was completely depleted. Similarly, the time profile for formation of lipid peroxide indicated that oxymyoglobin oxidation initiates both protein oxidation and lipid oxidation. PMID:27217062

  13. Polypeptide composition of the purified photosystem II pigment-protein complex from spinach.

    PubMed

    Satoh, K

    1979-04-11

    The Photosystem II pigment-protein complex, the chlorophyll alpha-protein comprising the reaction center of Photosystem II, was prepared from EDTA-treated spinach chloroplasts by digitonin extraction, sucrose-gradient centrifugation, DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, and isoelectrofocussing on Ampholine. The dissociated pigment-protein complex exhibits two polypeptide subunits that migrate in SDS-polyacrylamide gel with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to molecular weights of approximately 43,000 and 27,000. the chlorophyll was always found in the free pigment zone at the completion of the electrophoresis. Heat-treatment of the sample (100 degrees C, 90 s) for electrophoresis caused association of the two polypeptides into large aggregates. It is concluded that these two polypeptides, 43,000 and 27,000, are valid structural or functional components of Photosystem II pigment-protein complex. PMID:444494

  14. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality. PMID:23570970

  15. Enzymes of type II fatty acid synthesis and apicoplast differentiation and division in Eimeria tenella⋆

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D.J.P.; Campbell, S.A.; Henriquez, F.L.; Phan, L.; Mui, E.; Richards, T.A.; Muench, S.P.; Allary, M.; Lu, J.Z.; Prigge, S.T.; Tomley, F.; Shirley, M.W.; Rice, D.W.; McLeod, R.; Roberts, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites, Eimeria tenella, Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, possess a homologous plastid-like organelle termed the apicoplast, derived from the endosymbiotic enslavement of a photosynthetic alga. However, currently no eimerian nuclear encoded apicoplast targeted proteins have been identified, unlike in Plasmodium spp. and T. gondii. In this study, we demonstrate that nuclear encoded enoyl reductase of E. tenella (EtENR) has a predicted N-terminal bipartite transit sequence, typical of apicoplast-targeted proteins. Using a combination of immunocytochemistry and EM we demonstrate that this fatty acid biosynthesis protein is located in the apicoplast of E. tenella. Using the EtENR as a tool to mark apicoplast development during the Eimeria lifecycle, we demonstrate that nuclear and apicoplast division appear to be independent events, both organelles dividing prior to daughter cell formation, with each daughter cell possessing one to four apicoplasts. We believe this is the first report of multiple apicoplasts present in the infectious stage of an apicomplexan parasite. Furthermore, the microgametes lacked an identifiable apicoplast consistent with maternal inheritance via the macrogamete. It was found that the size of the organelle and the abundance of EtENR varied with developmental stage of the E. tenella lifecycle. The high levels of EtENR protein observed during asexual development and macrogametogony is potentially associated with the increased synthesis of fatty acids required for the rapid formation of numerous merozoites and for the extracellular development and survival of the oocyst. Taken together the data demonstrate that the E. tenella apicoplast participates in type II fatty acid biosynthesis with increased expression of ENR during parasite growth. Apicoplast division results in the simultaneous formation of multiple fragments. The division mechanism is unknown, but is independent of nuclear division and occurs prior to daughter

  16. The Crystalline Structure of Escherichia Coli Derived, - and Holo-Rat Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Nathan Shoup

    1993-01-01

    Crystal of apo- and holo-rat cellular retinol binding protein II from the recombinant protein isolated from E. coli were grown. X-ray data to about 2A resolution for both crystal forms were collected. The phases for both data sets were determined by the molecular replacement technique using cellular retinol binding protein. The structures were then refined. The electron density from bound retinol was observed in the holo-form. Other than the presence or absence of bound retinol, little difference was noted in the structures of the apo- and holo-protein. The retinol was bound in a interior cavity with the hydroxyl group in the center of the protein, and the ionone ring near the surface. The hydroxyl group of the retinol made a hydrogen bond to glutamine 108, and the amine group of lysine 40 came into Van der Waals contact with the isoprene chain. The structure of cellular retinol binding protein II was then compared with the structures of five other intracellular lipid binding proteins: adipocyte lipid binding protein, cellular retinol binding protein, intestinal fatty acid binding protein, p2 protein from myelin sheaths, and a midgut fatty acid binding protein.

  17. Differential Toxicity of Antibodies to the Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hornemann, Simone; Herrmann, Uli S.; Arand, Michael; Hawke, Simon; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against the prion protein PrPC can antagonize prion replication and neuroinvasion, and therefore hold promise as possible therapeutics against prion diseases. However, the safety profile of such antibodies is controversial. It was originally reported that the monoclonal antibody D13 exhibits strong target-related toxicity, yet a subsequent study contradicted these findings. We have reported that several antibodies against certain epitopes of PrPC, including antibody POM1, are profoundly neurotoxic, yet antibody ICSM18, with an epitope that overlaps with POM1, was reported to be innocuous when injected into mouse brains. In order to clarify this confusing situation, we assessed the neurotoxicity of antibodies D13 and ICSM18 with dose-escalation studies using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and various histological techniques. We report that both D13 and ICSM18 induce rapid, dose-dependent, on-target neurotoxicity. We conclude that antibodies directed to this region may not be suitable as therapeutics. No such toxicity was found when antibodies against the flexible tail of PrPC were administered. Any attempt at immunotherapy or immunoprophylaxis of prion diseases should account for these potential untoward effects. PMID:26821311

  18. Methylated arsenic metabolites bind to PML protein but do not induce cellular differentiation and PML-RARα protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian Qian; Zhou, Xin Yi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Bu, Na; Zhou, Jin; Cao, Feng Lin; Naranmandura, Hua

    2015-09-22

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is one of the most effective therapeutic agents used for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The probable explanation for As2O3-induced cell differentiation is the direct targeting of PML-RARα oncoprotein by As2O3, which results in initiation of PML-RARα degradation. However, after injection, As2O3 is rapidly methylated in body to different intermediate metabolites such as trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)), therefore, it remains unknown that which arsenic specie is actually responsible for the therapeutic effects against APL. Here we have shown the role of As2O3 (as iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites (i.e., MMA(III)/DMA(III)) in NB4 cells. Inorganic iAs(III) predominantly showed induction of cell differentiation, while MMA(III) and DMA(III) specifically showed to induce mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, respectively. On the other hand, in contrast to iAs(III), MMA(III) showed stronger binding affinity for ring domain of PML recombinant protein, however, could not induce PML protein SUMOylation and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. In summary, our results suggest that the binding of arsenicals to the ring domain of PML proteins is not associated with the degradation of PML-RARα fusion protein. Moreover, methylated arsenicals can efficiently lead to cellular apoptosis, however, they are incapable of inducing NB4 cell differentiation. PMID:26213848

  19. Methylated arsenic metabolites bind to PML protein but do not induce cellular differentiation and PML-RARα protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan Fang; Bu, Na; Zhou, Jin; Cao, Feng Lin; Naranmandura, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is one of the most effective therapeutic agents used for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The probable explanation for As2O3-induced cell differentiation is the direct targeting of PML-RARα oncoprotein by As2O3, which results in initiation of PML-RARa degradation. However, after injection, As2O3 is rapidly methylated in body to different intermediate metabolites such as trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAIII), therefore, it remains unknown that which arsenic specie is actually responsible for the therapeutic effects against APL. Here we have shown the role of As2O3 (as iAsIII) and its intermediate metabolites (i.e., MMAIII/DMAIII) in NB4 cells. Inorganic iAsIII predominantly showed induction of cell differentiation, while MMAIII and DMAIII specifically showed to induce mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, respectively. On the other hand, in contrast to iAsIII, MMAIII showed stronger binding affinity for ring domain of PML recombinant protein, however, could not induce PML protein SUMOylation and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. In summary, our results suggest that the binding of arsenicals to the ring domain of PML proteins is not associated with the degradation of PML-RARa fusion protein. Moreover, methylated arsenicals can efficiently lead to cellular apoptosis, however, they are incapable of inducing NB4 cell differentiation. PMID:26213848

  20. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay differentiates between Bolbphorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II sp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate between Bolbophorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II species cercariae. Both trematode species are prevalent throughout the commercial catfish industry,.as both infect the ram’s horn snail, Plano...

  1. Differential Relationships between WISC-IV and WIAT-II Scales: An Evaluation of Potentially Moderating Child Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konold, Timothy R.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable debate exists regarding the accuracy of intelligence tests with members of different groups. This study investigated differential predictive validity of the "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition". Participants from the WISC-IV--WIAT-II standardization linking sample (N = 550) ranged in age from 6 through 16 years (M…

  2. Higher-Order Factor Structure of the Differential Ability Scales-II: Consistency across Ages 4 to 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; Low, Justin A.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Patel, Puja G.; Ridley, Kristen P.

    2010-01-01

    The recently published second edition of the Differential Abilities Scale (DAS-II) is designed to measure multiple broad and general abilities from Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory. Although the technical manual presents information supporting the test's structure, additional research is needed to determine the constructs measured by the test and…

  3. Analysis of protein expression in zebrafish during gonad differentiation by targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Schönenberger, René; Eggen, Rik I L; Segner, Helmut; Suter, Marc J-F

    2013-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing sex determination and differentiation in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) are not fully understood. To gain more insights into the function of specific genes in these complex processes, the expression of multiple candidates needs to be assessed, preferably on the protein level. Here, we developed a targeted proteomics method based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to study the candidate sex-related proteins in zebrafish which were selected based on a global proteomics analysis of adult gonads and representational difference analysis of male and female DNA, as well as on published information on zebrafish and other vertebrates. We employed the developed SRM protocols to acquire time-resolved protein expression profiles during the gonad differentiation period in vas::EGFP transgenic zebrafish. Evidence on protein expression was obtained for the first time for several candidate genes previously studied only on the mRNA level or suggested by bioinformatic predictions. Tuba1b (tubulin alpha 1b), initially included in the study as one of the potential housekeeping proteins, was found to be preferentially expressed in the adult testis with nearly absent expression in the ovary. The revealed changes in protein expression patterns associated with gonad differentiation suggest that several of the examined proteins, especially Ilf2 and Ilf3 (interleukin enhancer-binding factors 2 and 3), Raldh3 (retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type 3), Zgc:195027 (low density lipoprotein-related receptor protein 3) and Sept5a (septin 5a), may play a specific role in the sexual differentiation in zebrafish. PMID:23968773

  4. The spot 14 protein inhibits growth and induces differentiation and cell death of human MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The S14 (spot 14) gene encodes a protein that is predominantly expressed in lipogenic tissues, such as the liver, white and brown adipose tissues and the lactating mammary glands. Accumulated evidence suggests that S14 could play an important role in the induction of lipogenic enzymes. In humans, the S14 locus resides in the chromosome region 11q13, which is frequently amplified in breast tumours, and as a result, it has been suggested that this protein could play a role in the metabolism and growth of these kinds of tumours. In the present study, we have examined the effects of S14 overexpression in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We found that S14 causes (i) an inhibition of cell proliferation and of anchorage-independent growth, (ii) a marked reduction in the number of viable cells and (iii) the induction of differentiation and cell death of these cells. The inhibition of cell growth was associated with a decrease in the expression of cyclin D1 and a reduction of cyclin D1 promoter activity. Increased expression of S14 also caused the accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings suggest that S14 may function as an important modulator of tumorigenesis in human breast by decreasing cell growth and inducing cell death and differentiation. PMID:15819613

  5. Glucocorticoid-induced differentiation of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts is mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-6.

    PubMed

    Boden, S D; Hair, G; Titus, L; Racine, M; McCuaig, K; Wozney, J M; Nanes, M S

    1997-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) at physiological concentrations promote osteoblast differentiation from fetal calvarial cells, calvarial organ cultures, and bone marrow stromal cells; however, the cellular pathways involved are not known. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are recognized as important mediators of osteoblast differentiation. Specific roles for individual BMPs during postembryonic membranous bone formation have yet to be determined. We recently reported that GC potentiated the osteoblast differentiation effects of BMP-2 and BMP-4, but not of BMP-6, which, by itself, was the most potent of the three. In the present study, we used fetal rat secondary calvarial cultures to study the role of BMP-6 during early osteoblast differentiation. Treatment with the GC triamcinolone (10(-9) M) resulted in a 5- to 8-fold increase in BMP-6 steady-state messenger RNA levels, peaking at 12 h. In contrast, BMPs -2, -4, -5, -7, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 messenger RNA levels increased by less than 2-fold, after GC treatment, compared with untreated control cultures at 24 h. BMP-6 protein secretion increased 6- to 7-fold by 12 h and 12-fold (from 7.5 to 90 ng/ml) by 24 h, as measured by quantitative Western analysis. Treatment of cells with oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to BMP-6 diminished secretion of BMP-6 protein and significantly inhibited the GC-induced differentiation, as determined by a 10-fold decrease in the number of mineralized bone nodules, compared with controls that were treated with sense oligonucleotides or no oligonucleotides (ANOVA, P < 0.05). The antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of differentiation was rescued by treatment with exogenous recombinant human BMP-6. We conclude that GC-induced differentiation of osteoblasts from the pluripotent precursors is mediated, in part, by BMP-6. These results suggest that BMP-6 has an important and unique role during early osteoblast differentiation. PMID:9202223

  6. Differential Expression of Proteins and mRNAs from Border Cells and Root Tips of Pea.

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, L. A.; Woo, H. H.; Nicoll, S. M.; Hawes, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    Many plants release large numbers of metabolically active root border cells into the rhizosphere. We have proposed that border cells, cells produced by the root cap meristem that separate from the rest of the root upon reaching the periphery of the cap, are a singularly differentiated part of the root system that modulates the environment of the plant root by producing specific substances to be released into the rhizosphere. Proteins synthesized in border cells exhibit profiles that are very distinct from those of the root tip (root cap, root meristem, and adjacent cells). In vivo-labeling experiments demonstrate that 13% of the proteins that are abundant in preparations from border cells are undetectable in root tip preparations. Twenty-five percent of the proteins synthesized by border cells in a 1-h period are rapidly excreted into the incubation medium. Quantitative variation in levels of specific marker proteins, including glutamine synthetase, heat-shock protein 70, and isoflavone reductase, also occurs between border cells and cells in the root tip. mRNA differential-display assays demonstrate that these large qualitative and quantitative differences in protein expression are correlated with similarly distinct patterns of gene expression. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a major switch in gene expression accompanies differentiation into root border cells, as expected for cells with specialized functions in plant development. PMID:12228604

  7. Differential protein expression in the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes induced by the insecticide temephos.

    PubMed

    Games, P D; Alves, S N; Katz, B B; Tomich, J M; Serrão, J E

    2016-09-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for pathogens of malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis. Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) is a known vector of lymphatic filariasis. Its control in Brazil has been managed using the organophosphate temephos. Studies examining the proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus that are differentially expressed in response to temephos further understanding of the modes of action of the insecticide and may potentially identify resistance factors in the mosquito. In the present study, a comparative proteomic analysis, using 2-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify midgut proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae that were differentially expressed in response to exposure to temephos relative to those in untreated controls. A total of 91 protein spots were differentially expressed; 40 were upregulated and 51 were downregulated by temephos. A total of 22 proteins, predominantly upregulated, were identified as known to play a role in the immune response, whereas the downregulated proteins were involved in energy and protein catabolism. This is the first proteome study of the midgut of Cx. quinquefasciatus and it provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of insecticide-induced responses in the mosquito. PMID:27072633

  8. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  9. p204, a p200 family protein, as a multifunctional regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yi; Lengyel, Peter; Liu, Chuan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-inducible p200 family comprises a group of homologous mouse and human proteins. Most of these have an N-terminal DAPIN domain and one or two partially conserved, 200 amino acid long C-terminal domains (designated as 200X domain). These proteins play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, tissue differentiation, apoptosis and senescence. p200 family proteins are involved also in autoimmunity and the control of tumor growth. These proteins function by binding to various target proteins (e.g. transcription factors, signaling proteins, oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins) and modulating target activity. This review concentrates on p204, a murine member of the family and its roles in regulating cell proliferation, cell and tissue differentiation (e.g. of skeletal muscle myotubes, beating cardiac myocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes and macrophages) and signaling by Ras proteins. The expression of p204 in various tissues as promoted by tissue-specific transcription factors, its distribution among subcellular compartments, and the controls of these features are also discussed. PMID:19027346

  10. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  11. Riproximin is a recently discovered type II ribosome inactivating protein with potential for treating cancer.

    PubMed

    Adwan, Hassan; Bayer, Helene; Pervaiz, Asim; Sagini, Micah; Berger, Martin R

    2014-11-01

    The development of new anticancer drugs is a salient problem and the traditional use of plants is a potentially rich source of information for detecting new molecules with antineoplastic activity. Riproximin is a recently detected cytotoxic type II ribosome inactivating protein with high selectivity for certain tumor cell lines. Its activity was recognized as the main component in a plant powder used by African healers for treating cancer. By ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase gene sequencing analysis, the powder was identified to be derived from the plant Ximenia americana. The cDNA sequence of riproximin was identified, the protein was modeled to contain one A- and a B-chain, respectively, and a reliable purification procedure from kernels of X. americana was established. Riproximin displays high but differential antiproliferative activity in a panel of human and rodent cancer cell lines, with concentrations inhibiting cell proliferation by 50% (IC50 values) that diverge by a factor of 100. Consistent antineoplastic activity was detected in colorectal and pancreatic cancer liver metastasis models in rats. The cytotoxic mechanism of action was determined to be based on cellular uptake of riproximin followed by its A-chain prompted depurination of the 28S ribosomal RNA and induction of unfolded protein response. Riproximin's specificity depended on its B-chain connected binding to cell surface glycans, the presence of which is crucial for subsequent internalization into cells and cytotoxicity. These N- and O-glycans include bi- and tri-antennary NA structures (NA2/NA3) as well as Tn3 structures (clustered Tn antigen). Riproximin was found to crosslink proteins with N- and O-glycan structure, thus indicating both types of binding sites on its B chain. Due to this crosslinking ability, riproximin is expected to show prominent cytotoxicity towards cells expressing both, NA2/NA3 and clustered Tn structures. Apart from the properties of riproximin, the plant X. americana

  12. MyoD synergizes with the E-protein HEB beta to induce myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maura H; Perry, Robert L S; Fauteux, Mélanie C; Berkes, Charlotte A; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2006-08-01

    The MyoD family of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors function as heterodimers with members of the E-protein family to induce myogenic gene activation. The E-protein HEB is alternatively spliced to generate alpha and beta isoforms. While the function of these molecules has been studied in other cell types, questions persist regarding the molecular functions of HEB proteins in skeletal muscle. Our data demonstrate that HEB alpha expression remains unchanged in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas HEB beta is upregulated during the early phases of terminal differentiation. Upon induction of differentiation, a MyoD-HEB beta complex bound the E1 E-box of the myogenin promoter leading to transcriptional activation. Importantly, forced expression of HEB beta with MyoD synergistically lead to precocious myogenin expression in proliferating myoblasts. However, after differentiation, HEB alpha and HEB beta synergized with myogenin, but not MyoD, to activate the myogenin promoter. Specific knockdown of HEB beta by small interfering RNA in myoblasts blocked differentiation and inhibited induction of myogenin transcription. Therefore, HEB alpha and HEB beta play novel and central roles in orchestrating the regulation of myogenic factor activity through myogenic differentiation. PMID:16847330

  13. Iridium(III) Luminescent Probe for Detection of the Malarial Protein Biomarker Histidine Rich Protein-II.

    PubMed

    Davis, Keersten M; Bitting, Anna L; Markwalter, Christine F; Bauer, Westley S; Wright, David W

    2015-01-01

    This work outlines the synthesis of a non-emissive, cyclometalated Ir(III) complex, Ir(ppy)2(H2O)2(+) (Ir1), which elicits a rapid, long-lived phosphorescent signal when coordinated to a histidine-containing protein immobilized on the surface of a magnetic particle. Synthesis of Ir1, in high yields,is complete O/N and involves splitting of the parent cyclometalated Ir(III) chloro-bridged dimer into two equivalents of the solvated complex. To confirm specificity, several amino acids were probed for coordination activity when added to the synthesized probe, and only histidine elicited a signal response. Using BNT-II, a branched peptide mimic of the malarial biomarker Histidine Rich Protein II (pfHRP-II), the iridium probe was validated as a tool for HRP-II detection. Quenching effects were noted in the BNT-II/Ir1 titration when compared to L-Histidine/Ir1, but these were attributed to steric hindrance and triplet state quenching. Biolayer interferometry was used to determine real-time kinetics of interaction of Ir1 with BNT-II. Once the system was optimized, the limit of detection of rcHRP-II using the probe was found to be 12.8 nM in solution. When this protein was immobilized on the surface of a 50 µm magnetic agarose particle, the limit of detection was 14.5 nM. The robust signal response of this inorganic probe, as well as its flexibility of use in solution or immobilized on a surface, can lend itself toward a variety of applications, from diagnostic use to imaging. PMID:26273845

  14. Differentially expressed proteins of soybean (Glycine max) pulvinus in light and dark conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean leaves (Glycine max) both track and avoid the sun through turgor changes of the pulvinus tissue at the base of leaves. Pulvinar response is known to be affected by both diurnally varying environmental factors and circadian patterns. Differential expression of the proteins between light and d...

  15. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  16. Kinetics of the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by pea protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2005-11-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) catalyzes the phosphorylation of various cellular proteins and excessive activities have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases. We hypothesized that positively charged peptides can be produced through enzymatic hydrolysis of pea proteins; such peptides could then bind to negatively charged calmodulin (CaM) at a physiological pH level and inhibit CaMKII activity. Pea protein isolate was hydrolyzed with an alkaline protease (alcalase) and filtered through a 1000-mol wt cutoff membrane. The permeate, which contained low-molecular weight peptides, was used to isolate cationic peptides on an SP-Sepharose column by ion exchange chromatography. Separation of the permeate on the SP-Sepharose column yielded two fractions with net positive charges that were subsequently used for enzyme inhibition studies. Fraction I eluted earlier from the column and contained lower contents of lysine and arginine than Fraction II, which eluted later. Results show that both peptide fractions inhibited CaMKII activity mostly in a competitive manner, although kinetic data suggested that inhibition by Fraction II may be of the mixed type. Kinetic analysis (K(m) and K(i)) showed that affinity of peptides in Fraction II for CaM was more than that in Fraction I, which was directly correlated with the higher inhibitory properties of Fraction II against CaMKII. The results suggest that it may be possible to use pea protein-derived cationic peptides to modulate CaMKII activities. PMID:16111873

  17. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Latron, F; Jotterand-Bellomo, M; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Bernard, M; Strominger, J L; Accolla, R S

    1988-01-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class II-negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids. Images PMID:3127829

  18. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Alberdi, M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50–1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as Fv/Fm, although the characteristic peak temperature of the S2/3QB – charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700+) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700+ re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed. PMID:23183256

  19. Excess manganese differentially inhibits photosystem I versus II in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Millaleo, R; Reyes-Díaz, M; Alberdi, M; Ivanov, A G; Krol, M; Hüner, N P A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of exposure to increasing manganese concentrations (50-1500 µM) from the start of the experiment on the functional performance of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) and photosynthetic apparatus composition of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared. In agreement with earlier studies, excess Mn caused minimal changes in the PSII photochemical efficiency measured as F(v)/F(m), although the characteristic peak temperature of the S(2/3)Q(B) (-) charge recombinations was shifted to lower temperatures at the highest Mn concentration. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses also did not exhibit any significant change in the relative abundance of PSII-associated polypeptides: PSII reaction centre protein D1, Lhcb1 (major light-harvesting protein of LHCII complex), and PsbO (OEC33, a 33 kDa protein of the oxygen-evolving complex). In addition, the abundance of Rubisco also did not change with Mn treatments. However, plants grown under excess Mn exhibited increased susceptibility to PSII photoinhibition. In contrast, in vivo measurements of the redox transients of PSI reaction centre (P700) showed a considerable gradual decrease in the extent of P700 photooxidation (P700(+)) under increased Mn concentrations compared to control. This was accompanied by a slower rate of P700(+) re-reduction indicating a downregulation of the PSI-dependent cyclic electron flow. The abundance of PSI reaction centre polypeptides (PsaA and PsaB) in plants under the highest Mn concentration was also significantly lower compared to the control. The results demonstrate for the first time that PSI is the major target of Mn toxicity within the photosynthetic apparatus of Arabidopsis plants. The possible involvement mechanisms of Mn toxicity targeting specifically PSI are discussed. PMID:23183256

  20. Structure of catabolite activator protein with cobalt(II) and sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ramya R.; Lawson, Catherine L.

    2014-04-15

    The crystal structure of E. coli catabolite activator protein with bound cobalt(II) and sulfate ions at 1.97 Å resolution is reported. The crystal structure of cyclic AMP–catabolite activator protein (CAP) from Escherichia coli containing cobalt(II) chloride and ammonium sulfate is reported at 1.97 Å resolution. Each of the two CAP subunits in the asymmetric unit binds one cobalt(II) ion, in each case coordinated by N-terminal domain residues His19, His21 and Glu96 plus an additional acidic residue contributed via a crystal contact. The three identified N-terminal domain cobalt-binding residues are part of a region of CAP that is important for transcription activation at class II CAP-dependent promoters. Sulfate anions mediate additional crystal lattice contacts and occupy sites corresponding to DNA backbone phosphate positions in CAP–DNA complex structures.

  1. Formation and fate of a complete 31-protein RNA polymerase II transcription preinitiation complex.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kenji; Calero, Guillermo; Brown, Christopher R; Liu, Xin; Davis, Ralph E; Boeger, Hinrich; Kornberg, Roger D

    2013-03-01

    Whereas individual RNA polymerase II (pol II)-general transcription factor (GTF) complexes are unstable, an assembly of pol II with six GTFs and promoter DNA could be isolated in abundant homogeneous form. The resulting complete pol II transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) contained equimolar amounts of all 31 protein components. An intermediate in assembly, consisting of four GTFs and promoter DNA, could be isolated and supplemented with the remaining components for formation of the PIC. Nuclease digestion and psoralen cross-linking mapped the PIC between positions -70 and -9, centered on the TATA box. Addition of ATP to the PIC resulted in quantitative conversion to an open complex, which retained all 31 proteins, contrary to expectation from previous studies. Addition of the remaining NTPs resulted in run-off transcription, with an efficiency that was promoter-dependent and was as great as 17.5% with the promoters tested. PMID:23303183

  2. Identification of Leaf Proteins Differentially Accumulated between Wheat Cultivars Distinct in Their Levels of Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhiwei; Dong, Kun; Ge, Pei; Bian, Yanwei; Dong, Liwei; Deng, Xiong; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    The drought-tolerant 'Ningchun 47' (NC47) and drought-sensitive 'Chinese Spring' (CS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were treated with different PEG6000 concentrations at the three-leaf stage. An analysis on the physiological and proteomic changes of wheat seedling in response to drought stress was performed. In total, 146 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots were separated and recognised using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 101 DAP spots representing 77 unique proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These proteins were allocated to 10 groups according to putative functions, which were mainly involved in carbon metabolism (23.4%), photosynthesis/respiration (22.1%) and stress/defence/detoxification (18.2%). Some drought stress-related proteins in NC47, such as enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2, fibrillin-like protein, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1 and 70-kDa heat shock protein, were more upregulated than those in CS. Multivariate principal components analysis revealed obvious differences between the control and treatments in both NC47 and CS, while cluster analysis showed that the DAPs displayed five and six accumulation patterns in NC47 and CS, respectively. Protein-protein interaction network analysis showed that some key DAPs, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein, 50S ribosomal protein L1, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and 70-kDa heat shock protein, with upregulated accumulation in NC47, had complex interactions with other proteins related to amino acid metabolism, carbon metabolism, energy pathway, signal transduction, stress/defence/detoxification, protein folding and nucleotide metabolism. These proteins could play important roles in drought-stress tolerance and contribute to the relatively stronger drought tolerance of NC47. PMID

  3. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Sawyer R.; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  4. Proteomics-Based Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins from Human Keratinocytes Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide

    PubMed Central

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tackett, Alan J; Byrum, Stephanie; Avaritt, Nathan L; Sengupta, Deepanwita; Moreland, Linley W; Tchounwou, Paul B; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Arsenic is a widely distributed environmental toxicant that can cause multi-tissue pathologies. Proteomic assays allow for the identification of biological processes modulated by arsenic in diverse tissue types. Method The altered abundance of proteins from HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line exposed to arsenic was quantified using a label-free LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry workflow. Selected proteomics results were validated using western blot and RT-PCR. A functional annotation analytics strategy that included visual analytical integration of heterogeneous data sets was developed to elucidate functional categories. The annotations integrated were mainly tissue localization, biological process and gene family. Result The abundance of 173 proteins was altered in keratinocytes exposed to arsenic; in which 96 proteins had increased abundance while 77 proteins had decreased abundance. These proteins were also classified into 69 Gene Ontology biological process terms. The increased abundance of transferrin receptor protein (TFRC) was validated and also annotated to participate in response to hypoxia. A total of 33 proteins (11 increased abundance and 22 decreased abundance) were associated with 18 metabolic process terms. The Glutamate--cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the only protein annotated with the term sulfur amino acid metabolism process, had increased abundance while succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit, mitochondrial precursor (SDHB), a tumor suppressor, had decreased abundance. Conclusion A list of 173 differentially abundant proteins in response to arsenic trioxide was grouped using three major functional annotations covering tissue localization, biological process and protein families. A possible explanation for hyperpigmentation pathologies observed in arsenic toxicity is that arsenic exposure leads to increased iron uptake in the normally hypoxic human skin. The proteins mapped to metabolic process terms and

  5. Secretogranin II; a Protein Increased in the Myocardium and Circulation in Heart Failure with Cardioprotective Properties

    PubMed Central

    Røsjø, Helge; Stridsberg, Mats; Florholmen, Geir; Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav; Ottesen, Anett Hellebø; Sjaastad, Ivar; Husberg, Cathrine; Dahl, Mai Britt; Øie, Erik; Louch, William E.; Omland, Torbjørn; Christensen, Geir

    2012-01-01

    Background Several beneficial effects have been demonstrated for secretogranin II (SgII) in non-cardiac tissue. As cardiac production of chromogranin A and B, two related proteins, is increased in heart failure (HF), we hypothesized that SgII could play a role in cardiovascular pathophysiology. Methodology/Principal Findings SgII production was characterized in a post-myocardial infarction heart failure (HF) mouse model, functional properties explored in experimental models, and circulating levels measured in mice and patients with stable HF of moderate severity. SgII mRNA levels were 10.5 fold upregulated in the left ventricle (LV) of animals with myocardial infarction and HF (p<0.001 vs. sham-operated animals). SgII protein levels were also increased in the LV, but not in other organs investigated. SgII was produced in several cell types in the myocardium and cardiomyocyte synthesis of SgII was potently induced by transforming growth factor-β and norepinephrine stimulation in vitro. Processing of SgII to shorter peptides was enhanced in the failing myocardium due to increased levels of the proteases PC1/3 and PC2 and circulating SgII levels were increased in mice with HF. Examining a pathophysiological role of SgII in the initial phase of post-infarction HF, the SgII fragment secretoneurin reduced myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardiomyocyte apoptosis by 30% and rapidly increased cardiomyocyte Erk1/2 and Stat3 phosphorylation. SgII levels were also higher in patients with stable, chronic HF compared to age- and gender-matched control subjects: median 0.16 (Q1–3 0.14–0.18) vs. 0.12 (0.10–0.14) nmol/L, p<0.001. Conclusions We demonstrate increased myocardial SgII production and processing in the LV in animals with myocardial infarction and HF, which could be beneficial as the SgII fragment secretoneurin protects from ischemia-reperfusion injury and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Circulating SgII levels are also increased in patients with chronic

  6. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes. PMID:25333871

  7. Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yuki; Ito, Tasuku; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Saito, Masato; Tamaki, Takayuki; Shirasu, Ken; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-03-01

    During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

  8. Aldosterone and angiotensin II induce protein aggregation in renal proximal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Muhammad U; Poulsen, Ebbe T; Enghild, Jan J; Hoorn, Ewout; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubules are highly active transporting epithelia and are at risk of protein aggregation due to high protein turnover and/or oxidative stress. We hypothesized that the risk of aggregation was increased upon hormone stimulation and assessed the state of the intracellular protein degradation systems in the kidney from control rats and rats receiving aldosterone or angiotensin II treatment for 7 days. Control rats formed both aggresomes and autophagosomes specifically in the proximal tubules, indicating a need for these structures even under baseline conditions. Fluorescence sorted aggresomes contained various rat keratins known to be expressed in renal tubules as assessed by protein mass spectrometry. Aldosterone administration increased the abundance of the proximal tubular aggresomal protein keratin 5, the ribosomal protein RPL27, ataxin-3, and the chaperone heat shock protein 70-4 with no apparent change in the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Angiotensin II induced aggregation of RPL27 specifically in proximal tubules, again without apparent change in antiaggregating proteins or the aggresome–autophagosome markers. Albumin endocytosis was unaffected by the hormone administration. Taken together, we find that the renal proximal tubules display aggresome formation and autophagy. Despite an increase in aggregation-prone protein load in these tubules during hormone treatment, renal proximal tubules seem to have sufficient capacity for removing protein aggregates from the cells. PMID:24303148

  9. Evolution of New Function in the GTP Cyclohydrolase II Proteins of Streptomyces coelicolor†

    PubMed Central

    Spoonamore, James E.; Dahlgran, Annie L.; Jacobsen, Neil E.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2009-01-01

    The genome sequence of Streptomyces coelicolor contains three open reading frames (sco1441, sco2687, and sco6655) that encode proteins with significant (>40%) amino acid identity to GTP cyclohydrolase II (GCH II), which catalyzes the committed step in the biosynthesis of riboflavin. The physiological significance of the redundancy of these proteins in S. coelicolor is not known. However, the gene contexts of the three proteins are different, suggesting that they may serve alternate biological niches. Each of the three proteins was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and characterized to determine if their functions are biologically overlapping. As purified, each protein contains 1 molar equiv of zinc/ mol of protein and utilizes guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) as substrate. Two of these proteins (SCO 1441 and SCO 2687) produce the canonical product of GCH II, 2,5-diamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5′-phosphate (APy). Remarkably, however, one of the three proteins (SCO 6655) converts GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5′-phosphate (FAPy), as shown by UV-visible spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, and NMR. This activity has been reported for a GTP cyclohydrolase III protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074–15084], which has no amino acid sequence homology to SCO 6655. Comparison of the sequences of these proteins and mapping onto the structure of the E. coli GCH II protein [Ren, J., Kotaka, M., Lockyer, M., Lamb, H. K., Hawkins, A. R., and Stammers, D. K. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 36912–36919] allowed identification of a switch residue, Met120, which appears to be responsible for the altered fate of GTP observed with SCO 6655; a Tyr is found in the analogous position of all proteins that have been shown to catalyze the conversion of GTP to APy. The Met120Tyr variant of SCO 6655 acquires the ability to catalyze the conversion of GTP to APy, suggesting

  10. Involvement of RNA binding proteins AUF1 in mammary gland differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kentaro . E-mail: akenaga@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Sakai, Senkiti

    2007-08-01

    The expression of many genes, such as {beta}-casein, c-myc, and cyclin D1, is altered by lactogenic hormone stimulation during mammary epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that post-transcriptional regulation plays an important role to establish gene expression required to initiate milk production as well as transcriptional control. AUF1 protein, a member of the AU-rich element (ARE)-binding protein family, plays a role in ARE-mRNA turnover by regulating mRNA stability and/or translational control. Cytoplasmic localization of AUF1 protein is critically linked to function. We show that as the mammary gland differentiates, AUF1 protein moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Moreover, in mammary gland epithelial cells (HC11), stimulation by lactogenic hormone decreased cytoplasmic and increased nuclear AUF1 levels. Direct binding of AUF1 protein was observed on c-myc mRNA, but not {beta}-casein or cyclin D1 mRNA. AUF1 downregulation in HC11 cells increased the expression of {beta}-casein mRNA and decreased the expression of c-myc mRNA by lactogenic hormone. Conversely, overexpression of AUF1 inhibited these effects of lactogenic hormone stimulation in HC11 cells. These results suggest that AUF1 participates in mammary gland differentiation processes under the control of lactogenic hormone signals.

  11. Differential Expression of Proteins Associated with the Hair Follicle Cycle - Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Yang, Mifang; Li, Zhongming; Ping, Fengfeng; Fan, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicle cycling can be divided into the following three stages: anagen, catagen, and telogen. The molecular signals that orchestrate the follicular transition between phases are still unknown. To better understand the detailed protein networks controlling this process, proteomics and bioinformatics analyses were performed to construct comparative protein profiles of mouse skin at specific time points (0, 8, and 20 days). Ninety-five differentially expressed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF as 44 proteins, which were found to change during hair follicle cycle transition. Proteomics analysis revealed that these changes in protein expression are involved in Ca2+-regulated biological processes, migration, and regulation of signal transduction, among other processes. Subsequently, three proteins were selected to validate the reliability of expression patterns using western blotting. Cluster analysis revealed three expression patterns, and each pattern correlated with specific cell processes that occur during the hair cycle. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the differentially expressed proteins impacted multiple biological networks, after which detailed functional analyses were performed. Taken together, the above data may provide insight into the three stages of mouse hair follicle morphogenesis and provide a solid basis for potential therapeutic molecular targets for this hair disease. PMID:26752403

  12. Acute high-altitude hypoxic brain injury: Identification of ten differential proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyu; Qi, Yuting; Liu, Hui; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Li; Gong, Haiying; Li, Yaxiao; Li, Lingzhi; Zhang, Yongliang

    2013-11-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia can cause severe brain damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, and is involved in hypoxic brain injury. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction in hypobaric hypoxic brain damage. In this study, a rat model of hypobaric hypoxic brain injury was established to investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. As revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis, 16, 21, and 36 differential protein spots in cerebral mitochondria were observed at 6, 12, and 24 hours post-hypobaric hypoxia, respectively. Furthermore, ten protein spots selected from each hypobaric hypoxia subgroup were similarly regulated and were identified by mass spectrometry. These detected proteins included dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, creatine kinase B-type, isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, elongation factor Ts, ATP synthase beta-subunit, 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha-subunit, Chain A of 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase, NADH dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein 8 and tropomyosin beta chain. These ten proteins are all involved in the electron transport chain and the function of ATP synthase. Our findings indicate that hypobaric hypoxia can induce the differential expression of several cerebral mitochondrial proteins, which are involved in the regulation of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:25206614

  13. Differential Expression of Proteins Associated with the Hair Follicle Cycle - Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Wenrong; Cao, Lei; Tian, Tian; Yang, Mifang; Li, Zhongming; Ping, Fengfeng; Fan, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicle cycling can be divided into the following three stages: anagen, catagen, and telogen. The molecular signals that orchestrate the follicular transition between phases are still unknown. To better understand the detailed protein networks controlling this process, proteomics and bioinformatics analyses were performed to construct comparative protein profiles of mouse skin at specific time points (0, 8, and 20 days). Ninety-five differentially expressed protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF as 44 proteins, which were found to change during hair follicle cycle transition. Proteomics analysis revealed that these changes in protein expression are involved in Ca2+-regulated biological processes, migration, and regulation of signal transduction, among other processes. Subsequently, three proteins were selected to validate the reliability of expression patterns using western blotting. Cluster analysis revealed three expression patterns, and each pattern correlated with specific cell processes that occur during the hair cycle. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the differentially expressed proteins impacted multiple biological networks, after which detailed functional analyses were performed. Taken together, the above data may provide insight into the three stages of mouse hair follicle morphogenesis and provide a solid basis for potential therapeutic molecular targets for this hair disease. PMID:26752403

  14. Activation of canonical wnt pathway promotes differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs into type II alveolar epithelial cells, confers resistance to oxidative stress, and promotes their migration to injured lung tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Ran; Liu, Le; Chen, Song; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Hong-Jie; Liu, Ling; Guo, Feng-Mei; Lu, Xiao-Min; Qiu, Hai-Bo

    2013-06-01

    The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into type II alveolar epithelial (AT II) cells in vivo and in vitro, is critical for reepithelization and recovery in acute lung injury (ALI), but the mechanisms responsible for differentiation are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of the canonical wnt pathway in the differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs (mMSCs) into AT II cells. Using a modified co-culture system with murine lung epithelial-12 (MLE-12) cells and small airway growth media (SAGM) to efficiently drive mMSCs differentiation, we found that GSK 3β and β-catenin in the canonical wnt pathway were up-regulated during differentiation. The levels of surfactant protein (SP) C, SPB, and SPD, the specific markers of AT II cells, correspondingly increased in mMSCs when Wnt3a or LiCl was added to the co-culture system to activate wnt/β-catenin signaling. The expression of these factors was depressed to some extent by inhibiting the pathway with the addition of DKK 1. The differentiation rate of mMSCs also depends on their abilities to accumulate and survive in inflammatory tissue. Our results suggested that the activation of wnt/β-catenin signaling promoted mMSCs migration towards ALI mouse-derived lung tissue in a Transwell assay, and ameliorated the cell death and the reduction of Bcl-2/Bax induced by H(2) O(2), which simultaneously caused reduced GSK 3β and β-catenin in mMSCs. These data supports a potential mechanism for the differentiation of mMSCs into AT II cells involving canonical wnt pathway activation, which may be significant to their application in ALI. PMID:23154940

  15. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  16. Differential expression of the regulator of G protein signaling RGS9 protein in nociceptive pathways of different age rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jun; Moriyama, Kumi; Han, Kyung Ream; Sharma, Manohar; Han, Xiaokang; Xie, Guo-xi; Palmer, Pamela Pierce

    2005-11-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-activating proteins which act as modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors. RGS9 has two alternative splicing variants. RGS9-1 is expressed in the retina. RGS9-2 is expressed in the brain, especially abundant in the striatum. It is believed to be an essential regulatory component of dopamine and opioid signaling. In this study, we compared the expression of RGS9 proteins in the nervous system of different age groups of rats employing immunocytochemistry. In both 3-week- and 1-year-old rats, RGS9 is expressed abundantly in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle. It is also expressed abundantly in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells. Quantitative analysis showed that the intensities of RGS9 expression in 1-year-old rats are higher than those in the 3-week-old rats in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, periaqueductal gray, and gray matter of the spinal cord. In contrast, in thalamic nuclei and locus coeruleus, the intensities of RGS9 immunostaining in 3-week-old rats are higher than in 1-year-old rats. In DRG cells, there is no significant difference between the two age groups. These data suggest that RGS9 is differentially expressed with age. Such differential expression may play an important role in neuronal differentiation and development as well as in neuronal function, such as dopamine and opioid signaling. PMID:16153714

  17. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single “Calponin Family Member” Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of “sphincter proteome.” Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled “idiopathic” and facilitating practice of precision medicine. PMID:26151053

  18. Analysis of the PS II proteins MSP and CP43

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    The goals of this proposal were two-fold: (1) to analyze the impact of mutations in the psbO gene (coding for the Mn-stabilizing protein, MSP) on O{sub 2}-evolution; and (2) to analyze membrane assembly in cyanobacteria, especially the effect of iron deficiency on this process. The mutations in the psbO gene were performed in the transformable and photoheterotrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, whereas the research with membrane assembly and iron deficiency was performed in the transformable strain Synechococcus sp. PCC7942. Our work with the Synechocystis psbO gene demonstrated that the MSP protein is not an essential protein but serves a regulatory function. We produced a deletion mutant, which we call {triangle}psbO. The {triangle}psbO strain was still capable of photosynthetic growth and evolved O{sub 2} at rates of 1/3 to 1/2 that of the wild type. We have characterized this strain in some detail and have reported the results in two publications in Biochemistry. The second of the these two papers was published during this grant period and is enclosed.

  19. Secreted Frizzled related protein-4 (sFRP4) promotes epidermal differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maganga, Richard; Giles, Natalie; Adcroft, Katharine; Unni, Ambili; Keeney, Diane; Wood, Fiona; Fear, Mark Dharmarajan, Arunasalam

    2008-12-12

    The skin provides vital protection from infection and dehydration. Maintenance of the skin is through a constant program of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of epidermal cells, whereby proliferating cells in the basal layer differentiating to form the keratinized, anucleated stratum corneum. The WNT signalling pathway is known to be important in the skin. WNT signalling has been shown to be important both in epidermal development and in the maintenance and cycling of hair follicles and epidermal stem cells. However, the precise role for this pathway in epidermal differentiation remains unknown. We investigated the role of the WNT signalling inhibitor sFRP4 in epidermal differentiation. sFRP4 is expressed in both normal skin and keratinocytes in culture. Expression of sFRP4 mRNA and protein increases with keratinocyte differentiation and apoptosis, whilst exposure of keratinocytes to exogenous sFRP4 promotes apoptosis and expression of the terminal differentiation marker Involucrin. These data suggest sFRP4 promotes epidermal differentiation.

  20. Identification of Leaf Proteins Differentially Accumulated between Wheat Cultivars Distinct in Their Levels of Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yanwei; Dong, Liwei; Deng, Xiong; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    The drought-tolerant ‘Ningchun 47’ (NC47) and drought-sensitive ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were treated with different PEG6000 concentrations at the three-leaf stage. An analysis on the physiological and proteomic changes of wheat seedling in response to drought stress was performed. In total, 146 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots were separated and recognised using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 101 DAP spots representing 77 unique proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These proteins were allocated to 10 groups according to putative functions, which were mainly involved in carbon metabolism (23.4%), photosynthesis/respiration (22.1%) and stress/defence/detoxification (18.2%). Some drought stress-related proteins in NC47, such as enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2, fibrillin-like protein, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1 and 70-kDa heat shock protein, were more upregulated than those in CS. Multivariate principal components analysis revealed obvious differences between the control and treatments in both NC47 and CS, while cluster analysis showed that the DAPs displayed five and six accumulation patterns in NC47 and CS, respectively. Protein–protein interaction network analysis showed that some key DAPs, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein, 50S ribosomal protein L1, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and 70-kDa heat shock protein, with upregulated accumulation in NC47, had complex interactions with other proteins related to amino acid metabolism, carbon metabolism, energy pathway, signal transduction, stress/defence/detoxification, protein folding and nucleotide metabolism. These proteins could play important roles in drought-stress tolerance and contribute to the relatively stronger drought tolerance of NC47

  1. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  2. The dependence of Escherichia coli asparaginase II formation on cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Russell, L; Yamazaki, H

    1978-05-01

    The amount of asparaginase II in an Escherichia coli wild-type strain (cya+, crp+) markedly increased upon a shift from aerobic to anaerobic growth. However, no such increase occurred in a mutant (cya) lacking cyclic AMP synthesis unless supplemented with exogenous cyclic AMP. Since a mutant (crp) deficient in cyclic AMP receptor protein also did not support the anaerobic formation of this enzyme, it is concluded that the formation of E. coli asparaginase II depends on both cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein. PMID:207402

  3. Smooth Muscle Cell Deletion of LDL Receptor Related Protein-1 Augments AngII-Induced Superior Mesenteric Arterial and Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Frank M.; Rateri, Debra L.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Strickland, Dudley K.; Muratoglu, Selen C.; Haggerty, Christopher M.; Fornwalt, Brandon K.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective LRP1, a multifunctional protein involved in endocytosis and cell signaling pathways, leads to a range of vascular pathologies when deleted in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The purpose of this study was to determine whether LRP1 deletion in SMCs influenced AngII-induced arterial pathologies. Approach and Results LRP1 protein abundance was equivalent in selected arterial-regions, but SMC-specific LRP1 depletion had no effect on abdominal and ascending aortic diameters in young mice. To determine the effects of LRP1 deficiency on AngII vascular responses, SMC-specific LRP1 (smLRP1) +/+ and -/- mice were infused with saline, AngII, or norepinephrine (NE). Several smLRP-/- mice died of superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) rupture during AngII infusion. In surviving mice, AngII profoundly augmented SMA dilation in smLRP1-/- mice. SMA dilation was blood pressure-dependent as demonstrated by a similar response during NE infusion. SMA dilation was also associated with profound macrophage accumulation, but minimal elastin fragmentation. AngII infusion led to no significant differences in abdominal aorta diameters between smLRP1+/+ and -/- mice. In contrast, ascending aortic dilation was exacerbated markedly in AngII-infused smLRP1-/- mice, but NE had no significant effect on either aortic region. Ascending aortas of smLRP1-/- mice infused with AngII had minimal macrophage accumulation but significantly increased elastin fragmentation and mRNA abundance of several LRP1 ligands including MMP-2 and uPA. Conclusions smLRP1 deficiency had no effect on AngII-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation. Conversely, AngII infusion in smLRP1-/- mice exacerbated SMA and ascending aorta dilation. Dilation in these two regions had differential association with blood pressure and divergent pathologic characteristics. PMID:25395615

  4. Crystal structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin II at 1.27 A

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Tani, Fumito; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} X-ray crystallographic structure of sweet-tasting protein, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. {yields} The overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to that of thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. {yields} The side chain of two critical residues, 67 and 82, for sweetness was modeled in two alternative conformations. {yields} The flexibility and fluctuation of side chains at 67 and 82 seems to be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, elicits a sweet taste sensation at 50 nM. Here the X-ray crystallographic structure of one of its variants, thaumatin II, was determined at a resolution of 1.27 A. Overall structure of thaumatin II is similar to thaumatin I, but a slight shift of the C{alpha} atom of G96 in thaumatin II was observed. Furthermore, the side chain of residue 67 in thaumatin II is highly disordered. Since residue 67 is one of two residues critical to the sweetness of thaumatin, the present results suggested that the critical positive charges at positions 67 and 82 are disordered and the flexibility and fluctuation of these side chains would be suitable for interaction of thaumatin molecules with sweet receptors.

  5. Proteomic Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins between Male and Female Plants in Pistacia chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis is a strict dioecious plant with male and female flowers in individuals. In China, P. chinensis is widely planted for biodiesel oil due to high oil content in seeds. In practice it requires to grow more female plants for biodiesel production. At present, there are still no reliable methods for sex determination during the long juvenile stage of this species. In order to develop protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis, proteomic approach was used to identify differentially expressed proteins between male and female plants. Vegetative organs (leaf and stem) rather than reproductive organs/tissues were used for protein extraction so as to develop protein markers which can be used in siblings before flowering. Protein was extracted using a phenol-based protocol. By using two-dimensional electrophoresis, a total of 10 protein spots were found to be differentially expressed in leaf and stem between both sexes, of which 7 were successfully identified by mass spectrometry and matched to 6 functional proteins such as NB-ARC domain containing protein, light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein, asorbate peroxidase (APX), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2, temperature-induced lipocalin (TIL) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK). The sex-related difference displayed in a tissue-specific way, especially in stem. PGK existed in high abundance in stem phloem in the female, but was almost not detected in the male; APX and two TIL species were highly abundant in the stem of male plants, while their abundance was much lower in female plants. Moreover, these abundance differences were further confirmed in individual plants. Hence, it is assumed that APX, PGK and TIL might be promising candidates to serve as protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis. Our results form the basis for a further understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of sex determination in P. chinensis. PMID:23691188

  6. Proteomic identification of differentially expressed proteins between male and female plants in Pistacia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Erhui; Wu, Xiaolin; Shi, Jiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis is a strict dioecious plant with male and female flowers in individuals. In China, P. chinensis is widely planted for biodiesel oil due to high oil content in seeds. In practice it requires to grow more female plants for biodiesel production. At present, there are still no reliable methods for sex determination during the long juvenile stage of this species. In order to develop protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis, proteomic approach was used to identify differentially expressed proteins between male and female plants. Vegetative organs (leaf and stem) rather than reproductive organs/tissues were used for protein extraction so as to develop protein markers which can be used in siblings before flowering. Protein was extracted using a phenol-based protocol. By using two-dimensional electrophoresis, a total of 10 protein spots were found to be differentially expressed in leaf and stem between both sexes, of which 7 were successfully identified by mass spectrometry and matched to 6 functional proteins such as NB-ARC domain containing protein, light harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein, asorbate peroxidase (APX), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2, temperature-induced lipocalin (TIL) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK). The sex-related difference displayed in a tissue-specific way, especially in stem. PGK existed in high abundance in stem phloem in the female, but was almost not detected in the male; APX and two TIL species were highly abundant in the stem of male plants, while their abundance was much lower in female plants. Moreover, these abundance differences were further confirmed in individual plants. Hence, it is assumed that APX, PGK and TIL might be promising candidates to serve as protein molecular markers for sex determination in P. chinensis. Our results form the basis for a further understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of sex determination in P. chinensis. PMID:23691188

  7. Role of cyclooxygenase 2 in protein kinase C beta II-mediated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wangsheng; Murray, Nicole R; Weems, Capella; Chen, Lu; Guo, Huiping; Ethridge, Richard; Ceci, Jeffrey D; Evers, B Mark; Thompson, E Aubrey; Fields, Alan P

    2003-03-28

    Elevated expression of protein kinase C beta II (PKC beta II) is an early promotive event in colon carcinogenesis (Gokmen-Polar, Y., Murray, N. R., Velasco, M. A., Gatalica, Z., and Fields, A. P. (2001) Cancer Res. 61, 1375-1381). Expression of PKC beta II in the colon of transgenic mice leads to hyperproliferation and increased susceptibility to colon carcinogenesis due, at least in part, to repression of transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGF-beta RII) expression (Murray, N. R., Davidson, L. A., Chapkin, R. S., Gustafson, W. C., Schattenberg, D. G., and Fields, A. P. (1999) J. Cell Biol., 145, 699-711). Here we report that PKC beta II induces the expression of cyclooxygenase type 2 (Cox-2) in rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells in vitro and in transgenic PKC beta II mice in vivo. Cox-2 mRNA increases more than 10-fold with corresponding increases in Cox-2 protein and PGE2 production in RIE/PKC beta II cells. PKC beta II activates the Cox-2 promoter by 2- to 3-fold and stabilizes Cox-2 mRNA by at least 4-fold. The selective Cox-2 inhibitor Celecoxib restores expression of TGF-beta RII both in vitro and in vivo and restores TGF beta-mediated transcription in RIE/PKC beta II cells. Likewise, the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which inhibits PKC beta II activity and colon carcinogenesis, causes inhibition of Cox-2 protein expression, re-expression of TGF-beta RII, and restoration of TGF-beta1-mediated transcription in RIE/PKC beta II cells. Our data demonstrate that PKC beta II promotes colon cancer, at least in part, through induction of Cox-2, suppression of TGF-beta signaling, and establishment of a TGF-beta-resistant, hyperproliferative state in the colonic epithelium. Our data define a procarcinogenic PKC beta II --> Cox-2 --> TGF-beta signaling axis within the colonic epithelium, and provide a molecular mechanism by which dietary omega-3 fatty acids and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents such as Celecoxib suppress colon

  8. Degradation of antenna chlrophyll-binding protein CP43 during photoinhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Akasaka, Tatsuya

    1995-07-18

    When photosystem II (PS II) membranes from spinach were treated with Tris (0.8 M, pH 9.0) and illuminated with white light (5000 {mu}E m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) under aerobic conditions at 25{degrees}C, not only were the reaction center-forming D1 and D2 proteins degraded but the antenna chlorophyll-binding protein CP43 was also degraded. Three products of the degradation of CP43, with molecular masses of 17.0, 15.5, and 14 kDa, respectively, were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate/urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting with a specific antibody. Degradation products of another antenna chlorophyll-binding protein of PS II, CP47, were not detected under the same conditions. Concomitant with the damage to the D1 and D2 proteins and CP43, cross-linked products of the D1 protein, CP43, and CP47 were formed. These products were identified as slow-moving smeared bands in the higher molecular weight range of the gel during electrophoresis. Both the degradation and the cross-linking of these proteins were prevented by the addition of electron donors to PS II, a result that suggests that these processes were caused by the donor-side mechanism of photoinhibition. The photoinduced degradation of CP43 and the cross-linking among the D1 protein, CP43, and CP47 were less obvious in the PS II membranes that had been treated with hydroxylamine rather than Tris and in the membranes that had been treated with Tris and reconstituted by addition of an extrinsic 33-kDa protein (OEC33). These results indicate that removal of OEC33, which is closely associated with CP43, from the PS II complex accelerates the degradation and cross-linking of CP43 during photoinhibition. It is suggested that OEC33 is involved in the stabilization of the antenna chlorophyll-binding proteins in PS II during photoinhibition. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Molecular differentiation of Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae based on species-specific sequence differences in a protein coding gene.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2013-05-01

    Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are two microsporidian pathogens of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. There is evidence that N. ceranae is more virulent than N. apis subject to environmental factors like climate. This makes N. ceranae one of the suspects in the increasing colony losses recently observed in many regions of the world. Correct differentiation between N. apis and N. ceranae is important and best accomplished by molecular methods. So far only protocols based on species-specific sequence differences in the 16S rRNA gene are available. However, recent studies indicated that these methods may lead to confusing results due to polymorphisms in and recombination between the multi-copy 16S rRNA genes. To solve this problem and to provide a reliable molecular tool for the differentiation between the two bee pathogenic microsporidia we here present and evaluate a duplex-PCR protocol based on species-specific sequence differences in the highly conserved gene coding for the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II largest subunit. A total of 102 honey bee samples were analyzed by the novel PCR protocol and the results were compared with the results of the originally published PCR-RFLP analysis and two recently published differentiation protocols, based on 16S rRNA sequence differences. Although the novel PCR protocol proved to be as reliable as the 16S rRNA gene based PCR-RFLP it was superior to simple 16S rRNA based PCR protocols which tended to overestimate the rate of N. ceranae infections. Therefore, we propose that species-specific sequence differences of highly conserved protein coding genes should become the preferred molecular tool for differentiation of Nosema spp. PMID:23352902

  10. Yes associated protein is a poor prognostic factor in well-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Hyun; Kim, Young Keum; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Nari; Kim, Arong; Lee, Jung Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jee Yeon; Lee, Chang Hun; Sol, Mee Young

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is a highly conserved potent regulator of cell growth and apoptosis including large tumor suppressor (LATS) and Yes-associated protein (YAP). LATS has been regarded as a tumor suppressor gene and YAP as either of a tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene. We investigated their expression in lung adenocarcinoma. YAP and LATS protein expression was assessed in 167 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and compared with clinicopathologic factors. Disease free survival and overall survival were also evaluated. YAP expression was noted in cytoplasm (48 cases; 28.7%), nuclear (34; 20.4%) and both locations (4; 2.4%). The nuclear expression was typically observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. LATS was expressed in cytoplasm when its signal is weak. Perinuclear expression of LATS was observed when it is strongly expressed. While cytoplasmic and nuclear YAP expressions were inversely related. In well differentiated adenocarcinoma patients, YAP nuclear expression was related with more frequent relapse. Both of nuclear YAP and LATS expression were more frequently observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, YAP expression exhibited more frequent relapse in well differentiated adenocarcinoma group. We suggest that YAP may act as an oncogene and predict poorer prognosis in well differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26884866