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Sample records for protein mutant r234w

  1. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  2. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  3. Mutant p53: one name, many proteins

    PubMed Central

    Freed-Pastor, William A.; Prives, Carol

    2012-01-01

    There is now strong evidence that mutation not only abrogates p53 tumor-suppressive functions, but in some instances can also endow mutant proteins with novel activities. Such neomorphic p53 proteins are capable of dramatically altering tumor cell behavior, primarily through their interactions with other cellular proteins and regulation of cancer cell transcriptional programs. Different missense mutations in p53 may confer unique activities and thereby offer insight into the mutagenic events that drive tumor progression. Here we review mechanisms by which mutant p53 exerts its cellular effects, with a particular focus on the burgeoning mutant p53 transcriptome, and discuss the biological and clinical consequences of mutant p53 gain of function. PMID:22713868

  4. Computational approaches for predicting mutant protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Shweta; Chaudhary, Vigi; Goswami, Girish K; Mathur, Nidhi

    2016-05-01

    Mutations in the protein affect not only the structure of protein, but also its function and stability. Prediction of mutant protein stability with accuracy is desired for uncovering the molecular aspects of diseases and design of novel proteins. Many advanced computational approaches have been developed over the years, to predict the stability and function of a mutated protein. These approaches based on structure, sequence features and combined features (both structure and sequence features) provide reasonably accurate estimation of the impact of amino acid substitution on stability and function of protein. Recently, consensus tools have been developed by incorporating many tools together, which provide single window results for comparison purpose. In this review, a useful guide for the selection of tools that can be employed in predicting mutated proteins' stability and disease causing capability is provided. PMID:27160393

  5. Bacillus sphaericus asporogenous mutants: morphology, protein pattern and larvicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Charles, J F; Kalfon, A; Bourgouin, C; de Barjac, H

    1988-01-01

    Asporogenous mutants from Bacillus sphaericus strains 2297 and 1593-4, blocked at different stages of the sporulation process, were isolated. Two mutants (2297 Aspo30A and 2297 Aspo34) which were blocked early in sporulation did not possess any crystalline inclusions and were poorly toxic to Culex pipiens mosquito larvae. Other mutants (2297 Aspo115, 2297 Aspo24 and 1593-4 Aspo12) which were blocked at later stages synthesized crystal-like inclusions next to the forespores, and were highly toxic to mosquito larvae. Electrophoretic protein analysis of alkali extracts from mutants and wild type strains confirmed the absence of toxic crystal-related proteins in early-blocked mutants and their presence in later ones. Western blots with antisera directed against the crystal proteins confirmed those observations. PMID:3408593

  6. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  7. The unfolded protein response selectively targets active smoothened mutants.

    PubMed

    Marada, Suresh; Stewart, Daniel P; Bodeen, William J; Han, Young-Goo; Ogden, Stacey K

    2013-06-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway, an essential regulator of developmental patterning, has been implicated in playing causative and survival roles in a range of human cancers. The signal-transducing component of the pathway, Smoothened, has revealed itself to be an efficacious therapeutic target in combating oncogenic signaling. However, therapeutic challenges remain in cases where tumors acquire resistance to Smoothened antagonists, and also in cases where signaling is driven by active Smoothened mutants that exhibit reduced sensitivity to these compounds. We previously demonstrated that active Smoothened mutants are subjected to prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention, likely due to their mutations triggering conformation shifts that are detected by ER quality control. We attempted to exploit this biology and demonstrate that deregulated Hedgehog signaling driven by active Smoothened mutants is specifically attenuated by ER stressors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). Upon UPR induction, active Smoothened mutants are targeted by ER-associated degradation, resulting in attenuation of inappropriate pathway activity. Accordingly, we found that the UPR agonist thapsigargin attenuated mutant Smoothened-induced phenotypes in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Wild-type Smoothened and physiological Hedgehog patterning were not affected, suggesting that UPR modulation may provide a novel therapeutic window to be evaluated for targeting active Smoothened mutants in disease. PMID:23572559

  8. ProTherm: Thermodynamic Database for Proteins and Mutants.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M M; An, J; Kono, H; Oobatake, M; Uedaira, H; Sarai, A

    1999-01-01

    The first release of the Thermodynamic Database for Proteins and Mutants (ProTherm) contains more than 3300 data of several thermodynamic parameters for wild type and mutant proteins. Each entry includes numerical data for unfolding Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change, heat capacity change, transition temperature, activity etc., which are important for understanding the mechanism of protein stability. ProTherm also includes structural information such as secondary structure and solvent accessibility of wild type residues, and experimental methods and other conditions. A WWW interface enables users to search data based on various conditions with different sorting options for outputs. Further, ProTherm is cross-linked with NCBI PUBMED literature database, Protein Mutant Database, Enzyme Code and Protein Data Bank structural database. Moreover, all the mutation sites associated with each PDB structure are automatically mapped and can be directly viewed through 3DinSight developed in our laboratory. The database is available at the URL, http://www.rtc.riken.go.jp/protherm.htm l PMID:9847203

  9. Analysis of the interactome of ribosomal protein S19 mutants.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Imperlini, Esther; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Ingenito, Laura; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2014-10-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia, characterized by defective erythroid progenitor maturation, is caused in one-fourth of cases by mutations of ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19), which is a component of the ribosomal 40S subunit. Our previous work described proteins interacting with RPS19 with the aim to determine its functions. Here, two RPS19 mutants, R62W and R101H, have been selected to compare their interactomes versus the wild-type protein one, using the same functional proteomic approach that we employed to characterize RPS19 interactome. Mutations R62W and R101H impair RPS19 ability to associate with the ribosome. Results presented in this paper highlight the striking differences between the interactomes of wild-type and mutant RPS19 proteins. In particular, mutations abolish interactions with proteins having splicing, translational and helicase activity, thus confirming the role of RPS19 in RNA processing/metabolism and translational control. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000640 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000640). PMID:25069755

  10. Protein Folding Simulation of Mutant Go Models of the Wild-Type Trp-cage Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhananta, Apichart; Liu, Junmin

    2008-03-01

    For the past three decades, Go models of protein folding have played important roles in the understanding of how proteins fold from random conformations to their unique native structures. Unfortunately Go models reliance on known NMR or x-ray structures to construct Go interaction potentials severely limit their predictive powers. In this work, we introduce a novel method for constructing Go interaction potentials of mutant proteins based on Go interaction potentials of wild type proteins. As a template we employ the all-atom Go model of the 20-residue Trp-cage protein (A. Linhananta, J. Boer and I. MacKay, J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 122, 114901) as the wild type Go model. Trp-cage mutants are constructed by replacing a Trp-cage residue with a different residue. In particular the Pro-12 residue of the Trp-cage is substituted by Trp-12 to produce the Trp2-cage mutant, whose native structure is not yet known. Monte Carlo simulations, using CHARMM force fields, are performed to determine the ground-state structure mutant. The resulting mutant structures are used to construct the Go interaction potential of the Trp2-cage mutant Go model.

  11. Predicting stability of Arc repressor mutants with protein stochastic moments.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Uriarte, Eugenio; Ramos de Armas, Ronal

    2005-01-17

    As more and more protein structures are determined and applied to drug manufacture, there is increasing interest in studying their stability. In this study, the stochastic moments ((SR)pi(k)) of 53 Arc repressor mutants were introduced as molecular descriptors modeling protein stability. The Linear Discriminant Analysis model developed correctly classified 43 out of 53, 81.13% of proteins according to their thermal stability. More specifically, the model classified 20/28 (71.4%) proteins with near wild-type stability and 23/25 (92%) proteins with reduced stability. Moreover, validation of the model was carried out by re-substitution procedures (81.0%). In addition, the stochastic moments based model compared favorably with respect to others based on physicochemical and geometric parameters such as D-Fire potential, surface area, volume, partition coefficient, and molar refractivity, which presented less than 77% of accuracy. This result illustrates the possibilities of the stochastic moments' method for the study of bioorganic and medicinal chemistry relevant proteins. PMID:15598555

  12. Tn5 insertion mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in surface expression of ferripyochelin-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, P.A.

    1987-07-01

    Transposon (Tn5) insertion mutants were isolated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. These mutants were screened for expression of the ferripyochelin-binding protein with monoclonal antibody in a whole-cell immunoblot assay. Fourteen mutants were identified which did not express ferripyochelin-binding protein on the cell surface. These mutants did not take up /sup 59/Fe-labeled pyochelin and grew slowly in the presence of iron chelators.

  13. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  14. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; et al

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  15. Familial prion protein mutants inhibit Hrd1-mediated retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins by depleting misfolded protein sensor BiP.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarah L; Déry, Marc-André; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    Similar to many proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway, cellular prion protein (PrP) partly retrotranslocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in an attempt to alleviate accumulation of cellular misfolded PrP. Surprisingly, familial PrP mutants fail to retrotranslocate and simultaneously block normal cellular PrP retrotranslocation. That impairments in retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins could lead to global disruptions in cellular homeostasis prompted further investigations into PrP mutant retrotranslocation defects. A gain- and loss-of-function approach identified human E3 ubiquitin ligase, Hrd1, as a critical regulator of PrP retrotranslocation in mammalian cells. Expression of familial human PrP mutants, V210I(129V) and M232R(129V), not only abolished PrP retrotranslocation, but also that of Hrd1-dependent ERAD substrates, transthyretin TTR(D18G) and α1-anti-trypsin A1AT(NHK). Mutant PrP expression decreased binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) levels by 50% and attenuated ER stress-induced BiP by increasing BiP turnover 6-fold. Overexpression of BiP with PrP mutants rescued retrotranslocation of PrP, TTR(D18G) and A1AT(NHK). PrP mutants-induced cell death was also rescued by co-expression of BiP. These results show that PrP mutants highjack the Hrd1-dependent ERAD pathway, an action that would result in misfolded protein accumulation especially in terminally differentiated neurons. This could explain the age-dependent neuronal degeneration in familial prion diseases. PMID:26740554

  16. Increased expression of the maize immunoglobulin binding protein homolog b-70 in three zein regulatory mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boston, R S; Fontes, E B; Shank, B B; Wrobel, R L

    1991-01-01

    Plants carrying floury-2, Defective endosperm-B30, or Mucronate mutations overproduce b-70, a maize homolog of the mammalian immunoglobulin binding protein. During endosperm development in these mutants, levels of both b-70 protein and RNA increase dramatically between 14 days and 20 days after pollination. At later stages, b-70 RNA levels decline while protein levels remain high. The increase in b-70 RNA levels is endosperm specific and dependent on gene dosage in the floury-2 mutant. In all three mutants, the increases in b-70 RNA and protein levels are inversely proportional to changes in zein synthesis. Although b-70 polypeptides can be extracted from purified protein bodies, they carry a carboxy-terminal endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, HDEL. We propose that induction of b-70 in these mutants is a cellular response to abnormally folded or improperly assembled storage proteins and probably reflects its role as a polypeptide chain binding protein. PMID:1840924

  17. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  18. The global translation profile in a ribosomal protein mutant resembles that of an eIF3 mutant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide assays performed in Arabidopsis and other organisms have revealed that the translation status of mRNAs responds dramatically to different environmental stresses and genetic lesions in the translation apparatus. To identify additional features of the global landscape of translational control, we used microarray analysis of polysomal as well as non-polysomal mRNAs to examine the defects in translation in a poly(A) binding protein mutant, pab2 pab8, as well as in a mutant of a large ribosomal subunit protein, rpl24b/shortvalve1. Results The mutation of RPL24B stimulated the ribosome occupancy of mRNAs for nuclear encoded ribosomal proteins. Detailed analysis yielded new insights into the translational regulon containing the ribosomal protein mRNAs. First, the ribosome occupancy defects in the rpl24b mutant partially overlapped with those in a previously analyzed initiation factor mutant, eif3h. Second, a group of mRNAs with incomplete coding sequences appeared to be uncoupled from the regulon, since their dependence on RPL24B differed from regular mRNAs. Third, different sister paralogs of the ribosomal proteins differed in their translation state in the wild-type. Some sister paralogs also differed in their response to the rpl24b mutation. In contrast to rpl24b, the pab2 pab8 mutant revealed few gene specific translational defects, but a group of seed storage protein mRNAs were stimulated in their ribosome occupancy. In the course of this work, while optimizing the statistical analysis of ribosome occupancy data, we collected 12 biological replicates of translation states from wild-type seedlings. We defined 20% of mRNAs as having a high variance in their translation state. Many of these mRNAs were functionally associated with responses to the environment, suggesting that subtle variation in the environmental conditions is sensed by plants and transduced to affect the translational efficiency of hundreds of mRNAs. Conclusions These data

  19. Properties of the coat protein of a new tobacco mosaic virus coat protein ts-mutant.

    PubMed

    Dobrov, E N; Abu-Eid, M M; Solovyev, A G; Kust, S V; Novikov, V K

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid substitutions in a majority of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP) ts-mutants have previously been mapped to the same region of the CP molecule tertiary structure, located at a distance of about 70 A from TMV virion axis. In the present work some properties of a new TMV CP ts-mutant ts21-66 (two substitutions I21=>T and D66=>G, both in the 70-A region) were studied. Thermal inactivation characteristics, sedimentation properties, circular dichroism spectra, and modification by a lysine-specific reagent, trinitrobenzensulfonic acid, of ts21-66 CP were compared with those of wild-type (U1) TMV CP. It is concluded that the 70-A region represents the most labile portion of the TMV CP molecule. Partial disordering of this region in the mutant CP at permissive temperatures leads to loss of the capacity to form two-layer aggregates of the cylindrical type, while further disordering induced by mild heating results also in the loss of the ability to form ordered helical aggregates. PMID:9055205

  20. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  1. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  2. Machine learning algorithms for predicting protein folding rates and stability of mutant proteins: comparison with statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Huang, Liang-Tsung

    2011-09-01

    Machine learning algorithms have wide range of applications in bioinformatics and computational biology such as prediction of protein secondary structures, solvent accessibility, binding site residues in protein complexes, protein folding rates, stability of mutant proteins, and discrimination of proteins based on their structure and function. In this work, we focus on two aspects of predictions: (i) protein folding rates and (ii) stability of proteins upon mutations. We briefly introduce the concepts of protein folding rates and stability along with available databases, features for prediction methods and measures for prediction performance. Subsequently, the development of structure based parameters and their relationship with protein folding rates will be outlined. The structure based parameters are helpful to understand the physical basis for protein folding and stability. Further, basic principles of major machine learning techniques will be mentioned and their applications for predicting protein folding rates and stability of mutant proteins will be illustrated. The machine learning techniques could achieve the highest accuracy of predicting protein folding rates and stability. In essence, statistical methods and machine learning algorithms are complimenting each other for understanding and predicting protein folding rates and the stability of protein mutants. The available online resources on protein folding rates and stability will be listed. PMID:21787301

  3. Protein substrates for cGMP-dependent protein phosphorylation in cilia of wild type and atalanta mutants of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Ann, K S; Nelson, D L

    1995-01-01

    In the ciliated protozoan Paramecium, swimming direction is regulated by voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the ciliary membrane. In response to depolarizing stimuli, intraciliary Ca2+ rises, triggering reversal of the ciliary power stroke and backward swimming. One class of Ca(2+)-unresponsive behavioral mutants of Paramecium, atalanta mutants, cannot swim backward even though they have functional Ca2+ channels in their ciliary membrane. Several atalanta mutants were characterized with regard to several Ca(2+)-dependent activities, but no significant difference between wild type and the mutants was detected. However, one allelic group, atalanta A (initially characterized by Hinrichsen and Kung [1984: Genet. Res. Camb. 43:11-20]), showed a helical swimming path of opposite handedness from that of wild-type cells when detergent-permeabilized cells ("models") were reactivated with MgATP. When cGMP-dependent protein kinase purified from wild-type cells was added to atalanta A models, the handedness of the swimming path was reversed. Cyclic GMP stimulated in vitro phosphorylation of several proteins in isolated cilia, and the pattern of phosphoproteins was very similar for wild type and atalanta mutants, with one exception: a protein of 59 kDa was phosphorylated much less in the mutant ata A. When ciliary proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis and then phosphorylated "on blot" by purified cGMP-dependent protein kinase, phosphoprotein patterns were similar in wild type and ata mutants except that a 48 kDa protein (p48) from ata A3 was more heavily phosphorylated. This difference in p48 phosphorylation was also observed with cGMP-dependent protein kinase purified from ata A3 mutant cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7796456

  4. Mutant forms of growth factor-binding protein-2 reverse BCR-ABL-induced transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Gishizky, M L; Cortez, D; Pendergast, A M

    1995-01-01

    Growth factor-binding protein 2 (Grb2) is an adaptor protein that links tyrosine kinases to Ras. BCR-ABL is a tyrosine kinase oncoprotein that is implicated in the pathogenesis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1)-positive leukemias. Grb2 forms a complex with BCR-ABL and the nucleotide exchange factor Sos that leads to the activation of the Ras protooncogene. In this report we demonstrate that Grb2 mutant proteins lacking amino- or carboxyl-terminal src homology SH3 domains suppress BCR-ABL-induced Ras activation and reverse the oncogenic phenotype. The Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins bind to BCR-ABL and do not impair tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutant proteins in BCR-ABL-transformed Rat-1 fibroblasts and in the human Ph1-positive leukemic cell line K562 inhibits their ability to grow as foci in soft agar and form tumors in nude mice. Furthermore, expression of the Grb2 SH3-deletion mutants in K562 cells induced their differentiation. Because Ras plays an important role in signaling by receptor and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, the use of interfering mutant Grb2 proteins may be applied to block the proliferation of other cancers that depend in part on activated tyrosine kinases for growth. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479904

  5. Reexamination of alcohol dehydrogenase structural mutants in Drosophila using protein blotting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollocher, H.; Place, A.R.

    1987-06-01

    Using protein blotting and an immuno-overlay procedure, the authors have reexamined the cross-reacting material produced by ADH null-activity mutants generated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Of the 13 mutants, 11 have an immunodetectable polypeptide of wild-type size. The native and urea denatured isoelectric points (pI) establish that 7 of 13 of the mutations have no effect on protein charge. The electrophoretic mobilities of each variant on increasing percent acrylamide gels (Ferguson analysis), reveal that 9 of the 11 immunodetectable mutations have retained the ability form dimers under native conditions. None of the inactive mutant proteins has the ability to form the adduct-bound isozyme. The authors have found no correlation between protein pI and i vivo stability. The observed frequencies of specific charge class alterations do not dispute the propensity of G:A transitions previously found for EMS mutagenesis.

  6. Expression of mutant bone morphogenetic protein receptor II worsens pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Linda J.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; McClellan, Lucas J.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; McConaha, Melinda E.; Gleaves, Linda A.; Talati, Megha A.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; West, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH), and previous studies have shown a potential link between bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR2) and PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. We exposed transgenic mice expressing mutant BMPR2 and control mice to repetitive intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin for 4 weeks. The duration of transgene activation was too short for mutant BMPR2 mice to develop spontaneous PH. Mutant BMPR2 mice had increased right ventricular systolic pressure compared to control mice, without differences in pulmonary fibrosis. We found increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1-α stabilization in lungs of mutant-BMPR2-expressing mice compared to controls following bleomycin treatment. In addition, expression of the hypoxia response element protein connective tissue growth factor was increased in transgenic mice as well as in a human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell line expressing mutant BMPR2. In mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, mutant BMPR2 expression resulted in increased HIF1-α and reactive oxygen species production following exposure to hypoxia, both of which were attenuated with the antioxidant TEMPOL. These data suggest that expression of mutant BMPR2 worsens secondary PH through increased HIF activity in vascular endothelium. This pathway could be therapeutically targeted in patients with PH secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26697175

  7. Oxysterol-binding protein ORP3 rescues the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked mutant VAPB phenotype.

    PubMed

    Darbyson, Angie; Ngsee, Johnny K

    2016-02-01

    A mutation in VAPB causes a familial form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The mutant protein (VAPB-P56S) is aggregate prone and blocks retrograde traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) including trafficking to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we report a morphological screen where overexpression of oxysterol binding protein-related protein-3 (ORP3) rescued the mutant VAPB phenotype. It resolved the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions, restored solubility of the mutant protein in non-ionic detergent, and restored trafficking of Emerin to the NE. Knockdown of ORP3 or VAPB increased the intracellular level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Decreasing PtdIns4P levels by inhibiting its synthesis reduced the severity of the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions and restored Emerin trafficking to the NE. Thus, VAPB and its interacting partners cooperatively regulate protein trafficking through the ERGIC by modulating PtdIns4P levels. PMID:26812496

  8. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  9. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens.

    PubMed

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  10. Novel quinolone resistance mutations of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase A protein: enzymatic analysis of the mutant proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, P; Maxwell, A

    1991-01-01

    Using the techniques of gap misrepair mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis, we have generated two novel quinolone resistance mutations of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase A protein. DNA sequencing showed these mutations to be Ser-83----Ala and Gln-106----Arg. The mutant proteins were overproduced and purified, and their enzymatic properties were analyzed and compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. With ciprofloxacin and other quinolones, the inhibition of DNA supercoiling, relaxation, and decatenation and the induction of DNA cleavage were investigated for both wild-type and mutant enzymes. In each assay, the mutant enzymes were found to require approximately 10 times more drug to inhibit the reaction or induce cleavage than was the wild-type enzyme. However, the Ca2(+)-directed DNA cleavage reaction was indistinguishable for wild-type and mutant gyrases. We discuss models for the gyrase-mediated bactericidal effects of quinolone drugs. Images PMID:1850970

  11. Protein structure. Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-01-30

    The 18-kilodalton translocator protein (TSPO), proposed to be a key player in cholesterol transport into mitochondria, is highly expressed in steroidogenic tissues, metastatic cancer, and inflammatory and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. TSPO ligands, including benzodiazepine drugs, are implicated in regulating apoptosis and are extensively used in diagnostic imaging. We report crystal structures (at 1.8, 2.4, and 2.5 angstrom resolution) of TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and a mutant that mimics the human Ala(147)→Thr(147) polymorphism associated with psychiatric disorders and reduced pregnenolone production. Crystals obtained in the lipidic cubic phase reveal the binding site of an endogenous porphyrin ligand and conformational effects of the mutation. The three crystal structures show the same tightly interacting dimer and provide insights into the controversial physiological role of TSPO and how the mutation affects cholesterol binding. PMID:25635101

  12. Mutant strains of Pichia pastoris with enhanced secretion of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sasha; Weaver, Jun; de Sa Campos, Katherine; Bulahan, Rhobe; Nguyen, Jackson; Grove, Heather; Huang, Amy; Low, Lauren; Tran, Namphuong; Gomez, Seth; Yau, Jennifer; Ilustrisimo, Thomas; Kawilarang, Jessica; Lau, Jonathan; Tranphung, Maivi; Chen, Irene; Tran, Christina; Fox, Marcia; Lin-Cereghino, Joan; Lin-Cereghino, Geoff P

    2013-11-01

    Although Pichia pastoris is a popular protein expression system, it exhibits limitations in its ability to secrete heterologous proteins. Therefore, a REMI (restriction enzyme mediated insertion) strategy was utilized to select mutant beta-g alactosidase s upersecretion (bgs) strains that secreted increased levels of a β-galactosidase reporter. Many of the twelve BGS genes may have functions in intracellular signaling or vesicle transport. Several of these strains also appeared to contain a more permeable cell wall. Preliminary characterization of four bgs mutants showed that they differed in the ability to enhance the export of other reporter proteins. bgs13, which has a disruption in a gene homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase C (PKC1), gave enhanced secretion of most recombinant proteins that were tested, raising the possibility that it has the universal super-secreter phenotype needed in an industrial production strain of P. pastoris. PMID:23881328

  13. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  14. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  15. Destabilizing Protein Polymorphisms in the Genetic Background Direct Phenotypic Expression of Mutant SOD1 Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  16. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I

    2009-03-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  17. ALS-linked mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) alters mitochondrial protein composition and decreases protein import.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Vande Velde, Christine; Israelson, Adrian; Xie, Jing; Bailey, Aaron O; Dong, Meng-Qui; Chun, Seung-Joo; Roy, Tamal; Winer, Leah; Yates, John R; Capaldi, Roderick A; Cleveland, Don W; Miller, Timothy M

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) cause familial ALS. Mutant SOD1 preferentially associates with the cytoplasmic face of mitochondria from spinal cords of rats and mice expressing SOD1 mutations. Two-dimensional gels and multidimensional liquid chromatography, in combination with tandem mass spectrometry, revealed 33 proteins that were increased and 21 proteins that were decreased in SOD1(G93A) rat spinal cord mitochondria compared with SOD1(WT) spinal cord mitochondria. Analysis of this group of proteins revealed a higher-than-expected proportion involved in complex I and protein import pathways. Direct import assays revealed a 30% decrease in protein import only in spinal cord mitochondria, despite an increase in the mitochondrial import components TOM20, TOM22, and TOM40. Recombinant SOD1(G93A) or SOD1(G85R), but not SOD1(WT) or a Parkinson's disease-causing, misfolded α-synuclein(E46K) mutant, decreased protein import by >50% in nontransgenic mitochondria from spinal cord, but not from liver. Thus, altered mitochondrial protein content accompanied by selective decreases in protein import into spinal cord mitochondria comprises part of the mitochondrial damage arising from mutant SOD1. PMID:21078990

  18. CHEMOSENSITIZATION BY A NON-APOPTOGENIC HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70-BINDING APOPTOSIS INDUCING FACTOR MUTANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemosensitization by a non-apoptogenic heat shock protein 70-binding apoptosis inducing factor mutant

    Abstract
    HSP70 inhibits apoptosis by neutralizing the caspase activator Apaf-1 and by interacting with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), a mitochondrial flavoprotein wh...

  19. Microtubule-mediated transport of the tumor-suppressor protein Merlin and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Benseñor, Lorena B; Barlan, Kari; Rice, Sarah E; Fehon, Richard G; Gelfand, Vladimir I

    2010-04-20

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor protein Merlin is a member of the ERM family of proteins that links the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. In humans, mutations in the NF2 gene cause neurofibromatosis type-2 (NF2), a cancer syndrome characterized by the development of tumors of the nervous system. Previous reports have suggested that the subcellular distribution of Merlin is critical to its function, and that several NF2 mutants that lack tumor-suppressor activity present improper localization. Here we used a Drosophila cell culture model to study the distribution and mechanism of intracellular transport of Merlin and its mutants. We found that Drosophila Merlin formed cytoplasmic particles that move bidirectionally along microtubules. A single NF2-causing amino acid substitution in the FERM domain dramatically inhibited Merlin particle movement. Surprisingly, the presence of this immotile Merlin mutant also inhibited trafficking of the WT protein. Analysis of the movement of WT protein using RNAi and pull-downs showed that Merlin particles are associated with and moved by microtubule motors (kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein), and that binding of motors and movement is regulated by Merlin phosphorylation. Inhibition of Merlin transport by expression of the dominant-negative mutant or depletion of kinesin-1 results in increased nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. These results demonstrate the requirement of microtubule-dependent transport for Merlin function. PMID:20368450

  20. Microtubule-mediated transport of the tumor-suppressor protein Merlin and its mutants

    PubMed Central

    Benseñor, Lorena B.; Barlan, Kari; Rice, Sarah E.; Fehon, Richard G.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2010-01-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor protein Merlin is a member of the ERM family of proteins that links the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. In humans, mutations in the NF2 gene cause neurofibromatosis type-2 (NF2), a cancer syndrome characterized by the development of tumors of the nervous system. Previous reports have suggested that the subcellular distribution of Merlin is critical to its function, and that several NF2 mutants that lack tumor-suppressor activity present improper localization. Here we used a Drosophila cell culture model to study the distribution and mechanism of intracellular transport of Merlin and its mutants. We found that Drosophila Merlin formed cytoplasmic particles that move bidirectionally along microtubules. A single NF2-causing amino acid substitution in the FERM domain dramatically inhibited Merlin particle movement. Surprisingly, the presence of this immotile Merlin mutant also inhibited trafficking of the WT protein. Analysis of the movement of WT protein using RNAi and pull-downs showed that Merlin particles are associated with and moved by microtubule motors (kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein), and that binding of motors and movement is regulated by Merlin phosphorylation. Inhibition of Merlin transport by expression of the dominant-negative mutant or depletion of kinesin-1 results in increased nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. These results demonstrate the requirement of microtubule-dependent transport for Merlin function. PMID:20368450

  1. Glycolipid analyses of light-harvesting chlorosomes from envelope protein mutants of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Thweatt, Jennifer; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Chlorosomes are large and efficient light-harvesting organelles in green photosynthetic bacteria, and they characteristically contain large numbers of bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e molecules. Self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll pigments are surrounded by a monolayer envelope membrane comprised of glycolipids and Csm proteins. Here, we analyzed glycolipid compositions of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum mutants lacking one, two, or three Csm proteins by HPLC equipped with an evaporative light-scattering detector. The ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglyceride (MGDG) to rhamnosylgalactosyldiacylglyceride (RGDG) was smaller in chlorosomes from mutants lacking two or three proteins in CsmC/D/H motif family than in chlorosomes from the wild-type, whereas chlorosomes lacking CsmIJ showed relatively less RGDG than MGDG. The results suggest that the CsmC, CsmD, CsmH, and other chlorosome proteins are involved in organizing MGDG and RGDG and thereby affect the size and shape of the chlorosome. PMID:26869354

  2. Pontin, a new mutant p53-binding protein, promotes gain-of-function of mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Zhang, C; Yue, X; Li, X; Liu, J; Yu, H; Belyi, V A; Yang, Q; Feng, Z; Hu, W

    2015-11-01

    Tumor-suppressor p53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Many tumor-associated mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins gain new functions in promoting tumorigenesis, defined as gain-of-function (GOF). The mechanisms for mutp53 GOF are not well understood. Here, we report Pontin, a highly conserved AAA+ ATPase important for various cellular functions, as a new mutp53-binding protein. This Pontin-mutp53 interaction promotes mutp53 GOF in invasion, migration and anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells. The ATPase domain of Pontin is crucial for its promoting effect on mutp53 GOF; blocking the ATPase activity of Pontin by a Pontin-specific ATPase inhibitor or an ATPase-deficient dominant-negative Pontin expression vector greatly diminished mutp53 GOF. Pontin promotes mutp53 GOF through regulation of mutp53 transcriptional activity; knockdown of Pontin abolished the transcriptional regulation of mutp53 toward a group of genes. Furthermore, overexpression of Pontin in tumors is associated with the poor survival in cancer patients, especially those containing mutp53. Our results highlight an important role and mechanism for Pontin, a new mutp53 partner, in promoting mutp53 GOF in tumorigenesis. PMID:25857266

  3. Properties of proteins and the glassy matrix in maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wolkers, W F; Alberda, M; Koornneef, M; Léon-Kloosterziel, K M; Hoekstra, F A

    1998-10-01

    In situ Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used to study the heat stability of proteins and hydrogen bonding interactions in dry maturation-defective mutant seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana. alpha-Helical, turn and beta-sheet conformations were the major protein secondary structures in all of these seeds. On heating, intermolecular extended beta-sheet structures, typical of protein denaturation, were formed in abscisic acid-insensitive (abi3) and leafy cotyledon (lec) mutant seeds. Proteins in dry wild-type seeds did not denature up to 150 degrees C, but those in dry desiccation-sensitive, lec1-1, lec1-3 and abi3-5 seeds did at 68, 89 and 87 degrees C, respectively. In the desiccation-tolerant abi3-7 and abi3-1 seeds, denaturation commenced above 120 and 135 degrees C, respectively. Seeds of the aba1-1 abi3-1 double mutant showed signs of denaturation already upon drying. The molecular packing in the seeds was studied by observing the shift in the position of the OH-stretching vibration band with temperature. The maximal rate of change of this band with temperature was much higher in the desiccation-sensitive abi3-5, aba1-1 abi3-1, lec1-1, and lec1-3 mutant seeds than in the desiccation-tolerant wild-type, abi3-1, abi3-7, and lec2-1 seeds. We interpret this to mean that the molecular packing density is higher in dry desiccation-tolerant than in dry desiccation-sensitive seeds, which is associated with a higher or lower protein denaturation temperature, respectively. The results are discussed in relation to the physiological and biochemical characteristics of these mutant seeds. PMID:9839460

  4. Molecular Effects of the CTG Repeats in Mutant Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Llamusí, Beatriz; Artero, Ruben

    2008-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multi-system disorder characterized by muscle wasting, myotonia, cardiac conduction defects, cataracts, and neuropsychological dysfunction. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3´untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene. A body of work demonstrates that DMPK mRNAs containing abnormally expanded CUG repeats are toxic to several cell types. A core mechanism underlying symptoms of DM1 is that mutant DMPK RNA interferes with the developmentally regulated alternative splicing of defined pre-mRNAs. Expanded CUG repeats fold into ds(CUG) hairpins that sequester nuclear proteins including human Muscleblind-like (MBNL) and hnRNP H alternative splicing factors. DM1 cells activate CELF family member CUG-BP1 protein through hyperphosphorylation and stabilization in the cell nucleus. CUG-BP1 and MBNL1 proteins act antagonistically in exon selection in several pre-mRNA transcripts, thus MBNL1 sequestration and increase in nuclear activity of CUG-BP1 both act synergistically to missplice defined transcripts. Mutant DMPK-mediated effect on subcellular localization, and defective phosphorylation of cytoplasmic CUG-BP1, have additionally been linked to defective translation of p21 and MEF2A in DM1, possibly explaining delayed differentiation of DM1 muscle cells. Mutant DMPK transcripts bind and sequester transcription factors such as Specificity protein 1 leading to reduced transcription of selected genes. Recently, transcripts containing long hairpin structures of CUG repeats have been shown to be a Dicer ribonuclease target and Dicer-induced downregulation of the mutant DMPK transcripts triggers silencing effects on RNAs containing long complementary repeats. In summary, mutant DMPK transcripts alter gene transcription, alternative splicing, and translation of specific gene transcripts, and have the ability to trigger gene-specific silencing effects in DM1 cells. Therapies aimed at reversing

  5. Glucose-induced production of recombinant proteins in Hansenula polymorpha mutants deficient in catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Krasovska, Olena S; Stasyk, Olena G; Nahorny, Viktor O; Stasyk, Oleh V; Granovski, Nikolai; Kordium, Vitaliy A; Vozianov, Oleksandr F; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    The most commonly used expression platform for production of recombinant proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha relies on the strong and strictly regulated promoter from the gene encoding peroxisomal enzyme alcohol (or methanol) oxidase (P(MOX)). Expression from P(MOX) is induced by methanol and is partially derepressed in glycerol or xylose medium, whereas in the presence of hexoses, disaccharides or ethanol, it is repressed. The need for methanol for maximal induction of gene expression in large-scale fermentation is a significant drawback, as this compound is toxic, flammable, supports a slow growth rate and requires extensive aeration. We isolated H. polymorpha mutants deficient in glucose repression of P(MOX) due to an impaired HpGCR1 gene, and other yet unidentified secondary mutations. The mutants exhibited pronounced defects in P(MOX) regulation only by hexoses and xylose, but not by disaccharides or ethanol. With one of these mutant strains as hosts, we developed a modified two-carbon source mode expression platform that utilizes convenient sugar substrates for growth (sucrose) and induction of recombinant protein expression (glucose or xylose). We demonstrate efficient regulatable by sugar carbon sources expression of three recombinant proteins: a secreted glucose oxidase from the fungus Aspergillus niger, a secreted mini pro-insulin, and an intracellular hepatitis B virus surface antigen in these mutant hosts. The modified expression platform preserves the favorable regulatable nature of P(MOX) without methanol, making a convenient alternative to the traditional system. PMID:17163508

  6. The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2007-09-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci.

  7. Organic hydroperoxide resistance protein and ergothioneine compensate for loss of mycothiol in Mycobacterium smegmatis mutants.

    PubMed

    Ta, Philong; Buchmeier, Nancy; Newton, Gerald L; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C

    2011-04-01

    The mshA::Tn5 mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis does not produce mycothiol (MSH) and was found to markedly overproduce both ergothioneine and an ~15-kDa protein determined to be organic hydroperoxide resistance protein (Ohr). An mshA(G32D) mutant lacking MSH overproduced ergothioneine but not Ohr. Comparison of the mutant phenotypes with those of the wild-type strain indicated the following: Ohr protects against organic hydroperoxide toxicity, whereas ergothioneine does not; an additional MSH-dependent organic hydroperoxide peroxidase exists; and elevated isoniazid resistance in the mutant is associated with both Ohr and the absence of MSH. Purified Ohr showed high activity with linoleic acid hydroperoxide, indicating lipid hydroperoxides as the likely physiologic targets. The reduction of oxidized Ohr by NADH was shown to be catalyzed by lipoamide dehydrogenase and either lipoamide or DlaT (SucB). Since free lipoamide and lipoic acid levels were shown to be undetectable in M. smegmatis, the bound lipoyl residues of DlaT are the likely source of the physiological dithiol reductant for Ohr. The pattern of occurrence of homologs of Ohr among bacteria suggests that the ohr gene has been distributed by lateral transfer. The finding of multiple Ohr homologs with various sequence identities in some bacterial genomes indicates that there may be multiple physiologic targets for Ohr proteins. PMID:21335456

  8. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  9. Lipase and Protease Double-Deletion Mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens Suitable for Extracellular Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myunghan; Moon, Yuseok; Oh, Mi Jin; Han, Sang Bin; Park, Ki Hyun; Kim, Jung-Gon

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens, a widespread Gram-negative bacterium, is an ideal protein manufacturing factory (PMF) because of its safety, robust growth, and high protein production. P. fluorescens possesses a type I secretion system (T1SS), which mediates secretion of a thermostable lipase (TliA) and a protease (PrtA) through its ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter. Recombinant proteins in P. fluorescens are attached to the C-terminal signal region of TliA for transport as fusion proteins to the extracellular medium. However, intrinsic TliA from the P. fluorescens genome interferes with detection of the recombinant protein and the secreted recombinant protein is hydrolyzed, due to intrinsic PrtA, resulting in decreased efficiency of the PMF. In this research, the lipase and protease genes of P. fluorescens SIK W1 were deleted using the targeted gene knockout method. Deletion mutant P. fluorescens ΔtliA ΔprtA secreted fusion proteins without TliA or protein degradation. Using wild-type P. fluorescens as an expression host, degradation of the recombinant protein varied depending on the type of culture media and aeration; however, degradation did not occur with the P. fluorescens ΔtliA ΔprtA double mutant irrespective of growth conditions. By homologous expression of tliA and the ABC transporter in a plasmid, TliA secreted from P. fluorescens ΔprtA and P. fluorescens ΔtliA ΔprtA cells was found to be intact, whereas that secreted from the wild-type P. fluorescens and P. fluorescens ΔtliA cells was found to be hydrolyzed. Our results demonstrate that the P. fluorescens ΔtliA ΔprtA deletion mutant is a promising T1SS-mediated PMF that enhances production and detection of recombinant proteins in extracellular media. PMID:23042178

  10. Calibrative approaches to protein solubility modeling of a mutant series using physicochemical descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Labute, P.

    2010-01-01

    A set of physicochemical properties describing a protein of known structure is employed for a calibrative approach to protein solubility. Common hydrodynamic and electrophoretic properties routinely measured in the bio-analytical laboratory such as zeta potential, dipole moment, the second osmotic virial coefficient are first estimated in silico as a function a pH and solution ionic strength starting with the protein crystal structure. The utility of these descriptors in understanding the solubility of a series of ribonuclease Sa mutants is investigated. A simple two parameter model was trained using solubility data of the wild type protein measured at a restricted number of solution pHs. Solubility estimates of the mutants demonstrate that zeta potential and dipole moment may be used to rationalize solubility trends over a wide pH range. Additionally a calibrative model based on the protein’s second osmotic virial coefficient, B22 was developed. A modified DVLO type potential along with a simplified representation of the protein allowed for efficient computation of the second viral coefficient. The standard error of prediction for both models was on the order of 0.3 log S units. These results are very encouraging and demonstrate that these models may be trained with a small number of samples and employed extrapolatively for estimating mutant solubilities. PMID:20842408

  11. Genetic Properties of Temperature-Sensitive Folding Mutants of the Coat Protein of Phage P22

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, C. L.; King, J.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations fall into two general classes: those generating thermolabile proteins; and those generating defects in protein synthesis, folding or assembly. Temperature-sensitive mutations at 17 sites in the gene for the coat protein of Phage P22 are of the latter class, preventing the productive folding of the polypeptide chain at restrictive temperature. We show here that, though the coat subunits interact intimately to form the viral shell, these temperature-sensitive folding (TSF) mutations were all recessive to wild type. The mutant polypeptide chains were not rescued by the presence of wild-type polypeptide chains. Missense substitutions in multimeric proteins frequently exhibit intragenic complementation; however, all pairs of coat protein TSF mutants tested failed to complement. The recessive phenotypes, absence of rescue and absence of intragenic complementation are all accounted for by the TSF defect, in which destabilization of a folding intermediate at restrictive temperature prevents the mutant chain from reaching the conformation required for subunit/subunit recognition. We suggest that absence of intragenic complementation should be a general property of TSF mutations in genes encoding multimeric proteins. The spectra of new loci identified by isolating second-site suppressors and synthetic lethals of temperature sensitive mutants will also differ depending on the nature of the defect. In the case of TSF mutations, where folding intermediates are defective rather than the native molecule, the spectra of other genes identified should shift from those whose products interact with the native molecule to those whose products influence the folding process. PMID:8150274

  12. Death-associated protein kinase 1 promotes growth of p53-mutant cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Dekuang; Poage, Graham M; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Zhang, Yun; Hill, Jamal L; Hartman, Zachary C; Savage, Michelle I; Mills, Gordon B; Brown, Powel H

    2015-07-01

    Estrogen receptor-negative (ER-negative) breast cancers are extremely aggressive and associated with poor prognosis. In particular, effective treatment strategies are limited for patients diagnosed with triple receptor-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which also carries the worst prognosis of all forms of breast cancer; therefore, extensive studies have focused on the identification of molecularly targeted therapies for this tumor subtype. Here, we sought to identify molecular targets that are capable of suppressing tumorigenesis in TNBCs. Specifically, we found that death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) is essential for growth of p53-mutant cancers, which account for over 80% of TNBCs. Depletion or inhibition of DAPK1 suppressed growth of p53-mutant but not p53-WT breast cancer cells. Moreover, DAPK1 inhibition limited growth of other p53-mutant cancers, including pancreatic and ovarian cancers. DAPK1 mediated the disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex, resulting in activation of the mTOR pathway. Our studies demonstrated that high DAPK1 expression causes increased cancer cell growth and enhanced signaling through the mTOR/S6K pathway; evaluation of multiple breast cancer patient data sets revealed that high DAPK1 expression associates with worse outcomes in individuals with p53-mutant cancers. Together, our data support targeting DAPK1 as a potential therapeutic strategy for p53-mutant cancers. PMID:26075823

  13. Death-associated protein kinase 1 promotes growth of p53-mutant cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Dekuang; Poage, Graham M.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Zhang, Yun; Hill, Jamal L.; Hartman, Zachary C.; Savage, Michelle I.; Mills, Gordon B.; Brown, Powel H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor–negative (ER-negative) breast cancers are extremely aggressive and associated with poor prognosis. In particular, effective treatment strategies are limited for patients diagnosed with triple receptor–negative breast cancer (TNBC), which also carries the worst prognosis of all forms of breast cancer; therefore, extensive studies have focused on the identification of molecularly targeted therapies for this tumor subtype. Here, we sought to identify molecular targets that are capable of suppressing tumorigenesis in TNBCs. Specifically, we found that death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) is essential for growth of p53-mutant cancers, which account for over 80% of TNBCs. Depletion or inhibition of DAPK1 suppressed growth of p53-mutant but not p53-WT breast cancer cells. Moreover, DAPK1 inhibition limited growth of other p53-mutant cancers, including pancreatic and ovarian cancers. DAPK1 mediated the disruption of the TSC1/TSC2 complex, resulting in activation of the mTOR pathway. Our studies demonstrated that high DAPK1 expression causes increased cancer cell growth and enhanced signaling through the mTOR/S6K pathway; evaluation of multiple breast cancer patient data sets revealed that high DAPK1 expression associates with worse outcomes in individuals with p53-mutant cancers. Together, our data support targeting DAPK1 as a potential therapeutic strategy for p53-mutant cancers. PMID:26075823

  14. Penicillin-binding proteins from Erwinia amylovora: mutants lacking PBP2 are avirulent.

    PubMed Central

    Milner, J S; Dymock, D; Cooper, R M; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    Radiolabelled penicillin G was used to examine penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) from Erwinia amylovora (OT1). This procedure identified seven PBPs with molecular masses ranging from 22 to 83 kDa. E. amylovora PBPs were compared with those from Escherichia coli (JM101) and from two spherical, avirulent TnphoA mutants derived from OT1. Radiolabelled penicillin G bound to only six proteins from the spherical mutants which lacked a 69-kDa PBP. The spherical mutants could be complemented by the cloned E. coli pbpA-rodA operon, which restored both cell shape and virulence to apple seedlings. This suggested that the E. amylovora 69-kDa PBP is probably the functional equivalent of the E. coli PBP2 protein. Southern blot analysis using the E. coli rodA and pbpA genes as radiolabelled probes showed that TnphoA had inserted into the E. amylovora equivalent of the E. coli rodA-pbpA operon. Southern blots to chromosomal DNAs of the two spherical mutants, using the cloned hrp and dsp genes from E. amylovora as radiolabelled probes, confirmed that the TnphoA insertions were not located in the region of the E. amylovora chromosome postulated to encode known virulence factors. Both of the spherical TnphoA mutants synthesized amounts of extracellular polysaccharide equivalent to those synthesized by the wild-type strain (OT1), were resistant to lysis in distilled water and to lysozyme, and elicited the hypersensitive response on nonhost plants. These results indicate a possible role for cell shape in the virulence of this plant pathogen. Images PMID:8407779

  15. Genomic polymorphism and protein changes of soybean mutant induced by space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Gao, Y.; Sun, Y.

    Soybean 194 4126 of excellent agricultural qualities such as high yield and rounder and wider leaf was selected in six generation after abroad recoverable satellite 15 days in 1996 from Soybean 72163 featured with long-leaf white-blossom grey-hair and infinitude-poding To explore the mechanisms of plant mutation induced by space environment we have experimented at genome and proteome level on Soybean 194 4126 and its control Soybean 72163 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism AFLP was used to identify mutated sits and the result shows that 36 polymorphic bands varying between 100 and 900 bp in 2022 DNA bands varying between 100 and 1500 bp have been amplified out of 64 pairs of primer combinations between mutant Soybean 194 4126 and the control plant So the mutation degree of DNA is 3 56 The protein two-dimensional electrophoresis 2-DE and peptide mass fingerprint PMF assays were used to investigate the difference of proteins in fruits and leaves between Soybean 194 4126 and its control Results indicate that 62 protein dots specially appear in Soybean 72163 and 39 dots specially in the mutant Soybean 194 4126 by image analysis software PDQuest in the 2-DE maps of soybean seeds Using PMF assay and protein data-base searching to investigate two distinct protein dots we found that the protein specially expressed in the seed of mutant Soybean 194 4126 may be Dehydrin and the other protein specially expressed in the seed of the control Soybean 72163 may be maturation-associated protein MAT1 Because Dehydrin and MAT1 are

  16. Mutant huntingtin represses CBP, but not p300, by binding and protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Shu-Yan; Pepers, Barry A; Evert, Bernd O; Rubinsztein, David C; Roos, Raymund A C; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2005-12-01

    Huntington's disease can be used as a model to study neurodegenerative disorders caused by aggregation-prone proteins. It has been proposed that the entrapment of transcription factors in aggregates plays an important role in pathogenesis. We now report that the transcriptional activity of CBP is already repressed in the early time points by soluble mutant huntingtin, whereas the histone acetylase activity of CBP/p300 is gradually diminished over time. Mutant huntingtin bound much stronger to CBP than normal huntingtin, possibly contributing to repression. Especially at the later time points, CBP protein level was gradually reduced via the proteasome pathway. In sharp contrast, p300 was unaffected by mutant huntingtin. This selective degradation of CBP was absent in spinocerebellar ataxia 3. Thus, mutant huntingtin specifically affects CBP and not p300 both at the early and later time points, via multiple mechanisms. In addition to the reduction of CBP, also the altered ratio of these closely related histone acetyl transferases may affect chromatin structure and transcription and thus contribute to neurodegeneration. PMID:16456924

  17. Mutant huntingtin represses CBP, but not p300, by binding and protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Shu-Yan; Pepers, Barry A; Evert, Bernd O; Rubinsztein, David C; Roos, Raymund A C; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2005-09-01

    Huntington's disease can be used as a model to study neurodegenerative disorders caused by aggregation-prone proteins. It has been proposed that the entrapment of transcription factors in aggregates plays an important role in pathogenesis. We now report that the transcriptional activity of CBP is already repressed in the early time points by soluble mutant huntingtin, whereas the histone acetylase activity of CBP/p300 is gradually diminished over time. Mutant huntingtin bound much stronger to CBP than normal huntingtin, possibly contributing to repression. Especially at the later time points, CBP protein level was gradually reduced via the proteasome pathway. In sharp contrast, p300 was unaffected by mutant huntingtin. This selective degradation of CBP was absent in spinocerebellar ataxia 3. Thus, mutant huntingtin specifically affects CBP and not p300 both at the early and later time points, via multiple mechanisms. In addition to the reduction of CBP, also the altered ratio of these closely related histone acetyltransferases may affect chromatin structure and transcription and thus contribute to neurodegeneration. PMID:15994095

  18. Production and Secretion of the Polysaccharide Biodispersan of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 in Protein Secretion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Elkeles, A; Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1994-12-01

    Biodispersan is an extracellular anionic polysaccharide produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A2 that changes the surface properties of limestone and acts both as a dispersant and as a grinding aid (E. Rosenberg, C. Rubinovitz, A. Gottlieb, S. Rosenhak, and E. Z. Ron, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:317-322, 1988; E. Rosenberg, C. Rubinovitz, R. Legmann, and E. Z. Ron, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:323-326, 1988; E. Rosenberg, Z. Schwartz, A. Tenenbaum, C. Rubinovitz, R. Legmann, and E. Z. Ron, J. Dispersion Sci. Technol. 10:241-250, 1989). Extracellular fluid also contains a high concentration of secreted proteins that create problems in the purification and application of biodispersan. In order to obtain preparations of biodispersan that contained smaller amounts of protein, we selected mutants of strain A2 that were defective in protein secretion. These mutants produced equal, or even higher, levels of total biodispersan compared with those of the parental strain. Moreover, although there was a significant drop in the concentration of extracellular proteins in the medium, the secretion of biodispersan was unaffected. These results suggest that secretion mutants are potentially useful for the production of extracellular polysaccharides. PMID:16349473

  19. Ultrastructure of the outer membrane of Salmonella typhimurium bacteriocin-resistant mutants deficient in the 33K protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lounatmaa, K

    1979-01-01

    Outer membrane mutants of Salmonella typhimurium deficient in one, two, or three of the 33,000-dalton (33K), 34K, and 36K outer membrane proteins (7) were studied by using thin sectioning and freeze-fracturing electron microscopy techniques. The outer concave fracture face of all mutants deficient in the 33K protein had numerous particleless patches. In contrast to all previously examined 34K to 36K-deficient mutants, the 33K-deficient mutants showed marked heterogeneity in the size and distribution of such "empty" patches between cells of a culture. One mutant was deficient in both the 33K and the 34K to 36K "porin" protein complex; its outer membrane had very large particleless smooth areas. It is concluded that the 33K protein on one hand and the porin on the other are both able to form intramembraneous particles. Images PMID:378982

  20. Noninvasive measurement of protein aggregation by mutant huntingtin fragments or alpha-synuclein in the lens.

    PubMed

    Muchowski, Paul J; Ramsden, Richard; Nguyen, QuangVu; Arnett, Ernest E; Greiling, Teri M; Anderson, Susan K; Clark, John I

    2008-03-01

    Many diverse human diseases are associated with protein aggregation in ordered fibrillar structures called amyloid. Amyloid formation may mediate aberrant protein interactions that culminate in neurodegeneration in Alzheimer, Huntington, and Parkinson diseases and in prion encephalopathies. Studies of protein aggregation in the brain are hampered by limitations in imaging techniques and often require invasive methods that can only be performed postmortem. Here we describe transgenic mice in which aggregation-prone proteins that cause Huntington and Parkinson disease are expressed in the ocular lens. Expression of a mutant huntingtin fragment or alpha-synuclein in the lens leads to protein aggregation and cataract formation, which can be monitored in real time by noninvasive, highly sensitive optical techniques. Expression of a mutant huntingtin fragment in mice lacking the major lens chaperone, alphaB-crystallin, markedly accelerated the onset and severity of aggregation, demonstrating that the endogenous chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin suppresses aggregation in vivo. These novel mouse models will facilitate the characterization of protein aggregation in vivo and are being used in efficient and economical screens for chemical and genetic modifiers of disease-relevant protein aggregation. PMID:18167346

  1. Noninvasive Measurement of Protein Aggregation by Mutant Huntingtin Fragments or α-Synuclein in the Lens*

    PubMed Central

    Muchowski, Paul J.; Ramsden, Richard; Nguyen, QuangVu; Arnett, Ernest E.; Greiling, Teri M.; Anderson, Susan K.; Clark, John I.

    2009-01-01

    Many diverse human diseases are associated with protein aggregation in ordered fibrillar structures called amyloid. Amyloid formation may mediate aberrant protein interactions that culminate in neurodegeneration in Alzheimer, Huntington, and Parkinson diseases and in prion encephalopathies. Studies of protein aggregation in the brain are hampered by limitations in imaging techniques and often require invasive methods that can only be performed postmortem. Here we describe transgenic mice in which aggregation-prone proteins that cause Huntington and Parkinson disease are expressed in the ocular lens. Expression of a mutant huntingtin fragment or α-synuclein in the lens leads to protein aggregation and cataract formation, which can be monitored in real time by noninvasive, highly sensitive optical techniques. Expression of a mutant huntingtin fragment in mice lacking the major lens chaperone, αB-crystallin, markedly accelerated the onset and severity of aggregation, demonstrating that the endogenous chaperone activity of αB-crystallin suppresses aggregation in vivo. These novel mouse models will facilitate the characterization of protein aggregation in vivo and are being used in efficient and economical screens for chemical and genetic modifiers of disease-relevant protein aggregation. PMID:18167346

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  3. Substantially elevating the levels of αB-crystallin in spinal motor neurons of mutant SOD1 mice does not significantly delay paralysis or attenuate mutant protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guilian; Fromholt, Susan; Ayers, Jacob I.; Brown, Hilda; Siemienski, Zoe; Crosby, Keith W.; Mayer, Christopher A.; Janus, Christopher; Borchelt, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There has been great interest in enhancing endogenous protein maintenance pathways such as the heat-shock chaperone response, as it is postulated that enhancing clearance of misfolded proteins could have beneficial disease modifying effects in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. In cultured cell models of mutant SOD1 aggregation, co-expression of αB-crystallin (αB-crys) has been shown to inhibit the formation of detergent-insoluble forms of mutant protein. Here, we describe the generation of a new line of transgenic mice that express αB-crys at >6-fold the normal level in spinal cord, with robust increases in immunoreactivity throughout the spinal cord grey matter and, specifically, in spinal motor neurons. Surprisingly, spinal cords of mice expressing αB-crys alone contained 20% more motor neurons per section than littermate controls. Raising αB-crys by these levels in mice transgenic for either G93A or L126Z mutant SOD1 had no effect on the age at which paralysis developed. In the G93A mice, which showed the most robust degree of motor neuron loss, the number of these cells declined by the same proportion as in mice expressing the mutant SOD1 alone. In paralyzed bigenic mice, the levels of detergent-insoluble, misfolded, mutant SOD1 were similar to those of mice expressing mutant SOD1 alone. These findings indicate that raising the levels of αB-crys in spinal motor neurons by 6-fold does not produce the therapeutic effects predicted by cell culture models of mutant SOD1 aggregation. PMID:25557022

  4. A highly digestible sorghum mutant cultivar exhibits a unique folded structure of endosperm protein bodies

    PubMed Central

    Oria, Maria P.; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Axtell, John D.; Huang, Chia-Ping

    2000-01-01

    The endosperm of a sorghum mutant cultivar, with high in vitro uncooked and cooked protein digestibilities, was examined by transmission electron microscopy and α-, β-, and γ-kafirins (storage proteins) were localized within its protein bodies. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs revealed that these protein bodies had a unique microstructure related to high protein digestibility. They were irregular in shape and had numerous invaginations, often reaching to the central area of the protein body. Protein bodies from normal cultivars, such as P721N studied here, with much lower uncooked and cooked digestibilities are spherical and contain no invaginations. Immunocytochemistry results showed that the relative location of α- and β-kafirins within the protein bodies of the highly digestible genotype were similar to the normal cultivar, P721N. γ-Kafirin, however, was concentrated in dark-staining regions at the base of the folds instead of at the protein body periphery, as is typical of normal cultivars. The resulting easy accessibility of digestive enzymes to α-kafirin, the major storage protein, in addition to the increased surface area of the protein bodies of the highly digestible cultivar appear to account for its high in vitro protein digestibility. PMID:10792028

  5. Kinetics and energetics of the translocation of maltose binding protein folding mutants.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Danuta; Nouwen, Nico; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2008-03-14

    Protein translocation in Escherichia coli is mediated by the translocase that, in its minimal form, comprises a protein-conducting pore (SecYEG) and a motor protein (SecA). The SecYEG complex forms a narrow channel in the membrane that allows passage of secretory proteins (preproteins) in an unfolded state only. It has been suggested that the SecA requirement for translocation depends on the folding stability of the mature preprotein domain. Here we studied the effects of the signal sequence and SecB on the folding and translocation of folding stabilizing and destabilizing mutants of the mature maltose binding protein (MBP). Although the mutations affect the folding of the precursor form of MBP, these are drastically overruled by the combined unfolding stabilization of the signal sequence and SecB. Consequently, the translocation kinetics, the energetics and the SecA and SecB dependence of the folding mutants are indistinguishable from those of wild-type preMBP. These data indicate that unfolding of the mature domain of preMBP is likely not a rate-determining step in translocation when the protein is targeted to the translocase via SecB. PMID:18241889

  6. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  7. Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport Mutants Identify Complex A Proteins With Multiple Genetic Interactions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Iomini, Carlo; Li, Linya; Esparza, Jessica M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The intraflagellar transport machinery is required for the assembly of cilia. It has been investigated by biochemical, genetic, and computational methods that have identified at least 21 proteins that assemble into two subcomplexes. It has been hypothesized that complex A is required for retrograde transport. Temperature-sensitive mutations in FLA15 and FLA17 show defects in retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in Chlamydomonas. We show that IFT144 and IFT139, two complex A proteins, are encoded by FLA15 and FLA17, respectively. The fla15 allele is a missense mutation in a conserved cysteine and the fla17 allele is an in-frame deletion of three exons. The flagellar assembly defect of each mutant is rescued by the respective transgenes. In fla15 and fla17 mutants, bulges form in the distal one-third of the flagella at the permissive temperature and this phenotype is also rescued by the transgenes. These bulges contain the complex B component IFT74/72, but not α-tubulin or p28, a component of an inner dynein arm, which suggests specificity with respect to the proteins that accumulate in these bulges. IFT144 and IFT139 are likely to interact with each other and other proteins on the basis of three distinct genetic tests: (1) Double mutants display synthetic flagellar assembly defects at the permissive temperature, (2) heterozygous diploid strains exhibit second-site noncomplemention, and (3) transgenes confer two-copy suppression. Since these tests show different levels of phenotypic sensitivity, we propose they illustrate different gradations of gene interaction between complex A proteins themselves and with a complex B protein (IFT172). PMID:19720863

  8. Modulation of cellular and viral promoters by mutant human p53 proteins found in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S; Jackson, C T; Subler, M A; Martin, D W

    1992-01-01

    Wild-type p53 has recently been shown to repress transcription from several cellular and viral promoters. Since p53 mutations are the most frequently reported genetic defects in human cancers, it becomes important to study the effects of mutations of p53 on promoter functions. We, therefore, have studied the effects of wild-type and mutant human p53 on the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter and on several viral promoters, including the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL9 promoter, the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter-enhancer, and the long terminal repeat promoters of Rous sarcoma virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I. HeLa cells were cotransfected with a wild-type or mutant p53 expression vector and a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene under viral (or cellular) promoter control. As expected, expression of the wild-type p53 inhibited promoter function. Expression of a p53 with a mutation at any one of the four amino acid positions 175, 248, 273, or 281, however, correlated with a significant increase of the PCNA promoter activity (2- to 11-fold). The viral promoters were also activated, although to a somewhat lesser extent. We also showed that activation by a mutant p53 requires a minimal promoter containing a lone TATA box. A more significant increase (25-fold) in activation occurs when the promoter contains a binding site for the activating transcription factor or cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Using Saos-2 cells that do not express p53, we showed that activation by a mutant p53 was a direct enhancement. The mutant forms of p53 used in this study are found in various cancer cells. The activation of PCNA by mutant p53s may indicate a way to increase cell proliferation by the mutant p53s. Thus, our data indicate a possible functional role for the mutants of p53 found in cancer cells in activating several important loci, including PCNA. Images PMID:1356162

  9. Functional Rescue of Retinal Degeneration-Associated Mutant RPE65 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Minghao; Li, Songhua; Hu, Jane; Jin, Heather H; Jacobson, Samuel G; Bok, Dean

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 different mutations in the RPE65 gene are associated with inherited retinal degeneration. Although some missense mutations have been shown to abolish isomerase activity of RPE65, the molecular bases leading to loss of function and retinal degeneration remain incompletely understood. Here we show that several missense mutations resulted in significant decrease in expression level of RPE65 in the human retinal pigment epithelium cells. The 26S proteasome non-ATPase regulatory subunit 13, a newly identified negative regulator of RPE65, mediated degradation of mutant RPE65s, which were misfolded and formed aggregates in the cells. Many mutations, including L22P, T101I, and L408P, were mapped on nonactive sites of RPE65. Enzyme activities of these mutant RPE65s were significantly rescued at low temperature, whereas mutant RPE65s with a distinct active site mutation could not be rescued under the same conditions. 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) displayed a significant synergistic effect on the low temperature-mediated rescue of the mutant RPE65s. Our results suggest that a low temperature eye mask and PBA, a FDA-approved oral medicine, may provide a promising "protein repair therapy" that can enhance the efficacy of gene therapy for delaying retinal degeneration caused by RPE65 mutations. PMID:26427455

  10. Mutant Amyloid Precursor Protein Differentially Alters Adipose Biology under Obesogenic and Non-Obesogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Linnea R.; Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP) have been most intensely studied in brain tissue for their link to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. However, APP is highly expressed in a variety of tissues including adipose tissue, where APP is also known to exhibit increased expression in response to obesity. In our current study, we analyzed the effects of mutant APP (E693Q, D694N, K670N/M671L) expression toward multiple aspects of adipose tissue homeostasis. These data reveal significant hypoleptinemia, decreased adiposity, and reduced adipocyte size in response to mutant APP, and this was fully reversed upon high fat diet administration. Additionally, mutant APP was observed to significantly exacerbate insulin resistance, triglyceride elevations, and macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue in response to a high fat diet. Taken together, these data have significant implications for linking mutant APP expression to adipose tissue dysfunction and global changes in endocrine and metabolic function under both obesogenic and non-obesogenic conditions. PMID:22912823

  11. Mutant p53 protein expression and antioxidant status deficiency in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Milicevic, Zorka; Kasapovic, Jelena; Gavrilovic, Ljubica; Milovanovic, Zorka; Bajic, Vladan; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that cancers develop and grow as a result of disordered function of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, which may be exploited for screening purposes. Extensive evidence indicated tumor suppressor protein p53 as candidate marker for mutation identification. We have investigated mutant p53 protein expression in human breast tumors in relation to antioxidant status deficiency. The study included 100 breast cancer patients. p53 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot assay and immunostaining using a CM-1, DO-7 and Pab240 antibodies. Antioxidant parameters and lipid peroxidation were estimated by biochemical analyses. Western blotting with epitopespecific monoclonal antibody Pab240 strongly suggests that nuclear extracts from breast cancer cells express mutant forms of p53. It is of interest that the mutant forms of p53 overexpression in conjunction with the appearance of nuclear bodies are observed in highly aggressive carcinomas. Expression of isoform Δp53 (45 kDa) and isoform of ~ 29 kDa were more common in cases with LN metastasis. These studies point out the molecular consequences of oxidative stress (lipid peroxides, LP, p<0.001) and antioxidant status deficiency (copper, zinc superoxid dismutase, SOD, p<0.001; catalase, CAT, p<0.01; glutathione reductase, GR, p<0.001; glutathione, GSH, p<0.05) and indicate the importance of p53 mutation as the commonest genetic alteration detected in breast cancer cells. The expression of mutant p53 is correlated to increased lipid peroxides (0.346, p<0.05 ) and lowered antioxidant activity of CAT (- 0.437, p<0.01) in the breast cancer patients. PMID:26417293

  12. In vivo functional protein-protein interaction: nuclear targeted hsp90 shifts cytoplasmic steroid receptor mutants into the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, K I; Devin, J; Cadepond, F; Jibard, N; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Baulieu, E E; Catelli, M G

    1994-01-01

    In target tissue extracts, heat shock protein hsp90 has been found associated to all unliganded steroid receptors. Modulation of important functions of these receptors, including prevention of DNA binding and optimization of transcriptional activity, has been attributed to hsp90. However no unequivocal in vivo demonstration of interaction between receptors and hsp90 has been presented. We targeted chicken hsp90, a mainly cytoplasmic protein, with the nucleoplasmin nuclear localization signal (90NLS). After transfection into COS-7 cells, 90NLS was found in the nucleus with specific immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy techniques. A human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant devoid of NLS sequence was also expressed in COS-7 cells and found exclusively cytoplasmic. Coexpression of 90NLS and of the cytoplasmic human glucocorticosteroid receptor mutant led to complete nuclear localization of the receptor, indicating its piggyback transport by 90NLS and thus physical and functional interaction between the two proteins in the absence of hormone. The same nuclear localization was obtained after cotransfection of 90NLS and a cytoplasmic rabbit progesterone receptor mutant. Finally, coexpression of wild-type rabbit progesterone receptor (nuclear) and wildtype hsp90 (cytoplasmic) into COS-7 cells provoked partial relocalization of hsp90 into the nucleus. These experiments lay the groundwork on which to study hsp90 as a chaperone, regulating activities of steroid receptors and possibly participating in their nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8278390

  13. Expression, purification and antimicrobial activity of puroindoline A protein and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yingjie; Chen, Ling; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yajuan; Zheng, Qian; Gao, Chunbao; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2012-10-01

    Wheat puroindoline proteins, PINA and PINB, play key roles in determining wheat grain hardness as well as in defending the plant against pathogens. PINA has much greater membrane-binding property and antimicrobial activity because it contains more tryptophan residues in the unique tryptophan-rich domain (TRD). In order to obtain proteins with higher antimicrobial activity, mutants of PINA containing two or three copies of TRD, designated ABBC and ABBBC, respectively, were constructed and expressed in E. coli Rosetta-gami (DE3). Metal affinity chromatography was used to purify the soluble affinity-tagged recombinant proteins. The secondary structures of the recombinant proteins were predicted by the online program Protein Homology/analog Y Recognition Engine v2.0 and experimentally assessed using circular dichroism. Minimum inhibition concentration tests and fluorescence microscope analyses were employed to evaluate the antimicrobial activities of the mutants. The results showed that the purified recombinant ABBC was correctly folded and presented significantly higher antimicrobial activities against E. coli and S. aureus than wild-type PINA, suggesting its potential use as an antimicrobial agent. The results also confirmed that TRD is a determinant of the antimicrobial activity of PINA and demonstrated that it is feasible to enhance the antimicrobial activity of PINA by adding one copy of TRD. PMID:22402594

  14. Epilepsy, Behavioral Abnormalities, and Physiological Comorbidities in Syntaxin-Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1) Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Marchese, Maria; Hamling, Kyla R.; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Krasniak, Christopher S.; Sicca, Federico; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Patel, Manisha; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the synaptic machinery gene syntaxin-binding protein 1, STXBP1 (also known as MUNC18-1), are linked to childhood epilepsies and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Zebrafish STXBP1 homologs (stxbp1a and stxbp1b) have highly conserved sequence and are prominently expressed in the larval zebrafish brain. To understand the functions of stxbp1a and stxbp1b, we generated loss-of-function mutations using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and studied brain electrical activity, behavior, development, heart physiology, metabolism, and survival in larval zebrafish. Homozygous stxbp1a mutants exhibited a profound lack of movement, low electrical brain activity, low heart rate, decreased glucose and mitochondrial metabolism, and early fatality compared to controls. On the other hand, homozygous stxbp1b mutants had spontaneous electrographic seizures, and reduced locomotor activity response to a movement-inducing “dark-flash” visual stimulus, despite showing normal metabolism, heart rate, survival, and baseline locomotor activity. Our findings in these newly generated mutant lines of zebrafish suggest that zebrafish recapitulate clinical phenotypes associated with human syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutations. PMID:26963117

  15. Peripheral neuropathy via mutant tRNA synthetases: Inhibition of protein translation provides a possible explanation.

    PubMed

    Storkebaum, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Recent evidence indicates that inhibition of protein translation may be a common pathogenic mechanism for peripheral neuropathy associated with mutant tRNA synthetases (aaRSs). aaRSs are enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNA, thus catalyzing the first step of translation. Dominant mutations in five distinct aaRSs cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) peripheral neuropathy, characterized by length-dependent degeneration of peripheral motor and sensory axons. Surprisingly, loss of aminoacylation activity is not required for mutant aaRSs to cause CMT. Rather, at least for some mutations, a toxic-gain-of-function mechanism underlies CMT-aaRS. Interestingly, several mutations in two distinct aaRSs were recently shown to inhibit global protein translation in Drosophila models of CMT-aaRS, by a mechanism independent of aminoacylation, suggesting inhibition of translation as a common pathogenic mechanism. Future research aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the translation defect induced by CMT-mutant aaRSs should provide novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these incurable diseases. PMID:27352040

  16. Strep-tag II Mutant Maltose-binding Protein for Reagentless Fluorescence Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hasmoni, Siti Halimah; Mau, Goh Kian; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Cass, Anthony; Shahir, Shafinaz

    2016-01-01

    Maltose-binding protein (MBP) is a periplasmic binding protein found in Gram negative bacteria. MBP is involved in maltose transport and bacterial chemotaxis; it binds to maltose and maltodextrins comprising α(1–4)-glucosidically linked linear glucose polymers and α(1–4)-glucosidically linked cyclodextrins. Upon ligand binding, MBP changes its conformation from an open to a closed form. This molecular recognition—transducing a ligand-binding event into a physical one—renders MBP an ideal candidate for biosensor development. Here, we describe the construction of a Strep-tag II mutant MBP for reagentless fluorescence sensing. malE, which encodes MBP, was amplified. A cysteine residue was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis to ensure a single label attachment at a specific site with a thiol-specific fluorescent probe. An environmentally sensitive fluorophore (IANBD amide) was covalently attached to the introduced thiol group and analysed by fluorescence sensing. The tagged mutant MBP (D95C) was purified (molecular size, ∼42 kDa). The fluorescence measurements of the IANBD-labelled Strep-tag II–D95C in the solution phase showed an appreciable change in fluorescence intensity (dissociation constant, 7.6±1.75 μM). Our mutant MBP retains maltose-binding activity and is suitable for reagentless fluorescence sensing. PMID:27019682

  17. Food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 mutant protein using Cry1Ac as a control Bt protein.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Santos, Vanessa Olinto; Pinto, Clidia Eduarda Moreira; Viana, Daniel Araújo; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2015-07-01

    Cry8Ka5 is a mutant protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that has been proposed for developing transgenic plants due to promising activity against coleopterans, like Anthonomus grandis (the major pest of Brazilian cotton culture). Thus, an early food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 protein could provide valuable information to support its use as a harmless biotechnological tool. This study aimed to evaluate the food safety of Cry8Ka5 protein following the two-tiered approach, based on weights of evidence, proposed by ILSI. Cry1Ac protein was used as a control Bt protein. The history of safe use revealed no convincing hazard reports for Bt pesticides and three-domain Cry proteins. The bioinformatics analysis with the primary amino acids sequence of Cry8Ka5 showed no similarity to any known toxic, antinutritional or allergenic proteins. The mode of action of Cry proteins is well understood and their fine specificity is restricted to insects. Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins were rapidly degraded in simulated gastric fluid, but were resistant to simulated intestinal fluid and heat treatment. The LD50 for Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac was >5000 mg/kg body weight when administered by gavage in mice. Thus, no expected relevant risks are associated with the consumption of Cry8Ka5 protein. PMID:25890087

  18. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  19. Nonbinding Site-Directed Mutants of Transferrin Binding Protein B Exhibit Enhanced Immunogenicity and Protective Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Frandoloso, Rafael; Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Calmettes, Charles; Fegan, Jamie; Costa, Estela; Curran, Dave; Yu, Rong-hua; Gutiérrez-Martín, César B.; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías F.; Moraes, Trevor F.

    2014-01-01

    Host-adapted Gram-negative bacterial pathogens from the Pasteurellaceae, Neisseriaceae, and Moraxellaceae families normally reside in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts of their hosts and rely on utilizing iron from host transferrin (Tf) for growth and survival. The surface receptor proteins that mediate this critical iron acquisition pathway have been proposed as ideal vaccine targets due to the critical role that they play in survival and disease pathogenesis in vivo. In particular, the surface lipoprotein component of the receptor, Tf binding protein B (TbpB), had received considerable attention as a potential antigen for vaccines in humans and food production animals but this has not translated into the series of successful vaccine products originally envisioned. Preliminary immunization experiments suggesting that host Tf could interfere with development of the immune response prompted us to directly address this question with site-directed mutant proteins defective in binding Tf. Site-directed mutants with dramatically reduced binding of porcine transferrin and nearly identical structure to the native proteins were prepared. A mutant Haemophilus parasuis TbpB was shown to induce an enhanced B-cell and T-cell response in pigs relative to native TbpB and provide superior protection from infection than the native TbpB or a commercial vaccine product. The results indicate that binding of host transferrin modulates the development of the immune response against TbpBs and that strategies designed to reduce or eliminate binding can be used to generate superior antigens for vaccines. PMID:25547790

  20. Regulation of Excitation Energy in a Wheat Mutant Deficient in Light-Harvesting Pigment Protein Complex 1

    PubMed Central

    Duysen, Murray E.; Freeman, Thomas P.; Williams, Norman D.; Olson, Linda L.

    1984-01-01

    Chloroplasts of the CD3 wheat mutant were deficient primarily in chlorophyll of light harvesting pigment proteins (LHPP) 1 and 2 and CP1a. The reduced level of protein associated with chlorophyll of LHPP1 and LHPP2 and the reduced level of low molecular weight polypeptides between 23 and 29 kilodaltons confirmed that the CD3 mutant was deficient in the LHPP complex. The high fluorescence emission ratio at 740 (F740) to 686 nanometers (F686) observed from chloroplasts of normal wheat following light induced phosphorylation of the LHPP complex was not noted from mutant chloroplasts. The long wavelength peak fluorescence emission (F740) was shifted to a shorter wavelength peak (F725) and was reduced in intensity compared to that of normal wheat thylakoids. The ratio of variable fluorescence to maximum fluorescence, a measure of PSII photochemical efficiency, was the same for the normal wheat and mutant leaves. The ratios of uncoupled photosystem I/photosystem II electron transport rates for mutant and normal wheat chloroplasts were similar at saturating light suggesting that absorbed excitation energy was distributed to the two photosystem reaction centers of the mutant in a similar manner as in the normal wheat. Proteins of the LHPP complex were differentially phosphorylated by action of a membrane protein kinase when both normal wheat and CD3 mutant thylakoids were irradiated without an electron transport chain acceptor. Even though the F740/F686 ratio was low in mutant thylakoids, the phosphorylation of the 27-kilodalton LHPP polypeptide was consistent with the mutant being in a state II condition. The data gave rise to the suggestion that the F740/F686 ratio might not indicate excitation energy distribution to the two photosystems in the mutant. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16663882

  1. Exploiting Transient Protein States for the Design of Small-Molecule Stabilizers of Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Joerger, Andreas C.; Bauer, Matthias R.; Wilcken, Rainer; Baud, Matthias G.J.; Harbrecht, Hannes; Exner, Thomas E.; Boeckler, Frank M.; Spencer, John; Fersht, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The destabilizing p53 cancer mutation Y220C creates an extended crevice on the surface of the protein that can be targeted by small-molecule stabilizers. Here, we identify different classes of small molecules that bind to this crevice and determine their binding modes by X-ray crystallography. These structures reveal two major conformational states of the pocket and a cryptic, transiently open hydrophobic subpocket that is modulated by Cys220. In one instance, specifically targeting this transient protein state by a pyrrole moiety resulted in a 40-fold increase in binding affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that both open and closed states of this subsite were populated at comparable frequencies along the trajectories. Our data extend the framework for the design of high-affinity Y220C mutant binders for use in personalized anticancer therapy and, more generally, highlight the importance of implementing protein dynamics and hydration patterns in the drug-discovery process. PMID:26636255

  2. Loss of RAD-23 Protects Against Models of Motor Neuron Disease by Enhancing Mutant Protein Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Angela M.; Lamitina, Todd; Liachko, Nicole F.; Sabatella, Mariangela; Lu, Jiayin; Zhang, Lei; Ostrow, Lyle W.; Gupta, Preetika; Wu, Chia-Yen; Doshi, Shachee; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Lans, Hannes; Wang, Jiou; Kraemer, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded proteins accumulate and aggregate in neurodegenerative disease. The existence of these deposits reflects a derangement in the protein homeostasis machinery. Using a candidate gene screen, we report that loss of RAD-23 protects against the toxicity of proteins known to aggregate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Loss of RAD-23 suppresses the locomotor deficit of Caenorhabditis elegans engineered to express mutTDP-43 or mutSOD1 and also protects against aging and proteotoxic insults. Knockdown of RAD-23 is further neuroprotective against the toxicity of SOD1 and TDP-43 expression in mammalian neurons. Biochemical investigation indicates that RAD-23 modifies mutTDP-43 and mutSOD1 abundance, solubility, and turnover in association with altering the ubiquitination status of these substrates. In human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord, we find that RAD-23 abundance is increased and RAD-23 is mislocalized within motor neurons. We propose a novel pathophysiological function for RAD-23 in the stabilization of mutated proteins that cause neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we identify RAD-23, a component of the protein homeostasis network and nucleotide excision repair pathway, as a modifier of the toxicity of two disease-causing, misfolding-prone proteins, SOD1 and TDP-43. Reducing the abundance of RAD-23 accelerates the degradation of mutant SOD1 and TDP-43 and reduces the cellular content of the toxic species. The existence of endogenous proteins that act as “anti-chaperones” uncovers new and general targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26490867

  3. High throughput gene complementation screening permits identification of a mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis (ρ(-)) mutant.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Prasanth; Procaccio, Vincent; Scheffler, Immo E; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    To identify nuclear DNA (nDNA) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene mutations using cultured cells, we have developed a complementation system based on retroviral transduction with a full length cDNA expression library and selection for OXHOS function by growth in galactose. We have used this system to transduce the Chinese hamster V79-G7 OXPHOS mutant cell line with a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The complemented cells were found to have acquired the cDNA for the bS6m polypeptide of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. bS6m is a 14 kDa polypeptide located on the outside of the mitochondrial 28S ribosomal subunit and interacts with the rRNA. The V79-G7 mutant protein was found to harbor a methionine to threonine missense mutation at codon 13. The hamster bS6m null mutant could also be complemented by its orthologs from either mouse or human. bS6m protein tagged at its C-terminus by HA, His or GFP localized to the mitochondrion and was fully functional. Through site-directed mutagenesis we identified the probable RNA interacting residues of the bS6m peptide and tested the functional significance of mammalian specific C-terminal region. The N-terminus of the bS6m polypeptide functionally corresponds to that of the prokaryotic small ribosomal subunit, but deletion of C-terminal residues along with the zinc ion coordinating cysteine had no functional effect. Since mitochondrial diseases can result from hundreds to thousands of different nDNA gene mutations, this one step viral complementation cloning may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a range of nDNA mitochondrial disease mutations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26946086

  4. Theoretical prediction of the binding free energy for mutants of replication protein A.

    PubMed

    Carra, Claudio; Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-07-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric (70, 32, and 14 kDa subunits), single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein required for pivotal functions in the cell metabolism, such as chromosomal replication, prevention of hairpin formation, DNA repair and recombination, and signaling after DNA damage. Studies based on deletions and mutations have identified the high affinity ssDNA binding domains in the 70 kDa subunit of RPA, regions A and B. Individually, the domain A and B have a low affinity for ssDNA, while tandems composed of AA, AB, BB, and BA sequences bind the ssDNA with moderate to high affinity. Single and double point mutations on polar residues in the binding domains leads to a reduction in affinity of RPA for ssDNA, in particular when two hydrophilic residues are involved. In view of these results, we performed a study based on molecular dynamics simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental change in binding free energy, ΔΔG, of RPA70 mutants to further elucidate the nature of the protein-ssDNA interaction. The MM-PB(GB)SA methods implemented in Amber10 and the code FoldX were used to estimate the binding free energy. The theoretical and experimental ΔΔG values correlate better when the results are obtained by MM-PBSA calculated on individual trajectories for each mutant. In these conditions, the correlation coefficient between experimental and theoretical ΔΔG reaches a value of 0.95 despite the overestimation of the energy change by one order of magnitude. The decomposition of the MM-GBSA energy per residue allows us to correlate the change of the affinity with the residue polarity and energy contribution to the binding. The method revealed reliable predictions of the change in the affinity in function of mutations, and can be used to identify new mutants with distinct binding properties. PMID:22160652

  5. Larger aggregates of mutant seipin in Celia's Encephalopathy, a new protein misfolding neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riquelme, Alejandro; Sánchez-Iglesias, Sofía; Rábano, Alberto; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Domingo-Jiménez, Rosario; Ramos, Adriana; Rosa, Isaac; Senra, Ana; Nilsson, Peter; García, Ángel; Araújo-Vilar, David; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-11-01

    Celia's Encephalopathy (MIM #615924) is a recently discovered fatal neurodegenerative syndrome associated with a new BSCL2 mutation (c.985C>T) that results in an aberrant isoform of seipin (Celia seipin). This mutation is lethal in both homozygosity and compounded heterozygosity with a lipodystrophic BSCL2 mutation, resulting in a progressive encephalopathy with fatal outcomes at ages 6-8. Strikingly, heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic, conflicting with the gain of toxic function attributed to this mutation. Here we report new key insights about the molecular pathogenic mechanism of this new syndrome. Intranuclear inclusions containing mutant seipin were found in brain tissue from a homozygous patient suggesting a pathogenic mechanism similar to other neurodegenerative diseases featuring brain accumulation of aggregated, misfolded proteins. Sucrose gradient distribution showed that mutant seipin forms much larger aggregates as compared with wild type (wt) seipin, indicating an impaired oligomerization. On the other hand, the interaction between wt and Celia seipin confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) assays, together with the identification of mixed oligomers in sucrose gradient fractionation experiments can explain the lack of symptoms in heterozygous carriers. We propose that the increased aggregation and subsequent impaired oligomerization of Celia seipin leads to cell death. In heterozygous carriers, wt seipin might prevent the damage caused by mutant seipin through its sequestration into harmless mixed oligomers. PMID:26282322

  6. Mutant p53 proteins alter cancer cell secretome and tumour microenvironment: Involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Butera, Giovanna; D'Orazi, Gabriella; Scarpa, Aldo; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    An ever-increasing number of studies highlight the role of mutant p53 proteins in the alteration of cancer cell secretome and in the modification of tumour microenvironment, sustaining an invasive phenotype of cancer cell. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between mutant p53 proteins and the microenvironment is becoming fundamental for the identification of both efficient anticancer therapeutic strategies and novel serum biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the novel findings concerning the regulation of secreted molecules by cancer cells bearing mutant TP53 gene. In particular, we highlight data from available literature, suggesting that mutant p53 proteins are able to (i) alter the secretion of enzymes involved in the modulation of extracellular matrix components; (ii) alter the secretion of inflammatory cytokines; (iii) increase the extracellular acidification; and (iv) regulate the crosstalk between cancer and stromal cells. PMID:27045472

  7. Overexpression of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutant proteins renders glioma cells more sensitive to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sichen; Chou, Arthur P.; Chen, Weidong; Chen, Ruihuan; Deng, Yuzhong; Phillips, Heidi S.; Selfridge, Julia; Zurayk, Mira; Lou, Jerry J.; Everson, Richard G.; Wu, Kuan-Chung; Faull, Kym F.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Liau, Linda M.; Lai, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) or 2 (IDH2) are found in a subset of gliomas. Among the many phenotypic differences between mutant and wild-type IDH1/2 gliomas, the most salient is that IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients demonstrate markedly improved survival compared with IDH1/2 wild-type glioma patients. To address the mechanism underlying the superior clinical outcome of IDH1/2 mutant glioma patients, we investigated whether overexpression of the IDH1R132H protein could affect response to therapy in the context of an isogenic glioma cell background. Stable clonal U87MG and U373MG cell lines overexpressing IDH1WT and IDH1R132H were generated, as well as U87MG cell lines overexpressing IDH2WT and IDH2R172K. In vitro experiments were conducted to characterize baseline growth and migration and response to radiation and temozolomide. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were measured under various conditions. U87MG-IDH1R132H cells, U373MG-IDH1R132H cells, and U87MG-IDH2R172K cells demonstrated increased sensitivity to radiation but not to temozolomide. Radiosensitization of U87MG-IDH1R132H cells was accompanied by increased apoptosis and accentuated ROS generation, and this effect was abrogated by the presence of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Interestingly, U87MG-IDH1R132H cells also displayed decreased growth at higher cell density and in soft agar, as well as decreased migration. Overexpression of IDH1R132H and IDH2R172K mutant protein in glioblastoma cells resulted in increased radiation sensitivity and altered ROS metabolism and suppression of growth and migration in vitro. These findings provide insight into possible mechanisms contributing to the improved outcomes observed in patients with IDH1/2 mutant gliomas. PMID:23115158

  8. Ultrafast Electronic and Vibrational Dynamics of Stabilized A State Mutants of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP): Snipping the Proton Wire

    PubMed Central

    Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Jaye, Andrew A.; Ronayne, Kate L.; Nappa, Jerome; Tonge, Peter J.; Meech, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    Two blue absorbing and emitting mutants (S65G/T203V/E222Q and S65T at pH 5.5) of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) have been investigated through ultrafast time resolved infra-red (TRIR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. In these mutants, in which the excited state proton transfer reaction observed in wild type GFP has been blocked, the photophysics are dominated by the neutral A state. It was found that the A* excited state lifetime is short, indicating that it is relatively less stabilised in the protein matrix than the anionic form. However, the lifetime of the A* state can be increased through modifications to the protein structure. The TRIR spectra show that a large shifts in protein vibrational modes on excitation of the A* state occurs in both these GFP mutants. This is ascribed to a change in H-bonding interactions between the protein matrix and the excited state. PMID:19554079

  9. Synthesis of outer membrane proteins in cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, J; Sambucetti, L; Silverman, P M

    1983-01-01

    Two major proteins, the murein lipoprotein and the OmpF matrix porin, are deficient in the outer membrane of cpxA cpxB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. We present evidence that the cpx mutations prevent or retard the translocation of these proteins to the outer membrane. The mutations had no effect on the rate of lipoprotein synthesis. Mutant cells labeled for 5 min with radioactive arginine accumulated as much lipoprotein as otherwise isogenic cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. This lipoprotein accumulated as such; no material synthesized in mutant cells and reactive with antilipoprotein antibodies had the electrophoretic mobility of prolipoprotein. Hence, the initial stages of prolipoprotein insertion into the inner membrane leading to its cleavage to lipoprotein appeared normal. However, after a long labeling interval, mutant cells were deficient in free lipoprotein and lacked lipoprotein covalently bound to peptidoglycan, suggesting that little if any of the lipoprotein synthesized in mutant cells reaches the outer membrane. Immunoreactive OmpF protein could also be detected in extracts of mutant cells labeled for 5 min, but the amount that accumulated was severalfold less in mutant cells than in cpxA+ cpxB+ cells. Analysis of beta-galactosidase synthesis from ompF-lacZ fusion genes showed this difference to be the result of a reduced rate of ompF transcription in mutant cells. Even so, little or none of the ompF protein synthesized in mutant cells was incorporated into the outer membrane. Images PMID:6339479

  10. TATA-Binding Protein Mutants That Are Lethal in the Absence of the Nhp6 High-Mobility-Group Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Peter; Biswas, Debabrata; Yu, Yaxin; Stewart, James M.; Stillman, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nhp6 protein is related to the high-mobility-group B family of architectural DNA-binding proteins that bind DNA nonspecifically but bend DNA sharply. Nhp6 is involved in transcriptional activation by both RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and Pol III. Our previous genetic studies have implicated Nhp6 in facilitating TATA-binding protein (TBP) binding to some Pol II promoters in vivo, and we have used a novel genetic screen to isolate 32 new mutations in TBP that are viable in wild-type cells but lethal in the absence of Nhp6. The TBP mutations that are lethal in the absence of Nhp6 cluster in three regions: on the upper surface of TBP that may have a regulatory role, near residues that contact Spt3, or near residues known to contact either TFIIA or Brf1 (in TFIIIB). The latter set of mutations suggests that Nhp6 becomes essential when a TBP mutant compromises its ability to interact with either TFIIA or Brf1. Importantly, the synthetic lethality for some of the TBP mutations is suppressed by a multicopy plasmid with SNR6 or by an spt3 mutation. It has been previously shown that nhp6ab mutants are defective in expressing SNR6, a Pol III-transcribed gene encoding the U6 splicing RNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that TBP binding to SNR6 is reduced in an nhp6ab mutant. Nhp6 interacts with Spt16/Pob3, the yeast equivalent of the FACT elongation complex, consistent with nhp6ab cells being extremely sensitive to 6-azauracil (6-AU). However, this 6-AU sensitivity can be suppressed by multicopy SNR6 or BRF1. Additionally, strains with SNR6 promoter mutations are sensitive to 6-AU, suggesting that decreased SNR6 RNA levels contribute to 6-AU sensitivity. These results challenge the widely held belief that 6-AU sensitivity results from a defect in transcriptional elongation. PMID:15226442

  11. Introduction of yeast artificial chromosomes containing mutant human amyloid precursor protein genes into transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Call, L.M.; Lamb, B.T.; Boese, K.F.

    1994-09-01

    Several hypothetical mechanisms have been proposed for the generation and deposition of the amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptide in Alzheimer`s disease (AD). These include overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, as suggested by Down Syndrome (DS, trisomy 21), and mutation of APP, as suggested by mutations associated with the presence of disease/amyloid deposition in some cases of familial AD (FAD). Although numerous in vitro studies have lead to certain insights into the molecular basis for amyloid deposition, the mechanisms(s) of amyloidogenesis in vivo remains poorly defined. To examine the effect of FAD mutations on amyloidogenesis in an animal model, we have focused on producing APP YAC transgenic mice containing the human APP gene with FAD mutations. These APP YAC transgenics are being produced by introduction of a 650 kb APP YAC through lipid-mediated transfection of ES cells. This strategy has two principal advantages: the APP genomic sequences contain transcriptional regulatory elements required for proper spatial and temporal expression and contain appropriate splice donor and acceptor sites needed to generate the entire spectrum of alternatively spliced APP transcripts. As a first step, we cloned the genomic regions surrounding APP exons 16 and 17 from an APP YAC sublibrary. Both the Swedish and the 717 mutations were then introduced into exons 16 and 17, respectively, by PCR mutagenesis, and subsequently transferred into the 650 kb APP YAC by a two step gene replacement in yeast. The mutant YACs have been introduced into ES cells, and we have determined that these cells are expressing human mutant APP mRNA and protein. These cells are being used to generate transgenic mice. This paradigm should provide the appropriate test of whether a mutant APP gene is capable of producing AD-like pathology in a mouse model.

  12. Multicolor protein labeling in living cells using mutant β-lactamase-tag technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shuji; Mizukami, Shin; Hori, Yuichiro; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2010-12-15

    Protein labeling techniques using small molecule probes have become important as practical alternatives to the use of fluorescent proteins (FPs) in live cell imaging. These labeling techniques can be applied to more sophisticated fluorescence imaging studies such as pulse-chase imaging. Previously, we reported a novel protein labeling system based on the combination of a mutant β-lactamase (BL-tag) with coumarin-derivatized probes and its application to specific protein labeling on cell membranes. In this paper, we demonstrated the broad applicability of our BL-tag technology to live cell imaging by the development of a series of fluorescence labeling probes for this technology, and the examination of the functions of target proteins. These new probes have a fluorescein or rhodamine chromophore, each of which provides enhanced photophysical properties relative to coumarins for the purpose of cellular imaging. These probes were used to specifically label the BL-tag protein and could be used with other small molecule fluorescent probes. Simultaneous labeling using our new probes with another protein labeling technology was found to be effective. In addition, it was also confirmed that this technology has a low interference with respect to the functions of target proteins in comparison to GFP. Highly specific and fast covalent labeling properties of this labeling technology is expected to provide robust tools for investigating protein functions in living cells, and future applications can be improved by combining the BL-tag technology with conventional imaging techniques. The combination of probe synthesis and molecular biology techniques provides the advantages of both techniques and can enable the design of experiments that cannot currently be performed using existing tools. PMID:20961132

  13. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis. PMID:26100117

  14. Functional analysis of N-linked glycosylation mutants of the measles virus fusion protein synthesized by recombinant vaccinia virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkhatib, G; Shen, S H; Briedis, D; Richardson, C; Massie, B; Weinberg, R; Smith, D; Taylor, J; Paoletti, E; Roder, J

    1994-01-01

    The role of N-linked glycosylation in the biological activity of the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) protein was analyzed by expressing glycosylation mutants with recombinant vaccinia virus vectors. There are three potential N-linked glycosylation sites located on the F2 subunit polypeptide of MV F, at asparagine residues 29, 61, and 67. Each of the three potential glycosylation sites was mutated separately as well as in combination with the other sites. Expression of mutant proteins in mammalian cells showed that all three sites are used for the addition of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cell surface expression of mutant proteins was reduced by 50% relative to the wild-type level when glycosylation at either Asn-29 or Asn-61 was abolished. Despite the similar levels of cell surface expression, the Asn-29 and Asn-61 mutant proteins had different biological activities. While the Asn-61 mutant was capable of inducing syncytium formation, the Asn-29 mutant protein did not exhibit any significant cell fusion activity. Inactivation of the Asn-67 glycosylation site also reduced cell surface transport of mutant protein but had little effect on its ability to cause cell fusion. However, when the Asn-67 mutation was combined with mutations at either of the other two sites, cleavage-dependent activation, cell surface expression, and cell fusion activity were completely abolished. Our data show that the loss of N-linked oligosaccharides markedly impaired the proteolytic cleavage, stability, and biological activity of the MV F protein. The oligosaccharide side chains in MV F are thus essential for optimum conformation of the extracellular F2 subunit that is presumed to bind cellular membranes. Images PMID:8107215

  15. Regulation of extracellular copper-binding proteins in copper-resistant and copper-sensitive mutants of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, V J; Gordon, A S

    1994-01-01

    Extracellular proteins of wild-type Vibrio alginolyticus were compared with those of copper-resistant and copper-sensitive mutants. One copper-resistant mutant (Cu40B3) constitutively produced an extracellular protein with the same apparent molecular mass (21 kDa) and chromatographic behavior as copper-binding protein (CuBP), a copper-induced supernatant protein which has been implicated in copper detoxification in wild-type V. alginolyticus. Copper-sensitive V. alginolyticus mutants displayed a range of alterations in supernatant protein profiles. CuBP was not detected in supernatants of one copper-sensitive mutant after cultures had been stressed with 50 microM copper. Increased resistance to copper was not induced by preincubation with subinhibitory levels of copper in the wild type or in the copper-resistant mutant Cu40B3. Copper-resistant mutants maintained the ability to grow on copper-amended agar after 10 or more subcultures on nonselective agar, demonstrating the stability of the phenotype. A derivative of Cu40B3 with wild-type sensitivity to copper which no longer constitutively expressed CuBP was isolated. The simultaneous loss of both constitutive CuBP production and copper resistance in Cu40B3 indicates that constitutive CuBP production is necessary for copper resistance in this mutant. These data support the hypothesis that the extracellular, ca. 20-kDa protein(s) of V. alginolyticus is an important factor in survival and growth of the organism at elevated copper concentrations. The range of phenotypes observed in copper-resistant and copper-sensitive V. alginolyticus indicate that altered sensitivity to copper was mediated by a variety of physiological changes. Images PMID:8031076

  16. Analysis of Constructed E Gene Mutants of Mouse Hepatitis Virus Confirms a Pivotal Role for E Protein in Coronavirus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Françoise; Stegen, Carola F.; Masters, Paul S.; Samsonoff, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Expression studies have shown that the coronavirus small envelope protein E and the much more abundant membrane glycoprotein M are both necessary and sufficient for the assembly of virus-like particles in cells. As a step toward understanding the function of the mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) E protein, we carried out clustered charged-to-alanine mutagenesis on the E gene and incorporated the resulting mutations into the MHV genome by targeted recombination. Of the four possible clustered charged-to-alanine E gene mutants, one was apparently lethal and one had a wild-type phenotype. The two other mutants were partially temperature sensitive, forming small plaques at the nonpermissive temperature. Revertant analyses of these two mutants demonstrated that the created mutations were responsible for the temperature-sensitive phenotype of each and provided support for possible interactions among E protein monomers. Both temperature-sensitive mutants were also found to be markedly thermolabile when grown at the permissive temperature, suggesting that there was a flaw in their assembly. Most significantly, when virions of one of the mutants were examined by electron microscopy, they were found to have strikingly aberrant morphology in comparison to the wild type: most mutant virions had pinched and elongated shapes that were rarely seen among wild-type virions. These results demonstrate an important, probably essential, role for the E protein in coronavirus morphogenesis. PMID:9733825

  17. Structural characterization of a mutant peptide derived from ubiquitin: implications for protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Zerella, R.; Chen, P. Y.; Evans, P. A.; Raine, A.; Williams, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of the N-terminal beta-hairpin of ubiquitin is thought to be an early event in the folding of this small protein. Previously, we have shown that a peptide corresponding to residues 1-17 of ubiquitin folds autonomously and is likely to have a native-like hairpin register. To investigate the causes of the stability of this fold, we have made mutations in the amino acids at the apex of the turn. We find that in a peptide where Thr9 is replaced by Asp, U(1-17)T9D, the native conformation is stabilized with respect to the wild-type sequence, so much so that we are able to characterize the structure of the mutant peptide fully by NMR spectroscopy. The data indicate that U(1-17)T9D peptide does indeed form a hairpin with a native-like register and a type I turn with a G1 beta-bulge, as in the full-length protein. The reason for the greater stability of the U(1-17)T9D mutant remains uncertain, but there are nuclear Overhauser effects between the side chains of Asp9 and Lys 11, which may indicate that a charge-charge interaction between these residues is responsible. PMID:11152124

  18. A mutant influenza virus that uses an N1 neuraminidase as the receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Kathryn A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2013-12-01

    In the vast majority of influenza A viruses characterized to date, hemagglutinin (HA) is the receptor-binding and fusion protein, whereas neuraminidase (NA) is a receptor-cleaving protein that facilitates viral release but is expendable for entry. However, the NAs of some recent human H3N2 isolates have acquired receptor-binding activity via the mutation D151G, although these isolates also appear to retain the ability to bind receptors via HA. We report here the laboratory generation of a mutation (G147R) that enables an N1 NA to completely co-opt the receptor-binding function normally performed by HA. Viruses with this mutant NA grow to high titers even in the presence of extensive mutations to conserved residues in HA's receptor-binding pocket. When the receptor-binding NA is paired with this binding-deficient HA, viral infectivity and red blood cell agglutination are blocked by NA inhibitors. Furthermore, virus-like particles expressing only the receptor-binding NA agglutinate red blood cells in an NA-dependent manner. Although the G147R NA receptor-binding mutant virus that we characterize is a laboratory creation, this same mutation is found in several natural clusters of H1N1 and H5N1 viruses. Our results demonstrate that, at least in tissue culture, influenza virus receptor-binding activity can be entirely shifted from HA to NA. PMID:24027333

  19. Dysfunctional conformational dynamics of protein kinase A induced by a lethal mutant of phospholamban hinder phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonggul; Masterson, Larry R.; Cembran, Alessandro; Verardi, Raffaello; Shi, Lei; Gao, Jiali; Taylor, Susan S.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic interplay between kinases and substrates is crucial for the formation of catalytically committed complexes that enable phosphoryl transfer. However, a clear understanding on how substrates modulate kinase structural dynamics to control catalytic efficiency is still missing. Here, we used solution NMR spectroscopy to study the conformational dynamics of two complexes of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A with WT and R14 deletion phospholamban, a lethal human mutant linked to familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Phospholamban is a central regulator of heart muscle contractility, and its phosphorylation by protein kinase A constitutes a primary response to β-adrenergic stimulation. We found that the single deletion of arginine in phospholamban’s recognition sequence for the kinase reduces its binding affinity and dramatically reduces phosphorylation kinetics. Structurally, the mutant prevents the enzyme from adopting conformations and motions committed for catalysis, with concomitant reduction in catalytic efficiency. Overall, these results underscore the importance of a well-tuned structural and dynamic interplay between the kinase and its substrates to achieve physiological phosphorylation levels for proper Ca2+ signaling and normal cardiac function. PMID:25775607

  20. Protein engineering of conger eel galectins by tracing of molecular evolution using probable ancestral mutants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conger eel galectins, congerin I (ConI) and congerin II (ConII), show the different molecular characteristics resulting from accelerating evolution. We recently reconstructed a probable ancestral form of congerins, Con-anc. It showed properties similar to those of ConII in terms of thermostability and carbohydrate recognition specificity, although it shares a higher sequence similarity with ConI than ConII. Results In this study, we have focused on the different amino acid residues between Con-anc and ConI, and have performed the protein engineering of Con-anc through site-directed mutagenesis, followed by the molecular evolution analysis of the mutants. This approach revealed the functional importance of loop structures of congerins: (1) N- and C-terminal and loop 5 regions that are involved in conferring a high thermostability to ConI; (2) loops 3, 5, and 6 that are responsible for stronger binding of ConI to most sugars; and (3) loops 5 and 6, and Thr38 residue in loop 3 contribute the specificity of ConI toward lacto-N-fucopentaose-containing sugars. Conclusions Thus, this methodology, with tracing of the molecular evolution using ancestral mutants, is a powerful tool for the analysis of not only the molecular evolutionary process, but also the structural elements of a protein responsible for its various functions. PMID:20152053

  1. Use of proline mutants to help solve the NMR solution structure of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, H.; Davies, P. L.; Sykes, B. D.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    To help understand the structure/function relationships in antifreeze proteins (AFP), and to define the motifs required for ice binding, a Type III AFP suitable for two-dimensional (2D) NMR studies was produced in Escherichia coli. A synthetic gene for one of the Type III AFP isoforms was assembled in a T7 polymerase-directed expression vector. The 67-amino acid-long gene product differed from the natural AFP by inclusion of an N-terminal methionine but was indistinguishable in activity. The NMR spectra of this AFP were complicated by cis-trans proline isomerization from the C-terminal sequence YPPA. Substitution of this sequence by YAA eliminated isomer signals without altering the activity or structure of the mutant AFP. This variant (rQAE m1.1) was selected for sequential assignment and the secondary structure determination using 2D 1H NMR spectroscopy. Nine beta-strands are paired to form two triple-stranded antiparallel sheets and one double-stranded antiparallel sheet. Two further proline replacements, P29A and P33A, were made to delineate the role of conserved prolines in Type III AFP. These mutants were valuable in clarifying ambiguous NMR spectral assignments amongst the remaining six prolines of rQAE m1.1. In contrast to the replacement of the C-terminal prolyl residues, the exchange of P29 and P33 caused some structural changes and significantly decreased protein solubility and antifreeze activity. PMID:8401227

  2. Cellular Targets of Functional and Dysfunctional Mutants of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Fused to Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vitaly; van der Laak, Jessica; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Suslova, Elena; Kwon, Myoung-Ok; Heinlein, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    Intercellular transport of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA involves the accumulation of virus-encoded movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (Pd), in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived inclusion bodies, and on microtubules. The functional significance of these interactions in viral RNA (vRNA) movement was tested in planta and in protoplasts with TMV derivatives expressing N- and C-terminal deletion mutants of MP fused to the green fluorescent protein. Deletion of 55 amino acids from the C terminus of MP did not interfere with the vRNA transport function of MP:GFP but abolished its accumulation in inclusion bodies, indicating that accumulation of MP at these ER-derived sites is not a requirement for function in vRNA intercellular movement. Deletion of 66 amino acids from the C terminus of MP inactivated the protein, and viral infection occurred only upon complementation in plants transgenic for MP. The functional deficiency of the mutant protein correlated with its inability to associate with microtubules and, independently, with its absence from Pd at the leading edge of infection. Inactivation of MP by N-terminal deletions was correlated with the inability of the protein to target Pd throughout the infection site, whereas its associations with microtubules and inclusion bodies were unaffected. The observations support a role of MP-interacting microtubules in TMV RNA movement and indicate that MP targets microtubules and Pd by independent mechanisms. Moreover, accumulation of MP in Pd late in infection is insufficient to support viral movement, confirming that intercellular transport of vRNA relies on the presence of MP in Pd at the leading edge of infection. PMID:11070034

  3. Expression of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in human chondrocytes induces the pseudoachondroplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Thomas M; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haynes, Richard; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2006-04-01

    Over 70 mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a large extracellular pentameric glycoprotein synthesized by chondrocytes, have been identified as causing two skeletal dysplasias: multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED/EDM1), and a dwarfing condition, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH). These mutations induce misfolding of intracellular COMP, resulting in retention of the protein in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of chondrocytes. This accumulation of COMP in the rER creates the phenotypic enlarged rER cisternae in the cells, which is believed to compromise chondrocyte function and eventually cause cell death. To study the molecular mechanisms involved with the disease, we sought to develop an in vitro model that recapitulates the PSACH phenotype. Normal human chondrocytes were transfected with wildtype (wt-) COMP or with mutant COMP (D469del; mt-) recombinant adenoviruses and grown in a nonattachment redifferentiating culture system that provides an environment allowing formation of a differentiated chondrocyte nodule. Visualization of normal cells expressing COMP suggested the hallmarks of the PSACH phenotype. Mutant COMP expressed in normal cells was retained in enlarged rER cisternae, which also retained IX collagen (COL9) and matrilin-3 (MATN3). Although these proteins were secreted normally into the ECM of the wt-COMP nodules, reduced secretion of these proteins was observed in nodules composed of cells transfected with mt-COMP. The findings complement those found in chondrocytes from PSACH patient growth plates. This new model system allows for production of PSACH chondrocyte pathology in normal costochondral chondrocytes and can be used for future mechanistic and potential gene therapy studies. PMID:16514635

  4. Dynamics of the GroEL-protein complex: effects of nucleotides and folding mutants.

    PubMed

    Sparrer, H; Lilie, H; Buchner, J

    1996-04-26

    Chaperonins are a ubiquitous class of ring-shaped oligomeric protein complexes that are of crucial importance for protein folding in vivo. Analysis of the underlying functional principles had relied mainly on model proteins the (un)folding of which is dominated by irreversible side-reactions. We used maltose-binding protein (MBP) as a substrate protein for GroEL, since the refolding of this protein is completely reversible and thus allows a detailed analysis of the molecular parameters that determine the interaction of GroEL with non-native protein. We show that MBP folding intermediates are effectively trapped by GroEL in a diffusion-controlled reaction. This complex is stabilized via unspecific hydrophobic interactions. Stabilization energies for wild-type MBP increasing linearly with ionic strength from 50 kJ/mol to 60 kJ/mol. Depending on the intrinsic folding rate and the hydrophobicity of the substrate protein, the interaction of GroEL with MBP folding intermediates leads to a dramatically decreased apparent refolding rate of MBP (wild-type) or a complete suppression of folding (MBP folding mutant Y283D). On the basis of our data, a quantitative kinetic model of the GroEL-mediated folding cycle is proposed, which allows simulation of the partial reactions of the binding and release cycles under all conditions tested. In the presence of ATP and non-hydrolysable analogues, MBP is effectively released from GroEL, since the overall dissociation constant is reduced by three orders of magnitude. Interestingly, binding of nucleotide does not change the off rate by more than a factor of 3. However the on-rate is decreased by at least two orders of magnitude. Therefore, the rebinding reaction is prevented and folding occurs in solution. PMID:8613994

  5. CHIP overexpression reduces mutant androgen receptor protein and ameliorates phenotypes of the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Waza, Masahiro; Tokui, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2007-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract within the androgen receptor (AR). The pathologic features of SBMA are motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem and diffuse nuclear accumulation and nuclear inclusions of the mutant AR in the residual motor neurons and certain visceral organs. Many components of the ubiquitin-proteasome and molecular chaperones are also sequestered in the inclusions, suggesting that they may be actively engaged in an attempt to degrade or refold the mutant AR. C terminus of Hsc70 (heat shock cognate protein 70)-interacting protein (CHIP), a U-box type E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been shown to interact with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) or Hsp70 and ubiquitylates unfolded proteins trapped by molecular chaperones and degrades them. Here, we demonstrate that transient overexpression of CHIP in a neuronal cell model reduces the monomeric mutant AR more effectively than it does the wild type, suggesting that the mutant AR is more sensitive to CHIP than is the wild type. High expression of CHIP in an SBMA transgenic mouse model also ameliorated motor symptoms and inhibited neuronal nuclear accumulation of the mutant AR. When CHIP was overexpressed in transgenic SBMA mice, mutant AR was also preferentially degraded over wild-type AR. These findings suggest that CHIP overexpression ameliorates SBMA phenotypes in mice by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR via enhanced mutant AR degradation. Thus, CHIP overexpression would provide a potential therapeutic avenue for SBMA. PMID:17494697

  6. Insights into the conformational equilibria of maltose-binding protein by analysis of high affinity mutants.

    PubMed

    Telmer, Patrick G; Shilton, Brian H

    2003-09-01

    The affinity of maltose-binding protein (MBP) for maltose and related carbohydrates was greatly increased by removal of groups in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft. The wild-type protein has a KD of 1200 nM for maltose; mutation of residues Met-321 and Gln-325, both to alanine, resulted in a KD for maltose of 70 nM; deletion of 4 residues, Glu-172, Asn-173, Lys-175, and Tyr-176, which are part of a poorly ordered loop, results in a KD for maltose of 110 nM. Combining the mutations yields an increased affinity for maltodextrins and a KD of 6 nM for maltotriose. Comparison of ligand binding by the mutants, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, indicates that decreases in the off-rate are responsible for the increased affinity. Small-angle x-ray scattering was used to demonstrate that the mutations do not significantly affect the solution conformation of MBP in either the presence or absence of maltose. The crystal structures of selected mutants showed that the mutations do not cause significant structural changes in either the closed or open conformation of MBP. These studies show that interactions in the interface opposite the ligand binding cleft, which we term the "balancing interface," are responsible for modulating the affinity of MBP for its ligand. Our results are consistent with a model in which the ligand-bound protein alternates between the closed and open conformations, and removal of interactions in the balancing interface decreases the stability of the open conformation, without affecting the closed conformation. PMID:12794084

  7. Mutant Brucella abortus membrane fusogenic protein induces protection against challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; de Paulo Martins, Vicente; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2015-04-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:25644010

  8. Mutant Brucella abortus Membrane Fusogenic Protein Induces Protection against Challenge Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Filho, Job Alves; Martins, Vicente de Paulo; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Santos, Nathalia V.; de Oliveira, Fernanda Souza; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Azevedo, Vasco; Cravero, Silvio Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Brucella species can cause brucellosis, a zoonotic disease that causes serious livestock economic losses and represents a public health threat. The mechanism of virulence of Brucella spp. is not yet fully understood. Therefore, it is crucial to identify new molecules that serve as virulence factors to better understand this host-pathogen interplay. Here, we evaluated the role of the Brucella membrane fusogenic protein (Mfp) and outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19) in bacterial pathogenesis. In this study, we showed that B. abortus Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan deletion mutant strains have reduced persistence in vivo in C57BL/6 and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) knockout (KO) mice. Additionally, 24 h after macrophage infection with a Δmfp::kan or Δomp19::kan strain expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) approximately 80% or 65% of Brucella-containing vacuoles (BCVs) retained the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1, respectively, whereas around 60% of BCVs containing wild-type S2308 were found in LAMP-1-negative compartments. B. abortus Δomp19::kan was attenuated in vivo but had a residual virulence in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, whereas the Δmfp::kan strain had a lower virulence in these same mouse models. Furthermore, Δmfp::kan and Δomp19::kan strains were used as live vaccines. Challenge experiments revealed that in C57BL/6 and IRF-1 KO mice, the Δmfp::kan strain induced greater protection than the vaccine RB51 and protection similar that of vaccine S19. However, a Δomp19::kan strain induced protection similar to that of RB51. Thus, these results demonstrate that Brucella Mfp and Omp19 are critical for full bacterial virulence and that the Δmfp::kan mutant may serve as a potential vaccine candidate in future studies. PMID:25644010

  9. UV sensitivity and impaired nucleotide excision repair in DNA-dependent protein kinase mutant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, C; Calsou, P; Frit, P; Cayrol, C; Carter, T; Salles, B

    1998-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a member of the phosphatidyl-inositol (PI)3-kinase family, is involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Its regulatory subunit, Ku, binds to DNA and recruits the kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We show here a new role of DNA-PK in the modulation of the process of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vivo since, as compared with their respective parental cell lines, DNA-PK mutants (scid , V-3 and xrs 6 cells) exhibit sensitivity to UV-C irradiation (2.0- to 2.5-fold) and cisplatin ( approximately 3- to 4-fold) associated with a decreased activity (40-55%) of unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV-C irradiation. Moreover, we observed that wortmannin sensitized parental cells in vivo when combined with either cisplatin or UV-C light, but had no effect on the DNA-PKcs deficient scid cells. Despite a lower repair synthesis activity (approximately 2-fold) measured in vitro with nuclear cell extracts from DNA-PK mutants, a direct involvement of DNA-PK in the NER reaction in vitro has not been observed. This study establishes a regulatory function of DNA-PK in the NER process in vivo but rules out a physical role of the complex in the repair machinery at the site of the DNA lesion. PMID:9490781

  10. Systematic Phenotypic Screen of Arabidopsis Peroxisomal Mutants Identifies Proteins Involved in β-Oxidation1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Hu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic and multifunctional organelles essential to development. Plant peroxisomes accommodate a multitude of metabolic reactions, many of which are related to the β-oxidation of fatty acids or fatty acid-related metabolites. Recently, several dozens of novel peroxisomal proteins have been identified from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) through in silico and experimental proteomic analyses followed by in vivo protein targeting validations. To determine the functions of these proteins, we interrogated their transfer DNA insertion mutants with a series of physiological, cytological, and biochemical assays to reveal peroxisomal deficiencies. Sugar dependence and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid response assays uncovered statistically significant phenotypes in β-oxidation-related processes in mutants for 20 of 27 genes tested. Additional investigations uncovered a subset of these mutants with abnormal seed germination, accumulation of oil bodies, and delayed degradation of long-chain fatty acids during early seedling development. Mutants for seven genes exhibited deficiencies in multiple assays, strongly suggesting the involvement of their gene products in peroxisomal β-oxidation and initial seedling growth. Proteins identified included isoforms of enzymes related to β-oxidation, such as acyl-CoA thioesterase2, acyl-activating enzyme isoform1, and acyl-activating enzyme isoform5, and proteins with functions previously unknown to be associated with β-oxidation, such as Indigoidine synthase A, Senescence-associated protein/B12D-related protein1, Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and Unknown protein5. This multipronged phenotypic screen allowed us to reveal β-oxidation proteins that have not been discovered by single assay-based mutant screens and enabled the functional dissection of different isoforms of multigene families involved in β-oxidation. PMID:25253886

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-06-21

    VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6{sub 1}22, P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and P2{sub 1}, respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source.

  12. Mutant prenyltransferase-like mitochondrial protein (PLMP) and mitochondrial abnormalities in kd/kd mice

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Jarett, Leonard; Meade, Ray; Madaio, Michael P.; Hancock, Wayne W.; George, Alfred L.; Neilson, Eric G.; Gasser, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mice that are homozygous for the kidney disease (kd) mutation are apparently healthy for the first 8 weeks of life, but spontaneously develop a severe form of interstitial nephritis that progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by 4 to 8 months of age. By testing for linkage to microsatellite markers, we previously localized the kd gene to a YAC/BAC contig. Methods The sequence of the entire critical region was examined, and candidate genes were identified. These candidate genes were sequenced in both mutant (kd/kd) mice and normal controls. The phenotype was further characterized by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Transgenic mice were constructed that carried the wild-type allele of the prime candidate gene, and this transgene was transferred to a kd/kd background by breeding. Results We have obtained evidence that kd is a mutant allele of a novel gene for a prenyltransferase-like mitochondrial protein (PLMP). This gene is alternatively spliced, with the larger gene product having one domain that resembles transprenyltransferase and another that is similar to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase. The smaller gene product includes only the first domain. An antiserum to PLMP localizes to mitochondria, and ultrastructural defects are present in the mitochondria of renal tubular epithelial cells, and to a lesser extent, hepatocytes and heart cells from kd/kd mice. In a line of kd/kd mice that carried the wild-type PLMP allele as a transgene, only 1 out of 13 animals expressed the disease by 120 days of age. Conclusion The kd allele codes for a novel protein that localizes to the mitochondria, and the kd/kd mouse has dysmorphic mitochondria in the renal tubular epithelial cells. This mouse is therefore a unique animal model for studying mechanisms that lead to tubulointerstitial nephritis. PMID:15200409

  13. Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins potently ubiquitylate and degrade familial ALS-related mutant SOD1 proteins and reduce their cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Miho; Ito, Takashi; Sone, Jun; Doyu, Manabu; Urano, Fumihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2007-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dorfin is a ubiquitin ligase (E3) that degrades mutant SOD1 proteins, which are responsible for familial ALS. Although Dorfin has potential as an anti-ALS molecule, its life in cells is short. To improve its stability and enhance its E3 activity, we developed chimeric proteins containing the substrate-binding hydrophobic portion of Dorfin and the U-box domain of the carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), which has strong E3 activity through the U-box domain. All the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins were more stable in cells than was wild-type Dorfin (Dorfin(WT)). One of the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins, Dorfin-CHIP(L), ubiquitylated mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT) and CHIP in vivo, and degraded mutant SOD1 protein more rapidly than Dorfin(WT) does. Furthermore, Dorfin-CHIP(L) rescued neuronal cells from mutant SOD1-associated toxicity and reduced the aggresome formation induced by mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT). PMID:17157513

  14. A subset of yeast vacuolar protein sorting mutants is blocked in one branch of the exocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harsay, Edina; Schekman, Randy

    2002-01-21

    Exocytic vesicles that accumulate in a temperature-sensitive sec6 mutant at a restrictive temperature can be separated into at least two populations with different buoyant densities and unique cargo molecules. Using a sec6 mutant background to isolate vesicles, we have found that vacuolar protein sorting mutants that block an endosome-mediated route to the vacuole, including vps1, pep12, vps4, and a temperature-sensitive clathrin mutant, missort cargo normally transported by dense exocytic vesicles, such as invertase, into light exocytic vesicles, whereas transport of cargo specific to the light exocytic vesicles appears unaffected. Immunoisolation experiments confirm that missorting, rather than a changed property of the normally dense vesicles, is responsible for the altered density gradient fractionation profile. The vps41Delta and apl6Delta mutants, which block transport of only the subset of vacuolar proteins that bypasses endosomes, sort exocytic cargo normally. Furthermore, a vps10Delta sec6 mutant, which lacks the sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y (CPY), accumulates both invertase and CPY in dense vesicles. These results suggest that at least one branch of the yeast exocytic pathway transits through endosomes before reaching the cell surface. Consistent with this possibility, we show that immunoisolated clathrin-coated vesicles contain invertase. PMID:11807092

  15. BAG2 promotes tumorigenesis through enhancing mutant p53 protein levels and function

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhao, Yuhan; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Cen; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Jiabei; Zheng, Tongsen; Liu, Lianxin; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in tumors. Many mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins promote tumorigenesis through the gain-of-function (GOF) mechanism. Mutp53 proteins often accumulate to high levels in tumors, which is critical for mutp53 GOF. Its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we found that BAG2, a protein of Bcl-2 associated athanogene (BAG) family, promotes mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumors. Mechanistically, BAG2 binds to mutp53 and translocates to the nucleus to inhibit the MDM2-mutp53 interaction, and MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of mutp53. Thus, BAG2 promotes mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumor growth, metastasis and chemoresistance. BAG2 is frequently overexpressed in tumors. BAG2 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis in patients and mutp53 accumulation in tumors. These findings revealed a novel and important mechanism for mutp53 accumulation and GOF in tumors, and also uncovered an important role of BAG2 in tumorigenesis through promoting mutp53 accumulation and GOF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08401.001 PMID:26271008

  16. Low dietary protein content alleviates motor symptoms in mice with mutant dynactin/dynein-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Diana; Sinniger, Jérome; Henriques, Alexandre; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Müller, Hans-Peter; Rasche, Volker; Ferger, Boris; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Soylu-Kucharz, Rana; Petersén, Asa; Walther, Paul; Linkus, Birgit; Kassubek, Jan; Wong, Philip C.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Dupuis, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in components of the molecular motor dynein/dynactin lead to neurodegenerative diseases of the motor system or atypical parkinsonism. These mutations are associated with prominent accumulation of vesicles involved in autophagy and lysosomal pathways, and with protein inclusions. Whether alleviating these defects would affect motor symptoms remain unknown. Here, we show that a mouse model expressing low levels of disease linked-G59S mutant dynactin p150Glued develops motor dysfunction >8 months before loss of motor neurons or dopaminergic degeneration is observed. Abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes and protein inclusions were efficiently corrected by lowering dietary protein content, and this was associated with transcriptional upregulations of key players in autophagy. Most importantly this dietary modification partially rescued overall neurological symptoms in these mice after onset. Similar observations were made in another mouse strain carrying a point mutation in the dynein heavy chain gene. Collectively, our data suggest that stimulating the autophagy/lysosomal system through appropriate nutritional intervention has significant beneficial effects on motor symptoms of dynein/dynactin diseases even after symptom onset. PMID:25552654

  17. Low dietary protein content alleviates motor symptoms in mice with mutant dynactin/dynein-mediated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Diana; Sinniger, Jérome; Henriques, Alexandre; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Müller, Hans-Peter; Rasche, Volker; Ferger, Boris; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Soylu-Kucharz, Rana; Petersén, Asa; Walther, Paul; Linkus, Birgit; Kassubek, Jan; Wong, Philip C; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2015-04-15

    Mutations in components of the molecular motor dynein/dynactin lead to neurodegenerative diseases of the motor system or atypical parkinsonism. These mutations are associated with prominent accumulation of vesicles involved in autophagy and lysosomal pathways, and with protein inclusions. Whether alleviating these defects would affect motor symptoms remain unknown. Here, we show that a mouse model expressing low levels of disease linked-G59S mutant dynactin p150(Glued) develops motor dysfunction >8 months before loss of motor neurons or dopaminergic degeneration is observed. Abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes and protein inclusions were efficiently corrected by lowering dietary protein content, and this was associated with transcriptional upregulations of key players in autophagy. Most importantly this dietary modification partially rescued overall neurological symptoms in these mice after onset. Similar observations were made in another mouse strain carrying a point mutation in the dynein heavy chain gene. Collectively, our data suggest that stimulating the autophagy/lysosomal system through appropriate nutritional intervention has significant beneficial effects on motor symptoms of dynein/dynactin diseases even after symptom onset. PMID:25552654

  18. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein

    PubMed Central

    Picone, Delia

    2016-01-01

    MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques. PMID:27340829

  19. Drosophila ribosomal protein mutants control tissue growth non-autonomously via effects on the prothoracic gland and ecdysone.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jane I; Mitchell, Naomi C; Kalcina, Marina; Tchoubrieva, Elly; Stewart, Mary J; Marygold, Steven J; Walker, Cherryl D; Thomas, George; Leevers, Sally J; Pearson, Richard B; Quinn, Leonie M; Hannan, Ross D

    2011-12-01

    The ribosome is critical for all aspects of cell growth due to its essential role in protein synthesis. Paradoxically, many Ribosomal proteins (Rps) act as tumour suppressors in Drosophila and vertebrates. To examine how reductions in Rps could lead to tissue overgrowth, we took advantage of the observation that an RpS6 mutant dominantly suppresses the small rough eye phenotype in a cyclin E hypomorphic mutant (cycE(JP)). We demonstrated that the suppression of cycE(JP) by the RpS6 mutant is not a consequence of restoring CycE protein levels or activity in the eye imaginal tissue. Rather, the use of UAS-RpS6 RNAi transgenics revealed that the suppression of cycE(JP) is exerted via a mechanism extrinsic to the eye, whereby reduced Rp levels in the prothoracic gland decreases the activity of ecdysone, the steroid hormone, delaying developmental timing and hence allowing time for tissue and organ overgrowth. These data provide for the first time a rationale to explain the counter-intuitive organ overgrowth phenotypes observed for certain members of the Minute class of Drosophila Rp mutants. They also demonstrate how Rp mutants can affect growth and development cell non-autonomously. PMID:22194697

  20. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-01-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties. PMID:26497062

  1. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-01

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  2. On the role of a Lipid-Transfer Protein. Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant is compromised in germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, Luciana A; Oyarburo, Natalia; Cimmino, Carlos; Pinedo, Marcela L; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Plant Lipid-Transfer Proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to reversibly bind/transport lipids in vitro. LTPs have been involved in diverse physiological processes but conclusive evidence on their role has only been presented for a few members, none of them related to seed physiology. Arabidopsis seeds rely on storage oil breakdown to supply carbon skeletons and energy for seedling growth. Here, Arabidopsis ltp3 mutant was analyzed for its ability to germinate and for seedling establishment. Ltp3 showed delayed germination and reduced germination frequency. Seedling growth appeared reduced in the mutant but this growth restriction was rescued by the addition of an exogenous carbon supply, suggesting a defective oil mobilization. Lipid breakdown analysis during seedling growth revealed a differential profile in the mutant compared to the wild type. The involvement of LTP3 in germination and seedling growth and its relationship with the lipid transfer ability of this protein is discussed. PMID:26479260

  3. Structure analysis of the protein transduction domain of human Period1 and its mutant analogs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Lin; Xie, Jun; Niu, Bo; Hu, Xiao Nian; Gao, Yang; Xiang, Qian; Zhang, Yue Hong; Guo, Yong; Zhang, Zheng Guo

    2005-04-01

    Human Period1 (hPer1) has been proved to be able to translocate into cells in a protein transduction manner. The segment of amino acids 830-845 of hPer1 is its protein transduction domain (PTD). In order to explore the membrane penetrating mechanism of hPer1-PTD and the physico-chemical properties necessary in the process, Ala scanning mutation method was used to investigate the variation in the peptide internalization. To further investigate the related physico-chemical requirements, the three dimensional structures of hPer1-PTD and its mutant analogs were simulated by Rosetta method. The electrostatic potentials and energies of these structures were calculated using the Delphi algorithm to solve Poisson-Boltzman equation. The hydrophobicity was assessed by the percentage of the nonpolar area in SAS (solvent accessible surface (SAS)). It has been proved that the Arg836 was the key residue for peptide internalization. When this Arg mutated into Ala, the peptide could not cross the membrane. The large enough area with positive charge was the decisive factor for hPer1-PTD. The alpha-helical structure seemed to play an assistant role so as to enable the positive charge connected in spatial arrangement. PMID:15781181

  4. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  5. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-03-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  6. Yeast phenotype classifies mammalian protein kinase C cDNA mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Su, L; Hansen, H

    1993-01-01

    The phorbol ester receptor protein kinase C (PKC) gene family encodes essential mediators of eukaryotic cellular signals. Molecular dissection of their mechanisms of action has been limited in part by the lack of random mutagenesis approaches and by the complexity of signaling pathways in mammalian cells which involve multiple PKC isoforms. Here we present a rapid screen which permits the quantification of mammalian PKC activity phenotypically in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bovine PKC alpha cDNA is functionally expressed in S. cerevisiae. This results in a phorbol ester response: a fourfold increase in the cell doubling time and a substantial decrease in yeast colony size on agar plates. We have expressed pools of bovine PKC alpha cDNAs mutagenized by Bal 31 deletion of internal, amino-terminal, or carboxyl-terminal sequences and have identified three classes of mutants on the basis of their distinct yeast phenotypes. Representatives of each class were analyzed. An internal deletion of amino acids (aa) 172 to 225 displayed ligand-dependent but reduced catalytic activity, an amino-terminal truncation of aa 1 to 153 displayed elevated and ligand-independent activity, and a carboxyl-terminal 26-aa truncation (aa 647 to 672) lacked activity under any conditions. Additional mutations confirmed the distinct functional characteristics of these classes. Our data show that deletion of the V1 and C1 regions results in elevated basal catalytic activity which is still Ca2+ responsive. Internal deletions in the V2 and C2 regions do not abolish phorbol ester or Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity, suggesting that most of the C2 domain is not essential for phorbol ester stimulation and most of the regulatory domain is dispensable for Ca2+ regulation of PKC activity. These distinct activities od the PKC mutants correlate with a specific and proportional yeast phenotype and are quantified on agar plates by yeast colony size. This provides a phenotypic screen which is suitable

  7. Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes from Euglena gracilis and Mutants Deficient in Chlorophyll b1

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Francis X.; Schiff, Jerome A.

    1986-01-01

    The use of n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside along with sodium dodecyl sulfate improves the retention of chlorophyll (Chl) by chlorophyll-protein complexes (CPs) prepared from thylakoids of Euglena gracilis Klebs var bacillaris Cori and yields several additional complexes. Thylakoids from wild-type (WT) cells, solubilized in these detergents and subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 0°C, yield the following CPs, in order of relative molecular weight, containing the pigments shown in parentheses with their respective molar ratios where determined: CP Ia (Chl a, diadinoxanthin and β-carotene; 100:12:5); CP I (Chl a and β-carotene; 100:6-12); CPx (Chl and carotenoids); LHCP2 (light-harvesting CP oligomer) (Chl a, Chl b, diadinoxanthin and neoxanthin; 12:4:3:1); CPy (Chl a, diadinoxanthin and β-carotene; 100:14:8); CPa (Chl a and β-carotene; 100:18-25) and LHCP (monomer) (Chl a, Chl b, diadinoxanthin and neoxanthin; 12:6:4:1). The LHCP complexes retain up to 40% of the total Chl and 80% of the Chl b in the thylakoids. CP Ia contains only a trace of Chl b (Chl a/b [mol/mol] = 62). The lower amount of Chl b in Euglena (about 10% of Chl a + b) compared to higher plants (about 30% of Chl a + b) is probably a consequence of the lower Chl b (relative to Chl a) in the LHCPs of Euglena rather than of fewer LHCPs being present. G1BU, Gr1BSL, and O4BSL, mutants of bacillaris low in Chl b (1-2% of Chl a + b), lack the CP Ia, LHCP, and LHCP2 found in wildtype (WT); G1 and O4 also lack CPy. The mutants contain reduced amounts of Chl a (two-thirds of WT in Gr1 and one-third in G1 and O4) and neoxanthin (20-40% of WT) but retain levels of β-carotene and diadinoxanthin close to those in cells of WT. The CPs remaining in the mutants have pigment compositions very similar to their counterparts from WT. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16664586

  8. The effects of maribavir on the autophosphorylation of ganciclovir resistant mutants of the cytomegalovirus UL97 protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The UL97 protein kinase of human cytomegalovirus phosphorylates the antiviral drug ganciclovir and is the target of maribavir action. A detailed enzyme kinetic analysis of maribavir on the various enzymatic functions of wild type and ganciclovir resistant forms of UL97 is required. Methods Wild type and site directed mutant forms of the human cytomegalovirus UL97 gene product were expressed using recombinant baculoviruses and the purified products used to assess the effects of maribavir on the ganciclovir (GCV) kinase and protein kinase (PK) activities. Results Maribavir was a potent inhibitor of the autophosporylation of the wild type and all the major GCV resistant UL97 mutants analysed (M460I, H520Q, A594V and L595F) with a mean IC50 of 35 nM. The M460I mutation resulted in hypersensitivity to maribavir with an IC50 of 4.8 nM. A maribavir resistant mutant of UL97 (L397R) was functionally compromised as both a GCV kinase and a protein kinase (~ 10% of wild type levels). Enzyme kinetic experiments demonstrated that maribavir was a competitive inhibitor of ATP with a Ki of 10 nM. Discussion Maribavir is a potent competitive inhibitor of the UL97 protein kinase function and shows increased activity against the M460I GCV-resistant mutant which may impact on the management of GCV drug resistance in patients. PMID:21429239

  9. Detection of in vivo protein tyrosine nitration in petite mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: consequence of its formation and significance.

    PubMed

    Panja, Chiranjit; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2014-09-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a selective post-translational modification often associated with physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group. In our previous study we first time showed that PTN occurs in vivo in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study we observed occurrence of PTN in petite mutant of S. cerevisiae which indicated that PTN is not absolutely dependent on functional mitochondria. Nitration of proteins in S. cerevisiae was also first time confirmed in immunohistochemical study using spheroplasts. Using proteosomal mutants Rpn10Δ, Pre9Δ, we first time showed that the fate of protein nitration in S. cerevisiae was not dependent on proteosomal clearing and probably played vital role in modulating signaling cascades. From our study it is evident that protein tyrosine nitration is a normal physiological event of S. cerevisiae. PMID:25111815

  10. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-04-01

    Val57 point mutants of human cystatin C, which were designed to assess the influence of changes in the properties of the L1 loop on the dimerization propensity, were structurally characterized. Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations.

  11. Mutant surfactant A2 proteins associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer induce TGF-β1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Cano, Christopher A.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the lung surfactant proteins are found in patients with interstitial lung disease and lung cancer, but their pathologic mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans heterozygous for a missense mutation in the gene encoding surfactant protein (SP)-A2 (SFTPA2) contains more TGF-β1 than control samples. Expression of mutant SP-A2 in lung epithelial cells leads to secretion of latent TGF-β1, which is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling. TGF-β1 secretion is not observed in lung epithelial cells expressing the common SP-A2 variants or other misfolded proteins capable of increasing cellular endoplasmic reticulum stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response is necessary for maximal TGF-β1 secretion because gene silencing of the unfolded protein response transducers leads to an ∼50% decrease in mutant SP-A2–mediated TGF-β1 secretion. Expression of the mutant SP-A2 proteins leads to the coordinated increase in gene expression of TGF-β1 and two TGF-β1–binding proteins, LTBP-1 and LTBP-4; expression of the latter is necessary for secretion of this cytokine. Inhibition of the TGF-β autocrine positive feedback loop by a pan–TGF-β–neutralizing antibody, a TGF-β receptor antagonist, or LTBP gene silencing results in the reversal of TGF-β–mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell death. Because secretion of latent TGF-β1 is induced specifically by mutant SP-A2 proteins, therapeutics targeted to block this pathway may be especially beneficial for this molecularly defined subgroup of patients. PMID:23223528

  12. Dystrophin Hot-Spot Mutants Leading to Becker Muscular Dystrophy Insert More Deeply into Membrane Models than the Native Protein.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Paboeuf, Gilles; Tascon, Christophe; Hubert, Jean-François; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Vié, Véronique; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline

    2016-07-26

    Dystrophin (DYS) is a membrane skeleton protein whose mutations lead to lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy or to the milder Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). One third of BMD "in-frame" exon deletions are located in the region that codes for spectrin-like repeats R16 to R21. We focused on four prevalent mutated proteins deleted in this area (called RΔ45-47, RΔ45-48, RΔ45-49, and RΔ45-51 according to the deleted exon numbers), analyzing protein/membrane interactions. Two of the mutants, RΔ45-48 and RΔ45-51, led to mild pathologies and displayed a similar triple coiled-coil structure as the full-length DYS R16-21, whereas the two others, RΔ45-47 and RΔ45-49, induced more severe pathologies and showed "fractional" structures unrelated to the normal one. To explore lipid packing, small unilamellar liposomes (SUVs) and planar monolayers were used at various initial surface pressures. The dissociation constants determined by microscale thermophoresis (MST) were much higher for the full-length DYS R161-21 than for the mutants; thus the wild type protein has weaker SUV binding. Comparing surface pressures after protein adsorption and analysis of atomic force microscopy images of mixed protein/lipid monolayers revealed that the mutants insert more into the lipid monolayer than the wild type does. In fact, in both models every deletion mutant showed more interactions with membranes than the full-length protein did. This means that mutations in the R16-21 part of dystrophin disturb the protein's molecular behavior as it relates to membranes, regardless of whether the accompanying pathology is mild or severe. PMID:27367833

  13. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: I. Design and analysis of monomeric mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olga V.; Roginskii, Denis O.; Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP) differs from other lipocalins by lacking the conserved disulfide bond and for being able to form the domain-swapped dimers. To identify structural features responsible for the formation of the bOBP unique dimeric structure and to understand the role of the domain swapping on maintaining the native structure of the protein, structural properties of the recombinant wild type bOBP and its mutant that cannot dimerize via the domain swapping were analyzed. We also looked at the effect of the disulfide bond by designing a monomeric bOBPs with restored disulfide bond which is conserved in other lipocalins. Finally, to understand which features in the microenvironment of the bOBP tryptophan residues play a role in the defining peculiarities of the intrinsic fluorescence of this protein we designed and investigated single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP. Our analysis revealed that the insertion of the glycine after the residue 121 of the bOBP prevents domain swapping and generates a stable monomeric protein bOBP-Gly121+. We also show that the restored disulfide bond in the GCC-bOBP mutant leads to the noticeable stabilization of the monomeric structure. Structural and functional analysis revealed that none of the amino acid substitutions introduced to the bOBP affected functional activity of the protein and that the ligand binding leads to the formation of a more compact and stable state of the recombinant bOBP and its mutant monomeric forms. Finally, analysis of the single-tryptophan mutants of the monomeric bOBP gave us a unique possibility to find peculiarities of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues which were not previously described. PMID:27114880

  14. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  15. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Johnson, F. Brad; Marette, André; Lebel, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice) do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles. PMID:26447695

  16. BRCA-associated protein 1 mutant cholangiocarcinoma: an aggressive disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Anand, Deepa; Shroff, Rachna T.; Jain, Apurva; Zuo, Mingxin; Conrad, Claudius; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA-associated protein 1, an enzyme encoded by the BAP1 gene, is commonly mutated in uveal melanoma, mesothelioma, and renal cancers. Tumors with BAP1 mutation follow an aggressive course. BAP1 mutations have also been observed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The clinical phenotype of BAP1 mutant CCA may yield useful prognostic and therapeutic information but has not been defined. Methods The records of CCA patients who underwent next-generation sequencing (NGS) were reviewed, and data on clinical, histopathological, genetic, and radiological features; response to therapy; time to progression; and survival were analyzed. Results Twenty-two cases of BAP1-mutation associated CCA were diagnosed from January 1, 2009, to February 1, 2015, at our center. Twenty patients had intrahepatic CCA and two had extrahepatic CCA. Tumor sizes (largest dimension) ranged from 2 to 16 cm (mean, 8.5 cm). Twelve patients had tumors that were poorly differentiated. Majority of the patients had advanced disease at presentation and 13 had bone metastases. Thirteen patients (59%) experienced rapidly progressive disease following primary therapy (chemotherapy or surgical resection). The mean time to tumor progression was 3.8 months after the first line chemotherapy. Conclusions BAP1 mutation in CCA may be associated with aggressive disease and poor response to standard therapies. Therefore, BAP1-targeted therapies need to be investigated. PMID:27563445

  17. In Vitro and Molecular Modeling Analysis of Two Mutant Desert Hedgehog Proteins Associated with 46,XY Gonadal Dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Josué Joram; Méndez, Juan Pablo; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin Antonio; Damian-Matsumura, Pablo; Benítez-Granados, Jesús; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee

    2013-01-01

    Mutations of Desert hedgehog (DHH) have been associated to 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (PGD) and to mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD); however, there have been no functional studies of mutations described in DHH. To determine if mutations p.L162P and Δ1086delG yield functional impairment, we performed in vitro and in silico analysis of both DHH mutants. In complementary DNA of DHH, we performed site-directed mutagenesis, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Protein extracts were obtained from HEK293cells transfected with different constructs and analyzed by Western blot; besides, densitometric analysis of chemiluminescent signals was performed. In addition, the structure of the wt-DHH and its two mutant proteins was inferred using in silico protein molecular modeling. In the Western blot analysis, we observed the absence of signal for p.L162P in DHH-N and a diminished signal for Δ1086delG in DHH-C, when compared to wt-DHH. Protein modeling showed notable conformational changes for the side chains of p.L162P, while the secondary structure was drastically modified in Δ1086delG, when compared to wt-DHH. To our knowledge, this is the first study focused to determine by in vitro studies, the effect of two specific mutations in DHH associated with 46,XY PGD and MGD. Our results suggest that both mutations have a deleterious effect on the expression of the DHH mutant proteins. PMID:23786321

  18. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  19. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  20. Concerted asynchronous hula-twist photoisomerization in the S65T/H148D mutant of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Chen, Xuebo; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Thiel, Walter

    2014-08-11

    Fluorescence emission of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) is lost in the S65T mutant, but partly recovered in the S65T/H148D double mutant. These experimental findings are rationalized by a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study at the QM(CASPT2//CASSCF)/AMBER level. A barrierless excited-state proton transfer, which is exclusively driven by the Asp148 residue introduced in the double mutant, is responsible for the ultrafast formation of the anionic fluorescent state, which can be deactivated through a concerted asynchronous hula-twist photoisomerization. This causes the lower fluorescence quantum yield in S65T/H148D compared to wild-type GFP. Hydrogen out-of-plane motion plays an important role in the deactivation of the S65T/H148D fluorescent state. PMID:25044736

  1. Surveying the lipogenesis landscape in Yarrowia lipolytica through understanding the function of a Mga2p regulatory protein mutant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leqian; Markham, Kelly; Blazeck, John; Zhou, Nijia; Leon, Dacia; Otoupal, Peter; Alper, Hal S

    2015-09-01

    Lipogenic organisms represent great starting points for metabolic engineering of oleochemical production. While previous engineering efforts were able to significantly improve lipid production in Yarrowia lipolytica, the lipogenesis landscape, especially with respect to regulatory elements, has not been fully explored. Through a comparative genomics and transcriptomics approach, we identified and validated a mutant mga2 protein that serves as a regulator of desaturase gene expression and potent lipogenesis factor. The resulting strain is enriched in unsaturated fatty acids. Comparing the underlying mechanism of this mutant to other previously engineered strains suggests that creating an imbalance between glycolysis and the TCA cycle can serve as a driving force for lipogenesis when combined with fatty acid catabolism overexpressions. Further comparative transcriptomics analysis revealed both distinct and convergent rewiring associated with these different genotypes. Finally, by combining metabolic engineering targets, it is possible to further engineer a strain containing the mutant mga2 gene to a lipid production titer of 25g/L. PMID:26219673

  2. Insights on the structural perturbations in human MTHFR Ala222Val mutant by protein modeling and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abhinand, P A; Shaikh, Faraz; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Radadiya, Ashish; Bhaskar, L V K S; Shah, Anamik; Ragunath, P K

    2016-04-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) protein catalyzes the only biochemical reaction which produces methyltetrahydrofolate, the active form of folic acid essential for several molecular functions. The Ala222Val polymorphism of human MTHFR encodes a thermolabile protein associated with increased risk of neural tube defects and cardiovascular disease. Experimental studies have shown that the mutation does not affect the kinetic properties of MTHFR, but inactivates the protein by increasing flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) loss. The lack of completely solved crystal structure of MTHFR is an impediment in understanding the structural perturbations caused by the Ala222Val mutation; computational modeling provides a suitable alternative. The three-dimensional structure of human MTHFR protein was obtained through homology modeling, by taking the MTHFR structures from Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus as templates. Subsequently, the modeled structure was docked with FAD using Glide, which revealed a very good binding affinity, authenticated by a Glide XP score of -10.3983 (kcal mol(-1)). The MTHFR was mutated by changing Alanine 222 to Valine. The wild-type MTHFR-FAD complex and the Ala222Val mutant MTHFR-FAD complex were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation over 50 ns period. The average difference in backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) between wild and mutant variant was found to be ~.11 Å. The greater degree of fluctuations in the mutant protein translates to increased conformational stability as a result of mutation. The FAD-binding ability of the mutant MTHFR was also found to be significantly lowered as a result of decreased protein grip caused by increased conformational flexibility. The study provides insights into the Ala222Val mutation of human MTHFR that induces major conformational changes in the tertiary structure, causing a significant reduction in the FAD-binding affinity. PMID:26273990

  3. Immunogenicity and Cross-Protective Efficacy Induced by Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Typhimurium Mutants with Truncated LPS in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Liu, Qing; Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Tian; Yi, Jie; Liang, Kang; Kong, Qingke

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor present in the outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from Salmonella show high immunogenicity and provide protection against Salmonella infection, and truncated LPS alters the outer membrane composition of the cell wall. In our previous study, we demonstrated that Salmonella mutants carrying truncated LPS failed to induce strong immune responses and cross-reaction to other enteric bacteria, due to their high attenuation and low colonization in the host. Therefore, we plan to investigate whether outer membrane proteins from Salmonella mutants with truncated LPS resulting from a series of nonpolar mutations, including ∆waaC12, ∆waaF15, ∆waaG42, ∆rfaH49, ∆waaI43, ∆waaJ44, ∆waaL46, ∆wbaP45 and ∆wzy-48, affect immunogenicity and provide protection against diverse Salmonella challenge. In this study, the immunogenicity and cross-protection efficiency of purified OMPs from all mutants were investigated to explore a potential OMP vaccine to protect against homologous or heterologous serotype Salmonella challenge. The results demonstrated that OMPs from three Salmonella mutants (∆waaC12, ∆waaJ44 and ∆waaL46) induced higher immune responses and provided good protection against homologous S. Typhimurium. The OMPs from these three mutants were also selected to determine the cross-protective efficacy against homologous and heterologous serotype Salmonella. Our results indicated that the mutant ∆waaC12 can elicit higher cross-reactivity and can provide good protection against S. Choleraesuis and S. Enteritidis infection and that the cross-reactivity may be ascribed to an antigen of approximately 18.4–30 kDa. PMID:27011167

  4. Electric properties of thylakoid membranes from pea mutants with modified carotenoid and chlorophyll-protein complex composition.

    PubMed

    Dobrikova, A; Morgan, R M; Ivanov, A G; Apostolova, E; Petkanchin, I; Huner, N P; Taneva, S G

    2000-01-01

    Surface electric properties of thylakoid membranes from wild type and two mutant forms, Coeruleovireus 2/16 and Costata 2/133, of pea are investigated by electric light scattering and microelectrophoretic measurements. Characterization of the chlorophyll-protein complexes in thylakoid membranes reveals that the relative ratio of oligomeric (LHC II(1)) to monomeric (LHC II(3)) forms of the light-harvesting Chl a/b complex of Photosystem II is lower (3.34) in 2/133 mutant and higher (6.62) in 2/16 mutant than in wild type (4.57). This is accompanied by elevated amounts and a considerable reduction of all carotenoids in 2/16 and 2/133 mutant, respectively, as compared to the wild type. The concomitant variations of the permanent dipole moment (transversal charge asymmetry), electric polarizability and electrokinetic charge of the thylakoid membranes from both the mutants are discussed in terms of the differences in the supramolecular (oligomeric) organization of the light-harvesting complexes II within the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:16228483

  5. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering—A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Laulumaa, Saara; Nieminen, Tuomo; Lehtimäki, Mari; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Koza, Michael M.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS). The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations. PMID:26068118

  6. The role of mutant TAR DNA-binding protein 43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Jonathan; Kleinberger, Gernot; Wils, Hans; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2011-08-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) has been identified as a key protein of ubiquitinated inclusions in brains of patients with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) or FTLD (frontotemporal lobar degeneration), defining a new pathological disease spectrum. Recently, coding mutations have been identified in the TDP-43 gene (TARDBP), which further confirmed the pathogenic nature of the protein. Today, several animal models have been generated to gain more insight into the disease-causing pathways of the FTLD/ALS spectrum. This mini-review summarizes the current status of TDP-43 models, with a focus on mutant TDP-43. PMID:21787329

  7. Fukutin-related protein mutations that cause congenital muscular dystrophy result in ER-retention of the mutant protein in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Esapa, Christopher T; McIlhinney, R A Jeffrey; Blake, Derek J

    2005-01-15

    Mutations in the gene encoding fukutin-related protein (FKRP) cause a spectrum of diseases including congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C), limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) and congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) with brain malformations and mental retardation. Although these diseases are associated with abnormal dystroglycan processing, the cellular consequences of the idiosyncratic FKRP mutations have not been determined. Here we show, in cultured cells, that FKRP mutants associated with the more severe disease phenotypes (S221R, A455D, P448L) are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas the wild-type protein and the mutant L276I that causes LGMD2I are found predominantly in the Golgi apparatus. The ER-retained proteins have a shorter half-life than the wild-type FKRP and are preferentially degraded by the proteasome. Furthermore, calnexin binds preferentially to the ER-retained mutants suggesting that it may participate in the quality control pathway for FKRP. These data provide the first evidence that the ER-retention of mutant FKRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of CMD and potentially explain why the allelic disorder LGMD2I is milder, because the mutated protein is able to reach the Golgi apparatus. PMID:15574464

  8. Rationally designed fluorescently labeled sulfate-binding protein mutants: evaluation in the development of a sensing system for sulfate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Salins, Lyndon L E.; Mark Ensor, C.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins from E. coli undergo large conformational changes upon binding their respective ligands. By attaching a fluorescent probe at rationally selected unique sites on the protein, these conformational changes in the protein can be monitored by measuring the changes in fluorescence intensity of the probe which allow the development of reagentless sensing systems for their corresponding ligands. In this work, we evaluated several sites on bacterial periplasmic sulfate-binding protein (SBP) for attachment of a fluorescent probe and rationally designed a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Eight different mutants of SBP were prepared by employing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to introduce a unique cysteine residue at a specific location on the protein. The sites Gly55, Ser90, Ser129, Ala140, Leu145, Ser171, Val181, and Gly186 were chosen for mutagenesis by studying the three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of SBP. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe (MDCC) was then attached site-specifically to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the unique cysteine residue introduced. Each fluorescent probe-conjugated SBP mutant was characterized in terms of its fluorescence properties and Ser171 was determined to be the best site for the attachment of the fluorescent probe that would allow for the development of a reagentless sensing system for sulfate. Three different environment-sensitive fluorescent probes (1,5-IAEDANS, MDCC, and acylodan) were studied with the SBP171 mutant protein. A calibration curve for sulfate was constructed using the labeled protein and relating the change in the fluorescence intensity with the amount of sulfate present in the sample. The detection limit for sulfate was found to be in the submicromolar range using this system. The selectivity of the sensing system was demonstrated by evaluating its response to other anions. A fast and selective sensing system with detection limits for sulfate in the

  9. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

    PubMed Central

    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta; Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations. PMID:23519666

  10. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  11. Nonenzymatic anticoagulant activity of the mutant serine protease Ser360Ala-activated protein C mediated by factor Va.

    PubMed Central

    Gale, A. J.; Sun, X.; Heeb, M. J.; Griffin, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    The human plasma serine protease, activated protein C (APC), primarily exerts its anticoagulant function by proteolytic inactivation of the blood coagulation cofactors Va and VIIIa. A recombinant active site Ser 360 to Ala mutation of protein C was prepared, and the mutant protein was expressed in human 293 kidney cells and purified. The activation peptide of the mutant protein C zymogen was cleaved by a snake venom activator, Protac C, but the "activated" S360A APC did not have amidolytic activity. However, it did exhibit significant anticoagulant activity both in clotting assays and in a purified protein assay system that measured prothrombinase activity. The S360A APC was compared to plasma-derived and wild-type recombinant APC. The anticoagulant activity of the mutant, but not native APC, was resistant to diisopropyl fluorophosphate, whereas all APCs were inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against APC. In contrast to native APC, S360A APC was not inactivated by serine protease inhibitors in plasma and did not bind to the highly reactive mutant protease inhibitor M358R alpha 1 antitrypsin. Since plasma serpins provide the major mechanism for inactivating APC in vivo, this suggests that S360A APC would have a long half-life in vivo, with potential therapeutic advantages. S360A APC rapidly inhibited factor Va in a nonenzymatic manner since it apparently did not proteolyze factor Va. These data suggest that native APC may exhibit rapid nonenzymatic anticoagulant activity followed by enzymatic irreversible proteolysis of factor Va. The results of clotting assays and prothrombinase assays showed that S360A APC could not inhibit the variant Gln 506-FVa compared with normal Arg 506-FVa, suggesting that the active site of S360A APC binds to FVa at or near Arg 506. PMID:9007985

  12. Flexibility of the murine prion protein and its Asp178Asn mutant investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, J; Ferrara, P; Caflisch, A

    2001-01-01

    Inherited forms of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, e.g. familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome and fatal familial insomnia, segregate with specific point mutations of the prion protein. It has been proposed that the pathologically relevant Asp178Asn (D178N) mutation might destabilize the structure of the prion protein because of the loss of the Arg164-Asp178 salt bridge. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structured C-terminal domain of the murine prion protein and the D178N mutant were performed to investigate this hypothesis. The D178N mutant did not deviate from the NMR conformation more than the wild type on the nanosecond time scale of the simulations. In agreement with CD spectroscopy experiments, no major structural rearrangement could be observed for the D178N mutant, apart from the N-terminal elongation of helix 2. The region of structure around the disulfide bridge deviated the least from the NMR conformation and showed the smallest fluctuations in all simulations in agreement with hydrogen exchange data of the wild type prion protein. Large deviations and flexibility were observed in the segments which are ill-defined in the NMR conformation. Moreover, helix 1 showed an increased degree of mobility, especially at its N-terminal region. The dynamic behavior of the D178N mutant and its minor deviation from the folded conformation suggest that the salt bridge between Arg164 and Asp178 might not be crucial for the stability of the prion protein. PMID:11775003

  13. Single cell protein production from yacon extract using a highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant of the marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Tong; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The intracellular protein in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant can be easily released when they are incubated both in the low-osmolarity water and at the non-permissive temperature (usually 37 degrees C). After the mutant was grown in the yacon extract for 45 h, the crude protein content in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant Z114 was 59.1% and over 61% of the total protein could be released from the cells treated at 37 degrees C. The mutant cells grown in the yacon extract still contained high level of essential amino acids and other nutrients. This means that the yacon extract could be used as the medium for growth of the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant which contained high content of crude protein. PMID:19727833

  14. Plasma membrane lipid–protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Burgos, Asdrubal; Garapati, Prashanth; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid–protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status. PMID:24672530

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  16. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced. PMID:25492221

  17. Two classes of human papillomavirus type 16 E1 mutants suggest pleiotropic conformational constraints affecting E1 multimerization, E2 interaction, and interaction with cellular proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Yasugi, T; Vidal, M; Sakai, H; Howley, P M; Benson, J D

    1997-01-01

    Random mutagenesis of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E1 was used to generate E1 missense mutants defective for interaction with either hUBC9 or 16E1-BP, two cDNAs encoding proteins that have been identified by their ability to interact with HPV16 E1 in two-hybrid assays. hUBC9, the human counterpart of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UBC9, is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme known to be involved in cell cycle progression. 16E1-BP encodes a protein of no known function but does contain an ATPase signature motif. Eight hUBC9 or 16E1-BP interaction-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants were identified and characterized for origin-dependent transient DNA replication, ATPase activity, and various protein-protein interaction phenotypes. Six of these mutant E1 proteins were significantly impaired for replication. Among these, two classes of replication-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants were observed. One class, represented by the S330R replication-defective mutant (containing an S-to-R change at position 330), remained competent for all protein-protein interactions tested, with the exception of hUBC9 association. Furthermore, this mutant, unlike the other replication-defective HPV16 E1 missense mutants, had a strong dominant negative replication phenotype in transient-replication assays. The other class, represented by five of the missense mutants, was defective for multiple protein-protein interactions, usually including, but not limited to, the interaction defect for which each mutant was originally selected. In many cases, a single missense mutation in one region of HPV16 E1 had pleiotropic effects, even upon activities thought to be associated with other domains of HPV16 E1. This suggests that E1 proteins are not modular but may instead be composed of multiple structurally and/or functionally interdependent domains. PMID:9223484

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of the BRAF V600E mutant protein in colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Vakiani, Efsevia; Yaeger, Rona; Brooke, Sylvester; Zhou, Yi; Klimstra, David S.; Shia, Jinru

    2016-01-01

    Reliable assessment of the BRAF mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of colorectal carcinomas (CRC). The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a recently developed mutation-specific antibody (VE1, SpringBio, Pleasanton, CA) to detect the BRAF V600E protein in paraffin tissue. We analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) 117 cases that had been evaluated for BRAF mutation using a MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry based assay. IHC staining was evaluated without the knowledge of the genetic data and was considered positive when there was distinct homogeneous cytoplasmic staining in the tumor cells. The analyzed cases included 4 polyps, 63 primary and 50 metastatic CRC. Forty-five of the 46 (97.8%) cases that were positive by IHC had a BRAF V600E mutation by genetic analysis; the 1 discordant case was notably of signet ring cell type. Similarly, 66 of the 67 (98.5%) cases that were negative by IHC were also negative by genetic analysis. Four cases that showed weak cytoplasmic staining and/or nuclear staining in the tumor cells were considered to be IHC equivocal; by genetic analysis, 2 of the 4 were positive and 2 were negative. The overall sensitivity and specificity of IHC for the detection of a BRAF V600E mutant tumor was 93.7% and 95.6%, respectively. Our results support the use of VE1 IHC for identification of colorectal neoplasms harboring the BRAF V600E mutation. Difficulties in IHC interpretation may arise in a small number of cases, and in those cases molecular testing is required. PMID:25517872

  19. Response to Comment on "Crystal structures of translocator protein (TSPO) and mutant mimic of a human polymorphism".

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Liu, Jian; Zheng, Yi; Garavito, R Michael; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2015-10-30

    Wang comments that the diffraction data for the structure of the A139T mutant of translocator protein TSPO from Rhodobacter sphaeroides should be used to 1.65 instead of 1.8 angstroms and that the density interpreted as porphyrin and monoolein is better fitted as polyethylene glycol. Although different practices of data processing exist, in this case they do not substantially influence the final map. Additional data are presented supporting the fit of a porphyrin and monooleins. PMID:26516277

  20. Quantification of mutant huntingtin protein in cerebrospinal fluid from Huntington’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Edward J.; Boggio, Roberto; Langbehn, Douglas; Robertson, Nicola; Haider, Salman; Miller, James R.C.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leavitt, Blair R.; Kuhn, Rainer; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Macdonald, Douglas; Weiss, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantification of disease-associated proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been critical for the study and treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders; however, mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT), the cause of Huntington’s disease (HD), is at very low levels in CSF and, to our knowledge, has never been measured previously. METHODS: We developed an ultrasensitive single-molecule counting (SMC) mHTT immunoassay that was used to quantify mHTT levels in CSF samples from individuals bearing the HD mutation and from control individuals in 2 independent cohorts. RESULTS: This SMC mHTT immunoassay demonstrated high specificity for mHTT, high sensitivity with a femtomolar detection threshold, and a broad dynamic range. Analysis of the CSF samples showed that mHTT was undetectable in CSF from all controls but quantifiable in nearly all mutation carriers. The mHTT concentration in CSF was approximately 3-fold higher in patients with manifest HD than in premanifest mutation carriers. Moreover, mHTT levels increased as the disease progressed and were associated with 5-year onset probability. The mHTT concentration independently predicted cognitive and motor dysfunction. Furthermore, the level of mHTT was associated with the concentrations of tau and neurofilament light chain in the CSF, suggesting a neuronal origin for the detected mHTT. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that mHTT can be quantified in CSF from HD patients using the described SMC mHTT immunoassay. Moreover, the level of mHTT detected is associated with proximity to disease onset and diminished cognitive and motor function. The ability to quantify CSF mHTT will facilitate the study of HD, and mHTT quantification could potentially serve as a biomarker for the development and testing of experimental mHTT-lowering therapies for HD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable. FUNDING: CHDI Foundation Inc.; Medical Research Council (MRC) UK; National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR); Rosetrees

  1. Identification of a 34 kDa protein altered in the LF-1 mutant as the herbicide-binding D1 protein of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, J.; Pakrasi, H.; Seibert, M.; Arntzen, C.

    1986-04-01

    The LF-1 mutant of Scenedesmus has a complete block on the oxidizing side of its PSII reaction center. However, the reaction center as well as the reducing side of PSII is fully functional in this mutant. Compared to the wildtype (WT) the only detected protein difference in the PSII complex of LF-1 is the change in mobility of a 34 kDa protein to 36 kDa. This protein has been implicated to have a major role in Mn-binding and water-oxidation. The authors have recently shown that photoaffinity labeling of thylakoids with azido-(/sup 14/C)-atrazine tags the 34 kDa protein in WT and the 36 kDa protein in LF-1. It has been shown that the azido-atrazine labeled protein, called D1, functions in herbicide binding and Q/sub A/ to Q/sub B/ electron transfer on the reducing side of PSII. Polyclonal antibodies directed against the D1 protein of Amaranthus hybridus (Ohad, et al., EMBOJ 1985) were found to recognize the Scenedesmus 34 kDa (WT) and 36 kDa (LF-1) proteins. The implied dual function for the D1 protein on the reducing as well as the oxidizing side of PSII reaction center will be discussed.

  2. Reduced Infectivity in Cattle for an Outer Membrane Protein Mutant of Anaplasma marginale

    PubMed Central

    Brayton, Kelly A.; Magunda, Forgivemore; Munderloh, Ulrike G.; Kelley, Karen L.; Barbet, Anthony F.

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the causative agent of anaplasmosis in cattle. Transposon mutagenesis of this pathogen using the Himar1 system resulted in the isolation of an omp10 operon insertional mutant referred to as the omp10::himar1 mutant. The work presented here evaluated if this mutant had morphological and/or growth rate defects compared to wild-type A. marginale. Results showed that the morphology, developmental cycle, and growth in tick and mammalian cell cultures are similar for the mutant and the wild type. Tick transmission experiments established that tick infection levels with the mutant were similar to those with wild-type A. marginale and that infected ticks successfully infected cattle. However, this mutant exhibited reduced infectivity and growth in cattle. The possibility of transforming A. marginale by transposon mutagenesis coupled with in vitro and in vivo assessment of altered phenotypes can aid in the identification of genes associated with virulence. The isolation of deliberately attenuated organisms that can be evaluated in their natural biological system is an important advance for the rational design of vaccines against this species. PMID:25595772

  3. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome. PMID:26906928

  4. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Jessica; De Santis, Riccardo; de Turris, Valeria; Morlando, Mariangela; Laneve, Pietro; Calvo, Andrea; Caliendo, Virginia; Chiò, Adriano; Rosa, Alessandro; Bozzoni, Irene

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUSR514S and FUSR521C patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUSP525L mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs) is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis. PMID:26035390

  5. The Evolutionarily Conserved Protein PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 Is Required for Efficient Manganese Uptake at the Thylakoid Membrane in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anja; Steinberger, Iris; Herdean, Andrei; Gandini, Chiara; Eisenhut, Marion; Kurz, Samantha; Morper, Anna; Hoecker, Natalie; Rühle, Thilo; Labs, Mathias; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Geimer, Stefan; Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Husted, Søren; Weber, Andreas P M; Spetea, Cornelia; Leister, Dario

    2016-04-01

    In plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the light-driven oxidation of water. The oxygen-evolving complex of PSII is a Mn4CaO5 cluster embedded in a well-defined protein environment in the thylakoid membrane. However, transport of manganese and calcium into the thylakoid lumen remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana PHOTOSYNTHESIS AFFECTED MUTANT71 (PAM71) is an integral thylakoid membrane protein involved in Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis in chloroplasts. This protein is required for normal operation of the oxygen-evolving complex (as evidenced by oxygen evolution rates) and for manganese incorporation. Manganese binding to PSII was severely reduced in pam71 thylakoids, particularly in PSII supercomplexes. In cation partitioning assays with intact chloroplasts, Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) ions were differently sequestered in pam71, with Ca(2+) enriched in pam71 thylakoids relative to the wild type. The changes in Ca(2+) homeostasis were accompanied by an increased contribution of the transmembrane electrical potential to the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane. PSII activity in pam71 plants and the corresponding Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant cgld1 was restored by supplementation with Mn(2+), but not Ca(2+) Furthermore, PAM71 suppressed the Mn(2+)-sensitive phenotype of the yeast mutant Δpmr1 Therefore, PAM71 presumably functions in Mn(2+) uptake into thylakoids to ensure optimal PSII performance. PMID:27020959

  6. prlA suppression of defective export of maltose-binding protein in secB mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Francetić, O; Hanson, M P; Kumamoto, C A

    1993-07-01

    An Escherichia coli strain containing a signal sequence mutation in the periplasmic maltose-binding protein (MBP) (malE18-1) and a point mutation in the soluble export factor SecB (secBL75Q) is completely defective in export of MBP and unable to grow on maltose (Mal- phenotype). We isolated 95 spontaneous Mal+ revertants and characterized them genetically. Three types of extragenic suppressors were identified: informational (missense) suppressors, a bypass suppressor conferring the Mal+ phenotype in the absence of MBP, and suppressors affecting the prlA gene, which encodes a component of the protein export apparatus. In this study, a novel prlA allele, designated prlA1001 and mapping in the putative second transmembrane domain of the PrlA (SecY) protein, was found. In addition, we isolated a mutation designated prlA1024 which is identical to prlA4-2, the mutation responsible for the signal sequence suppression in the prlA4 (prlA4-1 prlA4-2) double mutant (T. Sako and T. Iino, J. Bacteriol. 170:5389-5391, 1988). Comparison of the prlA1024 mutant and the prlA4 double mutant provides a possible explanation for the isolation of these prlA alleles. PMID:8320219

  7. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  8. ALS mutant FUS proteins are recruited into stress granules in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Jessica; De Santis, Riccardo; de Turris, Valeria; Morlando, Mariangela; Laneve, Pietro; Calvo, Andrea; Caliendo, Virginia; Chiò, Adriano; Rosa, Alessandro; Bozzoni, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an opportunity to study human diseases mainly in those cases for which no suitable model systems are available. Here, we have taken advantage of in vitro iPSCs derived from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and carrying mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS to study the cellular behavior of the mutant proteins in the appropriate genetic background. Moreover, the ability to differentiate iPSCs into spinal cord neural cells provides an in vitro model mimicking the physiological conditions. iPSCs were derived from FUS(R514S) and FUS(R521C) patient fibroblasts, whereas in the case of the severe FUS(P525L) mutation, in which fibroblasts were not available, a heterozygous and a homozygous iPSC line were raised by TALEN-directed mutagenesis. We show that aberrant localization and recruitment of FUS into stress granules (SGs) is a prerogative of the FUS mutant proteins and occurs only upon induction of stress in both undifferentiated iPSCs and spinal cord neural cells. Moreover, we show that the incorporation into SGs is proportional to the amount of cytoplasmic FUS, strongly correlating with the cytoplasmic delocalization phenotype of the different mutants. Therefore, the available iPSCs represent a very powerful system for understanding the correlation between FUS mutations, the molecular mechanisms of SG formation and ALS ethiopathogenesis. PMID:26035390

  9. Gaucher disease due to saposin C deficiency is an inherited lysosomal disease caused by rapidly degraded mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Motta, Marialetizia; Camerini, Serena; Tatti, Massimo; Casella, Marialuisa; Torreri, Paola; Crescenzi, Marco; Tartaglia, Marco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2014-11-01

    Saposin (Sap) C is an essential cofactor for the lysosomal degradation of glucosylceramide (GC) by glucosylceramidase (GCase) and its functional impairment underlies a rare variant form of Gaucher disease (GD). Sap C promotes rearrangement of lipid organization in lysosomal membranes favoring substrate accessibility to GCase. It is characterized by six invariantly conserved cysteine residues involved in three intramolecular disulfide bonds, which make the protein remarkably stable to acid environment and degradation. Five different mutations (i.e. p.C315S, p.342_348FDKMCSKdel, p.L349P, p.C382G and p.C382F) have been identified to underlie Sap C deficiency. The molecular mechanism by which these mutations affect Sap C function, however, has not been delineated in detail. Here, we characterized biochemically and functionally four of these gene lesions. We show that all Sap C mutants are efficiently produced, and exhibit lipid-binding properties, modulatory behavior on GCase activity and subcellular localization comparable with those of the wild-type protein. We then delineated the structural rearrangement of these mutants, documenting that most proteins assume diverse aberrant disulfide bridge arrangements, which result in a substantial diminished half-life, and rapid degradation via autophagy. These findings further document the paramount importance of disulfide bridges in the stability of Sap C and provide evidence that accelerated degradation of the Sap C mutants is the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of Sap C deficiency. PMID:24925315

  10. Acquired Substrate Preference for GAB1 Protein Bestows Transforming Activity to ERBB2 Kinase Lung Cancer Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Marino, Michael P.; Ou, Wu; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Reiser, Jakob; Johnson, Gibbes R.

    2013-01-01

    Activating mutations in the αC-β4 loop of the ERBB2 kinase domain, such as ERBB2YVMA and ERBB2G776VC, have been identified in human lung cancers and found to drive tumor formation. Here we observe that the docking protein GAB1 is hyper-phosphorylated in carcinomas from transgenic mice and in cell lines expressing these ERBB2 cancer mutants. Using dominant negative GAB1 mutants lacking canonical tyrosine residues for SHP2 and PI3K interactions or lentiviral shRNA that targets GAB1, we demonstrate that GAB1 phosphorylation is required for ERBB2 mutant-induced cell signaling, cell transformation, and tumorigenesis. An enzyme kinetic analysis comparing ERBB2YVMA to wild type using physiologically relevant peptide substrates reveals that ERBB2YVMA kinase adopts a striking preference for GAB1 phosphorylation sites as evidenced by ∼150-fold increases in the specificity constants (kcat/Km) for several GAB1 peptides, and this change in substrate selectivity was predominantly attributed to the peptide binding affinities as reflected by the apparent Km values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ERBB2YVMA phosphorylates GAB1 protein ∼70-fold faster than wild type ERBB2 in vitro. Notably, the mutation does not significantly alter the Km for ATP or sensitivity to lapatinib, suggesting that, unlike EGFR lung cancer mutants, the ATP binding cleft of the kinase is not significantly changed. Taken together, our results indicate that the acquired substrate preference for GAB1 is critical for the ERBB2 mutant-induced oncogenesis. PMID:23612964

  11. Acquired substrate preference for GAB1 protein bestows transforming activity to ERBB2 kinase lung cancer mutants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Marino, Michael P; Ou, Wu; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Reiser, Jakob; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2013-06-01

    Activating mutations in the αC-β4 loop of the ERBB2 kinase domain, such as ERBB2(YVMA) and ERBB2(G776VC), have been identified in human lung cancers and found to drive tumor formation. Here we observe that the docking protein GAB1 is hyper-phosphorylated in carcinomas from transgenic mice and in cell lines expressing these ERBB2 cancer mutants. Using dominant negative GAB1 mutants lacking canonical tyrosine residues for SHP2 and PI3K interactions or lentiviral shRNA that targets GAB1, we demonstrate that GAB1 phosphorylation is required for ERBB2 mutant-induced cell signaling, cell transformation, and tumorigenesis. An enzyme kinetic analysis comparing ERBB2(YVMA) to wild type using physiologically relevant peptide substrates reveals that ERBB2(YVMA) kinase adopts a striking preference for GAB1 phosphorylation sites as evidenced by ∼150-fold increases in the specificity constants (kcat/Km) for several GAB1 peptides, and this change in substrate selectivity was predominantly attributed to the peptide binding affinities as reflected by the apparent Km values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ERBB2(YVMA) phosphorylates GAB1 protein ∼70-fold faster than wild type ERBB2 in vitro. Notably, the mutation does not significantly alter the Km for ATP or sensitivity to lapatinib, suggesting that, unlike EGFR lung cancer mutants, the ATP binding cleft of the kinase is not significantly changed. Taken together, our results indicate that the acquired substrate preference for GAB1 is critical for the ERBB2 mutant-induced oncogenesis. PMID:23612964

  12. Biochemical Characterization of Mutants in Chaperonin Proteins CCT4 and CCT5 Associated with Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Sergeeva, Oksana A.; Tran, Meme T.; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; King, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies are a class of disorders marked by degeneration of the nerve fibers in the sensory periphery neurons. Recently, two mutations were identified in the subunits of the eukaryotic cytosolic chaperonin TRiC, a protein machine responsible for folding actin and tubulin in the cell. C450Y CCT4 was identified in a stock of Sprague-Dawley rats, whereas H147R CCT5 was found in a human Moroccan family. As with many genetically identified mutations associated with neuropathies, the underlying molecular basis of the mutants was not defined. We investigated the biochemical properties of these mutants using an expression system in Escherichia coli that produces homo-oligomeric rings of CCT4 and CCT5. Full-length versions of both mutant protein chains were expressed in E. coli at levels approaching that of the WT chains. Sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed chaperonin-sized complexes of both WT and mutant chaperonins, but with reduced recovery of C450Y CCT4 soluble subunits. Electron microscopy of negatively stained samples of C450Y CCT4 revealed few ring-shaped species, whereas WT CCT4, H147R CCT5, and WT CCT5 revealed similar ring structures. CCT5 complexes were assayed for their ability to suppress aggregation of and refold the model substrate γd-crystallin, suppress aggregation of mutant huntingtin, and refold the physiological substrate β-actin in vitro. H147R CCT5 was not as efficient in chaperoning these substrates as WT CCT5. The subtle effects of these mutations are consistent with the homozygous disease phenotype, in which most functions are carried out during development and adulthood, but some selective function is lost or reduced. PMID:25124038

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Mutant Sinorhizobium meliloti NodD1 Proteins with Altered Responses to Luteolin

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Melicent C.; Bliss, Robert

    2013-01-01

    NodD1, a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTRs), mediates nodulation (nod) gene expression in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti in response to the plant-secreted flavonoid luteolin. We used genetic screens and targeted approaches to identify NodD1 residues that show altered responses to luteolin during the activation of nod gene transcription. Here we report four types of NodD1 mutants. Type I (NodD1 L69F, S104L, D134N, and M193I mutants) displays reduced or no activation of nod gene expression. Type II (NodD1 K205N) is constitutively active but repressed by luteolin. Type III (NodD1 L280F) demonstrates enhanced activity with luteolin compared to that of wild-type NodD1. Type IV (NodD1 D284N) shows moderate constitutive activity yet can still be induced by luteolin. In the absence of luteolin, many mutants display a low binding affinity for nod gene promoter DNA in vitro. Several mutants also show, as does wild-type NodD1, increased affinity for nod gene promoters with added luteolin. All of the NodD1 mutant proteins can homodimerize and heterodimerize with wild-type NodD1. Based on these data and the crystal structures of several LTTRs, we present a structural model of wild-type NodD1, identifying residues important for inducer binding, protein multimerization, and interaction with RNA polymerase at nod gene promoters. PMID:23772067

  14. [Construction and expression of six deletion mutants of human astrovirus C-terminal nsP1a/4 protein].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Ke; Zhao, Jian; Jin, Yi-ming; Sui, Ting-ting; Wang, Wen

    2013-09-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the leading causes of actue virual diarrhea in infants. HAstV-induced epithdlial cell apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of HAstV infection. Our previous study indicated that HAstV non-structural protein nsPla C-terminal protein nsPla/4 was the major apoptosis functional protein and probably contained the main apoptosis domains. In order to screen for astrovirus encoded apoptotic protien, nsPla/4 and six turncated proteins, which possessed nsPla/4 protein different function domain ,were cloned into green fluorescent protein (GFP) vector pEG-FP-N3. After 24-72 h transfection, the fusion protein expression in BHK21 cells, was analysis by fluorescence microscope and Western blot. The results indicated seven fusion proteins were observed successfully in BHK21 cell after transfected for 24 h. Western blot analysis showed that the level of fusion protein expressed in BHK21 cells was increased significantly at 72h compared to 48h in transfected cells. The successful expression of deletion mutants of nsPla/4 protein was an important foundation to gain further insights into the function of apoptosis domains of nsPla/4 protein and it would also provide research platform to further confirm the molecule pathogenic mechanism of human astrovirus. PMID:24386845

  15. Highly ordered crystals of channel-forming membrane proteins, of nucleoside-monophosphate kinases, of FAD-containing oxidoreductases and of sugar-processing enzymes and their mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G. E.; Dreyer, M.; Klein, C.; Kreusch, A.; Mittl, P.; Mu¨ller, C. W.; Mu¨ller-Dieckmann, J.; Muller, Y. A.; Proba, K.; Schlauderer, G.; Spu¨rgin, P.; Stehle, T.; Weiss, M. S.

    1992-08-01

    Preparation and crystallization procedures as well as crystal properties are reported for 12 proteins plus numerous site-directed mutants. The proteins are: the integral membrane protein porin from Rhodobacter capsulatus which diffracts to at least 1.8A˚resolution, porin from Rhodopseudomonas blastica which diffracts to at least 2.0A˚resolution, adenylate kinase from yeast and mutants, adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli and mutants, bovine liver mitochondrial adenylate kinase, guanylate kinase from yeast, uridylate kinase from yeast, glutathione reductase from E. coli and mutants, NADH peroxidase from Streptococcus faecalis containing a sulfenic acid as redox-center, pyruvate oxidase from Lactobacillus plantarum containing FAD and TPP, cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans and mutants, and a fuculose aldolase from E. coli.

  16. Neferine attenuates the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin in PC-12 cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Wu, An Guo; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Mutant huntingtin aggregation is highly associated with the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, an adult-onset autosomal dominant disorder, which leads to a loss of motor control and decline in cognitive function. Recent literature has revealed the protective role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases through degradation of mutant toxic proteins, including huntingtin or a-synuclein. Through the GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we have  identified  neferine,  isolated  from  the  lotus  seed  embryo  of Nelumbo nucifera, which is able to induce autophagy through an AMPK-mTOR-dependent pathway. Furthermore, by overexpressing huntingtin with 74 CAG repeats (EGFP-HTT 74) in PC-12 cells, neferine reduces both the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin through an autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent mechanism. With the variety of novel active compounds present in medicinal herbs, our current study suggests the possible protective mechanism of an autophagy inducer isolated from Chinese herbal medicine, which is crucial for its further development into a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders in the future. PMID:25699594

  17. Diminished Self-Chaperoning Activity of the ΔF508 Mutant of CFTR Results in Protein Misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, John R.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2008-01-01

    The absence of a functional ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) protein called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) from apical membranes of epithelial cells is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Over 90% of CF patients carry at least one mutant allele with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 located in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Biochemical and cell biological studies show that the ΔF508 mutant exhibits inefficient biosynthetic maturation and susceptibility to degradation probably due to misfolding of NBD1 and the resultant misassembly of other domains. However, little is known about the direct effect of the Phe508 deletion on the NBD1 folding, which is essential for rational design strategies of cystic fibrosis treatment. Here we show that the deletion of Phe508 alters the folding dynamics and kinetics of NBD1, thus possibly affecting the assembly of the complete CFTR. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we find that meta-stable intermediate states appearing on wild type and mutant folding pathways are populated differently and that their kinetic accessibilities are distinct. The structural basis of the increased misfolding propensity of the ΔF508 NBD1 mutant is the perturbation of interactions in residue pairs Q493/P574 and F575/F578 found in loop S7-H6. As a proof-of-principle that the S7-H6 loop conformation can modulate the folding kinetics of NBD1, we virtually design rescue mutations in the identified critical interactions to force the S7-H6 loop into the wild type conformation. Two redesigned NBD1-ΔF508 variants exhibited significantly higher folding probabilities than the original NBD1-ΔF508, thereby partially rescuing folding ability of the NBD1-ΔF508 mutant. We propose that these observed defects in folding kinetics of mutant NBD1 may also be modulated by structures separate from the 508 site. The identified structural determinants of increased misfolding propensity of NBD1-ΔF508 are essential

  18. Diminished self-chaperoning activity of the DeltaF508 mutant of CFTR results in protein misfolding.

    PubMed

    Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Riordan, John R; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    The absence of a functional ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) protein called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) from apical membranes of epithelial cells is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Over 90% of CF patients carry at least one mutant allele with deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 located in the N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD1). Biochemical and cell biological studies show that the DeltaF508 mutant exhibits inefficient biosynthetic maturation and susceptibility to degradation probably due to misfolding of NBD1 and the resultant misassembly of other domains. However, little is known about the direct effect of the Phe508 deletion on the NBD1 folding, which is essential for rational design strategies of cystic fibrosis treatment. Here we show that the deletion of Phe508 alters the folding dynamics and kinetics of NBD1, thus possibly affecting the assembly of the complete CFTR. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we find that meta-stable intermediate states appearing on wild type and mutant folding pathways are populated differently and that their kinetic accessibilities are distinct. The structural basis of the increased misfolding propensity of the DeltaF508 NBD1 mutant is the perturbation of interactions in residue pairs Q493/P574 and F575/F578 found in loop S7-H6. As a proof-of-principle that the S7-H6 loop conformation can modulate the folding kinetics of NBD1, we virtually design rescue mutations in the identified critical interactions to force the S7-H6 loop into the wild type conformation. Two redesigned NBD1-DeltaF508 variants exhibited significantly higher folding probabilities than the original NBD1-DeltaF508, thereby partially rescuing folding ability of the NBD1-DeltaF508 mutant. We propose that these observed defects in folding kinetics of mutant NBD1 may also be modulated by structures separate from the 508 site. The identified structural determinants of increased misfolding propensity of NBD1-DeltaF508

  19. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking monomeric antenna proteins of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R

    2011-10-21

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  20. Quenching in Arabidopsis thaliana Mutants Lacking Monomeric Antenna Proteins of Photosystem II*

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavina, Yuliya; de Bianchi, Silvia; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Holzwarth, Alfred R.

    2011-01-01

    The minor light-harvesting complexes CP24, CP26, and CP29 have been proposed to play a key role in the zeaxanthin (Zx)-dependent high light-induced regulation (NPQ) of excitation energy in higher plants. To characterize the detailed roles of these minor complexes in NPQ and to determine their specific quenching effects we have studied the ultrafast fluorescence kinetics in knockout (ko) mutants koCP26, koCP29, and the double mutant koCP24/CP26. The data provide detailed insight into the quenching processes and the reorganization of the Photosystem (PS) II supercomplex under quenching conditions. All genotypes showed two NPQ quenching sites. Quenching site Q1 is formed by a light-induced functional detachment of parts of the PSII supercomplex and a pronounced quenching of the detached antenna parts. The antenna remaining bound to the PSII core was also quenched substantially in all genotypes under NPQ conditions (quenching site Q2) as compared with the dark-adapted state. The latter quenching was about equally strong in koCP26 and the koCP24/CP26 mutants as in the WT. Q2 quenching was substantially reduced, however, in koCP29 mutants suggesting a key role for CP29 in the total NPQ. The observed quenching effects in the knockout mutants are complicated by the fact that other minor antenna complexes do compensate in part for the lack of the CP24 and/or CP29 complexes. Their lack also causes some LHCII dissociation already in the dark. PMID:21844190

  1. Yarrowia lipolytica Cells Mutant for the PEX24 Gene Encoding a Peroxisomal Membrane Peroxin Mislocalize Peroxisomal Proteins and Accumulate Membrane Structures Containing Both Peroxisomal Matrix and Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Rachubinski, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxins are proteins required for peroxisome assembly and are encoded by the PEX genes. Functional complementation of the oleic acid–nonutilizing strain mut1-1 of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has identified the novel gene, PEX24. PEX24 encodes Pex24p, a protein of 550 amino acids (61,100 Da). Pex24p is an integral membrane protein of peroxisomes that exhibits high sequence homology to two hypothetical proteins encoded by the open reading frames YHR150W and YDR479C of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Pex24p is detectable in wild-type cells grown in glucose-containing medium, and its levels are significantly increased by incubation of cells in oleic acid–containing medium, the metabolism of which requires intact peroxisomes. pex24 mutants are compromised in the targeting of both matrix and membrane proteins to peroxisomes. Although pex24 mutants fail to assemble functional peroxisomes, they do harbor membrane structures that contain subsets of peroxisomal proteins. PMID:12181338

  2. The Myoblast C2C12 Transfected with Mutant Valosin-Containing Protein Exhibits Delayed Stress Granule Resolution on Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Flores, Julio C; Valenzuela, Joanna A; Rodriguez, Gema J; Zumkehr, Joannee; Tran, Diana N; Kimonis, Virginia E; Kitazawa, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) mutations cause inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease and frontotemporal dementia. However, the mechanisms by which mutant VCP triggers degeneration remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of VCP in cellular stress and found that the oxidative stressor arsenite and heat shock-activated stress responses evident by T-intracellular antigen-1-positive granules in C2C12 myoblasts. Granules also contained phosphorylated transactive response DNA-binding protein 43, ubiquitin, microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B light chains 3, and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2. Mutant VCP produced more T-intracellular antigen-1-positive granules than wild-type in the postarsenite exposure period. Similar results were observed for other granule components, indicating that mutant VCP delayed clearance of stress granules. Furthermore, stress granule resolution was impaired on differentiated C2C12 cells expressing mutant VCP. To address whether mutant VCP triggers dysregulation of the stress granule pathway in vivo, we analyzed skeletal muscle of aged VCPR155H-knockin mice. We found significant increments in oxidated proteins but observed the stress granule markers RasGAP SH3-binding protein and phosphorylated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α unchanged. The mixed results indicate that mutant VCP together with aging lead to higher oxidative stress in skeletal muscle but were insufficient to disrupt the stress granule pathway. Our findings support that deficiencies in recovery from stressors may result in attenuated tolerance to stress that could trigger muscle degeneration. PMID:27106764

  3. Functions that Protect Escherichia coli from Tightly Bound DNA-Protein Complexes Created by Mutant EcoRII Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Morgan L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2015-01-01

    Expression of mutant EcoRII methyltransferase protein (M.EcoRII-C186A) in Escherichia coli leads to tightly bound DNA-protein complexes (TBCs), located sporadically on the chromosome rather than in tandem arrays. The mechanisms behind the lethality induced by such sporadic TBCs are not well studied, nor is it clear whether very tight binding but non-covalent complexes are processed in the same way as covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). Using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A block replication forks in vivo. Specific bubble molecules were detected as spots on the 2D gel, only when M.EcoRII-C186A was induced, and a mutation that eliminates a specific EcoRII methylation site led to disappearance of the corresponding spot. We also performed a candidate gene screen for mutants that are hypersensitive to TBCs induced by M.EcoRII-C186A. We found several gene products necessary for protection against these TBCs that are known to also protect against DPCs induced with wild-type M.EcoRII (after 5-azacytidine incorporation): RecA, RecBC, RecG, RuvABC, UvrD, FtsK, XerCD and SsrA (tmRNA). In contrast, the RecFOR pathway and Rep helicase are needed for protection against TBCs but not DPCs induced by M.EcoRII. We propose that stalled fork processing by RecFOR and RecA promotes release of tightly bound (but non-covalent) blocking proteins, perhaps by licensing Rep helicase-driven dissociation of the blocking M.EcoRII-C186A. Our studies also argued against the involvement of several proteins that might be expected to protect against TBCs. We took the opportunity to directly compare the sensitivity of all tested mutants to two quinolone antibiotics, which target bacterial type II topoisomerases and induce a unique form of DPC. We uncovered rep, ftsK and xerCD as novel quinolone hypersensitive mutants, and also obtained evidence against the involvement of a number of functions that might be expected to protect against quinolones. PMID:25993347

  4. A microtiter-based assay for protein kinase activity suitable for the analysis of large numbers of samples, and its application to the study of Drosophila learning mutants.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, J D; Dudai, Y

    1988-02-15

    We have developed a microtiter-based assay for protein kinase activity which depends on the immobilization of substrate proteins to nitrocellulose. The technique makes use of a filtration manifold, allowing as much as a 10-fold increase in efficiency as compared to other protein kinase assays. We have used this assay to measure cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in Drosophila learning and memory mutants, with exogenous and endogenous substrates. An alteration was found in the affinity of PKA in the mutant turnip. The procedure should be useful for rapid screening of mutants and drugs and could be adapted to additional types of protein kinases as well as protein phosphatases. PMID:3369684

  5. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  6. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  7. SCS1, a multicopy suppressor of hsp60-ts mutant alleles, does not encode a mitochondrially targeted protein.

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Y; Hallberg, R L

    1995-01-01

    We identified and isolated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene which, when overexpressed, suppressed the temperature-sensitive phenotype of cells expressing a mutant allele of the gene encoding the mitochondrial chaperonin, Hsp60. This gene, SCS1 (suppressor of chaperonin sixty-1), encodes a 757-amino-acid protein of as yet unknown function which, nonetheless, has human, rice, and Caenorhabditis elegans homologs with high degrees (ca. 60%) of amino acid sequence identity. SCS1 is not an essential gene, but SCS1-null strains do not grow above 37 degrees C and show some growth-related defects at 30 degrees C as well. This gene is expressed at both 30 and 38 degrees C, producing little or no differences in mRNA levels at these two temperatures. Overexpression of SCS1 could not complement an HSP60-null allele, indicating that suppression was not due to the bypassing of Hsp60 activity. Of 10 other hsp60-ts alleles tested, five could also be suppressed by SCS1 overexpression. There were no common mutant phenotypes of the strains expressing these alleles that give any clue as to why they were suppressible while others were not. An epitope (influenza virus hemagglutinin)-tagged form of SCS1 in single copy complemented an SCS1-null allele. The Scs1-hemagglutinin protein was found to be at comparable levels and in similar multiply modified forms in cells growing at both 30 and 38 degrees C. Surprisingly, when localized either by cell fractionation procedures or by immunocytochemistry, these proteins were found not in mitochondria but in the cytosol. The overexpression of SCS1 had significant effects on the cellular levels of mRNAs encoding the proteins Cpn10 and Mgel, two other mitochondrial protein cochaperones, but not on mRNAs encoding a number of other mitochondrial or cytosolic proteins analyzed. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7565713

  8. Construction and characterization of isogenic mutants of Streptococcus mutans deficient in major surface protein antigen P1 (I/II).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S F; Progulske-Fox, A; Erdos, G W; Piacentini, D A; Ayakawa, G Y; Crowley, P J; Bleiweis, A S

    1989-01-01

    The gene (spaP) coding for the Streptococcus mutans major surface protein antigen P1 (or I/II) has been cloned into Escherichia coli (S. F. Lee, A. Progulske-Fox, and A. S. Bleiweis, Infect. Immun. 56:2114-2119, 1988). In the present study, this gene has been disrupted in vitro by insertional inactivation with pVA981, which carries a Tcr marker, and transformed into S. mutans NG8 (serotype c) by electroporation. Upon homologous recombination, the defective spaP was integrated into the genome as demonstrated by Southern hybridization analysis. One Tcr mutant, designated 834, selected by its nonreactivity with anti-P1 monoclonal antibodies, was found to lack the cell surface fuzzy layer which was clearly present on the parent cells. Analysis of extracellular fluids, sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized membranes, and cytoplasmic fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that 834 had protein profiles identical to the parent. However, a 185-kilodalton protein which reacts with anti-P1 antibodies was missing from the wall of 834, suggesting that spaP has been specifically inactivated. This mutant displayed levels of glucosyltransferase and fructosyltransferase activities similar to those of the parent. It was much less hydrophobic than the parent. S. mutans NG8 aggregated readily in the presence of clarified whole saliva or a high-molecular-weight salivary agglutinin. This strain also adhered to agglutinin-coated hydroxyapatite. The P1-negative mutants, however, did not display these two properties, suggesting that P1 may play a role in saliva-mediated aggregation and adherence. Images PMID:2807526

  9. Che-1/AATF: A Critical Cofactor for Both Wild-Type- and Mutant-p53 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Tiziana; Iezzi, Simona; Fanciulli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The p53 protein is a key player in a wide range of protein networks that allow the state of “good health” of the cell. Not surprisingly, mutations of the TP53 gene are one of the most common alterations associated to cancer cells. Mutated forms of p53 (mtp53) not only lose the ability to protect the integrity of the genetic heritage of the cell but also acquire pro-oncogenic functions, behaving like dangerous accelerators of transformation and tumor progression. In recent years, many studies focused on investigating possible strategies aiming to counteract this mutant p53 “gain of function” but the results have not always been satisfactory. Che-1/AATF is a nuclear protein that binds to RNA polymerase II and plays a role in multiple fundamental processes, including control of transcription, cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and apoptosis. Several studies showed Che-1/AATF as an important endogenous regulator of p53 expression and activity in a variety of biological processes. Notably, this same regulation was more recently observed also on mtp53. The depletion of Che-1/AATF strongly reduces the expression of mutant p53 in several tumors in vitro and in vivo, making the cells an easier target for chemotherapy treatments. In this mini review, we report an overview of Che-1/AATF functions and discuss a possible role of Che-1/AATF in cancer therapy, with particular regard to its action on p53/mtp53. PMID:26913241

  10. Directed evolution of bright mutants of an oxygen-independent flavin-binding fluorescent protein from Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescent reporter proteins have revolutionized our understanding of cellular bioprocesses by enabling live cell imaging with exquisite spatio-temporal resolution. Existing fluorescent proteins are predominantly based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and related analogs. However, GFP-family proteins strictly require molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which precludes their application for investigating biological processes in low-oxygen environments. A new class of oxygen-independent fluorescent reporter proteins was recently reported based on flavin-binding photosensors from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida. However, flavin-binding fluorescent proteins show very limited brightness, which restricts their utility as biological imaging probes. Results In this work, we report the discovery of bright mutants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein from P. putida using directed evolution by site saturation mutagenesis. We discovered two mutations at a chromophore-proximal amino acid (F37S and F37T) that confer a twofold enhancement in brightness relative to the wild type fluorescent protein through improvements in quantum yield and holoprotein fraction. In addition, we observed that substitution with other aromatic amino acids at this residue (F37Y and F37W) severely diminishes fluorescence emission. Therefore, we identify F37 as a key amino acid residue in determining fluorescence. Conclusions To increase the scope and utility of flavin-binding fluorescent proteins as practical fluorescent reporters, there is a strong need for improved variants of the wild type protein. Our work reports on the application of site saturation mutagenesis to isolate brighter variants of a flavin-binding fluorescent protein, which is a first-of-its-kind approach. Overall, we anticipate that the improved variants will find pervasive use as fluorescent reporters for biological studies in low-oxygen environments. PMID:23095243

  11. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. PMID:27503952

  12. A Protein-Based Genetic Screening Uncovers Mutants Involved in Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling; Xin, Ruijiao; Huq, Enamul

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive red and far-red region of the light spectrum to regulate photomorphogenesis through a family of photoreceptors called phytochromes. Phytochromes transduce the light signals to trigger a cascade of downstream gene regulation in part via a subfamily of bHLH transcription factors called Phytochrome Interacting Factors (PIFs). As the repressors of light signaling pathways, most PIFs are phosphorylated and degraded through the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in response to light. The mechanisms involved in the phosphorylation and degradation of PIFs have not been fully understood yet. Here we used an EMS mutagenesis and luminescent imaging system to identify mutants defective in the degradation of one of the PIFs, called PIF1. We identified five mutants named stable PIF (spf) that showed reduced degradation of PIF1 under light treatment in both luminescent imaging and immunoblot assays. The amounts of PIF1 in spf3, spf4, and spf5 were similar to a PIF1 missense mutant (PIF1–3M) that lacks interactions between PIF1 and phyA/phyB under light. The hypocotyl lengths of spf1 and spf2 were slightly longer under red light compared to the LUC-PIF1 control, while only spf1 displayed weak phenotype under far-red light conditions. Interestingly, the spf3, spf4, and spf5 displayed high abundance of PIF1, yet the hypocotyl lengths were similar to the wild type under these conditions. Cloning and characterization of these mutants will help identify key players in the light signaling pathways including, the light-regulated kinase(s) and the E3 ligase(s) necessary for the light-induced degradation of PIFs. PMID:27499759

  13. Construction and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein F-deficient mutants after in vitro and in vivo insertion mutagenesis of the cloned gene.

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, W A; Hancock, R E

    1988-01-01

    Mutants with insertion mutations in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein F (oprF) gene were created in vivo by Tn1 mutagenesis of the cloned gene in Escherichia coli and in vitro by insertion of the streptomycin resistance-encoding omega fragment into the cloned gene, followed by transfer of the mutated protein F gene back to P. aeruginosa. Homologous recombination into the P. aeruginosa chromosome was driven by a bacteriophage F116L transduction method in the oprF::Tn1 mutants or Tn5-instability in the oprF::omega mutants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting demonstrated that the resultant oprF insertion mutants had lost protein F, whereas restriction digestion and Southern blotting experiments proved that the mutants contained a single chromosomal oprF gene with either Tn1 or omega inserted into it. It has been proposed that protein F has a role in antibiotic uptake in P. aeruginosa. Measurement of antibiotic resistance levels showed small to marginal increases in resistance, compared with that of the parent P. aeruginosa strain, to a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. Protein F-deficient mutants had altered barrier properties as revealed by a three- to fivefold increase in the uptake of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine. Images PMID:2836364

  14. Investigation of the low frequency dynamics of heme proteins: native and mutant cytochrome P450(cam) and redox partner complexes.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Venugopal; Denisov, Ilia; Sligar, Stephen G; Champion, Paul M

    2011-05-12

    Vibrational coherence spectroscopy (VCS) is used to investigate the low-frequency dynamics of camphor-free and camphor-bound cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP 101) and its L358P mutant. The low-frequency heme vibrations are found to be perturbed upon binding to the electron transfer partner putidaredoxin (Pdx). A strong correlation between the "detuned" vibrational coherence spectrum, which monitors frequencies between 100 and 400 cm(-1), and the lower frequency part of the Raman spectrum is also demonstrated. The very low frequency region ≤200 cm(-1), uniquely accessed by open-band VCS measurements, reveals a mode near 103 cm(-1) in P450(cam) when camphor is not present in the distal pocket. This reflects the presence of a specific heme distortion, such as saddling or ruffling, in the substrate-free state where water is coordinated to the low-spin iron atom. Such distortions are likely to retard the rate of electron transfer to the substrate-free protein. The presence of strong mode near ∼33 cm(-1) in the camphor-bound form suggests a significant heme-doming distortion, which is supported by analysis using normal coordinate structural decomposition. Pdx also displays a strong coherent vibration near 30 cm(-1) that in principle could be involved in vibrational resonance with its electron transfer target. A splitting of the 33 cm(-1) feature and intensification of a mode near 78 cm(-1) appear when the P450(cam)/Pdx complex is formed. These observations are consistent with vibrational mixing and heme geometric distortions upon Pdx binding that are coincident with the increased thiolate electron donation to the heme. The appearance of a mode near 65 cm(-1) in the coherence spectra of the L358P mutant is comparable to the mode at 78 cm(-1) seen in the P450(cam)/Pdx complex and is consistent with the view that the heme and its environment in the L358P mutant are similar to the Pdx-bound native protein. Resonance Raman spectra are presented for both P450(cam) and the L358P

  15. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    PubMed

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα. PMID:27131901

  16. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Riordan, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (<2-fold), and the mature product remained short-lived (T1/2∼4.5 h) and thermally unstable, even though its overall conformational state was similar to wild type, as judged by resistance to proteolysis and interdomain cross-linking. Consistent with its inability to restore thermodynamic stability, VX-809 stimulated maturation 2–5-fold beyond that caused by several different stabilizing modifications of NBD1 and the NBD1/CL4 interface. The compound also promoted maturation of several disease-associated processing mutants on the CL4 side of this interface. Although these effects may reflect an interaction of VX-809 with this interface, an interpretation supported by computational docking, it also rescued maturation of mutants in other cytoplasmic loops, either by allosteric effects or via additional sites of action. In addition to revealing the capabilities and some of the limitations of this important investigational drug, these findings clearly demonstrate that ΔF508 CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein. PMID:23104983

  17. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Kota, Pradeep; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Tim; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2013-02-01

    Most cystic fibrosis is caused by the deletion of a single amino acid (F508) from CFTR and the resulting misfolding and destabilization of the protein. Compounds identified by high-throughput screening to improve ΔF508 CFTR maturation have already entered clinical trials, and it is important to understand their mechanisms of action to further improve their efficacy. Here, we showed that several of these compounds, including the investigational drug VX-809, caused a much greater increase (5- to 10-fold) in maturation at 27 than at 37°C (<2-fold), and the mature product remained short-lived (T(1/2)∼4.5 h) and thermally unstable, even though its overall conformational state was similar to wild type, as judged by resistance to proteolysis and interdomain cross-linking. Consistent with its inability to restore thermodynamic stability, VX-809 stimulated maturation 2-5-fold beyond that caused by several different stabilizing modifications of NBD1 and the NBD1/CL4 interface. The compound also promoted maturation of several disease-associated processing mutants on the CL4 side of this interface. Although these effects may reflect an interaction of VX-809 with this interface, an interpretation supported by computational docking, it also rescued maturation of mutants in other cytoplasmic loops, either by allosteric effects or via additional sites of action. In addition to revealing the capabilities and some of the limitations of this important investigational drug, these findings clearly demonstrate that ΔF508 CFTR can be completely assembled and evade cellular quality control systems, while remaining thermodynamically unstable. He, L., Kota, P., Aleksandrov, A. A., Cui, L., Jensen, T., Dokholyan, N. V., Riordan, J. R. Correctors of ΔF508 CFTR restore global conformational maturation without thermally stabilizing the mutant protein. PMID:23104983

  18. Enhanced photoprotection by protein-bound vs free xanthophyll pools: a comparative analysis of chlorophyll b and xanthophyll biosynthesis mutants.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Luca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Havaux, Michel; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    When light absorbed by plants exceeds the capacity of photosynthesis, the xanthophyll violaxanthin is reversibly de-epoxidized to zeaxanthin in the so-called xanthophyll cycle. Zeaxanthin plays a key role in the protection of photosynthetic organisms against excess light, by promoting rapidly reversible (qE) and long-term (qI) quenching of excited chlorophylls, and preventing lipid oxidation. The photoprotective role of zeaxanthin, either free or bound to light-harvesting complexes (Lhcs), has been investigated by using mutants lacking Chl b (ch1) and/or specific xanthophyll species (npq, lut2). The ch1 mutation causes (1) the absence of Lhcb proteins; (2) strong reduction of the feedback de-excitation (qE); and (3) accumulation of xanthophylls as free pigments into thylakoids. Ch1 mutants showed extreme sensitivity to photo-oxidative stress in high light, due to higher singlet oxygen (¹O₂) release. The double mutant ch1npq1 was more sensitive to photo-oxidation than ch1, showing that zeaxanthin does protect lipids even when free in the membrane. Nevertheless, lack of zeaxanthin had a much stronger impact on the level of lipid peroxidation in Lhcs-containing plants (WT vs npq1) with respect to Lhc-less plants (ch1 vs ch1npq1), implying that its protective effect is enhanced by interaction with antenna proteins. It is proposed that the antioxidant capacity of zeaxanthin is empowered in the presence of PSII-LHCs-Zea complexes, while its effect on enhancement of qE only provides a minor contribution. Comparison of the sensitivity of WT vs npq1 plants to exogenous ¹O₂ suggests that besides the scavenging of ¹O₂, at least one additional mechanism is involved in chloroplast photoprotection. PMID:20100799

  19. Analysis of parainfluenza virus-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein mutants that are blocked in internalization and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Robach, Jessica G.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-10-25

    The PIV-5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein is a multifunctional protein with sialic acid binding, neuraminidase and fusion promotion activity. HN is internalized by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and degraded. HN lacks internalization signals in its cytoplasmic tail but a single glutamic acid present at residue 37 at the putative transmembrane/ectodomain boundary is critical. We rescued rPIV-5 with mutations E37D or E37K, which have been shown to impair or abolish HN internalization, respectively. These viruses exhibited growth properties similar to wild-type (wt) virus but are impaired for fitness in tissue culture. Biochemical analysis of HN activities showed differences between HN E37D and HN E37K in fusion promotion and incorporation of HN and F into virions. Furthermore, oligomeric analyses indicate that HN E37 mutants perturb the tetrameric organization of HN, probably by destabilizing the dimer-of-dimers interface.

  20. A Protein-Protein Interaction Assay FlimPIA Based on the Functional Complementation of Mutant Firefly Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Ohmuro-Matsuyama, Yuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant focus on detecting and assaying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in biology and biotechnology. Protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) is one of the most widely used methods to detect PPI by splitting the enzyme-coding or fluorescent protein-coding polypeptide, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, we describe a novel PPI assay FlimPIA (firefly luminescent intermediate-based protein-protein interaction assay) by a unique approach of splitting the two major catalytic steps (half reactions) of firefly luciferase (FLuc). PMID:27424900

  1. Sendai virus wild-type and mutant C proteins show a direct correlation between L polymerase binding and inhibition of viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Grogan, C C; Moyer, S A

    2001-09-15

    The Sendai virus C proteins, C', C, Y1, and Y2, are a nested set of four independently initiated carboxy-coterminal proteins encoded on the P mRNA from an alternate reading frame. Together the C proteins have been shown to inhibit viral transcription and replication in vivo and in vitro and C' binds the Sendai virus L protein, the presumed catalytic subunit of the viral RNA polymerase. To identify amino acids within the C' protein that are important for binding L, site-directed mutagenesis of the gstC' gene was used to change conserved charged amino acids to alanine, generating nine mutants. Additionally, a tenth natural mutant, gstF170S, was also constructed. Six of the gstC' mutants, primarily in the C-terminal half of C', exhibited a defect in the ability to bind L protein. The mutants were assayed for their effect on in vitro transcription and replication from the antigenomic promoter, and the data suggest in all but one case a direct correlation between the ability of C to bind L and to inhibit these steps in RNA synthesis. Further studies with two nonfusion C mutants showed that this correlation was specifically due to the C' portion, and not the gst portion, of the fusion proteins. To study their individual functions, each of the four C proteins was fused downstream of glutathione S-transferase. The gstC', gstC, gstY1, and gstY1 fusion proteins were all able to bind L protein and to inhibit viral mRNA and (+)-leader RNA synthesis, and antigenome replication in vitro. In addition, the nonfusion C, Y1, and Y2 proteins all inhibited transcription. The inhibition of (+)-leader RNA and mRNA synthesis by wt C proteins (nonfusion) showed nearly identical dose-response curves, suggesting that inhibition occurs early in RNA synthesis. PMID:11543662

  2. ERAD and protein import defects in a sec61 mutant lacking ER-lumenal loop 7

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Sec61 channel mediates protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane during secretory protein biogenesis, and likely also during export of misfolded proteins for ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms of channel opening for the different modes of translocation are not understood so far, but the position of the large ER-lumenal loop 7 of Sec61p suggests a decisive role. Results We show here that the Y345H mutation in L7 which causes diabetes in the mouse displays no ER import defects in yeast, but a delay in misfolded protein export. A complete deletion of L7 in Sec61p resulted in viable, cold- and tunicamycin-hypersensitive yeast cells with strong defects in posttranslational protein import of soluble proteins into the ER, and in ERAD of soluble substrates. Membrane protein ERAD was only moderately slower in sec61∆L7 than in wildtype cells. Although Sec61∆L7 channels were unstable in detergent, co-translational protein integration into the ER membrane, proteasome binding to Sec61∆L7 channels, and formation of hetero-heptameric Sec complexes were not affected. Conclusions We conclude that L7 of Sec61p is required for initiation of posttranslational soluble protein import into and misfolded soluble protein export from the ER, suggesting a key role for L7 in transverse gating of the Sec61 channel. PMID:24314051

  3. Backrub-like backbone simulation recapitulates natural protein conformational variability and improves mutant side-chain prediction

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin A.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    Summary Incorporation of effective backbone sampling into protein simulation and design is an important step in increasing the accuracy of computational protein modeling. Recent analysis of high-resolution crystal structures has suggested a new model, termed backrub, to describe localized, hinge-like alternative backbone and side chain conformations observed in the crystal lattice. The model involves internal backbone rotations about axes between Cα atoms. Based on this observation, we have implemented a backrub-inspired sampling method in the Rosetta structure prediction and design program. We evaluate this model of backbone flexibility using three different tests. First, we show that Rosetta backrub simulations recapitulate the correlation between backbone and side-chain conformations in the high-resolution crystal structures upon which the model was based. As a second test of backrub sampling, we show that backbone flexibility improves the accuracy of predicting point-mutant side chain conformations over fixed backbone rotameric sampling alone. Finally, we show that backrub sampling of triosephosphate isomerase loop 6 can capture the ms/µs oscillation between the open and closed states observed in solution. Our results suggest that backrub sampling captures a sizable fraction of localized conformational changes that occur in natural proteins. Application of this simple model of backbone motions may significantly improve both protein design and atomistic simulations of localized protein flexibility. PMID:18547585

  4. Characterization of Lipids and Proteins Associated to the Cell Wall of the Acapsular Mutant Cryptococcus neoformans Cap 67.

    PubMed

    Longo, Larissa V G; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Pires, Jhon H S; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Vallejo, Milene C; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Almeida, Igor C; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes life-threatening meningitis. In this fungus, the cell wall is exceptionally not the outermost structure due to the presence of a surrounding polysaccharide capsule, which has been highly studied. Considering that there is little information about C. neoformans cell wall composition, we aimed at describing proteins and lipids extractable from this organelle, using as model the acapsular mutant C. neoformans cap 67. Purified cell wall preparations were extracted with either chloroform/methanol or hot sodium dodecyl sulfate. Total lipids fractionated in silica gel 60 were analyzed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), while trypsin digested proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We detected 25 phospholipid species among phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid. Two glycolipid species were identified as monohexosyl ceramides. We identified 192 noncovalently linked proteins belonging to different metabolic processes. Most proteins were classified as secretory, mainly via nonclassical mechanisms, suggesting a role for extracellular vesicles (EV) in transwall transportation. In concert with that, orthologs from 86% of these proteins have previously been reported both in fungal cell wall and/or in EV. The possible role of the presently described structures in fungal-host relationship is discussed. PMID:25733123

  5. A small GTP-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana functionally complements the yeast YPT6 null mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, S Y; Reynolds, T L; Schroeder, M; Grabowski, R; Hengst, L; Gallwitz, D; Raikhel, N V

    1994-01-01

    A clone designated A.t.RAB6 encoding a small GTP-binding protein was isolated from a cDNA library of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue. The predicted amino acid sequence was highly homologous to the mammalian and yeast counterparts, H.Rab6 and Ryh1/Ypt6, respectively. Lesser homology was found between the predicted Arabidopsis protein sequence and two small GTP-binding proteins isolated from plant species (44% homology to Zea mays Ypt1 and 43% homology to Nicotiana tabacum Rab5). Conserved stretches in the deduced amino acid sequence of A.t.Rab6 include four regions involved in GTP-binding, an effector region, and C-terminal cysteine residues required for prenylation and subsequent membrane attachment. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that A.t.Rab6 mRNA was expressed in root, leaf, stem, and flower tissues from A. thaliana with the highest levels present in roots. Escherichia coli produced histidine-tagged A.t.Rab6 protein-bound GTP, whereas a mutation in one of the guanine nucleotide-binding sites (asparagine122 to isoleucine) rendered it incapable of binding GTP. Functionally, the A.t.RAB6 gene was able to complement the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the YPT6 null mutant in yeast. The isolation of this gene will aid in the dissection of the machinery involved in soluble protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network of plants. PMID:8159788

  6. The manganese binding site of manganese peroxidase: Characterization of an Asp179Asn site-directed mutant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kusters-van Someren, M.; Kishi, K.; Lundell, T.

    1995-08-22

    A site-directed mutant, D179N, in the gene encoding Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase isozyme 1 (mnp1), was created by overlap extension, using polymerase chain reaction. The mutant gene was expressed in P. chrysosporium under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The mutant manganese peroxidase (MnP) was purified, and its spectra and MW were very similar to those of the wild-type enzyme. Steady-state kinetic analysis of MnP D179N revealed that the K{sub m} for the substrate Mn{sup II} was {approximately}50-fold greater than the corresponding K{sub m} for the wild-type recombinant enzyme (3.7 mM versus {approximately}70 {mu}M). Likewise, the k{sub cat} value for Mn{sup II} oxidation of the mutant protein was only 1/265 of that for the wild-type enzyme. By comparison, the apparent K{sub m} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} of MnP D179N was similar to the corresponding value of the wild-type MnP. The first-order rate constant for MnP D179N compound II reduction by Mn{sup II} was approximately 1/200 of that for the wild-type enzyme. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for MnP D179N compound II reduction by Mn{sup II} was {approximately}100-fold greater than the K{sub D} for the wild-type compound II. In contrast, the second-order rate constant for p-cresol reduction of the mutant compound II was similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. These results also suggest that the mutation affects the binding of Mn{sup II} to the enzyme and, consequently, the rate of compound II reduction by Mn{sup II}. In contrast, the mutation apparently does not have a significant effect on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} cleavage during compound I formation or on p-cresol reduction of compound II. The results strongly suggest that Asp179 is one of the acidic amino acid ligands in the Mn{sup II} binding site of MnP. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Mutant bacterial sodium channels as models for local anesthetic block of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natalie E; Corry, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels are the target of a range of local anesthetic, anti-epileptic and anti-arrhythmic compounds. But, gaining a molecular level understanding of their mode of action is difficult as we only have atomic resolution structures of bacterial sodium channels not their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we used molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that the binding sites of both the local anesthetic benzocaine and the anti-epileptic phenytoin to the bacterial sodium channel NavAb can be altered significantly by the introduction of point mutations. Free energy techniques were applied to show that increased aromaticity in the pore of the channel, used to emulate the aromatic residues observed in eukaryotic Nav1.2, led to changes in the location of binding and dissociation constants of each drug relative to wild type NavAb. Further, binding locations and dissociation constants obtained for both benzocaine (660 μM) and phenytoin (1 μ M) in the mutant channels were within the range expected from experimental values obtained from drug binding to eukaryotic sodium channels, indicating that these mutant NavAb may be a better model for drug binding to eukaryotic channels than the wild type. PMID:26852716

  8. Induction of expression and co-localization of heat shock polypeptides with the polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 after chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qishan Bag, Jnanankur

    2008-05-23

    Formation of nuclear inclusions consisting of aggregates of a polyalanine expansion mutant of nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1) is the hallmark of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). OPMD is a late onset autosomal dominant disease. Patients with this disorder exhibit progressive swallowing difficulty and drooping of their eye lids, which starts around the age of 50. Previously we have shown that treatment of cells expressing the mutant PABPN1 with a number of chemicals such as ibuprofen, indomethacin, ZnSO{sub 4}, and 8-hydroxy-quinoline induces HSP70 expression and reduces PABPN1 aggregation. In these studies we have shown that expression of additional HSPs including HSP27, HSP40, and HSP105 were induced in mutant PABPN1 expressing cells following exposure to the chemicals mentioned above. Furthermore, all three additional HSPs were translocated to the nucleus and probably helped to properly fold the mutant PABPN1 by co-localizing with this protein.

  9. Identification and characterization of a double-stranded RNA- reovirus temperature-sensitive mutant defective in minor core protein mu2.

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    A newly identified temperature-sensitive mutant whose defect was mapped to the reovirus M1 gene (minor core protein mu2) was studied to better understand the functions of this virion protein. Sequence determination of the Ml gene of this mutant (tsH11.2) revealed a predicted methionine-to-threonine alteration at amino acid 399 and a change from proline to histidine at amino acid 414. The mutant made normal amounts of single-stranded RNA, both in in vitro transcriptase assays and in infected cells, and normal amounts of progeny viral protein at early times in a restrictive infection. However, tsH11.2 produced neither detectable progeny protein nor double-stranded RNA at late times in a restrictive infection. These studies indicate that mu2 plays a role in the conversion of reovirus mRNA to progeny double-stranded RNA. PMID:8676444

  10. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  11. Characterization of Mutants of Human Small Heat Shock Protein HspB1 Carrying Replacements in the N-Terminal Domain and Associated with Hereditary Motor Neuron Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Muranova, Lydia K.; Weeks, Stephen D.; Strelkov, Sergei V.; Gusev, Nikolai B.

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties of the mutations G34R, P39L and E41K in the N-terminal domain of human heat shock protein B1 (HspB1), which have been associated with hereditary motor neuron neuropathy, were analyzed. Heat-induced aggregation of all mutants started at lower temperatures than for the wild type protein. All mutations decreased susceptibility of the N- and C-terminal parts of HspB1 to chymotrypsinolysis. All mutants formed stable homooligomers with a slightly larger apparent molecular weight compared to the wild type protein. All mutations analyzed decreased or completely prevented phosphorylation-induced dissociation of HspB1 oligomers. When mixed with HspB6 and heated, all mutants yielded heterooligomers with apparent molecular weights close to ~400 kDa. Finally, the three HspB1 mutants possessed lower chaperone-like activity towards model substrates (lysozyme, malate dehydrogenase and insulin) compared to the wild type protein, conversely the environmental probe bis-ANS yielded higher fluorescence with the mutants than with the wild type protein. Thus, in vitro the analyzed N-terminal mutations increase stability of large HspB1 homooligomers, prevent their phosphorylation-dependent dissociation, modulate their interaction with HspB6 and decrease their chaperoning capacity, preventing normal functioning of HspB1. PMID:25965061

  12. Processing, surface expression, and immunogenicity of carboxy-terminally truncated mutants of G protein of human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Murphy, B R; Lawrence, L A; Elango, N; Moss, B; Collins, P L

    1989-01-01

    Posttranslational processing and cell surface expression were examined for three C-terminally truncated mutants of the G protein of respiratory syncytial virus expressed from engineered cDNAs. The truncated mutants, encoded by cDNAs designated G71, G180, and G230, contained the N-terminal 71, 180, and 230 amino acids, respectively, of the 298-amino-acid G protein. To facilitate detection of G71, which reacted inefficiently with G-specific antisera, we constructed a parallel set of cDNAs, designated G71/13, G180/13, and G230/13, to encode the same truncated species with the addition of a C-terminal 13-amino-acid reporter peptide which could be detected efficiently with an antipeptide serum. G71, G180, and G230 were expressed as species of Mr 7,500, 48,000, and 51,000, respectively, compared with 84,000 for parental G protein. The proteins encoded by G180 and G230, like parental G protein, contained both N-linked and O-linked carbohydrate. Also, the protein encoded by G71/13 appeared to be O glycosylated, showing that even this highly truncated form contained the structural information required to target the protein for O glycosylation. As for parental G protein, the estimated Mrs of the proteins encoded by G180 and G230 were approximately twice the calculated molecular weight of the polypeptide chain. Experiments with monensin showed that most of this difference between the calculated and observed Mr was due to posttranslational processing in or beyond the trans-Golgi compartment, presumably owing to the addition of carbohydrate or aggregation into dimers or both. Like parental G protein, all three truncated forms accumulated abundantly at the cell surface, and in each case the C terminus was extracellular. Thus, the N-terminal 71 amino acids of the G protein contained all the structural information required for efficient membrane insertion and cell surface expression, whereas the extracellular domain was dispensable for these activities. Cotton rats were immunized

  13. Cooperative assembly of proteins in the ribosomal GTPase centre demonstrated by their interactions with mutant 23S rRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1995-01-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 binds to the region of 23S rRNA associated with the GTPase-dependent steps of protein synthesis. Nucleotides 1054-1107 within this region of the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene were mutagenized with bisulphite. Twenty point mutations (G-->A and C-->T transitions) and numerous multiple mutations were generated. Expression of mutant 23S rRNAs in vivo shows that all the mutations detectably alter the phenotype, with effects ranging from a slight growth rate reduction to lack of viability. Temperature sensitivity is conferred by 1071G-->A and 1092C-->U substitutions. These effects are relieved by point mutations at other sites, indicating functional interconnections within the higher order structure of this 23S rRNA region. Several mutations prevent direct binding of r-protein L11 to 23S rRNA in vitro. These mutations are mainly in a short irregular stem (1087-1102) and within a hairpin loop (1068-1072), where the protein probably makes nucleotide contacts. Some of these mutations also interfere with binding of the r-protein complex L10.(L12)4 to an adjacent site on the rRNA. When added together to rRNA, proteins L10.(L12)4 and L11 bind cooperatively to overcome the effects of mutations at 1091 and 1099. The proteins also stimulate each others binding to rRNA mutated at 1087 or 1092, although in these cases binding remains clearly substoichiometric. Surprisingly, none of the mutations prevents incorporation of L11 into ribosomes in vivo, indicating that other, as yet unidentified, factors are involved in the cooperative assembly process. Images PMID:7630717

  14. Alpha-Synuclein Proteins Promote Pro-Inflammatory Cascades in Microglia: Stronger Effects of the A53T Mutant.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Claire; Gustin, Audrey; Birck, Cindy; Kirchmeyer, Mélanie; Beaume, Nicolas; Felten, Paul; Grandbarbe, Luc; Heuschling, Paul; Heurtaux, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is histologically described by the deposition of α-synuclein, whose accumulation in Lewy bodies causes dopaminergic neuronal death. Although most of PD cases are sporadic, point mutations of the gene encoding the α-synuclein protein cause inherited forms of PD. There are currently six known point mutations that result in familial PD. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have also been described as early events associated with dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in PD. Though it is known that microglia are activated by wild-type α-synuclein, little is known about its mutated forms and the signaling cascades responsible for this microglial activation. The present study was designed to investigate consequences of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein (A53T, A30P and E46K) exposure on microglial reactivity. Interestingly, we described that α-synuclein-induced microglial reactivity appeared to be peptide-dependent. Indeed, the A53T protein activated more strongly microglia than the wild-type α-synuclein and other mutants. This A53T-induced microglial reactivity mechanism was found to depend on phosphorylation mechanisms mediated by MAPKs and on successive NFkB/AP-1/Nrf2 pathways activation. These results suggest that the microgliosis intensity during PD might depend on the type of α-synuclein protein implicated. Indeed, mutated forms are more potent microglial stimulators than wild-type α-synuclein. Based on these data, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapeutic strategies may be valid in order to reduce microgliosis but also to subsequently slow down PD progression, especially in familial cases. PMID:27622765

  15. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3

    PubMed Central

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415–425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  16. Photosystem II Repair and Plant Immunity: Lessons Learned from Arabidopsis Mutant Lacking the THYLAKOID LUMEN PROTEIN 18.3.

    PubMed

    Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light. PMID:27064270

  17. Dynamics of mitochondrial RNA-binding protein complex in Trypanosoma brucei and its petite mutant under optimized immobilization conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenqiu; Kaltenbrunner, Sabine; Šimková, Eva; Stanĕk, David; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    There are a variety of complex metabolic processes ongoing simultaneously in the single, large mitochondrion of Trypanosoma brucei. Understanding the organellar environment and dynamics of mitochondrial proteins requires quantitative measurement in vivo. In this study, we have validated a method for immobilizing both procyclic stage (PS) and bloodstream stage (BS) T. brucei brucei with a high level of cell viability over several hours and verified its suitability for undertaking fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), with mitochondrion-targeted yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Next, we used this method for comparative analysis of the translational diffusion of mitochondrial RNA-binding protein 1 (MRP1) in the BS and in T. b. evansi. The latter flagellate is like petite mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae because it lacks organelle-encoded nucleic acids. FRAP measurement of YFP-tagged MRP1 in both cell lines illuminated from a new perspective how the absence or presence of RNA affects proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. This work represents the first attempt to examine this process in live trypanosomes. PMID:25063375

  18. A signal sequence is not required for protein export in prlA mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Derman, A I; Puziss, J W; Bassford, P J; Beckwith, J

    1993-01-01

    The prlA/secY gene, which codes for an integral membrane protein component of the Escherichia coli protein export machinery, is the locus of the strongest suppressors of signal sequence mutations. We demonstrate that two exported proteins of E.coli, maltose-binding protein and alkaline phosphatase, each lacking its entire signal sequence, are exported to the periplasm in several prlA mutants. The export efficiency can be substantial; in a strain carrying the prlA4 allele, 30% of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase is exported to the periplasm. Other components of the E.coli export machinery, including SecA, are required for this export. SecB is required for the export of signal-sequenceless alkaline phosphatase even though the normal export of alkaline phosphatase does not require this chaperonin. Our findings indicate that signal sequences confer speed and efficiency upon the export process, but that they are not always essential for export. Entry into the export pathway may involve components that so overlap in function that the absence of a signal sequence can be compensated for, or there may exist one or more means of entry that do not require signal sequences at all. Images PMID:8458344

  19. Comparison of Modules of Wild Type and Mutant Huntingtin and TP53 Protein Interaction Networks: Implications in Biological Processes and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Mahashweta; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P.; Mohanty, Pradeep K.

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing mutations usually change the interacting partners of mutant proteins. In this article, we propose that the biological consequences of mutation are directly related to the alteration of corresponding protein protein interaction networks (PPIN). Mutation of Huntingtin (HTT) which causes Huntington's disease (HD) and mutations to TP53 which is associated with different cancers are studied as two example cases. We construct the PPIN of wild type and mutant proteins separately and identify the structural modules of each of the networks. The functional role of these modules are then assessed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis for biological processes (BPs). We find that a large number of significantly enriched () GO terms in mutant PPIN were absent in the wild type PPIN indicating the gain of BPs due to mutation. Similarly some of the GO terms enriched in wild type PPIN cease to exist in the modules of mutant PPIN, representing the loss. GO terms common in modules of mutant and wild type networks indicate both loss and gain of BPs. We further assign relevant biological function(s) to each module by classifying the enriched GO terms associated with it. It turns out that most of these biological functions in HTT networks are already known to be altered in HD and those of TP53 networks are altered in cancers. We argue that gain of BPs, and the corresponding biological functions, are due to new interacting partners acquired by mutant proteins. The methodology we adopt here could be applied to genetic diseases where mutations alter the ability of the protein to interact with other proteins. PMID:23741403

  20. Structural properties of fibrillar proteins isolated from the cell surface and cytoplasm of Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells and nonadhesive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Liem, R S

    1986-01-01

    Most Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells contain two protein antigens with different adhesive functions. The subcellular distribution and some structural properties of purified proteins were studied. Antigen B (AgB), a protein involved in interbacterial coaggregation with gram-negative bacteria, was present in the cell wall fraction only of the wild-type strain and was absent from the cells of a nonadhesive mutant. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in host-associated adhesive functions, was predominantly associated with the cell wall of the wild-type strain (AgCw), but accumulated in high amounts in the cytoplasmic fraction (AgCin) of mutants lacking the wall-associated form. AgB, AgCw, and AgCin had molecular weights of 380,000, 250,000 to 320,000, and 488,000, respectively, upon gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. In the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and beta-mercaptoethanol the molecular weights were only slightly lower, suggesting that the free, isolated molecules exist as monomers under native conditions. AgCin readily stained with periodate-Schiff reagent, indicating a significant content of carbohydrate, similar to AgCw. Circular dichroism spectra showed that about 45% of the amino acids of AgCw were involved in alpha-helical coiled structures. AgB had a significantly lower proportion of ordered coiled structure. Electron microscopic observations of low-angle-shadowed preparations of purified antigens showed that they were flexible, thin rods with thickened or globular ends. Measurements corrected for shadow thickness showed lengths of 184 nm (AgB), 112 nm (AgCin), and 87 nm (AgCw). Treatment of AgCw with protease destroyed the fibrillar core, but seemed not to affect the globular ends. Comparison of the results with the localization of the antigens in wild-type and specific mutant strains suggested that each antigen molecule may represent a single, characteristic surface fibril with a specific adhesive capacity. Images PMID

  1. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  2. SPN1, a conserved gene identified by suppression of a postrecruitment-defective yeast TATA-binding protein mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Julie A; Kraemer, Susan M; Stargell, Laurie A

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about TATA-binding protein (TBP) functions after recruitment to the TATA element, although several TBP mutants display postrecruitment defects. Here we describe a genetic screen for suppressors of a postrecruitment-defective TBP allele. Suppression was achieved by a single point mutation in a previously uncharacterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, SPN1 (suppresses postrecruitment functions gene number 1). SPN1 is an essential yeast gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. The suppressing mutation in SPN1 substitutes an asparagine for an invariant lysine at position 192 (spn1(K192N)). The spn1(K192N) strain is able to suppress additional alleles of TBP that possess postrecruitment defects, but not a TBP allele that is postrecruitment competent. In addition, Spn1p does not stably associate with TFIID in vivo. Cells containing the spn1(K192N) allele exhibit a temperature-sensitive phenotype and some defects in activated transcription, whereas constitutive transcription appears relatively robust in the mutant background. Consistent with an important role in postrecruitment functions, transcription from the CYC1 promoter, which has been shown to be regulated by postrecruitment mechanisms, is enhanced in spn1(K192N) cells. Moreover, we find that SPN1 is a member of the SPT gene family, further supporting a functional requirement for the SPN1 gene product in transcriptional processes. PMID:12524336

  3. Proteomic and biochemical analyses show a functional network of proteins involved in antioxidant defense of the Arabidopsis anp2anp3 double mutant.

    PubMed

    Takáč, Tomáš; Šamajová, Olga; Vadovič, Pavol; Pechan, Tibor; Košútová, Petra; Ovečka, Miroslav; Husičková, Alexandra; Komis, George; Šamaj, Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Disentanglement of functional complexity associated with plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling has benefited from transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic, and genetic studies. Published transcriptomic analysis of a double homozygous recessive anp2anp3 mutant of two MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) genes called Arabidopsis thaliana Homologues of Nucleus- and Phragmoplast-localized Kinase 2 (ANP2) and 3 (ANP3) showed the upregulation of stress-related genes. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis of anp2anp3 mutant against its respective Wassilevskaja ecotype (Ws) wild type background is provided. Such differential proteomic analysis revealed overabundance of core enzymes such as FeSOD1, MnSOD, DHAR1, and FeSOD1-associated regulatory protein CPN20, which are involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in the anp2anp3 mutant. The proteomic results were validated at the level of single protein abundance by Western blot analyses and by quantitative biochemical determination of antioxidant enzymatic activities. Finally, the functional network of proteins involved in antioxidant defense in the anp2anp3 mutant was physiologically linked with the increased resistance of mutant seedlings against paraquat treatment. PMID:25325904

  4. Changes in 30K protein synthesis during delayed degeneration of the silk gland by a caspase-dependent pathway in a Bombyx (silkworm) mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Yulong; Wu, Chengjia; Tao, Hui; Chen, Xuedong; Yin, Weimin; Sima, Yanghu; Wang, Yujun; Xu, Shiqing

    2016-08-01

    The silk gland in silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly specialized organ that specifically synthesizes silk proteins. A function shift to the synthesis of large quantities of 30K proteins occurs in the degenerating silk gland cells during larval-pupal metamorphosis. The posterior silk gland developmental mutant model of silkworm was used in this study and changes in the programmed cell death (PCD) regulatory signals and 30K protein synthesis during silk gland degeneration were investigated. The results showed that PCD induced by 20-hydroxyecdysone was initiated early during larval-pupal metamorphosis in the mutant, but PCD proceeded slowly, resulting in the degeneration process of the silk gland being extended and took almost twice the time compared with the wild type. Caspase-dependent pathway signals regulated by Dronc in the silk gland cells of the mutant were significantly reduced, while the PCD initiation signal regulated by the Atg family was not delayed or reduced, and PCD-related epigenetic modification such as lysine methylation, acetylation, and succinylation, and tyrosine phosphorylation changed significantly. During the degeneration process in the mutant, 30K proteins were efficiently synthesized in the silk gland cells in stage PP1 even when no caspase protein was detected. Degeneration of the silk gland is a PCD process in which autophagy and apoptosis may participate. The degeneration process was regulated by a caspase-dependent pathway, while the synthesis of 30K proteins along with silk gland degeneration may not be entirely dependent on caspase signals. PMID:27107566

  5. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants Blocked in the Folding or Subunit Assmbly of the Bacteriophage P22 Tailspike Protein. I. Fine-Structure Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donna H.; Berget, Peter B.; King, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    As part of a study of protein folding, we have constructed a fine-structure map of 9 existing and 29 newly isolated UV- and hydroxylamine-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in gene 9 of Salmonella bacteriophage P22. Gene 9 specifies the polypeptide chain of the multimeric tail spikes, six of which form the cell attachment organelle of the phage. The 38 ts mutants were mapped against deletion lysogens with endpoints in gene 9. They mapped in 10 of the 15 deletion intervals. Two- and three-factor crosses between mutants within each interval indicated that at least 31 ts sites are represented among the 38 mutants. To determine the distribution of ts sites within the physical map, we identified the protein fragments from infection of su- hosts with 10 gene 9 amber mutants. Their molecular weights, ranging from 13,900 to 55,000 daltons, were combined with the genetic data to yield a composite map of gene 9. The 31 ts sites were distributed through most of the gene, but were most densely clustered in the central third.—None of the ts mutant pairs tested exhibited intragenic complementation. Studies of the defective phenotypes of the ts mutants (Goldenberg and King 1981; Smith and King 1981) revealed that most do not affect the thermostability of the mature protein, but instead prevent the folding or subunit assembly of the mutant chains synthesized at restrictive temperature. Thus, many of thes ts mutations identify sites in the polypeptide chain that are critical for the folding or maturation of the tail-spike protein. PMID:7021307

  6. A pleiotropic iron-uptake mutant of Neisseria meningitidis lacks a 70-kilodalton iron-regulated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, D W; West, E P; McKenna, W; Thompson, S A; Sparling, P F

    1988-01-01

    We isolated an iron-uptake mutant of Neisseria meningitidis M986-NCV-1 that was severely limited in the ability to use several sources of iron in the form of Fe3+. This mutant, FAM11, grew poorly or not at all with human transferrin (TF) or lactoferrin (LF) as the sole iron source in a defined medium but grew as well as wild-type meningococci with hemin or hemoglobin. Uptake of 55Fe bound to TF, LF, dicitrate complexes, aerobactin, or nitrilotriacetate was reduced to 0 to 4% of the wild-type level. FAM11 did not produce an iron-repressible outer membrane protein (FeRP) of 70 kilodaltons (kDa) found in membranes of iron-stressed M986-NCV-1. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis using rabbit antiserum against this protein revealed that at least 17 of 18 meningococcal and 10 of 14 gonococcal strains produced an FeRP of ca. 70 kDa. The 70-kDa FeRP was shown to be surface exposed by radioimmunoprecipitation with human immune sera. These data suggest that the 70-kDa FeRP is somehow involved in Fe uptake from TF and LF. However, we were unable to transform the iron-uptake phenotype from FAM11 into wild-type meningococci to confirm this. Revertants of FAM11 that grew with TF and LF did not regain the ability to make the 70-kDa FeRP but also did not completely regain the Fe-uptake phenotype of M986-NCV-1. Images PMID:3126152

  7. Modeling Alzheimer’s Disease in Mouse without Mutant Protein Overexpression: Cooperative and Independent Effects of Aβ and Tau

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qinxi; Li, Hongmei; Cole, Allysa L.; Hur, Ji-Yeun; Li, Yueming; Zheng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, has two pathological hallmarks: Aβ plaques and aggregation of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau). Aβ is a cleavage product of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). Presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2) are the catalytic subunit of γ-secretase, which cleaves APP and mediates Aβ production. Genetic mutations in APP, PSEN1 or PSEN2 can lead to early onset of familial AD (FAD). Although mutations in the tau encoding gene MAPT leads to a subtype of frontotemporal dementia and these mutations have been used to model AD tauopathy, no MAPT mutations have been found to be associated with AD. Results To model AD pathophysiology in mice without the gross overexpression of mutant transgenes, we created a humanized AD mouse model by crossing the APP and PSEN1 FAD knock-in mice with the htau mice which express wildtype human MAPT genomic DNA on mouse MAPT null background (APP/PS1/htau). The APP/PS1/htau mice displayed mild, age-dependent, Aβ plaques and tau hyperphosphorylation, thus successfully recapitulating the late-onset AD pathological hallmarks. Selected biochemical analyses, including p-tau western blot, γ-secretase activity assay, and Aβ ELISA, were performed to study the interaction between Aβ and p-tau. Subsequent behavioral studies revealed that the APP/PS1/htau mice showed reduced mobility in old ages and exaggerated fear response. Genetic analysis suggested that the fear phenotype is due to a synergic interaction between Aβ and p-tau, and it can be completely abolished by tau deletion. Conclusion The APP/PS1/htau model represents a valuable and disease-relevant late-onset pre-clinical AD animal model because it incorporates human AD genetics without mutant protein overexpression. Analysis of the mice revealed both cooperative and independent effects of Aβ and p-tau. PMID:24278307

  8. trans-dominant interference with virus infection at two different stages by a mutant envelope protein of Friend murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Matano, T; Odawara, T; Ohshima, M; Yoshikura, H; Iwamoto, A

    1993-01-01

    A dominant negative mutant Friend murine leukemia virus (FMLV) env gene was cloned from an immunoselected Friend erythroleukemia cell. The mutant env had a point mutation which resulted in a Cys-to-Arg substitution at the 361st amino acid in the FMLV envelope protein (Env). The mutant Env was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and accumulated because of its slow degradation. The NIH 3T3 cells expressing the mutant env were resistant to ecotropic Moloney MLV (MoMLV) penetration, suggesting that the mutant Env traps the ecotropic MLV receptors in the ER. When the mutant env gene was transfected into and expressed in the cells persistently infected with MoMLV, the wild-type Env was trapped in the ER, and the MoMLV production was suppressed. Thus, the mutant Env accumulating in the ER trans-dominantly and efficiently interfered with the ecotropic MLV infection at both the early and the late stages. Images PMID:8445721

  9. Loss of the thyroid hormone-binding protein Crym renders striatal neurons more vulnerable to mutant huntingtin in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Guillermier, Martine; Houitte, Diane; Bonvento, Gilles; Petit, Fanny; Jan, Caroline; Dufour, Noëlle; Hantraye, Philippe; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; De Chaldée, Michel; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2015-03-15

    The mechanisms underlying preferential atrophy of the striatum in Huntington's disease (HD) are unknown. One hypothesis is that a set of gene products preferentially expressed in the striatum could determine the particular vulnerability of this brain region to mutant huntingtin (mHtt). Here, we studied the striatal protein µ-crystallin (Crym). Crym is the NADPH-dependent p38 cytosolic T3-binding protein (p38CTBP), a key regulator of thyroid hormone (TH) T3 (3,5,3'-triiodo-l-thyronine) transportation. It has been also recently identified as the enzyme that reduces the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines, which are potential neurotransmitters. Here, we confirm the preferential expression of the Crym protein in the rodent and macaque striatum. Crym expression was found to be higher in the macaque caudate than in the putamen. Expression of Crym was reduced in the BACHD and Knock-in 140CAG mouse models of HD before onset of striatal atrophy. We show that overexpression of Crym in striatal medium-size spiny neurons using a lentiviral-based strategy in mice is neuroprotective against the neurotoxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mHtt in vivo. Thus, reduction of Crym expression in HD could render striatal neurons more susceptible to mHtt suggesting that Crym may be a key determinant of the vulnerability of the striatum. In addition our work points to Crym as a potential molecular link between striatal degeneration and the THs deregulation reported in HD patients. PMID:25398949

  10. Dataset of differentially regulated proteins in HUVECs challenged with wild type and UGM1 mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gabriela Westerlund Peixoto; Curty, Nathália; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula Helena; Fontaine, Thierry; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Cunha, Marcel Lyra; Goldman, Gustavo H; Beauvais, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2016-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is the primary opportunistic invasive fungal infection described in neutropenic hematologic patients, caused by the angioinvasive pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The molecular mechanisms associated with A. fumigatus infection in the vascular endothelium are poorly understood. In this context, we used a high-throughput proteomic approach to unveil the proteins modulated in HUVECs after interaction with a wild type strain and the UGM1 mutant (Δugm1) of A. fumigatus. The proteomic analysis was also performed in HUVECs challenged with a galactosaminogalactan (GAG) purified from A. fumigatus cell wall. The dataset presented here correspond to all proteins identified that fit a 2-fold change criteria (log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or ≤ -1), disregarding the statistical validation cut off, in order to supplement the research article entitled "Modifications to the composition of the hyphal outer layer of Aspergillus fumigatus modulates the HUVEC proteins associated with inflammatory and stress responses" (G.W.P. Neves, N.A. Curty, P.H. Kubitschek-Barreira, T. Fontaine, G.H.M.F. Souza, M. Lyra Cunha, G.H. Goldman, A. Beauvais, J.P. Latgé, L.M. Lopes-Bezerra, 2016) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomic data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002823. PMID:27622208

  11. Endometrial cancer-associated mutants of SPOP are defective in regulating estrogen receptor-α protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Gao, K; Jin, X; Ma, J; Peng, J; Wumaier, R; Tang, Y; Zhang, Y; An, J; Yan, Q; Dong, Y; Huang, H; Yu, L; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of evidence strongly suggests that dysregulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system is closely associated with cancer pathogenesis. Speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) is an adapter protein of the CUL3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes. It selectively recruits substrates for their ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. Recently, several exome-sequencing studies of endometrial cancer revealed high frequency somatic mutations in SPOP (5.7-10%). However, how SPOP mutations contribute to endometrial cancer remains unknown. Here, we identified estrogen receptor-α (ERα), a major endometrial cancer promoter, as a substrate for the SPOP-CUL3-RBX1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. SPOP specifically recognizes multiple Ser/Thr (S/T)-rich degrons located in the AF2 domain of ERα, and triggers ERα degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. SPOP depletion by siRNAs promotes endometrial cells growth. Strikingly, endometrial cancer-associated mutants of SPOP are defective in regulating ERα degradation and ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that SPOP participates in estrogen-induced ERα degradation and transactivation. Our study revealed novel molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of ERα protein homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions, and provided insights in understanding the relationship between SPOP mutations and the development of endometrial cancer. PMID:25766326

  12. A non-aggregating Surfactant Protein C mutant is misdirected to early endosomes and disrupts phospholipid recycling

    PubMed Central

    Beers, Michael F.; Hawkins, Arie; Maguire, Jean Ann; Kotorashvili, Adam; Zhao, Ming; Newitt, Jennifer L.; Ding, Wenge; Russo, Scott; Guttentag, Susan; Gonzales, Linda; Mulugeta, Surafel

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease in both children and adults has been linked to mutations in the lung-specific Surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC). Among these, the missense mutation (isoleucine to threonine at codon 73 = hSP-CI73T) accounts for ~30% of all described SFTPC mutations. We reported previously that unlike the BRICHOS misfolding SFTPC mutants, expression of hSP-CI73T induces lung remodeling and alveolar lipoproteinosis without a substantial ER stress response or ER-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. We show here that, in contrast to its wild type counterpart that is directly routed to lysosomal-like organelles for processing, SP-CI73T is misdirected to the plasma membrane and subsequently internalized to the endocytic pathway via early endosomes, leading to the accumulation of abnormally processed proSP-C isoforms. Functionally, cells expressing hSP-CI73T demonstrated both impaired uptake and degradation of surfactant phospholipid, thus providing a molecular mechanism for the observed lipid accumulation in patients expressing hSP-CI73T through the disruption of normal phospholipid recycling. Our data provide evidence for a novel cellular mechanism for conformational protein associated diseases, and suggest a paradigm for mistargeted proteins involved in the disruption of the endosomal/lysosomal sorting machinery. PMID:21707890

  13. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles. PMID:26925228

  14. Protein Degradation, Meiosis and Sporulation in Proteinase-Deficient Mutants of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Zubenko, George S.; Jones, Elizabeth W.

    1981-01-01

    During the process of sporulation, a/α diploids degrade about 50% of their vegetative proteins. This degradation is not sporulation specific, for asporogenous diploids of a/a mating type degrade their vegetative proteins in a fashion similar to that of their a/α counterparts. Diploids lacking carboxypeptidase Y activity, prc1/prc1, show about 80% of wild-type levels of protein degradation, but are unimpaired in the production of normal asci. Diploids lacking proteinase B activity, prb1/prb1, show about 50% of wild-type levels of protein degradation. The effect on degradation of the proteinase B deficiency is epistatic to the degradation deficit attributable to the carboxypeptidase Y deficiency. The prb1 homozygotes undergo meiosis and produce spores, but the asci and, possibly, the spores are abnormal. Diploids homozygous for the pleiotropic pep4–3 mutation show only 30% of the wild-type levels of degradation when exposed to a sporulation regimen, and do not undergo meiosis or sporulation. Neither proteinase B nor carboxypeptidase Y is necessary for germination of spores.——Approximately half of the colonies arising from a/a or α/α diploids exposed to the sporulation regiment that express an initially heterozygous drug-resistance marker (can1) appear to arise from mating-type switches followed by meiosis and sporulation. PMID:7021321

  15. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  16. Active photosynthesis in cyanobacterial mutants with directed modifications in the ligands for two iron-sulfur clusters on the PsaC protein of photosystem I.

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, R M; He, W Z; Metzger, S U; Whitmarsh, J; Malkin, R; Pakrasi, H B

    1996-01-01

    The PsaC protein of the Photosystem I (PSI) complex in thylakoid membranes coordinates two [4Fe-4S] clusters, FA and FB. Although it is known that PsaC participates in electron transfer to ferredoxin, the pathway of electrons through this protein is unknown. To elucidate the roles of FA and FB, we created two site-directed mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. In one mutant, cysteine 13, a ligand for FB was replaced by an aspartic acid (C13D); in the other mutant, cysteine 50, a ligand for FA was modified similarly (C50D). Low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance studies demonstrated that the C50D mutant has a normal FB center and a modified FA center. In contrast, the C13D strain has normal FA, but failed to reveal any signal from FB. Room-temperature optical studies showed that C13D has only one functional electron acceptor in PsaC, whereas two such acceptors are functional in the C50D and wild-type strains. Although both mutants grow under photoautotrophic conditions, the rate of PSI-mediated electron transfer in C13D under low light levels is about half that of C50D or wild type. These data show that (i) FB is not essential for the assembly of the PsaC protein in PSI and (ii) FB is not absolutely required for electron transfer from the PSI reaction center to ferredoxin. PMID:8617228

  17. Piperlongumine exerts cytotoxic effects against cancer cells with mutant p53 proteins at least in part by restoring the biological functions of the tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Basak, Debasish; Punganuru, Surendra R; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S

    2016-04-01

    Piperlongumine (PL), a small molecule alkaloid present in black pepper (Piper longum), has been reported to kill tumor cells irrespective of their p53 gene status, however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Since p53 is a redox-sensitive protein, we hypothesized that the redox imbalance induced by PL may affect the structure and/or function of the mutant p53 protein and promote cell death. We used two human colon cancer cell lines, the HT29 and SW620 which harbor the R273H DNA contact abrogatory mutation in p53. PL treatment induced significant ROS production and protein glutathionylation with a concomitant increase in Nrf-2 expression in both cell lines. Surprisingly, immunoprecipitation with wt-p53 specific antibodies (PAb1620) or direct western blotting showed a progressive generation of wild-type-like p53 protein along with a loss of its mutant counterpart in PL-treated HT29 and SW620 cells. Moreover, the EMSA and DNA-affinity blotting revealed a time-dependent restoration of DNA-binding for the mutant p53, which was accompanied by the induction of p53 target genes, MDM2 and Bax. PL, while cytotoxic by itself, also increased the cell killing by many anticancer drugs. In nude mice bearing the HT29 tumors, PL alone (7.5 mg/kg daily) produced a 40% decrease in tumor volume, which was accompanied by diminished intratumoral mutant p53 protein levels. The antitumor efficacy of BCNU or doxorubicin in HT29 xenografts was highly potentiated by PL, followed by expression of apoptotic proteins. These clinically-relevant findings suggest that PL-induced oxidative milieu facilitates a weak functional restoration of mutant p53 through protein glutathionylation and contributes to the increased drug sensitivity. PMID:26848023

  18. Structure-based mutant stability predictions on proteins of unknown structure.

    PubMed

    Gonnelli, Giulia; Rooman, Marianne; Dehouck, Yves

    2012-10-31

    The ability to rapidly and accurately predict the effects of mutations on the physicochemical properties of proteins holds tremendous importance in the rational design of modified proteins for various types of industrial, environmental or pharmaceutical applications, as well as in elucidating the genetic background of complex diseases. In many cases, the absence of an experimentally resolved structure represents a major obstacle, since most currently available predictive software crucially depend on it. We investigate here the relevance of combining coarse-grained structure-based stability predictions with a simple comparative modeling procedure. Strikingly, our results show that the use of average to high quality structural models leads to virtually no loss in predictive power compared to the use of experimental structures. Even in the case of low quality models, the decrease in performance is quite limited and this combined approach remains markedly superior to other methods based exclusively on the analysis of sequence features. PMID:22782143

  19. Structural Determinants of Affinity Enhancement between GoLoco Motifs and G-Protein α Subunit Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Kimple, Adam J.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Muller, Robin E.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Kuhlman, Brian; Willard, Francis S.; Siderovski, David P.

    2011-01-01

    GoLoco motif proteins bind to the inhibitory Gi subclass of G-protein α subunits and slow the release of bound GDP; this interaction is considered critical to asymmetric cell division and neuro-epithelium and epithelial progenitor differentiation. To provide protein tools for interrogating the precise cellular role(s) of GoLoco motif/Gαi complexes, we have employed structure-based protein design strategies to predict gain-of-function mutations that increase GoLoco motif binding affinity. Here, we describe fluorescence polarization and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements showing three predicted Gαi1 point mutations, E116L, Q147L, and E245L; each increases affinity for multiple GoLoco motifs. A component of this affinity enhancement results from a decreased rate of dissociation between the Gα mutants and GoLoco motifs. For Gαi1Q147L, affinity enhancement was seen to be driven by favorable changes in binding enthalpy, despite reduced contributions from binding entropy. The crystal structure of Gαi1Q147L bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif revealed disorder among three peptide residues surrounding a well defined Leu-147 side chain. Monte Carlo simulations of the peptide in this region showed a sampling of multiple backbone conformations in contrast to the wild-type complex. We conclude that mutation of Glu-147 to leucine creates a hydrophobic surface favorably buried upon GoLoco peptide binding, yet the hydrophobic Leu-147 also promotes flexibility among residues 511–513 of the RGS14 GoLoco peptide. PMID:21115486

  20. Structural determinants of affinity enhancement between GoLoco motifs and G-protein alpha subunit mutants.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Dustin E; Kimple, Adam J; Sammond, Deanne W; Muller, Robin E; Miley, Michael J; Machius, Mischa; Kuhlman, Brian; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2011-02-01

    GoLoco motif proteins bind to the inhibitory G(i) subclass of G-protein α subunits and slow the release of bound GDP; this interaction is considered critical to asymmetric cell division and neuro-epithelium and epithelial progenitor differentiation. To provide protein tools for interrogating the precise cellular role(s) of GoLoco motif/Gα(i) complexes, we have employed structure-based protein design strategies to predict gain-of-function mutations that increase GoLoco motif binding affinity. Here, we describe fluorescence polarization and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements showing three predicted Gα(i1) point mutations, E116L, Q147L, and E245L; each increases affinity for multiple GoLoco motifs. A component of this affinity enhancement results from a decreased rate of dissociation between the Gα mutants and GoLoco motifs. For Gα(i1)(Q147L), affinity enhancement was seen to be driven by favorable changes in binding enthalpy, despite reduced contributions from binding entropy. The crystal structure of Gα(i1)(Q147L) bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif revealed disorder among three peptide residues surrounding a well defined Leu-147 side chain. Monte Carlo simulations of the peptide in this region showed a sampling of multiple backbone conformations in contrast to the wild-type complex. We conclude that mutation of Glu-147 to leucine creates a hydrophobic surface favorably buried upon GoLoco peptide binding, yet the hydrophobic Leu-147 also promotes flexibility among residues 511-513 of the RGS14 GoLoco peptide. PMID:21115486

  1. The role of cavities in protein dynamics: crystal structure of a photolytic intermediate of a mutant myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Brunori, M; Vallone, B; Cutruzzola, F; Travaglini-Allocatelli, C; Berendzen, J; Chu, K; Sweet, R M; Schlichting, I

    2000-02-29

    We determined the structure of the photolytic intermediate of a sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant called Mb-YQR [Leu-(B10)-->Tyr; His(E7)-->Gln; Thr(E10)-->Arg] to 1.4-A resolution by ultra-low temperature (20 K) x-ray diffraction. Starting with the CO complex, illumination leads to photolysis of the Fe-CO bond, and migration of the photolyzed carbon monoxide (CO*) to a niche in the protein 8.1 A from the heme iron; this cavity corresponds to that hosting an atom of Xe when the crystal is equilibrated with xenon gas at 7 atmospheres [Tilton, R. F., Jr., Kuntz, I. D. & Petsko, G. A. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2849-2857]. The site occupied by CO* corresponds to that predicted by molecular dynamics simulations previously carried out to account for the NO geminate rebinding of Mb-YQR observed in laser photolysis experiments at room temperature. This secondary docking site differs from the primary docking site identified by previous crystallographic studies on the photolyzed intermediate of wild-type sperm whale Mb performed at cryogenic temperatures [Teng et al. (1994) Nat. Struct. Biol. 1, 701-705] and room temperature [Srajer et al. (1996) Science 274, 1726-1729]. Our experiment shows that the pathway of a small molecule in its trajectory through a protein may be modified by site-directed mutagenesis, and that migration within the protein matrix to the active site involves a limited number of pre-existing cavities identified in the interior space of the protein. PMID:10681426

  2. Overexpression of mutant amyloid-β protein precursor and presenilin 1 modulates enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Puig, Kendra L; Lutz, Brianna M; Urquhart, Siri A; Rebel, Andrew A; Zhou, Xudong; Manocha, Gunjan D; Sens, MaryAnn; Tuteja, Ashok K; Foster, Norman L; Combs, Colin K

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) protein accumulation and activation of associated microglia. Although these features are well described in the central nervous system, the process and consequences of Aβ accumulation in the enteric nervous system have not been extensively studied. We hypothesized that Aβ also may accumulate in the enteric nervous system and lead to immune cell activation and neuronal dysfunction in the digestive tract not unlike that observed in diseased brain. To test this hypothesis, ileums of the small intestine of thirteen month old AβPP/PS1 and C57BL/6 (wild type) mice were collected and analyzed using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, cytokine arrays, and ELISA. AβPP/PS1 mice demonstrated no differences in intestinal motility or water absorption but elevated luminal IgA levels compared to wild type mice. They also had increased protein levels of AβPP and the proteolytic enzyme, BACE, corresponding to an increase in Aβ1-40 in the intestinal lysate as well as an increase in both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in the stool. This correlated with increased protein markers of proinflammatory and immune cell activation. Histologic analysis localized AβPP within enteric neurons but also intestinal epithelial cells with elevated Aβ immunoreactivity in the AβPP/PS1 mice. The presence of AβPP, Aβ, and CD68 immunoreactivity in the intestines of some patients with neuropathologically-confirmed AD are consistent with the findings in this mouse model. These data support the hypothesis that in AD the intestine, much like the brain, may develop proinflammatory and immune changes related to AβPP and Aβ. PMID:25408221

  3. Intragenic reversion mutations that improve export of maltose-binding protein in Escherichia coli malE signal sequence mutants.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J P; Duncan, M C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1986-03-01

    Escherichia coli strains harboring malE signal sequence point mutations accumulate export-defective precursor maltose-binding protein (MBP) in the cytoplasm. Beginning with these mutants, a number of spontaneous intragenic revertants have been obtained in which export of the MBP to the periplasm is either partially or totally restored. With a single exception, each of the reversion mutations resulted in an increase in the overall hydrophobicity of the signal peptide hydrophobic core by one of five different mechanisms. In some revertants, MBP export was achieved at a rate comparable to the wild type MBP; in other cases, the rate of MBP export was significantly slower than wild type. The results indicate that the overall hydrophobicity of the signal peptide, rather than the absolute length of its uninterrupted hydrophobic core, is a major determinant of MBP export competency. An alteration at residue 19 of the mature MBP also has been identified that provides fairly efficient suppression of the export defect in the adjacent signal peptide, further suggesting that important export information may reside in this region of the precursor protein. PMID:3512555

  4. Use of a mutant OGA for detecting O-GlcNAc modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    In the previous issue of Biochemical Journal Mariappa et al. [(2015) Biochem J. 470,: 255-262] demonstrate a new method for visualizing O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modified proteins by making use of a catalytically dead version of the enzyme that normally removes this modification. They show their approach has broader specificity than current antibody-based techniques and higher specificity than lectin and chemical biology-based labelling approaches. This commentary discusses methods for O-GlcNAc detection and the significance of this work for characterizing this common, but currently poorly understood regulatory modification. PMID:26567273

  5. Biochemical Classification of Disease-associated Mutants of RAS-like Protein Expressed in Many Tissues (RIT1).

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhenhao; Marshall, Christopher B; Yin, Jiani C; Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Gasmi-Seabrook, Geneviève M C; Smith, Matthew J; Nishikawa, Tadateru; Xu, Yang; Neel, Benjamin G; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-22

    RAS-like protein expressed in many tissues 1 (RIT1) is a disease-associated RAS subfamily small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase). Recent studies revealed that germ-line and somatic RIT1 mutations can cause Noonan syndrome (NS), and drive proliferation of lung adenocarcinomas, respectively, akin to RAS mutations in these diseases. However, the locations of these RIT1 mutations differ significantly from those found in RAS, and do not affect the three mutational "hot spots" of RAS. Moreover, few studies have characterized the GTPase cycle of RIT1 and its disease-associated mutants. Here we developed a real-time NMR-based GTPase assay for RIT1 and investigated the effect of disease-associated mutations on GTPase cycle. RIT1 exhibits an intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate similar to that of H-RAS, but its intrinsic nucleotide exchange rate is ∼4-fold faster, likely as a result of divergent residues near the nucleotide binding site. All of the disease-associated mutations investigated increased the GTP-loaded, activated state of RIT1 in vitro, but they could be classified into two groups with different intrinsic GTPase properties. The S35T, A57G, and Y89H mutants exhibited more rapid nucleotide exchange, whereas F82V and T83P impaired GTP hydrolysis. A RAS-binding domain pulldown assay indicated that RIT1 A57G and Y89H were highly activated in HEK293T cells, whereas T83P and F82V exhibited more modest activation. All five mutations are associated with NS, whereas two (A57G and F82V) have also been identified in urinary tract cancers and myeloid malignancies. Characterization of the effects on the GTPase cycle of RIT1 disease-associated mutations should enable better understanding of their role in disease processes. PMID:27226556

  6. Catalytically impaired hMYH and NEIL1 mutant proteins identified in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Forsbring, Monika; Vik, Erik S.; Dalhus, Bjørn; Karlsen, Tom H.; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bjørås, Magnar; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Alseth, Ingrun

    2009-01-01

    The human hMYH and NEIL1 genes encode DNA glycosylases involved in repair of oxidative base damage and mutations in these genes are associated with certain cancers. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammatory destruction of the biliary tree, is often complicated by the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, we aimed to investigate the influence of genetic variations in the hMYH and NEIL1 genes on risk of CCA in PSC patients. The hMYH and NEIL1 gene loci in addition to the DNA repair genes hOGG1, NTHL1 and NUDT1 were analyzed in 66 PSC patients (37 with CCA and 29 without cancer) by complete genomic sequencing of exons and adjacent intronic regions. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations were identified and severe impairment of protein function was observed for three non-synonymous variants. The NEIL1 G83D mutant was dysfunctional for the major oxidation products 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG), thymine glycol and dihydrothymine in duplex DNA, and the ability to perform δ-elimination at abasic sites was significantly reduced. The hMYH R260Q mutant had severe defect in adenine DNA glycosylase activity, whereas hMYH H434D could excise adenines from A:8oxoG pairs but not from A:G mispairs. We found no overall associations between the 18 identified variants and susceptibility to CCA in PSC patients; however, the impaired variants may be of significance for carcinogenesis in general. Our findings demonstrate the importance of complete resequencing of selected candidate genes in order to identify rare genetic variants and their possible contribution to individual susceptibility to cancer development. PMID:19443904

  7. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in wild-type and a mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks the mitochondrial HMG box protein Abf2p.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S M; Zelenaya-Troitskaya, O; Perlman, P S; Butow, R A

    1996-01-01

    DNA-protein complexes (nucleoids) are believed to be the segregating unit of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A mitochondrial HMG box protein, Abf2p, is needed for maintenance of mtDNA in cells grown on rich dextrose medium, but is dispensible in glycerol grown cells. As visualized by 4',6'-diamino-2-phenylindole staining, mtDNA nucleoids in mutant cells lacking Abf2p ( delta abf2) are diffuse compared with those in wild-type cells. We have isolated mtDNA nucleoids and characterized two mtDNA-protein complexes, termed NCLDp-2 and NCLDs-2, containing distinct but overlapping sets of polypeptides. This protocol yields similar nucleoid complexes from the delta abf2 mutant, although several proteins appear lacking from NCLDs-2. Segments of mtDNA detected with probes to COXII, VAR1 and ori5 sequences are equally sensitive to DNase I digestion in NCLDs-2 and NCLDp-2 from wild-type cells and from the delta abf2 mutant. However, COXII and VAR1 sequences are 4-to 5-fold more sensitive to DNase I digestion of mtDNA in toluene-permeabilized mitochondria from the delta abf2 mutant than from wild-type cells, but no difference in DNase I sensitivity was detected with the ori5 probe. These results provide a first indication that Abf2p influences differential organization of mtDNA sequences. PMID:8628667

  8. The cold sensitivity of a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 is suppressed by loss of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    SSH1, a newly identified member of the heat shock protein (hsp70) multigene family of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a protein localized to the mitochondrial matrix. Deletion of the SSH1 gene results in extremely slow growth at 23 degrees C or 30 degrees C, but nearly wild-type growth at 37 degrees C. The matrix of the mitochondria contains another hsp70, Ssc1, which is essential for growth and required for translocation of proteins into mitochondria. Unlike SSC1 mutants, an SSH1 mutant showed no detectable defects in import of several proteins from the cytosol to the matrix compared to wild type. Increased expression of Ssc1 partially suppressed the cold- sensitive growth defect of the SSH1 mutant, suggesting that when present in increased amounts, Ssc1 can at least partially carry out the normal functions of Ssh1. Spontaneous suppressors of the cold-sensitive phenotype of an SSH1 null mutant were obtained at a high frequency at 23 degrees C, and were all found to be respiration deficient. 15 of 16 suppressors that were analyzed lacked mitochondrial DNA, while the 16th had reduced amounts. We suggest that Ssh1 is required for normal mitochondrial DNA replication, and that disruption of this process in ssh1 cells results in a defect in mitochondrial function at low temperatures. PMID:8707841

  9. Evolution of the adhE gene product of Escherichia coli from a functional reductase to a dehydrogenase. Genetic and biochemical studies of the mutant proteins.

    PubMed

    Membrillo-Hernandez, J; Echave, P; Cabiscol, E; Tamarit, J; Ros, J; Lin, E C

    2000-10-27

    The multifunctional AdhE protein of Escherichia coli (encoded by the adhE gene) physiologically catalyzes the sequential reduction of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol under fermentative conditions. The NH(2)-terminal region of the AdhE protein is highly homologous to aldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductases, whereas the COOH-terminal region is homologous to a family of Fe(2+)-dependent ethanol:NAD(+) oxidoreductases. This fusion protein also functions as a pyruvate formate lyase deactivase. E. coli cannot grow aerobically on ethanol as the sole carbon and energy source because of inadequate rate of adhE transcription and the vulnerability of the AdhE protein to metal-catalyzed oxidation. In this study, we characterized 16 independent two-step mutants with acquired and improved aerobic growth ability on ethanol. The AdhE proteins in these mutants catalyzed the sequential oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde and to acetyl-CoA. All first stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 240 min. Sequence analysis of a randomly chosen mutant revealed an Ala-267 --> Thr substitution in the acetaldehyde:NAD(+) oxidoreductase domain of AdhE. All second stage mutants grew on ethanol with a doubling time of about 90 min, and all of them produced an AdhE(A267T/E568K). Purified AdhE(A267T) and AdhE(A267T/E568K) showed highly elevated acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. It therefore appears that when AdhE catalyzes the two sequential reactions in the counter-physiological direction, acetaldehyde dehydrogenation is the rate-limiting step. Both mutant proteins were more thermosensitive than the wild-type protein, but AdhE(A267T/E568K) was more thermal stable than AdhE(A267T). Since both mutant enzymes exhibited similar kinetic properties, the second mutation probably conferred an increased growth rate on ethanol by stabilizing AdhE(A267T). PMID:10922373

  10. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongping; Li, Dongsheng; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lor, Mary; Rustanti, Lina; Cloonan, Nicole; Wani, Shivangi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein by the eEF1α promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JQ1 had no effect, while suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) modestly stimulated virus production but at levels 300-fold lower than those seen in HIV-1-infected Jurkat-ZSG1 cells. Virus replication was not recovered by coculture of HIV-1-infected Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells with uninfected Jurkat cells. Latently infected Jurkat latent 6.3 and ACH2 cells treated with latency-reversing agents produced measurable viral capsid (CA), but little or none was made when they expressed NB-ZSG1. When Jurkat cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were transduced with lentiviral virus-like particles conveying NB-ZSG1, a >3-log reduction in CA production was observed. Addition of PMA increased virus CA production but at levels 500-fold lower than those seen in nontransduced Jurkat cells. Transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed that HIV-1 mRNA was strongly inhibited by NB-ZSG1 but indicated that full-length viral mRNA was made. Analysis of HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells expressing NB-ZSG1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that recruitment of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation were inhibited. The reduction of HIV-1 promoter-associated RNAPII and epigenetic changes in viral nucleosomes indicate that Nullbasic can inhibit HIV-1 replication by enforcing viral silencing in cells. PMID:27381288

  11. Loss of the thyroid hormone-binding protein Crym renders striatal neurons more vulnerable to mutant huntingtin in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Guillermier, Martine; Houitte, Diane; Bonvento, Gilles; Petit, Fanny; Jan, Caroline; Dufour, Noëlle; Hantraye, Philippe; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; De Chaldée, Michel; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying preferential atrophy of the striatum in Huntington's disease (HD) are unknown. One hypothesis is that a set of gene products preferentially expressed in the striatum could determine the particular vulnerability of this brain region to mutant huntingtin (mHtt). Here, we studied the striatal protein µ-crystallin (Crym). Crym is the NADPH-dependent p38 cytosolic T3-binding protein (p38CTBP), a key regulator of thyroid hormone (TH) T3 (3,5,3′-triiodo-l-thyronine) transportation. It has been also recently identified as the enzyme that reduces the sulfur-containing cyclic ketimines, which are potential neurotransmitters. Here, we confirm the preferential expression of the Crym protein in the rodent and macaque striatum. Crym expression was found to be higher in the macaque caudate than in the putamen. Expression of Crym was reduced in the BACHD and Knock-in 140CAG mouse models of HD before onset of striatal atrophy. We show that overexpression of Crym in striatal medium-size spiny neurons using a lentiviral-based strategy in mice is neuroprotective against the neurotoxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mHtt in vivo. Thus, reduction of Crym expression in HD could render striatal neurons more susceptible to mHtt suggesting that Crym may be a key determinant of the vulnerability of the striatum. In addition our work points to Crym as a potential molecular link between striatal degeneration and the THs deregulation reported in HD patients. PMID:25398949

  12. Resolution of fluorescence intensity decays of the two tryptophan residues in glutamine-binding protein from Escherichia coli using single tryptophan mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Bajzer, Z; Prendergast, F G; Cottam, P F; Ho, C

    1991-01-01

    Time correlated single photon counting measurements of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence intensity decay and other spectroscopic studies were performed on glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli. Using site-specifically mutated forms of the protein in which tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) substitute for the Trp residues at positions 32 and 220, we have examined whether wild-type (Wtyp) intensity decay components may be assigned to specific Trp residues. Results indicate that: (a) two exponential intensity decay components are recovered from the Wtyp protein (6.16 ns, 0.46 ns); (b) the long decay component arises from Trp-220 and comprises greater than 90% of the total fluorescence emission; (c) the short component arises from Trp-32 and is highly quenched; (d) all four single-Trp mutants exhibit multiexponential intensity decays, yet equimolar mixtures of two single-Trp mutants yield only two decay components which are virtually indistinguishable from the Wtyp protein; (e) the recovery of additional components in protein mixtures is obscured by statistical noise inherent in the technique of photon counting; (f) various spectroscopic measurements suggest that Trp-Trp interactions occur in the Wtyp protein, but the Wtyp intensity decay may be closely approximated by a linear combination of intensity decays from single-Trp mutants; and (g) inferences derived independently from fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy which pertain to the presence of Trp-Trp interactions and the relative solvent exposure of the two Trp residues are in agreement. PMID:1932553

  13. Conservative tryptophan mutants of the protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH exhibit impaired WPD-loop function and crystallize with divanadate esters in their active sites.

    PubMed

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C; Johnson, Sean J

    2015-10-27

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  14. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  15. A MUTANT PRION PROTEIN SENSITIZES NEURONS TO GLUTAMATE-INDUCED EXCITOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Biasini, Emiliano; Unterberger, Ursula; Solomon, Isaac H.; Massignan, Tania; Senatore, Assunta; Bian, Hejiao; Voigtlaender, Till; Bowman, Frederick P.; Bonetto, Valentina; Chiesa, Roberto; Luebke, Jennifer; Toselli, Paul; Harris, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a physiological activity of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) plays a crucial role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including prion and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, how the functional activity of PrPC is subverted to deliver neurotoxic signals remains uncertain. Transgenic mice expressing PrP with a deletion of residues 105–125 in the central region (referred to as ΔCR PrP) provide important insights into this problem. Tg(ΔCR) mice exhibit neonatal lethality and massive degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons, a phenotype that is dose-dependently suppressed by the presence of wild-type PrP. When expressed in cultured cells, ΔCR PrP induces large, ionic currents that can be detected by patch-clamping techniques. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that abnormal ion channel activity underlies the neuronal death seen in Tg(ΔCR) mice. We find that ΔCR PrP induces abnormal ionic currents in neurons in culture and in cerebellar slices, and that this activity sensitizes the neurons to glutamate-induced, calcium-mediated death. In combination with ultrastructural and biochemical analyses, these results demonstrate a role for glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in PrP-mediated neurodegeneration. A similar mechanism may operate in other neurodegenerative disorders due to toxic, β-rich oligomers that bind to PrPC. PMID:23392670

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of influenza virus mutants selected with the sialidase fusion protein DAS181

    PubMed Central

    Triana-Baltzer, Gallen B.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Hedlund, Maria; Jensen, Kellie A.; Aschenbrenner, Laura M.; Larson, Jeffrey L.; Fang, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses (IFVs) frequently achieve resistance to antiviral drugs, necessitating the development of compounds with novel mechanisms of action. DAS181 (Fludase®), a sialidase fusion protein, may have a reduced potential for generating drug resistance due to its novel host-targeting mechanism of action. Methods IFV strains B/Maryland/1/59 and A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) were subjected to >30 passages under increasing selective pressure with DAS181. The DAS181-selected IFV isolates were characterized in vitro and in mice. Results Despite extensive passaging, DAS181-selected viruses exhibited a very low level of resistance to DAS181, which ranged between 3- and 18-fold increase in EC50. DAS181-selected viruses displayed an attenuated phenotype in vitro, as exhibited by slower growth, smaller plaque size and increased particle to pfu ratios relative to wild-type virus. Further, the DAS181 resistance phenotype was unstable and was substantially reversed over time upon DAS181 withdrawal. In mice, the DAS181-selected viruses exhibited no greater virulence than their wild-type counterparts. Genotypic and phenotypic analysis of DAS181-selected viruses revealed mutations in the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) molecules and also changes in HA and NA function. Conclusions Results indicate that resistance to DAS181 is minimal and unstable. The DAS181-selected IFV isolates exhibit reduced fitness in vitro, likely due to altered HA and NA functions. PMID:21097900

  17. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  18. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as “spa-types”, based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as “non-typeable”. Results We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated “non-typeable” using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. Conclusions This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments. PMID:24621342

  19. A protein kinase screen of Neurospora crassa mutant strains reveals that the SNF1 protein kinase promotes glycogen synthase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Candido, Thiago De Souza; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Felício, Ana Paula; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; De Carvalho, Ana Carolina Gomes Vieira; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2014-12-15

    Glycogen functions as a carbohydrate reserve in a variety of organisms and its metabolism is highly regulated. The activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of the synthesis and degradation processes, respectively, are regulated by allosteric modulation and reversible phosphorylation. To identify the protein kinases affecting glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa, we performed a screen of 84 serine/threonine kinase knockout strains. We identified multiple kinases that have already been described as controlling glycogen metabolism in different organisms, such as NcSNF1, NcPHO85, NcGSK3, NcPKA, PSK2 homologue and NcATG1. In addition, many hypothetical kinases have been implicated in the control of glycogen metabolism. Two kinases, NcIME-2 and NcNIMA, already functionally characterized but with no functions related to glycogen metabolism regulation, were also identified. Among the kinases identified, it is important to mention the role of NcSNF1. We showed in the present study that this kinase was implicated in glycogen synthase phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the higher levels of glycogen accumulated during growth, along with a higher glycogen synthase (GSN) ±glucose 6-phosphate activity ratio and a lesser set of phosphorylated GSN isoforms in strain Ncsnf1KO, when compared with the wild-type strain. The results led us to conclude that, in N. crassa, this kinase promotes phosphorylation of glycogen synthase either directly or indirectly, which is the opposite of what is described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The kinases also play a role in gene expression regulation, in that gdn, the gene encoding the debranching enzyme, was down-regulated by the proteins identified in the screen. Some kinases affected growth and development, suggesting a connection linking glycogen metabolism with cell growth and development. PMID:25253091

  20. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur

    2006-02-17

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including alpha-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis. PMID:16378590

  1. Ectopic expression of a polyalanine expansion mutant of poly(A)-binding protein N1 in muscle cells in culture inhibits myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qishan; Bag, Jnanankur . E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca

    2006-02-17

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset dominant genetic disease caused by the expansion of a GCG trinucleotide repeat that encodes the polyalanine tract at the N-terminus of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein (PABPN1). Presence of intranuclear inclusions (INIs) containing PABPN1 aggregates in the skeletal muscles is the hallmark of OPMD. Here, we show that ectopic expression of the mutant PABPN1 produced INIs in a muscle cell culture model and reduced expression of several muscle-specific proteins including {alpha}-actin, slow troponin C, muscle creatine kinase, and two myogenic transcription factors, myogenin and MyoD. However, the levels of two upstream regulators of the MyoD gene, the Myf-5 and Pax3/7, were not affected, but both proteins co-localized with the PABPN1 aggregates in the mutant PABPN1 overexpressing cells. In these cells, although myogenin and MyoD levels were reduced, these two transcription factors did not co-localize with the mutant PABPN1 aggregates. Therefore, sequestration of Myf5 and Pax3/7 by the mutant PABPN1 aggregates was a specific effect on these factors. Our results suggest that trapping of these two important myogenic determinants may interfere with an early step in myogenesis.

  2. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Rana, Sandeep; McMurray, Cynthia T; Hua, Duy H

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP) compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD. PMID:19586540

  3. Local delivery of mutant CCL2 protein-reduced orthopaedic implant wear particle-induced osteolysis and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinyi; Sato, Taishi; Yao, Zhenyu; Keeney, Michael; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) has been widely used as a standard treatment for late-stage arthritis. One challenge for long-term efficacy of TJR is the generation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear particles from the implant surface that activates an inflammatory cascade which may lead to bone loss, prosthetic loosening and eventual failure of the procedure. Here, we investigate the efficacy of local administration of mutant CCL2 proteins, such as 7ND, on reducing wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis in vivo using a mouse calvarial model. Mice were treated with local injection of 7ND or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) every other day for up to 14 days. Wear particle-induced osteolysis and the effects of 7ND treatment were evaluated using micro-CT, histology, and immunofluorescence staining. Compared with the PBS control, 7ND treatment significantly decreased wear particle-induced osteolysis, which led to a higher bone volume fraction and bone mineral density. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining showed 7ND treatment decreased the number of recruited inflammatory cells and osteoclasts. Together, our results support the feasibility of local delivery of 7ND for mitigating wear particle-induced inflammation and osteolysis, which may offer a promising strategy for extending the life time of TJRs. PMID:26174978

  4. Properties of a Streptococcus salivarius spontaneous mutant in which the methionine at position 48 in the protein HPr has been replaced by a valine.

    PubMed Central

    Vadeboncoeur, C; Gauthier, L; Gagnon, G; Leduc, A; Brochu, D; Lapointe, R; Desjardins, B; Frenette, M

    1994-01-01

    HPr is a protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) that participates in the concomitant transport and phosphorylation of sugars in bacteria. In gram-positive bacteria, HPr is also reversibly phosphorylated at a seryl residue at position 46 (Ser-46) by a metabolite-activated ATP-dependent kinase and a Pi-dependent HPr(Ser-P) phosphatase. We report in this article the isolation of a spontaneous mutant (mutant A66) from a streptococcus (Streptococcus salivarius) in which the methionine at position 48 (Met-48) in the protein HPr has been replaced by a valine (Val). The mutation inhibited the phosphorylation of HPr on Ser-46 by the ATP-dependent kinase but did not prevent phosphorylation of HPr by enzyme I or the phosphorylation of enzyme II complexes by HPr(His-P). The results, however, suggested that replacement of Met-48 by Val decreased the affinity of enzyme I for HPr or the affinity of enzyme II proteins for HPr(His-P) or both. Characterization of mutant A66 demonstrated that it has pleiotropic properties, including the lack of IIILman, a specific protein of the mannose PTS; decreased levels of HPr; derepression of some cytoplasmic proteins; reduced growth on PTS as well as on non-PTS sugars; and aberrant growth in medium containing a mixture of sugars. Images PMID:8288549

  5. Impaired renal secretion of substrates for the multidrug resistance protein 2 in mutant transport-deficient (TR-) rats.

    PubMed

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Notenboom, Sylvia; Smeets, Pascal H E; Wouterse, Alfons C; Russel, Frans G M

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies with mutant transport-deficient rats (TR(-)), in which the multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2) is lacking, have emphasized the importance of this transport protein in the biliary excretion of a wide variety of glutathione conjugates, glucuronides, and other organic anions. Mrp2 is also present in the luminal membrane of proximal tubule cells of the kidney, but little information is available on its role in the renal excretion of xenobiotics. The authors compared renal transport of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrates calcein, fluo-3, and lucifer yellow (LY) between perfused kidneys isolated from Wistar Hannover (WH) and TR(-) rats. Isolated rat kidneys were perfused with 100 nM of the nonfluorescent calcein-AM or 500 nM fluo3-AM, which enter the tubular cells by diffusion and are hydrolyzed intracellularly into the fluorescent anion. The urinary excretion rates of calcein and fluo-3 were 3 to 4 times lower in perfused kidneys from TR(-) rats compared with WH rats. In contrast, the renal excretion of LY (10 micro M, free anion) was somewhat delayed but appeared unimpaired in TR(-) rats. Membrane vesicles from Sf9 cells expressing human MRP2 or human MRP4 indicated that MRP2 exhibits a preferential affinity for calcein and fluo-3, whereas LY is a better substrate for MRP4. We conclude that the renal clearance of the Mrp2 substrates calcein and fluo-3 is significantly reduced in TR(-) rat; for LY, the absence of the transporter may be compensated for by (an)other organic anion transporter(s). PMID:14569083

  6. Small heat shock proteins target mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator for degradation via a small ubiquitin-like modifier-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Schmidt, Bela Z; Peters, Kathryn W; Rabeh, Wael M; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) bind destabilized proteins during cell stress and disease, but their physiological functions are less clear. We evaluated the impact of Hsp27, an sHsp expressed in airway epithelial cells, on the common protein misfolding mutant that is responsible for most cystic fibrosis. F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a well-studied protein that is subject to cytosolic quality control, selectively associated with Hsp27, whose overexpression preferentially targeted mutant CFTR to proteasomal degradation. Hsp27 interacted physically with Ubc9, the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E2 conjugating enzyme, implying that F508del SUMOylation leads to its sHsp-mediated degradation. Enhancing or disabling the SUMO pathway increased or blocked Hsp27's ability to degrade mutant CFTR. Hsp27 promoted selective SUMOylation of F508del NBD1 in vitro and of full-length F508del CFTR in vivo, which preferred endogenous SUMO-2/3 paralogues that form poly-chains. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4 recognizes poly-SUMO chains to facilitate nuclear protein degradation. RNF4 overexpression elicited F508del degradation, whereas Hsp27 knockdown blocked RNF4's impact on mutant CFTR. Similarly, the ability of Hsp27 to degrade F508del CFTR was lost during overexpression of dominant-negative RNF4. These findings link sHsp-mediated F508del CFTR degradation to its SUMOylation and to STUbL-mediated targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and thereby implicate this pathway in the disposal of an integral membrane protein. PMID:23155000

  7. Structural Model of Ligand-G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Complex Based on Experimental Double Mutant Cycle Data

    PubMed Central

    Marquer, Catherine; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Letellier, Guillaume; Marcon, Elodie; Mourier, Gilles; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Ménez, André; Servent, Denis; Gilquin, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The snake toxin MT7 is a potent and specific allosteric modulator of the human M1 muscarinic receptor (hM1). We previously characterized by mutagenesis experiments the functional determinants of the MT7-hM1 receptor interaction (Fruchart-Gaillard, C., Mourier, G., Marquer, C., Stura, E., Birdsall, N. J., and Servent, D. (2008) Mol. Pharmacol. 74, 1554–1563) and more recently collected evidence indicating that MT7 may bind to a dimeric form of hM1 (Marquer, C., Fruchart-Gaillard, C., Mourier, G., Grandjean, O., Girard, E., le Maire, M., Brown, S., and Servent, D. (2010) Biol. Cell 102, 409–420). To structurally characterize the MT7-hM1 complex, we adopted a strategy combining double mutant cycle experiments and molecular modeling calculations. First, thirty-three ligand-receptor proximities were identified from the analysis of sixty-one double mutant binding affinities. Several toxin residues that are more than 25 Å apart still contact the same residues on the receptor. As a consequence, attempts to satisfy all the restraints by docking the toxin onto a single receptor failed. The toxin was then positioned onto two receptors during five independent flexible docking simulations. The different possible ligand and receptor extracellular loop conformations were described by performing simulations in explicit solvent. All the docking calculations converged to the same conformation of the MT7-hM1 dimer complex, satisfying the experimental restraints and in which (i) the toxin interacts with the extracellular side of the receptor, (ii) the tips of MT7 loops II and III contact one hM1 protomer, whereas the tip of loop I binds to the other protomer, and (iii) the hM1 dimeric interface involves the transmembrane helices TM6 and TM7. These results structurally support the high affinity and selectivity of the MT7-hM1 interaction and highlight the atypical mode of interaction of this allosteric ligand on its G protein-coupled receptor target. PMID:21685390

  8. Reduced function of the RNA-binding protein FPA rescues a T-DNA insertion mutant in the Arabidopsis ZHOUPI gene by promoting transcriptional read-through.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Goodrich, Justin; Wu, Chunxia; Wei, Haichao; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to investigate plant gene functions. Unexpectedly, in several reported cases, the phenotype of T-DNA insertion mutations can be suppressed because of trans T-DNA interactions associated with epigenetic modification, which indicates that caution is needed when T-DNA mutants are used. In the present study, we characterized a novel process suppressing a T-DNA mutation. The spz2 (suppressor of zou 2) mutant was isolated as a suppressor of the phenotype of the zou-4 mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the first intron. The spz2 mutation partially recovered the native ZOU gene expression in the zou-4 background, but not in two other zou alleles, zou-2 and zou-3, with T-DNAs inserted in the exon and intron, respectively. The suppressed phenotype was inherited in a Mendelian fashion and is not associated with epigenetic modification. The recovery of the native ZOU gene expression in the spz2 zou-4 double mutant is caused by transcriptional read-through of the intronic T-DNA as a result of decreased proximal polyadenylation. SPZ2 encodes an RNA-binding protein, FPA, which is known to regulate polyadenylation site selection. This is the first example of FPA rescuing a T-DNA insertion mutation by affecting the polyadenylation site selection. PMID:27164978

  9. An unfolded protein response is the initial cellular response to the expression of mutant matrilin-3 in a mouse model of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Nundlall, Seema; Rajpar, M. Helen; Bell, Peter A.; Clowes, Christopher; Zeeff, Leo A. H.; Gardner, Benjamin; Thornton, David J.; Boot-Handford, Raymond P.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) can result from mutations in matrilin-3, a structural protein of the cartilage extracellular matrix. We have previously shown that in a mouse model of MED the tibia growth plates were normal at birth but developed a progressive dysplasia characterised by the intracellular retention of mutant matrilin-3 and abnormal chondrocyte morphology. By 3 weeks of age, mutant mice displayed a significant decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and dysregulated apoptosis. The aim of this current study was to identify the initial post-natal stages of the disease. We confirmed that the disease phenotype is seen in rib and xiphoid cartilage and, like tibia growth plate cartilage is characterised by the intracellular retention of mutant matrilin-3. Gene expression profiling showed a significant activation of classical unfolded protein response (UPR) genes in mutant chondrocytes at 5 days of age, which was still maintained by 21 days of age. Interestingly, we also noted the upregulation of arginine-rich, mutated in early stage of tumours (ARMET) and cysteine-rich with EGF-like domain protein 2 (CRELD2) are two genes that have only recently been implicated in the UPR. This endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and UPR did not lead to increased chondrocyte apoptosis in mutant cartilage by 5 days of age. In an attempt to alleviate ER stress, mutant mice were fed with a chemical chaperone, 4-sodium phenylbutyrate (SPB). SPB at the dosage used had no effect on chaperone expression at 5 days of age but modestly decreased levels of chaperone proteins at 3 weeks. However, this did not lead to increased secretion of mutant matrilin-3 and in the long term did not improve the disease phenotype. We performed similar studies with a mouse model of Schmid metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, but again this treatment did not improve the phenotype. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12192-010-0193-y) contains supplementary

  10. A role for protein kinase CK2 in cell proliferation: evidence using a kinase-inactive mutant of CK2 catalytic subunit alpha.

    PubMed

    Lebrin, F; Chambaz, E M; Bianchini, L

    2001-04-12

    Protein kinase CK2 is an ubiquitous and pleiotropic Ser/Thr protein kinase composed of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two regulatory (beta) subunits generally combined to form alpha(2)beta(2), alphaalpha'beta(2), or alpha'(2)beta(2) heterotetramers. To gain more insight into the role of CK2 in the control of proliferation in mammalian cells, overexpression of isolated CK2 subunits alpha, alpha', or beta was carried out in two fibroblast cell lines: NIH3T3 and CCL39. To interfere with CK2 cellular functions, cells were also transfected with a kinase-inactive mutant of CK2alpha catalytic subunit: CK2alpha-K68A. In NIH3T3 cells, overexpression of either wild-type subunit (alpha, alpha' or beta) had no effect on cell proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of the CK2alpha kinase-deficient mutant induced a marked inhibition of cell proliferation. This resulted from a defect in G1/S progression as demonstrated in transient transfection experiments in both NIH3T3 and CCL39 cells using BrdU incorporation measurements and in CCL39 clones stably overexpressing the CK2alpha-K68A mutant by growth curve analysis. We demonstrated that the kinase-negative mutant has the capacity to integrate the endogenous CK2 subunit pool both as an isolated kinase-inactive alpha subunit and as associated to the beta subunit in a kinase-inactive tetramer. Finally we showed that expression of the kinase-inactive mutant interferes with phosphorylation of an endogenous CK2 substrate; we speculate that optimal phosphorylation of target proteins by CK2 is required to achieve optimal cell cycle progression. PMID:11360185

  11. Opacity proteins of neisseria gonorrhoeae in lipooligosaccharide mutants lost ability to interact with neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Tu, Ya-Ting; Cai, Hua-Hua; Ding, Hong-Hui; Li, Qiao; He, Ying-Xia; Liu, Xin-Xin; Wang, Xin; Hu, Feng; Chen, Tie; Chen, Hong-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    Lipooligosacharide (LOS) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci, GC) is involved in the interaction of GC with host cells. Deletion of the alpha-oligosaccharide (alpha-OS) moiety of LOS (lgtF mutant) significantly impairs invasion of GC into epithelial cell lines. GC opacity (Opa) proteins, such as OpaI, mediate phagocytosis and stimulate chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils in part through interaction with members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family, which includes CEACAM3 (CD66d), a human neutrophil specific receptor for phagocytosis of bacteria. In the present work, we examined the effects of OpaI-expressing lgtF mutant on phagocytosis by HeLa-CEACAM3 cells and chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. The results showed that lgtF mutant even expressing OpaI completely lost the ability to promote either phagocytosis mediated by CEACAM3 interaction in HeLa cells or chemiluminescence responses in neutrophils. These data indicated that Opa proteins in the lgtF mutant, which might result from the conformational change, cannot be functional. PMID:27376801

  12. Structures of the N47A and E109Q mutant proteins of pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylase from Methanococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Soriano, Erika V.; McCloskey, Diane E.; Kinsland, Cynthia; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-04-01

    The crystal structures of two arginine decarboxylase mutant proteins provide insights into the mechanisms of pyruvoyl-group formation and the decarboxylation reaction. Pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylase (PvlArgDC) catalyzes the first step of the polyamine-biosynthetic pathway in plants and some archaebacteria. The pyruvoyl group of PvlArgDC is generated by an internal autoserinolysis reaction at an absolutely conserved serine residue in the proenzyme, resulting in two polypeptide chains. Based on the native structure of PvlArgDC from Methanococcus jannaschii, the conserved residues Asn47 and Glu109 were proposed to be involved in the decarboxylation and autoprocessing reactions. N47A and E109Q mutant proteins were prepared and the three-dimensional structure of each protein was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The N47A and E109Q mutant proteins showed reduced decarboxylation activity compared with the wild-type PvlArgDC. These residues may also be important for the autoprocessing reaction, which utilizes a mechanism similar to that of the decarboxylation reaction.

  13. Investigation of Endoglin Wild-Type and Missense Mutant Protein Heterodimerisation Using Fluorescence Microscopy Based IF, BiFC and FRET Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Förg, Tassilo; Hafner, Mathias; Lux, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The homodimeric transmembrane receptor endoglin (CD105) plays an important role in angiogenesis. This is highlighted by mutations in its gene, causing the vascular disorder HHT1. The main role of endoglin function has been assigned to the modulation of transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic protein signalling in endothelial cells. Nevertheless, other functions of endoglin have been revealed to be involved in different cellular functions and in other cell types than endothelial cells. Compared to the exploration of its natural function, little experimental data have been gathered about the mode of action of endoglin HHT mutations at the cellular level, especially missense mutations, and to what degree these might interfere with normal endoglin function. In this paper, we have used fluorescence-based microscopic techniques, such as bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), immunofluorescence staining with the endoglin specific monoclonal antibody SN6, and protein interaction studies by Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to investigate the formation and cellular localisation of possible homo- and heterodimers composed of endoglin wild-type and endoglin missense mutant proteins. The results show that all of the investigated missense mutants dimerise with themselves, as well as with wild-type endoglin, and localise, depending on the position of the affected amino acid, either in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) or in the plasma membrane of the cells. We show that the rER retained mutants reduce the amount of endogenous wild-type endoglin on the plasma membrane through interception in the rER when transiently or stably expressed in HMEC-1 endothelial cells. As a result of this, endoglin modulated TGF-β1 signal transduction is also abrogated, which is not due to TGF-β receptor ER trafficking interference. Protein interaction analyses by FRET show that rER located endoglin missense mutants do not perturb protein processing of other

  14. Structures of KaiC Circadian Clock Mutant Proteins: A New Phosphorylation Site at T426 and Mechanisms of Kinase, ATPase and Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Mori, Tetsuya; Xu, Yao; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin

    2010-09-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. Homo-hexameric KaiC displays kinase, phosphatase and ATPase activities; KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and KaiB antagonizes KaiA. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the two known sites in the C-terminal half of KaiC subunits, T432 and S431, follow a strict order (TS {yields} pTS {yields} pTpS {yields} TpS {yields} TS) over the daily cycle, the origin of which is not understood. To address this void and to analyze the roles of KaiC active site residues, in particular T426, we determined structures of single and double P-site mutants of S. elongatus KaiC. The conformations of the loop region harboring P-site residues T432 and S431 in the crystal structures of six KaiC mutant proteins exhibit subtle differences that result in various distances between Thr (or Ala/Asn/Glu) and Ser (or Ala/Asp) residues and the ATP {gamma}-phosphate. T432 is phosphorylated first because it lies consistently closer to P{gamma}. The structures of the S431A and T432E/S431A mutants reveal phosphorylation at T426. The environments of the latter residue in the structures and functional data for T426 mutants in vitro and in vivo imply a role in dephosphorylation. We provide evidence for a third phosphorylation site in KaiC at T426. T426 and S431 are closely spaced and a KaiC subunit cannot carry phosphates at both sites simultaneously. Fewer subunits are phosphorylated at T426 in the two KaiC mutants compared to phosphorylated T432 and/or S431 residues in the structures of wt and other mutant KaiCs, suggesting that T426 phosphorylation may be labile. The structures combined with functional data for a host of KaiC mutant proteins help rationalize why S431 trails T432 in the loss of its phosphate and shed light on the mechanisms of the KaiC kinase, ATPase and phosphatase activities.

  15. Folding and Rescue of a Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking Mutant Identified Using Human-Murine Chimeric Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Da Paula, Ana Carina; Sousa, Marisa; Xu, Zhe; Dawson, Elizabeth S.; Boyd, A. Christopher; Sheppard, David N.; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2010-01-01

    Impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel causes cystic fibrosis, a fatal genetic disease. Here, to gain insight into CFTR structure and function, we exploited interspecies differences between CFTR homologues using human (h)-murine (m) CFTR chimeras containing murine nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) or regulatory domain on an hCFTR backbone. Among 15 hmCFTR chimeras analyzed, all but two were correctly processed, one containing part of mNBD1 and another containing part of mNBD2. Based on physicochemical distance analysis of divergent residues between human and murine CFTR in the two misprocessed hmCFTR chimeras, we generated point mutations for analysis of respective CFTR processing and functional properties. We identified one amino acid substitution (K584E-CFTR) that disrupts CFTR processing in NBD1. No single mutation was identified in NBD2 that disrupts protein processing. However, a number of NBD2 mutants altered channel function. Analysis of structural models of CFTR identified that although Lys584 interacts with residue Leu581 in human CFTR Glu584 interacts with Phe581 in mouse CFTR. Introduction of the murine residue (Phe581) in cis with K584E in human CFTR rescued the processing and trafficking defects of K584E-CFTR. Our data demonstrate that human-murine CFTR chimeras may be used to validate structural models of full-length CFTR. We also conclude that hmCFTR chimeras are a valuable tool to elucidate interactions between different domains of CFTR. PMID:20551307

  16. Role of protein synthesis in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage in a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yezzi, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant for protein synthesis, CHO-TSH1, has been compared to the wild-type cell, CHO-sC1, in single- and split-radiation-dose schemes. When the exponentially growing TS mutant and the wild-type cells were treated at 40/sub 0/C for up to 2 hrs prior to graded doses of x rays, the survival curves were identical and were the same as those obtained without heat treatment. If the cultures were incubated at 40/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and maintained at 40/sup 0/C during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval, repair of radiation damage was reduced in the mutant compared to the wild type. These observations implied that a pool of proteins was involved in the repair of sublethal x-ray damage. However, if repair was measured by the alkaline-unwinding technique under the same time and temperature schemes, no difference in the kientics of DNA strand rejoining was observed. Misrepair processes may permit restoration of DNA strand integrity but not allow functional repair. The effect of diminished repair under conditions of inhibition of protein synthesis was found to be cell-cycle dependent in survival studies with synchronized mutant cell populations. Repair was found to be almost completely eliminated if the temperature sequence described above was applied in the middle of the DNA synthetic phase. Treatment of cell populations in the middle of G/sub 1/-phase yielded repair inhibition comparable to that observed with the asynchronous cells. Splitdose experiments were done using pre-incubation with cycloheximide to chemically inhibit protein synthesis. WT cells and TS cells were treated with cycloheximide at 35/sup 0/C for 2 hrs before a first dose and during a 2 hr dose fractionation interval. 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. A Mutant Form of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pilus Secretin Protein PilQ Allows Increased Entry of Heme and Antimicrobial Compounds†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-ju; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Shafer, William M.; Seifert, H. Steven; Sparling, P. Frederick

    2004-01-01

    A spontaneous point mutation in pilQ (pilQ1) resulted in phenotypic suppression of a hemoglobin (Hb) receptor mutant (hpuAB mutant), allowing gonococci to grow on Hb as the sole source of iron. PilQ, formerly designated OMP-MC, is a member of the secretin family of proteins located in the outer membrane and is required for pilus biogenesis. The pilQ1 mutant also showed decreased piliation and transformation efficiency. Insertional inactivation of pilQ1 resulted in the loss of the Hb utilization phenotype and decreased entry of free heme. Despite the ability of the pilQ1 mutant to use Hb for iron acquisition and porphyrin, there was no demonstrable binding of Hb to the cell surface. The pilQ1 mutant was more sensitive to the toxic effect of free heme in growth medium and hypersensitive to the detergent Triton X-100 and multiple antibiotics. Double mutation in pilQ1 and tonB had no effect on these phenotypes, but a double pilQ1 pilT mutant showed a reduction in Hb-dependent growth and decreased sensitivity to heme and various antimicrobial agents. Insertional inactivation of wild-type pilQ also resulted in reduced entry of heme, Triton X-100, and some antibiotics. These results show that PilQ forms a channel that allows entry of heme and certain antimicrobial compounds and that a gain-of function point mutation in pilQ results in TonB-independent, PilT-dependent increase of entry. PMID:14729699

  18. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence studies on excitation energy transfer in a histidine 117 mutant of the D2 protein of photosystem II in Synechocystis 6803.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    2000-11-21

    The role of the peripheral reaction center chlorophyll a molecule associated with His117 of the D2 polypeptide in photosystem II was investigated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using a combination of steady state, pump-probe, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Data were obtained from intact cells and isolated thylakoid membranes of a control mutant and a D2-H117T mutant, both of which lacked photosystem I. Excitation energy transfer and trapping were investigated by analyzing the data with a kinetic model that used an exact numerical solution of the Pauli master equation, taking into account available photosystem II spectral and structural information. The results of our kinetic analysis revealed the observed difference in excited-state dynamics between the H117T mutant and the control to be consistent with a retardation of the rate of excitation energy transfer from the peripheral chlorophyll of D2 (Chl at His117) to the electron-transfer pigments and an increase of the rate constant for charge recombination in the H117T mutant. The kinetic model was able to account for the experimentally observed changes in absorption cross section and fluorescence decay kinetics between the control and mutant by invoking changes in only these two rate constants. The results rule out quenching of excitation by a chlorophyll cation radical as a mechanism responsible for the lower efficiency of excitation energy utilization in the H117T mutant. Our work also demonstrates the importance of the chlorophyll associated with His117 of the D2 protein for excitation energy transfer to the PSII electron-transfer pigments and for the effective stabilization of the primary radical pair. PMID:11087370

  19. Mutant Analysis of the Escherichia coli FhuA Protein Reveals Sites of FhuA Activity

    PubMed Central

    Endriß, Franziska; Braun, Michael; Killmann, Helmut; Braun, Volkmar

    2003-01-01

    The FhuA outer membrane protein of Escherichia coli actively transports ferrichrome, albomycin, and rifamycin CGP 4832, and confers sensitivity to microcin J25, colicin M, and the phages T1, T5, and φ80. Guided by the FhuA crystal structure and derived predictions on how FhuA might function, mutants were isolated in the cork domain (residues 1 to 160) and in the β-barrel domain (residues 161 to 714). Deletion of the TonB box (residues 7 to 11) completely inactivated all TonB-dependent functions of FhuA. Fixation of the cork to turn 7 of the barrel through a disulfide bridge between introduced C27 and C533 residues abolished ferrichrome transport, which was restored by reduction of the disulfide bond. Deletion of residues 24 to 31, including the switch helix (residues 24 to 29), which upon binding of ferrichrome to FhuA undergoes a large structural transition (17 Å) and exposes the N terminus of FhuA (TonB box) to the periplasm, reduced FhuA transport activity (79% of the wild-type activity) but conferred full sensitivity to colicin M and the phages. Duplication of residues 23 to 30 or deletion of residues 13 to 20 resulted in FhuA derivatives with properties similar to those of FhuA with a deletion of residues 24 to 31. However, a frameshift mutation that changed QSEA at positions 18 to 21 to KKAP abolished almost completely most of FhuA's activities. The conserved residues R93 and R133 among energy-coupled outer membrane transporters are thought to fix the cork to the β-barrel by forming salt bridges to the conserved residues E522 and E571 of the β-barrel. Proteins with the E522R and E571R mutations were inactive, but inactivity was not caused by repulsion of R93 by R522 and R571 and of R133 by R571. Point mutations in the cork at sites that move or do not move upon the binding of ferrichrome had no effect or conferred only slightly reduced activities. It is concluded that the TonB box is essential for FhuA activity. The TonB box region has to be flexible

  20. Investigation of the stability of yeast rad52 mutant proteins uncovers post-translational and transcriptional regulation of Rad52p.

    PubMed Central

    Asleson, Erin N; Livingston, Dennis M

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the stability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein to learn how a cell controls its quantity and longevity. We measured the cellular levels of wild-type and mutant forms of Rad52p when expressed from the RAD52 promoter and the half-lives of the various forms of Rad52p when expressed from the GAL1 promoter. The wild-type protein has a half-life of 15 min. rad52 mutations variably affect the cellular levels of the protein products, and these levels correlate with the measured half-lives. While missense mutations in the N terminus of the protein drastically reduce the cellular levels of the mutant proteins, two mutations--one a deletion of amino acids 210-327 and the other a missense mutation of residue 235--increase the cellular level and half-life more than twofold. These results suggest that Rad52p is subject to post-translational regulation. Proteasomal mutations have no effect on Rad52p half-life but increase the amount of RAD52 message. In contrast to Rad52p, the half-life of Rad51p is >2 hr, and RAD51 expression is unaffected by proteasomal mutations. These differences between Rad52p and Rad51p suggest differential regulation of two proteins that interact in recombinational repair. PMID:12586699

  1. Evaluation of the non-toxic mutant of the diphtheria toxin K51E/E148K as carrier protein for meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pecetta, S; Vijayakrishnan, B; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Surdo, P Lo; Balocchi, C; Mori, E; Davis, B G; Berti, F

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 is a common carrier protein for glycoconjugate vaccines, which has been proven an effective protein vector for, among others, meningococcal carbohydrates. The wide-range use of this protein in massive vaccine production requires constant increase of production yields and adaptability to an ever-growing market. Here we compare CRM197 with the alternative diphtheria non-toxic variant DT-K51E/E148K, an inactive mutant that can be produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of DT-K51E/E148K suggested high similarity with CRM197, with main differences in their alpha-helical content, and a suitable purity for conjugation and vaccine preparation. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) glycoconjugates were synthesized using CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K as carrier proteins, obtaining the same conjugation yields and comparable biophysical profiles. Mice were then immunized with these CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K conjugates, and essentially identical immunogenic and protective effects were observed. Overall, our data indicate that DT-K51E/E148K is a readily produced protein that now allows the added flexibility of E. coli production in vaccine development and that can be effectively used as protein carrier for a meningococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26845738

  2. Structure-biological function relationship extended to mitotic arrest-deficient 2-like protein Mad2 native and mutants-new opportunity for genetic disorder control.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53-0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82-0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  3. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington's disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington's disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington's disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington's disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results. PMID:27110099

  4. Trafficking defect of mutant kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) proteins associated with distal renal tubular acidosis and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Udomchaiprasertkul, Wandee; Noisakran, Sansanee; Rungroj, Nanyawan; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2006-11-24

    Compound heterozygous anion exchanger 1 (AE1) SAO/G701D mutations result in distal renal tubular acidosis with Southeast Asian ovalocytosis. Interaction, trafficking and localization of wild-type and mutant (SAO and G701D) kAE1 proteins fused with hemagglutinin, six-histidine, Myc, or green fluorescence protein (GFP) were examined in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. When individually expressed, wild-type kAE1 was localized at cell surface while mutant kAE1 SAO and G701D were intracellularly retained. When co-expressed, wild-type kAE1 could form heterodimer with kAE1 SAO or kAE1 G701D and could rescue mutant kAE1 proteins to express on the cell surface. Co-expression of kAE1 SAO and kAE1 G701D also resulted in heterodimer formation but intracellular retention without cell surface expression, suggesting their trafficking defect and failure to rescue each other to the plasma membrane, most likely the molecular mechanism of the disease in the compound heterozygous condition. PMID:17027918

  5. Xyloketal-derived small molecules show protective effect by decreasing mutant Huntingtin protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yixuan; Guo, Wenyuan; Xu, Guangqing; Wang, Qinmei; Feng, Luyang; Long, Simei; Liang, Fengyin; Huang, Yi; Lu, Xilin; Li, Shichang; Zhou, Jiebin; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Pang, Jiyan; Pei, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder, with chorea as the most prominent manifestation. The disease is caused by abnormal expansion of CAG codon repeats in the IT15 gene, which leads to the expression of a glutamine-rich protein named mutant Huntingtin (Htt). Because of its devastating disease burden and lack of valid treatment, development of more effective therapeutics for Huntington’s disease is urgently required. Xyloketal B, a natural product from mangrove fungus, has shown protective effects against toxicity in other neurodegenerative disease models such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. To identify potential neuroprotective molecules for Huntington’s disease, six derivatives of xyloketal B were screened in a Caenorhabditis elegans Huntington’s disease model; all six compounds showed a protective effect. Molecular docking studies indicated that compound 1 could bind to residues GLN369 and GLN393 of the mutant Htt protein, forming a stable trimeric complex that can prevent the formation of mutant Htt aggregates. Taken together, we conclude that xyloketal derivatives could be novel drug candidates for treating Huntington’s disease. Molecular target analysis is a good method to simulate the interaction between proteins and drug compounds. Further, protective candidate drugs could be designed in future using the guidance of molecular docking results. PMID:27110099

  6. Characterization of the sporulation control protein SsgA by use of an efficient method to create and screen random mutant libraries in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Traag, Bjørn A; Seghezzi, Nicolas; Vijgenboom, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2007-04-01

    Filamentous actinomycetes are commercially widely used as producers of natural products. However, the mycelial lifestyle of actinomycetes has been a major bottleneck in their commercialization, and screening is difficult due to their poor growth on microtiter plates. We previously demonstrated that the enhanced expression of the cell division activator protein SsgA results in the fragmented growth of streptomycetes, with enhanced growth rates and improved product formation. We here describe a novel and efficient method to create, maintain, and screen mutant libraries in streptomycetes and the application of this method for the functional analysis of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgA. The variants were amplified directly from deep-frozen biomass suspensions. Around 800 ssgA variants, including single-amino-acid-substitution mutants corresponding to more than half of all SsgA residues, were analyzed for their abilities to restore sporulation to an ssgA mutant. The essential residues were clustered in three main sections, and hardly any were in the carboxy-terminal third of the protein. The majority of the crucial residues were conserved among all SsgA-like proteins (SALPs). However, the essential residues L29, D58, and S89 were conserved only in SsgA orthologues and not in other SALPs, suggesting an SsgA-specific function. PMID:17293502

  7. pH Induced Conformational Transitions in the Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein (TGFβIp) Associated Corneal Dystrophy Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Elavazhagan; Venkatraman, Anandalakshmi; Lei, Zhou; Mouvet, Victoria; Rui Yi Lim, Rayne; Muruganantham, Nandhakumar; Goh, Eunice; Swee Lim Peh, Gary; Beuerman, Roger W.; Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Most stromal corneal dystrophies are associated with aggregation and deposition of the mutated transforming growth factor-β induced protein (TGFβIp). The 4th_FAS1 domain of TGFβIp harbors ~80% of the mutations that forms amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic aggregates. To understand the mechanism of aggregation and the differences between the amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic phenotypes, we expressed the 4th_FAS1 domains of TGFβIp carrying the mutations R555W (non-amyloidogenic) and H572R (amyloidogenic) along with the wild-type (WT). R555W was more susceptible to acidic pH compared to H572R and displayed varying chemical stabilities with decreasing pH. Thermal denaturation studies at acidic pH showed that while WT did not undergo any conformational transition, the mutants exhibited a clear pH-dependent irreversible conversion from αβ conformation to β-sheet oligomers. The β-oligomers of both mutants were stable at physiological temperature and pH. Electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering studies showed that β-oligomers of H572R were larger compared to R555W. The β-oligomers of both mutants were cytotoxic to primary human corneal stromal fibroblast (pHCSF) cells. The β-oligomers of both mutants exhibit variations in their morphologies, sizes, thermal and chemical stabilities, aggregation patterns and cytotoxicities. PMID:27030015

  8. Increased leaf photosynthesis caused by elevated stomatal conductance in a rice mutant deficient in SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel protein

    PubMed Central

    Kusumi, Kensuke

    2012-01-01

    In rice (Oryza sativa L.), leaf photosynthesis is known to be highly correlated with stomatal conductance; however, it remains unclear whether stomatal conductance dominantly limits the photosynthetic rate. SLAC1 is a stomatal anion channel protein controlling stomatal closure in response to environmental [CO2]. In order to examine stomatal limitations to photosynthesis, a SLAC1-deficient mutant of rice was isolated and characterized. A TILLING screen of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-derived mutant lines was conducted for the rice SLAC1 orthologue gene Os04g0674700, and four mutant lines containing mutations within the open reading frame were obtained. A second screen using an infrared thermography camera revealed that one of the mutants, named slac1, had a constitutive low leaf temperature phenotype. Measurement of leaf gas exchange showed that slac1 plants grown in the greenhouse had significantly higher stomatal conductance (g s), rates of photosynthesis (A), and ratios of internal [CO2] to ambient [CO2] (C i/C a) compared with wild-type plants, whereas there was no significant difference in the response of photosynthesis to internal [CO2] (A/C i curves). These observations demonstrate that in well-watered conditions, stomatal conductance is a major determinant of photosynthetic rate in rice. PMID:22915747

  9. p-Phenylenediamine induced DNA damage in SV-40 immortalized human uroepithelial cells and expression of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Chun; Hung, Wen-Chun; Kang, Wan-Yi; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin

    2007-04-25

    p-Phenylenediamine (p-PD) is the main aromatic amine used in the formulation of hair dyes. Some epidemiologic studies have suggested that the use of p-PD-based hair dyes might be related to increased risk of human malignant tumors including bladder cancer and hematopoietic cancers. However, the toxicity and genotoxicity of p-PD on urothelial cells has not been reported yet. Therefore, we investigated the genotoxicity of p-PD on human urothelial cells and study its association with the expression of oncoproteins p53 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Our results revealed that p-PD was able to induce DNA damage determined by Comet assay. In addition, our immunocytochemical and Western blotting results showed that p-PD induced overexpression of mutant p53 and COX-2 in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between mutant p53 and COX-2 expression shows strong correlation. Furthermore, the accumulation of mutant p53 was linearly correlated with Comet scores. These results suggest that p-PD can induce DNA damage and accumulation of mutant p53 and COX-2 proteins; this may be one of the possible mechanisms that cause genotoxic carcinogenesis in the urothelial cells. PMID:17403587

  10. Absence of the major light-harvesting antenna proteins alters the redox properties of photosystem II reaction centres in the chlorina F2 mutant of barley.

    PubMed

    Krol, Marianna; Ivanov, Alexander G; Booij-James, Isabelle; Mattoo, Autar K; Sane, P V; Hüner, Norman P A

    2009-08-01

    Although the chlorina F2 mutant of barley specifically exhibits reduced levels of the major light-harvesting polypeptides associated with photosystem II (PSII), thermoluminescence measurements of photosystem reaction centre photochemistry revealed that S2/S3QB- charge recombinations were shifted to lower temperatures, while the characteristic peak of S2QA- charge recombinations was shifted to higher temperatures compared with wild-type (WT) barley. Thus, we show that the absence of the major light-harvesting polypeptides affects the redox properties of PSII reaction centres. Radiolabeling studies in vivo and in vitro with [32P]orthophosphate or [gamma-32P]ATP, respectively, demonstrated that the D1 PSII reaction centre polypeptide is phosphorylated in both the WT and the F2 mutant. In contrast with the radiolabeling results, phosphorylation of D1 and other PSII proteins, although detected in WT barley, was ambiguous in the F2 mutant when the phosphothreonine antibody method of detection was used. Thus, caution must be exercised in the use of commercially available phosphothreonine antibodies to estimate thylakoid polypeptide phosphorylation. Furthermore, in membrano, the D1 polypeptide of the F2 mutant was less susceptible to trypsin treatment than that of WT barley. The role of the light-harvesting complex in modulating the structure and function of the D1 polypeptide of PSII reaction centers is discussed. PMID:19767820

  11. The Mutant KRAS Gene Up-regulates BCL-XL Protein via STAT3 to Confer Apoptosis Resistance That Is Reversed by BIM Protein Induction and BCL-XL Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Zaanan, Aziz; Okamoto, Koichi; Kawakami, Hisato; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Huang, Shengbing; Sinicrope, Frank A

    2015-09-25

    In colorectal cancers with oncogenic GTPase Kras (KRAS) mutations, inhibition of downstream MEK/ERK signaling has shown limited efficacy, in part because of failure to induce a robust apoptotic response. We studied the mechanism of apoptosis resistance in mutant KRAS cells and sought to enhance the efficacy of a KRAS-specific MEK/ERK inhibitor, GDC-0623. GDC-0623 was shown to potently up-regulate BIM expression to a greater extent versus other MEK inhibitors in isogenic KRAS HCT116 and mutant KRAS SW620 colon cancer cells. ERK silencing enhanced BIM up-regulation by GDC-0623 that was due to its loss of phosphorylation at Ser(69), confirmed by a BIM-EL phosphorylation-defective mutant (S69G) that increased protein stability and blocked BIM induction. Despite BIM and BIK induction, the isogenic KRAS mutant versus wild-type cells remained resistant to GDC-0623-induced apoptosis, in part because of up-regulation of BCL-XL. KRAS knockdown by a doxycycline-inducible shRNA attenuated BCL-XL expression. BCL-XL knockdown sensitized KRAS mutant cells to GDC-0623-mediated apoptosis, as did the BH3 mimetic ABT-263. GDC-0623 plus ABT-263 induced a synergistic apoptosis by a mechanism that includes release of BIM from its sequestration by BCL-XL. Furthermore, mutant KRAS activated p-STAT3 (Tyr(705)) in the absence of IL-6 secretion, and STAT3 knockdown reduced BCL-XL mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that BCL-XL up-regulation by STAT3 contributes to mutant KRAS-mediated apoptosis resistance. Such resistance can be overcome by potent BIM induction and concurrent BCL-XL antagonism to enable a synergistic apoptotic response. PMID:26245900

  12. Ribosomes containing mutants of L4 ribosomal protein from Thermus thermophilus display multiple defects in ribosomal functions and sensitivity against erythromycin

    PubMed Central

    TSAGKALIA, AIKATERINI; LEONTIADOU, FOTINI; XAPLANTERI, MARIA A.; PAPADOPOULOS, GEORGIOS; KALPAXIS, DIMITRIOS L.; CHOLI-PAPADOPOULOU, THEODORA

    2005-01-01

    Protein L4 from Thermus thermophilus (TthL4) was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli cells. To study the implication of the extended loop of TthL4 in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase functions, the highly conserved E56 was replaced by D or Q, while the semiconserved G55 was changed to E or S. Moreover, the sequence -G55E56- was inverted to -E55G56-. When we incorporated these mutants into E. coli ribosomes and investigated their impact on poly(Phe) synthesis, high variations in the synthetic activity and response to erythromycin of the resulting ribosomes were observed. In the absence of erythromycin, ribosomes harboring mutations G55E and E56D in TthL4 protein were characterized by low activity in synthesizing poly(Phe) and decreased capability in binding tRNA at the A site. On the other hand, ribosomes possessing mutations G55E, G55S, G55E-E56G, or E56Q in TthL4 protein were unexpectedly more sensitive to erythromycin. Evidence in support of these findings was drawn by in vivo experiments, assessing the erythromycin sensitivity of E. coli cells expressing wild-type or mutant TthL4 proteins. Our results emphasize the role of the extended loop of L4 ribosomal protein in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase center functions. PMID:16244130

  13. The lack of LHCII proteins modulates excitation energy partitioning and PSII charge recombination in Chlorina F2 mutant of barley.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Krol, M; Zeinalov, Y; Huner, N P A; Sane, P V

    2008-07-01

    Analysis of the partitioning of absorbed light energy within PSII into fractions utilized by PSII photochemistry (ØPSII), thermally dissipated via ΔpH-and zeaxanthin-dependent energy quenching (ØNPQ) and constitutive non-photochemical energy losses (ØNO) was performed in wild type and F2 mutant of barley. The estimated energy partitioning of absorbed light to various pathways indicated that the fraction of ØPSII was slightly higher, while the proportion of thermally dissipated energy through ØNPQ was 38% lower in F2 mutant than in WT. In contrast, ØNO, i.e. the fraction of absorbed light energy dissipated by additional quenching mechanism(s) was 34% higher in F2 mutant. The increased proportion of ØNO correlated with narrowing the temperature gap (ΔT M) between S2/3QB- and S2QA- charge recombinations in F2 mutant as revealed by thermoluminescence measurements. We suggest that this would result in increased probability for an alternative non-radiative P680+QA- radical pair recombination pathway for energy dissipation within the reaction centre of PSII (reaction center quenching) and that this additional quenching mechanism might play an important role in photoprotection when the capacity for the primary, zeaxanthin-dependent non-photochemical quenching (ØNPQ) and state transitions pathways are restricted in the absence of LHCII polypeptides in F2 mutant. PMID:23572888

  14. Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Phage T4 Vertex Protein Gp24 and its Mutant Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Boeshans,K.; Liu, F.; Peng, G.; Idler, W.; Jang, S.; Marekov, L.; Black, L.; Ahvazi, B.

    2006-01-01

    The study of bacteriophage T4 assembly has revealed regulatory mechanisms pertinent not only to viruses but also to macromolecular complexes. The capsid of bacteriophage T4 is composed of the major capsid protein gp23, and a minor capsid protein gp24, which is arranged as pentamers at the vertices of the capsid. In this study the T4 capsid protein gp24 and its mutant forms were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The overexpression from plasmid vectors of all the constructs in Escherichia coli yields biologically active protein in vivo as determined by assembly of active virus following infection with inactivated gene 24 mutant viruses. The gp24 mutant was subjected to surface entropy reduction by mutagenesis and reductive alkylation in order to improve its crystallization properties and diffraction quality. To determine if surface mutagenesis targeting would result in diffractable crystals, two glutamate to alanine mutations (E89A,E90A) were introduced. We report here the biochemical observations and consequent mutagenesis experiment that resulted in improvements in the stability, crystallizability and crystal quality of gp24 without affecting the overall folding. Rational modification of the protein surface to achieve crystallization appears promising for improving crystallization behavior and crystal diffracting qualities. The crystal of gp24(E89A,E90A) diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution compared to wild-type gp24 at 3.80 {angstrom} resolution under the same experimental conditions. Surface mutation proved to be a better method than reductive methylation for improving diffraction quality of the gp24 crystals.

  15. Use of an Isogenic Mutant Constructed in Moraxella catarrhalis To Identify a Protective Epitope of Outer Membrane Protein B1 Defined by Monoclonal Antibody 11C6

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nicole R.; Russo, Thomas A.; Luther, Neal; Campagnari, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis-induced otitis media continues to be a significant cause of infection in young children, prompting increased efforts at identifying effective vaccine antigens. We have previously demonstrated that M. catarrhalis expresses specific outer membrane proteins (OMPs) in response to iron limitation and that this organism can utilize transferrin and lactoferrin for in vitro growth. One of these proteins, which binds human transferrin, is OMP B1. As the human host presents a naturally iron-limited environment, proteins, like OMP B1, which are expressed in response to this nutritional stress are potential vaccine antigens. In this study, we have developed monoclonal antibody (MAb) 11C6, which reacts to a surface-exposed epitope of OMP B1 expressed by M. catarrhalis 7169. This antibody was used to clone ompB1, and sequence analysis suggested that OMP B1 is the M. catarrhalis homologue to the transferrin binding protein B described for pathogenic Neisseriaceae, Haemophilus influenzae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and M. catarrhalis. Expression of recombinant OMP B1 on the surface of Escherichia coli confers transferrin binding activity, confirming that this protein is likely involved in iron acquisition. In addition, ompB1 was used to construct an isogenic mutant in M. catarrhalis 7169. This mutant, termed 7169b12, was used as the control in bactericidal assays designed to determine if OMP B1 elicits protective antibodies. In the presence of MAb 11C6 and human complement, wild-type 7169 demonstrated a 99% decline in viability, whereas the ompB1 isogenic mutant was resistant to this bactericidal activity. Further analysis with MAb 11C6 revealed the presence of this OMP B1 epitope on 31% of the clinical isolates tested. These data suggest that OMP B1 is a potential vaccine antigen against M. catarrhalis infections. PMID:9916077

  16. Targeting mutant p53 protein and the tumor vasculature: an effective combination therapy for advanced breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Benakanakere, Indira; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer progression depends upon the elaboration of a vasculature sufficient for the nourishment of the developing tumor. Breast tumor cells frequently contain a mutant form of p53 (mtp53), a protein which promotes their survival. The aim of this study was to determine whether combination therapy targeting mtp53 and anionic phospholipids (AP) on tumor blood vessels might be an effective therapeutic strategy for suppressing advanced breast cancer. We examined the therapeutic effects, singly, or in combination, of p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis (PRIMA-1), which reactivates mtp53 and induces tumor cell apoptosis, and 2aG4, a monoclonal antibody that disrupts tumor vasculature by targeting AP on the surface of tumor endothelial cells and causes antibody-dependent destruction of tumor blood vessels, leading to ischemia and tumor cell death. Xenografts from two tumor cell lines containing mtp53, BT-474 and HCC-1428, were grown in nude mice to provide models of advanced breast tumors. After treatment with PRIMA-1 and/or 2aG4, regressing tumors were analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, blood vessel loss, and apoptotic markers. Individual drug treatment led to partial suppression of breast cancer progression. In contrast, combined treatment with PRIMA-1 and 2aG4 was extremely effective in suppressing tumor growth in both models and completely eradicated approximately 30% of tumors in the BT-474 model. Importantly, no toxic effects were observed in any treatment group. Mechanistic studies determined that PRIMA-1 reactivated mtp53 and also exposed AP on the surface of tumor cells as determined by enhanced 2aG4 binding. Combination treatment led to significant induction of tumor cell apoptosis, loss of VEGF expression, as well as destruction of tumor blood vessels. Furthermore, combination treatment severely disrupted tumor blood vessel perfusion in both tumor models. The observed in vitro PRIMA-1-induced exposure of

  17. Brucella ovis PA mutants for outer membrane proteins Omp10, Omp19, SP41, and BepC are not altered in their virulence and outer membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Sidhu-Muñoz, Rebeca S; Sancho, Pilar; Vizcaíno, Nieves

    2016-04-15

    Mutants in several genes have been obtained on the genetic background of virulent rough (lacking O-polysaccharide) Brucella ovis PA. The target genes encode outer membrane proteins previously associated with the virulence of smooth (bearing O-polysaccharide chains in the lipopolysaccharide) Brucella strains. Multiple attempts to delete omp16, coding for a homologue to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins, were unsuccessful, which suggests that Omp16 is probably essential for in vitro survival of B. ovis PA. Single deletion of omp10 or omp19-that encode two other outer membrane lipoproteins--was achieved, but the simultaneous removal of both genes failed, suggesting an essential complementary function between both proteins. Two other deletion mutants, defective in the Tol-C-homologue BepC or in the SP41 adhesin, were also obtained. Surprisingly when compared to previous results obtained with smooth Brucella, none of the B. ovis mutants showed attenuation in the virulence, either in the mouse model or in cellular models of professional and non-professional phagocytes. Additionally, and in contrast to the observations reported with smooth Brucella strains, several properties related to the outer membrane remained almost unaltered. These results evidence new distinctive traits between naturally rough B. ovis and smooth brucellae. PMID:27016758

  18. Differential apoptotic and proliferative activities of wild-type FOXL2 and blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES)-associated mutant FOXL2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2014-03-01

    FOXL2 is an essential transcription factor that is required for proper development of the ovary and eyelid. Mutations in FOXL2 cause an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES). BPES type I patients have eyelid malformation and premature ovarian failure leading to infertility, whereas women with type II BPES are fertile or subfertile. In the present study, we evaluated and compared apoptotic and antiproliferative activities of wild-type (WT) and mutant FOXL2 proteins found in BPES type I and II in human granulosa cell tumor-derived KGN cells. Ectopic expression of WT FOXL2 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell cycle progression in human granulosa cells. In contrast, mutated FOXL2s found in BPES type I significantly reduced these activities, whereas mutated FOXL2s in BPES type II showed intermediate activities. Furthermore, mutant FOX L2 proteins were defective in activating transcription of target genes including Caspase 8, TNF-R1, FAS, p21, and BMP4, which regulate apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation of granulosa cells. Thus, decreased apoptotic and antiproliferative activities caused by mutant forms of FOXL2 found in BPES patients may at least partially contribute to the pathophysiology of ovarian dysfunction. PMID:24240106

  19. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  20. Identification of Atg2 and ArfGAP1 as Candidate Genetic Modifiers of the Eye Pigmentation Phenotype of Adaptor Protein-3 (AP-3) Mutants in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Imilce A.; Dell’Angelica, Esteban C.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptor Protein (AP)-3 complex is an evolutionary conserved, molecular sorting device that mediates the intracellular trafficking of proteins to lysosomes and related organelles. Genetic defects in AP-3 subunits lead to impaired biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles (LROs) such as mammalian melanosomes and insect eye pigment granules. In this work, we have performed a forward screening for genetic modifiers of AP-3 function in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Specifically, we have tested collections of large multi-gene deletions–which together covered most of the autosomal chromosomes–to identify chromosomal regions that, when deleted in single copy, enhanced or ameliorated the eye pigmentation phenotype of two independent AP-3 subunit mutants. Fine-mapping led us to define two non-overlapping, relatively small critical regions within fly chromosome 3. The first critical region included the Atg2 gene, which encodes a conserved protein involved in autophagy. Loss of one functional copy of Atg2 ameliorated the pigmentation defects of mutants in AP-3 subunits as well as in two other genes previously implicated in LRO biogenesis, namely Blos1 and lightoid, and even increased the eye pigment content of wild-type flies. The second critical region included the ArfGAP1 gene, which encodes a conserved GTPase-activating protein with specificity towards GTPases of the Arf family. Loss of a single functional copy of the ArfGAP1 gene ameliorated the pigmentation phenotype of AP-3 mutants but did not to modify the eye pigmentation of wild-type flies or mutants in Blos1 or lightoid. Strikingly, loss of the second functional copy of the gene did not modify the phenotype of AP-3 mutants any further but elicited early lethality in males and abnormal eye morphology when combined with mutations in Blos1 and lightoid, respectively. These results provide genetic evidence for new functional links connecting the machinery for biogenesis of LROs with molecules implicated

  1. Mutants at the 2-Fold Interface of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2) Structural Proteins Suggest a Role in Viral Transcription for AAV Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Fikret; Salganik, Maxim; Resztak, Justyna; Singh, Jasbir; Bennett, Antonette; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that an amino acid substitution, Y704A, near the 2-fold interface of adeno-associated virus (AAV) was defective for transcription of the packaged genome (M. Salganik, F. Aydemir, H. J. Nam, R. McKenna, M. Agbandje-McKenna, and N. Muzyczka, J Virol 88:1071–1079, 2013, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02093-13). In this report, we have characterized the defect in 6 additional capsid mutants located in a region ∼30 Å in diameter on the surface of the AAV type 2 (AAV2) capsid near the 2-fold interface. These mutants, which are highly conserved among primate serotypes, displayed a severe defect (3 to 6 logs) in infectivity. All of the mutants accumulated significant levels of uncoated DNA in the nucleus, but none of the mutants were able to accumulate significant amounts of genomic mRNA postinfection. In addition, wild-type (wt) capsids that were bound to the conformational antibody A20, which is known to bind the capsid surface in the region of the mutants, were also defective for transcription. In all cases, the mutant virus particles, as well as the antibody-bound wild-type capsids, were able to enter the cell, travel to the nucleus, uncoat, and synthesize a second strand but were unable to transcribe their genomes. Taken together, the phenotype of these mutants provides compelling evidence that the AAV capsid plays a role in the transcription of its genome, and the mutants map this functional region on the surface of the capsid near the 2-fold interface. This appears to be the first example of a viral structural protein that is also involved in the transcription of the viral genome that it delivers to the nucleus. IMPORTANCE Many viruses package enzymes within their capsids that assist in expressing their genomes postinfection, e.g., retroviruses. A number of nonenveloped viruses, including AAV, carry proteases that are needed for capsid maturation or for capsid modification during infection. We describe here what appears to

  2. Solvent environments significantly affect the enzymatic function of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase: comparison of wild-type protein and active-site mutant D27E.

    PubMed

    Ohmae, Eiji; Miyashita, Yurina; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Kitazawa, Soichiro; Kitahara, Ryo; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the contribution of solvent environments to the enzymatic function of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the salt-, pH-, and pressure-dependence of the enzymatic function of the wild-type protein were compared with those of the active-site mutant D27E in relation to their structure and stability. The salt concentration-dependence of enzymatic activity indicated that inorganic cations bound to and inhibited the activity of wild-type DHFR at neutral pH. The BaCl2 concentration-dependence of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of the wild-type DHFR-folate binary complex showed that the cation-binding site was located adjacent to the Met20 loop. The insensitivity of the D27E mutant to univalent cations, the decreased optimal pH for its enzymatic activity, and the increased Km and Kd values for its substrate dihydrofolate suggested that the substrate-binding cleft of the mutant was slightly opened to expose the active-site side chain to the solvent. The marginally increased fluorescence intensity and decreased volume change due to unfolding of the mutant also supported this structural change or the modified cavity and hydration. Surprisingly, the enzymatic activity of the mutant increased with pressurization up to 250MPa together with negative activation volumes of -4.0 or -4.8mL/mol, depending on the solvent system, while that of the wild-type was decreased and had positive activation volumes of 6.1 or 7.7mL/mol. These results clearly indicate that the insertion of a single methylene at the active site could substantially change the enzymatic reaction mechanism of DHFR, and solvent environments play important roles in the function of this enzyme. PMID:24140567

  3. TARGETING THE ONCOGENIC MUC1-C PROTEIN INHIBITS MUTANT EGFR-MEDIATED SIGNALING AND SURVIVAL IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Akriti; Rajabi, Hasan; Jin, Caining; Tchaicha, Jeremy; Kikuchi, Eiki; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) that express the EGF receptor (EGFR) with activating mutations frequently develop resistance to EGFR kinase inhibitors. The mucin 1 (MUC1) heterodimeric protein is aberrantly overexpressed in NSCLC cells and confers a poor prognosis; however, the functional involvement of MUC1 in mutant EGFR signaling is not known. Experimental Design Targeting the oncogenic MUC1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) in NSCLC cells harboring mutant EGFR was studied for effects on signaling, growth, clonogenic survival and tumorigenicity. Results Stable silencing of MUC1-C in H1975/EGFR(L858R/T790M) cells resulted in downregulation of AKT signaling and inhibition of growth, colony formation and tumorigenicity. Similar findings were obtained when MUC1-C was silenced in gefitinib-resistant PC9GR cells expressing EGFR(delE746_A750/T790M). The results further show that expression of a MUC1-C(CQC→AQA) mutant, which blocks MUC1-C homodimerization, suppresses EGFR(T790M), AKT and MEK→ERK activation, colony formation and tumorigenicity. In concert with these results, treatment of H1975 and PC9GR cells with GO-203, a cell-penetrating peptide that blocks MUC1-C homodimerization, resulted in inhibition of EGFR, AKT and MEK→ERK signaling and in loss of survival. Combination studies of GO-203 and afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of EGFR, further demonstrate that these agents are synergistic in inhibiting growth of NSCLC cells harboring the activating EGFR(T790M) or EGFR(delE746-A750) mutants. Conclusions These findings indicate that targeting MUC1-C inhibits mutant EGFR signaling and survival, and thus represents a potential approach alone and in combination for the treatment of NSCLCs resistant to EGFR kinase inhibitors. PMID:25189483

  4. Mutations in the Schmallenberg Virus Gc Glycoprotein Facilitate Cellular Protein Synthesis Shutoff and Restore Pathogenicity of NSs Deletion Mutants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rute Maria; Caporale, Marco; Piras, Ilaria M.; Taggart, Aislynn; Seehusen, Frauke; Hahn, Kerstin; Janowicz, Anna; de Souza, William Marciel; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Shi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serial passage of viruses in cell culture has been traditionally used to attenuate virulence and identify determinants of viral pathogenesis. In a previous study, we found that a strain of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) serially passaged in tissue culture (termed SBVp32) unexpectedly displayed increased pathogenicity in suckling mice compared to wild-type SBV. In this study, we mapped the determinants of SBVp32 virulence to the viral genome M segment. SBVp32 virulence is associated with the capacity of this virus to reach high titers in the brains of experimentally infected suckling mice. We also found that the Gc glycoprotein, encoded by the M segment of SBVp32, facilitates host cell protein shutoff in vitro. Interestingly, while the M segment of SBVp32 is a virulence factor, we found that the S segment of the same virus confers by itself an attenuated phenotype to wild-type SBV, as it has lost the ability to block the innate immune system of the host. Single mutations present in the Gc glycoprotein of SBVp32 are sufficient to compensate for both the attenuated phenotype of the SBVp32 S segment and the attenuated phenotype of NSs deletion mutants. Our data also indicate that the SBVp32 M segment does not act as an interferon (IFN) antagonist. Therefore, SBV mutants can retain pathogenicity even when they are unable to fully control the production of IFN by infected cells. Overall, this study suggests that the viral glycoprotein of orthobunyaviruses can compensate, at least in part, for the function of NSs. In addition, we also provide evidence that the induction of total cellular protein shutoff by SBV is determined by multiple viral proteins, while the ability to control the production of IFN maps to the NSs protein. IMPORTANCE The identification of viral determinants of pathogenesis is key to the development of prophylactic and intervention measures. In this study, we found that the bunyavirus Gc glycoprotein is a virulence factor. Importantly, we show that

  5. Gene expression profile of zeitlupe/lov kelch protein1 T-DNA insertion mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana: Downregulation of auxin-inducible genes in hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Aya; Takase, Tomoyuki; Kitaki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Elongation of hypocotyl cells has been studied as a model for elucidating the contribution of cellular expansion to plant organ growth. ZEITLUPE (ZTL) or LOV KELCH PROTEIN1 (LKP1) is a positive regulator of warmth-induced hypocotyl elongation under white light in Arabidopsis, although the molecular mechanisms by which it promotes hypocotyl cell elongation remain unknown. Microarray analysis showed that 134 genes were upregulated and 204 genes including 15 auxin-inducible genes were downregulated in the seedlings of 2 ztl T-DNA insertion mutants grown under warm conditions with continuous white light. Application of a polar auxin transport inhibitor, an auxin antagonist or an auxin biosynthesis inhibitor inhibited hypocotyl elongation of control seedlings to the level observed with the ztl mutant. Our data suggest the involvement of auxin and auxin-inducible genes in ZTL-mediated hypocotyl elongation. PMID:26237185

  6. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na(+) is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na(+) on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na(+) mediated stomatal opening than K(+) mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K(+)-mediated but not Na(+)-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na(+) on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  7. The effect of NaCl on stomatal opening in Arabidopsis wild type and agb1 heterotrimeric G-protein mutant plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity is a major agricultural problem that affects crop yield. Na+ is transported to the shoot through the transpiration stream. The mutant of the sole Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein β subunit, agb1, is hypersensitive to salinity in part due to a higher transpiration rate. Here, we investigated the direct effect of Na+ on stomatal opening using detached epidermal peels of wild type and agb1 plants. In both genotypes, NaCl is equally as effective as KCl in mediating stomatal opening at the concentrations tested. In both genotypes, ABA is less effective in inhibiting Na+ mediated stomatal opening than K+ mediated stomatal opening. The agb1 mutant is hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of K+-mediated but not Na+-mediated stomatal opening. These results suggest that the greater transpiration observed in agb1 plants grown in saline conditions is likely not mediated by differential genotypic direct effects of Na+ on stomatal apertures. PMID:26431457

  8. B-cell proliferation and induction of early G1-regulating proteins by Epstein-Barr virus mutants conditional for EBNA2.

    PubMed

    Kempkes, B; Spitkovsky, D; Jansen-Dürr, P; Ellwart, J W; Kremmer, E; Delecluse, H J; Rottenberger, C; Bornkamm, G W; Hammerschmidt, W

    1995-01-01

    Infection of primary B-lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) leads to growth transformation of these B-cells in vitro. EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), one of the first genes expressed after EBV infection of B-cells, is a transcriptional activator of viral and cellular genes and is essential for the transforming potential of the virus. We generated conditional EBV mutants by expressing EBNA2 as chimeric fusion protein with the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor on the genetic background of the virus. Growth transformation of primary normal B-cells by mutant virus resulted in estrogen-dependent lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing the chimeric EBNA2 protein. In the absence of estrogen about half of the cells enter a quiescent non-proliferative state whereas the others die by apoptosis. EBNA2 is thus required not only for initiation but also for maintenance of transformation. Growth arrest occurred at G1 and G2 stages of the cell cycle, indicating that functional EBNA2 is required at different restriction points of the cell cycle. Growth arrest is reversible for G1/G0 cells as indicated by the sequential accumulation and modification of cell cycle regulating proteins. EBV induces the same cell cycle regulating proteins as polyclonal stimuli in primary B-cells. These data suggest that EBV is using a common pathway for B-cell activation bypassing the requirement for antigen, T-cell signals and growth factors. PMID:7828599

  9. Physicochemical origin of high correlation between thermal stability of a protein and its packing efficiency: a theoretical study for staphylococcal nuclease mutants

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Koji; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    There is an empirical rule that the thermal stability of a protein is related to the packing efficiency or core volume of the folded state and the protein tends to exhibit higher stability as the backbone and side chains are more closely packed. Previously, the wild type and its nine mutants of staphylococcal nuclease were compared by examining their folded structures. The results obtained were as follows: The stability was not correlated with the number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, intramolecular electrostatic interaction energy, or degree of burial of the hydrophobic surface; though the empirical rule mentioned above held, it was not the proximate cause of higher stability; and the number of van der Waals contacts NvdW, or equivalently, the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy was an important factor governing the stability. Here we revisit the wild type and its nine mutants of staphylococcal nuclease using our statistical-mechanical theory for hydration of a protein. A molecular model is employed for water. We show that the pivotal factor is the magnitude of the water-entropy gain upon folding. The gain originates from an increase in the total volume available to the translational displacement of water molecules coexisting with the protein in the system. The magnitude is highly correlated with the denaturation temperature Tm. Moreover, the apparent correlation between NvdW and Tm as well as the empirical rule is interpretable (i.e., their physicochemical meanings can be clarified) on the basis of the water-entropy effect. PMID:27493849

  10. Whole genome sequencing of phage resistant Bacillus anthracis mutants reveals an essential role for cell surface anchoring protein CsaB in phage AP50c adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spontaneous Bacillus anthracis mutants resistant to infection by phage AP50c (AP50R) exhibit a mucoid colony phenotype and secrete an extracellular matrix. Methods Here we utilized a Roche/454-based whole genome sequencing approach to identify mutations that are candidates for conferring AP50c phage resistance, followed by genetic deletion and complementation studies to validate the whole genome sequence data and demonstrate that the implicated gene is necessary for AP50c phage infection. Results Using whole genome sequence data, we mapped the relevant mutations in six AP50R strains to csaB. Eleven additional spontaneous mutants, isolated in two different genetic backgrounds, were screened by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing of the csaB gene. In each spontaneous mutant, we found either a non-synonymous substitution, a nonsense mutation, or a frame-shift mutation caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms or a 5 base pair insertion in csaB. All together, 5 and 12 of the 17 spontaneous mutations are predicted to yield altered full length and truncated CsaB proteins respectively. As expected from these results, a targeted deletion or frame-shift mutations introduced into csaB in a different genetic background, in a strain not exposed to AP50c, resulted in a phage resistant phenotype. Also, substitution of a highly conserved histidine residue with an alanine residue (H270A) in CsaB resulted in phage resistance, suggesting that a functional CsaB is necessary for phage sensitivity. Conversely, introduction of the wild type allele of csaB in cis into the csaB deletion mutant by homologous recombination or supplying the wild type CsaB protein in trans from a plasmid restored phage sensitivity. The csaB mutants accumulated cell wall material and appeared to have a defective S-layer, whereas these phenotypes were reverted in the complemented strains. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest an essential role for csaB in AP50c phage infection, most likely in

  11. Comparison of the effect of recombinant bovine wild and mutant lipopolysaccharide-binding protein in lipopolysaccharide-challenged bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Lian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jie; Wang, Genlin

    2016-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) plays a crucial role in the recognition of bacterial components, such as LPS that causes an immune response. The aim of this study was to compare the different effects of recombinant bovine wild LBP and mutant LBP (67 Ala → Thr) on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). When BMECs were treated with various concentrations of recombinant bovine lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (RBLBP) (1, 5, 10, and 15 μg/mL) for 12 h, RBLBP of 5 μg/mL increased the apoptosis of BMECs induced by LPS without cytotoxicity, and mutant LBP resulted in a higher cell apoptosis than wild LBP did. By gene-chip microarray and bioinformatics, the data identified 2306 differentially expressed genes that were changed significantly between the LPS-induced inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of mutant LBP and the BMECs only treated with 10 μg/mL of LPS (fold change ≥2). Meanwhile, 1585 genes were differently expressed between the inflamed BMECs treated with 5 μg/mL of wild LBP and 10 μg/mL of LPS-treated BMECs. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses showed that these differentially expressed genes were involved in different pathways that regulate the inflammation response. It predicted that carriers of this mutation increase the risk for a more severe inflammatory response. Our study provides an overview of the gene expression profile between wild LBP and mutant LBP on the LPS-induced inflammatory response of BMECs, which will lead to further understanding of the potential effects of LBP mutations on bovine mammary glands. PMID:26813383

  12. Distinct functions of the 90 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) in oestrogen and mineralocorticosteroid receptor activity: effects of hsp90 deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Binart, N; Lombès, M; Baulieu, E E

    1995-11-01

    Recent studies have confirmed that the 90 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp90) interacts both in vitro and in vivo with steroid receptors, encouraging further detailed physicochemical and functional analysis of its chaperone role. Thus, to explore the relationship between hsp90 and receptors, the baculovirus system was used to overexpress the chick hsp90 alpha (chsp90) along with the chick oestradiol receptor (cER) or the human mineralocorticosteroid receptor (hMR). These receptors were able to form 9 S complexes with chsp90, demonstrating the association of the co-expressed recombinant proteins. Three mutants of chsp90 (delta A, delta B and delta Z) have been created by deletion of the A (residues 221-290) and B (530-581) regions, rich in charged amino acids, and the Z (392-419) region, a putative leucine zipper. After co-expression, anti-receptor antibodies immunoprecipitated the cER or hMR complexed with the wild-type chsp90, the delta B or the delta Z mutant, but not with the delta A chsp90, indicating that deletion of the A region of chsp90 leads to a lack of interaction with these receptors. The hormone binding capacity of the cER was unaffected after its co-expression with each of the three mutants. In contrast, the hMR co-expressed with the delta B mutant failed to bind aldosterone, a finding confirmed in vivo by the absence of hormone-induced hMR nuclear translocation. Thus the B region is required for high-affinity ligand binding by the hMR. Our results suggest that the A region (but not the B or Z regions) is involved in binding of chsp90 to the cER and hMR, while the B region is essential for hormone binding by the hMR, consistent with a chaperone function for hsp90. PMID:7487934

  13. Heterologous expression in Escherichia coli of native and mutant forms of the major intrinsic protein of rat eye lens (MIP26).

    PubMed Central

    Dilsiz, N; Crabbe, M J

    1995-01-01

    The complete cDNA of rat eye lens major intrinsic protein (MIP26) was sequenced using the dideoxy chain termination method. The sequence displayed 89% nucleotide identity and 95% identity at the amino acid level with bovine MIP26 [Gorin, Yancey, Cline, Revel and Horwitz (1984) Cell, 39, 49-54]. Both native and mutant cDNAs coding for rat MIP26 were amplified by PCR and subcloned into the pPOW expression vector for expression of Escherichia coli. A membrane signal peptide (PelB) was used for secretion of MIP26 into the cytoplasmic membrane. A hydrophilic octapeptide tail (FLAG) was fused to either the N- or C-terminus of MIP26 to aid monoclonal antibody-mediated identification and purification. Heterologously expressed MIP26 was identified by using a monoclonal antibody corresponding to the FLAG peptide located at the termini of MIP26. Immunofluorescently labelled monoclonal antibody was used to determine the localization of MIP26 in the cytoplasmic membrane. The majority of the protein was integrated into cell plasma membrane. MIP26 was extracted with n-octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside and then purified on an affinity gel column. Rat MIP26 cDNA contains an -Asn-Gly- sequence at the C-terminus, which has been shown in other proteins to be particularly susceptible to spontaneous deamidation [Takemoto and Emmons (1991) Curr. Eye Res. 10, 863-869]. We therefore modified the MIP26 molecule using a site-directed mutagenesis method to generate a mutant MIP26 at the appropriate asparagine residue (Asn244-->Asp) near the C-terminus. The mutation was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The mutant MIP26 protein was also expressed in E. coli and incorporated predominantly into the cytoplasmic membrane. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7848273

  14. Use of adhesion-defective mutants of Staphylococcus aureus to define the role of specific plasma proteins in promoting bacterial adhesion to canine arteriovenous shunts.

    PubMed Central

    Vaudaux, P E; François, P; Proctor, R A; McDevitt, D; Foster, T J; Albrecht, R M; Lew, D P; Wabers, H; Cooper, S L

    1995-01-01

    We used an ex vivo canine arteriovenous shunt model, previously developed to study plasma protein adsorption and thrombogenesis on polymeric biomaterials, to define the role of host proteins in promoting adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus. Either polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride tubings were exposed to canine blood for 5, 15, or 60 min at a flow rate of 300 ml/min and then were flushed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), cut into 1.5-cm segments, and stored at -70 degrees C. After thawing, each segment was preincubated in 0.5% albumin in PBS to prevent nonspecific staphylococcal attachment to surfaces that were not exposed to blood. Each segment was then incubated with 4 x 10(6) CFU of [3H]thymidine-labelled S. aureus per ml for 60 min at 37 degrees C in an in vitro adhesion assay. Two site-specific mutants of S. aureus were tested: one specifically defective in adhesion to surface-bound fibronectin (FnAd-def) and the other defective in adhesion to fibrinogen (FgAD-def) [corrected]. Compared with their respective parental strains, the FgAd-def, but not the FnAd-def, mutant of S. aureus showed a strong (> 80%) decrease in attachment to ex vivo tubings. The adhesion of each strain of S. aureus onto polyethylene was consistently more than twofold higher than the adhesion onto polyvinyl chloride segments exposed to flowing blood for 5 or 15 min, but adhesion became similar to that on polyvinyl chloride after 60 min of exposure. In conclusion, the specific adhesion-defective mutants of S. aureus suggested that fibrinogen was the most active adhesion-promoting protein in a short-term blood-material interaction. The experimental approach described in this study should prove useful for screening materials thought to be resistant to protein-mediated staphylococcal adhesion and colonization. PMID:7822026

  15. DNMT3A R882 mutants interact with polycomb proteins to block haematopoietic stem and leukaemic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koya, Junji; Kataoka, Keisuke; Sato, Tomohiko; Bando, Masashige; Kato, Yuki; Tsuruta-Kishino, Takako; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Narukawa, Kensuke; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the clinical impact of DNMT3A mutation on acute myeloid leukaemia, the molecular mechanisms regarding how this mutation causes leukaemogenesis in vivo are largely unknown. Here we show that, in murine transplantation experiments, recipients transplanted with DNMT3A mutant-transduced cells exhibit aberrant haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) accumulation. Differentiation-associated genes are downregulated without accompanying changes in methylation status of their promoter-associated CpG islands in DNMT3A mutant-transduced stem/progenitor cells, representing a DNA methylation-independent role of mutated DNMT3A. DNMT3A R882H also promotes monoblastic transformation in vitro in combination with HOXA9. Molecularly, the DNMT3A mutant interacts with polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), causing transcriptional silencing, revealing a DNA methylation-independent role of DNMT3A mutation. Suppression of PRC1 impairs aberrant HSC accumulation and monoblastic transformation. From our data, it is shown that DNMT3A mutants can block the differentiation of HSCs and leukaemic cells via PRC1. This interaction could be targetable in DNMT3A-mutated leukaemias. PMID:27010239

  16. A Screen for Dominant Negative Mutants of SEC18 Reveals a Role for the AAA Protein Consensus Sequence in ATP Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Gregor J.; Harley, Carol; Boyd, Alan; Morgan, Alan

    2000-01-01

    An evolutionarily ancient mechanism is used for intracellular membrane fusion events ranging from endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi traffic in yeast to synaptic vesicle exocytosis in the human brain. At the heart of this mechanism is the core complex of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF), soluble NSF attachment proteins (SNAPs), and SNAP receptors (SNAREs). Although these proteins are accepted as key players in vesicular traffic, their molecular mechanisms of action remain unclear. To illuminate important structure–function relationships in NSF, a screen for dominant negative mutants of yeast NSF (Sec18p) was undertaken. This involved random mutagenesis of a GAL1-regulated SEC18 yeast expression plasmid. Several dominant negative alleles were identified on the basis of galactose-inducible growth arrest, of which one, sec18-109, was characterized in detail. The sec18-109 phenotype (abnormal membrane trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway, accumulation of a membranous tubular network, growth suppression, increased cell density) is due to a single A-G substitution in SEC18 resulting in a missense mutation in Sec18p (Thr394→Pro). Thr394 is conserved in most AAA proteins and indeed forms part of the minimal AAA consensus sequence that serves as a signature of this large protein family. Analysis of recombinant Sec18-109p indicates that the mutation does not prevent hexamerization or interaction with yeast α-SNAP (Sec17p), but instead results in undetectable ATPase activity that cannot be stimulated by Sec17p. This suggests a role for the AAA protein consensus sequence in regulating ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, this approach of screening for dominant negative mutants in yeast can be applied to other conserved proteins so as to highlight important functional domains in their mammalian counterparts. PMID:10749934

  17. Involvement of the Eukaryote-Like Kinase-Phosphatase System and a Protein That Interacts with Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 in Emergence of Cephalosporin Resistance in Cephalosporin-Sensitive Class A Penicillin-Binding Protein Mutants in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Desbonnet, Charlene; Tait-Kamradt, Amelia; Garcia-Solache, Monica; Dunman, Paul; Coleman, Jeffrey; Arthur, Michel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intrinsic resistance of Enterococcus faecium to ceftriaxone and cefepime (here referred to as “cephalosporins”) is reliant on the presence of class A penicillin-binding proteins (Pbps) PbpF and PonA. Mutants lacking these Pbps exhibit cephalosporin susceptibility that is reversible by exposure to penicillin and by selection on cephalosporin-containing medium. We selected two cephalosporin-resistant mutants (Cro1 and Cro2) of class A Pbp-deficient E. faecium CV598. Genome analysis revealed changes in the serine-threonine kinase Stk in Cro1 and a truncation in the associated phosphatase StpA in Cro2 whose respective involvements in resistance were confirmed in separate complementation experiments. In an additional effort to identify proteins linked to cephalosporin resistance, we performed tandem affinity purification using Pbp5 as bait in penicillin-exposed E. faecium; these experiments yielded a protein designated Pbp5-associated protein (P5AP). Transcription of the P5AP gene was increased after exposure to penicillin in wild-type strains and in Cro2 and suppressed in Cro2 complemented with the wild-type stpA. Transformation of class A Pbp-deficient strains with the plasmid-carried P5AP gene conferred cephalosporin resistance. These data suggest that Pbp5-associated cephalosporin resistance in E. faecium devoid of typical class A Pbps is related to the presence of P5AP, whose expression is influenced by the activity of the serine-threonine phosphatase/kinase system. PMID:27048803

  18. [The accumulation of proteins with chitinase activity in the culture media of the parent and mutant Serratia marcescens strain grown in the presence of mitomycin C].

    PubMed

    Iusupova, D V; Petukhova, E V; Sokolova, R B; Gabdrakhmanova, L A

    2002-01-01

    The study of the accumulation pattern of extracellular proteins with chitinase activity in the parent Serratia marcescens strain Bú 211 (ATCC 9986) grown in the presence of mitomycin C and its mutant strain with the constitutive synthesis of chitinases grown in the absence of the inducer showed that chitinase activity appeared in the culture liquids of both strains at the end of the exponential phase (4 h of growth) and reached a maximum in the stationary phase (18-20 h of growth). The analysis of the culture liquids (12 h of growth) by denaturing electrophoresis in PAAG followed by the protein renaturation step revealed the presence of four extracellular proteins with chitinase activity and molecular masses of 21, 38, 52, and 58 kDa. PMID:12449629

  19. Expression and characterization of EF-hand I loop mutants of aequorin replaced with other loop sequences of Ca2+-binding proteins: an approach to studying the EF-hand motif of proteins.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Satoshi; Sahara-Miura, Yuiko

    2016-07-01

    The binding properties of Ca(2+) to EF-hand I of aequorin (AQ) were characterized by replacing the loop sequence of EF-hand I (AQ[I]) with other known loop sequences of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including photoproteins (aequorin, clytin-I, clytin-II and mitrocomin), Renilla luciferin-binding protein (RLBP) and calmodulin (CaM). For evaluation of the binding affinity of Ca(2+) to AQ[I] mutants, the half-decay time of the maximum intensity in the luminescence reaction triggered by Ca(2+) was used as an indicator and 22 kinds of AQ[I] mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli cells. AQ[I] mutants replaced with the EF-hand I and EF-hand III from photoproteins showed sufficient luminescence activity, but it was not shown by other EF-hands from RLBP and CaM. An AQ[I] mutant with a lysine or arginine residue at the second position of the non-conserved amino acid residue showed a slow-decay pattern of luminescence, indicating that the Ca(2+)-binding affinity to aequorin was reduced by a positive charge at the second position of the loop sequence. The specific loop sequence of the EF-hand I motif in aequorin caused the specific Ca(2+)-triggered luminescence pattern. PMID:26896488

  20. A Truncated NLR Protein, TIR-NBS2, Is Required for Activated Defense Responses in the exo70B1 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Marc T.; Vogel, John P.; Liu, Na; Liu, Simu; Zhao, Yaofei; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Tang, Dingzhong

    2015-01-01

    During exocytosis, the evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex tethers Golgi-derived vesicles to the target plasma membrane, a critical function for secretory pathways. Here we show that exo70B1 loss-of-function mutants express activated defense responses upon infection and express enhanced resistance to fungal, oomycete and bacterial pathogens. In a screen for mutants that suppress exo70B1 resistance, we identified nine alleles of TIR-NBS2 (TN2), suggesting that loss-of-function of EXO70B1 leads to activation of this nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR)-like disease resistance protein. This NLR-like protein is atypical because it lacks the LRR domain common in typical NLR receptors. In addition, we show that TN2 interacts with EXO70B1 in yeast and in planta. Our study thus provides a link between the exocyst complex and the function of a ‘TIR-NBS only’ immune receptor like protein. Our data are consistent with a speculative model wherein pathogen effectors could evolve to target EXO70B1 to manipulate plant secretion machinery. TN2 could monitor EXO70B1 integrity as part of an immune receptor complex. PMID:25617755

  1. Spermine Binding to Parkinson’s Protein α-Synuclein and its Disease-Related A30P and A53T Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Grabenauer, Megan; Bernstein, Summer L.; Lee, Jennifer C.; Wyttenbach, Thomas; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn), a protein implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD), is believed to progress through the formation of a partially folded intermediate. Using nano-electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry combined with ion mobility measurements we found evidence for a highly compact partially folded family of structures for α-syn and its disease-related A53T mutant with net charges of −6, −7 and −8. For the other early-onset PD mutant, A30P, this highly compact population was only evident when the protein had a net charge of −6. When bound to spermine near physiologic pH, all three proteins underwent a charge reduction from the favored solution charge state of −10 to a net charge of −6. This charge reduction is accompanied by a dramatic size reduction of about a factor of two (cross section of 2600Å2 (−10 charge state) down to 1430Å2 (−6 charge state)). We conclude that spermine increases the aggregation rate of α-syn by inducing a collapsed conformation, which then proceeds to form aggregates. PMID:18693700

  2. A porcine circovirus-2 mutant isolated in Brazil contains low-frequency substitutions in regions of immunoprotective epitopes in the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rafael Locatelli; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; Gonzaga, Natalia F; de Souza, Luiz F L; Polêto, Marcelo D; Onofre, Thiago Souza; Eller, Monique R; Pereira, Carlos Eduardo Real; Fietto, Juliana L R; Bressan, Gustavo C; Guedes, Roberto M C; Almeida, Márcia R; Silva Júnior, Abelardo

    2015-11-01

    Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV2) is the etiologic agent of several diseases in pigs, including multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). In this work, a new mutant PCV2b was isolated from PMWS-affected pigs on a Brazilian farm. Its genome showed high sequence similarity (>99% identity) to those from a group of emerging mutants isolated from cases of PMWS outbreaks in vaccinated pigs in China, the USA and South Korea. Here, we show that these isolates share a combination of low-frequency substitutions (single amino acid polymorphisms with a frequency of ≤25%) in the viral capsid protein, mainly in regions of immunoprotective epitopes, and an additional lysine residue at position 234. These isolates were phylogenetically grouped in the PCV2b clade, reinforcing the idea of the emergence of a new group of mutants PCV2b associated with outbreaks worldwide. The identification of these polymorphisms in the viral capsid highlights the importance of considering these isolates for the development of more-effective vaccines. PMID:26271152

  3. Characterization of a Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 double mutant lacking the CyanoP and Ycf48 proteins of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Simon A; Eaton-Rye, Julian J

    2015-05-01

    Homologs of the Photosystem II (PS II) subunit PsbP are found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. In higher plants, PsbP is associated with mature PS II centers, but in cyanobacteria, the homologous CyanoP protein appears sub-stoichiometric to PS II. We have investigated the role of CyanoP by characterizing knockout mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Removal of CyanoP resulted in changes to phycobilisome coupling and energy transfer to PS II, but the function of PS II itself remained similar to wild type. We therefore investigated the hypothesis that CyanoP is involved in the biogenesis or repair of PS II by creating a double mutant lacking both CyanoP and the PS II assembly factor Ycf48. This strain exhibited an additive reduction in the amplitude of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence induction relative to either of the single mutants but displayed increased oxygen evolution, slight increases in PS II monomer and dimer levels, and a reduction in accumulation of an early PS II assembly complex containing CP47, compared to the ΔYcf48 strain. PMID:25800516

  4. Rescuing Trafficking Mutants of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein, ABCA4, with Small Molecule Correctors as a Treatment for Stargardt Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Sabirzhanova, Inna; Lopes Pacheco, Miquéias; Rapino, Daniele; Grover, Rahul; Handa, James T; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Liudmila

    2015-08-01

    Stargardt disease is the most common form of early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in ABCA4, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, are associated with Stargardt disease. Here, we have examined two disease-causing mutations in the NBD1 region of ABCA4, R1108C, and R1129C, which occur within regions of high similarity with CFTR, another ABC transporter gene, which is associated with cystic fibrosis. We show that R1108C and R1129C are both temperature-sensitive processing mutants that engage the cellular quality control mechanism and show a strong interaction with the chaperone Hsp 27. Both mutant proteins also interact with HDCAC6 and are degraded in the aggresome. We also demonstrate that novel corrector compounds that are being tested as treatment for cystic fibrosis, such as VX-809, can rescue the processing of the ABCA4 mutants, particularly their expression at the cell surface, and can reduce their binding to HDAC6. Thus, our data suggest that VX-809 can potentially be developed as a new therapy for Stargardt disease, for which there is currently no treatment. PMID:26092729

  5. Acyl protein thioesterase 1 and 2 (APT-1, APT-2) inhibitors palmostatin B, ML348 and ML349 have different effects on NRAS mutant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, Igor; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Vujic, Marin; Kwong, Andrew; Tsumura, Aaron; Murphy, Ryan; Moy, Adrian; Posch, Christian; Monshi, Babak; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequent in melanoma and lead to increased downstream signaling and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Since the direct inhibition of NRAS is not possible yet, modulators of NRAS posttranslational modifications have become an area of interest. Specifically, interfering with NRAS posttranslational palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle could disturb proper NRAS localization, and therefore decrease cell proliferation and downstream signaling. Here, we investigate the expression and function of NRAS depalmitoylating acyl protein thioesterases 1 and 2 (APT-1, APT-2) in a panel of NRAS mutant melanoma cells. First, we show that all melanoma cell lines examined express APT-1 and APT-2. Next, we show that siRNA mediated APT-1 and APT-2 knock down and that the specific APT-1 and -2 inhibitors ML348 and ML349 have no biologically significant effects in NRAS mutant melanoma cells. Finally, we test the dual APT-1 and APT-2 inhibitor palmostatin B and conclude that palmostatin B has effects on NRAS downstream signaling and cell viability in NRAS mutant melanoma cells, offering an interesting starting point for future studies. PMID:26771141

  6. Enhancing cellulase production by overexpression of xylanase regulator protein gene, xlnR, in Talaromyces cellulolyticus cellulase hyperproducing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Naoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    We obtained strains with the xylanase regulator gene, xlnR, overexpressed (HXlnR) and disrupted (DXlnR) derived from Talaromyces cellulolyticus strain C-1, which is a cellulase hyperproducing mutant. Filter paper degrading enzyme activity and cellobiohydrolase I gene expression was the highest in HXlnR, followed by C-1 and DXlnR. These results indicate that the enhancement of cellulase productivity was succeeded by xlnR overexpression. PMID:27309759

  7. The expression analysis of cysteine proteinase-like protein in wild-type and nm2 mutant silkworm (Lepidoptera: Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Kang, Lequn; Wang, Pingyang; Zhao, Qiaoling

    2016-07-15

    The mutant of non-molting in the 2nd instar (nm2) is a recently discovered mutant of Bombyx mori. The mutant cannot molt and exuviate and died successively in premolting of 2nd instar. In this study, two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to screen the differential expression of epidermis proteins in pre-molting larvae of 2nd instar between the wild-type and nm2 mutant. Interestingly, a cysteine proteinase-like (BmCP-like) protein in nm2 was significantly higher than that of the wild-type. The transcription profiles of BmCP-like gene were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and the result revealed that BmCP-like mRNA was remarkably higher in nm2 than that of the wild-type. The transcription level of BmCP-like was high in the epidermis while low in the midgut and hemocytes, and fluctuate with development, while the highest in the newly molted larvae of 3rd and lowest in the pre-molting of the 1st and 2nd instar. The body of injected BmCP-like RNAi of 2nd larvae formed a dark spots around the injection place. These results suggested the BmCP-like gene play a key role in the degradation of the cuticle and epidermis layer during molting of 1st and 2nd instar silkworm. Furthermore, the ORF of BmCP-like gene in nm2 was the same to the wild-type. These studies give us a hint that BmCP-like gene maybe not the major gene responsible for nm2, but BmCP-like gene might participate in the immune systems of silkworm, and the upregulation of BmCP-like transcription in the nm2 mutant might be induced by the disadvantages that limit the growth and development of silkworm in order to survive. PMID:27080953

  8. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutant HBxΔ127 promotes proliferation of hepatoma cells through up-regulating miR-215 targeting PTPRT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fabao; You, Xiaona; Chi, Xiumei; Wang, Tao; Ye, Lihong; Niu, Junqi; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Relative to wild type HBx, HBX mutant HBxΔ127 strongly enhances cell proliferation. • Relative to wild type HBx, HBxΔ127 remarkably up-regulates miR-215 in hepatoma cells. • HBxΔ127-elevated miR-215 promotes cell proliferation via targeting PTPRT mRNA. - Abstract: The mutant of virus is a frequent event. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a vital role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, the identification of potent mutant of HBx in hepatocarcinogenesis is significant. Previously, we identified a natural mutant of the HBx gene (termed HBxΔ127). Relative to wild type HBx, HBxΔ127 strongly enhanced cell proliferation and migration in HCC. In this study, we aim to explore the mechanism of HBxΔ127 in promotion of proliferation of hepatoma cells. Our data showed that both wild type HBx and HBxΔ127 could increase the expression of miR-215 in hepatoma HepG2 and H7402 cells. However, HBxΔ127 was able to significantly increase miR-215 expression relative to wild type HBx in the cells. We identified that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type T (PTPRT) was one of the target genes of miR-215 through targeting 3′UTR of PTPRT mRNA. In function, miR-215 was able to promote the proliferation of hepatoma cells. Meanwhile anti-miR-215 could partially abolish the enhancement of cell proliferation mediated by HBxΔ127 in vitro. Knockdown of PTPRT by siRNA could distinctly suppress the decrease of cell proliferation mediated by anti-miR-215 in HepG2-XΔ127/H7402-XΔ127 cells. Moreover, we found that anti-miR-215 remarkably inhibited the tumor growth of hepatoma cells in nude mice. Collectively, relative to wild type HBx, HBxΔ127 strongly enhances proliferation of hepatoma cells through up-regulating miR-215 targeting PTPRT. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of HBx mutant HBxΔ127 in promotion of proliferation of hepatoma cells.

  9. Rer1 and calnexin regulate endoplasmic reticulum retention of a peripheral myelin protein 22 mutant that causes type 1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Taichi; Hashimoto, Yukiko; Akuzawa, Tomoko; Hirai, Rika; Kobayashi, Hisae; Sato, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) resides in the plasma membrane and is required for myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. Many PMP22 mutants accumulate in excess in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lead to the inherited neuropathies of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. However, the mechanism through which PMP22 mutants accumulate in the ER is unknown. Here, we studied the quality control mechanisms for the PMP22 mutants L16P and G150D, which were originally identified in mice and patients with CMT. We found that the ER-localised ubiquitin ligase Hrd1/SYVN1 mediates ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of PMP22(L16P) and PMP22(G150D), and another ubiquitin ligase, gp78/AMFR, mediates ERAD of PMP22(G150D) as well. We also found that PMP22(L16P), but not PMP22(G150D), is partly released from the ER by loss of Rer1, which is a Golgi-localised sorting receptor for ER retrieval. Rer1 interacts with the wild-type and mutant forms of PMP22. Interestingly, release of PMP22(L16P) from the ER was more prominent with simultaneous knockdown of Rer1 and the ER-localised chaperone calnexin than with the knockdown of each gene. These results suggest that CMT disease-related PMP22(L16P) is trapped in the ER by calnexin-dependent ER retention and Rer1-mediated early Golgi retrieval systems and partly degraded by the Hrd1-mediated ERAD system. PMID:25385046

  10. Evidence for proteolytic cleavage of the 120-kilodalton outer membrane protein of rickettsiae: identification of an avirulent mutant deficient in processing.

    PubMed Central

    Hackstadt, T; Messer, R; Cieplak, W; Peacock, M G

    1992-01-01

    The 120-kDa rickettsial outer membrane protein (rOmpB) is encoded by a gene with the capacity to encode a protein of approximately 168 kDa. The carboxy-terminal end of the molecule is apparently cleaved to yield 120- and 32-kDa products. Both polypeptides are surface exposed and remain associated with the outer membrane of intact rickettsiae. All species of rickettsiae examined display similar cleavage of rOmpB. Comparison of diverse species of rickettsiae demonstrate a conserved N terminus of the 32-kDa fragment, with a predicted procaryotic secretory signal peptide immediately upstream of the proposed cleavage site. Coprecipitation of the 120-kDa rOmpB protein and the 32-kDa peptide by monoclonal antibodies specific for the 120-kDa portion of the molecule suggests that the two fragments remain noncovalently associated on the surface of rickettsiae. Analysis of an avirulent mutant of Rickettsia rickettsii revealed reduced amounts of the 120- and 32-kDa fragments, but with a correspondingly larger rOmpB protein that displayed properties expected of the putative precursor. This avirulent mutant grows intracellularly but fails to cause the lysis of infected cells that is typical of R. rickettsii. DNA sequence analysis of the region of the gene encoding the cleavage site of the avirulent strain revealed no difference from the sequence obtained from virulent R. rickettsii. The 168-kDa putative precursor of the avirulent strain of R. rickettsii was not extracted from the surface by dilute buffers, as is the 120-kDa protein of virulent R. rickettsii or R. prowazekii. These latter results suggest that the 32-kDa C-terminal region of the molecule may serve as a membrane anchor domain. Images PMID:1729180

  11. Use of a cellulase-derepressed mutant of cellulomonas in the production of a single-cell protein product from cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hitchner, E V; Leatherwood, J M

    1980-02-01

    A cellulase-derepressed mutant of a Cellulomonas species was used to produce single-cell protein from crystalline cellulose. In preliminary tests, maximum yield of single-cell protein was obtained at 30 degrees C (pH 7.0) with urea as the nitrogen source. A continuous-flow foam flotation procedure was developed for rapid and efficient separation of bacteria from the culture liquid and cellulose residue. A pH of 4.5 was optimum for foam flotation of this organism. In preliminary trials, recovery was 85% of the cells with the flotation procedure. Cellulomonas was 68% true protein and had an essential amino acid profile featuring a high lysine content (6.5% of protein). The Cellulomonas product was evaluated nutritionally with weanling rats. The net protein utilization value for the protein supplemented with methionine was 50.4% Weight gain of rats on the Cellulomonas diet was similar to that of rats fed a casein diet. PMID:16345511

  12. Characterization of three putative Lon proteases of Thermus thermophilus HB27 and use of their defective mutants as hosts for production of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Tomoko; Hoshino, Takayuki; Nakamura, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In the genome of a thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB27, three genes, TTC0418, TTC0746 and TTC1975, were annotated as ATP-dependent protease La (Lon). Sequence comparisons indicated that TTC0418 and TTC0746 showed significant similarities to bacterial LonA-type proteases, such as Escherichia coli Lon protease, especially in regions corresponding to domains for ATP-binding and hydrolysis, and for proteolysis, but TTC1975 exhibited a similarity only at the C-terminal proteolytic domain. The enzymatic analyses, using purified recombinant proteins produced by E. coli, revealed that TTC0418 and TTC0746 exhibited peptidase and protease activities against two synthetic peptides and casein, respectively, in an ATP-dependent manner, and at the same time, both the enzymes had significant ATPase activities in the presence of substrates. On the other hand, TTC1975 possessed a protease activity against casein, but addition of ATP did not enhance this activity. Moreover, a T. thermophilus mutant deficient in both TTC0418 and TTC0746 showed a similar growth characteristic to an E. coli lon mutant, i.e., a growth defect lag after a nutritional downshift. These results indicate that TTC0418 and TTC0746 are actually members of bacterial LonA-type proteases with different substrate specificities, whereas TTC1975 should not be classified as a Lon protease. Finally, the effects of mutations deficient in these proteases were assessed on production of several heterologous gene products from Pyrococcus horikoshii and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. It was shown that TTC0746 mutation was more effective in improving production than the other two mutations, especially for production of P. horikoshii alpha-mannosidase and G. stearothermophilus alpha-amylase, indicating that the TTC0746 mutant of T. thermophilus HB27 may be useful for production of heterologous proteins from thermophiles and hyperthermophiles. PMID:18157502

  13. The cross-road between the mechanisms of protein folding and aggregation; study of human stefin B and its H75W mutant.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Aida; Berbić, Selma; Žerovnik, Eva

    2011-11-18

    The role of the aromatic residue at site 75 to protein stability, the mechanism of folding and the mechanism of amyloid-fibril formation were investigated for the human stefin B variant (bearing Y at site 31) and its point mutation H75W. With an aim to reveal the conformation at the cross-road between folding and aggregation, first, the kinetics of folding and oligomer formation by human stefin B(Y31) variant were studied. It was found to fold in three kinetic phases at pH 4.8 and 10% TFE; the pH and solvent conditions that transform the protein into amyloid fibrils at longer times. The same pH leads to the formation of native-like intermediate (known from previous studies of this variant), meaning that the process of folding and amyloid-fibril formation share the same structural intermediate, which is in this case native-like and dimeric. At pH 5.8 and 7.0 stefin B folded to the native state in four kinetic phases over two intermediates. In distinction, the mutant H75W did not fold to completion, ending in intermediate states at all pH values studied: 4.8, 5.8 and 7.0. At pH 4.8 and 5.8, the mutant folded in one kinetic phase to the intermediate of the "molten globule" type, which leads to the conclusion that its mechanism of folding differs from the one of the parent stefin B at the same pH. At pH 7.0 the mutant H75W folded in three kinetic phases to a native-like intermediate, analogous to folding of stefin B at pH 4.8. PMID:22033403

  14. Large scale comparative proteomics of a chloroplast Clp protease mutant reveals folding stress, altered protein homeostasis, and feedback regulation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zybailov, Boris; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Rodríguez, Verenice Ramírez; Asakura, Yukari; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2009-08-01

    The clpr2-1 mutant is delayed in development due to reduction of the chloroplast ClpPR protease complex. To understand the role of Clp proteases in plastid biogenesis and homeostasis, leaf proteomes of young seedlings of clpr2-1 and wild type were compared using large scale mass spectrometry-based quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap and spectral counting with significance determined by G-tests. Virtually only chloroplast-localized proteins were significantly affected, indicating that the molecular phenotype was confined to the chloroplast. A comparative chloroplast stromal proteome analysis of fully developed plants was used to complement the data set. Chloroplast unfoldase ClpB3 was strongly up-regulated in both young and mature leaves, suggesting widespread and persistent protein folding stress. The importance of ClpB3 in the clp2-1 mutant was demonstrated by the observation that a CLPR2 and CLPB3 double mutant was seedling-lethal. The observed up-regulation of chloroplast chaperones and protein sorting components further illustrated destabilization of protein homeostasis. Delayed rRNA processing and up-regulation of a chloroplast DEAD box RNA helicase and polynucleotide phosphorylase, but no significant change in accumulation of ribosomal subunits, suggested a bottleneck in ribosome assembly or RNA metabolism. Strong up-regulation of a chloroplast translational regulator TypA/BipA GTPase suggested a specific response in plastid gene expression to the distorted homeostasis. The stromal proteases PreP1,2 were up-regulated, likely constituting compensation for reduced Clp protease activity and possibly shared substrates between the ClpP and PreP protease systems. The thylakoid photosynthetic apparatus was decreased in the seedlings, whereas several structural thylakoid-associated plastoglobular proteins were strongly up-regulated. Two thylakoid-associated reductases involved in isoprenoid and chlorophyll synthesis were up-regulated reflecting feedback from rate

  15. Large Scale Comparative Proteomics of a Chloroplast Clp Protease Mutant Reveals Folding Stress, Altered Protein Homeostasis, and Feedback Regulation of Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Zybailov, Boris; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Rodríguez, Verenice Ramírez; Asakura, Yukari; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The clpr2-1 mutant is delayed in development due to reduction of the chloroplast ClpPR protease complex. To understand the role of Clp proteases in plastid biogenesis and homeostasis, leaf proteomes of young seedlings of clpr2-1 and wild type were compared using large scale mass spectrometry-based quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap and spectral counting with significance determined by G-tests. Virtually only chloroplast-localized proteins were significantly affected, indicating that the molecular phenotype was confined to the chloroplast. A comparative chloroplast stromal proteome analysis of fully developed plants was used to complement the data set. Chloroplast unfoldase ClpB3 was strongly up-regulated in both young and mature leaves, suggesting widespread and persistent protein folding stress. The importance of ClpB3 in the clp2-1 mutant was demonstrated by the observation that a CLPR2 and CLPB3 double mutant was seedling-lethal. The observed up-regulation of chloroplast chaperones and protein sorting components further illustrated destabilization of protein homeostasis. Delayed rRNA processing and up-regulation of a chloroplast DEAD box RNA helicase and polynucleotide phosphorylase, but no significant change in accumulation of ribosomal subunits, suggested a bottleneck in ribosome assembly or RNA metabolism. Strong up-regulation of a chloroplast translational regulator TypA/BipA GTPase suggested a specific response in plastid gene expression to the distorted homeostasis. The stromal proteases PreP1,2 were up-regulated, likely constituting compensation for reduced Clp protease activity and possibly shared substrates between the ClpP and PreP protease systems. The thylakoid photosynthetic apparatus was decreased in the seedlings, whereas several structural thylakoid-associated plastoglobular proteins were strongly up-regulated. Two thylakoid-associated reductases involved in isoprenoid and chlorophyll synthesis were up-regulated reflecting feedback from rate

  16. Stoichiometric complex formation by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and its interacting protein: purification and crystallization of the DNA polymerase and PCNA monomer mutant complex from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Matsumiya, Shigeki; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2006-03-01

    A stable stoichiometric complex of archaeal DNA polymerase with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was formed using a PCNA monomer mutant and the complex was successfully crystallized. Replicative DNA polymerase interacts with processivity factors, the β-subunit of DNA polymerase III or proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in order to function with a long template DNA. The archaeal replicative DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus furiosus interacts with PCNA via its PCNA-interacting protein (PIP) motif at the C-terminus. The PCNA homotrimeric ring contains one PIP interacting site on each monomer and since the ring can accommodate up to three molecules simultaneously, formation of a stable stoichiometric complex of PCNA with its interacting protein has been difficult to control in vitro. A stable complex of the DNA polymerase with PCNA, using a PCNA monomer mutant, has been purified and crystallized. The best ordered crystal diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 225.3, b = 123.3, c = 91.3 Å.

  17. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  18. Mutations in Ribosomal Proteins, RPL4 and RACK1, Suppress the Phenotype of a Thermospermine-Deficient Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kakehi, Jun-Ichi; Kawano, Eri; Yoshimoto, Kaori; Cai, Qingqing; Imai, Akihiro; Takahashi, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Thermospermine acts in negative regulation of xylem differentiation and its deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, acaulis5 (acl5), shows excessive xylem formation and severe dwarfism. Studies of two dominant suppressors of acl5, sac51-d and sac52-d, have revealed that SAC51 and SAC52 encode a transcription factor and a ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10), respectively, and these mutations enhance translation of the SAC51 mRNA, which contains conserved upstream open reading frames in the 5’ leader. Here we report identification of SAC53 and SAC56 responsible for additional suppressors of acl5. sac53-d is a semi-dominant allele of the gene encoding a receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) homolog, a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. sac56-d represents a semi-dominant allele of the gene for RPL4. We show that the GUS reporter activity driven by the CaMV 35S promoter plus the SAC51 5’ leader is reduced in acl5 and restored by sac52-d, sac53-d, and sac56-d as well as thermospermine. Furthermore, the SAC51 mRNA, which may be a target of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, was found to be stabilized in these ribosomal mutants and by thermospermine. These ribosomal proteins are suggested to act in the control of uORF-mediated translation repression of SAC51, which is derepressed by thermospermine. PMID:25625317

  19. Role of xanthophylls in light harvesting in green plants: a spectroscopic investigation of mutant LHCII and Lhcb pigment-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Fuciman, Marcel; Enriquez, Miriam M; Polívka, Tomáš; Dall'Osto, Luca; Bassi, Roberto; Frank, Harry A

    2012-03-29

    The spectroscopic properties and energy transfer dynamics of the protein-bound chlorophylls and xanthophylls in monomeric, major LHCII complexes, and minor Lhcb complexes from genetically altered Arabidopsis thaliana plants have been investigated using both steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The pigment-protein complexes that were studied contain Chl a, Chl b, and variable amounts of the xanthophylls, zeaxanthin (Z), violaxanthin (V), neoxanthin (N), and lutein (L). The complexes were derived from mutants of plants denoted npq1 (NVL), npq2lut2 (Z), aba4npq1lut2 (V), aba4npq1 (VL), npq1lut2 (NV), and npq2 (LZ). The data reveal specific singlet energy transfer routes and excited state spectra and dynamics that depend on the xanthophyll present in the complex. PMID:22372667

  20. Impaired chromosome partitioning and synchronization of DNA replication initiation in an insertional mutant in the Vibrio harveyi cgtA gene coding for a common GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Słomińska, Monika; Konopa, Grazyna; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Czyz, Agata

    2002-01-01

    The Vibrio harveyi cgtA gene product belongs to a subfamily of small GTP-binding proteins, called Obg-like proteins. Members of this subfamily are present in diverse organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. On the other hand, the functions of these proteins in the regulation of cellular processes are largely unknown. Genes coding for these proteins are essential in almost all bacteria investigated thus far. However, a viable V. harveyi insertional mutant in the cgtA gene was described recently. Therefore, this mutant gives a unique opportunity to study functions of a member of the subfamily of Obg-like proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mutant cells often form long filaments with expanded, non-partitioned or rarely partitioned chromosomes. Such a phenotype suggests impairment of the mechanism of chromosome partition. Flow cytometric studies revealed that synchronization of chromosome replication initiation is also significantly disturbed in the cgtA mutant. Moreover, in contrast to wild-type V. harveyi, inhibition of chromosome replication and/or of cell division in the mutant bacteria caused significant increase in the number of large cells, suggesting that the cgtA gene product may be involved in the coupling of cell growth to chromosome replication and cell division. These results indicate that CgtA, an Obg-like GTP-binding protein, plays an important role in the regulation of chromosomal functions. PMID:11879184

  1. An AXIN2 Mutant Allele Associated With Predisposition to Colorectal Neoplasia Has Context-Dependent Effects on AXIN2 Protein Function1

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Serina M.; Petty, Elizabeth M.; Stoffel, Elena M.; Fearon, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous, germline nonsense mutations in AXIN2 have been reported in two families with oligodontia and colorectal cancer (CRC) predisposition, including an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation. Somatic AXIN2 mutations predicted to generate truncated AXIN2 (trAXIN2) proteins have been reported in some CRCs. Our studies of cells from an AXIN2 1989G>A mutation carrier showed that the mutant transcripts are not significantly susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay and, thus, could encode a trAXIN2 protein. In transient transfection assays, trAXIN2 was more abundant than wild-type AXIN2 protein, and in contrast to AXIN2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition did not increase trAXIN2 levels. Like AXIN2, the trAXIN2 protein interacts with β-catenin destruction complex proteins. When ectopically overexpressed, trAXIN2 inhibits β-catenin/T-cell factor–dependent reporter gene activity and SW480 CRC cell colony formation. These findings suggest the trAXIN2 protein may retain some wild-type functions when highly expressed. However, when stably expressed in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, the trAXIN2 protein did not match AXIN2’s activity in inhibiting Wnt-mediated induction of Wnt-regulated target genes, and SW480 cells with stable expression of trAXIN2 but not AXIN2 could be generated. Our data suggest the AXIN2 1989G>A mutation may not have solely a loss-of-function role in CRC. Rather, its contribution may depend on context, with potential loss-of-function when AXIN2 levels are low, such as in the absence of Wnt pathway activation. However, given its apparent increased stability in some settings, the trAXIN2 protein might have gain-of-function in cells with substantially elevated AXIN2 expression, such as Wnt pathway–defective CRC cells. PMID:26025668

  2. Late-onset Krabbe disease is predominant in Japan and its mutant precursor protein undergoes more effective processing than the infantile-onset form.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Arif; Otomo, Takanobu; Saito, Seiji; Ohno, Kazuki; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Hamada, Yusuke; Ozono, Keiichi; Sakai, Norio

    2014-01-25

    Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive leukodystrophy caused by the deficiency of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) enzyme. It is pathologically characterized by demyelination of the central and peripheral nervous systems by accumulation of galactosylsphingosine. To date, more than 120 mutations in the GALC gene have been reported worldwide and genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported in some types of mutations. In this study, we analyzed 22 unreported Japanese patients with Krabbe disease and summarized a total of 51 Japanese patients, including 29 previously reported patients. To elucidate how GALC mutations impair enzymatic activity, multiple disease-causing mutations including common mutations and polymorphisms were investigated for enzymatic activity and precursor processing ability with transient expression system. We also performed 3-D enzyme structure analysis to determine the effect of each new mutation. Five novel mutations were detected including one deletion c.1808delT [p.L603X], one nonsense mutation c.1023C>G [p.Y341X], and three missense mutations c.209T>C [p.L70P], c.1054G>A [p.G352R], and c.1937G>C [p.G646A]. For the total of 51 patients, 59% had late-onset forms of Krabbe disease. Seven common mutations accounted for 58% of mutant alleles of patients with Krabbe disease in Japan. Infantile-onset mutations had almost no enzyme activity, while late-onset mutations had 4%-20% of normal enzyme activity. The processing rate of precursor GALC protein to mature form was slower for infantile-onset mutations. Heat stability of the mutant proteins revealed that p.G270D was more stable compared to the other mutations. The constructed 3D-model showed that the residues for Krabbe mutations were less solvent-accessible and located in the core region of GALC protein. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the most common phenotype in Japan is the late-onset type, that the enzyme activity for GALC mutants is correlated with mutational severity, and

  3. A novel mutant 10Ala/Arg together with mutant 144Ser/Arg of hepatitis B virus X protein involved in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocarcinogenesis in HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying; Wang, Junwei; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Anna; Guo, Hongliang; Wei, Feili; Mehta, Sanjay R; Espitia, Stephen; Smith, Davey M; Liu, Longgen; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Dexi

    2016-02-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a major health problem worldwide. HBV X (HBx) protein is the most common open reading frame that may undergo mutations, resulting in the development of HCC. This study aimed to determine specific HBx mutations that differentiate the central- and para-tumor tissues, and identify their association with HCC development. HBx gene from HCC tumor and para-tumor tissues of 47 HCC patients was amplified, sequenced and statistically analyzed. A novel combination of 2 mutations at residues 10 and 144 was identified which might play a significant role in HCC development. Expression vectors carrying HBx with the specific mutations were constructed and transfected into HepG2 and p53-null HepG2 cells. Compared to wild type (WT) and single mutation of HBx at residue 10 or 144, the 10/144 double mutations strongly up-regulated p21 expression and prolonged G1/S transition in WT- and p53-null HepG2 cells. Apoptosis was also inhibited by HBx harboring 10/44 double-mutation. Binding of 10/144 double-mutant HBx to p53 was lower than WT HBx. Conclusively, the 10/144 double mutation of HBx might play a crucial role in HCC formation. PMID:26706415

  4. Quantitative evaluation of his-tag purification and immunoprecipitation of tristetraprolin and its mutant proteins from transfected human cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histidine (His)-tag is widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins, but the yield and purity of expressed proteins are quite different. Little information is available about quantitative evaluation of this procedure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the His-tag pr...

  5. Food safety knowledge on the Bt mutant protein Cry8Ka5 employed in the development of coleopteran-resistant transgenic cotton plants.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi F; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Carvalho, Ana F U

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been exploited in the development of genetically modified (GM) crops for pest control. However, several pests are still difficult to control such as the coleopteran boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. By applying in vitro molecular evolution to the cry8Ka1 gene sequence, variants were generated with improved activity against A. grandis. Among them, Cry8Ka5 mutant protein showed coleoptericidal activity 3-fold higher (LC50 2.83 μg/mL) than that of the original protein (Cry8Ka1). Cry8Ka5 has been used in breeding programs in order to obtain coleopteran-resistant cotton plants. Nevertheless, there is some concern in relation to the food safety of transgenic crops, especially to the heterologously expressed proteins. In this context, our research group has performed risk assessment studies on Cry8Ka5, using the tests recommended by Codex as well as tests that we proposed as alternative and/or complementary approaches. Our results on the risk analysis of Cry8Ka5 taken together with those of other Cry proteins, point out that there is a high degree of certainty on their food safety. It is reasonable to emphasize that most safety studies on Cry proteins have essentially used the Codex approach. However, other methodologies would potentially provide additional information such as studies on the effects of Cry proteins and derived peptides on the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota and on intestinal epithelial cells of humans. Additionally, emerging technologies such as toxicogenomics potentially will offer sensitive alternatives for some current approaches or methods. PMID:26513483

  6. EXAFS of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase MoFe protein from wild-type and nif V mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Eidsness, M.K.; Flank, A.M.; Smith, B.E.; Flood, A.C.; Garner, C.D.; Cramer. S.P.

    1986-05-14

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N/sub 2/ to NH/sub 3/. In Klebsiella pneumoniae a cluster of 17 genes in seven transcriptional units has been associated with nitrogen fixation. The nitrogenase enzyme from the nif V mutants is relatively ineffective at dinitrogen reduction, is more efficient than the wild-type enzyme at HCN reduction, and has its hydrogen evolution activity inhibited up to 80% by CO. This altered substrate specificity has been shown to be associated with the iron-molybdenum cofactor, FeMo-co, of the enzyme. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for probing the molybdenum environment of wild-type nitrogenase, and the authors report here similar studies on the Nif V/sup -/ enzyme.

  7. A yeast Ubc9 mutant protein with temperature-sensitive in vivo function is subject to conditional proteolysis by a ubiquitin- and proteasome-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Betting, J; Seufert, W

    1996-10-18

    The UBC9 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential for cell viability and encodes a soluble protein of the nucleus that is metabolically stable. Products of mutant alleles selected to confer temperature-sensitive in vivo function were found to be extremely short-lived at the restrictive but long-lived at the permissive condition. An extragenic suppressor mutation was isolated which increased thermoresistance of a ubc9-1 strain. This suppressor turned out to stabilize the mutated gene product, indicating that the physiological activity of ubc9-1 protein is primarily controlled by conditional proteolysis. The labile ubc9-1 protein appears to be a substrate for ubiquitination, and its turnover was substantially reduced by expression of a ubiquitin derivative that interferes with formation of multi-ubiquitin chains. Stabilization resulted also from competitive inhibition of Ubc4-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. Activity of the proteasome complex was crucial to rapid breakdown, whereas vacuolar proteases were dispensable. Thus, the heat-denatured ubc9-1 protein is targeted for proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and may serve as a useful tool to further define the process by which a misfolded polypeptide is recognized. PMID:8824207

  8. Changes of alternative oxidase activity, capacity and protein content in leaves of Cucumis sativus wild-type and MSC16 mutant grown under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Ostaszewska, Monika; Galle, Alexander; Flexas, Jaume; Rychter, Anna M; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2009-12-01

    In vitro studies demonstrated that alternative oxidase (AOX) is biochemically regulated by a sulfhydryl-disulfide system, interaction with alpha-ketoacids, ubiquinone pool redox state and protein content among others. However, there is still scarce information about the in vivo regulation of the AOX. Cucumis sativus wild-type (WT) and MSC16 mutant plants were grown under two different light intensities and were used to analyze the relationship between the amount of leaf AOX protein and its in vivo capacity and activity at night and day periods. WT and MSC16 plants presented lower total respiration (V(t)), cytochrome oxidase pathway (COP) activity (v(cyt)) and alternative oxidase pathway (AOP) activity (v(alt)) when grown at low light (LL), although growth light intensity did not change the amount of cytochrome oxidase (COX) nor AOX protein. Changes of v(cyt) related to growing light conditions suggested a substrate availability and energy demand control. On the other hand, the total amount of AOX protein present in the tissue does not play a role in the regulation neither of the capacity nor of the activity of the AOP in vivo. Soluble carbohydrates were directly related to the activity of the AOP. However, although differences in soluble sugar contents mostly regulate the capacity of the AOP at different growth light intensities, additional regulatory mechanisms are necessary to fully explain the observed results. PMID:19493308

  9. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  10. Quantitative analysis of wild-type and V600E mutant BRAF proteins in colorectal carcinoma using immunoenrichment and targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Wu, Chia-Chun; Lin, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Hsuan; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2016-08-24

    The BRAF V600E mutation is one of the most common mutations implicated in the development of several types of cancer including colorectal cancer (CRC), where it is associated with aggressive disease phenotypes and poor outcomes. The status of the BRAF V600E mutation is frequently determined by direct DNA sequencing. However, no previous study has sought to quantify the BRAF V600E protein in cancer specimens. Here, we evaluated immunoenrichment coupled with two MS-based quantitative techniques, namely multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and single ion monitoring conjugated accurate inclusion mass screening (SIM-AIMS), to detect and precisely quantify wild-type (WT) and V600E mutant BRAF proteins in DNA sequence-confirmed CRC tissue specimens. WT and V600E BRAF proteins were immunoprecipitated from a CRC cell line (HT-29), and their representative peptides ((592)IGDFGLATVK(601) and (592)IGDFGLATEK(601), respectively) were confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis and then quantified by MRM or SIM-AIMS with spiked stable isotope-labeled peptide standards. Both assays worked well for measuring WT BRAF from different amounts of HT-29 cell lysates, but the MRM assay was more sensitive than SIM-AIMS assay for quantifying lower levels of V600E BRAF. In protein extracts (2 mg) from 11 CRC tissue specimens, the MRM assay could measure WT BRAF in all 11 cases (0.32-1.66 ng) and the V600E BRAF in two cases (0.1-0.13 ng; mutant-to-WT ratio, 0.16-0.17). The SIM-AIMS assay could also detect WT and V600E BRAF in CRC specimens, but the measured levels of both targets were lower than those determined by MRM assay. Collectively, this study provides an effective method to precisely quantify WT and V600E BRAF proteins in complex biological samples using immunoenrichment-coupled targeted MS. Since the V600E BRAF protein has emerged as an important therapeutic target for cancer, the developed assay should facilitate future BRAF-related basic and clinical studies. PMID:27497007

  11. The α-subunit of the rice heterotrimeric G protein, RGA1, regulates drought tolerance during the vegetative phase in the dwarf rice mutant d1

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero-Serrano, Ángel; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Essential in the Green Revolution was the development of high-yielding dwarf varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L.), but their selection was not based on responses to water limitation. We studied physiological responses to progressive drought of the dwarf rice mutant, d1, in which the RGA1 gene, which encodes the GTP-binding α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein, is non-functional. Wild-type (WT) plants cease net carbon fixation 11 days after water is withheld, while d1 plants maintain net photosynthesis for an additional week. During drought, d1 plants exhibit greater stomatal conductance than the WT, but both genotypes exhibit the same transpirational water loss per unit leaf area. This is explained by a smaller driving force for water loss in d1 owing to its lower leaf temperatures, consistent with its more erect architecture. As drought becomes more severe, WT plants show an accelerated decline in photosynthesis, which may be exacerbated by the higher leaf temperatures in the WT. We thus show how a rice mutant with dwarf and erect leaves has a decreased susceptibility to water stress. Accordingly, it may be useful to incorporate RGA1 mutation in breeding or biotechnological strategies for development of drought-resistant rice. PMID:27194741

  12. The α-subunit of the rice heterotrimeric G protein, RGA1, regulates drought tolerance during the vegetative phase in the dwarf rice mutant d1.

    PubMed

    Ferrero-Serrano, Ángel; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-05-01

    Essential in the Green Revolution was the development of high-yielding dwarf varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L.), but their selection was not based on responses to water limitation. We studied physiological responses to progressive drought of the dwarf rice mutant, d1, in which the RGA1 gene, which encodes the GTP-binding α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein, is non-functional. Wild-type (WT) plants cease net carbon fixation 11 days after water is withheld, while d1 plants maintain net photosynthesis for an additional week. During drought, d1 plants exhibit greater stomatal conductance than the WT, but both genotypes exhibit the same transpirational water loss per unit leaf area. This is explained by a smaller driving force for water loss in d1 owing to its lower leaf temperatures, consistent with its more erect architecture. As drought becomes more severe, WT plants show an accelerated decline in photosynthesis, which may be exacerbated by the higher leaf temperatures in the WT. We thus show how a rice mutant with dwarf and erect leaves has a decreased susceptibility to water stress. Accordingly, it may be useful to incorporate RGA1 mutation in breeding or biotechnological strategies for development of drought-resistant rice. PMID:27194741

  13. Arabidopsis Mutants Deleted in the Light-Harvesting Protein Lhcb4 Have a Disrupted Photosystem II Macrostructure and Are Defective in Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    de Bianchi, Silvia; Betterle, Nico; Kouril, Roman; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Boekema, Egbert; Bassi, Roberto; Dall’Osto, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The role of the light-harvesting complex Lhcb4 (CP29) in photosynthesis was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana by characterizing knockout lines for each of the three Lhcb4 isoforms (Lhcb4.1/4.2/4.3). Plants lacking all isoforms (koLhcb4) showed a compensatory increase of Lhcb1 and a slightly reduced photosystem II/I ratio with respect to the wild type. The absence of Lhcb4 did not result in alteration in electron transport rates. However, the kinetic of state transition was faster in the mutant, and nonphotochemical quenching activity was lower in koLhcb4 plants with respect to either wild type or mutants retaining a single Lhcb4 isoform. KoLhcb4 plants were more sensitive to photoinhibition, while this effect was not observed in knockout lines for any other photosystem II antenna subunit. Ultrastructural analysis of thylakoid grana membranes showed a lower density of photosystem II complexes in koLhcb4. Moreover, analysis of isolated supercomplexes showed a different overall shape of the C2S2 particles due to a different binding mode of the S-trimer to the core complex. An empty space was observed within the photosystem II supercomplex at the Lhcb4 position, implying that the missing Lhcb4 was not replaced by other Lhc subunits. This suggests that Lhcb4 is unique among photosystem II antenna proteins and determinant for photosystem II macro-organization and photoprotection. PMID:21803939

  14. Arabidopsis mutants deleted in the light-harvesting protein Lhcb4 have a disrupted photosystem II macrostructure and are defective in photoprotection.

    PubMed

    de Bianchi, Silvia; Betterle, Nico; Kouril, Roman; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Boekema, Egbert; Bassi, Roberto; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2011-07-01

    The role of the light-harvesting complex Lhcb4 (CP29) in photosynthesis was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana by characterizing knockout lines for each of the three Lhcb4 isoforms (Lhcb4.1/4.2/4.3). Plants lacking all isoforms (koLhcb4) showed a compensatory increase of Lhcb1 and a slightly reduced photosystem II/I ratio with respect to the wild type. The absence of Lhcb4 did not result in alteration in electron transport rates. However, the kinetic of state transition was faster in the mutant, and nonphotochemical quenching activity was lower in koLhcb4 plants with respect to either wild type or mutants retaining a single Lhcb4 isoform. KoLhcb4 plants were more sensitive to photoinhibition, while this effect was not observed in knockout lines for any other photosystem II antenna subunit. Ultrastructural analysis of thylakoid grana membranes showed a lower density of photosystem II complexes in koLhcb4. Moreover, analysis of isolated supercomplexes showed a different overall shape of the C₂S₂ particles due to a different binding mode of the S-trimer to the core complex. An empty space was observed within the photosystem II supercomplex at the Lhcb4 position, implying that the missing Lhcb4 was not replaced by other Lhc subunits. This suggests that Lhcb4 is unique among photosystem II antenna proteins and determinant for photosystem II macro-organization and photoprotection. PMID:21803939

  15. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  16. Modeling and Docking Studies on Novel Mutants (K71L and T204V) of the ATPase Domain of Human Heat Shock 70 kDa Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Elengoe, Asita; Naser, Mohammed Abu; Hamdan, Salehhuddin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of exploring protein interactions between human adenovirus and heat shock protein 70 is to exploit a potentially synergistic interaction to enhance anti-tumoral efficacy and decrease toxicity in cancer treatment. However, the protein interaction of Hsp70 with E1A32 kDa of human adenovirus serotype 5 remains to be elucidated. In this study, two residues of ATPase domain of human heat shock 70 kDa protein 1 (PDB: 1 HJO) were mutated. 3D mutant models (K71L and T204V) using PyMol software were then constructed. The structures were evaluated by PROCHECK, ProQ, ERRAT, Verify 3D and ProSA modules. All evidence suggests that all protein models are acceptable and of good quality. The E1A32 kDa motif was retrieved from UniProt (P03255), as well as subjected to docking interaction with NBD, K71L and T204V, using the Autodock 4.2 program. The best lowest binding energy value of −9.09 kcal/mol was selected for novel T204V. Moreover, the protein-ligand complex structures were validated by RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds and salt bridge analysis. This revealed that the T204V-E1A32 kDa motif complex was the most stable among all three complex structures. This study provides information about the interaction between Hsp70 and the E1A32 kDa motif, which emphasizes future perspectives to design rational drugs and vaccines in cancer therapy. PMID:24758925

  17. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-21

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  18. Identification of antigenic epitopes in an alanine-rich repeating region of a surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, N; Takahashi, I; Nakai, M; Senpuku, H; Nisizawa, T; Koga, T

    1993-01-01

    A surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans with a molecular mass of 190 kDa is considered to play an important role in the initial attachment of this streptococcus to the tooth surface. Two internal repeating amino acid sequences are present in the PAc molecule. One repeating region located in the N-terminal region is rich in alanine (A-region), and the other, located in the central region, is rich in proline (P-region). To identify antigenic epitopes on the A-region of the PAc protein, 82 sequential overlapping synthetic decapeptides covering one of the repetitive units of the A-region were synthesized. In the epitope scanning analyses using murine antisera raised against recombinant PAc (rPAc), multiple antigenic epitopes were found in the repetitive unit of the A-region, and some of them reacted with antisera to rPAc from BALB/c, B10, B10.D2, and B10.BR mice. In particular, a peptide YEAALKQY (residues 366 to 373) was recognized by anti-rPAc sera from all four strains of mice. The reactivities of anti-rPAc sera in the epitope scanning were confirmed by using a purified synthetic peptide, NAKATYEAALKQYEADLAA (corresponding to residues 361 to 379). Furthermore, antisera against a surface protein antigen PAg (SpaA) of Streptococcus sobrinus from BALB/c mice reacted strongly to residues 330 to 337, 362 to 369, and 366 to 373 of the PAc protein by the epitope scanning analysis. An AKATYEAALKQY (residues 362 to 373 of the PAc protein)-like sequence, AKANYEAKLAQY, was found within the A-region of S. sobrinus PAg, suggesting that the amino acid sequences AKA-YEA and YEA-L-QY may be major cross-reactive epitopes of the S. mutans PAc protein and the S. sobrinus PAg protein. PMID:7681043

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  20. The seirena B Class Floral Homeotic Mutant of California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica) Reveals a Function of the Enigmatic PI Motif in the Formation of Specific Multimeric MADS Domain Protein Complexes[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Orashakova, Svetlana; Lange, Sabrina; Melzer, Rainer; Theißen, Günter; Smyth, David R.; Becker, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The products of B class floral homeotic genes specify petal and stamen identity, and loss of B function results in homeotic conversions of petals into sepals and stamens into carpels. Here, we describe the molecular characterization of seirena-1 (sei-1), a mutant from the basal eudicot California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) that shows homeotic changes characteristic of floral homeotic B class mutants. SEI has been previously described as EScaGLO, one of four B class–related MADS box genes in California poppy. The C terminus of SEI, including the highly conserved PI motif, is truncated in sei-1 proteins. Nevertheless, like the wild-type SEI protein, the sei-1 mutant protein is able to bind CArG-boxes and can form homodimers, heterodimers, and several higher order complexes with other MADS domain proteins. However, unlike the wild type, the mutant protein is not able to mediate higher order complexes consisting of specific B, C, and putative E class related proteins likely involved in specifying stamen identity. Within the PI motif, five highly conserved N-terminal amino acids are specifically required for this interaction. Several families lack this short conserved sequence, including the Brassicaceae, and we propose an evolutionary scenario to explain these functional differences. PMID:23444328

  1. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y.; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrPC) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrPSc leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrPC (PrPΔ214–229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrPC. Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214–229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214–229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  2. Secretory pathway retention of mutant prion protein induces p38-MAPK activation and lethal disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C; Ulbrich, Sarah; Linsenmeier, Luise; Krasemann, Susanne; Chakroun, Karima; Acevedo-Morantes, Claudia Y; Wille, Holger; Tatzelt, Jörg; Glatzel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Misfolding of proteins in the biosynthetic pathway in neurons may cause disturbed protein homeostasis and neurodegeneration. The prion protein (PrP(C)) is a GPI-anchored protein that resides at the plasma membrane and may be misfolded to PrP(Sc) leading to prion diseases. We show that a deletion in the C-terminal domain of PrP(C) (PrPΔ214-229) leads to partial retention in the secretory pathway causing a fatal neurodegenerative disease in mice that is partially rescued by co-expression of PrP(C). Transgenic (Tg(PrPΔ214-229)) mice show extensive neuronal loss in hippocampus and cerebellum and activation of p38-MAPK. In cell culture under stress conditions, PrPΔ214-229 accumulates in the Golgi apparatus possibly representing transit to the Rapid ER Stress-induced ExporT (RESET) pathway together with p38-MAPK activation. Here we describe a novel pathway linking retention of a GPI-anchored protein in the early secretory pathway to p38-MAPK activation and a neurodegenerative phenotype in transgenic mice. PMID:27117504

  3. S-Nitrosylation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1 Mediates Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Neuronal Injury in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haun, Florian; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Shiu, Alicia D.; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Tsunemi, Taiji; Holland, Emily A.; La Spada, Albert R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Dynamin-related protein1 (Drp1) is a large GTPase that mediates mitochondrial fission. We recently reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) that S-nitrosylation of Drp1 (forming S-nitroso [SNO]-Drp1) results in GTPase hyperactivity and mitochondrial fragmentation, thus impairing bioenergetics and inducing synaptic damage and neuronal loss. Here, since aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are also key features of Huntington's disease (HD), we investigated whether formation of SNO-Drp1 contributes to the pathogenesis of HD in cell-based and animal models. Results: We found that expression of mutant huntingtin (mutHTT) protein in primary cultured neurons triggers significant production of nitric oxide (NO). Consistent with this result, increased levels of SNO-Drp1 were found in the striatum of a transgenic mouse model of HD as well as in human postmortem brains from HD patients. Using specific fluorescence markers, we found that formation of SNO-Drp1 induced excessive mitochondrial fragmentation followed by loss of dendritic spines, signifying synaptic damage. These neurotoxic events were significantly abrogated after transfection with non-nitrosylatable mutant Drp1(C644A), or by the blocking of NO production using an nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. These findings suggest that SNO-Drp1 is a key mediator of mutHTT toxicity, and, thus, may represent a novel drug target for HD. Innovation and Conclusion: Our findings indicate that aberrant S-nitrosylation of Drp1 is a prominent pathological feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD and HD. Moreover, the SNO-Drp1 signaling pathway links mutHTT neurotoxicity to a malfunction in mitochondrial dynamics, resulting in neuronal synaptic damage in HD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1173–1184. PMID:23641925

  4. Assembly defects of desmin disease mutants carrying deletions in the alpha-helical rod domain are rescued by wild type protein.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Mücke, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald

    2007-04-01

    Most mutations of desmin that cause severe autosomal dominant forms of myofibrillar myopathy are point mutations and locate in the central alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain. Recently, two in-frame deletions of one and three amino acids, respectively, in the alpha-helix have been described and discussed to drastically interfere with the architecture of the desmin dimer and possibly also the formation of tetramers and higher order complexes [Kaminska, A., Strelkov, S.V., Goudeau, B., Olive, M., Dagvadorj, A., Fidzianska, A., Simon-Casteras, M., Shatunov, A., Dalakas, M.C., Ferrer, I., Kwiecinski, H., Vicart, P., Goldfarb, L.G., 2004. Small deletions disturb desmin architecture leading to breakdown of muscle cells and development of skeletal or cardioskeletal myopathy. Hum. Genet. 114, 306-313.]. Therefore, it was proposed that they may poison intermediate filament (IF) assembly. We have now recombinantly synthesized both mutant proteins and subjected them to comprehensive in vitro assembly experiments. While exhibiting assembly defects when analyzed on their own, both one-to-one mixtures of the respective mutant protein with wild type desmin facilitated proper filament formation. Transient transfection studies complemented this fundamental finding by demonstrating that wild type desmin is also rescuing these assembly defects in vivo. In summary, our findings strongly question the previous hypothesis that it is assembly incompetence due to molecular rearrangements caused by the mutations, which triggers the development of disease. As an alternative, we propose that these mutations cause subtle age-dependent structural alterations of desmin IFs that eventually lead to disease. PMID:17188893

  5. COOH-Terminal Collagen Q (COLQ) Mutants Causing Human Deficiency of Endplate Acetylcholinesterase Impair the Interaction of ColQ with Proteins of the Basal Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Ng, Fiona; Gochez, Danielle A.; Lee, Diana C.; Logia, Stephanie P.; Nguyen, Joanna; Maselli, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen Q (ColQ) is a key multidomain functional protein of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), crucial for anchoring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to the basal lamina (BL) and accumulating AChE at the NMJ. The attachment of AChE to the BL is primarily accomplished by the binding of the ColQ collagen domain to the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan and the COOH-terminus to the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), which in turn plays a fundamental role in the development and maintenance of the NMJ. Yet, the precise mechanism by which ColQ anchors AChE at the NMJ remains unknown. We identified five novel mutations at the COOH-terminus of ColQ in seven patients from five families affected with endplate (EP) AChE deficiency. We found that the mutations do not affect the assembly of ColQ with AChE to form asymmetric forms of AChE or impair the interaction of ColQ with perlecan. By contrast, all mutations impair in varied degree the interaction of ColQ to MuSK as well as basement membrane extract (BME) that have no detectable MuSK. Our data confirm that the interaction of ColQ to perlecan and MuSK is crucial for anchoring AChE to the NMJ. In addition, the identified COOH-terminal mutants not only reduce the interaction of ColQ with MuSK, but also diminish the interaction of ColQ with BME. These findings suggest that the impaired attachment of COOH-terminal mutants causing EP AChE deficiency is in part independent of MuSK, and that the COOH-terminus of ColQ may interact with other proteins at the BL. PMID:24281389

  6. Protein preparation and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase from Streptococcus mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Guan-Jing; Li, Lan-Fen; Li, Dan; Liu, Cong; Wei, Shi-Cheng; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase homologue from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.4 Å resolution. The SMU.636 protein from Streptococcus mutans is a putative glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase with 233 residues. The smu.636 gene was PCR-amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET-28a(+). The resultant His-tagged fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in two steps. Crystals of the fusion protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.83, b = 82.13, c = 134.70 Å.

  7. Mitochondrial protein oxidation in yeast mutants lacking manganese-(MnSOD) or copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD): evidence that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in protecting mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kristin M; Dirmeier, Reinhard; Engle, Marcella; Poyton, Robert O

    2004-12-10

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses two forms of superoxide dismutase (SOD): MnSOD, encoded by SOD2, which is located within the mitochondrial matrix, and CuZnSOD, encoded by SOD1, which is located in both the cytosol and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Because two different SOD enzymes are located in the mitochondrion, we examined the relative roles of each in protecting mitochondria against oxidative stress. Using protein carbonylation as a measure of oxidative stress, we have found no correlation between overall levels of respiration and the level of oxidative mitochondrial protein damage in either wild type or sod mutant strains. Moreover, mitochondrial protein carbonylation levels in sod1, sod2, and sod1sod2 mutants are not elevated in cells harvested from mid-logarithmic and early stationary phases, suggesting that neither MnSOD nor CuZnSOD is required for protecting the majority of mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage during these early phases of growth. During late stationary phase, mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases in all strains, particularly in sod1 and sod1sod2 mutants. By using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have found that specific proteins become carbonylated in sod1 and sod2 mutants. We identified six mitochondrial protein spots representing five unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod1 mutant and 19 mitochondrial protein spots representing 11 unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod2 mutant. Although some of the same proteins are carbonylated in both mutants, other proteins are not. These findings indicate that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in the mitochondrion. PMID:15385544

  8. Selection of hepatitis B surface "escape" mutants during passive immune prophylaxis following liver transplantation: potential impact of genetic changes on polymerase protein function

    PubMed Central

    Shields, P; Owsianka, A; Carman, W; Boxall, E; Hubscher, S; Shaw, J; O'Donnell, K; Elias, E; Mutimer, D

    1999-01-01

    CASE REPORT—A patient is described who developed hepatitis B virus (HBV) reinfection five months following liver transplantation. Failure of hepatitis B immunoglobulin prophylaxis was associated with the emergence of mutations. HBV gene sequencing identified nucleotide substitutions associated with amino acid changes, one within the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the HBV surface antigen at amino acid position 144 and one outside the MHR. Because of the overlapping reading frames of surface and polymerase genes, the latter surface antigen change was associated with an amino acid change in the polymerase protein. The patient developed significant allograft hepatitis and was treated with lamivudine (3TC) 100 mg daily. Rapid decline of serum HBV DNA was observed with loss of HBV e antigen and HBV surface antigen from serum. There was normalisation of liver biochemistry, and liver immunohistochemistry showed a reduction in HBV core and disappearance of HBs antigen staining.
CONCLUSION—Surface antigen encoding gene mutations associated with HBIg escape may be associated with alteration of the polymerase protein. The polymerase changes may affect sensitivity to antiviral treatment. Selection pressure on one HBV reading frame (for example, HBIg pressure on HBsAg, or nucleoside analogue pressure on polymerase protein) may alter the gene product of the overlapping frame. Such interactions are relevant to strategies employing passive immune prophylaxis and antiviral treatment.


Keywords: liver transplantation; prophylaxis; escape mutants; lamivudine PMID:10403747

  9. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  10. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We’ve also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a “GST-like” S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  11. Mutation of a Cuticle Protein Gene, BmCPG10, Is Responsible for Silkworm Non-Moulting in the 2nd Instar Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiaoling; Kang, Lequn; Xia, Dingguo; Qiu, Zhiyong; Tang, Shunming; Li, Muwang; Shen, Xingjia; Zhang, Guozheng

    2016-01-01

    In the silkworm, metamorphosis and moulting are regulated by ecdysone hormone and juvenile hormone. The subject in the present study is a silkworm mutant that does not moult in the 2nd instar (nm2). Genetic analysis indicated that the nm2 mutation is controlled by a recessive gene and is homozygous lethal. Based on positional cloning, nm2 was located in a region approximately 275 kb on the 5th linkage group by eleven SSR polymorphism markers. In this specific range, according to the transcriptional expression of thirteen genes and cloning, the relative expression level of the BmCPG10 gene that encodes a cuticle protein was lower than the expression level of the wild-type gene. Moreover, this gene’s structure differs from that of the wild-type gene: there is a deletion of 217 bp in its open reading frame, which resulted in a change in the protein it encoded. The BmCPG10 mRNA was detectable throughout silkworm development from the egg to the moth. This mRNA was low in the pre-moulting and moulting stages of each instar but was high in the gluttonous stage and in newly exuviated larvae. The BmCPG10 mRNA showed high expression levels in the epidermis, head and trachea, while the expression levels were low in the midgut, Malpighian tubule, prothoracic gland, haemolymph and ventral nerve cord. The ecdysone titre was determined by ELISA, and the results demonstrated that the ecdysone titre of nm2 larvae was lower than that of the wild-type larvae. The nm2 mutant could be rescued by feeding 20-hydroxyecdysone, cholesterol and 7—dehydrocholesterol (7dC), but the rescued nm2 only developed to the 4th instar and subsequently died. The moulting time of silkworms could be delayed by BmCPG10 RNAi. Thus, we speculated that the mutation of BmCPG10 was responsible for the silkworm mutant that did not moult in the 2nd instar. PMID:27096617

  12. Mutation of a Cuticle Protein Gene, BmCPG10, Is Responsible for Silkworm Non-Moulting in the 2nd Instar Mutant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Wang, Pingyang; Zhao, Qiaoling; Kang, Lequn; Xia, Dingguo; Qiu, Zhiyong; Tang, Shunming; Li, Muwang; Shen, Xingjia; Zhang, Guozheng

    2016-01-01

    In the silkworm, metamorphosis and moulting are regulated by ecdysone hormone and juvenile hormone. The subject in the present study is a silkworm mutant that does not moult in the 2nd instar (nm2). Genetic analysis indicated that the nm2 mutation is controlled by a recessive gene and is homozygous lethal. Based on positional cloning, nm2 was located in a region approximately 275 kb on the 5th linkage group by eleven SSR polymorphism markers. In this specific range, according to the transcriptional expression of thirteen genes and cloning, the relative expression level of the BmCPG10 gene that encodes a cuticle protein was lower than the expression level of the wild-type gene. Moreover, this gene's structure differs from that of the wild-type gene: there is a deletion of 217 bp in its open reading frame, which resulted in a change in the protein it encoded. The BmCPG10 mRNA was detectable throughout silkworm development from the egg to the moth. This mRNA was low in the pre-moulting and moulting stages of each instar but was high in the gluttonous stage and in newly exuviated larvae. The BmCPG10 mRNA showed high expression levels in the epidermis, head and trachea, while the expression levels were low in the midgut, Malpighian tubule, prothoracic gland, haemolymph and ventral nerve cord. The ecdysone titre was determined by ELISA, and the results demonstrated that the ecdysone titre of nm2 larvae was lower than that of the wild-type larvae. The nm2 mutant could be rescued by feeding 20-hydroxyecdysone, cholesterol and 7-dehydrocholesterol (7dC), but the rescued nm2 only developed to the 4th instar and subsequently died. The moulting time of silkworms could be delayed by BmCPG10 RNAi. Thus, we speculated that the mutation of BmCPG10 was responsible for the silkworm mutant that did not moult in the 2nd instar. PMID:27096617

  13. Bacteriophage T4D Head Morphogenesis. VIII. DNA-Protein Associations in Intermediate Head Structures That Accumulate in Gene 49− Mutant-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Glinert, Susan J.; Luftig, Ronald B.

    1977-01-01

    We have utilized the gene 49− mutant-infected cells of bacteriophage T4D to accumulate large numbers of nucleic acid-protein intermediate head structures. These heads were used as substrates for experiments in the investigations of the mechanism of DNA packaging. Specifically, we have examined: (i) the susceptibility of the DNA in these structures to digestion by a variety of nucleases after a series of increasing temperature pulses from 25 to 100°C, (ii) the physicochemical characteristics of the DNA inside these heads, and (iii) the mechanism by which proteins are displaced from the interior of the head after treatment with basic proteins. We isolated DNA from these gene 49− heads by use of gradient centrifugation procedures. The DNA had a molecular weight of 8 × 106 and a density of 1.697 ± 0.005 g/cm3, and it contained a short resistant fraction (SRF) which, when associated with the gene 49− heads, exhibited AT-protected regions that were not susceptible to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Such a fraction may contain pieces which are important in the initial association of the DNA with the prohead. Exposure of the gene 49− intermediate capsid structures to basic proteins, such as bovine trypsin inhibitor, lysozyme, and l-polylysine-70, caused a displacement of an amorphous-appearing structure which may be a complex of the gene 49− DNA and interior components of the capsid (e.g., internal proteins, polyamines). Our general conclusion is that in the gene 49− intermediate head structures which are only partly filled with DNA, this DNA is held inside the head by strong electrostatic linkages with interior polypeptides and polyamines. Images PMID:875137

  14. Posttranslational events leading to the assembly of photosystem II protein complex: a study using photosynthesis mutants from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    de Vitry, C; Olive, J; Drapier, D; Recouvreur, M; Wollman, F A

    1989-09-01

    We studied the assembly of photosystem II (PSII) in several mutants from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which were unable to synthesize either one PSII core subunit (P6 [43 kD], D1, or D2) or one oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE1 or OEE2) subunit. Synthesis of the PSII subunits was analyzed on electrophoretograms of cells pulse labeled with [14C]acetate. Their accumulation in thylakoid membranes was studied on immunoblots, their chlorophyll-binding ability on nondenaturating gels, their assembly by detergent fractionation, their stability by pulse-chase experiments and determination of in vitro protease sensitivity, and their localization by immunocytochemistry. In Chlamydomonas, the PSII core subunits P5 (47 kD), D1, and D2 are synthesized in a concerted manner while P6 synthesis is independent. P5 and P6 accumulate independently of each other in the stacked membranes. They bind chlorophyll soon after, or concomitantly with, their synthesis and independently of the presence of the other PSII subunits. Resistance to degradation increases step by step: beginning with assembly of P5, D1, and D2, then with binding of P6, and, finally, with binding of the OEE subunits on two independent high affinity sites (one for OEE1 and another for OEE2 to which OEE3 binds). In the absence of PSII cores, the OEE subunits accumulate independently in the thylakoid lumen and bind loosely to the membranes; OEE1 was found on stacked membranes, but OEE2 was found on either stacked or unstacked membranes depending on whether or not P6 was synthesized. PMID:2670960

  15. Structures and free energy landscapes of the A53T mutant-type α-synuclein protein and impact of A53T mutation on the structures of the wild-type α-synuclein protein with dynamics.

    PubMed

    Coskuner, Orkid; Wise-Scira, Olivia

    2013-07-17

    The A53T genetic missense mutation of the wild-type α-synuclein (αS) protein was initially identified in Greek and Italian families with familial Parkinson's disease. Detailed understanding of the structures and the changes induced in the wild-type αS structure by the A53T mutation, as well as establishing the direct relationships between the rapid conformational changes and free energy landscapes of these intrinsically disordered fibrillogenic proteins, helps to enhance our fundamental knowledge and to gain insights into the pathogenic mechanism of Parkinson's disease. We employed extensive parallel tempering molecular dynamics simulations along with thermodynamic calculations to determine the secondary and tertiary structural properties as well as the conformational free energy surfaces of the wild-type and A53T mutant-type αS proteins in an aqueous solution medium using both implicit and explicit water models. The confined aqueous volume effect in the simulations of disordered proteins using an explicit model for water is addressed for a model disordered protein. We also assessed the stabilities of the residual secondary structure component interconversions in αS based on free energy calculations at the atomic level with dynamics using our recently developed theoretical strategy. To the best of our knowledge, this study presents the first detailed comparison of the structural properties linked directly to the conformational free energy landscapes of the monomeric wild-type and A53T mutant-type α-synuclein proteins in an aqueous solution environment. Results demonstrate that the β-sheet structure is significantly more altered than the helical structure upon A53T mutation of the monomeric wild-type αS protein in aqueous solution. The β-sheet content close to the mutation site in the N-terminal region is more abundant while the non-amyloid-β component (NAC) and C-terminal regions show a decrease in β-sheet abundance upon A53T mutation. Obtained results

  16. The X-ray structures of two mutant crystallin domains shed light on the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Norledge, B V; Mayr, E M; Glockshuber, R; Bateman, O A; Slingsby, C; Jaenicke, R; Driessen, H P

    1996-03-01

    We use protein engineering and crystallography to simulate aspects of the early evolution of beta gamma-crystallins by observing how a single domain oligomerizes in response to changes in a sequence extension. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of gamma beta-crystallin with its four-residue C-terminal extension shows that the domain does not form a symmetric homodimer analogous to the two-domain pairing in beta gamma-crystallins. Instead the C-terminal extension now forms heterologous interactions with other domains leading to the solvent exposure of the natural hydrophobic interface with a consequent loss in protein solubility. However, this domain truncated by just the C-terminal tyrosine forms a symmetric homodimer of domains in the crystal lattice. PMID:8605629

  17. Activation of mutant protein kinase C{gamma} leads to aberrant sequestration and impairment of its cellular function

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, Graeme; Davies, Kay E.; Talbot, Kevin

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in protein kinase C{gamma} (PKC{gamma}) cause the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, expression of an extensive panel of known SCA14-associated PKC{gamma} mutations as fusion proteins in cell culture led to the consistent formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in response to purinoceptor stimulation. Aggregates co-stained with antibodies to phosphorylated PKC{gamma} and the early endosome marker EEA1 but failed to redistribute to the cell membrane under conditions of oxidative stress. These studies suggest that Purkinje cell damage in SCA14 may result from a reduction of PKC{gamma} activity due its aberrant sequestration in the early endosome compartment.

  18. Naturally Occurring Deletion Mutants of the Pig-Specific, Intestinal Crypt Epithelial Cell Protein CLCA4b without Apparent Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Binder, Stefanie; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Gruber, Achim D.; Mundhenk, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The human CLCA4 (chloride channel regulator, calcium-activated) modulates the intestinal phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients via an as yet unknown pathway. With the generation of new porcine CF models, species-specific differences between human modifiers of CF and their porcine orthologs are considered critical for the translation of experimental data. Specifically, the porcine ortholog to the human CF modulator gene CLCA4 has recently been shown to be duplicated into two separate genes, CLCA4a and CLCA4b. Here, we characterize the duplication product, CLCA4b, in terms of its genomic structure, tissue and cellular expression patterns as well as its in vitro electrophysiological properties. The CLCA4b gene is a pig-specific duplication product of the CLCA4 ancestor and its protein is exclusively expressed in small and large intestinal crypt epithelial cells, a niche specifically occupied by no other porcine CLCA family member. Surprisingly, a unique deleterious mutation of the CLCA4b gene is spread among modern and ancient breeds in the pig population, but this mutation did not result in an apparent phenotype in homozygously affected animals. Electrophysiologically, neither the products of the wild type nor of the mutated CLCA4b genes were able to evoke a calcium-activated anion conductance, a consensus feature of other CLCA proteins. The apparently pig-specific duplication of the CLCA4 gene with unique expression of the CLCA4b protein variant in intestinal crypt epithelial cells where the porcine CFTR is also present raises the question of whether it may modulate the porcine CF phenotype. Moreover, the naturally occurring null variant of CLCA4b will be valuable for the understanding of CLCA protein function and their relevance in modulating the CF phenotype. PMID:26474299

  19. Repair of chromosomal RAG-mediated DNA breaks by mutant RAG proteins lacking phosphatidylinositol 3-like kinase consensus phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Gapud, Eric J; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Mahowald, Grace K; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2011-08-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) are members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-like family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate serines or threonines when positioned adjacent to a glutamine residue (SQ/TQ). Both kinases are activated rapidly by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulate the function of proteins involved in DNA damage responses. In developing lymphocytes, DSBs are generated during V(D)J recombination, which is required to assemble the second exon of all Ag receptor genes. This reaction is initiated through a DNA cleavage step by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which together comprise an endonuclease that generates DSBs at the border of two recombining gene segments and their flanking recombination signals. This DNA cleavage step is followed by a joining step, during which pairs of DNA coding and signal ends are ligated to form a coding joint and a signal joint, respectively. ATM and DNA-PKcs are integrally involved in the repair of both signal and coding ends, but the targets of these kinases involved in the repair process have not been fully elucidated. In this regard, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which each have several SQ/TQ motifs, have been implicated in the repair of RAG-mediated DSBs. In this study, we use a previously developed approach for studying chromosomal V(D)J recombination that has been modified to allow for the analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 function. We show that phosphorylation of RAG1 or RAG2 by ATM or DNA-PKcs at SQ/TQ consensus sites is dispensable for the joining step of V(D)J recombination. PMID:21742970

  20. The short form of the CheA protein restores kinase activity and chemotactic ability to kinase-deficient mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, A J; Stewart, R C

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli expresses two forms of the chemotaxis-associated CheA protein, CheAL and CheAS, as the result of translational initiation at two distinct, in-frame initiation sites in the gene cheA. The long form, CheAL, plays a crucial role in the chemotactic signal transduction mechanism by phosphorylating two other chemotaxis proteins: CheY and CheB. CheAL must first autophosphorylate at amino acid His-48 before transferring its phosphono group to these other signal transduction proteins. The short form, CheAS, lacks the N-terminal 97 amino acids of CheAL and, therefore, does not possess the site of autophosphorylation. Here we demonstrate that although it lacks the ability to autophosphorylate, CheAS can mediate phosphorylation of kinase-deficient variants of CheAL each of which retains a functional autophosphorylation site. This transphosphorylation enables these kinase-deficient CheAL variants to phosphorylate CheY. Because it mediates this activity, CheAS can restore to kinase-deficient E. coli cells the ability to tumble and, thus, to perform chemotaxis in swarm plate assays. Images PMID:8434013

  1. Target binding to S100B reduces dynamic properties and increases Ca2+-binding affinity for wild type and EF-hand mutant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liriano, Melissa A.; Varney, Kristen M.; Wright, Nathan T.; Hoffman, Cassandra L.; Toth, Eric A.; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the second EF-hand (D61N, D63N, D65N, E72A) of S100B were used to study its Ca2+-binding and dynamic properties in the absence and presence of abound target, TRTK-12. With D63NS100B as an exception (D63NKD = 50 ± 9 µM), Ca2+-binding to EF2-hand mutants were reduced by more than 8-fold in the absence of TRTK-12 (D61NKD = 412 ± 67 µM; D65NKD = 968 ± 171 µM; E72AKD = 471 ± 133 µM), when compared to wild-type protein (WTKD = 56 ± 9 µM). For the TRTK-12 complexes, the Ca2+-binding affinity to wild type (WT+TRTKKD = 12 ± 10 µM) and the EF2 mutants were increased by 5- to 19-fold versus in the absence of target (D61N+TRTKKD = 29 ± 1.2 µM; D63N+TRTKKD = 10 ± 2.2 µM; D65N+TRTKKD = 73 ± 4.4 µM; E72A+TRTKKD = 18 ± 3.7 µM). In addition, Rex, as measured using relaxation dispersion for side chain 15N resonances of Asn63 (D63NS100B) was reduced upon TRTK-12 binding when measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Likewise, backbone motions on multiple time scales (ps-ms) throughout wild type, D61NS100B D63NS100B, and D65NS100B were lowered upon binding TRTK-12. However, the X-ray structures of Ca2+-bound (2.0 Å) and TRTK-bound (1.2 Å) D63NS100B showed no change in Ca2+ coordination, so these and analogous structural data for the wild-type protein could not be used to explain how target binding increased Ca2+-binding affinity in solution. Thus, a model for how S100B-TRTK12 complex formation increases Ca2+ binding is discussed, which considers changes in protein dynamics upon binding the target TRTK-12. PMID:22824086

  2. Identification of novel drug-resistant EGFR mutant inhibitors by in silico screening using comprehensive assessments of protein structures.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Hisami; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Yuki, Hitomi; Mikuni, Junko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Fujimoto, Takako; Terazawa, Yumiko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Honma, Teruki

    2012-06-15

    EGFR is a target protein for the treatment of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The mutations associated with the activation of EGFR kinase activity, such as L858R and G719S, destabilize the inactive conformation of EGFR and are closely linked with the development of NSCLC. The additional T790M mutation reportedly causes drug resistance against the commercially available EGFR inhibitors, gefitinib and erlotinib. In this study, we searched for novel G719S/T790M EGFR inhibitors by a new in silico screening strategy, using two datasets. The results of in silico screening using protein-ligand docking are affected by the selection of 3D structure of the target protein. As the first strategy, we chose the 3D structures for in silico screening by test dockings using the G719S/T790M crystal structure, its molecular dynamics snapshots, and known inhibitors of the drug-resistant EGFR. In the second strategy, we selected the 3D structures by test dockings using all of the EGFR structures, regardless of the mutations, and all of the known EGFR inhibitors. Using each of the 3D structures selected by the strategies, 1000 compounds were chosen from the 71,588 compounds. Kinase assays identified 15 G719S/T790M EGFR inhibitors, including two compounds with novel scaffolds. Analyses of their structure-activity relationships revealed that interactions with the mutated Met790 residue specifically increase the inhibitory activity against G719S/T790M EGFR. PMID:22607878

  3. Overexpression and purification of PWL2D, a mutant of the effector protein PWL2 from Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D R S; Saraiva, A M; Azzoni, A R; Miranda, H R C A N; de Toledo, M A S; Pelloso, A C; Souza, A P

    2010-11-01

    The rice blast disease caused by the ascomycete Magnaporthe grisea continues to cause a tremendous impact in rice (Oryza sativa) cultures around the world. Elucidating the molecular basis of the fungus interactions with its host might help increase the general understanding of the pathogen-host relationship. At the moment of invasion, the fungus secretes effectors that modify host defenses and cellular processes as they successively invade living rice cells. PWL2, an effector protein, is a known AVR (avirulence) gene product. The PWL2 gene prevents the fungus from infecting weeping lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula). In this study, we identified a PWL2 allele gene (which we termed PWL2D) in a strain of M. grisea. The sequence of PWL2D has only two bases different from that of PWL2, producing alterations in residue 90 and residue 142. However, the alteration of residue 90 (from D(90) to N(90)) is critical to gene function. Here, we cloned the gene PWL2D in a pET System vector, expressed the gene product in Escherichia coli and evaluated by spectroscopic techniques some aspects of the PWL2D structure. While TRX-tagged PWL2D is prone to aggregation, the solubility of PWL2D is improved when it is overexpressed without its original signal peptide. Expression and purification procedures for these constructs are described. Finally, we found out that the protein seems to be an intrinsically disordered protein. Results from these studies will facilitate structural analysis of PWL2D and might contribute to understanding the gene's function and of fungal/plant interactions. PMID:20438845

  4. Kinetics of interaction of Cotton Leaf Curl Kokhran Virus-Dabawali (CLCuKV-Dab) coat protein and its mutants with ssDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Priyadarshini, C.G. Poornima; Savithri, H.S.

    2009-04-10

    Gemini viral assembly and transport of viral DNA into nucleus for replication, essentially involve DNA-coat protein interactions. The kinetics of interaction of Cotton Leaf Curl Kokhran Virus-Dabawali recombinant coat protein (rCP) with DNA was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The rCP interacted with ssDNA with a K{sub A}, of 2.6 +- 0.29 x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} in a sequence non-specific manner. The CP has a conserved C2H2 type zinc finger motif composed of residues C68, C72, H81 and H85. Mutation of these residues to alanine resulted in reduced binding to DNA probes. The H85A mutant rCP showed the least binding with approximately 756 fold loss in the association rate and a three order magnitude decrease in the binding affinity as compared to rCP. The CP-DNA interactions via the zinc finger motif could play a crucial role in virus assembly and in nuclear transport.

  5. Sum1, a highly conserved WD-repeat protein, suppresses S-M checkpoint mutants and inhibits the osmotic stress cell cycle response in fission yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, T; Enoch, T

    1998-01-01

    The S-M checkpoint ensures that entry into mitosis is dependent on completion of DNA replication. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SM checkpoint mutant cdc2-3w is thought to be defective in receiving the checkpoint signal. To isolate genes that function in the checkpoint pathway, we screened an S. pombe cDNA library for genes that, when overexpressed, could suppress the checkpoint defect of cdc2-3w. Using this approach, we have identified a novel gene, sum1+ (suppressor of uncontrolled mitosis). sum1+ encodes a highly conserved WD-transducin repeat protein with striking sequence similarity to the human transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-receptor interacting protein TRIP-1 and to the translation initiation factor 3 subunit eIF3-p39, encoded by the TIF34 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. pombe sum1+ is an essential gene, required for normal cell growth and division. In addition to restoring checkpoint control, overexpression of sum1+ inhibits the normal cell cycle response to osmotic stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inactivation of the stress-activated MAP kinase pathway, required for cell cycle stress response, restores the S-M checkpoint in cdc2-3w cells. These results suggest that Suml interacts with the stress-activated MAP kinase pathway and raise the possibility that environmental conditions may influence the checkpoint response in fission yeast. PMID:9560390

  6. A commercial PCV2a-based vaccine is effective in protection from experimental challenge of PCV2 mutant with two amino acids elongation in capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Long-Jun; Fu, Yu-Jie; Huang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yi-Ping; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2015-07-17

    Current commercial PCV2 vaccines are almost based on PCV2a and have been shown to be effective in reducing PCV2a and PCV2b viremia and PCV2-associated lesions and diseases. The recent emergence of novel mutant PCV2 (mPCV2) strains and linkage of mPCV2 with cases of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) in pig herds have raised concerns over emergence of vaccine-escape mutants and reduced efficacy of PCV2a-based vaccines. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a commercial PCV2a-based vaccine developed by our laboratory to protect conventional pigs against experimental challenge with mPCV2 at 9 weeks of age. Twenty 4-week-old pigs free of PCV2 infection were randomly divided into four treatment groups with 5 pigs each. Two groups were unvaccinated as positive and negative controls. Another two groups were vaccinated with the commercial PCV2a-based vaccine (PCV2-LG strain, China) at 4 weeks of age and identical booster immunization was conducted 3 weeks post primary immunization. At 9 weeks of age, all pigs except the negative control were challenged with a mutant PCV2b/YJ (mPCV2b/YJ) with two amino acids elongation in capsid protein. The experiment was terminated 28 days after challenge. Under the conditions of this study, vaccinated pigs were protected against PCV2 viremia and lesions whereas unvaccinated pigs were not. Moreover, mPCV2b/YJ infection was demonstrated in positive control and almost all had macroscopic or microscopic lesions consistent with PCVAD while negative control did not develop PCVAD. This study indicates that mPCV2b/YJ infection alone can trigger PCVAD development and that the commercial vaccine (PCV2-LG) is still effective in protecting conventional pigs against the emerging mPCV2b/YJ strain in China. PMID:26051516

  7. Induction of cell death by stimulation of protein kinase C in human epithelial cells expressing a mutant ras oncogene: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Hall-Jackson, C. A.; Jones, T.; Eccles, N. G.; Dawson, T. P.; Bond, J. A.; Gescher, A.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1998-01-01

    Ras oncogene activation is a key genetic event in several types of human cancer, making its signal pathways an ideal target for novel therapies. We previously showed that expression of mutant ras sensitizes human thyroid epithelial cells to induction of cell death by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and other phorbol esters. We have now investigated further the nature and mechanism of this cell death using both primary and cell line models. The cytotoxic effect of PMA could be blocked by bisindolylmaleimide (GF 109203X), a well-characterized inhibitor of c and n protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, and by prior down-regulation of PKC, indicating that it is mediated by acute stimulation, rather than down-regulation. Western analysis identified two candidate isoforms--alpha and epsilon--both of which showed PMA-induced subcellular translocation, either or both of which may be necessary for PMA-induced cell death. Immunofluorescence showed that PMA induced a rapid nuclear translocation of p42 MAP kinase of similar magnitude in the presence or absence of mutant ras expression. Cell death exhibited the microscopic features (chromatin condensation, TdT labelling) and DNA fragmentation typical of apoptosis but after a surprising lag (4 days). Taken together with recent models of ras-modulated apoptosis, our data suggest that activation of the MAPK pathway by PMA tips the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic signals generated by ras in favour of apoptosis. The high frequency of ras mutations in some cancers, such as cancer of the pancreas, which are refractory to conventional chemotherapy, together with the potential for stimulating PKC by cell-permeant pharmacological agents, makes this an attractive therapeutic approach. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:9744505

  8. Connexin Mutants and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.; Ebihara, Lisa; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2013-01-01

    The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8) have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating) or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death) and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles). These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues. PMID:23596416

  9. Importance of β2-β3 Loop Motion for the Increased Binding and Decreased Selectivity of the ΔLL Mutant of the Human Papillomavirus Type 6 E2 Protein.

    PubMed

    Gray, Geoffrey M; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2015-08-11

    The binding affinity of the human papillomavirus type 6 E2 protein is strongly mediated by the sequence of the DNA linker region, with high affinity for the AATT linker and low affinity for the CCGG linker. When two terminal leucine residues are removed from the protein, the level of binding to both strands increases, but unequally, resulting in a significant decrease in selectivity for the AATT linker strand. To rationalize this behavior, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type and mutant protein in the apo state and bound to DNA with high-affinity AATT and low-affinity CCGG linker strands. While no stable contacts were made between the β2-β3 loop and DNA in the wild type, this loop was repositioned in the mutant complexes and formed electrostatic contacts with the DNA backbone. More contacts were formed when the mutant was bound to the CCGG linker strand than to the AATT linker strand, resulting in a more favorable change in interaction energy for the CCGG strand. In addition, significant differences in correlated motions were found, which further explained the differences in binding. The simulations suggest that β2-β3 loop motions are responsible for the increased affinity and decreased selectivity of the mutant protein. PMID:26169609

  10. Protein Kinase Cι Drives a NOTCH3-dependent Stem-like Phenotype in Mutant KRAS Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Justilien, Verline; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R; Fields, Alan P

    2016-03-14

    We report that the protein kinase Cι (PKCι) oncogene controls expression of NOTCH3, a key driver of stemness, in KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PKCι activates NOTCH3 expression by phosphorylating the ELF3 transcription factor and driving ELF3 occupancy on the NOTCH3 promoter. PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling controls the tumor-initiating cell phenotype by regulating asymmetric cell division, a process necessary for tumor initiation and maintenance. Primary LADC tumors exhibit PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling, and combined pharmacologic blockade of PKCι and NOTCH synergistically inhibits tumorigenic behavior in vitro and LADC growth in vivo demonstrating the therapeutic potential of PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signal inhibition to more effectively treat KRAS LADC. PMID:26977885

  11. Generation of protein kinase Ck1α mutants which discriminate between canonical and non-canonical substrates

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Victor H.; Marin, Oriano; Meggio, Flavio; Cesaro, Luca; Allende, Catherine C.; Allende, Jorge E.; Pinna, Lorenzo A.

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase CK1 denotes a family of pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinases implicated in a variety of cellular functions. Typically, CK1 acts as a ‘phosphate-directed’ kinase whose targeting is primed by a single phosphorylated side chain at position n−3 or n−4 relative to serine/threonine, but increasing evidence is accumulating that CK1 can also engage some of its substrates at sites that do not conform to this canonical consensus. In the present paper, we show that CK1α phosphorylates with the same efficiency phosphopeptides primed by a phosphoserine residue at either n−3 [pS(−3)] or n−4 [pS(−4)] positions. The phosphorylation efficiency of the pS(−4) peptide, and to a lesser extent that of the pS(−3) peptide, is impaired by the triple mutation of the lysine residues in the K229KQK232 stretch to alanine residues, promoting 40-fold and 6-fold increases of Km respectively. In both cases, the individual mutation of Lys232 is as detrimental as the triple mutation. A kinetic alanine-scan analysis with a series of substituted peptide substrates in which the priming phosphoserine residue was effectively replaced by a cluster of four aspartate residues was also consistent with a crucial role of Lys232 in the recognition of the acidic determinant at position n−4. In sharp contrast, the phosphorylation of β-catenin and of a peptide including the non-canonical β-catenin site (Ser45) lacking acidic/phosphorylated determinants upstream is not significantly affected by mutations in the KKQK stretch. These data provide a molecular insight into the structural features that underlie the site specificity of CK1α and disclose the possibility of developing strategies for the preferential targeting of subsets of CK1 substrates. PMID:15975091

  12. Streptavidin mutants

    DOEpatents

    Sano, Takeshi; Cantor, Charles R.; Vajda, Sandor; Reznik, Gabriel O.; Smith, Cassandra L.; Pandori, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to streptavidin proteins and peptides having a altered physical properties such as an increased stability or increased or decreased affinity for binding biotin. The invention also relates to methods for the detection, identification, separation and isolation of targets using streptavidin proteins or peptides. Streptavidin with increased or reduced affinity allows for the use of the streptavidin-biotin coupling systems for detection and isolation systems wherein it is necessary to remove of one or the other of the binding partners. Such systems are useful for the purification of functional proteins and viable cells. The invention also relates to nucleic acids which encode these streptavidin proteins and peptides and to recombinant cells such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells which contain these nucleic acids.

  13. Genetic screen of a mutant poxvirus library identifies an ankyrin repeat protein involved in blocking induction of avian type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Stephen M; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen; Skinner, Michael A

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  14. Structure of wild type and mutant F508del CFTR: A small-angle X-ray scattering study of the protein-detergent complexes.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Naomi L; Satriano, Letizia; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Ford, Robert C; Moran, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    CFTR is an anionic channel expressed in epithelia whose mutations cause cystic fibrosis. Wild (WT) and mutated (F508del) types were over-expressed in yeast, solubilised in the detergent LPG-14 and purified. The detergent-CFTR complexes were studied by SAXS techniques using a solvent of variable density. The final result of the study is the numerical value of a set of parameters: molecular mass, volume and radius of gyration, average electron density and second moment of the electron density fluctuations inside the particles. It is also shown that in the complex the centres of gravity of CFTR and of the detergent are displaced relative to each other. The analysis of these parameters led to the determination of the size and shape of the volumes occupied by protein and by detergent in the complex. WT-CFTR to be an elongated molecule (maximum diameter ∼12.4nm) which spans a flat detergent micelle. The distance distribution function, P(r) confirms that the WT-CFTR is elongated and with an inhomogeneous electronic density. The F508del-CFTR molecule is also elongated (maximum diameter ∼13.2nm), but the associated detergent micelle hides a larger surface, plausibly related to an increased exposure of hydrophobic portions of the mutated protein. The corresponding P(r) is consistent with the presence of well defined domains, probably linked by flexible regions. These differences suggest that the full-length mutant F508del-CFTR has a detectably different conformation, in contrast to the minor differences observed for the isolated F508-containing domain. We interpret the data in terms of an incomplete post-translational assembly of the protein domains. PMID:26850167

  15. Functional deficiency of NBN, the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein, in a p.R215W mutant breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in NBN, the gene for Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS), are thought to predispose women to developing breast cancer, but a breast cancer cell line containing mutations in NBN has not yet been described. The p.R215W missense mutation occurs at sub-polymorphic frequencies in several populations. We aimed to investigate its functional impact in breast cancer cells from a carrier of this NBN mutation. Methods Breast cancer cell lines were screened by immunoblotting for NBN protein levels, and the NBN coding region was sequenced for mutation analysis. Radiosensitivity assays and functional studies were performed through immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting, and flow cytometry was employed to assess cell cycle progression. Impedance measurements were used to study the consequences of PARP1 inhibition. Statistical comparisons between cell lines were performed using t-tests. Results HCC1395 breast cancer cells exhibited reduced NBN protein levels. Direct sequencing identified the NBN p.R215W mutation in the hemizygous state, in addition to a truncation in BRCA1. Mutations in both genes were already present in the heterozygous state in the patient’s germline. HCC1395 cells were highly radiosensitive, susceptible to apoptosis and were deficient in the formation of NBN foci. There was also evidence for some impairment in the formation of γH2AX, MDC1, and 53BP1 foci after irradiation; these foci appeared smaller and irregular compared with repair foci in wild-type cells, although ATM signalling was largely unaffected. In line with their deficiency in NBN and BRCA1, HCC1395 cells were particularly sensitive to PARP1 inhibition. Conclusion Our results indicate that the p.R215W mutation in the HCC1395 breast cancer cell line impairs NBN function, making this cell line a potentially useful cellular model for studying defective NBN protein within a mutant BRCA1 background. PMID:24928521

  16. Escherichia coli sec mutants accumulate a processed immature form of maltose-binding protein (MBP), a late-phase intermediate in MBP export.

    PubMed

    Ueguchi, C; Ito, K

    1990-10-01

    Protein translocation across the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane may consist of several temporally or topographically distinct steps. Although early events in the translocation pathway have been characterized to some extent, the mechanisms responsible for the trans-bilayer movement of a polypeptide are only poorly understood. This article reports on our attempts to dissect the translocation pathway in vivo. A processed form of maltose-binding protein (MBP) was detected in the spheroplasts of secY and secA temperature-sensitive mutant cells that had been pulse-labeled at the permissive temperature (30 degrees C). This species of molecule was found to have an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the mature MBP, but a considerable fraction of it was inaccessible to externally added protease. It had not attained the protease-resistant conformation characteristically observed for the exported mature protein. The radioactivity associated with this species decreased during chase and was presumably converted into the exported mature form, a process that required energy, probably the proton motive force, as demonstrated by its inhibition by an energy uncoupler. The spheroplast-associated processed form was more predominantly observed in the presence of a low concentration of chloramphenicol. A similar intermediate was also detected for beta-lactamase in wild-type cells. These results suggest that in a late phase of translocation, the bulk of the polypeptide chain can move through the membrane in the absence of the covalently attached leader peptide, and the secA-secY gene products are somehow involved in this process. We termed the processed intermediates processed immature forms. PMID:2211501

  17. Genetic Screen of a Mutant Poxvirus Library Identifies an Ankyrin Repeat Protein Involved in Blocking Induction of Avian Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Robey, Rebecca; Davies, Marc; Giotis, Efstathios S.; Ross, Craig; Buttigieg, Karen; Goodbourn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VACV), have evolved multiple mechanisms to evade the host type I interferon (IFN) responses at different levels, with viral proteins targeting IFN induction, signaling, and antiviral effector functions. Avian poxviruses (avipoxviruses), which have been developed as recombinant vaccine vectors for permissive (i.e., poultry) and nonpermissive (i.e., mammals, including humans) species, encode no obvious equivalents of any of these proteins. We show that fowlpox virus (FWPV) fails to induce chicken beta IFN (ChIFN2) and is able to block its induction by transfected poly(I·C), an analog of cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). A broad-scale loss-of-function genetic screen was used to find FWPV-encoded modulators of poly(I·C)-mediated ChIFN2 induction. It identified fpv012, a member of a family of poxvirus genes highly expanded in the avipoxviruses (31 in FWPV; 51 in canarypox virus [CNPV], representing 15% of the total gene complement), encoding proteins containing N-terminal ankyrin repeats (ANKs) and C-terminal F-box-like motifs. Under ectopic expression, the first ANK of fpv012 is dispensable for inhibitory activity and the CNPV ortholog is also able to inhibit induction of ChIFN2. FWPV defective in fpv012 replicates well in culture and barely induces ChIFN2 during infection, suggesting that other factors are involved in blocking IFN induction and resisting the antiviral effectors. Nevertheless, unlike parental and revertant viruses, the mutants induce moderate levels of expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), suggesting either that there is sufficient ChIFN2 expression to partially induce the ISGs or the involvement of alternative, IFN-independent pathways that are also normally blocked by fpv012. PMID:23427153

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica. PMID:21176126

  19. Toxic gain of function from mutant FUS protein is crucial to trigger cell autonomous motor neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Sendscheid, Oliver; El Oussini, Hajer; Jambeau, Mélanie; Sun, Ying; Mersmann, Sina; Wagner, Marina; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Drenner, Kevin; Birling, Marie-Christine; Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Yu; Li, Hairi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Rouaux, Caroline; Shelkovnikova, Tatyana; Witting, Anke; Ludolph, Albert C; Kiefer, Friedemann; Storkebaum, Erik; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-05-17

    FUS is an RNA-binding protein involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Cytoplasmic FUS-containing aggregates are often associated with concomitant loss of nuclear FUS Whether loss of nuclear FUS function, gain of a cytoplasmic function, or a combination of both lead to neurodegeneration remains elusive. To address this question, we generated knockin mice expressing mislocalized cytoplasmic FUS and complete FUS knockout mice. Both mouse models display similar perinatal lethality with respiratory insufficiency, reduced body weight and length, and largely similar alterations in gene expression and mRNA splicing patterns, indicating that mislocalized FUS results in loss of its normal function. However, FUS knockin mice, but not FUS knockout mice, display reduced motor neuron numbers at birth, associated with enhanced motor neuron apoptosis, which can be rescued by cell-specific CRE-mediated expression of wild-type FUS within motor neurons. Together, our findings indicate that cytoplasmic FUS mislocalization not only leads to nuclear loss of function, but also triggers motor neuron death through a toxic gain of function within motor neurons. PMID:26951610

  20. Global Systems-Level Analysis of Hfq and SmpB Deletion Mutants in Salmonella: Implications for Virulence and Global Protein Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Yoon, Hyunjin; Porwollik, Steffen; Mottaz-Brewer, Heather; Petritis, Brianne O.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Adkins, Joshua N.; Mcclelland, Michael; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-11

    In recent years the profound importance of sRNA-mediated translational/post-transcriptional regulation has been increasingly appreciated. However, the global role played by translational regulation in control of gene expression has never been elucidated in any organism for the simple reason that global proteomics methods required to accurately characterize post-transcriptional processes and the knowledge of translational control mechanisms have only become available within the last few years. The proteins Hfq and SmpB are essential for the biological activity of a range of regulatory sRNAs and thus provide a means to identify potential targets of sRNA regulation. We performed a sample-matched global proteomics and transcriptional analysis to examine the role of Hfq and SmpB in global protein translation and virulence using the Salmonella typhimurium model system. Samples were analyzed from bacteria grown under four different conditions; two laboratory conditions and two that are thought to mimic the intracellular environment. We show that mutants of hfq and smpB directly or indirectly modulate at least 20% and 4% of all Salmonella proteins, respectively, with limited correlation between transcription and protein expression. This is the first report suggesting that SmpB could be a general translational regulator. The broad spectrum of proteins modulated by Hfq was also surprising including central metabolism, LPS biosynthesis, two-component regulatory systems, quorum sensing, SP1-TTSS, oxidative stress, fatty acid metabolism, nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism, envelope stress, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, amino acid biosynthesis, peptide transport, and motility.. The extent of global regulation of translation by Hfq is unexpected, with profound effects in all stages of Salmonella’s life cycle. Our results represent the first global systems-level analysis of translational regulation; the elucidated potential targets of sRNA regulation from our analysis will

  1. Manipulation of cellular GSH biosynthetic capacity via TAT-mediated protein transduction of wild-type or a dominant-negative mutant of glutamate cysteine ligase alters cell sensitivity to oxidant-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Backos, Donald S.; Brocker, Chad N.; Franklin, Christopher C.

    2010-02-15

    The glutathione (GSH) antioxidant defense system plays a central role in protecting mammalian cells against oxidative injury. Glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) is the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis and is a heterodimeric holoenzyme composed of catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunits. As a means of assessing the cytoprotective effects of enhanced GSH biosynthetic capacity, we have developed a protein transduction approach whereby recombinant GCL protein can be rapidly and directly transferred into cells when coupled to the HIV TAT protein transduction domain. Bacterial expression vectors encoding TAT fusion proteins of both GCL subunits were generated and recombinant fusion proteins were synthesized and purified to near homogeneity. The TAT-GCL fusion proteins were capable of heterodimerization and formation of functional GCL holoenzyme in vitro. Exposure of Hepa-1c1c7 cells to the TAT-GCL fusion proteins resulted in the time- and dose-dependent transduction of both GCL subunits and increased cellular GCL activity and GSH levels. A heterodimerization-competent, enzymatically deficient GCLC-TAT mutant was also generated in an attempt to create a dominant-negative suppressor of GCL. Transduction of cells with a catalytically inactive GCLC(E103A)-TAT mutant decreased cellular GCL activity in a dose-dependent manner. TAT-mediated manipulation of cellular GCL activity was also functionally relevant as transduction with wild-type GCLC(WT)-TAT or mutant GCLC(E103A)-TAT conferred protection or enhanced sensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death, respectively. These findings demonstrate that TAT-mediated transduction of wild-type or dominant-inhibitory mutants of the GCL subunits is a viable means of manipulating cellular GCL activity to assess the effects of altered GSH biosynthetic capacity.

  2. Small Molecule DFPM Derivative-Activated Plant Resistance Protein Signaling in Roots Is Unaffected by EDS1 Subcellular Targeting Signal and Chemical Genetic Isolation of victr R-Protein Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Mevers, Emily; García, Ana V.; Highhouse, Samantha; Gerwick, William H.; Parker, Jane E.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule DFPM ([5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione) was recently shown to trigger signal transduction via early effector-triggered immunity signaling genes including EDS1 and PAD4 in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0. Chemical genetic analyses of A. thaliana natural variants identified the plant Resistance protein-like Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor (TIR)-Nucleotide Binding (NB)-Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein VICTR as required for DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. Here a chemical genetic screen for mutants which disrupt DFPM-mediated root growth arrest in the Col-0 accession identified new mutant alleles of the TIR-NB-LRR gene VICTR. One allele, victr-6, carries a Gly216-to-Asp mutation in the Walker A domain supporting an important function of the VICTR nucleotide binding domain in DFPM responses consistent with VICTR acting as a canonical Resistance protein. The essential nucleo-cytoplasmic regulator of TIR-NB-LRR-mediated effector-triggered immunity, EDS1, was reported to have both nuclear and cytoplasmic actions in pathogen resistance. DFPM was used to investigate the requirements for subcellular EDS1 localization in DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. EDS1-YFP fusions engineered to localize mainly in the cytoplasm or the nucleus by tagging with a nuclear export signal (NES) or a nuclear localization signal (NLS), respectively, were tested. We found that wild-type EDS1-YFP and both the NES and NLS-tagged EDS1 variants were induced by DFPM treatments and fully complemented eds1 mutant plants in root responses to DFPM, suggesting that enrichment of EDS1 in either compartment could confer DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. We further found that a light and O2-dependent modification of DFPM is necessary to mediate DFPM signaling in roots. Chemical analyses including Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High-Resolution Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry identified a DFPM modification product that is

  3. Small Molecule DFPM Derivative-Activated Plant Resistance Protein Signaling in Roots Is Unaffected by EDS1 Subcellular Targeting Signal and Chemical Genetic Isolation of victr R-Protein Mutants.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Hans-Henning; Park, Jiyoung; Mevers, Emily; García, Ana V; Highhouse, Samantha; Gerwick, William H; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule DFPM ([5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione) was recently shown to trigger signal transduction via early effector-triggered immunity signaling genes including EDS1 and PAD4 in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0. Chemical genetic analyses of A. thaliana natural variants identified the plant Resistance protein-like Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor (TIR)-Nucleotide Binding (NB)-Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein VICTR as required for DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. Here a chemical genetic screen for mutants which disrupt DFPM-mediated root growth arrest in the Col-0 accession identified new mutant alleles of the TIR-NB-LRR gene VICTR. One allele, victr-6, carries a Gly216-to-Asp mutation in the Walker A domain supporting an important function of the VICTR nucleotide binding domain in DFPM responses consistent with VICTR acting as a canonical Resistance protein. The essential nucleo-cytoplasmic regulator of TIR-NB-LRR-mediated effector-triggered immunity, EDS1, was reported to have both nuclear and cytoplasmic actions in pathogen resistance. DFPM was used to investigate the requirements for subcellular EDS1 localization in DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. EDS1-YFP fusions engineered to localize mainly in the cytoplasm or the nucleus by tagging with a nuclear export signal (NES) or a nuclear localization signal (NLS), respectively, were tested. We found that wild-type EDS1-YFP and both the NES and NLS-tagged EDS1 variants were induced by DFPM treatments and fully complemented eds1 mutant plants in root responses to DFPM, suggesting that enrichment of EDS1 in either compartment could confer DFPM-mediated root growth arrest. We further found that a light and O2-dependent modification of DFPM is necessary to mediate DFPM signaling in roots. Chemical analyses including Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High-Resolution Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry identified a DFPM modification product that is

  4. Reconstitution of maltose chemotaxis in Escherichia coli by addition of maltose-binding protein to calcium-treated cells of maltose regulon mutants.

    PubMed

    Brass, J M; Manson, M D

    1984-03-01

    Maltose chemotaxis was reconstituted in delta malE cells lacking maltose-binding protein (MBP). Purified MBP was introduced into intact cells during incubation with 250 mM CaCl2 in Tris-hydrochloride buffer at 0 degrees C. After removal of extracellular CaCl2 and MBP, chemotaxis was measured with tethered bacteria in a flow chamber or with free-swimming cells in a capillary assay. About 20% of tethered cells responded to 10(-4) M maltose; the mean response times were about half those of CaCl2-treated wild-type cells (100 s as opposed to 190 s). In capillary tests, the maltose response of reconstituted cells was between 15 and 40% of the aspartate response, about the same percentage as in wild-type cells. The best reconstitution was seen with 0.5 to 1 mM MBP in the reconstitution mixture, which is similar to the periplasmic MBP concentration estimated for maltose-induced wild-type cells. Strains containing large deletions of the malB region and malT mutants lacking the positive regulator gene of the mal regulon also could be reconstituted for maltose chemotaxis, showing that no product of the mal regulon other than MBP is essential for maltose chemotaxis. PMID:6321442

  5. Gene Mapping of a Mutant Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Using New Molecular Markers Suggests a Gene Encoding a YUC4-like Protein Regulates the Chasmogamous Flower Trait.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingbin; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Xin; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xingxing; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) is a cleistogamous plant in which flowers are pollinated before they open, which prevents yield improvements through heterosis. We previously generated a chasmogamous mutant (CM) mungbean in which open flowers are pollinated. In this study, we developed insertion/deletion (indel) markers based on the transcriptome differences between CM and Sulu-1 (i.e., normal flowering) plants. An F2 population derived from a cross between CM and Sulu-1 was used for gene mapping. Segregation analyses revealed that a single recessive gene regulates the production of chasmogamous flowers. Using newly developed indel and simple sequence repeat markers, the cha gene responsible for the chasmogamous flower trait was mapped to a 277.1-kb segment on chromosome 6. Twelve candidate genes were detected in this segment, including Vradi06g12650, which encodes a YUCCA family protein associated with floral development. A single base pair deletion producing a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in Vradi06g12650 was detected only in CM plants. This suggested that Vradi06g12650 is a cha candidate gene. Our results provide important information for the molecular breeding of chasmogamous mungbean lines, which may serve as new genetic resources for hybrid cultivar development. PMID:27375671

  6. Multidrug resistance protein 1 reduces the aggregation of mutant huntingtin in neuronal cells derived from the Huntington's disease R6/2 model.

    PubMed

    Im, Wooseok; Ban, Jae-Jun; Chung, Jin-Young; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2015-01-01

    Mutant huntingtin (mHtt) aggregation in the nucleus is the most readily apparent phenotype and cause of neuronal death in Huntington's disease (HD). Inhibiting mHtt aggregation reduces cell death in the brain and is thus a promising therapeutic approach. The results of the present study demonstrated that mHtt aggregation in the nucleus was altered by the activity of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1), which was experimentally modulated by verapamil, siRNA and an expression vector. MDR1 detoxifies drugs and metabolites through its excretory functions in the membrane compartment, thereby protecting cells against death or senescence. When they were treated with verapamil, R6/2 mice showed a progressive decline in rotarod performance and increased mHtt aggregation in the brain. Using neuronal stem cells from R6/2 mice, we developed an in vitro HD model to test mHtt accumulation in the nuclei of neurons. When MDR1 activity in cells was decreased by verapamil or siRNA, mHtt aggregation in the nuclei increased, whereas the induction of MDR1 resulted in a decrease in mHtt aggregation. Thus, our data provide evidence that MDR1 plays an important role in the clearance of mHtt aggregation and may thus be a potential target for improving the survival of neurons in Huntington's disease. PMID:26586297

  7. Identification of four unique clones encoding 10 kDa proteins from Bacillus that cause phenotypic complementation of a phoA mutant strain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Edwards, C W; Hulett, F M

    1991-03-01

    A number of clones have been isolated from two Bacillus species which complement the PhoA- phenotype of Escherichia coli mutants under conditions that induce the expression of alkaline phosphatase (APase). These clones were initially thought to carry XPases because the transformed host could hydrolyse a common APase substrate, XP (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-phosphate). The sequences of the open reading frames responsible for the phenotypic complementation showed no sequence similarity to ATPases of E. coli, human (bone-liver-kidney, intestinal or placental) or Bacillus. Therefore, these clones were designated as XPA (for X Phosphatase Activity) clones. Four of the clones encoded small (10 kDa), basic, hydrophobic proteins. Two of these, xpaB from B. subtilis 168 and xpaL2 from B. licheniformis MC14, shared 62% identity at both the DNA and the predicted amino acid sequence level. The fact that homologues from two Bacillus strains were cloned indicated that the screen was specific, but not for APase genes. It is clear that phenotypic complementation with cloned DNA from another genus does not ensure the identification of an APase gene. Possible mechanisms for the abnormal phenotypic complementation are discussed. PMID:2033382

  8. Cardiolipin Molecular Species with Shorter Acyl Chains Accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mutants Lacking the Acyl Coenzyme A-binding Protein Acb1p

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, Pieter J.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Akbari, Hana; Brouwers, Jos F.; Koorengevel, Martijn C.; de Kruijff, Ben; Frentzen, Margrit; Vaz, Frédéric M.; de Kroon, Anton I. P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The function of the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is thought to depend on its acyl chain composition. The present study aims at a better understanding of the way the CL species profile is established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using depletion of the acyl-CoA-binding protein Acb1p as a tool to modulate the cellular acyl chain content. Despite the presence of an intact CL remodeling system, acyl chains shorter than 16 carbon atoms (C16) were found to accumulate in CL in cells lacking Acb1p. Further experiments revealed that Taz1p, a key CL remodeling enzyme, was not responsible for the shortening of CL in the absence of Acb1p. This left de novo CL synthesis as the only possible source of acyl chains shorter than C16 in CL. Experiments in which the substrate specificity of the yeast cardiolipin synthase Crd1p and the acyl chain composition of individual short CL species were investigated, indicated that both CL precursors (i.e. phosphatidylglycerol and CDP-diacylglycerol) contribute to comparable extents to the shorter acyl chains in CL in acb1 mutants. Based on the findings, we conclude that the fatty acid composition of mature CL in yeast is governed by the substrate specificity of the CL-specific lipase Cld1p and the fatty acid composition of the Taz1p substrates. PMID:19656950

  9. Gene Mapping of a Mutant Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Using New Molecular Markers Suggests a Gene Encoding a YUC4-like Protein Regulates the Chasmogamous Flower Trait

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingbin; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Xin; Cui, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Xingxing; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) is a cleistogamous plant in which flowers are pollinated before they open, which prevents yield improvements through heterosis. We previously generated a chasmogamous mutant (CM) mungbean in which open flowers are pollinated. In this study, we developed insertion/deletion (indel) markers based on the transcriptome differences between CM and Sulu-1 (i.e., normal flowering) plants. An F2 population derived from a cross between CM and Sulu-1 was used for gene mapping. Segregation analyses revealed that a single recessive gene regulates the production of chasmogamous flowers. Using newly developed indel and simple sequence repeat markers, the cha gene responsible for the chasmogamous flower trait was mapped to a 277.1-kb segment on chromosome 6. Twelve candidate genes were detected in this segment, including Vradi06g12650, which encodes a YUCCA family protein associated with floral development. A single base pair deletion producing a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon in Vradi06g12650 was detected only in CM plants. This suggested that Vradi06g12650 is a cha candidate gene. Our results provide important information for the molecular breeding of chasmogamous mungbean lines, which may serve as new genetic resources for hybrid cultivar development. PMID:27375671

  10. An Adenovirus Type 5 Mutant with the Preterminal Protein Gene Deleted Efficiently Provides Helper Functions for the Production of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Ian H.; Maxwell, Francoise; Schaack, Jerome

    1998-01-01

    Production of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) requires helper functions that have routinely been provided by infection of the producer cells with adenovirus. Complete removal and/or inactivation of progeny adenovirus, present in such rAAV preparations, presents significant difficulty. Here, we report that an adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) mutant with the preterminal protein (pTP) gene deleted can provide helper function for the growth of rAAV. At high multiplicity, Ad5dl308ΔpTP was as efficient as the phenotypically wild-type Ad5dl309 in permitting growth of rAAV. Use of Ad5dl308ΔpTP, which is incapable of replication in the absence of complementation for pTP, as a helper avoids the need to remove contaminating adenovirus infectious activity by heat inactivation or by purification. Comparison of the transducing ability of rAAV generated with either Ad5dl308ΔpTP or Ad5dl309 as a helper demonstrated that the heat inactivation protocol generally used does not remove all of the helper Ad5dl309 function. PMID:9733887

  11. Structure and potential C-terminal dimerization of a recombinant mutant of surfactant-associated protein C in chloroform/methanol.

    PubMed

    Luy, Burkhard; Diener, Alexander; Hummel, Rolf-Peter; Sturm, Ernst; Ulrich, Wolf-Rüdiger; Griesinger, Christian

    2004-06-01

    The solution structure of a recombinant mutant [rSP-C (FFI)] of the human surfactant-associated protein C (hSP-C) in a mixture of chloroform and methanol was determined by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. rSP-C (FFI) contains a helix from Phe5 to the C-terminal Leu34 and is thus longer by two residues than the helix of porcine SP-C (pSP-C), which is reported to start at Val7 in the same solvent. Two sets of resonances at the C-terminus of the peptide were observed, which are explained by low-order oligomerization, probably dimerization of rSP-C (FFI) in its alpha-helical form. The dimerization may be induced by hydrogen bonding of the C-terminal carboxylic groups or by the strictly conserved C-terminal heptapeptide segment with a motif similar to the GxxxG dimerization motif of glycophorin A. Dimerization at the heptapeptide segment would be consistent with findings based on electrospray ionization MS data, chemical cross-linking studies, and CNBr cleavage data. PMID:15153097

  12. Functional characterization of mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacking short domains within the large, lumen-exposed loop of the chlorophyll protein CP47 in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gleiter, H M; Haag, E; Shen, J R; Eaton-Rye, J J; Inoue, Y; Vermaas, W F; Renger, G

    1994-10-11

    Several autotrophic mutant strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 carrying short deletions or a single-site mutation within the large, lumen-exposed loop (loop E) of the chlorophyll a-binding photosystem II core protein, CP47, are analyzed for their functional properties by measuring the flash-induced pattern of thermoluminescence, oxygen yield, and fluorescence quantum yield. A physiological and biochemical characterization of these mutant strains has been given in two previous reports [Eaton-Rye, J.J., & Vermaas, W.F.J. (1991) Plant Mol. Biol. 17, 1165-1177; Haag, E., Eaton-Rye, J.J., Renger, G., & Vermaas, S. F.J. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 4444-4454]. The results of the present study show that deletion of charged and conserved amino acids in a region roughly located between residues 370 and 390 decreases the binding affinity of the extrinsic PS II-O protein to photosystem II. Marked differences with PSII-O deletion mutants are observed with respect to Ca2+ requirement and the flash-induced pattern of oxygen evolution. Under conditions where a sufficient light activation is provided, the psbB mutants assayed in this study reveal normal S-state parameters and lifetimes. The results bear two basic implications: (i) the manganese involved in water oxidation can still be bound in a functionally normal or only slightly distorted manner, and (ii) the binding of the extrinsic PS II-O protein to photosystem II is impaired in mutants carrying a deletion in the domain between residues 370 and 390, but the presence of the PS II-O protein is still of functional relevance for the PS II complex, e.g., for maintenance of a high-affinity binding site for Ca2+ and/or involvement during the process of photoactivation. PMID:7918426

  13. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway plays a critical role in regulating immunological properties of BRAF mutant cutaneous melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Chery A; Boni, Andrea; Fisher, Jan L; Hampton, Thomas H; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Mellinger, Diane L; Yan, Shaofeng; Tafe, Laura J; Brinckerhoff, Constance E; Turk, Mary J; Mullins, David W; Fadul, Camilo E; Ernstoff, Marc S

    2016-06-01

    The advent of drugs targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has markedly changed the treatment of advanced-stage melanoma harboring BRAF mutations. However, drug resistance, through mechanisms not well elucidated, often occurs. A better understanding of how melanoma-derived immunologically active molecules change in response to MAPK inhibition of BRAF mutated (BRAF) and BRAF wild type (BRAF) melanomas could help identify promising treatment combinations of small molecule inhibitors and immunotherapy. To this aim, we treated 13 BRAF and 13 BRAF mutated human melanoma cell lines with either a specific BRAF inhibitor or an MEK1/2 inhibitor and analyzed changes in the secretion of 42 selected cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. We also measured changes in the expression levels of immunologically relevant melanoma cell surface markers. The BRAF melanomas showed minimal changes in response to the inhibitors, whereas the BRAF cell lines showed, on average, a significant decrease in IFNα2, interleukin-7, Fractalkine, GCSF, GRO, TGFα2, interleukin-8, and VEGF, as well as a reduction in pERK and pMEK protein levels, upon MAPK pathway blockade. BRAF inhibition in BRAF cell lines also resulted in significant changes in the expression of several surface markers including upregulation of β2-microglobulin as well as a decrease in MIC A/B and TRAIL-R2. These results indicate that MAPK pathway inhibition leads to changes in the immunological properties of mutant BRAF melanoma cells and lends support for future studies aimed at designing effective treatment strategies that combine BRAF and MEK inhibition with immunotherapy. PMID:26974965

  14. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunmin; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Yim, Kendrick; Rivas, Candy; Alarcon, Sylvia; Schwartz, Harvey; Khamit-Kush, Kofi; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Beebe, Kristin; Trepel, Jane B.; Neckers, Len

    2015-01-01

    The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states. PMID:26517842

  15. Abscisic Acid–Responsive Guard Cell Metabolomes of Arabidopsis Wild-Type and gpa1 G-Protein Mutants[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaofen; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Zhu, Mengmeng; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Albert, Reka; Chen, Sixue; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Individual metabolites have been implicated in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in guard cells, but a metabolite profile of this specialized cell type is lacking. We used liquid chromatography–multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for targeted analysis of 85 signaling-related metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell protoplasts over a time course of ABA treatment. The analysis utilized ∼350 million guard cell protoplasts from ∼30,000 plants of the Arabidopsis Columbia accession (Col) wild type and the heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit mutant, gpa1, which has ABA-hyposensitive stomata. These metabolomes revealed coordinated regulation of signaling metabolites in unrelated biochemical pathways. Metabolites clustered into different temporal modules in Col versus gpa1, with fewer metabolites showing ABA-altered profiles in gpa1. Ca2+-mobilizing agents sphingosine-1-phosphate and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose exhibited weaker ABA-stimulated increases in gpa1. Hormone metabolites were responsive to ABA, with generally greater responsiveness in Col than in gpa1. Most hormones also showed different ABA responses in guard cell versus mesophyll cell metabolomes. These findings suggest that ABA functions upstream to regulate other hormones, and are also consistent with G proteins modulating multiple hormonal signaling pathways. In particular, indole-3-acetic acid levels declined after ABA treatment in Col but not gpa1 guard cells. Consistent with this observation, the auxin antagonist α-(phenyl ethyl-2-one)-indole-3-acetic acid enhanced ABA-regulated stomatal movement and restored partial ABA sensitivity to gpa1. PMID:24368793

  16. The single N-glycan deletion mutant of soluble ErbB3 protein attenuates heregulin β1-induced tumor progression by blocking of the HIF-1 and Nrf2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Takamiya, Rina Takahashi, Motoko; Uehara, Yasuaki; Ariki, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Jiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Kuroki, Yoshio

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant blocks heregulin β1 induced nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant attenuates cancer cell migration induced by heregulin β1. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant blocks heregulin β1 induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2. • The sErbB3 N418Q mutant may be a potential therapeutic application for tumor. - Abstract: It has been well documented that activation of the ErbB3–PI3K–Akt pathway is implicated in tumor survival and progression. We previously demonstrated that the single N-glycan deletion mutant of soluble ErbB3 protein (sErbB3 N418Q) attenuates heregulin β1-induced ErbB3 signaling. The active PI3K–Akt pathway augments the nuclear accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which activates the transcription of many target genes and drives cancer progression. In this study, we focused on the effects of sErbB3 N418Q mutant on nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. Pretreatment with the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed heregulin β1-induced HIF-1α activation in MCF7 cells. Similar results were also obtained in other breast cancer cell lines, T47D and BT474. Interestingly, these suppressive effects were not observed with the sErbB3 wild type. In addition, pretreatment with the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed the cell migration of MCF7 cells induced by heregulin β1. Furthermore, incubation with heregulin β1 also induced the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, and this effect was also reduced by the sErbB3 N418Q mutant, but not the sErbB3 wild type. These findings indicated that the sErbB3 N418Q mutant suppressed malignant formation of cancer cells by blocking of the HIF-1α and Nrf2 pathways.

  17. Impaired Auxin Biosynthesis in the defective endosperm18 Mutant Is Due to Mutational Loss of Expression in the ZmYuc1 Gene Encoding Endosperm-Specific YUCCA1 Protein in Maize1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Jamila; Lanubile, Alessandra; Li, Qin-Bao; Kumar, Dibyendu; Kladnik, Aleš; Cook, Sam D.; Ross, John J.; Marocco, Adriano; Chourey, Prem S.

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) plays a fundamental role in vegetative and reproductive plant development. Here, we characterized a seed-specific viable maize (Zea mays) mutant, defective endosperm18 (de18) that is impaired in IAA biosynthesis. de18 endosperm showed large reductions of free IAA levels and is known to have approximately 40% less dry mass, compared with De18. Cellular analyses showed lower total cell number, smaller cell volume, and reduced level of endoreduplication in the mutant endosperm. Gene expression analyses of seed-specific tryptophan-dependent IAA pathway genes, maize Yucca1 (ZmYuc1), and two tryptophan-aminotransferase co-orthologs were performed to understand the molecular basis of the IAA deficiency in the mutant. Temporally, all three genes showed high expression coincident with high IAA levels; however, only ZmYuc1 correlated with the reduced IAA levels in the mutant throughout endosperm development. Furthermore, sequence analyses of ZmYuc1 complementary DNA and genomic clones revealed many changes specific to the mutant, including a 2-bp insertion that generated a premature stop codon and a truncated YUC1 protein of 212 amino acids, compared with the 400 amino acids in the De18. The putative, approximately 1.5-kb, Yuc1 promoter region also showed many rearrangements, including a 151-bp deletion in the mutant. Our concurrent high-density mapping and annotation studies of chromosome 10, contig 395, showed that the De18 locus was tightly linked to the gene ZmYuc1. Collectively, the data suggest that the molecular changes in the ZmYuc1 gene encoding the YUC1 protein are the causal basis of impairment in a critical step in IAA biosynthesis, essential for normal endosperm development in maize. PMID:22961134

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1 sequesters Hu antigen R (HuR) and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR): implications for impaired post-transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liang; Wang, Shuying; Zheng, Lei; Li, Xuelin; Suswam, Esther A; Zhang, Xiaowen; Wheeler, Crystal G; Nabors, L B; Filippova, Natalia; King, Peter H

    2009-12-01

    Down-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the mouse leads to progressive and selective degeneration of motor neurons similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In mice expressing ALS-associated mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), VEGF mRNA expression in the spinal cord declines significantly prior to the onset of clinical manifestations. In vitro models suggest that dysregulation of VEGF mRNA stability contributes to that decline. Here, we show that the major RNA stabilizer, Hu Antigen R (HuR), and TIA-1-related protein (TIAR) colocalize with mutant SOD1 in mouse spinal cord extracts and cultured glioma cells. The colocalization was markedly reduced or abolished by RNase treatment. Immunoanalysis of transfected cells indicated that colocalization occurred in insoluble aggregates and inclusions. RNA immunoprecipitation showed a significant loss of VEGF mRNA binding to HuR and TIAR in mutant SOD1 cells, and there was marked depletion of HuR from polysomes. Ectopic expression of HuR in mutant SOD1 cells more than doubled the mRNA half-life of VEGF and significantly increased expression to that of wild-type SOD1 control. Cellular effects produced by mutant SOD1, including impaired mitochondrial function and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, were reversed by HuR in a gene dose-dependent pattern. In summary, our findings indicate that mutant SOD1 impairs post-transcriptional regulation by sequestering key regulatory RNA-binding proteins. The rescue effect of HuR suggests that this impairment, whether related to VEGF or other potential mRNA targets, contributes to cytotoxicity in ALS. PMID:19805546

  19. Proteomic analysis of proteins related to rice grain chalkiness using iTRAQ and a novel comparison system based on a notched-belly mutant with white-belly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain chalkiness is a complex trait adversely affecting appearance and milling quality, and therefore has been one of principal targets for rice improvement. Eliminating chalkiness from rice has been a daunting task due to the complex interaction between genotype and environment and the lack of molecular markers. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying grain chalkiness formation are still imperfectly understood. Results We identified a notched-belly mutant (DY1102) with high percentage of white-belly, which only occurs in the bottom part proximal to the embryo. Using this mutant, a novel comparison system that can minimize the effect of genetic background and growing environment was developed. An iTRAQ-based comparative display of the proteins between the bottom chalky part and the upper translucent part of grains of DY1102 was performed. A total of 113 proteins responsible for chalkiness formation was identified. Among them, 70 proteins are up-regulated and 43 down-regulated. Approximately half of these differentially expressed proteins involved in central metabolic or regulatory pathways including carbohydrate metabolism (especially cell wall synthesis) and protein synthesis, folding and degradation, providing proteomic confirmation of the notion that chalkiness formation involves diverse but delicately regulated pathways. Protein metabolism was the most abundant category, accounting for 27.4% of the total differentially expressed proteins. In addition, down regulation of PDIL 2–3 and BiP was detected in the chalky tissue, indicating the important role of protein metabolism in grain chalkiness formation. Conclusions Using this novel comparison system, our comprehensive survey of endosperm proteomics in the notched-belly mutant provides a valuable proteomic resource for the characterization of pathways contributing to chalkiness formation at molecular and biochemical levels. PMID:24924297

  20. cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase HSPDE4D3 mutants which mimic activation and changes in rolipram inhibition triggered by protein kinase A phosphorylation of Ser-54: generation of a molecular model.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, R; Wilkinson, I R; McCallum, J F; Engels, P; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    Ser-13 and Ser-54 were shown to provide the sole sites for the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the human cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform HSPDE4D3. The ability of PKA to phosphorylate and activate HSPDE4D3 was mimicked by replacing Ser-54 with either of the negatively charged amino acids, aspartate or glutamate, within the consensus motif of RRES54. The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram ¿4-[3-(cyclopentoxy)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone¿ inhibited both PKA-phosphorylated HSPDE4D3 and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant, with an IC50 value that was approximately 8-fold lower than that seen for the non-PKA-phosphorylated enzyme. Lower IC50 values for inhibition by rolipram were seen for a wide range of non-activated residue 54 mutants, except for those which had side-chains able to serve as hydrogen-bond donors, namely the Ser-54-->Thr, Ser-54-->Tyr and Ser-54-->Cys mutants. The Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited an activity comparable with that of the PKA phosphorylated native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp mutant but, in contrast to the native enzyme, was insensitive to activation by PKA, despite being more rapidly phosphorylated by this protein kinase. The activated Glu-53-->Ala mutant exhibited a sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram which was unchanged from that of the native enzyme. The double mutant, Arg-51-->Ala/Arg-52-->Ala, showed no change in either enzyme activity or rolipram inhibition from the native enzyme and was incapable of providing a substrate for PKA phosphorylation at Ser-54. No difference in inhibition by dipyridamole was seen for the native enzyme and the Ser-54-->Asp and Ser-54-->Ala mutants. A model is proposed which envisages that phosphorylation by PKA triggers at least two distinct conformational changes in HSPDE4D3; one of these gives rise to enzyme activation and another enhances sensitivity to inhibition by rolipram. Activation of HSPDE4D3 by PKA-mediated phosphorylation is suggested to involve disruption of an ion

  1. Dissection of β-barrel Outer Membrane Protein Assembly Pathways through Characterizing BamA POTRA 1 Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bennion, Drew; Charlson, Emily S.; Coon, Eric; Misra, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Summary BamA of Escherichia coli is an essential component of the hetero-oligomeric machinery that mediates β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly. The C- and N-termini of BamA fold into trans-membrane β-barrel and five soluble POTRA domains, respectively. Detailed characterization of BamA POTRA 1 missense and deletion mutants revealed two competing OMP assembly pathways, one of which is followed by the archetypal trimeric β-barrel OMPs, OmpF and LamB, and is dependent on POTRA 1. Interestingly, our data suggest that BamA also requires its POTRA 1 domain for proper assembly. The second pathway is independent of POTRA 1 and is exemplified by TolC. Site-specific cross-linking analysis revealed that the POTRA 1 domain of BamA interacts with SurA, a periplasmic chaperone required for the assembly of OmpF and LamB, but not that of TolC and BamA. The data suggest that SurA and BamA POTRA 1 domain function in concert to assist folding and assembly of most β-barrel OMPs except for TolC, which folds into a unique soluble α-helical barrel and an OM-anchored β-barrel. The two assembly pathways finally merge at some step beyond POTRA 1 but presumably before membrane insertion, which is thought to be catalyzed by the trans-membrane β-barrel domain of Bam A. PMID:20598079

  2. Dissection of β-barrel outer membrane protein assembly pathways through characterizing BamA POTRA 1 mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bennion, Drew; Charlson, Emily S; Coon, Eric; Misra, Rajeev

    2010-09-01

    BamA of Escherichia coli is an essential component of the hetero-oligomeric machinery that mediates β-barrel outer membrane protein (OMP) assembly. The C- and N-termini of BamA fold into trans-membrane β-barrel and five soluble POTRA domains respectively. Detailed characterization of BamA POTRA 1 missense and deletion mutants revealed two competing OMP assembly pathways, one of which is followed by the archetypal trimeric β-barrel OMPs, OmpF and LamB, and is dependent on POTRA 1. Interestingly, our data suggest that BamA also requires its POTRA 1 domain for proper assembly. The second pathway is independent of POTRA 1 and is exemplified by TolC. Site-specific cross-linking analysis revealed that the POTRA 1 domain of BamA interacts with SurA, a periplasmic chaperone required for the assembly of OmpF and LamB, but not that of TolC and BamA. The data suggest that SurA and BamA POTRA 1 domain function in concert to assist folding and assembly of most β-barrel OMPs except for TolC, which folds into a unique soluble α-helical barrel and an OM-anchored β-barrel. The two assembly pathways finally merge at some step beyond POTRA 1 but presumably before membrane insertion, which is thought to be catalysed by the trans-membrane β-barrel domain of BamA. PMID:20598079

  3. A vaccine based on a mutant transferrin binding protein B of Haemophilus parasuis induces a strong T-helper 2 response and bacterial clearance after experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Sonia; Frandoloso, Rafael; Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías-Fernando; García-Iglesias, María-José; Pérez-Martínez, Claudia; Álvarez-Estrada, Álvaro; Gutiérrez-Martín, César-Bernardo

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to characterize the type of immune response induced by an experimental vaccine based on a mutant Haemophilus parasuis transferrin binding protein (Tbp) B (Y167A) defective in its ability to bind porcine transferrin. Clinical and pathological signs, bacterial clearance, antibody response and the cytokine profile in alveolar macrophages and spleen after the vaccination and challenge of twenty-two colostrum-deprived pigs with 10(8) CFU of H. parasuis were analysed. Pigs vaccinated with Y167A were compared to those vaccinated with native TbpB (nTbpB), those treated with a commercial bacterin (CB) against Glässer's disease, those unvaccinated challenged (CH) and those unvaccinated unchallenged (UNCH) pigs. The rectal temperatures of Y167A pigs resembled those of UNCH pigs and were significantly lower than those of the nTbpB, CB and CH animals. A major reduction in pathological changes of the challenged pigs was observed in the Y167A group. H. parasuis was cleared from 88.9% of the samples from Y167A pigs versus 60.0% and 55.6% from those of the CB and nTbpB groups, respectively. The antibody response elicited by Y167A by ELISA was notably higher than that observed for nTbpB and CB pigs and was capable of preventing the expression and secretion of IL-8. The expression of IL-4 and IL-5, which were associated with the specific antibody levels, suggests that the main mechanism of protection conferred by Y167A vaccine is based on a strong T-helper 2 response. PMID:27590421

  4. A mouse model of Townes-Brocks syndrome expressing a truncated mutant Sall1 protein is protected from acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Sara; El-Achkar, Tarek; Robbins, Lynn; Basta, Jeannine; Heitmeier, Monique; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Rauchman, Michael

    2015-11-15

    It has been postulated that developmental pathways are reutilized during repair and regeneration after injury, but functional analysis of many genes required for kidney formation has not been performed in the adult organ. Mutations in SALL1 cause Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) and nonsyndromic congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, both of which lead to childhood kidney failure. Sall1 is a transcriptional regulator that is expressed in renal progenitor cells and developing nephrons in the embryo. However, its role in the adult kidney has not been investigated. Using a mouse model of TBS (Sall1TBS), we investigated the role of Sall1 in response to acute kidney injury. Our studies revealed that Sall1 is expressed in terminally differentiated renal epithelia, including the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, in the mature kidney. Sall1TBS mice exhibited significant protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury and aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity. This protection from acute injury is seen despite the presence of slowly progressive chronic kidney disease in Sall1TBS mice. Mice containing null alleles of Sall1 are not protected from acute kidney injury, indicating that expression of a truncated mutant protein from the Sall1TBS allele, while causative of congenital anomalies, protects the adult kidney from injury. Our studies further revealed that basal levels of the preconditioning factor heme oxygenase-1 are elevated in Sall1TBS kidneys, suggesting a mechanism for the relative resistance to injury in this model. Together, these studies establish a functional role for Sall1 in the response of the adult kidney to acute injury. PMID:26311113

  5. Kasugamycin-dependent mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dabbs, E R

    1978-01-01

    Kasugamycin-dependent mutants have been isolated from Escherichia coli B. They were obtained through mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate or nitrosoguanidine in conjunction with an antibiotic underlay technique. In the case of nitrosoguanidine, dependent mutants were obtained at a frequency of about 3% of survivors growing up in the selection. In the case of ethyl methane sulfonate, the corresponding value was 1%. Nineteen mutants showing a kasugamycin-dependent phenotype were studied. In terms of response to various temperatures and antibiotic concentrations, they were very heterogeneous, although most fell into two general classes. Genetic analysis indicated that in at least some cases, the kasugamycin-dependent phenotype was the product of two mutations. Two-dimensional gel electropherograms revealed alterations in the ribosomal proteins of seven mutants. One mutant had an alteration in protein S13, and one had an alteration in protein L14. Three showed changes in protein S9. Each of two mutants had changes in two proteins, S18 and L11. Three of these mutants additionally had protein S18 occurring in a partly altered, partly unaltered form. Images PMID:363701

  6. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  7. Mutational analysis of the D1/E1 core helices and the conserved N-terminal region of yeast transcription factor IIB (TFIIB): identification of an N-terminal mutant that stabilizes TATA-binding protein-TFIIB-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bangur, C S; Pardee, T S; Ponticelli, A S

    1997-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) plays an essential role in transcription of protein-coding genes by RNA polymerase II. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to assess the role of conserved amino acids in several important regions of yeast TFIIB. These include residues in the highly conserved amino-terminal region and basic residues in the D1 and E1 core domain alpha-helices. Acidic substitutions of residues K190 (D1) and K201 (E1) resulted in growth impairments in vivo, reduced basal transcriptional activity in vitro, and an inability to form stable TFIIB-TATA-binding protein-DNA (DB) complexes. Significantly, these mutants retained the ability to respond to acidic activators in vivo and to the Gal4-VP16 activator in vitro, supporting the view that these basic residues play a role in basal transcription. In addition, 14 single-amino-acid substitutions were introduced in the conserved amino-terminal region. Three of these mutants, the L50D, R64E, and R78L mutants, displayed altered growth properties in vivo and were compromised for supporting transcription in vitro. The L50D mutant was impaired for RNA polymerase II interaction, while the R64E mutant exhibited altered transcription start site selection both in vitro and in vivo and, surprisingly, was more active than the wild type in the formation of stable DB complexes. These results support the view that the amino-terminal domain is involved in the direct interaction between yeast TFIIB and RNA polymerase II and suggest that this domain may interact with DNA and/or modulate the formation of a DB complex. PMID:9372909

  8. Greening under high light or cold temperature affects the level of xanthophyll-cycle pigments, early light-inducible proteins, and light-harvesting polypeptides in wild-type barley and the chlorina f2 mutant

    PubMed

    Krol; Ivanov; Jansson; Kloppstech; Huner

    1999-05-01

    Etiolated seedlings of wild type and the chlorina f2 mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare) were exposed to greening at either 5 degrees C or 20 degrees C and continuous illumination varying from 50 to 800 &mgr;mol m-2 s-1. Exposure to either moderate temperature and high light or low temperature and moderate light inhibited chlorophyll a and b accumulation in the wild type and in the f2 mutant. Continuous illumination under these greening conditions resulted in transient accumulations of zeaxanthin, concomitant transient decreases in violaxanthin, and fluctuations in the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll pool. Photoinhibition-induced xanthophyll-cycle activity was detectable after only 3 h of greening at 20 degrees C and 250 &mgr;mol m-2 s-1. Immunoblot analyses of the accumulation of the 14-kD early light-inducible protein but not the major (Lhcb2) or minor (Lhcb5) light-harvesting polypeptides demonstrated transient kinetics similar to those observed for zeaxanthin accumulation during greening at either 5 degrees C or 20 degrees C for both the wild type and the f2 mutant. Furthermore, greening of the f2 mutant at either 5 degrees C or 20 degrees C indicated that Lhcb2 is not essential for the regulation of the xanthophyll cycle in barley. These results are consistent with the thesis that early light-inducible proteins may bind zeaxanthin as well as other xanthophylls and dissipate excess light energy to protect the developing photosynthetic apparatus from excess excitation. We discuss the role of energy balance and photosystem II excitation pressure in the regulation of the xanthophyll cycle during chloroplast biogenesis in wild-type barley and the f2 mutant. PMID:10318697

  9. Greening under High Light or Cold Temperature Affects the Level of Xanthophyll-Cycle Pigments, Early Light-Inducible Proteins, and Light-Harvesting Polypeptides in Wild-Type Barley and the Chlorina f2 Mutant1

    PubMed Central

    Król, Marianna; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Jansson, Stefan; Kloppstech, Klaus; Huner, Norman P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Etiolated seedlings of wild type and the chlorina f2 mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare) were exposed to greening at either 5°C or 20°C and continuous illumination varying from 50 to 800 μmol m−2 s−1. Exposure to either moderate temperature and high light or low temperature and moderate light inhibited chlorophyll a and b accumulation in the wild type and in the f2 mutant. Continuous illumination under these greening conditions resulted in transient accumulations of zeaxanthin, concomitant transient decreases in violaxanthin, and fluctuations in the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll pool. Photoinhibition-induced xanthophyll-cycle activity was detectable after only 3 h of greening at 20°C and 250 μmol m−2 s−1. Immunoblot analyses of the accumulation of the 14-kD early light-inducible protein but not the major (Lhcb2) or minor (Lhcb5) light-harvesting polypeptides demonstrated transient kinetics similar to those observed for zeaxanthin accumulation during greening at either 5°C or 20°C for both the wild type and the f2 mutant. Furthermore, greening of the f2 mutant at either 5°C or 20°C indicated that Lhcb2 is not essential for the regulation of the xanthophyll cycle in barley. These results are consistent with the thesis that early light-inducible proteins may bind zeaxanthin as well as other xanthophylls and dissipate excess light energy to protect the developing photosynthetic apparatus from excess excitation. We discuss the role of energy balance and photosystem II excitation pressure in the regulation of the xanthophyll cycle during chloroplast biogenesis in wild-type barley and the f2 mutant. PMID:10318697

  10. A Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) Mutant with 234 Amino Acids in Capsid Protein Showed More Virulence In Vivo, Compared with Classical PCV2a/b Strain

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Longjun; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Yiping; Lu, Yuehua; Wei, Yanwu; Tang, Qinghai; Fan, Peihu; Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Feiyan; Huang, Liping; Liu, Dan; Li, Shengbin; Wu, Hongli; Liu, Changming

    2012-01-01

    Background Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is considered to be the primary causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), which has become a serious economic problem for the swine industry worldwide. The major genotypes, PCV2a and PCV2b, are highly prevalent in the pig population and are present worldwide. However, another newly emerging PCV2b genotype mutant, which has a mutation in its ORF2-encoded capsid protein, has been sporadically present in China, as well as in other countries. It is therefore important to determine the relative virulence of the newly emerging PCV2b genotype mutant, compared with the existing PCV2a and PCV2b genotypes, and to investigate whether the newly emerging mutant virus induces more severe illness. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty healthy, 30-day-old, commercial piglets served as controls or were challenged with PCV2a, PCV2b and the newly emerging mutant virus. A series of indexes representing different parameters were adopted to evaluate virulence, including clinical signs, serological detection, viral load and distribution, changes in immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood, and evaluation of pathological lesions. The newly emerging PCV2 mutant demonstrated more severe signs compatible with PMWS, characterized by wasting, coughing, dyspnea, diarrhea, rough hair-coat and depression. Moreover, the pathological lesions and viremia, as well as the viral loads in lymph nodes, tonsils and spleen, were significantly more severe (P<0.05) for piglets challenged with the newly emerging mutant compared with those in the groups challenged with PCV2a and PCV2b. In addition, a significantly lower average daily weight gain (P<0.05) was recorded in the group challenged with the newly emerging PCV2 mutant than in the groups challenged with the prevailing PCV2a and PCV2b. Conclusions This is believed to be the first report to confirm the enhanced virulence of the newly emerging PCV2 mutant in vivo. PMID:22829951

  11. Effects of dicer-like endoribonucleases 2 and 4 on infection of Arabidopsis thaliana by cucumber mosaic virus and a mutant virus lacking the 2b counter-defence protein gene.

    PubMed

    Ziebell, Heiko; Carr, John P

    2009-09-01

    In tobacco and Nicotiana benthamiana, limited cross-protection against cucumber mosaic virus strain Fny (Fny-CMV) was provided by prior inoculation with a deletion mutant lacking the 2b silencing-suppressor protein gene (Fny-CMVDelta2b). Cross-protection by Fny-CMVDelta2b did n