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Sample records for protein quantitation based

  1. Quantitative determination of proteins based on strong fluorescence enhancement in curcumin-chitosan-proteins system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Lingyan; Tang, Bo

    2012-03-01

    We found that the fluorescence intensity of curcumin (CU) can be highly enhanced by protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) in the presence of chitosan (CTS). Based on this finding, a new fluorimetric method to determine the concentration of protein was developed. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced intensities of fluorescence are quantitatively in proportion to the concentrations of protein in range of 0.007-100 μg·mL(-1) for BSA and 0.004-100 μg·mL(-1) for HSA at 426 nm excitation, and 0.007-100 μg·mL(-1) for BSA and 0.01-100 μg·mL(-1)for HSA at 280 nm excitation, while corresponding qualitative detection limits (S/N = 3) can lower to 3.96, 2.46, 4.56, 9.20 ng·mL(-1), respectively. The method has been successfully used for the determination of HSA in real samples. Based on resonance light scattering and UV-visible absorption spectroscopic analysis, mechanism studies suggested that the highly enhanced fluorescence of CU was resulted from synergic effects of favorable hydrophobic microenvironment provided by BSA and CTS and efficient intermolecular energy transfer between BSA and CU. Protein BSA may bind to CTS through hydrogen bonds, which causes the protein conformation to convert from β-fold to α-helix. CU can combine with the BSA-CTS complex through its center carbonyl carbon, and CTS plays a key role in promoting the energy transfer process by shortening the distance between BSA and CU. PMID:22271351

  2. A statistical framework for protein quantitation in bottom-up MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    ABSTRACT Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low-quality or incorrectly identified peptides and widespread, informative, missing data. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model for protein abundance in terms of peptide peak intensities, applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. The model allows for both random and censoring missingness mechanisms and provides naturally for protein-level estimates and confidence measures. The model is also used to derive automated filtering and imputation routines. Three LC-MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. Availability: The software has been made available in the open-source proteomics platform DAnTE (Polpitiya et al. (2008)) (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu

  3. A CAPS-based binding assay provides semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yongyao; Zhang, Yaling; Zhao, Xiucai; Liu, Yao-Guang; Chen, Letian

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of protein-DNA interactions provides crucial information for understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation. Current methods for studying protein-DNA interactions, such as DNaseI footprinting or gel shift assays, involve labeling DNA with radioactive or fluorescent tags, making these methods costly, laborious, and potentially damaging to the environment. Here, we describe a novel cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS)-based binding assay (CBA), which is a label-free method that can simplify the semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions. The CBA tests the interaction between a protein and its target DNA, based on the CAPS pattern produced due to differences in the accessibility of a restriction endonuclease site (intrinsic or artificial) in amplified DNA in the presence and absence of the protein of interest. Thus, the CBA can produce a semi-quantitative readout of the interaction strength based on the dose of the binding protein. We demonstrate the principle and feasibility of CBA using B3, MADS3 proteins and the corresponding RY or CArG-box containing DNAs. PMID:26877240

  4. A Statistical Framework for Protein Quantitation in Bottom-Up MS-Based Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Karpievitch, Yuliya; Stanley, Jeffrey R.; Taverner, Thomas; Huang, Jianhua; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Metz, Thomas O.; Qian, Weijun; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2009-08-15

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics requires protein-level estimates and associated confidence measures. Challenges include the presence of low quality or incorrectly identified peptides and informative missingness. Furthermore, models are required for rolling peptide-level information up to the protein level. Results: We present a statistical model that carefully accounts for informative missingness in peak intensities and allows unbiased, model-based, protein-level estimation and inference. The model is applicable to both label-based and label-free quantitation experiments. We also provide automated, model-based, algorithms for filtering of proteins and peptides as well as imputation of missing values. Two LC/MS datasets are used to illustrate the methods. In simulation studies, our methods are shown to achieve substantially more discoveries than standard alternatives. Availability: The software has been made available in the opensource proteomics platform DAnTE (http://omics.pnl.gov/software/). Contact: adabney@stat.tamu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test. PMID:26491289

  6. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  7. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  8. Advances in multiplexed MRM-based protein biomarker quantitation toward clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Chambers, Andrew G; Yang, Juncong; Hardie, Darryl B; Borchers, Christoph H

    2014-05-01

    Accurate and rapid protein quantitation is essential for screening biomarkers for disease stratification and monitoring, and to validate the hundreds of putative markers in human biofluids, including blood plasma. An analytical method that utilizes stable isotope-labeled standard (SIS) peptides and selected/multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM/MRM-MS) has emerged as a promising technique for determining protein concentrations. This targeted approach has analytical merit, but its true potential (in terms of sensitivity and multiplexing) has yet to be realized. Described herein is a method that extends the multiplexing ability of the MRM method to enable the quantitation 142 high-to-moderate abundance proteins (from 31mg/mL to 44ng/mL) in undepleted and non-enriched human plasma in a single run. The proteins have been reported to be associated to a wide variety of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), from cardiovascular disease (CVD) to diabetes. The concentrations of these proteins in human plasma are inferred from interference-free peptides functioning as molecular surrogates (2 peptides per protein, on average). A revised data analysis strategy, involving the linear regression equation of normal control plasma, has been instituted to enable the facile application to patient samples, as demonstrated in separate nutrigenomics and CVD studies. The exceptional robustness of the LC/MS platform and the quantitative method, as well as its high throughput, makes the assay suitable for application to patient samples for the verification of a condensed or complete protein panel. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:23806606

  9. Quantitative evaluation of proteins with bicinchoninic acid (BCA): resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Zhi; Lee, Youngju; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-12-21

    A rapid and highly sensitive bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reagent-based protein quantitation tool was developed using competitive resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) methods. A chelation reaction between BCA and Cu(+), which is reduced by protein in an alkaline environment, is exploited to create a BCA-Cu(+) complex that has strong RR and SERRS activities. Using these methods, protein concentrations in solutions can be quantitatively measured at concentrations as low as 50 μg mL(-1) and 10 pg mL(-1). There are many advantages of using RR and SERRS-based assays. These assays exhibit a much wider linear concentration range and provide an additional one (RR method) to four (SERRS method) orders of magnitude increase in detection limits relative to UV-based methods. Protein-to-protein variation is determined using a reference to a standard curve at concentrations of BSA that exhibits excellent recoveries. These novel methods are extremely accurate in detecting total protein concentrations in solution. This improvement in protein detection sensitivity could yield advances in the biological sciences and medical diagnostic field and extend the applications of reagent-based protein assay techniques. PMID:23099478

  10. Analysis of protein complexes through model-based biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyungwon; Kim, Sinae; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2010-06-22

    Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a common approach for identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and complexes. However, data analysis and visualization often rely on generic approaches that do not take advantage of the quantitative nature of AP-MS. We present a novel computational method, nested clustering, for biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data. Our approach forms bait clusters based on the similarity of quantitative interaction profiles and identifies submatrices of prey proteins showing consistent quantitative association within bait clusters. In doing so, nested clustering effectively addresses the problem of overrepresentation of interactions involving baits proteins as compared with proteins only identified as preys. The method does not require specification of the number of bait clusters, which is an advantage against existing model-based clustering methods. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm using two published intermediate scale human PPI data sets, which are representative of the AP-MS data generated from mammalian cells. We also discuss general challenges of analyzing and interpreting clustering results in the context of AP-MS data. PMID:20571534

  11. Analysis of protein complexes through model-based biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungwon; Kim, Sinae; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2010-01-01

    Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a common approach for identifying protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and complexes. However, data analysis and visualization often rely on generic approaches that do not take advantage of the quantitative nature of AP-MS. We present a novel computational method, nested clustering, for biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data. Our approach forms bait clusters based on the similarity of quantitative interaction profiles and identifies submatrices of prey proteins showing consistent quantitative association within bait clusters. In doing so, nested clustering effectively addresses the problem of overrepresentation of interactions involving baits proteins as compared with proteins only identified as preys. The method does not require specification of the number of bait clusters, which is an advantage against existing model-based clustering methods. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm using two published intermediate scale human PPI data sets, which are representative of the AP-MS data generated from mammalian cells. We also discuss general challenges of analyzing and interpreting clustering results in the context of AP-MS data. PMID:20571534

  12. Sensitive and Quantitative Detection of C-Reaction Protein Based on Immunofluorescent Nanospheres Coupled with Lateral Flow Test Strip.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiao; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Wen, Cong-Ying; Tang, Man; Wu, Ling-Ling; Liu, Cui; Zhu, Lian; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-06-21

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of protein biomarkers with a point-of-care (POC) assay is significant for early diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of diseases. In this paper, a quantitative lateral flow assay with high sensitivity for protein biomarkers was established by utilizing fluorescent nanospheres (FNs) as reporters. Each fluorescent nanosphere (FN) contains 332 ± 8 CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs), leading to its superstrong luminescence, 380-fold higher than that of one QD. Then a detection limit of 27.8 pM C-reaction protein (CRP) could be achieved with an immunofluorescent nanosphere (IFN)-based lateral flow test strip. The assay was 257-fold more sensitive than that with a conventional Au-based lateral flow test strip for CRP detection. Besides, the fluorescence intensity of FNs and bioactivity of IFNs were stable during 6 months of storage. Hence, the assay owns good reproducibility (intra-assay variability of 5.3% and interassay variability of 6.6%). Furthermore, other cancer biomarkers (PSA, CEA, AFP) showed negative results by this method, validating the excellent specificity of the method. Then the assay was successfully applied to quantitatively detect CRP in peripheral blood plasma samples from lung cancer and breast cancer patients, and healthy people, facilitating the diagnosis of lung cancer. It holds a good prospect of POC protein biomarker detection. PMID:27253137

  13. Strigolactone-Regulated Proteins Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Czarnecki, Olaf; Chourey, Karuna; Yang, Jun; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pan, Chongle; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. Here, a quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found SLs regulate the expression of about three dozens of proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  14. Quantitative Profiling of the Activity of Protein Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2 Using SILAC-Based Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jonathan B; Cao, Xing-Jun; Han, Bomie; Chen, Lisa Hong; Horvath, Alexander; Richardson, Timothy I; Campbell, Robert M; Garcia, Benjamin A; Nguyen, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    The significance of non-histone lysine methylation in cell biology and human disease is an emerging area of research exploration. The development of small molecule inhibitors that selectively and potently target enzymes that catalyze the addition of methyl-groups to lysine residues, such as the protein lysine mono-methyltransferase SMYD2, is an active area of drug discovery. Critical to the accurate assessment of biological function is the ability to identify target enzyme substrates and to define enzyme substrate specificity within the context of the cell. Here, using stable isotopic labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled with immunoaffinity enrichment of mono-methyl-lysine (Kme1) peptides and mass spectrometry, we report a comprehensive, large-scale proteomic study of lysine mono-methylation, comprising a total of 1032 Kme1 sites in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells and 1861 Kme1 sites in ESCC cells overexpressing SMYD2. Among these Kme1 sites is a subset of 35 found to be potently down-regulated by both shRNA-mediated knockdown of SMYD2 and LLY-507, a selective small molecule inhibitor of SMYD2. In addition, we report specific protein sequence motifs enriched in Kme1 sites that are directly regulated by endogenous SMYD2 activity, revealing that SMYD2 substrate specificity is more diverse than expected. We further show direct activity of SMYD2 toward BTF3-K2, PDAP1-K126 as well as numerous sites within the repetitive units of two unique and exceptionally large proteins, AHNAK and AHNAK2. Collectively, our findings provide quantitative insights into the cellular activity and substrate recognition of SMYD2 as well as the global landscape and regulation of protein mono-methylation. PMID:26750096

  15. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  16. A protocol for the systematic and quantitative measurement of protein-lipid interactions using the liposome-microarray-based assay.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Vonkova, Ivana; Deghou, Samy; Ceschia, Stefano; Tischer, Christian; Kugler, Karl G; Bork, Peer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Lipids organize the activity of the cell's proteome through a complex network of interactions. The assembly of comprehensive atlases embracing all protein-lipid interactions is an important challenge that requires innovative methods. We recently developed a liposome-microarray-based assay (LiMA) that integrates liposomes, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy and which is capable of measuring protein recruitment to membranes in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. Compared with previous assays that are labor-intensive and difficult to scale up, LiMA improves the protein-lipid interaction assay throughput by at least three orders of magnitude. Here we provide a step-by-step LiMA protocol that includes the following: (i) the serial and generic production of the liposome microarray; (ii) its integration into a microfluidic format; (iii) the measurement of fluorescently labeled protein (either purified proteins or from cell lysate) recruitment to liposomal membranes using high-throughput microscopy; (iv) automated image analysis pipelines to quantify protein-lipid interactions; and (v) data quality analysis. In addition, we discuss the experimental design, including the relevant quality controls. Overall, the protocol-including device preparation, assay and data analysis-takes 6-8 d. This protocol paves the way for protein-lipid interaction screens to be performed on the proteome and lipidome scales. PMID:27149326

  17. Quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay development and validation: from small molecules to proteins.

    PubMed

    Božović, Andrea; Kulasingam, Vathany

    2013-04-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical tool for the identification, characterization and quantification of various biomolecules (small molecules, drug metabolites and proteins) in biological specimens. The use of mass spectrometers in the clinical diagnostic laboratories have gained popularity due to its ease of development of new assays, ability to measure multiple analytes in a single analytical run, low volume requirements and low reagent costs. Novel technological advancements in ionization sources, instrumentation and software have increased the popularity of these platforms. Consequently, a number of home-brew assays, utilizing the power of MS, are being developed and validated for clinical diagnostic use. In this review, we will discuss the two phases that precede method implementation: method development and validation for both small molecule analysis and protein quantification using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Some of the challenges facing protein quantification will be highlighted and an outlook for the future of laboratory medicine and MS will be provided. PMID:23041077

  18. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of meningococcal antigens to evaluate the potential strain coverage of protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, John; Medini, Duccio; Boccadifuoco, Giuseppe; Biolchi, Alessia; Ward, Joel; Frasch, Carl; Moxon, E. Richard; Stella, Maria; Comanducci, Maurizio; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; Andrews, William; Chen, Jie; Santos, George; Santini, Laura; Boucher, Philip; Serruto, Davide; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2010-01-01

    A unique multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B meningococci incorporates the novel genome-derived proteins fHbp, NHBA, and NadA that may vary in sequence and level of expression. Measuring the effectiveness of such vaccines, using the accepted correlate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease, could require performing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) against many diverse strains for each geographic region. This approach is impractical, especially for infants, where serum volumes are very limited. To address this, we developed the meningococcal antigen typing system (MATS) by combining a unique vaccine antigen-specific ELISA, which detects qualitative and quantitative differences in antigens, with PorA genotyping information. The ELISA correlates with killing of strains by SBA and measures both immunologic cross-reactivity and quantity of the antigens NHBA, NadA, and fHbp. We found that strains exceeding a threshold value in the ELISA for any of the three vaccine antigens had ≥80% probability of being killed by immune serum in the SBA. Strains positive for two or more antigens had a 96% probability of being killed. Inclusion of multiple different antigens in the vaccine improves breadth of coverage and prevents loss of coverage if one antigen mutates or is lost. The finding that a simple and high-throughput assay correlates with bactericidal activity is a milestone in meningococcal vaccine development. This assay allows typing of large panels of strains and prediction of coverage of protein-based meningococcal vaccines. Similar assays may be used for protein-based vaccines against other bacteria. PMID:20962280

  19. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  20. Quantitative analysis of G-protein-coupled receptor internalization using DnaE intein-based assay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Chen, Linjie; Zhang, Yaping; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest family of cell surface receptors, are involved in many physiological processes. They represent highly important therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Currently, there are numerous cell-based assays developed for the pharmacological profiling of GPCRs and the identification of novel agonists and antagonists. However, the development of new, faster, easier, and more cost-effective approaches to detect GPCR activity remains highly desirable. β-arrestin-dependent internalization has been demonstrated to be a common mechanism for most GPCRs. Here we describe a novel assay for quantitative analysis of GPCR internalization based on DnaE intein-mediated reconstitution of fragmented Renilla luciferase or Firefly luciferase when activated GPCRs interact with β-arrestin2 or Rab5. Further validation, using functionally divergent GPCRs, showed that EC50 values obtained for the known agonists and antagonists were in close agreement with the results of previous reports. This suggests that this assay is sensitive enough to permit quantification of GPCR internalization. Compared with conventional assays, this novel assay system is cost-effective, rapid, and easy to manipulate. These advantages may allow this assay to be used universally as a functional cell-based system for GPCR characterization and in the screening process of drug discovery. PMID:26928549

  1. Quantitative measurement of epidermal growth factor receptor-mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction using a nine-plex, peptide-based immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Rauh-Adelmann, Christine; Moskow, John M; Graham, James R; Yen, Lucy G; Boucher, Jeffrey I; Murphy, Cheryl E; Nadler, Timothy K; Gordon, Neal F; Radding, Jeffrey A

    2008-04-15

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, ErbB1) signaling is implicated in cell transformation, motility, and invasion in a variety of cell types, and EGFR is the target of several anticancer drugs. However, the kinetics of EGFR signaling and the individual contributions of site-specific phosphorylation events remain largely unknown. A peptide-based, multiplex immunoassay approach was developed to simultaneously measure both total and phosphorylated protein in a single sample. The approach involves the proteolytic digestion of proteins prior to the isolation and quantitation of site-specific phosphorylation events within an individual protein. Quantitation of phosphorylated and total proteins, in picomolar to nanomolar concentrations, were interpolated from standard curves generated with synthetic peptides that correspond to the peptide targets used in the immunoassays. In this study, a bead-based, nine-plex immunoassay measuring total and phosphorylated protein was constructed to measure temporal, site-specific phosphorylation of key members of the EGFR pathway (ErbB1 receptor, MEK1, MEK2, ERK1, and ERK2) in A431 cells stimulated with epidermal growth factor. The effect of MEK inhibition on this pathway was determined using a known MEK kinase inhibitor, SL327. The results reported herein are the first quantitative measurements of site-specific phosphorylation events and total proteins in a single sample, at the same time representing a new paradigm for standardized protein and phosphorylation analysis using multiplexed, peptide-based, sandwich immunoassays. PMID:18275835

  2. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    Immunoglobulin light chains - urine; Urine Bence-Jones protein ... Bence-Jones proteins are a part of regular antibodies called light chains. These proteins are not normally in urine. Sometimes, when ...

  3. Intact Protein Quantitation Using Pseudoisobaric Dimethyl Labeling.

    PubMed

    Fang, Houqin; Xiao, Kaijie; Li, Yunhui; Yu, Fan; Liu, Yan; Xue, Bingbing; Tian, Zhixin

    2016-07-19

    Protein structural and functional studies rely on complete qualitative and quantitative information on protein species (proteoforms); thus, it is important to quantify differentially expressed proteins at their molecular level. Here we report our development of universal pseudoisobaric dimethyl labeling (pIDL) of amino groups at both the N-terminal and lysine residues for relative quantitation of intact proteins. Initial proof-of-principle study was conducted on standard protein myoglobin and hepatocellular proteomes (HepG2 vs LO2). The amino groups from both the N-terminal and lysine were dimethylated with HXHO (X = (13)C or C) and NaBY3CN (Y = H or D). At the standard protein level, labeling efficiency, effect of product ion size, and mass resolution on quantitation accuracy were explored; and a good linear quantitation dynamic range up to 50-fold was obtained. For the hepatocellular proteome samples, 33 proteins were quantified with RSD ≤ 10% from one-dimensional reversed phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-MS/MS) analysis of the 1:1 mixed samples. The method in this study can be extended to quantitation of other intact proteome systems. The universal "one-pot" dimethyl labeling of all the amino groups in a protein without the need of preblocking of those on the lysine residues is made possible by protein identification and quantitation analysis using ProteinGoggle 2.0 with customized databases of both precursor and product ions containing heavy isotopes. PMID:27359340

  4. Quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by quartz nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Astudillo, Luisana; Miksovska, Jaroslava; Wang, Xuewen; Li, Wenzhi; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-08-01

    In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with a series of concentrations in the bath solution. Such current change is due to the adsorption of Cyt c to the inner surface of the nanopipette through specific interactions with hNgb. In contrast, a smaller current change with weak concentration dependence was observed when Cyt c was replaced with lysozyme, which does not specifically bind to hNgb. The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) for the Cyt c-hNgb complex formation was derived and the value matched very well with the result from surface plasmon resonance measurement. This is the first quantitative study of protein-protein interactions by a conical-shaped nanopore based on charge sensing. Our results demonstrate that nanopipettes can potentially be used as a label-free analytical tool to quantitatively characterize protein-protein interactions.In this report, protein-modified quartz nanopipettes were used to quantitatively study protein-protein interactions in attoliter sensing volumes. As shown by numerical simulations, the ionic current through the conical-shaped nanopipette is very sensitive to the surface charge variation near the pore mouth. With the appropriate modification of negatively charged human neuroglobin (hNgb) onto the inner surface of a nanopipette, we were able to detect concentration-dependent current change when the hNgb-modified nanopipette tip was exposed to positively charged cytochrome c (Cyt c) with

  5. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis protein expression upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica, a common food-borne bacterial pathogen, is believed to change its protein expression profile in the presence of different environmental stress such as that caused by the exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which can be generated by phagocytes during infection and represents an important antibacterial mechanism of host cells. Among Salmonella proteins, the effectors of Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) are of particular interest since they are expressed during host infection in vivo and are important for invasion of epithelial cells and for replication in organs during systemic infection, respectively. However, the expression profiles of these proteins upon exposure to H2O2 or to host cells in vivo during the established phase of systemic infection have not been extensively studied. Results Using stable isotope labeling coupled with mass spectrometry, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and identified 76 proteins whose expression is modulated upon exposure to H2O2. SPI-1 effector SipC was expressed about 3-fold higher and SopB was expressed approximately 2-fold lower in the presence of H2O2, while no significant change in the expression of another SPI-1 protein SipA was observed. The relative abundance of SipA, SipC, and SopB was confirmed by Western analyses, validating the accuracy and reproducibility of our approach for quantitative analysis of protein expression. Furthermore, immuno-detection showed substantial expression of SipA and SipC but not SopB in the late phase of infection in macrophages and in the spleen of infected mice. Conclusions We have identified Salmonella proteins whose expression is modulated in the presence of H2O2. Our results also provide the first direct evidence that SipC is highly expressed in the spleen at late stage of salmonellosis in vivo. These results suggest a possible role of SipC and other regulated proteins in

  6. abFASP-MS: Affinity-Based Filter-Aided Sample Preparation Mass Spectrometry for Quantitative Analysis of Chemically Labeled Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled to 1-D gel-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) is a well-established and widespread approach for the analyses of noncovalently interacting protein complexes. In this study, two proteins conjugated to a streptavidin-binding peptide and hemagglutinin double tag were expressed in the respective Flp-In HEK293 cell lines: green fluorescent protein (SH-GFP) and TANK binding kinase 1 (SH-TBK1_MOUSE). Fluorescent anti-HA immunoblots revealed that the expression level of SH-GFP was ∼50% lower than that of SH-TBK1_MOUSE. Subsequently, the input material was normalized to obtain a similar quantity of purified SH-tagged proteins. Optimization of the release of protein complexes from the anti-HA-agarose with different eluting agents was then assessed. With respect to the total number of protein groups identified in the purified complexes, elution with 2% SDS surpassed both 100 mM glycine and 100 mM formic acid. Relative quantitation of the purified protein complexes using TMT 6-plex reagents confirmed the higher efficiency of the 2% SDS elution followed by filter-aided sample preparation (FASP). The data presented in this study provide a new application of FASP to quantitative MS analysis of affinity-purified protein complexes. We have termed the approach abFASP-MS, or affinity-based filter-aided sample preparation mass spectrometry. PMID:24400740

  7. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software. PMID:11831625

  8. Whole cell, label free protein quantitation with data independent acquisition: quantitation at the MS2 level.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Peter; Spicer, Vic; Schellenberg, John; Krokhin, Oleg; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David; Wilkins, John A

    2015-01-01

    Label free quantitation by measurement of peptide fragment signal intensity (MS2 quantitation) is a technique that has seen limited use due to the stochastic nature of data dependent acquisition (DDA). However, data independent acquisition has the potential to make large scale MS2 quantitation a more viable technique. In this study we used an implementation of data independent acquisition--SWATH--to perform label free protein quantitation in a model bacterium Clostridium stercorarium. Four tryptic digests analyzed by SWATH were probed by an ion library containing information on peptide mass and retention time obtained from DDA experiments. Application of this ion library to SWATH data quantified 1030 proteins with at least two peptides quantified (∼ 40% of predicted proteins in the C. stercorarium genome) in each replicate. Quantitative results obtained were very consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.960). Protein quantitation by summation of peptide fragment signal intensities was also highly consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.930), indicating that this approach may have increased viability compared to recent applications in label free protein quantitation. SWATH based quantitation was able to consistently detect differences in relative protein quantity and it provided coverage for a number of proteins that were missed in some samples by DDA analysis. PMID:25348682

  9. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  10. A Quantitative Mass Spectrometry-based Approach for Identifying Protein Kinase-Clients and Quantifying Kinase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes are believed to encode >500 and >1,000 protein kinases, respectively. Despite this abundance, few bona fide kinase-client relationships have been described in detail. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based approaches have been integral to the large-scale mapp...

  11. Development of a Univariate Membrane-Based Mid-Infrared Method for Protein Quantitation and Total Lipid Content Analysis of Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cappione, Amedeo; Lento, Joseph; Chernokalskaya, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Biological samples present a range of complexities from homogeneous purified protein to multicomponent mixtures. Accurate qualification of such samples is paramount to downstream applications. We describe the development of an MIR spectroscopy-based analytical method offering simultaneous protein quantitation (0.25–5 mg/mL) and analysis of total lipid or detergent species, as well as the identification of other biomolecules present in biological samples. The method utilizes a hydrophilic PTFE membrane engineered for presentation of aqueous samples in a dried format compatible with fast infrared analysis. Unlike classical quantification techniques, the reported method is amino acid sequence independent and thus applicable to complex samples of unknown composition. By comparison to existing platforms, this MIR-based method enables direct quantification using minimal sample volume (2 µL); it is well-suited where repeat access and limited sample size are critical parameters. Further, accurate results can be derived without specialized training or knowledge of IR spectroscopy. Overall, the simplified application and analysis system provides a more cost-effective alternative to high-throughput IR systems for research laboratories with minimal throughput demands. In summary, the MIR-based system provides a viable alternative to current protein quantitation methods; it also uniquely offers simultaneous qualification of other components, notably lipids and detergents. PMID:25371845

  12. Identification of Proteins Implicated in the Increased Heart Rate in ShenSongYangXin-Treated Bradycardia Rabbits by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhouying; Huang, Jian; Huo, Youping; Gong, Jing; Zhang, Yinhui; Wei, Cong; Pu, Jielin

    2015-01-01

    The present study tries to identify proteins implicated in bradycardia rabbits in hearts after ShenSongYangXin (SSYX, a traditional Chinese medicine) treatment. Eighteen adult rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups: sham, model, and SSYX treatment groups. Heart rate was recorded in rabbits and proteins were isolated from ventricular muscle. We used isobaric tags for elative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify altered proteins after SSYX treatment. The heart rate decreased after six weeks due to the injury of the sinoatrial node in the model group. This effect was partially reversed by 4-week SSYX treatment. A total of a2988 proteins were quantified by performing the iTRAQ-based experiments. Of these, 86 proteins were differentially expressed according to our criteria (42 upregulated and 44 downregulated). The identification of key proteins implicated in the treatment of bradycardia could serve as a foundation to better understand and further explore the molecular mechanism of SSYX treatment. PMID:26770253

  13. Decoding protein networks during virus entry by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gerold, Gisa; Bruening, Janina; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-06-15

    Virus entry into host cells relies on interactions between viral and host structures including lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. Particularly, protein-protein interactions between viral surface proteins and host proteins as well as secondary host protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in coordinating virus binding and uptake. These interactions are dynamic and frequently involve multiprotein complexes. In the past decade mass spectrometry based proteomics methods have reached sensitivities and high throughput compatibilities of genomics methods and now allow the reliable quantitation of proteins in complex samples from limited material. As proteomics provides essential information on the biologically active entity namely the protein, including its posttranslational modifications and its interactions with other proteins, it is an indispensable method in the virologist's toolbox. Here we review protein interactions during virus entry and compare classical biochemical methods to study entry with novel technically advanced quantitative proteomics techniques. We highlight the value of quantitative proteomics in mapping functional virus entry networks, discuss the benefits and limitations and illustrate how the methodology will help resolve unsettled questions in virus entry research in the future. PMID:26365680

  14. Quantitative interaction proteomics of neurodegenerative disease proteins.

    PubMed

    Hosp, Fabian; Vossfeldt, Hannes; Heinig, Matthias; Vasiljevic, Djordje; Arumughan, Anup; Wyler, Emanuel; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert; Wanker, Erich E; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Lalowski, Maciej; Voigt, Aaron; Selbach, Matthias

    2015-05-19

    Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1) for Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntingtin (HTT) for Huntington's disease, Parkin (PARK2) for Parkinson's disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD. PMID:25959826

  15. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)-Based Biosensor Technology for the Quantitative Characterization of Protein-Carotenoid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vachali, Preejith P; Li, Binxing; Bartschi, Alexis; Bernstein, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method is a highly sensitive, label-free technique to study the non-covalent interactions of biomolecules, especially protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. We have explored this robust biosensor platform to study the interactions of carotenoid-binding proteins and their carotenoid ligands to assess the specificity of interaction, kinetics, affinity, and stoichiometry. These characterizations are important to further study uptake and transport of carotenoids to targeted tissues such as the macula of the human eye. In this review, we present an overview of the SPR method and optimization of assay conditions, and we discuss the particular challenges in studying carotenoid-protein interactions using SPR. PMID:25513962

  16. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  17. Highly Multiplexed and Reproducible Ion-Current-Based Strategy for Large-Scale Quantitative Proteomics and the Application to Protein Expression Dynamics Induced by Methylprednisolone in 60 Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A proteome-level time-series study of drug effects (i.e., pharmacodynamics) is critical for understanding mechanisms of action and systems pharmacology, but is challenging, because of the requirement of a proteomics method for reliable quantification of many biological samples. Here, we describe a highly reproducible strategy, enabling a global, large-scale investigation of the expression dynamics of corticosteroid-regulated proteins in livers from adrenalectomized rats over 11 time points after drug dosing (0.5–66 h, N = 5/point). The analytical advances include (i) exhaustive tissue extraction with a Polytron/sonication procedure in a detergent cocktail buffer, and a cleanup/digestion procedure providing very consistent protein yields (relative standard deviation (RSD%) of 2.7%–6.4%) and peptide recoveries (4.1–9.0%) across the 60 animals; (ii) an ultrahigh-pressure nano-LC setup with substantially improved temperature stabilization, pump-noise suppression, and programmed interface cleaning, enabling excellent reproducibility for continuous analyses of numerous samples; (iii) separation on a 100-cm-long column (2-μm particles) with high reproducibility for days to enable both in-depth profiling and accurate peptide ion-current match; and (iv) well-controlled ion-current-based quantification. To obtain high-quality quantitative data necessary to describe the 11 time-points protein expression temporal profiles, strict criteria were used to define “quantifiable proteins”. A total of 323 drug-responsive proteins were revealed with confidence, and the time profiles of these proteins provided new insights into the diverse temporal changes of biological cascades associated with hepatic metabolism, response to hormone stimuli, gluconeogenesis, inflammatory responses, and protein translation processes. Most profile changes persisted well after the drug was eliminated. The developed strategy can also be broadly applied in preclinical and clinical research, where

  18. Fish Muscle Proteins: Extraction, Quantitation, and Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Denise

    Electrophoresis can be used to separate and visualize proteins. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), proteins are separated based on size. When protein samples are applied to such gels, it is usually necessary to know the protein content of the sample. This makes it possible to apply a volume of sample to the gel such that samples have a comparable amount of total protein. While it is possible to use an official method of protein analysis (e.g., Kjeldahl, N combustion) for such an application, it often is convenient to use a rapid spectroscopic protein analysis that requires only a small amount of sample. The bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay method will be used for this purpose.

  19. Quantitative Proteomics-Based Reconstruction and Identification of Metabolic Pathways and Membrane Transport Proteins Related to Sugar Accumulation in Developing Fruits of Pear (Pyrus communis).

    PubMed

    Reuscher, Stefan; Fukao, Yoichiro; Morimoto, Reina; Otagaki, Shungo; Oikawa, Akira; Isuzugawa, Kanji; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    During their 6 month development, pear (Pyrus communis) fruits undergo drastic changes in their morphology and their chemical composition. To gain a better understanding of the metabolic pathways and transport processes active during fruit development, we performed a time-course analysis using mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein identification and quantification of fruit flesh tissues. After pre-fractionation of the samples, 2,841 proteins were identified. A principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples from seven developmental stages into three distinct clusters representing the early, mid and late developmental phase. Over-representation analysis of proteins characteristic of each developmental phase revealed both expected and novel biological processes relevant at each phase. A high abundance of aquaporins was detected in samples from fruits in the cell expansion stage. We were able quantitatively to reconstruct basic metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which indicates sufficient coverage to reconstruct other metabolic pathways. Most of the enzymes that presumably contribute to sugar accumulation in pear fruits could be identified. Our data indicate that invertases do not play a major role in the sugar conversions in developing pear fruits. Rather, sucrose might be broken down by sucrose synthases. Further focusing on sugar transporters, we identified several putative sugar transporters from diverse families which showed developmental regulation. In conclusion, our data set comprehensively describes the proteome of developing pear fruits and provides novel insights about sugar accumulation as well as candidate genes for key reactions and transport steps. PMID:26755692

  20. Quantitating Metabolites in Protein Precipitated Serum Using NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative NMR-based metabolite profiling is challenged by the deleterious effects of abundant proteins in the intact blood plasma/serum, which underscores the need for alternative approaches. Protein removal by ultrafiltration using low molecular weight cutoff filters thus represents an important step. However, protein precipitation, an alternative and simple approach for protein removal, lacks detailed quantitative assessment for use in NMR based metabolomics. In this study, we have comprehensively evaluated the performance of protein precipitation using methanol, acetonitrile, perchloric acid, and trichloroacetic acid and ultrafiltration approaches using 1D and 2D NMR, based on the identification and absolute quantitation of 44 human blood metabolites, including a few identified for the first time in the NMR spectra of human serum. We also investigated the use of a “smart isotope tag,” 15N-cholamine for further resolution enhancement, which resulted in the detection of a number of additional metabolites. 1H NMR of both protein precipitated and ultrafiltered serum detected all 44 metabolites with comparable reproducibility (average CV, 3.7% for precipitation; 3.6% for filtration). However, nearly half of the quantified metabolites in ultrafiltered serum exhibited 10–74% lower concentrations; specifically, tryptophan, benzoate, and 2-oxoisocaproate showed much lower concentrations compared to protein precipitated serum. These results indicate that protein precipitation using methanol offers a reliable approach for routine NMR-based metabolomics of human blood serum/plasma and should be considered as an alternative to ultrafiltration. Importantly, protein precipitation, which is commonly used by mass spectrometry (MS), promises avenues for direct comparison and correlation of metabolite data obtained from the two analytical platforms to exploit their combined strength in the metabolomics of blood. PMID:24796490

  1. Quantitative Proteomics of Caveolin-1-regulated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Sowa, Grzegorz; Derakhshan, Behrad; Lin, Michelle I.; Lee, Ji Y.; Zhao, Hongyu; Luo, Ruiyan; Colangelo, Christopher; Sessa, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Caveolae are organelles abundant in the plasma membrane of many specialized cells including endothelial cells (ECs), epithelial cells, and adipocytes, and in these cells, caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is the major coat protein essential for the formation of caveolae. To identify proteins that require Cav-1 for stable incorporation into membrane raft domains, a quantitative proteomics analysis using isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification was performed on rafts isolated from wild-type and Cav-1-deficient mice. In three independent experiments, 117 proteins were consistently identified in membrane rafts with the largest differences in the levels of Cav-2 and in the caveola regulatory proteins Cavin-1 and Cavin-2. Because the lung is highly enriched in ECs, we validated and characterized the role of the newly described protein Cavin-1 in several cardiovascular tissues and in ECs. Cavin-1 was highly expressed in ECs lining blood vessels and in cultured ECs. Knockdown of Cavin-1 reduced the levels of Cav-1 and -2 and weakly influenced the formation of high molecular weight oligomers containing Cav-1 and -2. Cavin-1 silencing enhanced basal nitric oxide release from ECs but blocked proangiogenic phenotypes such as EC proliferation, migration, and morphogenesis in vitro. Thus, these data support an important role of Cavin-1 as a regulator of caveola function in ECs. PMID:20585024

  2. Affinity-Based Assays for the Identification and Quantitative Evaluation of Noncovalent Poly(ADP-Ribose)-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Haince, Jean-François; Pic, Émilie; Poirier, Guy G.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases have been linked to several cellular functions, most of which being mediated through the dynamics of poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr). In several pathways, pADPr is the effector molecule that regulates cellular signaling and dictates biological outcomes. pAPDr is a central molecule that is capable of promoting both cell survival through the maintenance of genome integrity and cell death that occurs by way of a signal-mediated apoptotic-like process. Thus, interactions with pADPr are extremely important in bringing about the balanced regulation that controls cell fate. Further clues regarding these functions are emerging from a growing list of proteins with which pADPr interacts. Here, we describe the current approaches for investigating noncovalent protein interactions with pADPr. PMID:21870257

  3. Assessing association between protein truncating variants and quantitative traits

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Neville, Matthew J.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Karpe, Fredrik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Donnelly, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: In sequencing studies of common diseases and quantitative traits, power to test rare and low frequency variants individually is weak. To improve power, a common approach is to combine statistical evidence from several genetic variants in a region. Major challenges are how to do the combining and which statistical framework to use. General approaches for testing association between rare variants and quantitative traits include aggregating genotypes and trait values, referred to as ‘collapsing’, or using a score-based variance component test. However, little attention has been paid to alternative models tailored for protein truncating variants. Recent studies have highlighted the important role that protein truncating variants, commonly referred to as ‘loss of function’ variants, may have on disease susceptibility and quantitative levels of biomarkers. We propose a Bayesian modelling framework for the analysis of protein truncating variants and quantitative traits. Results: Our simulation results show that our models have an advantage over the commonly used methods. We apply our models to sequence and exome-array data and discover strong evidence of association between low plasma triglyceride levels and protein truncating variants at APOC3 (Apolipoprotein C3). Availability: Software is available from http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba Contact: donnelly@well.ox.ac.uk PMID:23860716

  4. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis revealed alterations of carbohydrate metabolism pathways and mitochondrial proteins in a male sterile cybrid pummelo.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bei-Bei; Fang, Yan-Ni; Pan, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Li; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Grosser, Jude W; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2014-06-01

    Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic information on citrus floral bud is significant for understanding male sterility of the cybrid pummelo (G1+HBP) with nuclear genome of HBP and foreign mitochondrial genome of G1. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses of the anthers showed that the development of pollen wall in G1+HBP was severely defective with a lack of exine and sporopollenin formation. Proteomic analysis was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins between male sterile G1+HBP and fertile type (HBP) with the aim to clarify their potential roles in anther development and male sterility. On the basis of iTRAQ quantitative proteomics, we identified 2235 high-confidence protein groups, 666 of which showed differentially expressed profiles in one or more stages. Proteins up- or down-regulated in G1+HBP were mainly involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism (e.g., pyruvate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, and malate dehydrogenase), nucleotide binding (RNA-binding proteins), protein synthesis and degradation (e.g., ribosome proteins and proteasome subunits). Additionally, the proteins located in mitochondria also showed changed expression patterns. These findings provide a valuable inventory of proteins involved in floral bud development and contribute to elucidate the mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility in the cybrid pummelo. PMID:24824475

  5. Quantitative assessment of protein function prediction programs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, B N; Steffens, M B R; Raittz, R T; Santos-Weiss, I C R; Marchaukoski, J N

    2015-01-01

    Fast prediction of protein function is essential for high-throughput sequencing analysis. Bioinformatic resources provide cheaper and faster techniques for function prediction and have helped to accelerate the process of protein sequence characterization. In this study, we assessed protein function prediction programs that accept amino acid sequences as input. We analyzed the classification, equality, and similarity between programs, and, additionally, compared program performance. The following programs were selected for our assessment: Blast2GO, InterProScan, PANTHER, Pfam, and ScanProsite. This selection was based on the high number of citations (over 500), fully automatic analysis, and the possibility of returning a single best classification per sequence. We tested these programs using 12 gold standard datasets from four different sources. The gold standard classification of the databases was based on expert analysis, the Protein Data Bank, or the Structure-Function Linkage Database. We found that the miss rate among the programs is globally over 50%. Furthermore, we observed little overlap in the correct predictions from each program. Therefore, a combination of multiple types of sources and methods, including experimental data, protein-protein interaction, and data mining, may be the best way to generate more reliable predictions and decrease the miss rate. PMID:26782400

  6. Benchmarking stable isotope labeling based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Altelaar, A F Maarten; Frese, Christian K; Preisinger, Christian; Hennrich, Marco L; Schram, Andree W; Timmers, H Th Marc; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2013-08-01

    Several quantitative mass spectrometry based technologies have recently evolved to interrogate the complexity, interconnectivity and dynamic nature of proteomes. Currently, the most popular methods use either metabolic or chemical isotope labeling with MS based quantification or chemical labeling using isobaric tags with MS/MS based quantification. Here, we assess the performance of three of the most popular approaches through systematic independent large scale quantitative proteomics experiments, comparing SILAC, dimethyl and TMT labeling strategies. Although all three methods have their strengths and weaknesses, our data indicate that all three can reach a similar depth in number of identified proteins using a classical (MS2 based) shotgun approach. TMT quantification using only MS2 is heavily affected by co-isolation leading to compromised precision and accuracy. This issue may be partly resolved by using an MS3 based acquisition; however, at the cost of a significant reduction in number of proteins quantified. Interestingly, SILAC and chemical labeling with MS based quantification produce almost indistinguishable results, independent of which database search algorithm used. PMID:23085607

  7. Protein quantitation using various modes of high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Grotefend, Sandra; Kaminski, Lukas; Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Deeb, Sami El; Kühn, Nancy; Reichl, Stephan; Limberger, Markus; Watt, Steven; Wätzig, Hermann

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals based on proteins (biologicals), such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb), attain more and more relevance since they were established as potent drugs in anticancer therapy or for the treatment of autoimmune based diseases. Due to their high efficiency it is essential to have accurate and precise methods for protein quantitation and the detection of protein aggregates, which in some cases may lead to adverse effects after application. Selectivity and precision of traditional protein quantification methods such as the Bradford assay or SDS-PAGE are insufficient for quality control (QC) purposes. In this work several HPLC separation modes, which can significantly improve these important parameters, were compared for their application in this field. High performance size exclusion (HP-SEC), strong anion exchange (SAX), weak cation exchange (WCX) as well as reversed phase chromatography are all already successfully applied in protein analysis. Good precision (SEC: <1.9%, SAX: <5%, RP: <2% and WCX: <3.5% - RSD% for peak areas day-to-day), high selectivity and low quantitation limits (<15μg/ml) for the model proteins ovalbumin, myoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively cytochrome c and lysozyme in the cation exchange mode, could be achieved. Consecutively, the four separation modes were compared to each other and to electrophoretic techniques in terms of precision, selectivity, analysis time, effort of sample and mobile phase preparation as well as separating capacity. Moreover, the analysis of an IgG1-type antibody was included in this study. PMID:22980318

  8. Global Subcellular Characterization of Protein Degradation Using Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Ly, Tony; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    Protein degradation provides an important regulatory mechanism used to control cell cycle progression and many other cellular pathways. To comprehensively analyze the spatial control of protein degradation in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we have combined drug treatment and SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry with subcellular and protein fractionation. The resulting data set analyzed more than 74,000 peptides, corresponding to ∼5000 proteins, from nuclear, cytosolic, membrane, and cytoskeletal compartments. These data identified rapidly degraded proteasome targets, such as PRR11 and highlighted a feedback mechanism resulting in translation inhibition, induced by blocking the proteasome. We show this is mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. We observed compartment-specific differences in protein degradation, including proteins that would not have been characterized as rapidly degraded through analysis of whole cell lysates. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire data set is presented in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, a web-based resource, with proteins annotated for stability and subcellular distribution. PMID:23242552

  9. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  10. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials. PMID:26851341

  11. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  12. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  13. Imaging Beads-Retained Prey Assay for Rapid and Quantitative Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Conventional Western blot based pull-down methods involve lengthy and laborious work and the results are generally not quantitative. Here, we report the imaging beads-retained prey (IBRP) assay that is rapid and quantitative in studying protein-protein interactions. In this assay, the bait is immobilized onto beads and the prey is fused with a fluorescence protein. The assay takes advantage of the fluorescence of prey and directly quantifies the amount of prey binding to the immobilized bait under a microscope. We validated the assay using previously well studied interactions and found that the amount of prey retained on beads could have a relative linear relationship to both the inputs of bait and prey. IBRP assay provides a universal, fast, quantitative and economical method to study protein interactions and it could be developed to a medium- or high-throughput compatible method. With the availability of fluorescence tagged whole genome ORFs in several organisms, we predict IBRP assay should have wide applications. PMID:23555762

  14. Quantitative analysis of acrylamide labeled serum proteins by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Faca, Vitor; Coram, Marc; Phanstiel, Doug; Glukhova, Veronika; Zhang, Qing; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; McIntosh, Martin; Hanash, Samir

    2006-08-01

    Isotopic labeling of cysteine residues with acrylamide was previously utilized for relative quantitation of proteins by MALDI-TOF. Here, we explored and compared the application of deuterated and (13)C isotopes of acrylamide for quantitative proteomic analysis using LC-MS/MS and high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometry. The method was applied to human serum samples that were immunodepleted of abundant proteins. Our results show reliable quantitation of proteins across an abundance range that spans 5 orders of magnitude based on ion intensities and known protein concentration in plasma. The use of (13)C isotope of acrylamide had a slightly greater advantage relative to deuterated acrylamide, because of shifts in elution of deuterated acrylamide relative to its corresponding nondeuterated compound by reversed-phase chromatography. Overall, the use of acrylamide for differentially labeling intact proteins in complex mixtures, in combination with LC-MS/MS provides a robust method for quantitative analysis of complex proteomes. PMID:16889424

  15. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; Yang, Lee Lisheng; Choi, Megan; Singer, Mary E; Geller, Jil T; Fisher, Susan J; Hall, Steven C; Hazen, Terry C; Brenner, Steven E; Butland, Gareth; Jin, Jian; Witkowska, H Ewa; Chandonia, John-Marc; Biggin, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification of endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR. PMID:27099342

  16. The detection and quantitation of protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Gell, David A; Grant, Richard P; Mackay, Joel P

    2012-01-01

    There are many different techniques available to biologists and biochemists that can be used to detect and characterize the self-association of proteins. Each technique has strengths and weaknesses and it is often useful to combine several approaches to maximize the former and minimize the latter. Here we review a range of methodologies that identify protein self-association and/or allow the stoichiometry and affinity of the interaction to be determined, placing an emphasis on what type of information can be obtained and outlining the advantages and disadvantages involved. In general, in vitro biophysical techniques, such as size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, scattering techniques, NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence anisotropy and mass spectrometry, provide information on stoichiometry and/or binding affinities. Other approaches such as cross-linking, fluorescence methods (e.g., fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, FCS; Förster resonance energy transfer, FRET; fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, FRAP; and proximity imaging, PRIM) and complementation approaches (e.g., yeast two hybrid assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation, BiFC) can be used to detect protein self-association in a cellular context. PMID:22949109

  17. Quantitative Packaging of Active Enzymes into a Protein Cage.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yusuke; Zschoche, Reinhard; Tinzl, Matthias; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-01-22

    Genetic fusion of cargo proteins to a positively supercharged variant of green fluorescent protein enables their quantitative encapsulation by engineered lumazine synthase capsids possessing a negatively charged lumenal surface. This simple tagging system provides a robust and versatile means of creating hierarchically ordered protein assemblies for use as nanoreactors. The generality of the encapsulation strategy and its effect on enzyme function were investigated with eight structurally and mechanistically distinct catalysts. PMID:26695342

  18. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Hughes, Lindsey D; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E; Gross, Mitchell E; Plevritis, Sylvia K; McIntosh, Martin W; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Samir; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag

    2012-05-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by lack of tools to accurately assess a patient's response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here, we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study, we use stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGF receptor (EGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information, and a subset consisting of 400 proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and showed that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  19. Quantitative Proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M.; Hughes, Lindsey D.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E.; Gross, Mitchell E.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by a lack of tools to accurately assess a patient’s response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not-responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study we use Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGFR targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information and a subset consisting of [400] proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and demonstrated that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  20. Mass Spectrometry-Based Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenhong; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the differential protein expression in complex biological samples, strategies for rapid, highly reproducible and accurate quantification are necessary. Isotope labeling and fluorescent labeling techniques have been widely used in quantitative proteomics research. However, researchers are increasingly turning to label-free shotgun proteomics techniques for faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics falls into two general categories. In the first are the measurements of changes in chromatographic ion intensity such as peptide peak areas or peak heights. The second is based on the spectral counting of identified proteins. In this paper, we will discuss the technologies of these label-free quantitative methods, statistics, available computational software, and their applications in complex proteomics studies. PMID:19911078

  1. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Burnum, Kristin E.; Luna, Maria L.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Thrall, Brian D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Liu, Tao

    2011-12-01

    In biofluids (e.g., blood plasma) nanoparticles are readily embedded in layers of proteins that can affect their biological activity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the interactions between human plasma proteins and nanoparticles with a controlled systematic variation of properties using stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based quantitative proteomics. Novel protocol has been developed to simplify the isolation of nanoparticle bound proteins and improve the reproducibility. Plasma proteins associated with polystyrene nanoparticles with three different surface chemistries and two sizes as well as for four different exposure times (for a total of 24 different samples) were identified and quantified by LC-MS analysis. Quantitative comparison of relative protein abundances were achieved by spiking an 18 O-labeled 'universal reference' into each individually processed unlabeled sample as an internal standard, enabling simultaneous application of both label-free and isotopic labeling quantitation across the sample set. Clustering analysis of the quantitative proteomics data resulted in distinctive pattern that classifies the nanoparticles based on their surface properties and size. In addition, data on the temporal study indicated that the stable protein 'corona' that was isolated for the quantitative analysis appeared to be formed in less than 5 minutes. The comprehensive results obtained herein using quantitative proteomics have potential implications towards predicting nanoparticle biocompatibility.

  2. LC-MS/MS-Based Monitoring of In Vivo Protein Biotransformation: Quantitative Determination of Trastuzumab and Its Deamidation Products in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bults, Peter; Bischoff, Rainer; Bakker, Hilde; Gietema, Jourik A; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2016-02-01

    An LC-MS/MS-based method is described for quantitatively monitoring the in vivo deamidation of the biopharmaceutical monoclonal antibody trastuzumab at a crucial position in its complementarity determining region (CDR). The multiplexed LC-MS/MS assay using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) allows simultaneous quantitation of five molecular species derived from trastuzumab after tryptic digestion: a stable signature peptide (FTISADTSK), a deamidation-sensitive signature peptide (IYPTNGYTR), its deamidated products (IYPTDGYTR and IYPTisoDGYTR), and a succinimide intermediate (IYPTsuccGYTR). Digestion of a 50 μL plasma sample is performed at pH 7 for 3 h at 37 °C, which combines a reasonable (>80%) digestion efficiency with a minimal (<1%) formation of deamidation products during digestion. Rapid in vitro deamidation was observed at higher pH, leading to a (large) overestimation of the concentrations of deamidation products in the original plasma sample. The LC-MS/MS method was validated in accordance with international bioanalytical guidelines over the clinically relevant range of 0.5 to 500 μg/mL with bias and CV values well below 15%. Deamidation of trastuzumab was observed in plasma both in a 56 day in vitro forced degradation study (up to 37% of the total drug concentration) and in samples obtained from breast cancer patients after treatment with the drug for several months (up to 25%). Comparison with a validated ELISA method for trastuzumab showed that deamidation of the drug at the CDR leads to a loss of recognition by the antibodies used in the ELISA assay. PMID:26713683

  3. Extracting gene function from protein-protein interactions using Quantitative BAC InteraCtomics (QUBIC).

    PubMed

    Hubner, Nina C; Mann, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Large-scale proteomic screens are increasingly employed for placing genes into specific pathways. Therefore generic methods providing a physiological context for protein-protein interaction studies are of great interest. In recent years many protein-protein interactions have been determined by affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS). Among many different AP-MS approaches, the recently developed Quantitative BAC InteraCtomics (QUBIC) approach is particularly attractive as it uses tagged, full-length baits that are expressed under endogenous control. For QUBIC large cell line collections expressing tagged proteins from BAC transgenes or gene trap loci have been developed and are freely available. Here we describe detailed workflows on how to obtain specific protein binding partners with high confidence under physiological conditions. The methods are based on fast, streamlined and generic purification procedures followed by single run liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. Quantification is achieved either by the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) method or by a 'label-free' procedure. In either case data analysis is performed by using the freely available MaxQuant environment. The QUBIC approach enables biologists with access to high resolution mass spectrometry to perform small and large-scale protein interactome mappings. PMID:21184827

  4. Isobaric Labeling and Data Normalization without Requiring Protein Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Phillip D.; Patel, Bhavinkumar B.; Yeung, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01

    Isobaric multiplexed quantitative proteomics can complement high-resolution sample isolation techniques. Here, we report a simple workflow exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI)-MW deconvolution (EMMOL) for normalizing isobaric reporter ratios within and between experiments, where small or unknown amounts of protein are used. EMMOL deconvolutes the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) data to yield the quantity of each protein of each sample in the pool, a new approach that enables the comparison of many samples without including a channel of reference standard. Moreover, EMMOL allows using a sufficient quantity of control sample to facilitate the peptide fractionation (isoelectric-focusing was used in this report), and mass spectrometry MS/MS sequencing yet relies on the broad dynamic range of iTRAQ quantitation to compare relative protein abundance. We demonstrated EMMOL by comparing four pooled samples with 20-fold range differences in protein abundance and performed data normalization without using prior knowledge of the amounts of proteins in each sample, simulating an iTRAQ experiment without protein quantitation prior to labeling. We used emPAI,1 the target protein MW, and the iTRAQ reporter ratios to calculate the amount of each protein in each of the four channels. Importantly, the EMMOL-delineated proteomes from separate iTRAQ experiments can be assorted for comparison without using a reference sample. We observed no compression of expression in iTRAQ ratios over a 20-fold range for all protein abundances. To complement this ability to analyze minute samples, we report an optimized iTRAQ labeling protocol for using 5 μg protein as the starting material. PMID:22468137

  5. Identification of dengue RNA binding proteins using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex M; Gunaratne, J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in dengue virus (DENV) research has been to understand the interaction of the viral RNA with host cell proteins during infection. Until recently, there were no comprehensive studies identifying host RNA binding proteins that interact with DENV RNA (Ward et al. RNA Biol 8 (6):1173-1186, 2011). Here, we describe a method for identifying proteins that associate with DENV RNA using RNA chromatography and quantitative mass spectrometry. The method utilizes a tobramycin RNA aptamer incorporated into an RNA containing the dengue 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) in order to reversibly bind RNA to a tobramycin matrix. The RNA-tobramycin matrix is incubated with SILAC-labeled cell lysates, and bound proteins are eluted using an excess of tobramycin. The eluate is analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, which allows direct and quantitative comparison of proteins bound to DENV UTRs and a control RNA-tobramycin matrix. This technique has the advantage of allowing one to distinguish between specific and nonspecific binding proteins based on the ratio of protein preferentially bound to the DENV UTRs versus the control RNA. This methodology can also be used for validation of quantitative mass spectrometry results using conventional Western blotting for specific proteins. Furthermore, though it was specifically developed to identify DENV RNA binding proteins, the RNA chromatography method described here can be applied to a broad range of viral and cellular RNAs for identification of interacting proteins. PMID:24696342

  6. Quantitative analysis of flagellar proteins in Drosophila sperm tails.

    PubMed

    Mendes Maia, Teresa; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Basto, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The cilium has a well-defined structure, which can still accommodate some morphological and molecular composition diversity to suit the functional requirements of different cell types. The sperm flagellum of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster appears as a good model to study the genetic regulation of axoneme assembly and motility, due to the wealth of genetic tools publically available for this organism. In addition, the fruit fly's sperm flagellum displays quite a long axoneme (∼1.8mm), which may facilitate both histological and biochemical analyses. Here, we present a protocol for imaging and quantitatively analyze proteins, which associate with the fly differentiating, and mature sperm flagella. We will use as an example the quantification of tubulin polyglycylation in wild-type testes and in Bug22 mutant testes, which present defects in the deposition of this posttranslational modification. During sperm biogenesis, flagella appear tightly bundled, which makes it more challenging to get accurate measurements of protein levels from immunostained specimens. The method we present is based on the use of a novel semiautomated, macro installed in the image processing software ImageJ. It allows to measure fluorescence levels in closely associated sperm tails, through an exact distinction between positive and background signals, and provides background-corrected pixel intensity values that can directly be used for data analysis. PMID:25837396

  7. Uncovering Quantitative Protein Interaction Networks for Mouse PDZ Domains using Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Sevecka, Mark; MacBeath, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    One of the principle challenges in systems biology is to uncover the networks of protein-protein interactions that underlie most biological processes. To date, experimental efforts directed at this problem have largely produced only qualitative networks that are replete with false positives and false negatives. Here, we describe a domain-centered approach – compatible with genome-wide investigations – that enables us to measure the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of recombinant PDZ domains for fluorescently-labeled peptides that represent physiologically-relevant binding partners. Using a pilot set of 22 PDZ domains, 4 PDZ domain clusters, and 20 peptides, we define a gold standard dataset by determining the KD for all 520 PDZ-peptide combinations using fluorescence polarization. We then show that microarrays of PDZ domains identify interactions of moderate to high affinity (KD ≤ 10 μM) in a high-throughput format with a false positive rate of 14% and a false negative rate of 14%. By combining the throughput of protein microarrays with the fidelity of fluorescence polarization, our domain/peptide-based strategy yields a quantitative network that faithfully recapitulates 85% of previously reported interactions and uncovers new biophysical interactions, many of which occur between proteins that are co-expressed. From a broader perspective, the selectivity data produced by this effort reveal a strong concordance between protein sequence and protein function, supporting a model in which interaction networks evolve through small steps that do not involve dramatic rewiring of the network. PMID:16637659

  8. Profiling of Protein Interaction Networks of Protein Complexes Using Affinity Purification and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for nearly all biological processes, and it is known that aberrant protein-protein interactions can lead to human disease and cancer. Recent evidence has suggested that protein interaction interfaces describe a new class of attractive targets for drug development. Full characterization of protein interaction networks of protein complexes and their dynamics in response to various cellular cues will provide essential information for us to understand how protein complexes work together in cells to maintain cell viability and normal homeostasis. Affinity purification coupled with quantitative mass spectrometry has become the primary method for studying in vivo protein interactions of protein complexes and whole organism proteomes. Recent developments in sample preparation and affinity purification strategies allow the capture, identification, and quantification of protein interactions of protein complexes that are stable, dynamic, transient, and/or weak. Current efforts have mainly focused on generating reliable, reproducible, and high confidence protein interaction data sets for functional characterization. The availability of increasing amounts of information on protein interactions in eukaryotic systems and new bioinformatics tools allow functional analysis of quantitative protein interaction data to unravel the biological significance of the identified protein interactions. Existing studies in this area have laid a solid foundation toward generating a complete map of in vivo protein interaction networks of protein complexes in cells or tissues. PMID:20445003

  9. An interactome map of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic North American porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain generated using SILAC-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Stefanie S; Osorio, Fernando; Hiscox, Julian A

    2012-04-01

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of an infected cell and encode nucleocapsid proteins. These proteins function to promote encapsidation of the RNA genome and virus particle assembly as well as playing potential roles in viral RNA synthesis. Nucleocapsid proteins can also associate with cellular proteins and signaling cascades. The arterivirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is no exception and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleolus in virus-infected cells. This study generated an interactome map of the N protein from a highly virulent North American strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). This is a major pathogen of swine resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Crucial to the study was the use of SILAC coupled to affinity purification using GFP-traps and LC-MS/MS. This approach has not been applied before to the investigation of host/viral protein interactomes and this study revealed that the PRRSV N protein interacts with the host cell protein synthesis machinery especially at the level of translation initiation as well as with the RNA post-transcriptional modification machinery. Applications of the dataset can include studies of virus/host interactions and the design of live attenuated recombinant vaccines. PMID:22522808

  10. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  11. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  12. Quantitating protein synthesis, degradation, and endogenous antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Princiotta, Michael F; Finzi, Diana; Qian, Shu-Bing; Gibbs, James; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Buttgereit, Frank; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2003-03-01

    Using L929 cells, we quantitated the macroeconomics of protein synthesis and degradation and the microeconomics of producing MHC class I associated peptides from viral translation products. To maintain a content of 2.6 x 10(9) proteins, each cell's 6 x 10(6) ribosomes produce 4 x 10(6) proteins min(-1). Each of the cell's 8 x 10(5) proteasomes degrades 2.5 substrates min(-1), creating one MHC class I-peptide complex for each 500-3000 viral translation products degraded. The efficiency of complex formation is similar in dendritic cells and macrophages, which play a critical role in activating T cells in vivo. Proteasomes create antigenic peptides at different efficiencies from two distinct substrate pools: rapidly degraded newly synthesized proteins that clearly represent defective ribosomal products (DRiPs) and a less rapidly degraded pool in which DRiPs may also predominate. PMID:12648452

  13. Analysis of alpha-synuclein-associated proteins by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Gu, Guangyu; Goodlett, David R; Zhang, Terry; Pan, Catherine; Montine, Thomas J; Montine, Kathleen S; Aebersold, Ruedi H; Zhang, Jing

    2004-09-10

    To identify the proteins associated with soluble alpha-synuclein (AS) that might promote AS aggregation, a key event leading to neurodegeneration, we quantitatively compared protein profiles of AS-associated protein complexes in MES cells exposed to rotenone, a pesticide that produces parkinsonism in animals and induces Lewy body (LB)-like inclusions in the remaining dopaminergic neurons, and to vehicle. We identified more than 250 proteins associated with Nonidet P-40 soluble AS, and demonstrated that at least 51 of these proteins displayed significant differences in their relative abundance in AS complexes under conditions where rotenone was cytotoxic and induced formation of cytoplasmic inclusions immunoreactive to anti-AS. Overexpressing one of these proteins, heat shock protein (hsp) 70, not only protected cells from rotenone-mediated cytotoxicity but also decreased soluble AS aggregation. Furthermore, the protection afforded by hsp70 transfection appeared to be related to suppression of rotenone-induced oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial and proteasomal dysfunction. PMID:15234983

  14. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Evelyn H; Combe, Peter C; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.Graphical Abstract. PMID:26956437

  15. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-03-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  16. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  17. Isotope Coded Protein Labeling Coupled Immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): A Novel Approach for Quantitative Protein Complex Analysis From Native Tissue*

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-01-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms—including humans—are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)1 with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method. PMID:23268931

  18. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method. PMID:23268931

  19. In-depth Identification of Pathways Related to Cisplatin-induced Hepatotoxicity through an Integrative Method Based on an Informatics-assisted Label-free Protein Quantitation and Microarray Gene Expression Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Singh, Thoudam S. K.; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Myung-Hoon; Choi, Eung-Chil; Chen, Yu-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used widely for treatment of a variety of cancer diseases. Recently, however, the use of cisplatin is restricted because of its adverse effects such as hepatotoxicity. There is no study with current proteomics technology to evaluate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, even if some studies have reported on the hepatotoxicity. In this study, proteomic as well as genomic analyses have been used for identification of proteins and genes that respond to cisplatin treatment in rat primary hepatocytes. To investigate the hepatotoxic effects of cisplatin, rat primary hepatocytes were treated with an IC20 concentration for 24 h. From proteomic analysis based on label-free quantitation strategy, cisplatin induced 76 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated proteins among 325 distinct proteins. In the mRNA level, genomic analysis revealed 72 up-regulated and 385 down-regulated genes in the cisplatin-treated group. Based on these two analyses, 19 pathways were commonly altered, whereas seven pathways were identified only by proteomic analysis, and 19 pathways were identified only by genomic analysis. Overall, this study explained the mechanism of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity with two points of view: well known pathways including drug metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis/TCA cycle and little known pathways including urea cycle and inflammation metabolism, for hepatotoxicity of other toxic agents. Up-regulated proteins detected by proteomic analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: FBP1 (fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase 1), FASN (fatty acid synthase), CAT (catalase), PRDX1 (peroxiredoxin-1), HSPD1 (60-kDa heat shock protein), MDH2 (malate dehydrogenase 2), and ARG1 (arginase 1), and also down-regulated proteins in the cisplatin-treated group: TPM1 (tropomyosin 1), TPM3 (tropomyosin 3), and CTSB (cathepsin B), were confirmed by Western blot analysis. In addition, up-regulated mRNAs detected by microarray analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: GSTA2, GSTT2, YC2

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Protein Complex Prediction Through Proteome-Wide Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Simone; Priami, Corrado; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent progress in proteomics most protein complexes are still unknown. Identification of these complexes will help us understand cellular regulatory mechanisms and support development of new drugs. Therefore it is really important to establish detailed information about the composition and the abundance of protein complexes but existing algorithms can only give qualitative predictions. Herein, we propose a new approach based on stochastic simulations of protein complex formation that integrates multi-source data--such as protein abundances, domain-domain interactions and functional annotations--to predict alternative forms of protein complexes together with their abundances. This method, called SiComPre (Simulation based Complex Prediction), achieves better qualitative prediction of yeast and human protein complexes than existing methods and is the first to predict protein complex abundances. Furthermore, we show that SiComPre can be used to predict complexome changes upon drug treatment with the example of bortezomib. SiComPre is the first method to produce quantitative predictions on the abundance of molecular complexes while performing the best qualitative predictions. With new data on tissue specific protein complexes becoming available SiComPre will be able to predict qualitative and quantitative differences in the complexome in various tissue types and under various conditions. PMID:26492574

  1. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays—Quantitative Assessment of Multiple Biomarkers in Biopsies for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Boellner, Stefanie; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA) represent a very promising sensitive and precise high-throughput technology for the quantitative measurement of hundreds of signaling proteins in biological and clinical samples. This array format allows quantification of one protein or phosphoprotein in multiple samples under the same experimental conditions at the same time. Moreover, it is suited for signal transduction profiling of small numbers of cultured cells or cells isolated from human biopsies, including formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. Owing to the much easier sample preparation, as compared to mass spectrometry based technologies, and the extraordinary sensitivity for the detection of low-abundance signaling proteins over a large linear range, RPPA have the potential for characterization of deregulated interconnecting protein pathways and networks in limited amounts of sample material in clinical routine settings. Current aspects of RPPA technology, including dilution curves, spotting, controls, signal detection, antibody validation, and calculation of protein levels are addressed.

  2. Sub-visible particle quantitation in protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Cao, S; Jiao, N; Jiang, Y; Mire-Sluis, A; Narhi, L O

    2009-10-01

    Biologics represent a large and growing segment of the therapeutic medicinal market. Sub-visible particles present in these products are a product quality attribute and a potential patient safety concern yet to be fully explored. Early and consistent particle quantitation and control throughout the product life cycle of these drugs from development to commercial lot release is critical in mitigating any concerns. This requires appropriate analytical methods which can be applied to biopharmaceuticals across a large variety of protein concentrations and modes of administration. The compendial light obscuration method for quantitating sub-visible particles in small volume parenterals is not ideally suited for therapeutic biologics. Approaches to modify the current compendial method so that it is applicable to biologics, including appropriate sample preparation, reduced assay sample volume, increased sizing information, and development of an appropriate sampling plan, are presented in this article. Successful applications of a modified light obscuration method to therapeutic protein products are demonstrated, and a strategy to utilise complimentary methods and techniques at different phases of product development is discussed. PMID:20144454

  3. Quantitation of protein post-translational modifications using isobaric tandem mass tags.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Chung; Lahert, Emma; Pike, Ian; Ward, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to modulate many cellular processes and their qualitative and quantitative evaluation is fundamental for understanding the mechanisms of biological events. Over the past decade, improvements in sample preparation techniques and enrichment strategies, the development of quantitative labeling strategies, the launch of a new generation of mass spectrometers and the creation of bioinformatics tools for the interrogation of ever larger datasets has established MS-based quantitative proteomics as a powerful workflow for global proteomics, PTM analysis and the elucidation of key biological mechanisms. With the advantage of their multiplexing capacity and the flexibility of an ever-growing family of different peptide-reactive groups, isobaric tandem mass tags facilitate quantitative proteomics and PTM experiments and enable higher sample throughput. In this review, we focus on the technical concept and utility of the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling approach to PTM analysis, including phosphorylation, glycosylation and S-nitrosylation. PMID:25697195

  4. Multiplexed MRM with Internal Standards for Cerebrospinal Fluid Candidate Protein Biomarker Quantitation.

    PubMed

    Percy, Andrew J; Yang, Juncong; Chambers, Andrew G; Simon, Romain; Hardie, Darryl B; Borchers, Christoph H

    2014-06-30

    Multiplexed quantitation is essential for discovering, verifying, and validating biomarkers for risk stratification, disease prognostication, and therapeutic monitoring. The most promising strategy for quantifying unverified protein biomarkers in biofluids relies on selected/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM or MRM) technology with isotopically labeled standards employed within a bottom-up proteomic workflow. Since cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an important fluid for studying central nervous system (CNS) related diseases, we sought to develop a rapid, antibody- and fractionation-free MRM-based approach with a complex mixture of peptide standards to quantify a highly multiplexed panel of candidate protein biomarkers in human CSF. Development involved peptide transition optimization, denaturation/digestion protocol evaluation, transition interference screening, and protein quantitation via peptide standard curves. The final method exhibited excellent reproducibility (average coefficient of variation of <1% for retention time and <6% for signal) and breadth of quantitation (130 proteins from 311 interference-free peptides) in a single 43-min run. These proteins are of high-to-low abundance with determined concentrations from 118 μg/mL (serum albumin) to 550 pg/mL (apolipoprotein C-I). Overall, the method consists of the most highly multiplexed and broadest panel of candidate protein biomarkers in human CSF reported thus far and is well suited for subsequent verification studies on patient samples. PMID:24911472

  5. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/). PMID:25913743

  6. Quantitative Measurement of Protein Relocalization in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Alan; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Microscope cytometry provides a powerful means to study signaling in live cells. Here we present a quantitative method to measure protein relocalization over time, which reports the absolute fraction of a tagged protein in each compartment. Using this method, we studied an essential step in the early propagation of the pheromone signal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: recruitment to the membrane of the scaffold Ste5 by activated Gβγ dimers. We found that the dose response of Ste5 recruitment is graded (EC50 = 0.44 ± 0.08 nM, Hill coefficient = 0.8 ± 0.1). Then, we determined the effective dissociation constant (Kde) between Ste5 and membrane sites during the first few minutes when the negative feedback from the MAPK Fus3 is first activated. Kde changed during the first minutes from a high affinity of <0.65 nM to a steady-state value of 17 ± 9 nM. During the same period, the total number of binding sites decreased slightly, from 1940 ± 150 to 1400 ± 200. This work shows how careful quantification of a protein relocalization dynamic can give insight into the regulation mechanisms of a biological system. PMID:23442923

  7. Quantitative analysis of protein dynamics during asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Bernd; Emery, Gregory; Berdnik, Daniela; Wirtz-Peitz, Frederik; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2005-10-25

    In dividing Drosophila sensory organ precursor (SOP) cells, the fate determinant Numb and its associated adaptor protein Pon localize asymmetrically and segregate into the anterior daughter cell, where Numb influences cell fate by repressing Notch signaling. Asymmetric localization of both proteins requires the protein kinase aPKC and its substrate Lethal (2) giant larvae (Lgl). Because both Numb and Pon localization require actin and myosin, lateral transport along the cell cortex has been proposed as a possible mechanism for their asymmetric distribution. Here, we use quantitative live analysis of GFP-Pon and Numb-GFP fluorescence and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to characterize the dynamics of Numb and Pon localization during SOP division. We demonstrate that Numb and Pon rapidly exchange between a cytoplasmic pool and the cell cortex and that preferential recruitment from the cytoplasm is responsible for their asymmetric distribution during mitosis. Expression of a constitutively active form of aPKC impairs membrane recruitment of GFP-Pon. This defect can be rescued by coexpression of nonphosphorylatable Lgl, indicating that Lgl is the main target of aPKC. We propose that a high-affinity binding site is asymmetrically distributed by aPKC and Lgl and is responsible for asymmetric localization of cell-fate determinants during mitosis. PMID:16243032

  8. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Membrane Protein-Mediated Hypersaline Sensitivity and Adaptation in Halophilic Nocardiopsis xinjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Yanchang; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Mingzhi; Su, Na; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Lingsheng; Wei, Wei; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Yanxia; Xu, Yongru; Xu, Ping; Li, Wenjun; Tao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is one of the most dominant Actinobacteria that survives in hypersaline environments. However, the adaptation mechanisms for halophilism are still unclear. Here, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification based quantitative proteomics to investigate the functions of the membrane proteome after salt stress. A total of 683 membrane proteins were identified and quantified, of which 126 membrane proteins displayed salt-induced changes in abundance. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analyses indicated that these differential proteins showed two expression patterns, which were further validated by phenotypic changes and functional differences. The majority of ABC transporters, secondary active transporters, cell motility proteins, and signal transduction kinases were up-regulated with increasing salt concentration, whereas cell differentiation, small molecular transporter (ions and amino acids), and secondary metabolism proteins were significantly up-regulated at optimum salinity, but down-regulated or unchanged at higher salinity. The small molecule transporters and cell differentiation-related proteins acted as sensing proteins that played a more important biological role at optimum salinity. However, the ABC transporters for compatible solutes, Na(+)-dependent transporters, and cell motility proteins acted as adaptive proteins that actively counteracted higher salinity stress. Overall, regulation of membrane proteins may provide a major protection strategy against hyperosmotic stress. PMID:26549328

  9. Quantitation of protein-protein interactions by thermal stability shift analysis.

    PubMed

    Layton, Curtis J; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-08-01

    Thermal stability shift analysis is a powerful method for examining binding interactions in proteins. We demonstrate that under certain circumstances, protein-protein interactions can be quantitated by monitoring shifts in thermal stability using thermodynamic models and data analysis methods presented in this work. This method relies on the determination of protein stabilities from thermal unfolding experiments using fluorescent dyes such as SYPRO Orange that report on protein denaturation. Data collection is rapid and straightforward using readily available real-time polymerase chain reaction instrumentation. We present an approach for the analysis of the unfolding transitions corresponding to each partner to extract the affinity of the interaction between the proteins. This method does not require the construction of a titration series that brackets the dissociation constant. In thermal shift experiments, protein stability data are obtained at different temperatures according to the affinity- and concentration-dependent shifts in unfolding transition midpoints. Treatment of the temperature dependence of affinity is, therefore, intrinsic to this method and is developed in this study. We used the interaction between maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a thermostable synthetic ankyrin repeat protein (Off7) as an experimental test case because their unfolding transitions overlap minimally. We found that MBP is significantly stabilized by Off7. High experimental throughput is enabled by sample parallelization, and the ability to extract quantitative binding information at a single partner concentration. In a single experiment, we were able to quantify the affinities of a series of alanine mutants, covering a wide range of affinities (∼ 100 nM to ∼ 100 μM). PMID:21674662

  10. Radar Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chang, P.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate high-resolution radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) has shown increasing values in hydrological predictions in the last decade. Such QPEs are especially valuable in complex terrain where rain gauge network is sparse and hard to maintain while flash floods and mudslides are common hazards. Taiwan Central Weather Bureau has deployed four S-band radars to support their flood warning operations in recent years, and a real-time multi-radar QPE system was developed. Evaluations of the real-time system over one-year revealed some underestimation issues in the radar QPE. The current work investigates these issues and develops a series of refinements to the system. The refinements include replacing the general R-Z relationships used in the old system with the local ones, mitigating non-standard beam blockage artifacts based on long-term accumulations, and applying vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) corrections. The local R-Z relationships were derived from 2D video disdrometer observations of winter stratiform precipitation, meiyu fronts, local convective storms, and typhoons. The VPR correction was applied to reduce radar QPE errors in severely blocked area near the Central Mountain Range (CMR). The new radar QPE system was tested using different precipitation events and showed significant improvements over the old system especially along the CMR.

  11. Physiologically based quantitative modeling of unihemispheric sleep.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, D J; Abeysuriya, R G; Phillips, A J K; Robinson, P A

    2012-12-01

    Unihemispheric sleep has been observed in numerous species, including birds and aquatic mammals. While knowledge of its functional role has been improved in recent years, the physiological mechanisms that generate this behavior remain poorly understood. Here, unihemispheric sleep is simulated using a physiologically based quantitative model of the mammalian ascending arousal system. The model includes mutual inhibition between wake-promoting monoaminergic nuclei (MA) and sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nuclei (VLPO), driven by circadian and homeostatic drives as well as cholinergic and orexinergic input to MA. The model is extended here to incorporate two distinct hemispheres and their interconnections. It is postulated that inhibitory connections between VLPO nuclei in opposite hemispheres are responsible for unihemispheric sleep, and it is shown that contralateral inhibitory connections promote unihemispheric sleep while ipsilateral inhibitory connections promote bihemispheric sleep. The frequency of alternating unihemispheric sleep bouts is chiefly determined by sleep homeostasis and its corresponding time constant. It is shown that the model reproduces dolphin sleep, and that the sleep regimes of humans, cetaceans, and fur seals, the latter both terrestrially and in a marine environment, require only modest changes in contralateral connection strength and homeostatic time constant. It is further demonstrated that fur seals can potentially switch between their terrestrial bihemispheric and aquatic unihemispheric sleep patterns by varying just the contralateral connection strength. These results provide experimentally testable predictions regarding the differences between species that sleep bihemispherically and unihemispherically. PMID:22960411

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Protein-DNA Interaction by qDPI-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stefan M; Böser, Alexander; Hirsch, Jan P; Wanke, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    The specific binding of DNA-binding proteins to their cognate DNA motifs is a crucial step for gene expression control and chromatin organization in vivo. The development of methods for the identification of in vivo binding regions by, e.g. chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) or DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (Dam-ID) added an additional level of qualitative information for data mining in systems biology or applications in synthetic biology. In this respect, the in vivo techniques outpaced methods for thorough characterization of protein-DNA interaction and, especially, of the binding motifs at single base-pair resolution. The elucidation of DNA-binding capacities of proteins is frequently done with methods such as yeast one-hybrid, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) that provide only qualitative binding information and are not suited for automation or high-throughput screening of several DNA motifs. Here, we describe the quantitative DNA-protein-Interaction-ELISA (qDPI-ELISA) protocol, which makes use of fluorescent fusion proteins and, hence, is faster and easier to handle than the classical DPI-ELISA. Although every DPI-ELISA experiment delivers quantitative information, the qDPI-ELISA has an increased consistency, as it does not depend on immunological detection. We demonstrate the high comparability between probes and different protein extracts in qDPI-ELISA experiments. PMID:27557760

  13. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques. PMID:25268018

  14. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications. PMID:26655185

  15. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-01

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species. PMID:23464874

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Protein Interaction with Methyl-Lysine Analogues by Hybrid Computational and Experimental Approaches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In cases where binding ligands of proteins are not easily available, structural analogues are often used. For example, in the analysis of proteins recognizing different methyl-lysine residues in histones, methyl-lysine analogues based on methyl-amino-alkylated cysteine residues have been introduced. Whether these are close enough to justify quantitative interpretation of binding experiments is however questionable. To systematically address this issue, we developed, applied, and assessed a hybrid computational/experimental approach that extracts the binding free energy difference between the native ligand (methyl-lysine) and the analogue (methyl-amino-alkylated cysteine) from a thermodynamic cycle. Our results indicate that measured and calculated binding differences are in very good agreement and therefore allow the correction of measured affinities of the analogues. We suggest that quantitative binding parameters for defined ligands in general can be derived by this method with remarkable accuracy. PMID:21991995

  17. Quantitative proteome-based guidelines for intrinsic disorder characterization.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Michael; Whidden, Mark; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins fail to adopt a stable three-dimensional structure under physiological conditions. It is now understood that many disordered proteins are not dysfunctional, but instead engage in numerous cellular processes, including signaling and regulation. Disorder characterization from amino acid sequence relies on computational disorder prediction algorithms. While numerous large-scale investigations of disorder have been performed using these algorithms, and have offered valuable insight regarding the prevalence of protein disorder in many organisms, critical proteome-based descriptive statistical guidelines that would enable the objective assessment of intrinsic disorder in a protein of interest remain to be established. Here we present a quantitative characterization of numerous disorder features using a rigorous non-parametric statistical approach, providing expected values and percentile cutoffs for each feature in ten eukaryotic proteomes. Our estimates utilize multiple ab initio disorder prediction algorithms grounded on physicochemical principles. Furthermore, we present novel threshold values, specific to both the prediction algorithms and the proteomes, defining the longest primary sequence length in which the significance of a continuous disordered region can be evaluated on the basis of length alone. The guidelines presented here are intended to improve the interpretation of disorder content and continuous disorder predictions from the proteomic point of view. PMID:27085142

  18. Quantitative time-resolved measurement of membrane protein-ligand interactions using microcantilever array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Thomas; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Backmann, Natalija; Grange, Wilfried; Boulanger, Pascale; Letellier, Lucienne; Lang, Hans-Peter; Bietsch, Alex; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Membrane proteins are central to many biological processes, and the interactions between transmembrane protein receptors and their ligands are of fundamental importance in medical research. However, measuring and characterizing these interactions is challenging. Here we report that sensors based on arrays of resonating microcantilevers can measure such interactions under physiological conditions. A protein receptor-the FhuA receptor of Escherichia coli-is crystallized in liposomes, and the proteoliposomes then immobilized on the chemically activated gold-coated surface of the sensor by ink-jet spotting in a humid environment, thus keeping the receptors functional. Quantitative mass-binding measurements of the bacterial virus T5 at subpicomolar concentrations are performed. These experiments demonstrate the potential of resonating microcantilevers for the specific, label-free and time-resolved detection of membrane protein-ligand interactions in a micro-array format.

  19. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dick Jr, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90–110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques. PMID:25997113

  20. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques. PMID:25997113

  1. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    PubMed Central

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ~100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ~200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ~90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the pheromone receptor model proposed by Laughlin et al. (Cell 133: 1255–65, 2008) are discussed. PMID:23121132

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  3. Mobile app-based quantitative scanometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessica X H; Liu, Frank S F; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-16

    The feasibility of using smartphones and other mobile devices as the detection platform for quantitative scanometric assays is demonstrated. The different scanning modes (color, grayscale, black/white) and grayscale converting protocols (average, weighted average/luminosity, and software specific) have been compared in determining the optical darkness ratio (ODR) values, a conventional quantitation measure for scanometric assays. A mobile app was developed to image and analyze scanometric assays, as demonstrated by paper-printed tests and a biotin-streptavidin assay on a plastic substrate. Primarily for ODR analysis, the app has been shown to perform as well as a traditional desktop scanner, augmenting that smartphones (and other mobile devices) promise to be a practical platform for accurate, quantitative chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. PMID:25420202

  4. A Novel Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Platform for Determining Protein O-GlcNAcylation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoshi; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Fan, Jing; Karch, Kelly R; Ball, Lauren E; Denu, John M; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decades, protein O-GlcNAcylation has been found to play a fundamental role in cell cycle control, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and cellular signaling. Nevertheless, quantitative approaches to determine in vivo GlcNAc dynamics at a large-scale are still not readily available. Here, we have developed an approach to isotopically label O-GlcNAc modifications on proteins by producing (13)C-labeled UDP-GlcNAc from (13)C6-glucose via the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. This metabolic labeling was combined with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to determine protein O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates. First, an efficient enrichment method for O-GlcNAc peptides was developed with the use of phenylboronic acid solid-phase extraction and anhydrous DMSO. The near stoichiometry reaction between the diol of GlcNAc and boronic acid dramatically improved the enrichment efficiency. Additionally, our kinetic model for turnover rates integrates both metabolomic and proteomic data, which increase the accuracy of the turnover rate estimation. Other advantages of this metabolic labeling method include in vivo application, direct labeling of the O-GlcNAc sites and higher confidence for site identification. Concentrating only on nuclear localized GlcNAc modified proteins, we are able to identify 105 O-GlcNAc peptides on 42 proteins and determine turnover rates of 20 O-GlcNAc peptides from 14 proteins extracted from HeLa nuclei. In general, we found O-GlcNAcylation turnover rates are slower than those published for phosphorylation or acetylation. Nevertheless, the rates widely varied depending on both the protein and the residue modified. We believe this methodology can be broadly applied to reveal turnovers/dynamics of protein O-GlcNAcylation from different biological states and will provide more information on the significance of O-GlcNAcylation, enabling us to study the temporal dynamics of this critical modification for the first time. PMID:27114449

  5. Development of a Model Protein Interaction Pair as a Benchmarking Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of 2-Site Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Newitt, John A; Doyle, Michael L; Arisaka, Fumio; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hensley, Preston; Myszka, David G; Schwarz, Fred P; Thomson, James A; Eisenstein, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the molecular interaction field is to accurately determine the stoichiometry and stepwise binding affinity constants for macromolecules having >1 binding site. The mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) is to show how biophysical technologies are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core technologies [such as biosensor, microcalorimetry, or analytic ultracentrifugation (AUC)]. In the present work, the MIRG has developed a robust model protein interaction pair consisting of a bivalent variant of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens extracellular RNase barnase and a variant of its natural monovalent intracellular inhibitor protein barstar. It is demonstrated that this system can serve as a benchmarking tool for the quantitative analysis of 2-site protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction pair enables determination of precise binding constants for the barstar protein binding to 2 distinct sites on the bivalent barnase binding partner (termed binase), where the 2 binding sites were engineered to possess affinities that differed by 2 orders of magnitude. Multiple MIRG laboratories characterized the interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), AUC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of the system as a benchmarking model. Although general agreement was seen for the binding constants measured using solution-based ITC and AUC approaches, weaker affinity was seen for surface-based method SPR, with protein immobilization likely affecting affinity. An analysis of the results from multiple MIRG laboratories suggests that the bivalent barnase-barstar system is a suitable model for benchmarking new approaches for the quantitative characterization of complex biomolecular interactions. PMID:26543437

  6. Multi-Q: a fully automated tool for multiplexed protein quantitation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Ting; Hung, Wei-Neng; Yian, Yi-Hwa; Wu, Kun-Pin; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yet-Ran; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2006-09-01

    The iTRAQ labeling method combined with shotgun proteomic techniques represents a new dimension in multiplexed quantitation for relative protein expression measurement in different cell states. To expedite the analysis of vast amounts of spectral data, we present a fully automated software package, called Multi-Q, for multiplexed iTRAQ-based quantitation in protein profiling. Multi-Q is designed as a generic platform that can accommodate various input data formats from search engines and mass spectrometer manufacturers. To calculate peptide ratios, the software automatically processes iTRAQ's signature peaks, including peak detection, background subtraction, isotope correction, and normalization to remove systematic errors. Furthermore, Multi-Q allows users to define their own data-filtering thresholds based on semiempirical values or statistical models so that the computed results of fold changes in peptide ratios are statistically significant. This feature facilitates the use of Multi-Q with various instrument types with different dynamic ranges, which is an important aspect of iTRAQ analysis. The performance of Multi-Q is evaluated with a mixture of 10 standard proteins and human Jurkat T cells. The results are consistent with expected protein ratios and thus demonstrate the high accuracy, full automation, and high-throughput capability of Multi-Q as a large-scale quantitation proteomics tool. These features allow rapid interpretation of output from large proteomic datasets without the need for manual validation. Executable Multi-Q files are available on Windows platform at http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/Multi-Q/. PMID:16944945

  7. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  8. Free flow electrophoresis separation and AMS quantitation of 14C-naphthalene-protein adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Haack, Kurt W.; Sporty, Jennifer L.; Buckpitt, Alan R.; Morin, Dexter

    2010-04-01

    Naphthalene is a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon to which humans are exposed from a variety of sources including mobile air sources and cigarette smoke. Naphthalene produces dose-(concentration)dependent injury to airway epithelial cells of murine lung which is observed at concentrations well below the current occupational exposure standard. Toxicity is dependent upon the cytochrome P450 mediated metabolic activation of the parent substrate to unstable metabolites which become bound covalently to tissue proteins. Nearly 70 proteins have been identified as forming adducts with reactive naphthalene metabolites using in vitro systems but very little work has been conducted in vivo because reasonably large amounts (100 μCi) of 14C labeled parent compound must be administered to generate detectable adduct levels on storage phosphor screens following separation of labeled proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis. The work described here was done to provide proof of concept that protein separation by free flow electrophoresis followed by AMS detection of protein fractions containing protein bound reactive metabolites would provide adducted protein profiles in animals dosed with trace quantities of labeled naphthalene. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg naphthalene intraperitoneally at a calculated specific activity of 2 DPM/nmol (1 pCi/nmol) and respiratory epithelial tissue was obtained by lysis lavage 4 h post injection. Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) separates proteins in the liquid phase over a large pH range (2.5-11.5) using low molecular weight acids and bases to modify the pH. The apparatus separates fractions into standard 96-well plates that can be used in other protein analysis techniques. The buffers of the fractions have very high carbon content, however, and need to be dialyzed to yield buffers compatible with 14C-AMS. We describe the processing techniques required to couple FFE to AMS for quantitation of protein adducts.

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-04-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 (K48M) ) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5-3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 (K48M) under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 (K48M) mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 (K48M) , mpk6, and PTP1 (S7AS8A) under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of protein kinase SnRK1 regulated protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis under submergence

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hsing-Yi; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wang, Ying-Tsui; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    SNF1 RELATED PROTEIN KINASE 1 (SnRK1) is proposed to be a central integrator of the plant stress and energy starvation signalling pathways. We observed that the Arabidopsis SnRK1.1 dominant negative mutant (SnRK1.1 K48M) had lower tolerance to submergence than the wild type, suggesting that SnRK1.1-dependent phosphorylation of target proteins is important in signalling pathways triggered by submergence. We conducted quantitative phosphoproteomics and found that the phosphorylation levels of 57 proteins increased and the levels of 27 proteins decreased in Col-0 within 0.5–3h of submergence. Among the 57 proteins with increased phosphorylation in Col-0, 38 did not show increased phosphorylation levels in SnRK1.1 K48M under submergence. These proteins are involved mainly in sugar and protein synthesis. In particular, the phosphorylation of MPK6, which is involved in regulating ROS responses under abiotic stresses, was disrupted in the SnRK1.1 K48M mutant. In addition, PTP1, a negative regulator of MPK6 activity that directly dephosphorylates MPK6, was also regulated by SnRK1.1. We also showed that energy conservation was disrupted in SnRK1.1 K48M, mpk6, and PTP1 S7AS8A under submergence. These results reveal insights into the function of SnRK1 and the downstream signalling factors related to submergence. PMID:27029354

  11. Quantitation of specific proteins in polyacrylamide gels by the elution of Fast Green FCF.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L B; Hook, G E

    1981-07-01

    The quantitation of proteins in polyacrylamide gels stained with Fast green FCF has been investigated using a modification of the elution technique originally described by Fenner et al. (Fenner, C., Traut, R.R., Mason, D.T. and Wikman-Coffelt, J. (1975) Anal. Biochem. 63, 595--602) for Coomassie Blue and adapted by Medugorac (Medugorac, I. (1979) Basic Res. Cardiol. 74, 406--416) for use with proteins stained with Fast Green FCF. The elution of dye from stained protein was accomplished using 1.0 M NaOH instead of aqueous pyridine as required by the original method. The primary advantages of our modification are that the time required for protein quantitation has been considerably reduced and the use of toxic organic solvents has been eliminated. We have investigated the applicability of the method of several different proteins and our results indicate: (a) The quantity of Fast Green FCF eluted from specific proteins is proportional to the quantity of protein applied to the gel, but varies for each individual protein. (b) The method allows quantitation over a very wide range of protein (1--800 micrograms). (c) Quantitation of protein is independent of the width of the stained bands as well as acrylamide concentration. (d) The method is applicable to gels of many types including disc, slab and continuous gradient gels. (e) Protein can be estimated from the patterns obtained by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. (f) The presence of Triton X-100 in gel and protein sample does not affect quantitation; the method is applicable to gels containing SDS provided that SDS is removed prior to staining. (g) Precipitation of protein with 12.5% TCA following electrophoresis does not interfere with quantitation. (h) The reproducibility of the technique is excellent, with standard deviations being less than 10% of the mean in all cases. This method appears highly versatile but requires appropriate standards for the quantitation of individual proteins. PMID:7276424

  12. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level 16O and 18O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in ΔgspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-cype cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with previously investigation demonstrating that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system. PMID:20380418

  13. Protein-based ferrogels.

    PubMed

    Mody, Puja; Hart, Cassidy; Romano, Siena; El-Magbri, Mariam; Esson, Moira M; Ibeh, Trisha; Knowlton, Elizabeth D; Zhang, Ming; Wagner, Michael J; Hartings, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel synthesis in which hemoglobin and Fe(2+) react, in the presence of KNO3 and KOH, to produce protein microgels that contain magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The synthesis results in microgels with polymer properties (denaturing and glass transition temperatures) that are consistent with the dried protein. The iron oxide nanoparticles that exhibit an average diameter of 22nm, are ferrimagnetic, and display properties consistent with Fe3O4. The multiple functional capabilities displayed by these materials: biocompatibility, magnetism, dye uptake and controlled release, and other properties archetypal of hydrogels, will make the magnetic hydrogels attractive for a number of biomedical applications. PMID:26901627

  14. Quantitative real-time kinetics of optogenetic proteins CRY2 and CIB1/N using single-molecule tools

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Choudhury, Samrat Roy; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this work we evaluate the interaction of two optogenetic protein variants (CIB1, CIBN) with their complementary protein CRY2 by single-molecule tools in cell-free extracts. After validating the blue light induced co-localization of CRY2 and CIB1/N by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells, a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) based method was developed to quantitatively determine the in vitro association of the extracted proteins. Our experiments suggest that CIB1, in comparison with CIBN, possesses a better coupling efficiency with CRY2 due to its intact protein structure and lower diffusion rate within 300 s detection window. PMID:24780222

  15. A Microfluidic Platform for High-Throughput Multiplexed Protein Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Volpetti, Francesca; Garcia-Cordero, Jose; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidic platform capable of quantitating up to 384 biomarkers in 4 distinct samples by immunoassay. The microfluidic device contains 384 unit cells, which can be individually programmed with pairs of capture and detection antibody. Samples are quantitated in each unit cell by four independent MITOMI detection areas, allowing four samples to be analyzed in parallel for a total of 1,536 assays per device. We show that the device can be pre-assembled and stored for weeks at elevated temperature and we performed proof-of-concept experiments simultaneously quantitating IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, PSA, and GFP. Finally, we show that the platform can be used to identify functional antibody combinations by screening 64 antibody combinations requiring up to 384 unique assays per device. PMID:25680117

  16. Quantitative and Qualitative Simulation in Computer Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Albert; Roberts, Burce

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based systems combining quantitative simulation with qualitative tutorial techniques provide learners with sophisticated individualized training. The teaching capabilities and operating procedures of Steamer, a simulated steam plant, are described. (Author/MBR)

  17. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis.

    PubMed

    Conti, C J; Giménez, I B; Cabrini, R L

    1976-03-01

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. PMID:1258094

  18. The effects of shared peptides on protein quantitation in label-free proteomics by LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Miller, John H.

    2008-01-02

    Assessment of differential protein abundance from the observed properties of detected peptides is an essential part of protein profiling based on shotgun proteomics. However, the abundance observed for degenerate peptides may be due to contributions from multiple proteins that are affected differently by a given treatment. Excluding degenerate peptides eliminates this ambiguity but may significantly decrease the number of proteins for which abundance estimates can be obtained. Peptide degeneracy within a family of biologically related proteins does not cause ambiguity if family members have a common response to treatment. Based on this concept, we have developed an approach for including degenerate peptides in the analysis of differential protein abundance in protein profiling. Data from a recent proteomics study of lung tissue from mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide, cigarette smoke, and a combination of these agents is used to illustrate our method. Starting from data where about half of the protein identifications involved degenerate peptides, 82% of the affected proteins were grouped into families, based on FASTA annotation, with closure on peptide degeneracy. In many cases, a common abundance relative to control was sufficient to explain ion-current peak areas for peptides, both unique and degenerate, that identified biologically-related proteins in a peptide-degeneracy closure group. Based on these results, we propose that peptide-degeneracy closure groups provide a way to include abundance data for degenerate-peptides in quantitative protein profiling by high throughput mass spectrometry.

  19. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction. PMID:23264567

  20. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  1. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cold-responsive proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Karlie A; Mariani, Michael; Haynes, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Rice is susceptible to cold stress and with a future of climatic instability we will be unable to produce enough rice to satisfy increasing demand. A thorough understanding of the molecular responses to thermal stress is imperative for engineering cultivars, which have greater resistance to low temperature stress. In this study we investigated the proteomic response of rice seedlings to 48, 72 and 96 h of cold stress at 12-14°C. The use of both label-free and iTRAQ approaches in the analysis of global protein expression enabled us to assess the complementarity of the two techniques for use in plant proteomics. The approaches yielded a similar biological response to cold stress despite a disparity in proteins identified. The label-free approach identified 236 cold-responsive proteins compared to 85 in iTRAQ results, with only 24 proteins in common. Functional analysis revealed differential expression of proteins involved in transport, photosynthesis, generation of precursor metabolites and energy; and, more specifically, histones and vitamin B biosynthetic proteins were observed to be affected by cold stress. PMID:21433000

  3. Shotgun Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Proteins Responding to Drought Stress in Brassica rapa L. (Inbred Line "Chiifu").

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Wook; Kim, Mijeong; Kim, Hijin; Lee, Joohyun

    2016-01-01

    Through a comparative shotgun quantitative proteomics analysis in Brassica rapa (inbred line Chiifu), total of 3,009 nonredundant proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of 0.01 in 3-week-old plants subjected to dehydration treatment for 0, 24, and 48 h, plants subjected to drought stress. Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylases, chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, and light harvesting complex in photosystem II were highly abundant proteins in the leaves and accounted for 9%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, of the total identified proteins. Comparative analysis of the treatments enabled detection of 440 differentially expressed proteins during dehydration. The results of clustering analysis, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, and analysis of composite expression profiles of functional categories for the differentially expressed proteins indicated that drought stress reduced the levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis and increased the levels of proteins involved in catabolic processes and stress responses. We observed enhanced expression of many proteins involved in osmotic stress responses and proteins with antioxidant activities. Based on previously reported molecular functions, we propose that the following five differentially expressed proteins could provide target genes for engineering drought resistance in plants: annexin, phospholipase D delta, sDNA-binding transcriptional regulator, auxin-responsive GH3 family protein, and TRAF-like family protein. PMID:27419125

  4. High-Throughput Multiplexed Quantitation of Protein Aggregation and Cytotoxicity in a Huntington’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington’s disease is the presence of a large polyglutamine expansion in the first exon of the Huntingtin protein and the propensity of protein aggregation by the mutant proteins. Aberrant protein aggregation also occurs in other polyglutamine expansion disorders, as well as in other neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and prion diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of these aggregates in the cell death that characterizes the diseases remains unclear. Identification of small molecule probes that modulate protein aggregation and cytotoxicity caused by aggregated proteins may greatly facilitate the studies on pathogenesis of these diseases and potentially lead to development of new therapies. Based on a detergent insoluble property of the Huntingtin protein aggregates, we have developed a homogenous assay to rapidly quantitate the levels of protein aggregates in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease. The protein aggregation assay has also been multiplexed with a protease release assay for the measurement of cytotoxicity resulting from aggregated proteins in the same cells. Through a testing screen of a compound library, we have demonstrated that this multiplexed cytotoxicity and protein aggregation assay has ability to identify active compounds that prevent cell death and/or modulate protein aggregation in cells of the Huntington’s disease model. Therefore, this multiplexed screening approach is also useful for development of high-throughput screening assays for other neurodegenerative diseases involving protein aggregation. PMID:23346268

  5. Shotgun Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Proteins Responding to Drought Stress in Brassica rapa L. (Inbred Line “Chiifu”)

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Through a comparative shotgun quantitative proteomics analysis in Brassica rapa (inbred line Chiifu), total of 3,009 nonredundant proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of 0.01 in 3-week-old plants subjected to dehydration treatment for 0, 24, and 48 h, plants subjected to drought stress. Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylases, chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, and light harvesting complex in photosystem II were highly abundant proteins in the leaves and accounted for 9%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, of the total identified proteins. Comparative analysis of the treatments enabled detection of 440 differentially expressed proteins during dehydration. The results of clustering analysis, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, and analysis of composite expression profiles of functional categories for the differentially expressed proteins indicated that drought stress reduced the levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis and increased the levels of proteins involved in catabolic processes and stress responses. We observed enhanced expression of many proteins involved in osmotic stress responses and proteins with antioxidant activities. Based on previously reported molecular functions, we propose that the following five differentially expressed proteins could provide target genes for engineering drought resistance in plants: annexin, phospholipase D delta, sDNA-binding transcriptional regulator, auxin-responsive GH3 family protein, and TRAF-like family protein. PMID:27419125

  6. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Bret; Feng, Jian; Garrett, Wesley M

    2010-09-01

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra, and the numbers of spectra were statistically evaluated for variation between samples. The results corroborate prior knowledge that combining spectra from replicate samples increases the number of identifiable proteins and that a summed spectral count for a protein increases linearly with increasing molar amounts of protein. Furthermore, statistical analysis of spectral counts for proteins in two- and three-way comparisons between replicates and combined replicates revealed little significant variation arising from run-to-run differences or data-dependent instrument ion sampling that might falsely suggest differential protein accumulation. In these experiments, spectral counting was enabled by PANORAMICS, probability-based software that predicts proteins detected by sets of observed peptides. Three alternative approaches to counting spectra were also evaluated by comparison. As the counting thresholds were changed from weaker to more stringent, the accuracy of ratio determination also changed. These results suggest that thresholds for counting can be empirically set to improve relative quantitation. All together, the data confirm the accuracy and reliability of label-free spectral counting in the relative, quantitative analysis of proteins between samples. PMID:20541435

  7. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N.; Qian, Weijun; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-05-03

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope 18O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and environmental electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 79% membrane proteins among all proteins identified from the enriched sample. To illustrate the quantification of membrane proteome changes, enriched membrane protein samples from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) were further labeled with 16O and 18O at the peptide level prior to LC-MS analysis. A chemical-probe-labeled pure protein has also been used as an internal standard for normalization purpose. The quantitative data revealed reduced abundances of many outer membrane proteins such as OmcA and MtrC in ΔgspD mutant cells, which agreed well with previously published studies.

  8. Identification of Protein Network Alterations upon Retinal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Quantitative Proteomics Using a Rattus norvegicus Model

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Han; Wang, Leilei; Cai, Ruiqi; Zheng, Ling; Guo, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is a common feature associated with several ocular diseases, including diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we investigated the effect of a retinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury on protein levels via a quantitative shotgun strategy using stable isotope dimethyl labeling combined with LC-MS/MS analysis. Based on the relative quantitation data of 1088 proteins, 234 proteins showed a greater than 1.5-fold change following I/R injury, 194 of which were up-regulated and 40 were down-regulated. Gene ontology analysis revealed that after I/R injury, there was an increase in the metabolic-process related proteins but a decline in cell communication, system process and transport-related proteins. A ribosome protein network and a secreted protein network consisting of many protease inhibitors were identified among the up-regulated proteins, despite a suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway following the I/R injury. A synaptic-related protein network was found to be significantly down-regulated, implicating a functional reduction of neurons following a retinal I/R injury. Our results provide new systems-biology clues for the study of retinal ischemia. PMID:25549249

  9. Quantitation of Human Metallothionein Isoforms: A Family of Small, Highly Conserved, Cysteine-rich Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mehus, Aaron A.; Muhonen, Wallace W.; Garrett, Scott H.; Somji, Seema; Sens, Donald A.; Shabb, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Human metallothioneins (MTs) are important regulators of metal homeostasis and protectors against oxidative damage. Their altered mRNA expression has been correlated with metal toxicity and a variety of cancers. Current immunodetection methods lack the specificity to distinguish all 12 human isoforms. Each, however, can be distinguished by the mass of its acetylated, cysteine-rich, hydrophilic N-terminal tryptic peptides. These properties were exploited to develop a bottom-up MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS-based method for their simultaneous quantitation. Key features included enrichment of N-terminal acetylated peptides by strong cation exchange chromatography, optimization of C18 reversed-phase chromatography, and control of methionine oxidation. Combinations of nine isoforms were identified in seven cell lines and two tissues. Relative quantitation was accomplished by comparing peak intensities of peptides generated from pooled cytosolic proteins alkylated with 14N- or 15N-iodoacetamide. Absolute quantitation was achieved using 15N-iodoacetamide-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards. The method was applied to the cadmium induction of MTs in human kidney HK-2 epithelial cells expressing recombinant MT-3. Seven isoforms were detected with abundances spanning almost 2 orders of magnitude and inductions up to 12-fold. The protein-to-mRNA ratio for MT-1E was one-tenth that of other MTs, suggesting isoform-specific differences in protein expression efficiency. Differential expression of MT-1G1 and MT-1G2 suggested tissue- and cell-specific alternative splicing for the MT-1G isoform. Protein expression of MT isoforms was also evaluated in human breast epithelial cancer cell lines. Estrogen-receptor-positive cell lines expressed only MT-2 and MT-1X, whereas estrogen-receptor-negative cell lines additionally expressed MT-1E. The combined expression of MT isoforms was 38-fold greater in estrogen-receptor-negative cell lines than in estrogen-receptor-positive cells. These

  10. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-01

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins. PMID:24027776

  11. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  12. Protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis found in human plasma using global quantitative proteomics profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Crispin, David A.; May, Damon; Stevens, Tyler; McIntosh, Martin; Bronner, Mary P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease that is difficult to diagnose at early stages when curable treatments are effective. Biomarkers that can improve current pancreatic cancer detection would have great value in improving patient management and survival rate. A large scale quantitative proteomics study was performed to search for the plasma protein alterations associated with pancreatic cancer. The enormous complexity of the plasma proteome and the vast dynamic range of protein concentration therein present major challenges for quantitative global profiling of plasma. To address these challenges, multi-dimensional fractionation at both protein and peptide levels was applied to enhance the depth of proteomics analysis. Employing stringent criteria, more than thirteen hundred proteins total were identified in plasma across 8-orders of magnitude in protein concentration. Differential proteins associated with pancreatic cancer were identified, and their relationship with the proteome of pancreatic tissue and pancreatic juice from our previous studies was discussed. A subgroup of differentially expressed proteins was selected for biomarker testing using an independent cohort of plasma and serum samples from well-diagnosed patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis and non-pancreatic disease controls. Using ELISA methodology, the performance of each of these protein candidates was benchmarked against CA19-9, the current gold standard for a pancreatic cancer blood test. A composite marker of TIMP1 and ICAM1 demonstrate significantly better performance than CA19-9 in distinguishing pancreatic cancer from the non-pancreatic disease controls and chronic pancreatitis controls. In addition, protein AZGP1 was identified as a biomarker candidate for chronic pancreatitis. The discovery and technical challenges associated with plasma-based quantitative proteomics are discussed and may benefit the development of plasma proteomics technology in general. The protein

  13. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Histone Related Protein, Ydl156w, and Its Functional Associations Using Quantitative Proteomic Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Stutzman, Brent; Peak, Allison; Seidel, Chris W.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge in biology is to functionally annotate novel and uncharacterized proteins. Several approaches are available for deducing the function of proteins in silico based upon sequence homology and physical or genetic interaction, yet this approach is limited to proteins with well-characterized domains, paralogs and/or orthologs in other species, as well as on the availability of suitable large-scale data sets. Here, we present a quantitative proteomics approach extending the protein network of core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, among which a novel associated protein, the previously uncharacterized Ydl156w, was identified. In order to predict the role of Ydl156w, we designed and applied integrative bioinformatics, quantitative proteomics and biochemistry approaches aiming to infer its function. Reciprocal analysis of Ydl156w protein interactions demonstrated a strong association with all four histones and also to proteins strongly associated with histones including Rim1, Rfa2 and 3, Yku70, and Yku80. Through a subsequent combination of the focused quantitative proteomics experiments with available large-scale genetic interaction data and Gene Ontology functional associations, we provided sufficient evidence to associate Ydl156w with multiple processes including chromatin remodeling, transcription and DNA repair/replication. To gain deeper insights into the role of Ydl156w in histone biology we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of ydl156w on H4 associated proteins, which lead to a dramatic decrease in the association of H4 with RNA polymerase III proteins. The implication of a role for Ydl156w in RNA Polymerase III mediated transcription was consequently verified by RNA-Seq experiments. Finally, using these approaches we generated a refined network of Ydl156w-associated proteins. PMID:22199229

  14. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  15. Quantitative methods for the analysis of protein phosphorylation in drug development.

    PubMed

    Olive, D Michael

    2004-10-01

    Most signal transduction and cell signaling pathways are mediated by protein kinases. Protein kinases have emerged as important cellular regulatory proteins in many aspects of neoplasia. Protein kinase inhibitors offer the opportunity to target diseases such as cancer with chemotherapeutic agents specific for the causative molecular defect. In order to identify possible targets and assess kinase inhibitors, quantitative methods for analyzing protein phosphorylation have been developed. This review examines some of the current formats used for quantifying kinase function for drug development. PMID:15966829

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mice corneal tissues reveals angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minqian; Tao, Yimin; Feng, Yifan; Liu, Xing; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced in Balb/c mice by alkali burns in the central area of the cornea with a diameter of 2.5mm. After fourteen days, the cornea from one eye was collected for histological staining for CNV examination, while the cornea from the other eye of the same mouse was harvested for proteomic analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach was applied to analyze five normal corneal tissues (normal group mice n=5) and five corresponding neovascularized corneal tissues (model group mice n=5). A total of 2124 proteins were identified, and 1682 proteins were quantified from these corneal tissues. Among these quantified proteins, 290 proteins were significantly changed between normal and alkali burned corneal tissues. Of these significantly changed proteins, 35 were reported or predicted as angiogenesis-related proteins. Then, these 35 proteins were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software, resulting in 26 proteins enriched and connected to each other in the protein-protein interaction network, such as Lcn-2, αB-crystallin and Serpinf1 (PEDF). These three significantly changed proteins were selected for further Western blotting validation. Consistent with the quantitative proteomic results, Western blotting showed that Lcn-2 and αB-crystallin were significantly up-regulated in CNV model, while PEDF was down-regulated. This study provided increased understanding of angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal vascular development, which will be useful in the ophthalmic clinic of specifically target angiogenesis. PMID:27049463

  17. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rüetschi, Ulla; Stenson, Martin; Hasselblom, Sverker; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Hansson, Ulrika; Fagman, Henrik; Andersson, Per-Ola

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS) quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i) early relapsed or refractory and (ii) long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy. PMID:26060582

  18. Nanocrystal-based biomimetic system for quantitative flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter; Dobrovolskaia, Marina; Kang, HyeongGon; Clarke, Matthew; Patri, Anil K.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2007-02-01

    fluorescence detection. Quantitative aspects of the proposed flow cytometery-based approach for measurement of the QD-based biomimetic samples are discussed.

  19. A Simplified Workflow for Protein Quantitation of Rat Brain Tissues Using Label-Free Proteomics and Spectral Counting.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; Grant, Shonnette F; Dave, Jitendra R

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is an increasingly valuable tool for determining relative or quantitative protein abundance in brain tissues. A plethora of technical and analytical methods are available, but straightforward and practical approaches are often needed to facilitate reproducibility. This aspect is particularly important as an increasing number of studies focus on models of traumatic brain injury or brain trauma, for which brain tissue proteomes have not yet been fully described. This text provides suggested techniques for robust identification and quantitation of brain proteins by using molecular weight fractionation prior to mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Detailed sample preparation and generalized protocols for chromatography, mass spectrometry, spectral counting, and normalization are described. The rat cerebral cortex isolated from a model of blast-overpressure was used as an exemplary source of brain tissue. However, these techniques may be adapted for lysates generated from several types of cells or tissues and adapted by the end user. PMID:27604744

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Protein Quantitative Trait Loci (pQTLs)

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Anna-Maria; Stevens, Kara; Rafferty, Ian; Lauretani, Fulvio; Murray, Anna; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Rafiq, Sajjad; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Lango, Hana; Scholz, Sonja; Weedon, Michael N.; Arepalli, Sampath; Rice, Neil; Washecka, Nicole; Hurst, Alison; Britton, Angela; Henley, William; van de Leemput, Joyce; Li, Rongling; Newman, Anne B.; Tranah, Greg; Harris, Tamara; Panicker, Vijay; Dayan, Colin; Bennett, Amanda; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Guralnik, Jack; Bandinelli, Stefania; Frayling, Timothy M.; Singleton, Andrew; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that human genetic variation influences gene expression. Genome-wide studies have revealed that mRNA levels are associated with genetic variation in or close to the gene coding for those mRNA transcripts – cis effects, and elsewhere in the genome – trans effects. The role of genetic variation in determining protein levels has not been systematically assessed. Using a genome-wide association approach we show that common genetic variation influences levels of clinically relevant proteins in human serum and plasma. We evaluated the role of 496,032 polymorphisms on levels of 42 proteins measured in 1200 fasting individuals from the population based InCHIANTI study. Proteins included insulin, several interleukins, adipokines, chemokines, and liver function markers that are implicated in many common diseases including metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious conditions. We identified eight Cis effects, including variants in or near the IL6R (p = 1.8×10−57), CCL4L1 (p = 3.9×10−21), IL18 (p = 6.8×10−13), LPA (p = 4.4×10−10), GGT1 (p = 1.5×10−7), SHBG (p = 3.1×10−7), CRP (p = 6.4×10−6) and IL1RN (p = 7.3×10−6) genes, all associated with their respective protein products with effect sizes ranging from 0.19 to 0.69 standard deviations per allele. Mechanisms implicated include altered rates of cleavage of bound to unbound soluble receptor (IL6R), altered secretion rates of different sized proteins (LPA), variation in gene copy number (CCL4L1) and altered transcription (GGT1). We identified one novel trans effect that was an association between ABO blood group and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels (p = 6.8×10−40), but this finding was not present when TNF-alpha was measured using a different assay , or in a second study, suggesting an assay-specific association. Our results show that protein levels share some of the features of the genetics of gene expression. These

  1. Thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography with bar code quantitation of C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, S; Lager, C; Laurell, T; Birnbaum, S

    1995-09-01

    A rapid thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatographic method for quantitation in serum of an acute phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), which can differentiate between viral and bacteria] infections, is described, where material and reagent costs are minimal. The analysis is based on the "sandwich" assay format using monoclonal antibodies directed against two sites of CRP. One of the antibodies is covalently bound to defined zones on a thin-layer immunoaffinity chromatography membrane, while the other antibody is covalently bound to deeply dyed blue latex particles. After incubation (CRP sample and latex particles), the CRP-latex immunocomplex is allowed to migrate along the immunoaffinity chromatography membrane. In the presence of antigen, a sandwich is formed between the CRP-latex immunocomplex and membrane-bound antibodies, which results in the appearance of blue lines on the membrane. Antibody immobilization on the TLC membrane is made with a redesigned piezoelectric-driven ink-jet printer. The time required for the analysis is less than 10 min. Quantitation is achieved either by counting the lines visually, with scanning reflectometry, or with a modified bar code reader. The limit of detection was estimated in the low femtomolar range using the naked eye as detector. PMID:8779423

  2. Quantitative low-cost webcam-based microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikesit, Gea Oswah Fatah; Darmawan, Marten; Faisal, Amir

    2010-11-01

    Digital web cameras (popularly known as webcams) have recently gained a significant increase of relevance in the field of optical microscopy, in particular to allow for quick and do-it-yourself methods in developing low-cost and portable microscopes suitable for life sciences and engineering applications in low-resource areas. Unfortunately, these methods were published without any systematic explanation and quantitative assessment of the imaging performances. We reproduce these do-it-yourself methods, discuss the optical considerations that are relevant for them, and quantitatively compare their imaging performances to a commercial digital microscope in order to clarify both the advantages and disadvantages of the webcam-based microscopes.

  3. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians. PMID:26131905

  4. Ultrasensitive proteomic quantitation of cellular signaling by digitized nanoparticle-protein counting

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Thomas; Agarwal, Anupriya; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; O’Hare, Thomas; Gönen, Mehmet; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2016-01-01

    Many important signaling and regulatory proteins are expressed at low abundance and are difficult to measure in single cells. We report a molecular imaging approach to quantitate protein levels by digitized, discrete counting of nanoparticle-tagged proteins. Digitized protein counting provides ultrasensitive molecular detection of proteins in single cells that surpasses conventional methods of quantitating total diffuse fluorescence, and offers a substantial improvement in protein quantitation. We implement this digitized proteomic approach in an integrated imaging platform, the single cell-quantum dot platform (SC-QDP), to execute sensitive single cell phosphoquantitation in response to multiple drug treatment conditions and using limited primary patient material. The SC-QDP: 1) identified pAKT and pERK phospho-heterogeneity and insensitivity in individual leukemia cells treated with a multi-drug panel of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors, and 2) revealed subpopulations of drug-insensitive CD34+ stem cells with high pCRKL and pSTAT5 signaling in chronic myeloid leukemia patient blood samples. This ultrasensitive digitized protein detection approach is valuable for uncovering subtle but important differences in signaling, drug insensitivity, and other key cellular processes amongst single cells. PMID:27320899

  5. A new fusion protein platform for quantitatively measuring activity of multiple proteases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recombinant proteins fused with specific cleavage sequences are widely used as substrate for quantitatively analyzing the activity of proteases. Here we propose a new fusion platform for multiple proteases, by using diaminopropionate ammonia-lyase (DAL) as the fusion protein. It was based on the finding that a fused His6-tag could significantly decreases the activities of DAL from E. coli (eDAL) and Salmonella typhimurium (sDAL). Previously, we have shown that His6GST-tagged eDAL could be used to determine the activity of tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) under different temperatures or in the denaturant at different concentrations. In this report, we will assay different tags and cleavage sequences on DAL for expressing yield in E. coli, stability of the fused proteins and performance of substrate of other common proteases. Results We tested seven different protease cleavage sequences (rhinovirus 3C, TEV protease, factor Xa, Ssp DnaB intein, Sce VMA1 intein, thrombin and enterokinase), three different tags (His6, GST, CBD and MBP) and two different DALs (eDAL and sDAL), for their performance as substrate to the seven corresponding proteases. Among them, we found four active DAL-fusion substrates suitable for TEVp, factor Xa, thrombin and DnaB intein. Enterokinase cleaved eDAL at undesired positions and did not process sDAL. Substitution of GST with MBP increase the expression level of the fused eDAL and this fusion protein was suitable as a substrate for analyzing activity of rhinovirus 3C. We demonstrated that SUMO protease Ulp1 with a N-terminal His6-tag or MBP tag displayed different activity using the designed His6SUMO-eDAL as substrate. Finally, owing to the high level of the DAL-fusion protein in E. coli, these protein substrates can also be detected directly from the crude extract. Conclusion The results show that our designed DAL-fusion proteins can be used to quantify the activities of both sequence- and conformational-specific proteases, with

  6. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  7. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay.

    PubMed

    Breen, Conor J; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  8. Deep Proteomics of Mouse Skeletal Muscle Enables Quantitation of Protein Isoforms, Metabolic Pathways, and Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T.; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms. PMID:25616865

  9. A Slot Blot Immunoassay for Quantitative Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein in Mosquito Midgut Oocyst

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Deng, Bingbing; Mahajan, Babita; Grabias, Bryan; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth J.; Locke, Emily; Birkett, Ashley; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole

    2014-01-01

    There is still a need for sensitive and reproducible immunoassays for quantitative detection of malarial antigens in preclinical and clinical phases of vaccine development and in epidemiology and surveillance studies, particularly in the vector host. Here we report the results of sensitivity and reproducibility studies for a research-grade, quantitative enhanced chemiluminescent-based slot blot assay (ECL-SB) for detection of both recombinant Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (rPfCSP) and native PfCSP from Oocysts (Pf Oocyst) developing in the midguts of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. The ECL-SB detects as little as 1.25 pg of rPfCSP (linear range of quantitation 2.5–20 pg; R2 = 0.9505). We also find the earliest detectable expression of native PfCSP in Pf Oocyst by ECL-SB occurs on day 7 post feeding with infected blood meal. The ECL-SB was able to detect approximately as few as 0.5 day 8 Pf Oocysts (linear quantitation range 1–4, R2 = 0.9795) and determined that one Pf Oocyst expressed approximately 2.0 pg (0.5–3 pg) of native PfCSP, suggesting a similar range of detection for recombinant and native forms of Pf CSP. The ECL-SB is highly reproducible; the Coefficient of Variation (CV) for inter-assay variability for rPf CSP and native PfCSP were 1.74% and 1.32%, respectively. The CVs for intra-assay variability performed on three days for rPf CSP were 2.41%, 0.82% and 2% and for native Pf CSP 1.52%, 0.57%, and 1.86%, respectively. In addition, the ECL-SB was comparable to microscopy in determining the P. falciparum prevalence in mosquito populations that distinctly contained either high and low midgut Pf Oocyst burden. In whole mosquito samples, estimations of positivity for P. falciparum in the high and low burden groups were 83.3% and 23.3% by ECL-SB and 85.7% and 27.6% by microscopy. Based on its performance characteristics, ECL-SB could be valuable in vaccine development and to measure the parasite prevalence in mosquitoes and

  10. A universal, high recovery assay for protein quantitation through temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC).

    PubMed

    Orton, Dennis J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-03-15

    As an alternative to direct UV absorbance measurements, estimation of total protein concentration is typically conducted through colorimetric reagent assays. However, for protein-limited applications, the proportion of the sample sacrificed to the assay becomes increasingly significant. This work demonstrates a method for quantitation of protein samples with high recovery. Temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC) with absorbance detection at 214nm permits accurate estimation of total protein concentration from samples containing as little as 0.75μg. The method incorporates a temperature gradient from 25 to 80°C to facilitate elution of total protein into a single fraction. Analyte recovery, as measured from 1 and 10μg protein extracts of Escherichia coli, is shown to exceed 93%. Extinction coefficients at 214nm were calculated across the human proteome, providing a relative standard deviation of 21% (versus 42% at 280nm), suggesting absorbance values at 214nm provide a more consistent measure of protein concentration. These results translate to a universal protein detection strategy exhibiting a coefficient of variation below 10%. Together with the sensitivity and tolerance to contaminants, TPLC with UV detection is a favorable alternative to colorimetric assay for total protein quantitation, particularly in sample-limited applications. PMID:23435344

  11. Quantitative chemogenomics: machine-learning models of protein-ligand interaction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Claes R; Gustafsson, Mats G; Strömbergsson, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Chemogenomics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that lies in the interface of biology, chemistry, and informatics. Most of the currently used drugs are small molecules that interact with proteins. Understanding protein-ligand interaction is therefore central to drug discovery and design. In the subfield of chemogenomics known as proteochemometrics, protein-ligand-interaction models are induced from data matrices that consist of both protein and ligand information along with some experimentally measured variable. The two general aims of this quantitative multi-structure-property-relationship modeling (QMSPR) approach are to exploit sparse/incomplete information sources and to obtain more general models covering larger parts of the protein-ligand space, than traditional approaches that focuses mainly on specific targets or ligands. The data matrices, usually obtained from multiple sparse/incomplete sources, typically contain series of proteins and ligands together with quantitative information about their interactions. A useful model should ideally be easy to interpret and generalize well to new unseen protein-ligand combinations. Resolving this requires sophisticated machine-learning methods for model induction, combined with adequate validation. This review is intended to provide a guide to methods and data sources suitable for this kind of protein-ligand-interaction modeling. An overview of the modeling process is presented including data collection, protein and ligand descriptor computation, data preprocessing, machine-learning-model induction and validation. Concerns and issues specific for each step in this kind of data-driven modeling will be discussed. PMID:21470169

  12. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Roger N; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E; Price, Julie C

    2015-11-21

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  13. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  14. Time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: a quantitative method to follow transient protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging studies of protein-protein interactions within live cells is still a challenging issue. Many cellular biology applications aim at the determination of the space and time variations of the relative amount of interacting fluorescently tagged proteins occurring in cells. This relevant quantitative parameter can be, at least partially, obtained at a pixel-level resolution by using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Indeed, fluorescence decay analysis of a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), leads to the intrinsic FRET efficiency value (E) and the fraction of the donor-tagged protein that undergoes FRET (fD). To simultaneously obtain fD and E values from a two-exponential fit, data must be acquired with a high number of photons, so that the statistics are robust enough to reduce fitting ambiguities. This is a time-consuming procedure. However, when fast-FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are unreliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), obtained from the mathematical minimization of fD. Here, we discuss different FLIM techniques and the compromises that must be made between precision and time invested in acquiring FLIM measurements. We show that mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for fast FLIM because it gives quantitative information about transient interactions in live cells. PMID:26034312

  15. LC–MS Based Detection of Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Leepika; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2010-01-01

    While several techniques are available in proteomics, LC-MS based analysis of complex protein/peptide mixtures has turned out to be a mainstream analytical technique for quantitative proteomics. Significant technical advances at both sample preparation/separation and mass spectrometry levels have revolutionized comprehensive proteome analysis. Moreover, automation and robotics for sample handling process permit multiple sampling with high throughput. For LC-MS based quantitative proteomics, sample preparation turns out to be critical step, as it can significantly influence sensitivity of downstream analysis. Several sample preparation strategies exist, including depletion of high abundant proteins or enrichment steps that facilitate protein quantification but with a compromise of focusing on a smaller subset of a proteome. While several experimental strategies have emerged, certain limitations such as physiochemical properties of a peptide/protein, protein turnover in a sample, analytical platform used for sample analysis and data processing, still imply challenges to quantitative proteomics. Other aspects that make analysis of a proteome a challenging task include dynamic nature of a proteome, need for efficient and fast analysis of protein due to its constant modifications inside a cell, concentration range of proteins that exceed dynamic range of a single analytical method, and absence of appropriate bioinformatics tools for analysis of large volume and high dimensional data. This paper gives an overview of various LC-MS methods currently used in quantitative proteomics and their potential for detecting differential protein expression. Fundamental steps such as sample preparation, LC separation, mass spectrometry, quantitative assessment and protein identification are discussed. For quantitative assessment of protein expression, both label and label free approaches are evaluated for their set of merits and demerits. While most of these methods edge on providing

  16. ReAsH as a Quantitative Probe of In-Cell Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Hannah; Wirth, Anna Jean; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The tetracysteine (tc) tag/biarsenical dye system (FlAsH or ReAsH) promises to combine the flexibility of fluorescent protein tags with the small size of dye labels, allowing in-cell study of target proteins that are perturbed by large protein tags. Quantitative thermodynamic and kinetic studies in-cell using FlAsH and ReAsH have been hampered by methodological complexities presented by the fluorescence properties of the tag-dye complex probed by either Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or direct excitation. We label the model protein phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) with AcGFP1 and ReAsH for direct comparison with AcGFP1/mCherry-labeled PGK. We find that fast relaxation imaging (FReI), combining millisecond temperature jump kinetics with fluorescence microscopy detection, circumvents many of the difficulties encountered working with the ReAsH system, allowing us to obtain quantitative FRET measurements of protein stability and kinetics both in vitro and in cells. We also demonstrate the to us surprising result that fluorescence from directly excited, unburied ReAsH at the C-terminus of the model protein also reports on folding in vitro and in cells. Comparing the ReAsH-labeled protein to a construct labeled with two fluorescent protein tags allows us to evaluate how a bulkier protein tag affects protein dynamics in cells and in vitro. We find that the average folding rate in the cell is closer to the in vitro rate with the smaller tag, highlighting the effect of tags on quantitative in-cell measurements. PMID:26959408

  17. A quantitative analysis of contractility in active cytoskeletal protein networks.

    PubMed

    Bendix, Poul M; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Cuvelier, Damien; Dogic, Zvonimir; Koeleman, Bernard N; Brieher, William M; Field, Christine M; Mahadevan, L; Weitz, David A

    2008-04-15

    Cells actively produce contractile forces for a variety of processes including cytokinesis and motility. Contractility is known to rely on myosin II motors which convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into forces on actin filaments. However, the basic physical principles of cell contractility remain poorly understood. We reconstitute contractility in a simplified model system of purified F-actin, muscle myosin II motors, and alpha-actinin cross-linkers. We show that contractility occurs above a threshold motor concentration and within a window of cross-linker concentrations. We also quantify the pore size of the bundled networks and find contractility to occur at a critical distance between the bundles. We propose a simple mechanism of contraction based on myosin filaments pulling neighboring bundles together into an aggregated structure. Observations of this reconstituted system in both bulk and low-dimensional geometries show that the contracting gels pull on and deform their surface with a contractile force of approximately 1 microN, or approximately 100 pN per F-actin bundle. Cytoplasmic extracts contracting in identical environments show a similar behavior and dependence on myosin as the reconstituted system. Our results suggest that cellular contractility can be sensitively regulated by tuning the (local) activity of molecular motors and the cross-linker density and binding affinity. PMID:18192374

  18. Population proteomics: quantitative variation within and among populations in cardiac protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rees, Bernard B; Andacht, Tracy; Skripnikova, Elena; Crawford, Douglas L

    2011-03-01

    Population analysis of gene expression is typically achieved by quantifying levels of mRNA; however, gene expression is also a function of protein translation and turnover. Therefore, a complete understanding of population variation in gene expression requires quantitative knowledge of protein expression within and among natural populations. We used two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to quantitatively compare expression of heart ventricle proteins among 18 individuals in three populations of the teleost fish Fundulus. Among populations, expressions between orthologous proteins and mRNAs were generally positively correlated. Additionally, similar to the pattern of cardiac mRNA expression for the same populations, we found considerable variation in protein expression both within and among populations: Of 408 protein features in 2D gels, 34% are significantly different (P < 0.01) among individuals within a population, 9% differ between populations, and 12% have a pattern of expression that suggests they have evolved by natural selection. Although similar to mRNA expression, the frequency of significant differences among populations is larger for proteins. Similar to mRNA expressions, expressions of most proteins are correlated to the expressions of many other proteins. However, the correlations among proteins are more extensive than the correlation for similar RNAs. These correlations suggest a greater coordinate regulation of protein than mRNA expression. The larger frequency of significant differences among populations and the greater frequency of correlated expression among proteins versus among RNAs suggest that the molecular mechanisms affecting protein expression enhance the differences among populations, and these regulatory steps could be a source of variation for adaptation. PMID:21109588

  19. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  20. Identification of Protein Interaction Partners in Mammalian Cells Using SILAC-immunoprecipitation Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Emmott, Edward; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics combined with immuno-affinity purification, SILAC immunoprecipitation, represent a powerful means for the discovery of novel protein:protein interactions. By allowing the accurate relative quantification of protein abundance in both control and test samples, true interactions may be easily distinguished from experimental contaminants. Low affinity interactions can be preserved through the use of less-stringent buffer conditions and remain readily identifiable. This protocol discusses the labeling of tissue culture cells with stable isotope labeled amino acids, transfection and immunoprecipitation of an affinity tagged protein of interest, followed by the preparation for submission to a mass spectrometry facility. This protocol then discusses how to analyze and interpret the data returned from the mass spectrometer in order to identify cellular partners interacting with a protein of interest. As an example this technique is applied to identify proteins binding to the eukaryotic translation initiation factors: eIF4AI and eIF4AII. PMID:25046639

  1. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-03-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  2. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  3. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  4. [Quantitative Detection of Chinese Cabbage Clubroot Based on FTIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-ping; Chai, A-li; Shi, Yan-xia; Xie, Xue-wen; Li, Bao-ju

    2015-05-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is considered the most devastating soilborne disease in Brassica crops. It has emerged as a serious disease threatening the cruciferous crop production industry in China. Nowadays, the detection techniques for P. brassicae are laborious, time-consuming and low sensitivity. Rapid and effective detection methods are needed. The objective of this study is to develop a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) technique for detection of P. brassicae effectively and accurately. FTIR and Real-time PCR techniques were applied in quantitative detection of P. brassicae. Chinese cabbages were inoculated with P. brassicae. By analyzing the FTIR spectra of P. brassicae, infected clubroots and healthy roots, three specific bands 1 105, 1 145 and 1 228 cm-1 were selected. According to the correlation between the peak areas at these sensitive bands and Real-time PCR Ct value, quantitative evaluation model of P. brassicae was established based on FTIR y=34. 17 +12. 24x - 9. 81x2 - 6. 05x3, r=0. 98 (p<0. 05). To validate accuracy of the model, 10 clubroot samples were selected randomly from field, and detected by FTIR spectrum model, the results showed that the average error is 1. 60%. This demonstrated that the FTIR technology is an available one for the quantitative detection of P. brassicae in clubroot, and it provides a new method for quantitative and quickly detection of Chinese cabbage clubroot. PMID:26415436

  5. Quantitative and Functional Characterization of the Hyper-Conserved Protein of Prochlorococcus and Marine Synechococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zorz, Jackie K.; Joy, Andrew P.; Barnett, David A.; Johnson, Milo S.; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Cockshutt, Amanda M.

    2014-01-01

    A large fraction of any bacterial genome consists of hypothetical protein-coding open reading frames (ORFs). While most of these ORFs are present only in one or a few sequenced genomes, a few are conserved, often across large phylogenetic distances. Such conservation provides clues to likely uncharacterized cellular functions that need to be elucidated. Marine cyanobacteria from the Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus clade are dominant bacteria in oceanic waters and are significant contributors to global primary production. A Hyper Conserved Protein (PSHCP) of unknown function is 100% conserved at the amino acid level in genomes of Prochlorococcus/marine Synechococcus, but lacks homologs outside of this clade. In this study we investigated Prochlorococcus marinus strains MED4 and MIT 9313 and Synechococcus sp. strain WH 8102 for the transcription of the PSHCP gene using RT-Q-PCR, for the presence of the protein product through quantitative immunoblotting, and for the protein's binding partners in a pull down assay. Significant transcription of the gene was detected in all strains. The PSHCP protein content varied between 8±1 fmol and 26±9 fmol per ug total protein, depending on the strain. The 50 S ribosomal protein L2, the Photosystem I protein PsaD and the Ycf48-like protein were found associated with the PSHCP protein in all strains and not appreciably or at all in control experiments. We hypothesize that PSHCP is a protein associated with the ribosome, and is possibly involved in photosystem assembly. PMID:25360678

  6. Gel-Based and Gel-Free Quantitative Proteomics Approaches at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Cosette; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is widely applied and remains the method of choice in proteomics; however, pervasive 2-DE-related concerns undermine its prospects as a dominant separation technique in proteome research. Consequently, the state-of-the-art shotgun techniques are slowly taking over and utilising the rapid expansion and advancement of mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a new toolbox of gel-free quantitative techniques. When coupled to MS, the shotgun proteomic pipeline can fuel new routes in sensitive and high-throughput profiling of proteins, leading to a high accuracy in quantification. Although label-based approaches, either chemical or metabolic, gained popularity in quantitative proteomics because of the multiplexing capacity, these approaches are not without drawbacks. The burgeoning label-free methods are tag independent and suitable for all kinds of samples. The challenges in quantitative proteomics are more prominent in plants due to difficulties in protein extraction, some protein abundance in green tissue, and the absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences. The goal of this perspective assay is to present the balance between the strengths and weaknesses of the available gel-based and -free methods and their application to plants. The latest trends in peptide fractionation amenable to MS analysis are as well discussed. PMID:23213324

  7. A Guided Materials Screening Approach for Developing Quantitative Sol-gel Derived Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Helka, Blake-Joseph; Brennan, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have found use in the development of high-throughput assays for new materials and discovery of small-molecule drug leads. Herein we describe a guided material screening approach to identify sol-gel based materials that are suitable for producing three-dimensional protein microarrays. The approach first identifies materials that can be printed as microarrays, narrows down the number of materials by identifying those that are compatible with a given enzyme assay, and then hones in on optimal materials based on retention of maximum enzyme activity. This approach is applied to develop microarrays suitable for two different enzyme assays, one using acetylcholinesterase and the other using a set of four key kinases involved in cancer. In each case, it was possible to produce microarrays that could be used for quantitative small-molecule screening assays and production of dose-dependent inhibitor response curves. Importantly, the ability to screen many materials produced information on the types of materials that best suited both microarray production and retention of enzyme activity. The materials data provide insight into basic material requirements necessary for tailoring optimal, high-density sol-gel derived microarrays. PMID:24022739

  8. Multiplexed Quantitation of Endogenous Proteins in Dried Blood Spots by Multiple Reaction Monitoring - Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Yang, Juncong; Camenzind, Alexander G.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, coupled with multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS), is a well-established approach for quantifying a wide range of small molecule biomarkers and drugs. This sampling procedure is simpler and less-invasive than those required for traditional plasma or serum samples enabling collection by minimally trained personnel. Many analytes are stable in the DBS format without refrigeration, which reduces the cost and logistical challenges of sample collection in remote locations. These advantages make DBS sample collection desirable for advancing personalized medicine through population-wide biomarker screening. Here we expand this technology by demonstrating the first multiplexed method for the quantitation of endogenous proteins in DBS samples. A panel of 60 abundant proteins in human blood was targeted by monitoring proteotypic tryptic peptides and their stable isotope-labeled analogs by MRM. Linear calibration curves were obtained for 40 of the 65 peptide targets demonstrating multiple proteins can be quantitatively extracted from DBS collection cards. The method was also highly reproducible with a coefficient of variation of <15% for all 40 peptides. Overall, this assay quantified 37 proteins spanning a range of more than four orders of magnitude in concentration within a single 25 min LC/MRM-MS analysis. The protein abundances of the 33 proteins quantified in matching DBS and whole blood samples showed an excellent correlation, with a slope of 0.96 and an R2 value of 0.97. Furthermore, the measured concentrations for 80% of the proteins were stable for at least 10 days when stored at −20 °C, 4 °C and 37 °C. This work represents an important first step in evaluating the integration of DBS sampling with highly-multiplexed MRM for quantitation of endogenous proteins. PMID:23221968

  9. Quantitative proteomics: assessing the spectrum of in-gel protein detection methods

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Victoria J.; Wright, Elise P.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics research relies heavily on visualization methods for detection of proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Commonly used staining approaches involve colorimetric dyes such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue, fluorescent dyes including Sypro Ruby, newly developed reactive fluorophores, as well as a plethora of others. The most desired characteristic in selecting one stain over another is sensitivity, but this is far from the only important parameter. This review evaluates protein detection methods in terms of their quantitative attributes, including limit of detection (i.e., sensitivity), linear dynamic range, inter-protein variability, capacity for spot detection after 2D gel electrophoresis, and compatibility with subsequent mass spectrometric analyses. Unfortunately, many of these quantitative criteria are not routinely or consistently addressed by most of the studies published to date. We would urge more rigorous routine characterization of stains and detection methodologies as a critical approach to systematically improving these critically important tools for quantitative proteomics. In addition, substantial improvements in detection technology, particularly over the last decade or so, emphasize the need to consider renewed characterization of existing stains; the quantitative stains we need, or at least the chemistries required for their future development, may well already exist. PMID:21686332

  10. Quantitative Fluorescent Labeling of Aldehyde-Tagged Proteins for Single-Molecule Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinghua; Jung, Yonil; Lin, Li-Jung; Liu, Cheng; Wu, Cong; Cann, Isaac K. O.; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-01-01

    A major hurdle for molecular mechanistic studies of many proteins is the lack of a general method for fluorescent labeling with high efficiency, specificity, and speed. By incorporating an aldehyde motif genetically into a protein and improving the labeling kinetics substantially under mild conditions, we achieved fast, site-specific labeling of a protein with ~100% efficiency while maintaining the biological function. We demonstrate that an aldehyde-tagged protein can be specifically labeled in cell extracts without protein purification and then can be used in single-molecule pull-down analysis. We further show the unique power of our method in a series of single-molecule studies on the transient interactions and switching between two quantitatively labeled DNA polymerases on their processivity factor. PMID:22466795

  11. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  12. A Hybrid Approach to Protein Differential Expression in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuan; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2012-04-19

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein's associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics data sets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. Results: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of 'presence/ absence,' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amendable to quantitative analysis; e.g., 'one-state' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/ absence analysis of a given data set in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single associated FDR.

  13. Quantitative surface studies of protein adsorption by infrared spectroscopy. II. Quantification of adsorbed and bulk proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, D.J.; Hutson, T.B.; Chittur, K.K.; Gendreau, R.M.

    1987-08-15

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of surface-adsorbed proteins are correlated with concentration measurements determined by /sup 125/I-labeled proteins. This paper demonstrates that linear correlations between the intensity of the major bands of proteins and the quantity of proteins can be obtained for human albumin and immunoglobulin G up to surface concentrations of approximately 0.25 microgram/cm2. A poorer correlation was observed for human fibrinogen. A linear correlation was also observed between the concentration in the bulk solution and the major bands of albumin up to a concentration of 60 mg/ml.

  14. Quantitation of protein 3 content of circulating erythrocytes at the single-cell level

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, L.K.; Brown, L.K.; Dockter, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The density and size of human erythrocytes has been roughly correlated with cell age, with the denser and smaller cells being older. Observations of this type have led to a hypothesis that the membranes of circulating erythrocytes are dynamic with respect to composition and that material is lost from the membrane during cell maturation and circulation. In this study, flow cytofluorimetry was used to investigate the distribution of the human erythrocyte anion transport protein (protein 3) in heterogeneous samples of circulating red cells. We verified that protein 3 can be specifically and quantitatively labeled in intact human erythrocytes with eosin-5-maleimide, a luminescent probe. Individual cells were accordingly analyzed for size by forward light scattering and for protein 3 content by quantitation of eosin fluorescence. Initial results indicated that the smallest erythrocytes had a protein 3 content equal to that of the largest circulating erythrocytes. This result was independently verified by light scatter-activated cell sorting; direct measurement of cell diameters by microscopy verified that the cell sizes of erythrocytes showing the 10% greatest and 10% smallest light-scattering signal were indeed distinct. Independent analysis of the size-sorted erythrocytes for protein 3 content was accomplished by gel electrophoresis of stroma from 150,000 large and small erythrocytes. Quantitative scanning densitometry of silver-stained gels of prepared stroma showed that protein 3 content of each set of fractionated cells was equal and did not vary as a function of cell size. Taken in combination with the reported correlation between increasing red blood cell age and decreasing cell size, these results indicate that any loss of membranous material during the cell aging process is not random.

  15. A quantitative proteomics-based signature of platinum sensitivity in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Fu, Cexiong; Pappin, Darryl J.; Lucito, Robert; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Su, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Although DNA encodes the molecular instructions that underlie control of cell function, it is the proteins that are primarily responsible for implementing those instructions. Therefore, quantitative analyses of the proteome would be expected to yield insights into important candidates for the detection and treatment of disease. We present an iTRAQ (Isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification)-based proteomic analysis of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines and 2 normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. We profiled the abundance of 2659 cellular proteins, of which 1273 were common to all 12 cell lines. Of the 1273, 75 proteins exhibited elevated expression, and 164 proteins had diminished expression in the cancerous cells compared to the normal cell lines. The iTRAQ expression profiles allowed us to segregate cell lines based upon sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin. Importantly, we observed no substantial correlation between protein abundance and RNA expression or epigenetic, DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we could not discriminate between sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin on the basis of RNA expression and DNA methylation data alone. This study illustrates the importance of proteomics-based discovery for defining the basis for the carboplatin response in ovarian cancer and highlights candidate proteins, particularly involved in cellular redox regulation, homologous recombination and DNA damage repair, that otherwise could not have been predicted from whole genome and expression data sources alone. PMID:25406946

  16. A comparison of protein extraction methods suitable for gel-based proteomic studies of aphid proteins.

    PubMed

    Cilia, M; Fish, T; Yang, X; McLaughlin, M; Thannhauser, T W; Gray, S

    2009-09-01

    Protein extraction methods can vary widely in reproducibility and in representation of the total proteome, yet there are limited data comparing protein isolation methods. The methodical comparison of protein isolation methods is the first critical step for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared three methods for isolation, purification, and solubilization of insect proteins. The aphid Schizaphis graminum, an agricultural pest, was the source of insect tissue. Proteins were extracted using TCA in acetone (TCA-acetone), phenol, or multi-detergents in a chaotrope solution. Extracted proteins were solubilized in a multiple chaotrope solution and examined using 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis and compared directly using 2-D Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Mass spectrometry was used to identify proteins from each extraction type. We were unable to ascribe the differences in the proteins extracted to particular physical characteristics, cell location, or biological function. The TCA-acetone extraction yielded the greatest amount of protein from aphid tissues. Each extraction method isolated a unique subset of the aphid proteome. The TCA-acetone method was explored further for its quantitative reliability using 2-D DIGE. Principal component analysis showed that little of the variation in the data was a result of technical issues, thus demonstrating that the TCA-acetone extraction is a reliable method for preparing aphid proteins for a quantitative proteomics experiment. These data suggest that although the TCA-acetone method is a suitable method for quantitative aphid proteomics, a combination of extraction approaches is recommended for increasing proteome coverage when using gel-based separation techniques. PMID:19721822

  17. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of Simon™, a new CE-based automated Western blot system as applied to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Loughney, John W; Hamm, Melissa; Hamm, Christopher; Lancaster, Catherine; Mach, Anna; Ha, Sha

    2012-09-01

    Many CE-based technologies such as imaged capillary IEF, CE-SDS, CZE, and MEKC are well established for analyzing proteins, viruses, or other biomolecules such as polysaccharides. For example, imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (charge-based protein separation) and CE-SDS (size-based protein separation) are standard replacement methods in biopharmaceutical industries for tedious and labor intensive IEF and SDS-PAGE methods, respectively. Another important analytical tool for protein characterization is a Western blot, where after size-based separation in SDS-PAGE the proteins are transferred to a membrane and blotted with specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Western blotting analysis is applied in many areas such as biomarker research, therapeutic target identification, and vaccine development. Currently, the procedure is very manual, laborious, and time consuming. Here, we evaluate a new technology called Simple Western™ (or Simon™) for performing automated Western analysis. This new technology is based on CE-SDS where the separated proteins are attached to the wall of capillary by a proprietary photo activated chemical crosslink. Subsequent blotting is done automatically by incubating and washing the capillary with primary and secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and detected with chemiluminescence. Typically, Western blots are not quantitative, hence we also evaluated the quantitative aspect of this new technology. We demonstrate that Simon™ can quantitate specific components in one of our vaccine candidates and it provides good reproducibility and intermediate precision with CV <10%. PMID:22965727

  18. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms. PMID:23226239

  19. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays for Detection and Characterization of Protein Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Farris, M Heath; Ford, Kara A; Doyle, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Initial evaluations of large microbial libraries for potential producers of novel antimicrobial proteins require both qualitative and quantitative methods to screen for target enzymes prior to investing greater research effort and resources. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate two complementary assays for conducting these initial evaluations. The microslide diffusion assay provides an initial or simple detection screen to enable the qualitative and rapid assessment of proteolytic activity against an array of both viable and heat-killed bacterial target substrates. As a counterpart, the increased sensitivity and reproducibility of the dye-release assay provides a quantitative platform for evaluating and comparing environmental influences affecting the hydrolytic activity of protein antimicrobials. The ability to label specific heat-killed cell culture substrates with Remazol brilliant blue R dye expands this capability to tailor the dye-release assay to characterize enzymatic activity of interest. PMID:27166738

  20. Pitfalls in protein quantitation using acid-catalyzed O18 labeling: hydrolysis-driven deamidation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunhai; Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis combined with O18 labeling emerged recently as a powerful tool for quantitation of proteins for which suitable internal standards cannot be produced using molecular biology methods. Several recent reports suggested that acid-catalyzed O18 labeling may be superior to the commonly accepted enzymatic protocol, as it may allow more significant spacing between the isotopic clusters of labeled and unlabeled peptides, thereby eliminating signal interference and enhancing the quality of quantitation. However, careful examination of this procedure reveals that the results of protein quantitation assisted by acid-catalyzed O18 labeling are highly peptide-dependent. The inconsistency was found to be caused by deamidation of Asn, Gln and carbamidomethylated Cys residues during prolonged exposure of the proteolytic fragments to the acidic environment of the labeling reaction, which translates into a loss in signal for theses peptides. Taking deamidation into account leads to a significant improvement in the consistency of quantitation across a range of different proteolytic fragments. PMID:21819098

  1. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Timothy A.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  2. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  3. Quantitation of proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome by spot urine protein creatinine ratio estimation in children.

    PubMed

    Biswas, A; Kumar, R; Chaterjee, A; Ghosh, J K; Basu, K

    2009-01-01

    In Nephrotic Syndrome the amount of protein excretion is a reflection of activity of disease. Quantitative measurement of proteinuria by a 24-hour urine collection has been the accepted method of evaluation. Recent studies have shown that calculation of protein/creatinine ratio in a spot urine sample correlates well with the 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP) excretion. A study was conducted to compare the accuracy of a spot urinary protein/creatinine ratio (P/C ratio) and urinary dipstick with the 24-hour urine protein. Fifty two samples from 26 patients of nephrotic syndrome were collected. This included a 24-hour urine sample followed by the next voided random spot sample. The protein/creatinine ratio was calculated and dipstick was performed on the spot sample. This was compared with the 24-hour urine protein excretion. The correlation between the three samples was statistically highly significant (p<0.001) for all levels of proteinuria. The normal value of protein/creatinine ratio in Indian children was also estimated on 50 normal children admitted in the ward without any renal diseases calculated to be 0.053 (SE of mean+/-0.003). PMID:19182753

  4. Identification of hypoxia-regulated proteins using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging combined with quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas; Schmich, Fabian; Sinclair, John; Mršnik, Martina; Schoof, Erwin M; Barker, Holly E; Linding, Rune; Jørgensen, Claus; Erler, Janine T

    2014-05-01

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed. PMID:24702160

  5. A quantitative strategy to detect changes in accessibility of protein regions to chemical modification on heterodimerization.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Mathias; Leung, Bo Wah; Brownlee, George G; Deng, Tao

    2009-07-01

    We describe a method for studying quantitative changes in accessibility of surface lysine residues of the PB1 subunit of the influenza RNA polymerase as a result of association with the PA subunit to form a PB1-PA heterodimer. Our method combines two established methods: (i) the chemical modification of surface lysine residues of native proteins by N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin (NHS-biotin) and (ii) the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. By linking the chemical modification with the SILAC methodology for the first time, we obtain quantitative data on chemical modification allowing subtle changes in accessibility to be described. Five regions in the PB1 monomer showed altered reactivity to NHS-biotin when compared with the [PB1-PA] heterodimer. Mutational analysis of residues in two such regions-at K265 and K481 of PB1, which were about three- and twofold, respectively, less accessible to biotinylation in the PB1-PA heterodimer compared with the PB1 monomer, demonstrated that both K265 and K481 were crucial for polymerase function. This novel assay of quantitative profiling of biotinylation patterns (Q-POP assay) highlights likely conformational changes at important functional sites, as observed here for PB1, and may provide information on protein-protein interaction interfaces. The Q-POP assay should be a generally applicable approach and may detect novel functional sites suitable for targeting by drugs. PMID:19517532

  6. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  7. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish. PMID:27071722

  8. Quantitation of protein kinase C by immunoblot-expression in different cell lines and response to phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Stabel, S.; Rodriguez-Pena, A.; Young, S.; Rozengurt, E.; Parker, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera have been raised against human protein kinase C and also against a synthetic peptide based on the sequence of the bovine brain enzyme (LLNQEEGEYYNVPIPE). These antibodies react with protein kinase C from a number of species (human, murine, rat, rabbit, bovine), indicating substantial conservation of epitopes. These antisera have been used to quantitate directly protein kinase C by immunoblot analysis. The authors show here that there is a strict correlation between the levels of immunoreactive polypeptide and extractable calcium- and phospholipid-dependent kinase activity for various cell lines. Treatment of murine, rat, and human cells with phorbol dibutyrate was found to deplete levels of immunoreactive protein kinase C severely. A detailed study of the time course of this depletion in Swiss 3T3 cells shows that it follows precisely the loss of extractable activity. On exposure to 400 nM phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate protein kinase C was essentially undetectable by 40 hours; the half-life of this down-regulation was 6.7 hours. This data thus demonstrate that the loss of immunoreactive protein kinase C and of extractable calcium- and phospholipid-dependent kinase activity precisely parallels the phorbol ester induced down-regulation of binding and responsiveness in Swiss 3T3 cells.

  9. Prediction of protein-protein interactions based on protein-protein correlation using least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Huang, De-Shuang; Zhang, Lei; Han, Kyungsook; Deng, Suping; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    In order to transform protein sequences into the feature vectors, several works have been done, such as computing auto covariance (AC), conjoint triad (CT), local descriptor (LD), moran autocorrelation (MA), normalized moreaubroto autocorrelation (NMB) and so on. In this paper, we shall adopt these transformation methods to encode the proteins, respectively, where AC, CT, LD, MA and NMB are all represented by '+' in a unified manner. A new method, i.e. the combination of least squares regression with '+' (abbreviated as LSR(+)), will be introduced for encoding a protein-protein correlation-based feature representation and an interacting protein pair. Thus there are totally five different combinations for LSR(+), i.e. LSRAC, LSRCT, LSRLD, LSRMA and LSRNMB. As a result, we combined a support vector machine (SVM) approach with LSR(+) to predict protein-protein interactions (PPI) and PPI networks. The proposed method has been applied on four datasets, i.e. Saaccharomyces cerevisiae, Escherichia coli, Homo sapiens and Caenorhabditis elegans. The experimental results demonstrate that all LSR(+) methods outperform many existing representative algorithms. Therefore, LSR(+) is a powerful tool to characterize the protein-protein correlations and to infer PPI, whilst keeping high performance on prediction of PPI networks. PMID:25059329

  10. SAFER, an Analysis Method of Quantitative Proteomic Data, Reveals New Interactors of the C. elegans Autophagic Protein LGG-1.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhou; Manil-Ségalen, Marion; Sago, Laila; Glatigny, Annie; Redeker, Virginie; Legouis, Renaud; Mucchielli-Giorgi, Marie-Hélène

    2016-05-01

    Affinity purifications followed by mass spectrometric analysis are used to identify protein-protein interactions. Because quantitative proteomic data are noisy, it is necessary to develop statistical methods to eliminate false-positives and identify true partners. We present here a novel approach for filtering false interactors, named "SAFER" for mass Spectrometry data Analysis by Filtering of Experimental Replicates, which is based on the reproducibility of the replicates and the fold-change of the protein intensities between bait and control. To identify regulators or targets of autophagy, we characterized the interactors of LGG1, a ubiquitin-like protein involved in autophagosome formation in C. elegans. LGG-1 partners were purified by affinity, analyzed by nanoLC-MS/MS mass spectrometry, and quantified by a label-free proteomic approach based on the mass spectrometric signal intensity of peptide precursor ions. Because the selection of confident interactions depends on the method used for statistical analysis, we compared SAFER with several statistical tests and different scoring algorithms on this set of data. We show that SAFER recovers high-confidence interactors that have been ignored by the other methods and identified new candidates involved in the autophagy process. We further validated our method on a public data set and conclude that SAFER notably improves the identification of protein interactors. PMID:26999449

  11. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Estimates with Ground-based Radar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Moazamigoodarzi, Saber; Langston, Carrie; Arthur, Ami

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty structure of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is largely unknown at fine spatiotemporal scales near the radar measurement scale (1-km/5-min). By using the WSR-88D radar network and rain gauge datasets across the conterminous US, an investigation of this subject has been carried out within the framework of the NOAA/NSSL ground radar-based Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor. Probability distributions of precipitation rates are computed instead of deterministic values using a model quantifying the relation between radar reflectivity and the corresponding "true" precipitation. The probabilistic model considers multiple sources of error in radar QPE as well as the impacts of correction algorithms on the radar signal. Ensembles of reflectivity-to-rain rate relationships accounting explicitly for rain typology were derived at a 5-min/1-km scale. This approach preserves the fine space/time sampling properties of the radar and conditions probabilistic QPE on the rain rate and precipitation type when computing probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimates (PQPE). The model components were estimated on the basis of a 1-year-long data sample. This PQPE model provides the basis for precipitation probability maps and the generation of radar precipitation ensembles. Maps of the precipitation exceedance probability for specific thresholds (e.g. precipitation return periods) are demonstrated. Precipitation probability maps are accumulated to the hourly time scale and compare positively to the deterministic QPE. This approach to PQPE can readily apply to other systems including space-based passive and active sensor algorithms.

  12. Smartphone based visual and quantitative assays on upconversional paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qingsong; Jing, Huarong; Li, You; Yisibashaer, Wuerzha; Chen, Jian; Nan Li, Bing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The integration of smartphone with paper sensors recently has been gain increasing attentions because of the achievement of quantitative and rapid analysis. However, smartphone based upconversional paper sensors have been restricted by the lack of effective methods to acquire luminescence signals on test paper. Herein, by the virtue of 3D printing technology, we exploited an auxiliary reusable device, which orderly assembled a 980nm mini-laser, optical filter and mini-cavity together, for digitally imaging the luminescence variations on test paper and quantitative analyzing pesticide thiram by smartphone. In detail, copper ions decorated NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles were fixed onto filter paper to form test paper, and the blue luminescence on it would be quenched after additions of thiram through luminescence resonance energy transfer mechanism. These variations could be monitored by the smartphone camera, and then the blue channel intensities of obtained colored images were calculated to quantify amounts of thiram through a self-written Android program installed on the smartphone, offering a reliable and accurate detection limit of 0.1μM for the system. This work provides an initial demonstration of integrating upconversion nanosensors with smartphone digital imaging for point-of-care analysis on a paper-based platform. PMID:26356763

  13. Quantitative methods to direct exploration based on hydrogeologic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graettinger, A.J.; Lee, J.; Reeves, H.W.; Dethan, D.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitatively Directed Exploration (QDE) approaches based on information such as model sensitivity, input data covariance and model output covariance are presented. Seven approaches for directing exploration are developed, applied, and evaluated on a synthetic hydrogeologic site. The QDE approaches evaluate input information uncertainty, subsurface model sensitivity and, most importantly, output covariance to identify the next location to sample. Spatial input parameter values and covariances are calculated with the multivariate conditional probability calculation from a limited number of samples. A variogram structure is used during data extrapolation to describe the spatial continuity, or correlation, of subsurface information. Model sensitivity can be determined by perturbing input data and evaluating output response or, as in this work, sensitivities can be programmed directly into an analysis model. Output covariance is calculated by the First-Order Second Moment (FOSM) method, which combines the covariance of input information with model sensitivity. A groundwater flow example, modeled in MODFLOW-2000, is chosen to demonstrate the seven QDE approaches. MODFLOW-2000 is used to obtain the piezometric head and the model sensitivity simultaneously. The seven QDE approaches are evaluated based on the accuracy of the modeled piezometric head after information from a QDE sample is added. For the synthetic site used in this study, the QDE approach that identifies the location of hydraulic conductivity that contributes the most to the overall piezometric head variance proved to be the best method to quantitatively direct exploration. ?? IWA Publishing 2006.

  14. Development of FRET assay into quantitative and high-throughput screening technology platforms for protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Madahar, Vipul; Liao, Jiayu

    2011-04-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology has been widely used in biological and biomedical research and is a very powerful tool in elucidating protein interactions in many cellular processes. Ubiquitination and SUMOylation are multi-step cascade reactions, involving multiple enzymes and protein-protein interactions. Here we report the development of dissociation constant (K (d)) determination for protein-protein interaction and cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay in SUMOylation cascade using FRET technology. These developments are based on steady state and high efficiency of fluorescent energy transfer between CyPet and YPet fused with SUMO1 and Ubc9, respectively. The developments in theoretical and experimental procedures for protein interaction K (d) determination and cell-based HTS provide novel tools in affinity measurement and protein interaction inhibitor screening. The K (d) determined by FRET between SUMO1 and Ubc9 is compatible with those determined with other traditional approaches, such as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The FRET-based HTS is pioneer in cell-based HTS. Both K (d) determination and cell-based HTS, carried out in 384-well plate format, provide powerful tools for large-scale and high-throughput applications. PMID:21174150

  15. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    YANG, CHIN-RANG

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  16. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  18. Genome-scale quantitative characterization of bacterial protein localization dynamics throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells display both spatial and temporal organization, and this complex structure is known to play a central role in cellular function. Although nearly one-fifth of all proteins in Escherichia coli localize to specific subcellular locations, fundamental questions remain about how cellular-scale structure is encoded at the level of molecular-scale interactions. One significant limitation to our understanding is that the localization behavior of only a small subset of proteins has been characterized in detail. As an essential step toward a global model of protein localization in bacteria, we capture and quantitatively analyze spatial and temporal protein localization patterns throughout the cell cycle for nearly every protein in E. coli that exhibits nondiffuse localization. This genome-scale analysis reveals significant complexity in patterning, notably in the behavior of DNA-binding proteins. Complete cell-cycle imaging also facilitates analysis of protein partitioning to daughter cells at division, revealing a broad and robust assortment of asymmetric partitioning behaviors. PMID:25353361

  19. Micromorphological characterization and label-free quantitation of small rubber particle protein in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Liu, Jiahui; Wu, Yanxia; You, Yawen; He, Jingyi; Zhang, Jichuan; Zhang, Liqun; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-04-15

    Commercial natural rubber is traditionally supplied by Hevea brasiliensis, but now there is a big energy problem because of the limited resource and increasing demand. Intensive study of key rubber-related substances is urgently needed for further research of in vitro biosynthesis of natural rubber. Natural rubber is biosynthesized on the surface of rubber particles. A membrane protein called small rubber particle protein (SRPP) is a key protein associated closely with rubber biosynthesis; however, SRPP in different plants has been only qualitatively studied, and there are no quantitative reports so far. In this work, H. brasiliensis was chosen as a model plant. The microscopic distribution of SRPP on the rubber particles during the washing process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labeling. A label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor was developed to quantify SRPP in H. brasiliensis for the first time. The immunosensor was then used to rapidly detect and analyze SRPP in dandelions and prickly lettuce latex samples. The label-free SPR immunosensor can be a desirable tool for rapid quantitation of the membrane protein SRPP, with excellent assay efficiency, high sensitivity, and high specificity. The method lays the foundation for further study of the functional relationship between SRPP and natural rubber content. PMID:26844871

  20. Quantitative reduction of the TCR adapter protein SLP-76 unbalances immunity and immune regulation.

    PubMed

    Siggs, Owen M; Miosge, Lisa A; Daley, Stephen R; Asquith, Kelly; Foster, Paul S; Liston, Adrian; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2015-03-15

    Gene variants that disrupt TCR signaling can cause severe immune deficiency, yet less disruptive variants are sometimes associated with immune pathology. Null mutations of the gene encoding the scaffold protein Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76), for example, cause an arrest of T cell positive selection, whereas a synthetic membrane-targeted allele allows limited positive selection but is associated with proinflammatory cytokine production and autoantibodies. Whether these and other enigmatic outcomes are due to a biochemical uncoupling of tolerogenic signaling, or simply a quantitative reduction of protein activity, remains to be determined. In this study we describe a splice variant of Lcp2 that reduced the amount of wild-type SLP-76 protein by ~90%, disrupting immunogenic and tolerogenic pathways to different degrees. Mutant mice produced excessive amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and IgE, revealing that simple quantitative reductions of SLP-76 were sufficient to trigger immune dysregulation. This allele reveals a dose-sensitive threshold for SLP-76 in the balance of immunity and immune dysregulation, a common disturbance of atypical clinical immune deficiencies. PMID:25662996

  1. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  2. Highly sensitive color-indicating and quantitative biosensor based on cholesteric liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Sung, Yu-Chien; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensors employ highly sensitive interfaces between the alignment layers and LCs to detect biomolecules and their interactions. Present techniques based on optical texture observation of the homeotropic-to-planar response of nematic LCs are limited by their quantitative reproducibility of results, indicating that both the accuracy and reliability of LC-based detection require further improvements. Here we show that cholesteric LC (CLC) can be used as a novel sensing element in the design of an alternative LC-based biosensing device. The chirality of the vertically anchored (VA) CLC was exploited in the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein standard commonly used in protein quantitation. The color appearance and the corresponding transmission spectrum of the cholesteric phase changed with the concentration of BSA, by which a detection limit of 1 fg/ml was observed. The optical response of the VA CLC interface offers a simple and inexpensive platform for highly sensitive and naked-eye color-indicating detection of biomolecules, and, thus, may facilitate the development of point-of-care devices for the detection of disease-related biomarkers. PMID:26713215

  3. Highly sensitive color-indicating and quantitative biosensor based on cholesteric liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Sung, Yu-Chien; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensors employ highly sensitive interfaces between the alignment layers and LCs to detect biomolecules and their interactions. Present techniques based on optical texture observation of the homeotropic-to-planar response of nematic LCs are limited by their quantitative reproducibility of results, indicating that both the accuracy and reliability of LC-based detection require further improvements. Here we show that cholesteric LC (CLC) can be used as a novel sensing element in the design of an alternative LC-based biosensing device. The chirality of the vertically anchored (VA) CLC was exploited in the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein standard commonly used in protein quantitation. The color appearance and the corresponding transmission spectrum of the cholesteric phase changed with the concentration of BSA, by which a detection limit of 1 fg/ml was observed. The optical response of the VA CLC interface offers a simple and inexpensive platform for highly sensitive and naked-eye color-indicating detection of biomolecules, and, thus, may facilitate the development of point-of-care devices for the detection of disease-related biomarkers. PMID:26713215

  4. A Rapid and Quantitative Fluorimetric Method for Protein-Targeting Small Molecule Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; New, Siu Yee; Lin, Jiaxian; Su, Xiaodi; Tan, Yen Nee

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new drug screening method for determining the binding affinity of small drug molecules to a target protein by forming fluorescent gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) within the drug-loaded protein, based on the differential fluorescence signal emitted by the Au NCs. Albumin proteins such as human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) are selected as the model proteins. Four small molecular drugs (e.g., ibuprofen, warfarin, phenytoin, and sulfanilamide) of different binding affinities to the albumin proteins are tested. It was found that the formation rate of fluorescent Au NCs inside the drug loaded albumin protein under denaturing conditions (i.e., 60 °C or in the presence of urea) is slower than that formed in the pristine protein (without drugs). Moreover, the fluorescent intensity of the as-formed NCs is found to be inversely correlated to the binding affinities of these drugs to the albumin proteins. Particularly, the higher the drug-protein binding affinity, the slower the rate of Au NCs formation, and thus a lower fluorescence intensity of the resultant Au NCs is observed. The fluorescence intensity of the resultant Au NCs therefore provides a simple measure of the relative binding strength of different drugs tested. This method is also extendable to measure the specific drug-protein binding constant (KD) by simply varying the drug content preloaded in the protein at a fixed protein concentration. The measured results match well with the values obtained using other prestige but more complicated methods. PMID:26555855

  5. Grain protein variability among species of Triticum and Aegilops: quantitative SDS-PAGE studies.

    PubMed

    Cole, E W; Fullington, J G; Kasarda, D D

    1981-01-01

    Total proteins were extracted from degermed seeds of various species of Triticum and Aegilops with solutions containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and mercaptoethanol. The reduced, dissociated proteins were fractionated according to molecular weight (MW) by high-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in buffers containing SDS (SDS-PAGE). Stained SDS-PAGE patterns were measured by densitometric scanning over a suitable range of optical density. The data were normalized to equivalent total areas for each of the densitometric scans by means of a computer program that also permitted the construction of patterns of hypothetical amphiploids by averaging patterns of two or three diploid species. The grain proteins of most species examined had distinctive qualitative and quantitative aspects that were characteristic of the species even though nearly every accession or cultivar of a species exhibited at least minor differences in pattern from other accessions or cultivars. The main protein components (probably prolamins) of Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum, T. monococcum ssp. boeoticum, T. urartu, and Aegilops squarrosa had MW's in the range 29-36 X 10(3) whereas the most important components of Ae. speltoides, Ae. longissima, and Ae. searsii had MW's in the range 37-55 × 10(3). Changes in the quantitative expression of particular genes, especially those coding for storage protein components, may have been associated with speciation. The strong predominance of proteins with MW's in the range 29-36 × 10(3) in some accessions of AB genome tetraploids, such as T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, may indicate contributions to the B genome of these tetraploids by T. monococcum ssp. boeoticum, T. urartu, or Ae. squarrosa. PMID:24276584

  6. A quantitative strategy to detect changes in accessibility of protein regions to chemical modification on heterodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Dreger, Mathias; Leung, Bo Wah; Brownlee, George G; Deng, Tao

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for studying quantitative changes in accessibility of surface lysine residues of the PB1 subunit of the influenza RNA polymerase as a result of association with the PA subunit to form a PB1-PA heterodimer. Our method combines two established methods: (i) the chemical modification of surface lysine residues of native proteins by N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin (NHS-biotin) and (ii) the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. By linking the chemical modification with the SILAC methodology for the first time, we obtain quantitative data on chemical modification allowing subtle changes in accessibility to be described. Five regions in the PB1 monomer showed altered reactivity to NHS-biotin when compared with the [PB1-PA] heterodimer. Mutational analysis of residues in two such regions—at K265 and K481 of PB1, which were about three- and twofold, respectively, less accessible to biotinylation in the PB1-PA heterodimer compared with the PB1 monomer, demonstrated that both K265 and K481 were crucial for polymerase function. This novel assay of quantitative profiling of biotinylation patterns (Q-POP assay) highlights likely conformational changes at important functional sites, as observed here for PB1, and may provide information on protein–protein interaction interfaces. The Q-POP assay should be a generally applicable approach and may detect novel functional sites suitable for targeting by drugs. PMID:19517532

  7. Models of Quantitative Estimations: Rule-Based and Exemplar-Based Processes Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Helversen, Bettina; Rieskamp, Jorg

    2009-01-01

    The cognitive processes underlying quantitative estimations vary. Past research has identified task-contingent changes between rule-based and exemplar-based processes (P. Juslin, L. Karlsson, & H. Olsson, 2008). B. von Helversen and J. Rieskamp (2008), however, proposed a simple rule-based model--the mapping model--that outperformed the exemplar…

  8. Protein profiling of human lung telocytes and microvascular endothelial cells using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonghua; Cretoiu, Dragos; Yan, Guoquan; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Fang, Hao; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are described as a particular type of cells of the interstitial space (www.telocytes.com). Their main characteristics are the very long telopodes with alternating podoms and podomers. Recently, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of human lung TCs with fibroblasts, demonstrating that TCs are clearly a distinct cell type. Therefore, the present study aims to reinforce this idea by comparing lung TCs with endothelial cells (ECs), since TCs and ECs share immunopositivity for CD34. We applied isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) combined with automated 2-D nano-ESI LC-MS/MS to analyse proteins extracted from TCs and ECs in primary cell cultures. In total, 1609 proteins were identified in cell cultures. 98 proteins (the 5th day), and 82 proteins (10th day) were confidently quantified (screened by two-sample t-test, P < 0.05) as up- or down-regulated (fold change >2). We found that in TCs there are 38 up-regulated proteins at the 5th day and 26 up-regulated proteins at the 10th day. Bioinformatics analysis using Panther revealed that the 38 proteins associated with TCs represented cellular functions such as intercellular communication (via vesicle mediated transport) and structure morphogenesis, being mainly cytoskeletal proteins and oxidoreductases. In addition, we found 60 up-regulated proteins in ECs e.g.: cell surface glycoprotein MUC18 (15.54-fold) and von Willebrand factor (5.74-fold). The 26 up-regulated proteins in TCs at 10th day, were also analysed and confirmed the same major cellular functions, while the 56 down-regulated proteins confirmed again their specificity for ECs. In conclusion, we report here the first extensive comparison of proteins from TCs and ECs using a quantitative proteomics approach. Our data show that TCs are completely different from ECs. Protein expression profile showed that TCs play specific roles in intercellular communication and intercellular signalling. Moreover, they might

  9. Quantitative changes in sets of proteins as markers of biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.; Gemmell, M.A.; Tollaksen, S.L. ); Lalwani, N.D.; Reddy, J.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to either physical or chemical insults triggers a cascade of bio-chemical events within the target cell. This response requires adjustment within the protein population of the cell, some proteins becoming more abundant (those involved in the cellular response), others less abundant (those not required or counterproductive to the response). Thus, quantitative changes in the global protein population of an exposed biological system may well serve as an indicator of exposure, provided the alterations observed are selective and dose-dependent. In this paper we present results from a study in which liver protein changes induced by exposure of mice to chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma where monitored. Clofibrate, and its chemical analog ciprofibrate, are hypolipidemic drugs. Di-(ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer used widely in disposable containers for blood products. WY-14643 is a chemical shown to cause hypolipidemic and peroxisome proliferation, similar to clofibrate, ciprofibrate and DEHP, but structurally different from these three chemicals. Thus, two of the four chemicals are structurally similar while the remaining two are very distinct, although all four chemicals cause the same gross biological response. Our results show that although common protein effects are observed in mice exposed to these chemicals, each chemical also causes specific alterations in selective subsets of proteins that could serve as markers of a particular exposure. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Complex mixture analysis using protein expression as a qualitative and quantitative tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.P.; Gonzalez, C.M.; Bond, J.A. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Tepper, B.E. . Paper Products Division)

    1994-07-01

    Some proteins in organisms exposed to chemicals in stressful amounts or toxic concentrations show increased expression; others show decreased expression. These inducible and repressible proteins together potentially provide qualitative and quantitative diagnoses of components in complex mixtures of chemicals. The authors examined sets of proteins synthesized by Daphnia magna after exposure to mixtures of a cationic polyamide epichlorhydrin adduct (Kymene) and a combined assortment of water-extractable substances from chemi-thermal-mechanical pulp (CTMP) in lab water. Proteins were identified, after extracting from Daphnia magna, by gel filtration and silver staining, or by radiolabeling and then gel separation. Patterns of proteins induced by Kymene[reg sign] and by CTMP extracts were distinguishable in lab water, but there was interaction between them. The method of identifying and quantifying Kymene, however, was successful using lab simulations of mixtures. The method was tested using wastewater samples from a paper manufacturing plant. Kymene could be detected against variable levels and types of additional substances. But, again, there was interference, perhaps due to Kymene binding to other anionic polymers sometimes present in the samples. Interpretation from analyses of protein expression were consistent with results from sublethal Ceriodaphnia dubia assays.

  11. Protein-protein interface prediction based on hexagon structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Ding, Yijie; Li, Shuai Cheng; Shen, Chao; Wang, Lusheng

    2016-08-01

    Studies on protein-protein interaction are important in proteome research. How to build more effective models based on sequence information, structure information and physicochemical characteristics, is the key technology in protein-protein interface prediction. In this paper, we study the protein-protein interface prediction problem. We propose a novel method for identifying residues on interfaces from an input protein with both sequence and 3D structure information, based on hexagon structure similarity. Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein interface. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves F-measure value by at least 0.03. On a common dataset consisting of 41 complexes, our method has overall precision and recall values of 63% and 57%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has overall precision and recall values of 55% and 56%. On CAPRI targets, our method has overall precision and recall values of 52% and 55%. PMID:26936323

  12. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  13. Wavelet-based verification of the quantitative precipitation forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Jakubiak, Bogumil

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores the use of wavelets for spatial verification of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF), and especially the capacity of wavelets to provide both localization and scale information. Two 24-h forecast experiments using the two versions of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) on 22 August 2010 over Poland are used to illustrate the method. Strong spatial localizations and associated intermittency of the precipitation field make verification of QPF difficult using standard statistical methods. The wavelet becomes an attractive alternative, because it is specifically designed to extract spatially localized features. The wavelet modes are characterized by the two indices for the scale and the localization. Thus, these indices can simply be employed for characterizing the performance of QPF in scale and localization without any further elaboration or tunable parameters. Furthermore, spatially-localized features can be extracted in wavelet space in a relatively straightforward manner with only a weak dependence on a threshold. Such a feature may be considered an advantage of the wavelet-based method over more conventional "object" oriented verification methods, as the latter tend to represent strong threshold sensitivities. The present paper also points out limits of the so-called "scale separation" methods based on wavelets. Our study demonstrates how these wavelet-based QPF verifications can be performed straightforwardly. Possibilities for further developments of the wavelet-based methods, especially towards a goal of identifying a weak physical process contributing to forecast error, are also pointed out.

  14. A quantitative dimming method for LED based on PWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyong; Mou, Tongsheng; Wang, Jianping; Tian, Xiaoqing

    2012-10-01

    Traditional light sources were required to provide stable and uniform illumination for a living or working environment considering performance of visual function of human being. The requirement was always reasonable until non-visual functions of the ganglion cells in the retina photosensitive layer were found. New generation of lighting technology, however, is emerging based on novel lighting materials such as LED and photobiological effects on human physiology and behavior. To realize dynamic lighting of LED whose intensity and color were adjustable to the need of photobiological effects, a quantitative dimming method based on Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) and light-mixing technology was presented. Beginning with two channels' PWM, this paper demonstrated the determinacy and limitation of PWM dimming for realizing Expected Photometric and Colorimetric Quantities (EPCQ), in accordance with the analysis on geometrical, photometric, colorimetric and electrodynamic constraints. A quantitative model which mapped the EPCQ into duty cycles was finally established. The deduced model suggested that the determinacy was a unique individuality only for two channels' and three channels' PWM, but the limitation was an inevitable commonness for multiple channels'. To examine the model, a light-mixing experiment with two kinds of white LED simulated variations of illuminance and Correlation Color Temperature (CCT) from dawn to midday. Mean deviations between theoretical values and measured values were obtained, which were 15lx and 23K respectively. Result shows that this method can effectively realize the light spectrum which has a specific requirement of EPCQ, and provides a theoretical basis and a practical way for dynamic lighting of LED.

  15. Quantitative proteomics by amino acid labeling identifies novel NHR-49 regulated proteins in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fredens, Julius; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids combined with mass spectrometry is a widely used methodology to quantitatively examine metabolic and signaling pathways in yeast, fruit flies, plants, cell cultures and mice. However, only metabolic labeling using 15N has been applied to examine such events in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We have recently shown that C. elegans can be completely labeled with heavy-labeled lysine by feeding worms on prelabeled lysine auxotroph Escherichia coli for just one generation. We applied this methodology to examine the organismal response to functional loss or RNAi mediated knock down of the transcription factor NHR-49, and found numerous proteins involved in lipid metabolism to be downregulated, which is consistent with its previously proposed function as a transcriptional regulator of fatty acid metabolism. The combined use of quantitative proteomics and selective gene knockdown by RNAi provides a powerful tool with broad implications for C. elegans biology. PMID:24058826

  16. Energetics-Based Methods for Protein Folding and Stability Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, M. Ariel; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, a series of energetics-based techniques have been developed for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability. These techniques include Stability of Unpurified Proteins from Rates of amide H/D Exchange (SUPREX), pulse proteolysis, Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX), slow histidine H/D exchange, lysine amidination, and quantitative cysteine reactivity (QCR). The above techniques, which are the subject of this review, all utilize chemical or enzymatic modification reactions to probe the chemical denaturant- or temperature-induced equilibrium unfolding properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. They employ various mass spectrometry-, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-, and optical spectroscopy-based readouts that are particularly advantageous for high-throughput and in some cases multiplexed analyses. This has created the opportunity to use protein folding and stability measurements in new applications such as in high-throughput screening projects to identify novel protein ligands and in mode-of-action studies to identify protein targets of a particular ligand.

  17. Autoradiographic method for quantitation of radiolabeled proteins in tissues using indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, E.M.; Tompkins, R.G.; Fischman, A.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.; Burke, J.F.; Rubin, R.H.; Strauss, H.W.; Yarmush, M.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A quantitative autoradiographic method was developed to measure 111In-labeled proteins in extravascular tissues with a spatial resolution sufficient to associate these proteins with tissue morphology. A linear relationship between measured grain density and isotope concentration was demonstrated with uniformly-labeled standard sources of epoxy-embedded gelatin containing (111In)albumin; half-distance of spatial resolution was 0.6 micron. The technique was illustrated by measuring 24-hr accumulation of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-coupled 111In-labeled human polyclonal IgG and human serum albumin (HSA) in a thigh infection model in the rat. Gamma camera images localized the infection and showed target-to-background ratios of 2.5 {plus minus} 0.3 for IgG and 1.4 {plus minus} 0.02 for human serum albumin (mean {plus minus} s.d., n = 3). Using quantitative autoradiography, significantly higher average tissue concentrations were found in the infected thighs at 4 to 4.5% of the initial plasma concentrations as compared to 0.2 to 0.3% of initial plasma concentrations in the noninfected thigh (p less than 0.05); these radiolabeled proteins were not inflammatory cell associated and localized primarily within the edematous interstitial spaces of the infection.

  18. Quantitative Liver-Specific Protein Fingerprint in Blood: A Signature for Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiyuan; Lausted, Christopher; Yoo, Hyuntae; Yan, Xiaowei; Brightman, Amy; Chen, Jiankui; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Hood, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    We discuss here a new approach to detecting hepatotoxicity by employing concentration changes of liver-specific blood proteins during disease progression. These proteins are capable of assessing the behaviors of their cognate liver biological networks for toxicity or disease perturbations. Blood biomarkers are highly desirable diagnostics as blood is easily accessible and baths virtually all organs. Fifteen liver-specific blood proteins were identified as markers of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity using three proteomic technologies: label-free antibody microarrays, quantitative immunoblotting, and targeted iTRAQ mass spectrometry. Liver-specific blood proteins produced a toxicity signature of eleven elevated and four attenuated blood protein levels. These blood protein perturbations begin to provide a systems view of key mechanistic features of APAP-induced liver injury relating to glutathione and S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and liver responses to the stress. Two markers, elevated membrane-bound catechol-O-methyltransferase (MB-COMT) and attenuated retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), report hepatic injury significantly earlier than the current gold standard liver biomarker, alanine transaminase (ALT). These biomarkers were perturbed prior to onset of irreversible liver injury. Ideal markers should be applicable for both rodent model studies and human clinical trials. Five of these mouse liver-specific blood markers had human orthologs that were also found to be responsive to human hepatotoxicity. This panel of liver-specific proteins has the potential to effectively identify the early toxicity onset, the nature and extent of liver injury and report on some of the APAP-perturbed liver networks. PMID:24465277

  19. Quantitative mass spectrometry measurements reveal stoichiometry of principal postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Markey, Sanford P; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative studies are presented of postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from rat cerebral cortex with the ultimate goal of defining the average copy numbers of proteins in the PSD complex. Highly specific and selective isotope dilution mass spectrometry assays were developed using isotopically labeled polypeptide concatemer internal standards. Interpretation of PSD protein stoichiometry was achieved as a molar ratio with respect to PSD-95 (SAP-90, DLG4), and subsequently, copy numbers were estimated using a consensus literature value for PSD-95. Average copy numbers for several proteins at the PSD were estimated for the first time, including those for AIDA-1, BRAGs, and densin. Major findings include evidence for the high copy number of AIDA-1 in the PSD (144 ± 30)-equivalent to that of the total GKAP family of proteins (150 ± 27)-suggesting that AIDA-1 is an element of the PSD scaffold. The average copy numbers for NMDA receptor sub-units were estimated to be 66 ± 18, 27 ± 9, and 45 ± 15, respectively, for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, yielding a total of 34 ± 10 NMDA channels. Estimated average copy numbers for AMPA channels and their auxiliary sub-units TARPs were 68 ± 36 and 144 ± 38, respectively, with a stoichiometry of ∼1:2, supporting the assertion that most AMPA receptors anchor to the PSD via TARP sub-units. This robust, quantitative analysis of PSD proteins improves upon and extends the list of major PSD components with assigned average copy numbers in the ongoing effort to unravel the complex molecular architecture of the PSD. PMID:25874902

  20. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  1. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  2. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-07-17

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of cofactors (cochaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these cochaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone-cochaperone-client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific cochaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein-protein interactions for cochaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family cochaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network and its regulation in development and disease and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug-target engagement. PMID:25036637

  3. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae. PMID:26961939

  4. Quantitative H2S-mediated protein sulfhydration reveals metabolic reprogramming during the integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bederman, Ilya; Majumder, Mithu; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda; Kabil, Omer; Willard, Belinda; Banerjee, Ruma; Wang, Benlian; Bebek, Gurkan; Evans, Charles R; Fox, Paul L; Gerson, Stanton L; Hoppel, Charles L; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The sulfhydration of cysteine residues in proteins is an important mechanism involved in diverse biological processes. We have developed a proteomics approach to quantitatively profile the changes of sulfhydrated cysteines in biological systems. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that sulfhydrated cysteines are part of a wide range of biological functions. In pancreatic β cells exposed to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, elevated H2S promotes the sulfhydration of enzymes in energy metabolism and stimulates glycolytic flux. We propose that transcriptional and translational reprogramming by the integrated stress response (ISR) in pancreatic β cells is coupled to metabolic alternations triggered by sulfhydration of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. PMID:26595448

  5. Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Fanben; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-12-01

    Resistive switching memory constitutes a prospective candidate for next-generation data storage devices. Meanwhile, naturally occurring biomaterials are promising building blocks for a new generation of environmentally friendly, biocompatible, and biodegradable electronic devices. Recent progress in using proteins to construct resistive switching memory devices is highlighted. The protein materials selection, device engineering, and mechanism of such protein-based resistive switching memory are discussed in detail. Finally, the critical challenges associated with protein-based resistive switching memory devices are presented, as well as insights into the future development of resistive switching memory based on natural biomaterials. PMID:25753764

  6. A Quantitative Approach to Analyzing Genome Reductive Evolution Using Protein–Protein Interaction Networks: A Case Study of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Akinola, Richard O.; Mazandu, Gaston K.; Mulder, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    The advance in high-throughput sequencing technologies has yielded complete genome sequences of several organisms, including complete bacterial genomes. The growing number of these available sequenced genomes has enabled analyses of their dynamics, as well as the molecular and evolutionary processes which these organisms are under. Comparative genomics of different bacterial genomes have highlighted their genome size and gene content in association with lifestyles and adaptation to various environments and have contributed to enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms of their evolution. Protein–protein functional interactions mediate many essential processes for maintaining the stability of the biological systems under changing environmental conditions. Thus, these interactions play crucial roles in the evolutionary processes of different organisms, especially for obligate intracellular bacteria, proven to generally have reduced genome sizes compared to their nearest free-living relatives. In this study, we used the approach based on the Renormalization Group (RG) analysis technique and the Maximum-Excluded-Mass-Burning (MEMB) model to investigate the evolutionary process of genome reduction in relation to the organization of functional networks of two organisms. Using a Mycobacterium leprae (MLP) network in comparison with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) network as a case study, we show that reductive evolution in MLP was as a result of removal of important proteins from neighbors of corresponding orthologous MTB proteins. While each orthologous MTB protein had an increase in number of interacting partners in most instances, the corresponding MLP protein had lost some of them. This work provides a quantitative model for mapping reductive evolution and protein–protein functional interaction network organization in terms of roles played by different proteins in the network structure. PMID:27066064

  7. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eui Geum

    2016-06-01

    As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR), a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings. PMID:27349664

  8. A quantitative autoradiographic method for the measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-05-01

    We have developed a new method for measuring local rates of brain protein synthesis in vivo. It combines the intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of low specific activity amino acid with quantitative autoradiography. This method has several advantages: 1) It is ideally suited for young or small animals or where immobilizing an animal is undesirable. 2 The amino acid injection ''floods'' amino acid pools so that errors in estimating precursor specific activity, which is especially important in pathological conditions, are minimized. 3) The method provides for the use of a radioautographic internal standard in which valine incorporation is measured directly. Internal standards from experimental animals correct for tissue protein content and self-absorption of radiation in tissue sections which could vary under experimental conditions.

  9. Quantitative analysis of gene expression in preimplantation mouse embryos using green fluorescent protein reporter.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Serguei Yuri; Tokunaga, Tomoyuki; Schultz, Richard M; Furukawa, Tsutomu; Nagai, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Manabu; Hosoe, Misa; Yakovlev, Alexander F; Takahashi, Seiya; Izaike, Yoshiaki

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a method to monitor noninvasively, quantitatively, and in real-time transcription in living preimplantation mouse embryos by measuring expression of a short half-life form of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) following microinjection of a plasmid-borne EGFP reporter gene. A standard curve was established by injecting known amounts of recombinant green fluorescent protein, and transcriptional activity was then determined by interpolating the amount of fluorescence in the DNA-injected embryos. This approach permitted multiple measurements in single embryos with no significant detrimental effect on embryonic development as long as light exposure was brief (<30 sec) and no more than two measurements were made each day. This method should facilitate analysis of the regulation of gene expression in preimplantation embryos; in particular, during the maternal-to-zygotic transition, and in other species in which limited numbers of embryos are available. PMID:12080029

  10. Quantitative investigations of quantum coherence for a light-harvesting protein at conditions simulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel B; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Lee, Kyung-Koo; Belsley, Michael S; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G; Scholes, Gregory D

    2012-04-14

    Recent measurements using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) have shown that the initial dynamic response of photosynthetic proteins can involve quantum coherence. We show how electronic coherence can be differentiated from vibrational coherence in 2D ES. On that basis we conclude that both electronic and vibrational coherences are observed in the phycobiliprotein light-harvesting complex PC645 from Chroomonas sp. CCMP270 at ambient temperature. These light-harvesting antenna proteins of the cryptophyte algae are suspended in the lumen, where the pH drops significantly under sustained illumination by sunlight. Here we measured 2D ES of PC645 at increasing levels of acidity to determine if the change in pH affects the quantum coherence; quantitative analysis reveals that the dynamics are insensitive to the pH change. PMID:22374579

  11. High-throughput analysis of the protein sequence-stability landscape using a quantitative "yeast surface two-hybrid" system and fragment reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sanjib; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Stability evaluation of many mutants can lead to a better understanding of the sequence determinants of a structural motif and of factors governing protein stability and protein evolution. The traditional biophysical analysis of protein stability is low throughput, limiting our ability to widely explore the sequence space in a quantitative manner. In this study, we have developed a high-throughput library screening method for quantifying stability changes, which is based on protein fragment reconstitution and yeast surface display. Our method exploits the thermodynamic linkage between protein stability and fragment reconstitution and the ability of the yeast surface display technique to quantitatively evaluate protein-protein interactions. The method was applied to a fibronectin type III (FN3) domain. Characterization of fragment reconstitution was facilitated by the co-expression of two FN3 fragments, thus establishing a "yeast surface two-hybrid" method. Importantly, our method does not rely on competition between clones and thus eliminates a common limitation of high-throughput selection methods in which the most stable variants are predominantly recovered. Thus, it allows for the isolation of sequences that exhibits a desired level of stability. We identified over one hundred unique sequences for a β-bulge motif, which was significantly more informative than natural sequences of the FN3 family in revealing the sequence determinants for the β-bulge. Our method provides a powerful means to rapidly assess stability of many variants, to systematically assess contribution of different factors to protein stability and to enhance protein stability. PMID:18674545

  12. Prediction of colorectal cancer diagnosis based on circulating plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Surinova, Silvia; Choi, Meena; Tao, Sha; Schüffler, Peter J; Chang, Ching-Yun; Clough, Timothy; Vysloužil, Kamil; Khoylou, Marta; Srovnal, Josef; Liu, Yansheng; Matondo, Mariette; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Weisser, Hendrik; Buhmann, Joachim M; Hajdúch, Marián; Brenner, Hermann; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-09-01

    Non-invasive detection of colorectal cancer with blood-based markers is a critical clinical need. Here we describe a phased mass spectrometry-based approach for the discovery, screening, and validation of circulating protein biomarkers with diagnostic value. Initially, we profiled human primary tumor tissue epithelia and characterized about 300 secreted and cell surface candidate glycoproteins. These candidates were then screened in patient systemic circulation to identify detectable candidates in blood plasma. An 88-plex targeting method was established to systematically monitor these proteins in two large and independent cohorts of plasma samples, which generated quantitative clinical datasets at an unprecedented scale. The data were deployed to develop and evaluate a five-protein biomarker signature for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:26253081

  13. Quantitative fluorescence loss in photobleaching for analysis of protein transport and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) is a widely used imaging technique, which provides information about protein dynamics in various cellular regions. In FLIP, a small cellular region is repeatedly illuminated by an intense laser pulse, while images are taken with reduced laser power with a time lag between the bleaches. Despite its popularity, tools are lacking for quantitative analysis of FLIP experiments. Typically, the user defines regions of interest (ROIs) for further analysis which is subjective and does not allow for comparing different cells and experimental settings. Results We present two complementary methods to detect and quantify protein transport and aggregation in living cells from FLIP image series. In the first approach, a stretched exponential (StrExp) function is fitted to fluorescence loss (FL) inside and outside the bleached region. We show by reaction–diffusion simulations, that the StrExp function can describe both, binding/barrier–limited and diffusion-limited FL kinetics. By pixel-wise regression of that function to FL kinetics of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), we determined in a user-unbiased manner from which cellular regions eGFP can be replenished in the bleached area. Spatial variation in the parameters calculated from the StrExp function allow for detecting diffusion barriers for eGFP in the nucleus and cytoplasm of living cells. Polyglutamine (polyQ) disease proteins like mutant huntingtin (mtHtt) can form large aggregates called inclusion bodies (IB’s). The second method combines single particle tracking with multi-compartment modelling of FL kinetics in moving IB’s to determine exchange rates of eGFP-tagged mtHtt protein (eGFP-mtHtt) between aggregates and the cytoplasm. This method is self-calibrating since it relates the FL inside and outside the bleached regions. It makes it therefore possible to compare release kinetics of eGFP-mtHtt between different cells and experiments. Conclusions We

  14. Predicting protein-protein interactions based only on sequences information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juwen; Zhang, Jian; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Yu, Kunqian; Chen, Kaixian; Li, Yixue; Jiang, Hualiang

    2007-03-13

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are central to most biological processes. Although efforts have been devoted to the development of methodology for predicting PPIs and protein interaction networks, the application of most existing methods is limited because they need information about protein homology or the interaction marks of the protein partners. In the present work, we propose a method for PPI prediction using only the information of protein sequences. This method was developed based on a learning algorithm-support vector machine combined with a kernel function and a conjoint triad feature for describing amino acids. More than 16,000 diverse PPI pairs were used to construct the universal model. The prediction ability of our approach is better than that of other sequence-based PPI prediction methods because it is able to predict PPI networks. Different types of PPI networks have been effectively mapped with our method, suggesting that, even with only sequence information, this method could be applied to the exploration of networks for any newly discovered protein with unknown biological relativity. In addition, such supplementary experimental information can enhance the prediction ability of the method. PMID:17360525

  15. A Comparison of Protein Extraction Methods Suitable for Gel-Based Proteomics Studies of Aphid Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few attempts have been made to methodically compare protein isolation methods from insect tissues for proteomic studies. To address this, we compared qualitative and quantitative differences among three methods for isolation, purification and solubilization of insect proteins. Schizaphis graminum,...

  16. Direct dye binding--a quantitative assay for solid-phase immobilized protein.

    PubMed

    Bonde, M; Pontoppidan, H; Pepper, D S

    1992-01-01

    A direct dye-binding procedure was established for the quantification of protein after its immobilization on a solid phase, using IgG and BSA as model proteins. The assay, which in the range 0-5 mg protein/ml gel correlates well with indirect protein determination by A280 as well as determination of protein hydrolyzed from the gel, is based on a modified Bradford dye-binding assay. As the protein coupled to the gel binds the dye, a decrease in A465 of the supernatant is measured. Three solid supports commonly used for protein immobilization (Sepharose, Sephadex, Sephacryl) were found to be compatible with the dye-binding assay while nonspecific dye binding was found to HEMA gels. Protein was coupled to Sephacryl S-1000 using three different activation methods (aldehyde, hydrazine, and adipic acid dihydrazide). Artifactual dye-binding was not observed using any of the three different "linkers." The assay is easily carried out and represents a useful tool, e.g., when optimizing procedures for protein immobilization. PMID:1595895

  17. Quantitative Interpretation of Multifrequency Multimode EPR Spectra of Metal Containing Proteins, Enzymes, and Biomimetic Complexes.

    PubMed

    Petasis, Doros T; Hendrich, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has long been a primary method for characterization of paramagnetic centers in materials and biological complexes. Transition metals in biological complexes have valence d-orbitals that largely define the chemistry of the metal centers. EPR spectra are distinctive for metal type, oxidation state, protein environment, substrates, and inhibitors. The study of many metal centers in proteins, enzymes, and biomimetic complexes has led to the development of a systematic methodology for quantitative interpretation of EPR spectra from a wide array of metal containing complexes. The methodology is now contained in the computer program SpinCount. SpinCount allows simulation of EPR spectra from any sample containing multiple species composed of one or two metals in any spin state. The simulations are quantitative, thus allowing determination of all species concentrations in a sample directly from spectra. This chapter will focus on applications to transition metals in biological systems using EPR spectra from multiple microwave frequencies and modes. PMID:26478486

  18. Quantitative prediction of peptide binding to HLA-DP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stefan; Dimitrov, Ivan; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    The exogenous proteins are processed by the host antigen-processing cells. Peptidic fragments of them are presented on the cell surface bound to the major hystocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules class II and recognized by the CD4+ T lymphocytes. The MHC binding is considered as the crucial prerequisite for T-cell recognition. Only peptides able to form stable complexes with the MHC proteins are recognized by the T-cells. These peptides are known as T-cell epitopes. All T-cell epitopes are MHC binders, but not all MHC binders are T-cell epitopes. The T-cell epitope prediction is one of the main priorities of immunoinformatics. In the present study, three chemometric techniques are combined to derive a model for in silico prediction of peptide binding to the human MHC class II protein HLA-DP1. The structures of a set of known peptide binders are described by amino acid z-descriptors. Data are processed by an iterative self-consisted algorithm using the method of partial least squares, and a quantitative matrix (QM) for peptide binding prediction to HLA-DP1 is derived. The QM is validated by two sets of proteins and showed an average accuracy of 86 percent. PMID:24091413

  19. Improved corn protein based articles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing higher value uses for zein (corn protein), a potential major co-product of the bio-ethanol industry, will improve the economics of this business. Historically, zein was predominantly used in the textile fiber industry. Unfortunately the techniques used at that time to modify the zein cann...

  20. High Resolution CZE-MS Quantitative Characterization of Intact Biopharmaceutical Proteins: Proteoforms of Interferon-β1.

    PubMed

    Bush, David R; Zang, Li; Belov, Arseniy M; Ivanov, Alexander R; Karger, Barry L

    2016-01-19

    New and improved methods are required for the enhanced characterization of complex biopharmaceuticals, especially those with charge and glycan heterogeneity. High resolution separation and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of intact proteoforms can contribute significantly to the characterization of such proteins, many of which are glycoproteins. Here, we report on capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) coupled via a commercial CESI sheathless interface to an Orbitrap ELITE MS for the intact analysis of recombinant human interferon-β1 (Avonex, rhIFN-β1), a biopharmaceutical with complex glycosylation at a single N-linked site. Using a cross-linked polyethylenimine coating, column efficiencies between 350,000 and 450,000 plates were produced, allowing separation based on charge and subtle hydrodynamic volume differences. A total of 138 proteoforms were found, and 55 were quantitated. Charge species due to deamidation and sialylation were separated by CZE. Given the high column efficiency, isobaric positional isomers of a single sialic acid on biantennary glycan antennae were resolved. Further, triantennary isomers (antenna on α(1-3) or α(1-6) arms) were separated and confirmed by exoglycosidase digestion. Proteoforms of the N-terminal cleavage of methionine were detected by precursor molecular weight and top-down ETD and HCD analysis of the reduced protein. Quantitative analysis suggested potential correlations between the methionine loss with the relative amount of the deamidation, as well as the level of deamidation with glycan structure. We demonstrate that high resolution CZE separation of intact glycoprotein species coupled to MS has significant potential for the in-depth characterization and quantitative analysis of biopharmaceutical proteoforms. PMID:26641950

  1. Template-based structure modeling of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Szilagyi, Andras; Zhang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein complexes can be constructed by using the known structure of other protein complexes as a template. The complex structure templates are generally detected either by homology-based sequence alignments or, given the structure of monomer components, by structure-based comparisons. Critical improvements have been made in recent years by utilizing interface recognition and by recombining monomer and complex template libraries. Encouraging progress has also been witnessed in genome-wide applications of template-based modeling, with modeling accuracy comparable to high-throughput experimental data. Nevertheless, bottlenecks exist due to the incompleteness of the proteinprotein complex structure library and the lack of methods for distant homologous template identification and full-length complex structure refinement. PMID:24721449

  2. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M.; Davies, Anthony J.; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A.; Masters, John R.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (p<0.0001). By using a multilabel, quantitative fluorophore technique we further investigated if the co-localization of these proteins (all transcription factors) with each other and in the nucleus (stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) was altered in FOSCC compared to normal tissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  3. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Antonio; Swift, Rebecca; Arthurs, Callum; Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M; Davies, Anthony J; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A; Masters, John R; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (p<0.0001). By using a multilabel, quantitative fluorophore technique we further investigated if the co-localization of these proteins (all transcription factors) with each other and in the nucleus (stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) was altered in FOSCC compared to normal tissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  4. Protein composition of wheat gluten polymer fractions determined by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour proteins from the US bread wheat Butte 86 were extracted in 0.5% SDS using a two-step procedure with and without sonication and further separated by size exclusion chromatography into monomeric and polymeric fractions. Proteins in each fraction were analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel...

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of wheat grain proteins reveals differential effects of silencing of omega-5 gliadin genes in transgenic lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel wheat lines with altered flour compositions can be used to decipher the roles of specific gluten proteins in flour quality. Grain proteins from transgenic wheat lines in which genes encoding the omega-5 gliadins were silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) were analyzed in detail by quantitative 2...

  6. Quantitative evaluation of his-tag purification and immunoprecipitation of tristetraprolin and its mutant proteins from transfected human cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histidine (His)-tag is widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins, but the yield and purity of expressed proteins are quite different. Little information is available about quantitative evaluation of this procedure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the His-tag pr...

  7. Genetic mapping and confirmation of quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil contents and seed weight in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] meal has increased worldwide and soybean importers often offer premiums for soybean containing higher contents of protein and oil. Objectives were to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with soybean seed protein, oil, and seed weight in a soyb...

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling protein, oil, and five major fatty acids’ contents in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved seed composition in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) for protein and oil quality is one of the major goals of soybean breeders. A group of genes that act as quantitative traits with their effects can alter protein, oil, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids percentage in soy...

  9. Quantitative immunological determination of 12 plasma proteins excreted in human urine collected before and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Poortmans, Jacques; Jeanloz, Roger W.

    1968-01-01

    Urine was collected from 6 healthy male adults at rest and from 20 male adults after a marathon race (25 miles). The concentrated urines were quantitatively analyzed, by single radial immunodiffusion, for their content in 12 different plasma proteins: tryptophan-rich prealbumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, α1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, hemopexin, β2-glycoprotein I, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin. Albumin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin represent the major part of the plasma proteins detected in normal urine excreted by humans at rest (12, 0.5, and 2.5 mg respectively, out of a total excretion of 17.5 mg of plasma proteins per 24 hr). The other plasma proteins were excreted at a lower rate (< 0.4 mg/24 hr). The relative content of tryptophan-rich prealbumin, α1-antitrypsin, Gc-globulin, transferrin, and γG-globulin was lower in normal urine than in normal serum, whereas that of α1-acid glycoprotein, β2-glycoprotein I, and γA-globulin was higher. The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 4.9:1. When plotted on a logarithmic scale, no direct relationship between the molecular weight of a protein and the value of its renal clearance could be observed. Strenuous exercise increased (up to 50-fold) the excretion of plasma proteins which represent 82% of the total proteins found in urine, instead of 57% in urine collected from humans at rest. There was particularly a significant rise of tryptophan-rich albumin, albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, γA-globulin, and γG-globulin (0.26, 127, 11.8, 3.3, 1.2, and 2.0 μg respectively, out of a total excretion of 167 μg of plasma proteins per min). The ratio of γG-globulin to γA-globulin was 16:1. After exercise, the renal clearance of proteins increased from 2 to 40 times, but, as for the urine of normal subjects at rest, no direct relationship between molecular weight and renal clearance could be observed. Images PMID:4170390

  10. Predicting Disease-Related Proteins Based on Clique Backbone in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases. PMID:25013377