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Sample records for protein sequence comparison

  1. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  2. nWayComp: A Tool for Universal Comparison of DNA and Protein Sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing number of whole genomic sequences of microorganisms has increased the complexity of genome-wide annotation and gene sequence comparison among multiple microorganisms. To address this problem, we developed nWayComp software that compares DNA and protein sequences of phylogenetically-r...

  3. Identification of the bacteriophage T5 dUTPase by protein sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown by protein sequence comparisons that a 148 amino acid open reading frame (ORF 148) located at 67% of the bacteriophage T5 genome encodes a protein with strong similarity to known dUTPases. This protein contains five characteristic amino acid sequence motifs that are common to the dUTPase gene family. A similarity in size and high degree of sequence identity strongly suggest that the protein encoded by the ORF 148 of bacteriophage T5 is dUTPase. PMID:8988373

  4. Progressive structure-based alignment of homologous proteins: Adopting sequence comparison strategies.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2012-09-01

    Comparison of multiple protein structures has a broad range of applications in the analysis of protein structure, function and evolution. Multiple structure alignment tools (MSTAs) are necessary to obtain a simultaneous comparison of a family of related folds. In this study, we have developed a method for multiple structure comparison largely based on sequence alignment techniques. A widely used Structural Alphabet named Protein Blocks (PBs) was used to transform the information on 3D protein backbone conformation as a 1D sequence string. A progressive alignment strategy similar to CLUSTALW was adopted for multiple PB sequence alignment (mulPBA). Highly similar stretches identified by the pairwise alignments are given higher weights during the alignment. The residue equivalences from PB based alignments are used to obtain a three dimensional fit of the structures followed by an iterative refinement of the structural superposition. Systematic comparisons using benchmark datasets of MSTAs underlines that the alignment quality is better than MULTIPROT, MUSTANG and the alignments in HOMSTRAD, in more than 85% of the cases. Comparison with other rigid-body and flexible MSTAs also indicate that mulPBA alignments are superior to most of the rigid-body MSTAs and highly comparable to the flexible alignment methods. PMID:22676903

  5. 3D representations of amino acids—applications to protein sequence comparison and classification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Koehl, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein is the key to understanding its structure and ultimately its function in the cell. This paper addresses the fundamental issue of encoding amino acids in ways that the representation of such a protein sequence facilitates the decoding of its information content. We show that a feature-based representation in a three-dimensional (3D) space derived from amino acid substitution matrices provides an adequate representation that can be used for direct comparison of protein sequences based on geometry. We measure the performance of such a representation in the context of the protein structural fold prediction problem. We compare the results of classifying different sets of proteins belonging to distinct structural folds against classifications of the same proteins obtained from sequence alone or directly from structural information. We find that sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show in contrast that the use of the three dimensional representation of the sequences significantly improves the classification accuracy. We conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of such a representation and with a description of potential improvements. PMID:25379143

  6. Thermal adaptation analyzed by comparison of protein sequences from mesophilic and extremely thermophilic Methanococcus species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, P. J.; Badger, J. H.; Buldak, G. L.; Reich, C. I.; Woese, C. R.; Olsen, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    The genome sequence of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii provides a wealth of data on proteins from a thermophile. In this paper, sequences of 115 proteins from M. jannaschii are compared with their homologs from mesophilic Methanococcus species. Although the growth temperatures of the mesophiles are about 50 degrees C below that of M. jannaschii, their genomic G+C contents are nearly identical. The properties most correlated with the proteins of the thermophile include higher residue volume, higher residue hydrophobicity, more charged amino acids (especially Glu, Arg, and Lys), and fewer uncharged polar residues (Ser, Thr, Asn, and Gln). These are recurring themes, with all trends applying to 83-92% of the proteins for which complete sequences were available. Nearly all of the amino acid replacements most significantly correlated with the temperature change are the same relatively conservative changes observed in all proteins, but in the case of the mesophile/thermophile comparison there is a directional bias. We identify 26 specific pairs of amino acids with a statistically significant (P < 0.01) preferred direction of replacement.

  7. A statistical physics perspective on alignment-independent protein sequence comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Nasiev, Diar; Flower, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Within bioinformatics, the textual alignment of amino acid sequences has long dominated the determination of similarity between proteins, with all that implies for shared structure, function and evolutionary descent. Despite the relative success of modern-day sequence alignment algorithms, so-called alignment-free approaches offer a complementary means of determining and expressing similarity, with potential benefits in certain key applications, such as regression analysis of protein structure-function studies, where alignment-base similarity has performed poorly. Results: Here, we offer a fresh, statistical physics-based perspective focusing on the question of alignment-free comparison, in the process adapting results from ‘first passage probability distribution’ to summarize statistics of ensemble averaged amino acid propensity values. In this article, we introduce and elaborate this approach. Contact: d.r.flower@aston.ac.uk PMID:25810434

  8. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  9. Establishing homologies in protein sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Barker, W. C.; Hunt, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based statistical techniques used to determine homologies between proteins occurring in different species are reviewed. The technique is based on comparison of two protein sequences, either by relating all segments of a given length in one sequence to all segments of the second or by finding the best alignment of the two sequences. Approaches discussed include selection using printed tabulations, identification of very similar sequences, and computer searches of a database. The use of the SEARCH, RELATE, and ALIGN programs (Dayhoff, 1979) is explained; sample data are presented in graphs, diagrams, and tables and the construction of scoring matrices is considered.

  10. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: biological properties, detection procedures and comparison of coat protein gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Coutts, B A; Kehoe, M A; Webster, C G; Wylie, S J; Jones, R A C

    2011-12-01

    Between 2006 and 2010, 5324 samples from at least 34 weed, two cultivated legume and 11 native species were collected from three cucurbit-growing areas in tropical or subtropical Western Australia. Two new alternative hosts of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) were identified, the Australian native cucurbit Cucumis maderaspatanus, and the naturalised legume species Rhyncosia minima. Low-level (0.7%) seed transmission of ZYMV was found in seedlings grown from seed collected from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) fruit infected with isolate Cvn-1. Seed transmission was absent in >9500 pumpkin (C. maxima and C. moschata) seedlings from fruit infected with isolate Knx-1. Leaf samples from symptomatic cucurbit plants collected from fields in five cucurbit-growing areas in four Australian states were tested for the presence of ZYMV. When 42 complete coat protein (CP) nucleotide (nt) sequences from the new ZYMV isolates obtained were compared to those of 101 complete CP nt sequences from five other continents, phylogenetic analysis of the 143 ZYMV sequences revealed three distinct groups (A, B and C), with four subgroups in A (I-IV) and two in B (I-II). The new Australian sequences grouped according to collection location, fitting within A-I, A-II and B-II. The 16 new sequences from one isolated location in tropical northern Western Australia all grouped into subgroup B-II, which contained no other isolates. In contrast, the three sequences from the Northern Territory fitted into A-II with 94.6-99.0% nt identities with isolates from the United States, Iran, China and Japan. The 23 new sequences from the central west coast and two east coast locations all fitted into A-I, with 95.9-98.9% nt identities to sequences from Europe and Japan. These findings suggest that (i) there have been at least three separate ZYMV introductions into Australia and (ii) there are few changes to local isolate CP sequences following their establishment in remote growing areas. Isolates from A-I and B

  11. Comparison of the rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 (NS53) from different species by sequence analysis and northern blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S J; Cross, T L; Greenberg, H B

    1994-08-15

    The nucleotide sequence of gene 5 encoding the rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 (NS53) of 6 strains (EW, EHP, RRV, I321, OSU, and Gottfried) was determined and compared to 6 previously reported strains (SA11, UK, RF, Hu803, DS-1, and Wa). The 12 rotavirus strains were derived from a total of five separate species (murine, bovine, simian, porcine, and human). Gene sizes ranged from 1564 to 1611 nucleotides in length and the deduced protein sequences were found to be 486 to 495 amino acids in length. Comparisons of NSP1 amino acid sequences showed identities ranging from 36 to 92%. This diversity was most evident between strains from different species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a clustering of NSP1 sequences according to species origin with the exception that the human and porcine strains were included in a single grouping. Northern blot hybridizations using additional rotavirus strains from the five species confirmed the grouping found by sequence analysis. The species specificity of NSP1 is consistent with the hypothesis that NSP1 plays a role in host range restriction. PMID:8030275

  12. Indigenous and introduced potyviruses of legumes and Passiflora spp. from Australia: biological properties and comparison of coat protein sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coat protein sequences of 33 Potyvirus isolates from legume and Passiflora spp. were sequenced to determine the identity of infecting viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed the presence of seven distinct virus species....

  13. Protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  14. Trading accuracy for speed: A quantitative comparison of search algorithms in protein sequence design.

    PubMed

    Voigt, C A; Gordon, D B; Mayo, S L

    2000-06-01

    Finding the minimum energy amino acid side-chain conformation is a fundamental problem in both homology modeling and protein design. To address this issue, numerous computational algorithms have been proposed. However, there have been few quantitative comparisons between methods and there is very little general understanding of the types of problems that are appropriate for each algorithm. Here, we study four common search techniques: Monte Carlo (MC) and Monte Carlo plus quench (MCQ); genetic algorithms (GA); self-consistent mean field (SCMF); and dead-end elimination (DEE). Both SCMF and DEE are deterministic, and if DEE converges, it is guaranteed that its solution is the global minimum energy conformation (GMEC). This provides a means to compare the accuracy of SCMF and the stochastic methods. For the side-chain placement calculations, we find that DEE rapidly converges to the GMEC in all the test cases. The other algorithms converge on significantly incorrect solutions; the average fraction of incorrect rotamers for SCMF is 0.12, GA 0.09, and MCQ 0.05. For the protein design calculations, design positions are progressively added to the side-chain placement calculation until the time required for DEE diverges sharply. As the complexity of the problem increases, the accuracy of each method is determined so that the results can be extrapolated into the region where DEE is no longer tractable. We find that both SCMF and MCQ perform reasonably well on core calculations (fraction amino acids incorrect is SCMF 0.07, MCQ 0.04), but fail considerably on the boundary (SCMF 0.28, MCQ 0.32) and surface calculations (SCMF 0.37, MCQ 0.44). PMID:10835284

  15. Sequence Comparison and Phylogeny of Nucleotide Sequence of Coat Protein and Nucleic Acid Binding Protein of a Distinct Isolate of Shallot virus X from India.

    PubMed

    Majumder, S; Baranwal, V K

    2011-06-01

    Shallot virus X (ShVX), a type species in the genus Allexivirus of the family Alfaflexiviridae has been associated with shallot plants in India and other shallot growing countries like Russia, Germany, Netherland, and New Zealand. Coat protein (CP) and nucleic acid binding protein (NB) region of the virus was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from scales leaves of shallot bulbs. The partial cDNA contained two open reading frames encoding proteins of molecular weights of 28.66 and 14.18 kDa belonging to Flexi_CP super-family and viral NB super-family, respectively. The percent identity and phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of CP and NB region of the virus associated with shallot indicated that it was a distinct isolate of ShVX. PMID:23637504

  16. Protein Structure Comparison and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çamoǧlu, Orhan; Singh, Ambuj K.

    The success of genome projects has generated an enormous amount of sequence data. In order to realize the full value of the data, we need to understand its functional role and its evolutionary origin. Sequence comparison methods are incredibly valuable for this task. However, for sequences falling in the twilight zone (usually between 20 and 35% sequence similarity), we need to resort to structural alignment and comparison for a meaningful analysis. Such a structural approach can be used for classification of proteins, isolation of structural motifs, and discovery of drug targets.

  17. Indigenous and introduced potyviruses of legumes and Passiflora spp. from Australia: biological properties and comparison of coat protein nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Brenda A; Kehoe, Monica A; Webster, Craig G; Wylie, Stephen J; Jones, Roger A C

    2011-10-01

    Five Australian potyviruses, passion fruit woodiness virus (PWV), passiflora mosaic virus (PaMV), passiflora virus Y, clitoria chlorosis virus (ClCV) and hardenbergia mosaic virus (HarMV), and two introduced potyviruses, bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CAbMV), were detected in nine wild or cultivated Passiflora and legume species growing in tropical, subtropical or Mediterranean climatic regions of Western Australia. When ClCV (1), PaMV (1), PaVY (8) and PWV (5) isolates were inoculated to 15 plant species, PWV and two PaVY P. foetida isolates infected P. edulis and P. caerulea readily but legumes only occasionally. Another PaVY P. foetida isolate resembled five PaVY legume isolates in infecting legumes readily but not infecting P. edulis. PaMV resembled PaVY legume isolates in legumes but also infected P. edulis. ClCV did not infect P. edulis or P. caerulea and behaved differently from PaVY legume isolates and PaMV when inoculated to two legume species. When complete coat protein (CP) nucleotide (nt) sequences of 33 new isolates were compared with 41 others, PWV (8), HarMV (4), PaMV (1) and ClCV (1) were within a large group of Australian isolates, while PaVY (14), CAbMV (1) and BCMV (3) isolates were in three other groups. Variation among PWV and PaVY isolates was sufficient for division into four clades each (I-IV). A variable block of 56 amino acid residues at the N-terminal region of the CPs of PaMV and ClCV distinguished them from PWV. Comparison of PWV, PaMV and ClCV CP sequences showed that nt identities were both above and below the 76-77% potyvirus species threshold level. This research gives insights into invasion of new hosts by potyviruses at the natural vegetation and cultivated area interface, and illustrates the potential of indigenous viruses to emerge to infect introduced plants. PMID:21744001

  18. Protein sequence comparisons show that the 'pseudoproteases' encoded by poxviruses and certain retroviruses belong to the deoxyuridine triphosphatase family.

    PubMed Central

    McGeoch, D J

    1990-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons show extensive similarities among the deoxyuridine triphosphatases (dUTPases) of Escherichia coli and of herpesviruses, and the 'protease-like' or 'pseudoprotease' sequences encoded by certain retroviruses in the oncovirus and lentivirus families and by poxviruses. These relationships suggest strongly that the 'pseudoproteases' actually are dUTPases, and have not arisen by duplication of an oncovirus protease gene as had been suggested. The herpesvirus dUTPase sequences differ from the others in that they are longer (about 370 residues, against around 140) and one conserved element ('Motif 3') is displaced relative to its position in the other sequences; a model involving internal duplication of the herpesvirus gene can account effectively for these observations. Sequences closely similar to Motif 3 are also found in phosphofructokinases, where they form part of the active site and fructose phosphate binding structure; thus these sequences may represent a class of structural element generally involved in phosphate transfer to and from glycosides. PMID:2165588

  19. Discrimination of Burkholderia mallei/pseudomallei from Burkholderia thailandensis by sequence comparison of a fragment of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene

    PubMed Central

    Frickmann, H.; Chantratita, N.; Gauthier, Y. P.; Neubauer, H.; Hagen, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Discrimination of Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei and B. mallei from environmental B. thailandensis is challenging. We describe a discrimination method based on sequence comparison of the ribosomal protein S21 (rpsU) gene. The rpsU gene was sequenced in ten B. pseudomallei, six B. mallei, one B. thailandensis reference strains, six isolates of B. pseudomallei, and 37 of B. thailandensis. Further rpsU sequences of six B. pseudomallei, three B. mallei, and one B. thailandensis were identified via NCBI GenBank. Three to four variable base-positions were identified within a 120-base-pair fragment, allowing discrimination of the B. pseudomallei/mallei-cluster from B. thailandensis, whose sequences clustered identically. All B. mallei and three B. pseudomallei sequences were identical, while 17/22 B. pseudomallei strains differed in one nucleotide (78A>C). Sequences of the rpsU fragment of ‘out-stander’ reference strains of B. cepacia, B. gladioli, B. plantarii, and B. vietnamensis clustered differently. Sequence comparison of the described rpsU gene fragment can be used as a supplementary diagnostic procedure for the discrimination of B. mallei/pseudomallei from B. thailandensis as well as from other species of the genus Burkholderia, keeping in mind that it does not allow for a differentiation between B. mallei and B. pseudomallei. PMID:23227305

  20. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the Sta58 major antigen gene of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi: sequence homology and antigenic comparison of Sta58 to the 60-kilodalton family of stress proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, C K; Marana, D P; Dasch, G A; Oaks, E V

    1990-01-01

    The scrub typhus 58-kilodalton (kDa) antigen (Sta58) of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi is a major protein antigen often recognized by humans infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae. A 2.9-kilobase HindIII fragment containing a complete sta58 gene was cloned in Escherichia coli and found to express the entire Sta58 antigen and a smaller protein with an apparent molecular mass of 11 kDa (Stp11). DNA sequence analysis of the 2.9-kilobase HindIII fragment revealed two adjacent open reading frames encoding proteins of 11 (Stp11) and 60 (Sta58) kDa. Comparisons of deduced amino acid sequences disclosed a high degree of homology between the R. tsutsugamushi proteins Stp11 and Sta58 and the E. coli proteins GroES and GroEL, respectively, and the family of primordial heat shock proteins designated Hsp10 Hsp60. Although the sequence homology between the Sta58 antigen and the Hsp60 protein family is striking, the Sta58 protein appeared to be antigenically distinct among a sample of other bacterial Hsp60 homologs, including the typhus group of rickettsiae. The antigenic uniqueness of the Sta58 antigen indicates that this protein may be a potentially protective antigen and a useful diagnostic reagent for scrub typhus fever. Images PMID:2108930

  1. Sequence repeats and protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh X.; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2012-11-01

    Repeats are frequently found in known protein sequences. The level of sequence conservation in tandem repeats correlates with their propensities to be intrinsically disordered. We employ a coarse-grained model of a protein with a two-letter amino acid alphabet, hydrophobic (H) and polar (P), to examine the sequence-structure relationship in the realm of repeated sequences. A fraction of repeated sequences comprises a distinct class of bad folders, whose folding temperatures are much lower than those of random sequences. Imperfection in sequence repetition improves the folding properties of the bad folders while deteriorating those of the good folders. Our results may explain why nature has utilized repeated sequences for their versatility and especially to design functional proteins that are intrinsically unstructured at physiological temperatures.

  2. Sequence comparison of JSRV with endogenous proviruses: envelope genotypes and a novel ORF with similarity to a G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Bishop, J V; Carlson, J O; DeMartini, J C

    1999-06-01

    Ovine pulmonary carcinoma, a contagious lung cancer of sheep, is caused by the oncogenic jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) that is closely related to a family of endogenous sheep retroviral sequences (ESRVs). By using exogenous virus-specific U3 oligonucleotide primers, the entire JSRV proviral genome or its 3' part was amplified from tumor DNA. Analysis of these proviral sequences revealed a novel open reading frame (ORF) within the pol coding region, designated ORF X, which was well conserved in ESRV and JSRV sequences. Deduced amino acids of ORF X showed similarity to a portion of the mammalian adenosine receptor subtype 3, a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. Comparison of deduced env amino acids of six JSRV strains from three continents identified 15 residues that defined two distinct genotypes of JSRVs. Sequence analysis identified two highly variable regions between JSRV and ESRV in the transmembrane domain of env (TM) and the 3' unique sequence (U3) of the long terminal repeat, from which JSRV-specific DNA probes were derived. By using these DNA probes in Southern hybridization, for the first time we successfully identified JSRV proviral sequences in tumor genomic DNA in the presence of multiple ESRV loci, validating the use of exogenous virus-specific DNA probes in the analysis of oncogenic proviral integration sites and identification of integrated exogenous proviral sequences. PMID:10366570

  3. SEQOPTICS: a protein sequence clustering system

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonghui; Reilly, Kevin D; Sprague, Alan P; Guan, Zhijie

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein sequence clustering has been widely used as a part of the analysis of protein structure and function. In most cases single linkage or graph-based clustering algorithms have been applied. OPTICS (Ordering Points To Identify the Clustering Structure) is an attractive approach due to its emphasis on visualization of results and support for interactive work, e.g., in choosing parameters. However, OPTICS has not been used, as far as we know, for protein sequence clustering. Results In this paper, a system of clustering proteins, SEQOPTICS (SEQuence clustering with OPTICS) is demonstrated. The system is implemented with Smith-Waterman as protein distance measurement and OPTICS at its core to perform protein sequence clustering. SEQOPTICS is tested with four data sets from different data sources. Visualization of the sequence clustering structure is demonstrated as well. Conclusion The system was evaluated by comparison with other existing methods. Analysis of the results demonstrates that SEQOPTICS performs better based on some evaluation criteria including Jaccard coefficient, Precision, and Recall. It is a promising protein sequence clustering method with future possible improvement on parallel computing and other protein distance measurements. PMID:17217502

  4. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  5. Mining protein sequences for motifs.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Giri; Bu, Changsong; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Xuning; Xu, Ning; Mathee, Kalai

    2002-01-01

    We use methods from Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery to design an algorithm for detecting motifs in protein sequences. The algorithm assumes that a motif is constituted by the presence of a "good" combination of residues in appropriate locations of the motif. The algorithm attempts to compile such good combinations into a "pattern dictionary" by processing an aligned training set of protein sequences. The dictionary is subsequently used to detect motifs in new protein sequences. Statistical significance of the detection results are ensured by statistically determining the various parameters of the algorithm. Based on this approach, we have implemented a program called GYM. The Helix-Turn-Helix motif was used as a model system on which to test our program. The program was also extended to detect Homeodomain motifs. The detection results for the two motifs compare favorably with existing programs. In addition, the GYM program provides a lot of useful information about a given protein sequence. PMID:12487759

  6. Mercury BLASTP: Accelerating Protein Sequence Alignment.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Arpith; Lancaster, Joseph; Buhler, Jeremy; Harris, Brandon; Chamberlain, Roger D

    2008-06-01

    Large-scale protein sequence comparison is an important but compute-intensive task in molecular biology. BLASTP is the most popular tool for comparative analysis of protein sequences. In recent years, an exponential increase in the size of protein sequence databases has required either exponentially more running time or a cluster of machines to keep pace. To address this problem, we have designed and built a high-performance FPGA-accelerated version of BLASTP, Mercury BLASTP. In this paper, we describe the architecture of the portions of the application that are accelerated in the FPGA, and we also describe the integration of these FPGA-accelerated portions with the existing BLASTP software. We have implemented Mercury BLASTP on a commodity workstation with two Xilinx Virtex-II 6000 FPGAs. We show that the new design runs 11-15 times faster than software BLASTP on a modern CPU while delivering close to 99% identical results. PMID:19492068

  7. Mercury BLASTP: Accelerating Protein Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Arpith; Lancaster, Joseph; Buhler, Jeremy; Harris, Brandon; Chamberlain, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale protein sequence comparison is an important but compute-intensive task in molecular biology. BLASTP is the most popular tool for comparative analysis of protein sequences. In recent years, an exponential increase in the size of protein sequence databases has required either exponentially more running time or a cluster of machines to keep pace. To address this problem, we have designed and built a high-performance FPGA-accelerated version of BLASTP, Mercury BLASTP. In this paper, we describe the architecture of the portions of the application that are accelerated in the FPGA, and we also describe the integration of these FPGA-accelerated portions with the existing BLASTP software. We have implemented Mercury BLASTP on a commodity workstation with two Xilinx Virtex-II 6000 FPGAs. We show that the new design runs 11-15 times faster than software BLASTP on a modern CPU while delivering close to 99% identical results. PMID:19492068

  8. Spectral clustering of protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Paccanaro, Alberto; Casbon, James A.; Saqi, Mansoor A. S.

    2006-01-01

    An important problem in genomics is automatically clustering homologous proteins when only sequence information is available. Most methods for clustering proteins are local, and are based on simply thresholding a measure related to sequence distance. We first show how locality limits the performance of such methods by analysing the distribution of distances between protein sequences. We then present a global method based on spectral clustering and provide theoretical justification of why it will have a remarkable improvement over local methods. We extensively tested our method and compared its performance with other local methods on several subsets of the SCOP (Structural Classification of Proteins) database, a gold standard for protein structure classification. We consistently observed that, the number of clusters that we obtain for a given set of proteins is close to the number of superfamilies in that set; there are fewer singletons; and the method correctly groups most remote homologs. In our experiments, the quality of the clusters as quantified by a measure that combines sensitivity and specificity was consistently better [on average, improvements were 84% over hierarchical clustering, 34% over Connected Component Analysis (CCA) (similar to GeneRAGE) and 72% over another global method, TribeMCL]. PMID:16547200

  9. Sequence correlations shape protein promiscuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukatsky, David B.; Afek, Ariel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-08-01

    We predict analytically that diagonal correlations of amino acid positions within protein sequences statistically enhance protein propensity for nonspecific binding. We use the term "promiscuity" to describe such nonspecific binding. Diagonal correlations represent statistically significant repeats of sequence patterns where amino acids of the same type are clustered together. The predicted effect is qualitatively robust with respect to the form of the microscopic interaction potentials and the average amino acid composition. Our analytical results provide an explanation for the enhanced diagonal correlations observed in hubs of eukaryotic organismal proteomes [J. Mol. Biol. 409, 439 (2011)], 10.1016/j.jmb.2011.03.056. We suggest experiments that will allow direct testing of the predicted effect.

  10. Rosetta stone method for detecting protein function and protein-protein interactions from genome sequences

    DOEpatents

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Thompson, Michael J.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2002-10-15

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  11. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  12. A simple method for global sequence comparison.

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, E; Attimonelli, M; Liuni, S; Frontali, C; Saccone, C

    1992-01-01

    A simple method of sequence comparison, based on a correlation analysis of oligonucleotide frequency distributions, is here shown to be a reliable test of overall sequence similarity. The method does not involve sequence alignment procedures and permits the rapid screening of large amounts of sequence data. It identifies those sequences which deserve more careful analysis of sequence similarity at the level of resolution of the single nucleotide. It uses observed quantities only and does not involve the adoption of any theoretical model. PMID:1738591

  13. The PIR-International Protein Sequence Database.

    PubMed Central

    George, D G; Barker, W C; Mewes, H W; Pfeiffer, F; Tsugita, A

    1994-01-01

    PIR-International is an association of macromolecular sequence data collection centers dedicated to fostering international cooperation as an essential element in the development of scientific databases. A major objective of PIR-International is to continue the development of the Protein Sequence Database as an essential public resource for protein sequence information. This paper briefly describes the architecture of the Protein Sequence Database and how it and associated data sets are distributed and can be accessed electronically. PMID:7937060

  14. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, T.G.; Chang, W.I.

    1997-12-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence. 5 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for biological sequence comparison

    DOEpatents

    Marr, Thomas G.; Chang, William I-Wei

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for comparing biological sequences from a known source of sequences, with a subject (query) sequence. The apparatus takes as input a set of target similarity levels (such as evolutionary distances in units of PAM), and finds all fragments of known sequences that are similar to the subject sequence at each target similarity level, and are long enough to be statistically significant. The invention device filters out fragments from the known sequences that are too short, or have a lower average similarity to the subject sequence than is required by each target similarity level. The subject sequence is then compared only to the remaining known sequences to find the best matches. The filtering member divides the subject sequence into overlapping blocks, each block being sufficiently large to contain a minimum-length alignment from a known sequence. For each block, the filter member compares the block with every possible short fragment in the known sequences and determines a best match for each comparison. The determined set of short fragment best matches for the block provide an upper threshold on alignment values. Regions of a certain length from the known sequences that have a mean alignment value upper threshold greater than a target unit score are concatenated to form a union. The current block is compared to the union and provides an indication of best local alignment with the subject sequence.

  16. Natural protein sequences are more intrinsically disordered than random sequences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Feng; Cao, Zanxia; Yang, Yuedong; Wang, Chun-Ling; Su, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Ya-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-08-01

    Most natural protein sequences have resulted from millions or even billions of years of evolution. How they differ from random sequences is not fully understood. Previous computational and experimental studies of random proteins generated from noncoding regions yielded inclusive results due to species-dependent codon biases and GC contents. Here, we approach this problem by investigating 10,000 sequences randomized at the amino acid level. Using well-established predictors for protein intrinsic disorder, we found that natural sequences have more long disordered regions than random sequences, even when random and natural sequences have the same overall composition of amino acid residues. We also showed that random sequences are as structured as natural sequences according to contents and length distributions of predicted secondary structure, although the structures from random sequences may be in a molten globular-like state, according to molecular dynamics simulations. The bias of natural sequences toward more intrinsic disorder suggests that natural sequences are created and evolved to avoid protein aggregation and increase functional diversity. PMID:26801222

  17. A new graphical representation of protein sequences and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Wenbing; Pan, Qiuhui; He, Mingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Sequence analysis is one of the foundations in bioinformatics for the abundant information hidden in the sequences. It is helpful for scientists' study on the function of DNA, proteins and cells. In this paper, we outline a novel method for protein sequences similarity analysis based on the physical-chemical properties of amino acids. We consider the protein sequence as a rigid-body with mass. Then we introduce the moment of inertia to the calculation of similarity of sequences and the sequences are transformed into vectors by the tensor for moment of inertia. The Euclidean distance is employed as a measurement of the similarities. At last, the comparison with other references' results shows our approach is reasonable and effective.

  18. Critical assessment of sequence-based protein-protein interaction prediction methods that do not require homologous protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interactions underlie many important biological processes. Computational prediction methods can nicely complement experimental approaches for identifying protein-protein interactions. Recently, a unique category of sequence-based prediction methods has been put forward - unique in the sense that it does not require homologous protein sequences. This enables it to be universally applicable to all protein sequences unlike many of previous sequence-based prediction methods. If effective as claimed, these new sequence-based, universally applicable prediction methods would have far-reaching utilities in many areas of biology research. Results Upon close survey, I realized that many of these new methods were ill-tested. In addition, newer methods were often published without performance comparison with previous ones. Thus, it is not clear how good they are and whether there are significant performance differences among them. In this study, I have implemented and thoroughly tested 4 different methods on large-scale, non-redundant data sets. It reveals several important points. First, significant performance differences are noted among different methods. Second, data sets typically used for training prediction methods appear significantly biased, limiting the general applicability of prediction methods trained with them. Third, there is still ample room for further developments. In addition, my analysis illustrates the importance of complementary performance measures coupled with right-sized data sets for meaningful benchmark tests. Conclusions The current study reveals the potentials and limits of the new category of sequence-based protein-protein interaction prediction methods, which in turn provides a firm ground for future endeavours in this important area of contemporary bioinformatics. PMID:20003442

  19. Detecting frame shifts by amino acid sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Claverie, J M

    1993-12-20

    Various amino acid substitution scoring matrices are used in conjunction with local alignments programs to detect regions of similarity and infer potential common ancestry between proteins. The usual scoring schemes derive from the implicit hypothesis that related proteins evolve from a common ancestor by the accumulation of point mutations and that amino acids tend to be progressively substituted by others with similar properties. However, other frequent single mutation events, like nucleotide insertion or deletion and gene inversion, change the translation reading frame and cause previously encoded amino acid sequences to become unrecognizable at once. Here, I derive five new types of scoring matrix, each capable of detecting a specific frame shift (deletion, insertion and inversion in 3 frames) and use them with a regular local alignments program to detect amino acid sequences that may have derived from alternative reading frames of the same nucleotide sequence. Frame shifts are inferred from the sole comparison of the protein sequences. The five scoring matrices were used with the BLASTP program to compare all the protein sequences in the Swissprot database. Surprisingly, the searches revealed hundreds of highly significant frame shift matches, of which many are likely to represent sequencing errors. Others provide some evidence that frame shift mutations might be used in protein evolution as a way to create new amino acid sequences from pre-existing coding regions. PMID:7903399

  20. Effects of hepatitis C virus on suppressor of cytokine signaling mRNA levels: comparison between different genotypes and core protein sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Stéphanie; Clément, Sophie; Guilloux, Kévin; Conzelmann, Stéphanie; Penin, François; Negro, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Glucose metabolism disturbances, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, are frequent and important cofactors of hepatitis C. Increasing epidemiological and experimental data suggest that all major genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV), albeit to a different extent, cause insulin resistance. The HCV core protein has been shown to be sufficient to impair insulin signaling in vitro through several post-receptorial mechanisms, mostly via the activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family members and the consequent decrease of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). The levels of IRS-1 and SOCS were investigated upon expression of the core protein of HCV genotypes 1-4. Furthermore, the core protein sequences were analyzed to identify the amino acid residues responsible for IRS-1 decrease, with particular regard to SOCS mRNA deregulation. The results suggest that the activation of SOCS family members is a general mechanism associated with the common HCV genotypes. A rare genotype 1b variant, however, failed to activate any of the SOCS tested: this allowed to analyze in detail the distinct amino acid sequences responsible for SOCS deregulation. By combining approaches using intergenotypic chimeras and site-directed mutagenesis, genetic evidence was provided in favor of a role of amino acids 49 and 131 of the HCV core-encoding sequence in mediating SOCS transactivation. PMID:21503913

  1. Turning yeast sequence into protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, G. von

    1996-04-01

    The complete genome sequencing of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae leads us into a new era of potential use for such data base information. Protein engineering studies suggest that genetic selection of overproducing strains may aid the assignment of protein function. Data base management and sequencing software have been developed to scan entire genomes.

  2. Recently published protein sequences. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.; Holmquist, R.

    1972-01-01

    Some polypeptide sequences that have been published in the 1972 scientific literature are listed. Only selected sequences are included. The compilation has two objectives. Current information between periods when more comprehensive compilations are published is to be assembled and the use of data that do not include arrangements of unsequenced peptides for 'maximum homology' is to be encouraged.

  3. Fold homology detection using sequence fragment composition profiles of proteins.

    PubMed

    Solis, Armando D; Rackovsky, Shalom R

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness of sequence alignment in detecting structural homology among protein sequences decreases markedly when pairwise sequence identity is low (the so-called "twilight zone" problem of sequence alignment). Alternative sequence comparison strategies able to detect structural kinship among highly divergent sequences are necessary to address this need. Among them are alignment-free methods, which use global sequence properties (such as amino acid composition) to identify structural homology in a rapid and straightforward way. We explore the viability of using tetramer sequence fragment composition profiles in finding structural relationships that lie undetected by traditional alignment. We establish a strategy to recast any given protein sequence into a tetramer sequence fragment composition profile, using a series of amino acid clustering steps that have been optimized for mutual information. Our method has the effect of compressing the set of 160,000 unique tetramers (if using the 20-letter amino acid alphabet) into a more tractable number of reduced tetramers (approximately 15-30), so that a meaningful tetramer composition profile can be constructed. We test remote homology detection at the topology and fold superfamily levels using a comprehensive set of fold homologs, culled from the CATH database that share low pairwise sequence similarity. Using the receiver-operating characteristic measure, we demonstrate potentially significant improvement in using information-optimized reduced tetramer composition, over methods relying only on the raw amino acid composition or on traditional sequence alignment, in homology detection at or below the "twilight zone". PMID:20635424

  4. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  5. Adaptive seeds tame genomic sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M; Wan, Raymond; Sato, Kengo; Horton, Paul; Frith, Martin C

    2011-03-01

    The main way of analyzing biological sequences is by comparing and aligning them to each other. It remains difficult, however, to compare modern multi-billionbase DNA data sets. The difficulty is caused by the nonuniform (oligo)nucleotide composition of these sequences, rather than their size per se. To solve this problem, we modified the standard seed-and-extend approach (e.g., BLAST) to use adaptive seeds. Adaptive seeds are matches that are chosen based on their rareness, instead of using fixed-length matches. This method guarantees that the number of matches, and thus the running time, increases linearly, instead of quadratically, with sequence length. LAST, our open source implementation of adaptive seeds, enables fast and sensitive comparison of large sequences with arbitrarily nonuniform composition. PMID:21209072

  6. Vibrio cholerae O395 tcpA pilin gene sequence and comparison of predicted protein structural features to those of type 4 pilins.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, C E; Taylor, R K

    1990-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 expresses a pilus that is coordinately regulated with cholera toxin production and hence termed TCP, for toxin-coregulated pilus. Insertion of Tn5 IS50L::phoA (TnphoA) into the major pilin subunit gene, tcpA, has previously been shown to render the strain avirulent as a result of its inability to colonize. One such insertion was isolated and used as a probe to screen for clones containing the intact tcpA gene. The DNA sequence of tcpA was determined by using the intact gene and several tcpA-phoA gene fusions. The deduced protein sequence agreed completely with that previously determined for the TcpA N terminus and with the size of the mature pilin protein. The reported homology with N-methylphenylalanine (type 4) pilins near the N terminus was extended and shown to include components of the atypical leader peptide as well as overall predicted structural similarities in other regions of the pilins. In contrast to the modified N-terminal phenylalanine residue found in all characterized type 4 pilins, the corresponding position in tcpA contains a Met codon, thus implying that the previously uncharacterized amino acid corresponding to the N-terminal position of the mature TcpA pilin is a modified form of methionine. Except for this difference, mature TcpA has the overall predicted structural motifs shared among type 4 pilins. Images PMID:1974887

  7. Classification and identification of geminiviruses using sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Padidam, M; Beachy, R N; Fauquet, C M

    1995-02-01

    The genomes and ORFs of 36 geminiviruses were compared to obtain phylogenetic trees and frequency distributions of all possible pairwise comparisons with an objective to classify geminiviruses. Such comparisons show that geminiviruses form two distinct clusters of leafhopper-transmitted viruses that infect monocots (subgroup I) and whitefly-transmitted viruses that infect dicots (subgroup III), irrespective of the part of the genome considered. Of the two leafhopper-transmitted viruses that infect dicots, tobacco yellow dwarf virus has a sequence most similar to subgroup I viruses, and that of beet curly top virus differed depending upon the ORF considered. The distributions of identities within subgroups are significantly different suggesting that the taxonomic status of a particular isolate within a subgroup can be quantified. All the recognized strains of any one virus have greater than 90% sequence identity. It was observed that the 200 nucleotide intercistronic regions of geminiviruses are more variable than the remainder of the genome. The amino acid sequences of the coat protein (CP) of subgroup III viruses are more conserved than the remainder of the genome. However, a short N-terminal region (60-70 amino acids) of the CP is more variable than the rest of the CP sequence and is a close representation of the genome. PCR primers based on conserved sequences can be used to clone and sequence the N-terminal sequences of the CP of the geminiviruses; this sequence is sufficient to classify a virus isolate. A possible taxonomic structure for geminiviruses is proposed after considering the sequence comparisons and biological properties. PMID:7844548

  8. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Paul; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    De novo protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that composes a given protein one can determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through protein structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. Mass spectrometry is the current technique of choice for de novo sequencing, but because some amino acids have the same mass the sequence cannot be completely determined in many cases. In this paper we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting perpendicular nanochannel, similar to that proposed in for DNA sequencing. Indeed, we find that the distribution of ionic currents for each of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids encoded by eukaryotic genes is statistically distinct, showing this technique's potential for de novo protein sequencing.

  9. Protein structure prediction from sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Debora S; Hopf, Thomas A; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequences contain rich evolutionary information about functional constraints on macromolecules such as proteins. This information can be efficiently mined to detect evolutionary couplings between residues in proteins and address the long-standing challenge to compute protein three-dimensional structures from amino acid sequences. Substantial progress has recently been made on this problem owing to the explosive growth in available sequences and the application of global statistical methods. In addition to three-dimensional structure, the improved understanding of covariation may help identify functional residues involved in ligand binding, protein-complex formation and conformational changes. We expect computation of covariation patterns to complement experimental structural biology in elucidating the full spectrum of protein structures, their functional interactions and evolutionary dynamics. PMID:23138306

  10. PROCAIN: protein profile comparison with assisting information

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of remote sequence homology is essential for the accurate inference of protein structure, function and evolution. The most sensitive detection methods involve the comparison of evolutionary patterns reflected in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of protein families. We present PROCAIN, a new method for MSA comparison based on the combination of ‘vertical’ MSA context (substitution constraints at individual sequence positions) and ‘horizontal’ context (patterns of residue content at multiple positions). Based on a simple and tractable profile methodology and primitive measures for the similarity of horizontal MSA patterns, the method achieves the quality of homology detection comparable to a more complex advanced method employing hidden Markov models (HMMs) and secondary structure (SS) prediction. Adding SS information further improves PROCAIN performance beyond the capabilities of current state-of-the-art tools. The potential value of the method for structure/function predictions is illustrated by the detection of subtle homology between evolutionary distant yet structurally similar protein domains. ProCAIn, relevant databases and tools can be downloaded from: http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/download. The web server can be accessed at http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/procain.php. PMID:19357092

  11. PROCAIN: protein profile comparison with assisting information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-06-01

    Detection of remote sequence homology is essential for the accurate inference of protein structure, function and evolution. The most sensitive detection methods involve the comparison of evolutionary patterns reflected in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) of protein families. We present PROCAIN, a new method for MSA comparison based on the combination of 'vertical' MSA context (substitution constraints at individual sequence positions) and 'horizontal' context (patterns of residue content at multiple positions). Based on a simple and tractable profile methodology and primitive measures for the similarity of horizontal MSA patterns, the method achieves the quality of homology detection comparable to a more complex advanced method employing hidden Markov models (HMMs) and secondary structure (SS) prediction. Adding SS information further improves PROCAIN performance beyond the capabilities of current state-of-the-art tools. The potential value of the method for structure/function predictions is illustrated by the detection of subtle homology between evolutionary distant yet structurally similar protein domains. ProCAIn, relevant databases and tools can be downloaded from: http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/download. The web server can be accessed at http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/procain.php. PMID:19357092

  12. Sequence information signal processor for local and global string comparisons

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Waterman, Michael S.; Hunkapillar, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A sequence information signal processing integrated circuit chip designed to perform high speed calculation of a dynamic programming algorithm based upon the algorithm defined by Waterman and Smith. The signal processing chip of the present invention is designed to be a building block of a linear systolic array, the performance of which can be increased by connecting additional sequence information signal processing chips to the array. The chip provides a high speed, low cost linear array processor that can locate highly similar global sequences or segments thereof such as contiguous subsequences from two different DNA or protein sequences. The chip is implemented in a preferred embodiment using CMOS VLSI technology to provide the equivalent of about 400,000 transistors or 100,000 gates. Each chip provides 16 processing elements, and is designed to provide 16 bit, two's compliment operation for maximum score precision of between -32,768 and +32,767. It is designed to provide a comparison between sequences as long as 4,194,304 elements without external software and between sequences of unlimited numbers of elements with the aid of external software. Each sequence can be assigned different deletion and insertion weight functions. Each processor is provided with a similarity measure device which is independently variable. Thus, each processor can contribute to maximum value score calculation using a different similarity measure.

  13. The DynaMine webserver: predicting protein dynamics from sequence.

    PubMed

    Cilia, Elisa; Pancsa, Rita; Tompa, Peter; Lenaerts, Tom; Vranken, Wim F

    2014-07-01

    Protein dynamics are important for understanding protein function. Unfortunately, accurate protein dynamics information is difficult to obtain: here we present the DynaMine webserver, which provides predictions for the fast backbone movements of proteins directly from their amino-acid sequence. DynaMine rapidly produces a profile describing the statistical potential for such movements at residue-level resolution. The predicted values have meaning on an absolute scale and go beyond the traditional binary classification of residues as ordered or disordered, thus allowing for direct dynamics comparisons between protein regions. Through this webserver, we provide molecular biologists with an efficient and easy to use tool for predicting the dynamical characteristics of any protein of interest, even in the absence of experimental observations. The prediction results are visualized and can be directly downloaded. The DynaMine webserver, including instructive examples describing the meaning of the profiles, is available at http://dynamine.ibsquare.be. PMID:24728994

  14. Structural alphabets for protein structure classification: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Le, Quan; Pollastri, Gianluca; Koehl, Patrice

    2009-03-27

    Finding structural similarities between proteins often helps reveal shared functionality, which otherwise might not be detected by native sequence information alone. Such similarity is usually detected and quantified by protein structure alignment. Determining the optimal alignment between two protein structures, however, remains a hard problem. An alternative approach is to approximate each three-dimensional protein structure using a sequence of motifs derived from a structural alphabet. Using this approach, structure comparison is performed by comparing the corresponding motif sequences or structural sequences. In this article, we measure the performance of such alphabets in the context of the protein structure classification problem. We consider both local and global structural sequences. Each letter of a local structural sequence corresponds to the best matching fragment to the corresponding local segment of the protein structure. The global structural sequence is designed to generate the best possible complete chain that matches the full protein structure. We use an alphabet of 20 letters, corresponding to a library of 20 motifs or protein fragments having four residues. We show that the global structural sequences approximate well the native structures of proteins, with an average coordinate root mean square of 0.69 A over 2225 test proteins. The approximation is best for all alpha-proteins, while relatively poorer for all beta-proteins. We then test the performance of four different sequence representations of proteins (their native sequence, the sequence of their secondary-structure elements, and the local and global structural sequences based on our fragment library) with different classifiers in their ability to classify proteins that belong to five distinct folds of CATH. Without surprise, the primary sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show that addition of either secondary-structure information or local information from the

  15. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ . PMID:26503432

  16. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; Morabito, Giuseppa; Fiers, Martijn; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and network evolution. PMID

  17. The PIR-International Protein Sequence Database.

    PubMed

    George, D G; Barker, W C; Mewes, H W; Pfeiffer, F; Tsugita, A

    1996-01-01

    From its origin the Protein Sequence Database has been designed to support research and has focused on comprehensive coverage, quality control and organization of the data in accordance with biological principles. Since 1988 the database has been maintained collaboratively within the framework of PIR-International, an association of macromolecular sequence data collection centers dedicated to fostering international cooperation as an essential element in the development of scientific databases. The database is widely distributed and is available on the World Wide Web, via ftp, email server, on CD-ROM and magnetic media. It is widely redistributed and incorporated into many other protein sequence data compilations, including SWISS-PROT and the Entrez system of the NCBI. PMID:8594572

  18. Dimeric 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase gene of Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli and characterization of the protein. Structural and functional comparison with the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Methanothermus fervidus.

    PubMed

    Hess, D; Krüger, K; Knappik, A; Palm, P; Hensel, R

    1995-10-01

    The gene coding for the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) of Pyrococcus woesei was cloned and sequenced. The gene sequence comprises 1230 bp coding for a polypeptide with the theoretical M(r) of 46,195. The deduced protein sequence exhibits a high similarity (46.1% and 46.6% identity) to the other known archaeal 3-phosphoglycerate kinases of Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanothermus fervidus [Fabry, S., Heppner, P., Dietmaier, W. & Hensel, R. (1990) Gene 91, 19-25]. By comparing the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase sequences of the mesophilic and the two thermophilic Archaea, trends in thermoadaptation were confirmed that could be deduced from comparisons of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequences from the same organisms [Zwickl, P., Fabry, S., Bogedain, C., Haas, A. & Hensel, R. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 4329-4338]. With increasing temperature the average hydrophobicity and the portion of aromatic residues increases, whereas the chain flexibility as well as the content in chemically labile residues (Asn, Cys) decreases. To study the phenotypic properties of the 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from thermophilic Archaea in more detail, the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase genes from P. woesei and M. fervidus were expressed in Escherichia coli. Comparisons of kinetic and molecular properties of the enzymes from the original organisms and from E. coli indicate that the proteins expressed in the mesophilic host are folded correctly. Besides their higher thermostability according to their origin from hyperthermophilic organisms, both enzymes differ from their bacterial and eucaryotic homologues mainly in two respects. (a) The 3-phosphoglycerate kinases from P. woesei and M. fervidus are homomeric dimers in their native state contrary to all other known 3-phosphoglycerate kinases, which are monomers including the enzyme from the mesophilic Archaeum M. bryantii. (b) Monovalent cations are essential for the activity of both archaeal enzymes with K+ being significantly more

  19. Predicting protein-protein interactions based only on sequences information.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juwen; Zhang, Jian; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Yu, Kunqian; Chen, Kaixian; Li, Yixue; Jiang, Hualiang

    2007-03-13

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are central to most biological processes. Although efforts have been devoted to the development of methodology for predicting PPIs and protein interaction networks, the application of most existing methods is limited because they need information about protein homology or the interaction marks of the protein partners. In the present work, we propose a method for PPI prediction using only the information of protein sequences. This method was developed based on a learning algorithm-support vector machine combined with a kernel function and a conjoint triad feature for describing amino acids. More than 16,000 diverse PPI pairs were used to construct the universal model. The prediction ability of our approach is better than that of other sequence-based PPI prediction methods because it is able to predict PPI networks. Different types of PPI networks have been effectively mapped with our method, suggesting that, even with only sequence information, this method could be applied to the exploration of networks for any newly discovered protein with unknown biological relativity. In addition, such supplementary experimental information can enhance the prediction ability of the method. PMID:17360525

  20. Integrative visual analysis of protein sequence mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An important aspect of studying the relationship between protein sequence, structure and function is the molecular characterization of the effect of protein mutations. To understand the functional impact of amino acid changes, the multiple biological properties of protein residues have to be considered together. Results Here, we present a novel visual approach for analyzing residue mutations. It combines different biological visualizations and integrates them with molecular data derived from external resources. To show various aspects of the biological information on different scales, our approach includes one-dimensional sequence views, three-dimensional protein structure views and two-dimensional views of residue interaction networks as well as aggregated views. The views are linked tightly and synchronized to reduce the cognitive load of the user when switching between them. In particular, the protein mutations are mapped onto the views together with further functional and structural information. We also assess the impact of individual amino acid changes by the detailed analysis and visualization of the involved residue interactions. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach and the developed software on the data provided for the BioVis 2013 data contest. Conclusions Our visual approach and software greatly facilitate the integrative and interactive analysis of protein mutations based on complementary visualizations. The different data views offered to the user are enriched with information about molecular properties of amino acid residues and further biological knowledge. PMID:25237389

  1. A novel method for similarity/dissimilarity analysis of protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zengchao; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Yusen

    2013-12-01

    Sequence comparison is one of the major tasks in bioinformatics, which can be used to study structural and functional conservation, as well as evolutionary relations among the sequences. In this paper, we introduce the concept of distance frequency of amino acid pairs and propose a new numerical characterization of protein sequences, which converts any protein sequence into a distance frequency matrix. Using this distance frequency matrix, we can compare the similarity of protein sequences. In order to confirm the validity of our method, we test it with two experiments. The results show that our method is effective.

  2. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse immunoglobulin epsilon gene: comparison with the human epsilon gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, N; Ueda, S; Hayashida, H; Miyata, T; Honjo, T

    1982-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the immunoglobulin epsilon gene cloned from newborn mouse DNA. The epsilon gene sequence allows prediction of the amino acid sequence of the constant region of the epsilon chain and comparison of it with sequences of the human epsilon and other mouse immunoglobulin genes. The epsilon gene was shown to be under the weakest selection pressure at the protein level among the immunoglobulin genes although the divergence at the synonymous position is similar. Our results suggest that the epsilon gene may be dispensable, which is in accord with the fact that IgE has only obscure roles in the immune defense system but has an undesirable role as a mediator of hypersensitivity. The sequence data suggest that the human and murine epsilon genes were derived from different ancestors duplicated a long time ago. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon chain is more homologous to those of the gamma chains than the other mouse heavy chains. Two membrane exons, separated by an 80-base intron, were identified 1.7 kb 3' to the CH4 domain of the epsilon gene and shown to conserve a hydrophobic portion similar to those of other heavy chain genes. RNA blot hybridization showed that the epsilon membrane exons are transcribed into two species of mRNA in an IgE hybridoma. Images Fig. 4. PMID:6329728

  3. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  4. Benchmarking NMR experiments: A relational database of protein pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamarai, Russell R. P.; Kuprov, Ilya; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    Systematic benchmarking of multi-dimensional protein NMR experiments is a critical prerequisite for optimal allocation of NMR resources for structural analysis of challenging proteins, e.g. large proteins with limited solubility or proteins prone to aggregation. We propose a set of benchmarking parameters for essential protein NMR experiments organized into a lightweight (single XML file) relational database (RDB), which includes all the necessary auxiliaries (waveforms, decoupling sequences, calibration tables, setup algorithms and an RDB management system). The database is interfaced to the Spinach library ( http://spindynamics.org), which enables accurate simulation and benchmarking of NMR experiments on large spin systems. A key feature is the ability to use a single user-specified spin system to simulate the majority of deposited solution state NMR experiments, thus providing the (hitherto unavailable) unified framework for pulse sequence evaluation. This development enables predicting relative sensitivity of deposited implementations of NMR experiments, thus providing a basis for comparison, optimization and, eventually, automation of NMR analysis. The benchmarking is demonstrated with two proteins, of 170 amino acids I domain of αXβ2 Integrin and 440 amino acids NS3 helicase.

  5. Sequence Analysis of Scaffolding Protein CipC and ORFXp, a New Cohesin-Containing Protein in Clostridium cellulolyticum: Comparison of Various Cohesin Domains and Subcellular Localization of ORFXp

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Sandrine; Bélaïch, Anne; Fierobe, Henri-Pierre; Tardif, Chantal; Gaudin, Christian; Bélaïch, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding the scaffolding protein of the cellulosome from Clostridium cellulolyticum, whose partial sequence was published earlier (S. Pagès, A. Bélaïch, C. Tardif, C. Reverbel-Leroy, C. Gaudin, and J.-P. Bélaïch, J. Bacteriol. 178:2279–2286, 1996; C. Reverbel-Leroy, A. Bélaïch, A. Bernadac, C. Gaudin, J. P. Bélaïch, and C. Tardif, Microbiology 142:1013–1023, 1996), was completely sequenced. The corresponding protein, CipC, is composed of a cellulose binding domain at the N terminus followed by one hydrophilic domain (HD1), seven highly homologous cohesin domains (cohesin domains 1 to 7), a second hydrophilic domain, and a final cohesin domain (cohesin domain 8) which is only 57 to 60% identical to the seven other cohesin domains. In addition, a second gene located 8.89 kb downstream of cipC was found to encode a three-domain protein, called ORFXp, which includes a cohesin domain. By using antiserum raised against the latter, it was observed that ORFXp is associated with the membrane of C. cellulolyticum and is not detected in the cellulosome fraction. Western blot and BIAcore experiments indicate that cohesin domains 1 and 8 from CipC recognize the same dockerins and have similar affinity for CelA (Ka = 4.8 × 109 M−1) whereas the cohesin from ORFXp, although it is also able to bind all cellulosome components containing a dockerin, has a 19-fold lower Ka for CelA (2.6 × 108 M−1). Taken together, these data suggest that ORFXp may play a role in cellulosome assembly. PMID:10074072

  6. The Lassa fever virus L gene: nucleotide sequence, comparison, and precipitation of a predicted 250 kDa protein with monospecific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Lukashevich, Igor S.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Shapiro, Keli; Sanchez, Anthony; Ravkov, Eugene; Nichol, Stuart T.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2008-01-01

    The large (L) RNA segment of Lassa fever virus (LAS) encodes a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp or L protein). Similar to other arenaviruses, the LAS L protein is encoded on the genome-complementary strand and is predicted to be 2218 amino acids in length (253 kDa). It has an unusually large non-coding region adjacent to its translation start site. The LAS L protein contains six motifs of conserved amino acids that have been found among arenavirus L proteins and core RdRp of other segmented negative-stranded (SNS) viruses (Arena-, Bunya- and Orthomyxoviridae). Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRp of 20 SNS viruses reveals that arenavirus L proteins represent a distinct cluster divided into LAS–lymphocytic choriomeningitis and Tacaribe–Pichinde virus lineages. Monospecific serum against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the most conserved central domain precipitates a 250 kDa product from LAS and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected cells. PMID:9049403

  7. Algorithm, applications and evaluation for protein comparison by Ramanujan Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Jiasong; Hua, Wei; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2015-12-01

    The amino acid sequence of a protein determines its chemical properties, chain conformation and biological functions. Protein sequence comparison is of great importance to identify similarities of protein structures and infer their functions. Many properties of a protein correspond to the low-frequency signals within the sequence. Low frequency modes in protein sequences are linked to the secondary structures, membrane protein types, and sub-cellular localizations of the proteins. In this paper, we present Ramanujan Fourier transform (RFT) with a fast algorithm to analyze the low-frequency signals of protein sequences. The RFT method is applied to similarity analysis of protein sequences with the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM). The results show that the proposed fast RFT method on protein comparison is more efficient than commonly used discrete Fourier transform (DFT). RFT can detect common frequencies as significant feature for specific protein families, and the RFT spectrum heat-map of protein sequences demonstrates the information conservation in the sequence comparison. The proposed method offers a new tool for pattern recognition, feature extraction and structural analysis on protein sequences. PMID:26325081

  8. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein–protein and gene–gene interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Motivations Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein–protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene–gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. Results In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile–sequence comparison, profile–profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. PMID:26370280

  9. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  10. PROCAIN server for remote protein sequence similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Sensitive and accurate detection of distant protein homology is essential for the studies of protein structure, function and evolution. We recently developed PROCAIN, a method that is based on sequence profile comparison and involves the analysis of four signals—similarities of residue content at the profile positions combined with three types of assisting information: sequence motifs, residue conservation and predicted secondary structure. Here we present the PROCAIN web server that allows the user to submit a query sequence or multiple sequence alignment and perform the search in a profile database of choice. The output is structured similar to that of BLAST, with the list of detected homologs sorted by E-value and followed by profile–profile alignments. The front page allows the user to adjust multiple options of input processing and output formatting, as well as search settings, including the relative weights assigned to the three types of assisting information. Availability: http://prodata.swmed.edu/procain/ Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu PMID:19497935

  11. Complete VAX/VMS DNA/protein sequence analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.W.

    1987-05-01

    A complete yet flexible system of programs and database libraries for analysis of DNA, RNA and protein sequences is implemented for VAX/VMS computers. Types of analysis include 1) construction and analysis of chimeric sequences (cloning in the VAX), 2) multiple analysis of one or more single sequences, 3) search and comparison studies using sequence libraries, and 4) direct input and analysis of experimental data. Published groups of programs, including the Staden, Los Alamos, Zuker, Pearson, and PHYLIP programs, are used. GenBank and EMBL DNA libraries and PIR and Doolittle NEWAT protein libraries are available, with associated programs. The system is tutorial, with online documentation for relevent VAX software, the programs, and the databases. The complete documentation is flexibly maintained on reserve via computer printout placed in 3-ring binders. Command files are used extensively; porting of the entire system to another VAX/VMS system requires modification of a single command. Users of the system are members of a VAX group, with automatic implementation of the system upon login. The present system occupies about 140,000 blocks, and is easily expanded, or contracted, as desired. The UCSD system is used extensively for both teaching and research purposes. Use of microcomputers emulating Tektronix 4014 graphics terminals permits saving of graphics output to disk for subsequent modification to generate high quality publishable figures.

  12. Comparison of non-sequential sets of protein residues.

    PubMed

    Garma, Leonardo D; Juffer, André H

    2016-04-01

    A methodology for performing sequence-free comparison of functional sites in protein structures is introduced. The method is based on a new notion of similarity among superimposed groups of amino acid residues that evaluates both geometry and physico-chemical properties. The method is specifically designed to handle disconnected and sparsely distributed sets of residues. A genetic algorithm is employed to find the superimposition of protein segments that maximizes their similarity. The method was evaluated by performing an all-to-all comparison on two separate sets of ligand-binding sites, comprising 47 protein-FAD (Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide) and 64 protein-NAD (Nicotinamide-Adenine Dinucleotide) complexes, and comparing the results with those of an existing sequence-based structural alignment tool (TM-Align). The quality of the two methodologies is judged by the methods' capacity to, among other, correctly predict the similarities in the protein-ligand contact patterns of each pair of binding sites. The results show that using a sequence-free method significantly improves over the sequence-based one, resulting in 23 significant binding-site homologies being detected by the new method but ignored by the sequence-based one. PMID:26773655

  13. Integrated visual analysis of protein structures, sequences, and feature data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular mechanisms that give rise to a protein's function, biologists often need to (i) find and access all related atomic-resolution 3D structures, and (ii) map sequence-based features (e.g., domains, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, post-translational modifications) onto these structures. Results To streamline these processes we recently developed Aquaria, a resource offering unprecedented access to protein structure information based on an all-against-all comparison of SwissProt and PDB sequences. In this work, we provide a requirements analysis for several frequently occuring tasks in molecular biology and describe how design choices in Aquaria meet these requirements. Finally, we show how the interface can be used to explore features of a protein and gain biologically meaningful insights in two case studies conducted by domain experts. Conclusions The user interface design of Aquaria enables biologists to gain unprecedented access to molecular structures and simplifies the generation of insight. The tasks involved in mapping sequence features onto structures can be conducted easier and faster using Aquaria. PMID:26329268

  14. DNA Sequencing Using an Engineered Protein Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Jens H.

    2010-03-01

    Inexpensive and fast sequencing of DNA is of paramount importance to medicine, the life sciences and to many other applications. Because of the nanometer diameter of DNA a nanometer-scale reader directly interfaced to macroscopic observables seems particularly attractive. We are working on a new single molecule technique based on a biological pore embedded in a lipid bilayer. When a voltage is applied across the bilayer an ion current is measured that flows through the nanometer opening of the pore. Poly-negatively charged single stranded DNA passes through the pore and reduces the ion current with the remaining ion current being indicative of the nucleotide type in the constriction of the pore. The protein pore that we introduced to the field, MspA, has a shape ideally suited to nanopore sequencing, has robustness comparable to solid state devices, is easily reproduced with sub-nanometer level precision and is engineerable using genetic mutations. I will present proof-of-principle data showing that this technique can lead to a direct very inexpensive and fast sequencing technology. The experimental electronic signatures of the DNA translocation process provide an ideal test bed for molecular dynamics simulations, which in turn allows developing intuition and prediction of nanoscale dynamics.

  15. Comparison of Next-Generation Sequencing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Li, Yinhu; Li, Siliang; Hu, Ni; He, Yimin; Pong, Ray; Lin, Danni; Lu, Lihua; Law, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    With fast development and wide applications of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, genomic sequence information is within reach to aid the achievement of goals to decode life mysteries, make better crops, detect pathogens, and improve life qualities. NGS systems are typically represented by SOLiD/Ion Torrent PGM from Life Sciences, Genome Analyzer/HiSeq 2000/MiSeq from Illumina, and GS FLX Titanium/GS Junior from Roche. Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI), which possesses the world's biggest sequencing capacity, has multiple NGS systems including 137 HiSeq 2000, 27 SOLiD, one Ion Torrent PGM, one MiSeq, and one 454 sequencer. We have accumulated extensive experience in sample handling, sequencing, and bioinformatics analysis. In this paper, technologies of these systems are reviewed, and first-hand data from extensive experience is summarized and analyzed to discuss the advantages and specifics associated with each sequencing system. At last, applications of NGS are summarized. PMID:22829749

  16. RCARE: RNA Sequence Comparison and Annotation for RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The post-transcriptional sequence modification of transcripts through RNA editing is an important mechanism for regulating protein function and is associated with human disease phenotypes. The identification of RNA editing or RNA-DNA difference (RDD) sites is a fundamental step in the study of RNA editing. However, a substantial number of false-positive RDD sites have been identified recently. A major challenge in identifying RDD sites is to distinguish between the true RNA editing sites and the false positives. Furthermore, determining the location of condition-specific RDD sites and elucidating their functional roles will help toward understanding various biological phenomena that are mediated by RNA editing. The present study developed RNA-sequence comparison and annotation for RNA editing (RCARE) for searching, annotating, and visualizing RDD sites using thousands of previously known editing sites, which can be used for comparative analyses between multiple samples. RCARE also provides evidence for improving the reliability of identified RDD sites. RCARE is a web-based comparison, annotation, and visualization tool, which provides rich biological annotations and useful summary plots. The developers of previous tools that identify or annotate RNA-editing sites seldom mention the reliability of their respective tools. In order to address the issue, RCARE utilizes a number of scientific publications and databases to find specific documentations respective to a particular RNA-editing site, which generates evidence levels to convey the reliability of RCARE. Sequence-based alignment files can be converted into VCF files using a Python script and uploaded to the RCARE server for further analysis. RCARE is available for free at http://www.snubi.org/software/rcare/. PMID:26043858

  17. Similarity/Dissimilarity Analysis of Protein Sequences Based on a New Spectrum-Like Graphical Representation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuhua; Yan, Shoujiang; Xu, Huimin; Han, Jianning; Nan, Xuying; He, Ping-an; Dai, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Sequence comparison is one of the foundations in bioinformatics, which can be used to study evolutionary relations among the sequences. In this study, a 2D spectrum-like graphical representation of protein sequences is presented based on the hydrophobicity scale of amino acids. The frequencies of amplitudes of 4-subsequences are adopted to characterize a spectrum-like graph, and a 17D vector is used as the descriptor of protein sequence. The χ2 value of compatibility test is performed. New similarity analysis approach is illustrated on the all protein sequences, which are encoded by the mitochondrion genome of 20 different species. Finally, comparison with the ClustalW method shows the utility of our method. PMID:25002811

  18. Partner-Aware Prediction of Interacting Residues in Protein-Protein Complexes from Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shandar; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Computational prediction of residues that participate in protein-protein interactions is a difficult task, and state of the art methods have shown only limited success in this arena. One possible problem with these methods is that they try to predict interacting residues without incorporating information about the partner protein, although it is unclear how much partner information could enhance prediction performance. To address this issue, the two following comparisons are of crucial significance: (a) comparison between the predictability of inter-protein residue pairs, i.e., predicting exactly which residue pairs interact with each other given two protein sequences; this can be achieved by either combining conventional single-protein predictions or making predictions using a new model trained directly on the residue pairs, and the performance of these two approaches may be compared: (b) comparison between the predictability of the interacting residues in a single protein (irrespective of the partner residue or protein) from conventional methods and predictions converted from the pair-wise trained model. Using these two streams of training and validation procedures and employing similar two-stage neural networks, we showed that the models trained on pair-wise contacts outperformed the partner-unaware models in predicting both interacting pairs and interacting single-protein residues. Prediction performance decreased with the size of the conformational change upon complex formation; this trend is similar to docking, even though no structural information was used in our prediction. An example application that predicts two partner-specific interfaces of a protein was shown to be effective, highlighting the potential of the proposed approach. Finally, a preliminary attempt was made to score docking decoy poses using prediction of interacting residue pairs; this analysis produced an encouraging result. PMID:22194998

  19. Size dependent complexity of sequences in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, W.

    2005-10-01

    The size dependent complexity of protein sequences in various families in the FSSP database is characterized by sequence entropy, sequence similarity and sequence identity. As the average length Lf of sequences in the family increases, an increasing trend of the sequence entropy and a decreasing trend of the sequence similarity and sequence identity are found. As Lf increases beyond 250, a saturation of the sequence entropy, the sequence similarity and the sequence identity is observed. Such a saturated behavior of complexity is attributed to the saturation of the probability Pg of global (long-range) interactions in protein structures when Lf >250. It is also found that the alphabet size of residue types describing the sequence diversity depends on the value of Lf, and becomes saturated at 12.

  20. Rapid automatic detection and alignment of repeats in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Heger, A; Holm, L

    2000-11-01

    Many large proteins have evolved by internal duplication and many internal sequence repeats correspond to functional and structural units. We have developed an automatic algorithm, RADAR, for segmenting a query sequence into repeats. The segmentation procedure has three steps: (i) repeat length is determined by the spacing between suboptimal self-alignment traces; (ii) repeat borders are optimized to yield a maximal integer number of repeats, and (iii) distant repeats are validated by iterative profile alignment. The method identifies short composition biased as well as gapped approximate repeats and complex repeat architectures involving many different types of repeats in the query sequence. No manual intervention and no prior assumptions on the number and length of repeats are required. Comparison to the Pfam-A database indicates good coverage, accurate alignments, and reasonable repeat borders. Screening the Swissprot database revealed 3,000 repeats not annotated in existing domain databases. A number of these repeats had been described in the literature but most were novel. This illustrates how in times when curated databases grapple with ever increasing backlogs, automatic (re)analysis of sequences provides an efficient way to capture this important information. PMID:10966575

  1. Visualizing and Clustering Protein Similarity Networks: Sequences, Structures, and Functions.

    PubMed

    Mai, Te-Lun; Hu, Geng-Ming; Chen, Chi-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Research in the recent decade has demonstrated the usefulness of protein network knowledge in furthering the study of molecular evolution of proteins, understanding the robustness of cells to perturbation, and annotating new protein functions. In this study, we aimed to provide a general clustering approach to visualize the sequence-structure-function relationship of protein networks, and investigate possible causes for inconsistency in the protein classifications based on sequences, structures, and functions. Such visualization of protein networks could facilitate our understanding of the overall relationship among proteins and help researchers comprehend various protein databases. As a demonstration, we clustered 1437 enzymes by their sequences and structures using the minimum span clustering (MSC) method. The general structure of this protein network was delineated at two clustering resolutions, and the second level MSC clustering was found to be highly similar to existing enzyme classifications. The clustering of these enzymes based on sequence, structure, and function information is consistent with each other. For proteases, the Jaccard's similarity coefficient is 0.86 between sequence and function classifications, 0.82 between sequence and structure classifications, and 0.78 between structure and function classifications. From our clustering results, we discussed possible examples of divergent evolution and convergent evolution of enzymes. Our clustering approach provides a panoramic view of the sequence-structure-function network of proteins, helps visualize the relation between related proteins intuitively, and is useful in predicting the structure and function of newly determined protein sequences. PMID:27267620

  2. Sequence comparison via polar coordinates representation and curve tree.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Guo, Xiaodong; Li, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Sequence comparison has become one of the essential bioinformatics tools in bioinformatics research, which could serve as evidence of structural and functional conservation, as well as of evolutionary relations among the sequences. Existing graphical representation methods have achieved promising results in sequence comparison, but there are some design challenges with the graphical representations and feature-based measures. We reported here a new method for sequence comparison. It considers whole distribution of dual bases and employs polar coordinates method to map a biological sequence into a closed curve. The curve tree was then constructed to numerically characterize the closed curve of biological sequences, and further compared biological sequences by evaluating the distance of the curve tree of the query sequence matching against a corresponding curve tree of the template sequence. The proposed method was tested by phylogenetic analysis, and its performance was further compared with alignment-based methods. The results demonstrate that using polar coordinates representation and curve tree to compare sequences is more efficient. PMID:22001081

  3. PDNAsite: Identification of DNA-binding Site from Protein Sequence by Incorporating Spatial and Sequence Context

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiyun; Xu, Ruifeng; He, Yulan; Lu, Qin; Wang, Hongpeng; Kong, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many fundamental biological processes essential for cellular function. Most of the existing computational approaches employed only the sequence context of the target residue for its prediction. In the present study, for each target residue, we applied both the spatial context and the sequence context to construct the feature space. Subsequently, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) was applied to remove the redundancies in the feature space. Finally, a predictor (PDNAsite) was developed through the integration of the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and ensemble learning. Results on the PDNA-62 and the PDNA-224 datasets demonstrate that features extracted from spatial context provide more information than those from sequence context and the combination of them gives more performance gain. An analysis of the number of binding sites in the spatial context of the target site indicates that the interactions between binding sites next to each other are important for protein-DNA recognition and their binding ability. The comparison between our proposed PDNAsite method and the existing methods indicate that PDNAsite outperforms most of the existing methods and is a useful tool for DNA-binding site identification. A web-server of our predictor (http://hlt.hitsz.edu.cn:8080/PDNAsite/) is made available for free public accessible to the biological research community. PMID:27282833

  4. PDNAsite: Identification of DNA-binding Site from Protein Sequence by Incorporating Spatial and Sequence Context.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyun; Xu, Ruifeng; He, Yulan; Lu, Qin; Wang, Hongpeng; Kong, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many fundamental biological processes essential for cellular function. Most of the existing computational approaches employed only the sequence context of the target residue for its prediction. In the present study, for each target residue, we applied both the spatial context and the sequence context to construct the feature space. Subsequently, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) was applied to remove the redundancies in the feature space. Finally, a predictor (PDNAsite) was developed through the integration of the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and ensemble learning. Results on the PDNA-62 and the PDNA-224 datasets demonstrate that features extracted from spatial context provide more information than those from sequence context and the combination of them gives more performance gain. An analysis of the number of binding sites in the spatial context of the target site indicates that the interactions between binding sites next to each other are important for protein-DNA recognition and their binding ability. The comparison between our proposed PDNAsite method and the existing methods indicate that PDNAsite outperforms most of the existing methods and is a useful tool for DNA-binding site identification. A web-server of our predictor (http://hlt.hitsz.edu.cn:8080/PDNAsite/) is made available for free public accessible to the biological research community. PMID:27282833

  5. The influence of protein coding sequences on protein folding rates of all-β proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui Fang; Li, Hong

    2011-06-01

    It is currently believed that the protein folding rate is related to the protein structures and its amino acid sequence. However, few studies have been done on the problem that whether the protein folding rate is influenced by its corresponding mRNA sequence. In this paper, we analyzed the possible relationship between the protein folding rates and the corresponding mRNA sequences. The content of guanine and cytosine (GC content) of palindromes in protein coding sequence was introduced as a new parameter and added in the Gromiha's model of predicting protein folding rates to inspect its effect in protein folding process. The multiple linear regression analysis and jack-knife test show that the new parameter is significant. The linear correlation coefficient between the experimental and the predicted values of the protein folding rates increased significantly from 0.96 to 0.99, and the population variance decreased from 0.50 to 0.24 compared with Gromiha's results. The results show that the GC content of palindromes in the corresponding protein coding sequence really influences the protein folding rate. Further analysis indicates that this kind of effect mostly comes from the synonymous codon usage and from the information of palindrome structure itself, but not from the translation information from codons to amino acids. PMID:21613670

  6. Proteins: sequence to structure and function--current status.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Sandhya R; Jayaram, B

    2010-11-01

    In an era that has been dominated by Structural Biology for the last 30-40 years, a dramatic change of focus towards sequence analysis has spurred the advent of the genome projects and the resultant diverging sequence/structure deficit. The central challenge of Computational Structural Biology is therefore to rationalize the mass of sequence information into biochemical and biophysical knowledge and to decipher the structural, functional and evolutionary clues encoded in the language of biological sequences. In investigating the meaning of sequences, two distinct analytical themes have emerged: in the first approach, pattern recognition techniques are used to detect similarity between sequences and hence to infer related structures and functions; in the second ab initio prediction methods are used to deduce 3D structure, and ultimately to infer function, directly from the linear sequence. In this article, we attempt to provide a critical assessment of what one may and may not expect from the biological sequences and to identify major issues yet to be resolved. The presentation is organized under several subtitles like protein sequences, pattern recognition techniques, protein tertiary structure prediction, membrane protein bioinformatics, human proteome, protein-protein interactions, metabolic networks, potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties, disordered proteins, the sequence-structure relationship and chemical logic of protein sequences. PMID:20887265

  7. Selection and sequence analysis of a cDNA clone encoding a known chorion protein of the A family.

    PubMed Central

    Tsitilou, S G; Regier, J C; Kafatos, F C

    1980-01-01

    Using as criteria the size, abundance and developmental specificity of hybridizing mRNA sequences, we have selected from our chorion cDNA library a clone corresponding to a specific chorion protein, A4--cl. Comparison between the clone sequence and the largely known sequence of A4--cl validates the use of the cDNA library for sequence analysis of the chorion multigene families. The two major chorion protein families, A and B, share certain structural similarities. Images PMID:7433133

  8. Recognition of Yeast Species from Gene Sequence Comparisons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review discusses recognition of yeast species from gene sequence comparisons, which have been responsible for doubling the number of known yeasts over the past decade. The resolution provided by various single gene sequences is examined for both ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species, and th...

  9. Protein Sequence Annotation Tool (PSAT): A centralized web-based meta-server for high-throughput sequence annotations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leung, Elo; Huang, Amy; Cadag, Eithon; Montana, Aldrin; Soliman, Jan Lorenz; Zhou, Carol L. Ecale

    2016-01-20

    In this study, we introduce the Protein Sequence Annotation Tool (PSAT), a web-based, sequence annotation meta-server for performing integrated, high-throughput, genome-wide sequence analyses. Our goals in building PSAT were to (1) create an extensible platform for integration of multiple sequence-based bioinformatics tools, (2) enable functional annotations and enzyme predictions over large input protein fasta data sets, and (3) provide a web interface for convenient execution of the tools. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of PSAT by annotating the predicted peptide gene products of Herbaspirillum sp. strain RV1423, importing the results of PSAT into EC2KEGG, and using the resultingmore » functional comparisons to identify a putative catabolic pathway, thereby distinguishing RV1423 from a well annotated Herbaspirillum species. This analysis demonstrates that high-throughput enzyme predictions, provided by PSAT processing, can be used to identify metabolic potential in an otherwise poorly annotated genome. Lastly, PSAT is a meta server that combines the results from several sequence-based annotation and function prediction codes, and is available at http://psat.llnl.gov/psat/. PSAT stands apart from other sequencebased genome annotation systems in providing a high-throughput platform for rapid de novo enzyme predictions and sequence annotations over large input protein sequence data sets in FASTA. PSAT is most appropriately applied in annotation of large protein FASTA sets that may or may not be associated with a single genome.« less

  10. The bioinformatics of nucleotide sequence coding for proteins requiring metal coenzymes and proteins embedded with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Cheung, E.; Holden, T.; Sullivan, R.; Nguyen, A.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    All metallo-proteins need post-translation metal incorporation. In fact, the isotope ratio of Fe, Cu, and Zn in physiology and oncology have emerged as an important tool. The nickel containing F430 is the prosthetic group of the enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase which catalyzes the release of methane in the final step of methano-genesis, a prime energy metabolism candidate for life exploration space mission in the solar system. The 3.5 Gyr early life sulfite reductase as a life switch energy metabolism had Fe-Mo clusters. The nitrogenase for nitrogen fixation 3 billion years ago had Mo. The early life arsenite oxidase needed for anoxygenic photosynthesis energy metabolism 2.8 billion years ago had Mo and Fe. The selection pressure in metal incorporation inside a protein would be quantifiable in terms of the related nucleotide sequence complexity with fractal dimension and entropy values. Simulation model showed that the studied metal-required energy metabolism sequences had at least ten times more selection pressure relatively in comparison to the horizontal transferred sequences in Mealybug, guided by the outcome histogram of the correlation R-sq values. The metal energy metabolism sequence group was compared to the circadian clock KaiC sequence group using magnesium atomic level bond shifting mechanism in the protein, and the simulation model would suggest a much higher selection pressure for the energy life switch sequence group. The possibility of using Kepler 444 as an example of ancient life in Galaxy with the associated exoplanets has been proposed and is further discussed in this report. Examples of arsenic metal bonding shift probed by Synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopy data and Zn controlled FOXP2 regulated pathways in human and chimp brain studied tissue samples are studied in relationship to the sequence bioinformatics. The analysis results suggest that relatively large metal bonding shift amount is associated with low probability correlation R

  11. Functional proteins from a random-sequence library

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Anthony D; Szostak, Jack W.

    2015-01-01

    Functional primordial proteins presumably originated from random sequences, but it is not known how frequently functional, or even folded, proteins occur in collections of random sequences. Here we have used in vitro selection of messenger RNA displayed proteins, in which each protein is covalently linked through its carboxy terminus to the 3′ end of its encoding mRNA1, to sample a large number of distinct random sequences. Starting from a library of 6 × 1012 proteins each containing 80 contiguous random amino acids, we selected functional proteins by enriching for those that bind to ATP. This selection yielded four new ATP-binding proteins that appear to be unrelated to each other or to anything found in the current databases of biological proteins. The frequency of occurrence of functional proteins in random-sequence libraries appears to be similar to that observed for equivalent RNA libraries2,3. PMID:11287961

  12. PSSARD: protein sequence-structure analysis relational database.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Kunchur; Srikanth, K; Babu, A V N

    2005-09-15

    We have implemented a relational database comprising a representative dataset of amino acid sequences and their associated secondary structure. The representative amino acid sequences were selected according to the PDB_SELECT program by choosing proteins corresponding to protein crystal structure data deposited in the protein data bank that share less than 25% overall pair-wise sequence identity. The secondary structure was extracted from the protein data bank website. The information content in the database includes the protein description, PDB code, crystal structure resolution, total number of amino acid residues in the protein chain, amino acid sequence, secondary structure conformation and its summary. The database is freely accessible from the website mentioned below and is useful to query on any of the above fields. The database is particularly useful to quickly retrieve amino acid sequences that are compatible to any super-secondary structure conformation from several proteins simultaneously. PMID:16054209

  13. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  14. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  15. Genomic Sequence Comparisons, 1987-2003 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Church

    2004-07-29

    This project was to develop new DNA sequencing and RNA and protein quantitation methods and related genome annotation tools. The project began in 1987 with the development of multiplex sequencing (published in Science in 1988), and one of the first automated sequencing methods. This lead to the first commercial genome sequence in 1994 and to the establishment of the main commercial participants (GTC then Agencourt) in the public DOE/NIH genome project. In collaboration with GTC we contributed to one of the first complete DOE genome sequences, in 1997, that of Methanobacterium thermoautotropicum, a species of great relevance to energy-rich gas production.

  16. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing has a promise to discover the protein post-translation modifications; however, such approach is still in their infancy and not widely applied for proteomics practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for discovery of protein modifications through identification of the UStags (Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry for peptides and polypeptides in a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were filtered to define a more limited set of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags’ prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer the possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances of yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. Random matching of the de novo sequences to the predicted sequences were examined with use of two random (false) databases, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity are described. The de novo-UStag complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling discovery of new protein modifications.

  17. Orpinomyces cellulase celf protein and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, Lars G.

    2000-09-05

    A cDNA (1,520 bp), designated celF, consisting of an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide (CelF) of 432 amino acids was isolated from a cDNA library of the anaerobic rumen fungus Orpinomyces PC-2 constructed in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed that starting from the N-terminus, CelF consists of a signal peptide, a cellulose binding domain (CBD) followed by an extremely Asn-rich linker region which separate the CBD and the catalytic domains. The latter is located at the C-terminus. The catalytic domain of CelF is highly homologous to CelA and CelC of Orpinomyces PC-2, to CelA of Neocallimastix patriciarum and also to cellobiohydrolase IIs (CBHIIs) from aerobic fungi. However, Like CelA of Neocallimastix patriciarum, CelF does not have the noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD) found in CelA and CelC from the same organism. The recombinant protein CelF hydrolyzes cellooligosaccharides in the pattern of CBHII, yielding only cellobiose as product with cellotetraose as the substrate. The genomic celF is interrupted by a 111 bp intron, located within the region coding for the CBD. The intron of the celF has features in common with genes from aerobic filamentous fungi.

  18. MESSA: MEta-Server for protein Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational sequence analysis, that is, prediction of local sequence properties, homologs, spatial structure and function from the sequence of a protein, offers an efficient way to obtain needed information about proteins under study. Since reliable prediction is usually based on the consensus of many computer programs, meta-severs have been developed to fit such needs. Most meta-servers focus on one aspect of sequence analysis, while others incorporate more information, such as PredictProtein for local sequence feature predictions, SMART for domain architecture and sequence motif annotation, and GeneSilico for secondary and spatial structure prediction. However, as predictions of local sequence properties, three-dimensional structure and function are usually intertwined, it is beneficial to address them together. Results We developed a MEta-Server for protein Sequence Analysis (MESSA) to facilitate comprehensive protein sequence analysis and gather structural and functional predictions for a protein of interest. For an input sequence, the server exploits a number of select tools to predict local sequence properties, such as secondary structure, structurally disordered regions, coiled coils, signal peptides and transmembrane helices; detect homologous proteins and assign the query to a protein family; identify three-dimensional structure templates and generate structure models; and provide predictive statements about the protein's function, including functional annotations, Gene Ontology terms, enzyme classification and possible functionally associated proteins. We tested MESSA on the proteome of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Manual curation shows that three-dimensional structure models generated by MESSA covered around 75% of all the residues in this proteome and the function of 80% of all proteins could be predicted. Availability MESSA is free for non-commercial use at http://prodata.swmed.edu/MESSA/ PMID:23031578

  19. Prediction of Protein Structural Classes for Low-Similarity Sequences Based on Consensus Sequence and Segmented PSSM

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences is useful for understanding fold patterns, regulation, functions, and interactions of proteins. It is well known that feature extraction is significant to prediction of protein structural class and it mainly uses protein primary sequence, predicted secondary structure sequence, and position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM). Currently, prediction solely based on the PSSM has played a key role in improving the prediction accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel method called CSP-SegPseP-SegACP by fusing consensus sequence (CS), segmented PsePSSM, and segmented autocovariance transformation (ACT) based on PSSM. Three widely used low-similarity datasets (1189, 25PDB, and 640) are adopted in this paper. Then a 700-dimensional (700D) feature vector is constructed and the dimension is decreased to 224D by using principal component analysis (PCA). To verify the performance of our method, rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on 1189, 25PDB, and 640 datasets. Comparison of our results with the existing PSSM-based methods demonstrates that our method achieves the favorable and competitive performance. This will offer an important complementary to other PSSM-based methods for prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences. PMID:26788119

  20. Prediction of Protein Structural Classes for Low-Similarity Sequences Based on Consensus Sequence and Segmented PSSM.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yunyun; Liu, Sanyang; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences is useful for understanding fold patterns, regulation, functions, and interactions of proteins. It is well known that feature extraction is significant to prediction of protein structural class and it mainly uses protein primary sequence, predicted secondary structure sequence, and position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM). Currently, prediction solely based on the PSSM has played a key role in improving the prediction accuracy. In this paper, we propose a novel method called CSP-SegPseP-SegACP by fusing consensus sequence (CS), segmented PsePSSM, and segmented autocovariance transformation (ACT) based on PSSM. Three widely used low-similarity datasets (1189, 25PDB, and 640) are adopted in this paper. Then a 700-dimensional (700D) feature vector is constructed and the dimension is decreased to 224D by using principal component analysis (PCA). To verify the performance of our method, rigorous jackknife cross-validation tests are performed on 1189, 25PDB, and 640 datasets. Comparison of our results with the existing PSSM-based methods demonstrates that our method achieves the favorable and competitive performance. This will offer an important complementary to other PSSM-based methods for prediction of protein structural classes for low-similarity sequences. PMID:26788119

  1. EVEREST: automatic identification and classification of protein domains in all protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Portugaly, Elon; Harel, Amir; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Background Proteins are comprised of one or several building blocks, known as domains. Such domains can be classified into families according to their evolutionary origin. Whereas sequencing technologies have advanced immensely in recent years, there are no matching computational methodologies for large-scale determination of protein domains and their boundaries. We provide and rigorously evaluate a novel set of domain families that is automatically generated from sequence data. Our domain family identification process, called EVEREST (EVolutionary Ensembles of REcurrent SegmenTs), begins by constructing a library of protein segments that emerge in an all vs. all pairwise sequence comparison. It then proceeds to cluster these segments into putative domain families. The selection of the best putative families is done using machine learning techniques. A statistical model is then created for each of the chosen families. This procedure is then iterated: the aforementioned statistical models are used to scan all protein sequences, to recreate a library of segments and to cluster them again. Results Processing the Swiss-Prot section of the UniProt Knoledgebase, release 7.2, EVEREST defines 20,230 domains, covering 85% of the amino acids of the Swiss-Prot database. EVEREST annotates 11,852 proteins (6% of the database) that are not annotated by Pfam A. In addition, in 43,086 proteins (20% of the database), EVEREST annotates a part of the protein that is not annotated by Pfam A. Performance tests show that EVEREST recovers 56% of Pfam A families and 63% of SCOP families with high accuracy, and suggests previously unknown domain families with at least 51% fidelity. EVEREST domains are often a combination of domains as defined by Pfam or SCOP and are frequently sub-domains of such domains. Conclusion The EVEREST process and its output domain families provide an exhaustive and validated view of the protein domain world that is automatically generated from sequence data. The

  2. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank: current status.

    PubMed Central

    Bairoch, A; Boeckmann, B

    1994-01-01

    SWISS-PROT is an annotated protein sequence database established in 1986 and maintained collaboratively, since 1988, by the Department of Medical Biochemistry of the University of Geneva and the EMBL Data Library. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank consist of sequence entries. Sequence entries are composed of different lines types, each with their own format. For standardization purposes the format of SWISS-PROT follows as closely as possible that of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database. A sample SWISS-PROT entry is shown in Figure 1. PMID:7937062

  3. An algorithm to find all palindromic sequences in proteins.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, N; Vaishnavi, M Kirti; Sekar, K

    2013-03-01

    A palindrome is a set of characters that reads the same forwards and backwards. Since the discovery of palindromic peptide sequences two decades ago, little effort has been made to understand its structural, functional and evolutionary significance. Therefore, in view of this, an algorithm has been developed to identify all perfect palindromes (excluding the palindromic subset and tandem repeats) in a single protein sequence. The proposed algorithm does not impose any restriction on the number of residues to be given in the input sequence. This avant-garde algorithm will aid in the identification of palindromic peptide sequences of varying lengths in a single protein sequence. PMID:23385825

  4. Fold Recognition Using Sequence Fingerprints of Protein Local Substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kryshtafovych, A A; Hvidsten, T; Komorowski, J; Fidelis, K

    2003-06-04

    A protein local substructure (descriptor) is a set of several short non-overlapping fragments of the polypeptide chain. Each descriptor describes local environment of a particular residue and includes only those segments that are located in the proximity of this residue. Similar descriptors from the representative set of proteins were analyzed to reveal links between the substructures and sequences of their segments. Using detected sequence-based fingerprints specific geometrical conformations are assigned to new sequences. The ability of the approach to recognize correct SCOP folds was tested on 273 sequences from the 49 most popular folds. Good predictions were obtained in 85% of cases. No performance drop was observed with decreasing sequence similarity between target sequences and sequences from the training set of proteins.

  5. Comparison of protein structures using 3D profile alignment.

    PubMed

    Suyama, M; Matsuo, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1997-01-01

    A novel method for protein structure comparison using 3D profile alignment is presented. The 3D profile is a position-dependent scoring matrix derived from three-dimensional structures and is basically used to estimate sequence-structure compatibility for prediction of protein structure. Our idea is to compare two 3D profiles using a dynamic programming algorithm to obtain optimal alignment and a similarity score between them. When the 3D profile of hemoglobin was compared with each of the profiles in the library, which contained 325 profiles of representative structures, all the profiles of other globins were detected with relatively high scores, and proteins in the same structural class followed the globins. Exhaustive comparison of 3D profiles in the library was also performed to depict protein relatedness in the structure space. Using multidimensional scaling, a planar projection of points in the protein structure space revealed an overall grouping in terms of structural classes, i.e., all-alpha, all-beta, alpha/beta, and alpha+beta. These results differ in implication from those obtained by the conventional structure-structure comparison method. Differences are discussed with respect to the structural divergence of proteins in the course of molecular evolution. PMID:9071025

  6. Intra-species sequence comparisons for annotating genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Weer, Claire V.; Weng, Li; Lewis, Keith D.; Shoukry, Malak I.; Pachter, Lior; Keys, David N.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-07-15

    Analysis of sequence variation among members of a single species offers a potential approach to identify functional DNA elements responsible for biological features unique to that species. Due to its high rate of allelic polymorphism and ease of genetic manipulability, we chose the sea squirt, Ciona intestinalis, to explore intra-species sequence comparisons for genome annotation. A large number of C. intestinalis specimens were collected from four continents and a set of genomic intervals amplified, resequenced and analyzed to determine the mutation rates at each nucleotide in the sequence. We found that regions with low mutation rates efficiently demarcated functionally constrained sequences: these include a set of noncoding elements, which we showed in C intestinalis transgenic assays to act as tissue-specific enhancers, as well as the location of coding sequences. This illustrates that comparisons of multiple members of a species can be used for genome annotation, suggesting a path for the annotation of the sequenced genomes of organisms occupying uncharacterized phylogenetic branches of the animal kingdom and raises the possibility that the resequencing of a large number of Homo sapiens individuals might be used to annotate the human genome and identify sequences defining traits unique to our species. The sequence data from this study has been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AY667278-AY667407.

  7. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport in nanochannels

    PubMed Central

    Boynton, Paul; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms and all sequence modifications that occur after a protein has been constructed from its corresponding DNA code. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that compose a given protein one can then determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Here, we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting perpendicular nanochannel. We find that the distribution of ionic currents for each of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids encoded by eukaryotic genes is statistically distinct, showing this technique’s potential for de novo protein sequencing. PMID:27140520

  8. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Paul; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms and all sequence modifications that occur after a protein has been constructed from its corresponding DNA code. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that compose a given protein one can then determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. Here, we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting perpendicular nanochannel. We find that the distribution of ionic currents for each of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids encoded by eukaryotic genes is statistically distinct, showing this technique's potential for de novo protein sequencing. PMID:27140520

  9. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Paul; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-05-01

    De novo protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms and all sequence modifications that occur after a protein has been constructed from its corresponding DNA code. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that compose a given protein one can then determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer’s Disease. Here, we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting perpendicular nanochannel. We find that the distribution of ionic currents for each of the 20 proteinogenic amino acids encoded by eukaryotic genes is statistically distinct, showing this technique’s potential for de novo protein sequencing.

  10. Sequence-based protein stabilization in the absence of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nikki Y; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Jamaluddin, M Fairuz; Mahmud, S Halimah Binte; Raman, Suresh C; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked N-glycosylation is a common modification of proteins that promotes productive protein folding and increases protein stability. Although N-glycosylation is important for glycoprotein folding, the precise sites of glycosylation are often not conserved between protein homologues. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteins upregulated during sporulation under nutrient deprivation have few N-glycosylation sequons and in their place tend to contain clusters of like-charged amino-acid residues. Incorporation of such sequences complements loss of in vivo protein function in the absence of glycosylation. Targeted point mutation to create such sequence stretches at glycosylation sequons in model glycoproteins increases in vitro protein stability and activity. A dependence on glycosylation for protein stability or activity can therefore be rescued with a small number of local point mutations, providing evolutionary flexibility in the precise location of N-glycans, allowing protein expression under nutrient-limiting conditions, and improving recombinant protein production. PMID:24434425

  11. Protein sequence classification with improved extreme learning machine algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuwen; Xiong, Lianglin

    2014-01-01

    Precisely classifying a protein sequence from a large biological protein sequences database plays an important role for developing competitive pharmacological products. Comparing the unseen sequence with all the identified protein sequences and returning the category index with the highest similarity scored protein, conventional methods are usually time-consuming. Therefore, it is urgent and necessary to build an efficient protein sequence classification system. In this paper, we study the performance of protein sequence classification using SLFNs. The recent efficient extreme learning machine (ELM) and its invariants are utilized as the training algorithms. The optimal pruned ELM is first employed for protein sequence classification in this paper. To further enhance the performance, the ensemble based SLFNs structure is constructed where multiple SLFNs with the same number of hidden nodes and the same activation function are used as ensembles. For each ensemble, the same training algorithm is adopted. The final category index is derived using the majority voting method. Two approaches, namely, the basic ELM and the OP-ELM, are adopted for the ensemble based SLFNs. The performance is analyzed and compared with several existing methods using datasets obtained from the Protein Information Resource center. The experimental results show the priority of the proposed algorithms. PMID:24795876

  12. Improvement of protein structure comparison using a structural alphabet.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Agnel Praveen; Srinivasan, N; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2011-09-01

    The three dimensional structure of a protein provides major insights into its function. Protein structure comparison has implications in functional and evolutionary studies. A structural alphabet (SA) is a library of local protein structure prototypes that can abstract every part of protein main chain conformation. Protein Blocks (PBs) is a widely used SA, composed of 16 prototypes, each representing a pentapeptide backbone conformation defined in terms of dihedral angles. Through this description, the 3D structural information can be translated into a 1D sequence of PBs. In a previous study, we have used this approach to compare protein structures encoded in terms of PBs. A classical sequence alignment procedure based on dynamic programming was used, with a dedicated PB Substitution Matrix (SM). PB-based pairwise structural alignment method gave an excellent performance, when compared to other established methods for mining. In this study, we have (i) refined the SMs and (ii) improved the Protein Block Alignment methodology (named as iPBA). The SM was normalized in regards to sequence and structural similarity. Alignment of protein structures often involves similar structural regions separated by dissimilar stretches. A dynamic programming algorithm that weighs these local similar stretches has been designed. Amino acid substitutions scores were also coupled linearly with the PB substitutions. iPBA improves (i) the mining efficiency rate by 6.8% and (ii) more than 82% of the alignments have a better quality. A higher efficiency in aligning multi-domain proteins could be also demonstrated. The quality of alignment is better than DALI and MUSTANG in 81.3% of the cases. Thus our study has resulted in an impressive improvement in the quality of protein structural alignment. PMID:21569819

  13. Describing Sequence-Ensemble Relationships for Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Albert H.; Lyle, Nicholas; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Intrinsically disordered proteins participate in important protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions and control cellular phenotypes through their prominence as dynamic organizers of transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and signaling networks. These proteins challenge the tenets of the structure-function paradigm and their functional mechanisms remain a mystery given that they fail to fold autonomously into specific structures. Solving this mystery requires a first principles understanding of the quantitative relationships between information encoded in the sequences of disordered proteins and the ensemble of conformations they sample. Advances in quantifying sequence-ensemble relationships have been facilitated through a four-way synergy between bioinformatics, biophysical experiments, computer simulations, and polymer physics theories. Here, we review these advances and the resultant insights that allow us to develop a concise quantitative framework for describing sequence-ensemble relationships of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:23240611

  14. Protein sequence design and its applications.

    PubMed

    Sandhya, Sankaran; Mudgal, Richa; Kumar, Gayatri; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2016-04-01

    Design of proteins has far-reaching potentials in diverse areas that span repurposing of the protein scaffold for reactions and substrates that they were not naturally meant for, to catching a glimpse of the ephemeral proteins that nature might have sampled during evolution. These non-natural proteins, either in synthesized or virtual form have opened the scope for the design of entities that not only rival their natural counterparts but also offer a chance to visualize the protein space continuum that might help to relate proteins and understand their associations. Here, we review the recent advances in protein engineering and design, in multiple areas, with a view to drawing attention to their future potential. PMID:26773478

  15. Computationally mapping sequence space to understand evolutionary protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kathryn A; Tidor, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary protein engineering has been dramatically successful, producing a wide variety of new proteins with altered stability, binding affinity, and enzymatic activity. However, the success of such procedures is often unreliable, and the impact of the choice of protein, engineering goal, and evolutionary procedure is not well understood. We have created a framework for understanding aspects of the protein engineering process by computationally mapping regions of feasible sequence space for three small proteins using structure-based design protocols. We then tested the ability of different evolutionary search strategies to explore these sequence spaces. The results point to a non-intuitive relationship between the error-prone PCR mutation rate and the number of rounds of replication. The evolutionary relationships among feasible sequences reveal hub-like sequences that serve as particularly fruitful starting sequences for evolutionary search. Moreover, genetic recombination procedures were examined, and tradeoffs relating sequence diversity and search efficiency were identified. This framework allows us to consider the impact of protein structure on the allowed sequence space and therefore on the challenges that each protein presents to error-prone PCR and genetic recombination procedures. PMID:18020358

  16. Dissecting the relationship between protein structure and sequence variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Wilke, Claus; Wilke Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade several independent works have shown that some structural properties of proteins are capable of predicting protein evolution. The strength and significance of these structure-sequence relations, however, appear to vary widely among different proteins, with absolute correlation strengths ranging from 0 . 1 to 0 . 8 . Here we present the results from a comprehensive search for the potential biophysical and structural determinants of protein evolution by studying more than 200 structural and evolutionary properties in a dataset of 209 monomeric enzymes. We discuss the main protein characteristics responsible for the general patterns of protein evolution, and identify sequence divergence as the main determinant of the strengths of virtually all structure-evolution relationships, explaining ~ 10 - 30 % of observed variation in sequence-structure relations. In addition to sequence divergence, we identify several protein structural properties that are moderately but significantly coupled with the strength of sequence-structure relations. In particular, proteins with more homogeneous back-bone hydrogen bond energies, large fractions of helical secondary structures and low fraction of beta sheets tend to have the strongest sequence-structure relation. BEACON-NSF center for the study of evolution in action.

  17. PROMALS web server for accurate multiple protein sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Tang, Ming; Grishin, Nick V

    2007-07-01

    Multiple sequence alignments are essential in homology inference, structure modeling, functional prediction and phylogenetic analysis. We developed a web server that constructs multiple protein sequence alignments using PROMALS, a progressive method that improves alignment quality by using additional homologs from PSI-BLAST searches and secondary structure predictions from PSIPRED. PROMALS shows higher alignment accuracy than other advanced methods, such as MUMMALS, ProbCons, MAFFT and SPEM. The PROMALS web server takes FASTA format protein sequences as input. The output includes a colored alignment augmented with information about sequence grouping, predicted secondary structures and positional conservation. The PROMALS web server is available at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/promals/ PMID:17452345

  18. DNA Shape versus Sequence Variations in the Protein Binding Process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanying; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2016-02-01

    The binding process of a protein with a DNA involves three stages: approach, encounter, and association. It has been known that the complexation of protein and DNA involves mutual conformational changes, especially for a specific sequence association. However, it is still unclear how the conformation and the information in the DNA sequences affects the binding process. What is the extent to which the DNA structure adopted in the complex is induced by protein binding, or is instead intrinsic to the DNA sequence? In this study, we used the multiscale simulation method to explore the binding process of a protein with DNA in terms of DNA sequence, conformation, and interactions. We found that in the approach stage the protein can bind both the major and minor groove of the DNA, but uses different features to locate the binding site. The intrinsic conformational properties of the DNA play a significant role in this binding stage. By comparing the specific DNA with the nonspecific in unbound, intermediate, and associated states, we found that for a specific DNA sequence, ∼40% of the bending in the association forms is intrinsic and that ∼60% is induced by the protein. The protein does not induce appreciable bending of nonspecific DNA. In addition, we proposed that the DNA shape variations induced by protein binding are required in the early stage of the binding process, so that the protein is able to approach, encounter, and form an intermediate at the correct site on DNA. PMID:26840719

  19. Comparison of mitochondrial genome sequences of pangolins (Mammalia, Pholidota).

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for three species of pangolins, Manis javanica, Phataginus tricuspis, and Smutsia temminckii, and comparisons were made with two other species, Manis pentadactyla and Phataginus tetradactyla. The genome of Manidae contains the 37 genes found in a typical mammalian genome, and the structure of the control region is highly conserved among species. In Manis, the overall base composition differs from that found in African genera. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia, as well as the basal division between Maninae and Smutsiinae. Comparisons with GenBank sequences reveal that the reference genomes of M. pentadactyla and P. tetradactyla (accession numbers NC_016008 and NC_004027) were sequenced from misidentified taxa, and that a new species of tree pangolin should be described in Gabon. PMID:25746396

  20. Sequence variation in ligand binding sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magliery, Thomas J; Regan, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Background The recent explosion in the availability of complete genome sequences has led to the cataloging of tens of thousands of new proteins and putative proteins. Many of these proteins can be structurally or functionally categorized from sequence conservation alone. In contrast, little attention has been given to the meaning of poorly-conserved sites in families of proteins, which are typically assumed to be of little structural or functional importance. Results Recently, using statistical free energy analysis of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, we observed that positions in contact with peptide ligands are more variable than surface positions in general. Here we show that statistical analysis of TPRs, ankyrin repeats, Cys2His2 zinc fingers and PDZ domains accurately identifies specificity-determining positions by their sequence variation. Sequence variation is measured as deviation from a neutral reference state, and we present probabilistic and information theory formalisms that improve upon recently suggested methods such as statistical free energies and sequence entropies. Conclusion Sequence variation has been used to identify functionally-important residues in four selected protein families. With TPRs and ankyrin repeats, protein families that bind highly diverse ligands, the effect is so pronounced that sequence "hypervariation" alone can be used to predict ligand binding sites. PMID:16194281

  1. Using homology relations within a database markedly boosts protein sequence similarity search.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-06-01

    Inference of homology from protein sequences provides an essential tool for analyzing protein structure, function, and evolution. Current sequence-based homology search methods are still unable to detect many similarities evident from protein spatial structures. In computer science a search engine can be improved by considering networks of known relationships within the search database. Here, we apply this idea to protein-sequence-based homology search and show that it dramatically enhances the search accuracy. Our new method, COMPADRE (COmparison of Multiple Protein sequence Alignments using Database RElationships) assesses the relationship between the query sequence and a hit in the database by considering the similarity between the query and hit's known homologs. This approach increases detection quality, boosting the precision rate from 18% to 83% at half-coverage of all database homologs. The increased precision rate allows detection of a large fraction of protein structural relationships, thus providing structure and function predictions for previously uncharacterized proteins. Our results suggest that this general approach is applicable to a wide variety of methods for detection of biological similarities. The web server is available at prodata.swmed.edu/compadre. PMID:26038555

  2. What Makes a Protein Sequence a Prion?

    PubMed Central

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Typical amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's were thought to exclusively result from de novo aggregation, but recently it was shown that amyloids formed in one cell can cross-seed aggregation in other cells, following a prion-like mechanism. Despite the large experimental effort devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the primary sequence. In many cases, prion structural conversion is driven by the presence of relatively large glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) enriched segments. Several studies suggest that it is the amino acid composition of these regions rather than their specific sequence that accounts for their priogenicity. However, our analysis indicates that it is instead the presence and potency of specific short amyloid-prone sequences that occur within intrinsically disordered Q/N-rich regions that determine their prion behaviour, modulated by the structural and compositional context. This provides a basis for the accurate identification and evaluation of prion candidate sequences in proteomes in the context of a unified framework for amyloid formation and prion propagation. PMID:25569335

  3. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K; Purvine, Samuel O; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing is a spectrum analysis approach for mass spectrometry data to discover post-translational modifications in proteins; however, such an approach is still in its infancy and is still not widely applied to proteomic practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for the discovery of protein modifications based on identification of the proteome UStags (Shen, Y.; Tolić, N.; Hixson, K. K.; Purvine, S. O.; Pasa-Tolić, L.; Qian, W. J.; Adkins, J. N.; Moore, R. J.; Smith, R. D. Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry data for peptides and polypeptides from a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were selected based on filter levels designed to provide a limited yet high quality subset of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags' prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances within several yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. To determine false discovery rates, two random (false) databases were independently used for sequence matching, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity of the approach were investigated and described. The combined de novo-UStag approach complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling the discovery of new protein modifications. PMID:18783246

  4. Multifractals, encoded walks and the ergodicity of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Dewey, T G; Strait, B J

    1996-01-01

    A variety of statistical methods have been developed to explore correlations in protein and nucleic acid sequences. Such correlations have important implications for the evolution and stability of these macromolecules. Recently, a number of fractal analyses of sequence data have been developed. These analyses have considerable appeal as they are extremely sensitive to long range correlations and to hierarchical structures. One such analysis decodes sequence information into a random walk and the statistics of the resulting random walk is investigated. Anomalous scaling of such walks has been interpreted as indicative of a fractal structure. Alternatively, a generalized box counting analysis of decoded sequences can be used to establish multifractal properties. In this work, the connection between these two seemingly disparate approaches is established. This connection is exploited to investigate correlations in protein sequences. An ensemble consisting of a comprehensive data set of representative protein sequences is analyzed to establish the ergodicity of protein sequences. The implications of this ergodicity for information theoretical approaches to protein structure prediction is explored. PMID:9390234

  5. MIPS: a database for genomes and protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mewes, H. W.; Frishman, D.; Gruber, C.; Geier, B.; Haase, D.; Kaps, A.; Lemcke, K.; Mannhaupt, G.; Pfeiffer, F.; Schüller, C.; Stocker, S.; Weil, B.

    2000-01-01

    The Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS-GSF), Martinsried, near Munich, Germany, continues its longstanding tradition to develop and maintain high quality curated genome databases. In addition, efforts have been intensified to cover the wealth of complete genome sequences in a systematic, comprehensive form. Bioinformatics, supporting national as well as European sequencing and functional analysis projects, has resulted in several up-to-date genome-oriented databases. This report describes growing databases reflecting the progress of sequencing the Arabidopsis thaliana (MATDB) and Neurospora crassa genomes (MNCDB), the yeast genome database (MYGD) extended by functional analysis data, the database of annotated human EST-clusters (HIB) and the database of the complete cDNA sequences from the DHGP (German Human Genome Project). It also contains information on the up-to-date database of complete genomes (PEDANT), the classification of protein sequences (ProtFam) and the collection of protein sequence data within the framework of the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database. These databases can be accessed through the MIPS WWW server (http://www. mips.biochem.mpg.de ). PMID:10592176

  6. Sequence and comparative genomic analysis of actin-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Muller, Jean; Oma, Yukako; Vallar, Laurent; Friederich, Evelyne; Poch, Olivier; Winsor, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    Actin-related proteins (ARPs) are key players in cytoskeleton activities and nuclear functions. Two complexes, ARP2/3 and ARP1/11, also known as dynactin, are implicated in actin dynamics and in microtubule-based trafficking, respectively. ARP4 to ARP9 are components of many chromatin-modulating complexes. Conventional actins and ARPs codefine a large family of homologous proteins, the actin superfamily, with a tertiary structure known as the actin fold. Because ARPs and actin share high sequence conservation, clear family definition requires distinct features to easily and systematically identify each subfamily. In this study we performed an in depth sequence and comparative genomic analysis of ARP subfamilies. A high-quality multiple alignment of approximately 700 complete protein sequences homologous to actin, including 148 ARP sequences, allowed us to extend the ARP classification to new organisms. Sequence alignments revealed conserved residues, motifs, and inserted sequence signatures to define each ARP subfamily. These discriminative characteristics allowed us to develop ARPAnno (http://bips.u-strasbg.fr/ARPAnno), a new web server dedicated to the annotation of ARP sequences. Analyses of sequence conservation among actins and ARPs highlight part of the actin fold and suggest interactions between ARPs and actin-binding proteins. Finally, analysis of ARP distribution across eukaryotic phyla emphasizes the central importance of nuclear ARPs, particularly the multifunctional ARP4. PMID:16195354

  7. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  8. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  9. Protein 3D Structure Computed from Evolutionary Sequence Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Robert; Hopf, Thomas A.; Pagnani, Andrea; Zecchina, Riccardo; Sander, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing. In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy. We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues., including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7–4.8 Å Cα-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org). This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of protein

  10. 3D structures of membrane proteins from genomic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Sheridan, Robert; Rost, Burkhard; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that amino acid co-variation in proteins, extracted from the evolutionary sequence record, can be used to fold transmembrane proteins. We use this technique to predict previously unknown, 3D structures for 11 transmembrane proteins (with up to 14 helices) from their sequences alone. The prediction method (EVfold_membrane), applies a maximum entropy approach to infer evolutionary co-variation in pairs of sequence positions within a protein family and then generates all-atom models with the derived pairwise distance constraints. We benchmark the approach with blinded, de novo computation of known transmembrane protein structures from 23 families, demonstrating unprecedented accuracy of the method for large transmembrane proteins. We show how the method can predict oligomerization, functional sites, and conformational changes in transmembrane proteins. With the rapid rise in large-scale sequencing, more accurate and more comprehensive information on evolutionary constraints can be decoded from genetic variation, greatly expanding the repertoire of transmembrane proteins amenable to modelling by this method. PMID:22579045

  11. Molecular sled sequences are common in mammalian proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Kan; Blainey, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins. PMID:26857546

  12. Molecular sled sequences are common in mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Kan; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-03-18

    Recent work revealed a new class of molecular machines called molecular sleds, which are small basic molecules that bind and slide along DNA with the ability to carry cargo along DNA. Here, we performed biochemical and single-molecule flow stretching assays to investigate the basis of sliding activity in molecular sleds. In particular, we identified the functional core of pVIc, the first molecular sled characterized; peptide functional groups that control sliding activity; and propose a model for the sliding activity of molecular sleds. We also observed widespread DNA binding and sliding activity among basic polypeptide sequences that implicate mammalian nuclear localization sequences and many cell penetrating peptides as molecular sleds. These basic protein motifs exhibit weak but physiologically relevant sequence-nonspecific DNA affinity. Our findings indicate that many mammalian proteins contain molecular sled sequences and suggest the possibility that substantial undiscovered sliding activity exists among nuclear mammalian proteins. PMID:26857546

  13. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nitrogenase iron protein of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pretorius, I.M.; Rawlings, D.E.; O'Neill, E.G.; Jones, W.A.; Kirby, R.; Woods, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA sequence was determined for the cloned Thiobacillus ferrooxidans nifH and part of the nifD genes. The DNA chains were radiolabeled with (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)dCTP (3000 Ci/mmol) or (..cap alpha..-/sup 35/S)dCTP (400 Ci/mmol). A putative T. ferrooxidans nifH promoter was identified whose sequences showed perfect consensus with those of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif promoter. Two putative consensus upstream activator sequences were also identified. The amino acid sequence was deduced from the DNA sequence. In a comparison of nifH DNA sequences from T. ferrooxidans and eight other nitrogen-fixing microbes, a Rhizobium sp. isolated from Parasponia andersonii showed the greatest homology (74%) and Clostridium pasteurianum (nifH1) showed the least homology (54%). In the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the Fe proteins, the Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium japonicum showed the greatest homology (both 86%) and C. pasteurianum (nifH1 gene product) demonstrated the least homology (56%) to the T. ferrooxidans Fe protein.

  14. In silico comparative analysis of DNA and amino acid sequences for prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Lee, J; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variability might contribute to species specificity of prion diseases in various organisms. In this study, structures of the prion protein gene (PRNP) and its amino acids were compared among species of which sequence data were available. Comparisons of PRNP DNA sequences among 12 species including human, chimpanzee, monkey, bovine, ovine, dog, mouse, rat, wallaby, opossum, chicken and zebrafish allowed us to identify candidate regulatory regions in intron 1 and 3'-untranslated region (UTR) in addition to the coding region. Highly conserved putative binding sites for transcription factors, such as heat shock factor 2 (HSF2) and myocite enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), were discovered in the intron 1. In 3'-UTR, the functional sequence (ATTAAA) for nucleus-specific polyadenylation was found in all the analysed species. The functional sequence (TTTTTAT) for maturation-specific polyadenylation was identically observed only in ovine, and one or two nucleotide mismatches in the other species. A comparison of the amino acid sequences in 53 species revealed a large sequence identity. Especially the octapeptide repeat region was observed in all the species but frog and zebrafish. Functional changes and susceptibility to prion diseases with various isoforms of prion protein could be caused by numeric variability and conformational changes discovered in the repeat sequences. PMID:18397498

  15. Nucleotide sequence of Bacillus phage Nf terminal protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, M C; Ito, J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of Bacillus phage Nf gene E has been determined. Gene E codes for phage terminal protein which is the primer necessary for the initiation of DNA replication. The deduced amino acid sequence of Nf terminal protein is approximately 66% homologous with the terminal proteins of Bacillus phages PZA and luminal diameter 29, and shows similar hydropathy and secondary structure predictions. A serine which has been identified as the residue which covalently links the protein to the 5' end of the genome in luminal diameter 29, is conserved in all three phages. The hydropathic and secondary structural environment of this serine is similar in these phage terminal proteins and also similar to the linking serine of adenovirus terminal protein. PMID:3601672

  16. Two modes of protein sequence evolution and their compositional dependencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.

    2013-06-01

    Protein sequence evolution has resulted in a vast repertoire of molecular functionality crucial to life. Despite the central importance of sequence evolution to biology, our fundamental understanding of how sequence composition affects evolution is incomplete. This report describes the utilization of lattice model simulations of directed evolution, which indicate that, on average, peptide and protein evolvability is strongly dependent on initial sequence composition. The report also discusses two distinct regimes of sequence evolution by point mutation: (a) the “classical” mode where sequences “crawl” over free energy barriers towards acquiring a target fold, and (b) the “quantum” mode where sequences appear to “tunnel” through large energy barriers generally insurmountable by means of a crawl. Finally, the simulations indicate that oily and charged peptides are the most efficient substrates for evolution at the “classical” and “quantum” regimes, respectively, and that their respective response to temperature is commensurate with analogies made to barrier crossing in classical and quantum systems. On the whole, these results show that sequence composition can tune both the evolvability and the optimal mode of evolution of peptides and proteins.

  17. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  18. Nucleotide sequence of a cloned woodchuck hepatitis virus genome: comparison with the hepatitis B virus sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Galibert, F; Chen, T N; Mandart, E

    1982-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a woodchuck hepatitis virus genome cloned in Escherichia coli was determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. This sequence was found to be 3,308 nucleotides long. Potential ATG initiator triplets and nonsense codons were identified and used to locate regions with a substantial coding capacity. A striking similarity was observed between the organization of human hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus. Nucleotide sequences of these open regions in the woodchuck virus were compared with corresponding regions present in hepatitis B virus. This allowed the location of four viral genes on the L strand and indicated the absence of protein coded by the S strand. Evolution rates of the various parts of the genome as well as of the four different proteins coded by hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were compared. These results indicated that: (i) the core protein has evolved slightly less rapidly than the other proteins; and (ii) when a region of DNA codes for two different proteins, there is less freedom for the DNA to evolve and, moreover, one of the proteins can evolve more rapidly than the other. A hairpin structure, very well conserved in the two genomes, was located in the only region devoid of coding function, suggesting the location of the origin of replication of the viral DNA. Images PMID:7086958

  19. A Fractal Dimension and Wavelet Transform Based Method for Protein Sequence Similarity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Tang, Yuan Yan; Lu, Yang; Luo, Huiwu

    2015-01-01

    One of the key tasks related to proteins is the similarity comparison of protein sequences in the area of bioinformatics and molecular biology, which helps the prediction and classification of protein structure and function. It is a significant and open issue to find similar proteins from a large scale of protein database efficiently. This paper presents a new distance based protein similarity analysis using a new encoding method of protein sequence which is based on fractal dimension. The protein sequences are first represented into the 1-dimensional feature vectors by their biochemical quantities. A series of Hybrid method involving discrete Wavelet transform, Fractal dimension calculation (HWF) with sliding window are then applied to form the feature vector. At last, through the similarity calculation, we can obtain the distance matrix, by which, the phylogenic tree can be constructed. We apply this approach by analyzing the ND5 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5) protein cluster data set. The experimental results show that the proposed model is more accurate than the existing ones such as Su's model, Zhang's model, Yao's model and MEGA software, and it is consistent with some known biological facts. PMID:26357222

  20. Using homology relations within a database markedly boosts protein sequence similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jing; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Inference of homology from protein sequences provides an essential tool for analyzing protein structure, function, and evolution. Current sequence-based homology search methods are still unable to detect many similarities evident from protein spatial structures. In computer science a search engine can be improved by considering networks of known relationships within the search database. Here, we apply this idea to protein-sequence–based homology search and show that it dramatically enhances the search accuracy. Our new method, COMPADRE (COmparison of Multiple Protein sequence Alignments using Database RElationships) assesses the relationship between the query sequence and a hit in the database by considering the similarity between the query and hit’s known homologs. This approach increases detection quality, boosting the precision rate from 18% to 83% at half-coverage of all database homologs. The increased precision rate allows detection of a large fraction of protein structural relationships, thus providing structure and function predictions for previously uncharacterized proteins. Our results suggest that this general approach is applicable to a wide variety of methods for detection of biological similarities. The web server is available at prodata.swmed.edu/compadre. PMID:26038555

  1. A logical sequence search for S100B target proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, K. A.; Shaw, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The EF-hand calcium-binding protein S100B has been shown to interact in vitro in a calcium-sensitive manner with many substrates. These potential S100B target proteins have been screened for the preservation of a previously identified consensus sequence across species. The results were compared to known structural and in vitro properties of the proteins to rationalize choices for potential binding partners. Our approach uncovered four oligomeric proteins tubulin (alpha and beta), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), desmin, and vimentin that have conserved regions matching the consensus sequence. In the type III intermediate filament proteins (GFAP, vimentin, and desmin), this region corresponds to a portion of a coiled-coil (helix 2A), the structural element responsible for their assembly. In tubulin, the sequence matches correspond to regions of alpha and beta tubulin found at the alpha beta tubulin interface. In both cases, these consensus sequence matches provide a logical explanation for in vitro observations that S100B is able to inhibit oligomerization of these proteins. PMID:11106180

  2. Comparison of solution-based exome capture methods for next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Techniques enabling targeted re-sequencing of the protein coding sequences of the human genome on next generation sequencing instruments are of great interest. We conducted a systematic comparison of the solution-based exome capture kits provided by Agilent and Roche NimbleGen. A control DNA sample was captured with all four capture methods and prepared for Illumina GAII sequencing. Sequence data from additional samples prepared with the same protocols were also used in the comparison. Results We developed a bioinformatics pipeline for quality control, short read alignment, variant identification and annotation of the sequence data. In our analysis, a larger percentage of the high quality reads from the NimbleGen captures than from the Agilent captures aligned to the capture target regions. High GC content of the target sequence was associated with poor capture success in all exome enrichment methods. Comparison of mean allele balances for heterozygous variants indicated a tendency to have more reference bases than variant bases in the heterozygous variant positions within the target regions in all methods. There was virtually no difference in the genotype concordance compared to genotypes derived from SNP arrays. A minimum of 11× coverage was required to make a heterozygote genotype call with 99% accuracy when compared to common SNPs on genome-wide association arrays. Conclusions Libraries captured with NimbleGen kits aligned more accurately to the target regions. The updated NimbleGen kit most efficiently covered the exome with a minimum coverage of 20×, yet none of the kits captured all the Consensus Coding Sequence annotated exons. PMID:21955854

  3. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  4. Correlated mutations in protein sequences: Phylogenetic and structural effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A.S. |; Giraud, B.G.; Stormo, G.D.

    1998-12-01

    Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for RNA molecules is relatively successful in elucidating RNA secondary structure, as well as some aspects of tertiary structure. Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for protein molecules is successful in certain instances in elucidating certain structural and functional links, but in general, pairs of sites displaying highly covarying mutations in protein sequences do not necessarily correspond to sites that are spatially close in the protein structure. In this paper the authors identify two reasons why naive use of covariation analysis for protein sequences fails to reliably indicate sequence positions that are spatially proximate. The first reason involves the bias introduced in calculation of covariation measures due to the fact that biological sequences are generally related by a non-trivial phylogenetic tree. The authors present a null-model approach to solve this problem. The second reason involves linked chains of covariation which can result in pairs of sites displaying significant covariation even though they are not spatially proximate. They present a maximum entropy solution to this classic problem of causation versus correlation. The methodologies are validated in simulation.

  5. Sequence and structural analysis of BTB domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J; Downs, Gregory S; Jauhal, Jimmy JS; Nandra, Sukhjeen K; Privé, Gilbert G

    2005-01-01

    Background The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a versatile protein-protein interaction motif that participates in a wide range of cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton dynamics, ion channel assembly and gating, and targeting proteins for ubiquitination. Several BTB domain structures have been experimentally determined, revealing a highly conserved core structure. Results We surveyed the protein architecture, genomic distribution and sequence conservation of BTB domain proteins in 17 fully sequenced eukaryotes. The BTB domain is typically found as a single copy in proteins that contain only one or two other types of domain, and this defines the BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF), BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK), voltage-gated potassium channel T1 (T1-Kv), MATH-BTB, BTB-NPH3 and BTB-BACK-PHR (BBP) families of proteins, among others. In contrast, the Skp1 and ElonginC proteins consist almost exclusively of the core BTB fold. There are numerous lineage-specific expansions of BTB proteins, as seen by the relatively large number of BTB-ZF and BBK proteins in vertebrates, MATH-BTB proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans, and BTB-NPH3 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the structural homology between Skp1 and the PLZF BTB homodimer, we present a model of a BTB-Cul3 SCF-like E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that shows that the BTB dimer or the T1 tetramer is compatible in this complex. Conclusion Despite widely divergent sequences, the BTB fold is structurally well conserved. The fold has adapted to several different modes of self-association and interactions with non-BTB proteins. PMID:16207353

  6. Single-molecule protein sequencing through fingerprinting: computational assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Docter, Margreet; van Ginkel, Jetty; de Ridder, Dick; Joo, Chirlmin

    2015-10-01

    Proteins are vital in all biological systems as they constitute the main structural and functional components of cells. Recent advances in mass spectrometry have brought the promise of complete proteomics by helping draft the human proteome. Yet, this commonly used protein sequencing technique has fundamental limitations in sensitivity. Here we propose a method for single-molecule (SM) protein sequencing. A major challenge lies in the fact that proteins are composed of 20 different amino acids, which demands 20 molecular reporters. We computationally demonstrate that it suffices to measure only two types of amino acids to identify proteins and suggest an experimental scheme using SM fluorescence. When achieved, this highly sensitive approach will result in a paradigm shift in proteomics, with major impact in the biological and medical sciences.

  7. A novel predictor for protein structural class based on integrated information of the secondary structure sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Xiqiang; Kong, Liang; Liu, Shuxia

    2014-08-01

    The structural class has become one of the most important features for characterizing the overall folding type of a protein and played important roles in many aspects of protein research. At present, it is still a challenging problem to accurately predict protein structural class for low-similarity sequences. In this study, an 18-dimensional integrated feature vector is proposed by fusing the information about content and position of the predicted secondary structure elements. The consistently high accuracies of jackknife and 10-fold cross-validation tests on different low-similarity benchmark datasets show that the proposed method is reliable and stable. Comparison of our results with other methods demonstrates that our method is an effective computational tool for protein structural class prediction, especially for low-similarity sequences. PMID:24859536

  8. Comprehensive analysis of sequences of a protein switch.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Hua; Meller, Jaroslaw; Elber, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Switches form a special class of proteins that dramatically change their three-dimensional structures upon a small perturbation. One possible perturbation that we explore is that of a single point mutation. Building on the pioneering experimental work of Alexander et al. (Alexander et al. PNAS, 2007; 104,11963-11968) that determines switch sequences between α and α+β folds we conduct a comprehensive sequence sampling by a Markov Chain with multiple fitness criteria to identify new switches given the experimental folds. We screen for switch sequences using a combination of contact potential, secondary structure prediction, and finally molecular dynamics simulations. Statistical properties of switch sequences are discussed and illustrated to be most sensitive to mutation at the N- and C- termini of the switch protein. Based on this analysis, a particularly stable putative switch pair is identified and proposed for further experimental analysis. PMID:26073558

  9. Structure and Sequence Search on Aptamer-Protein Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jiajie; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin; Salsbury, Freddie

    2015-03-01

    Interactions between proteins and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) play a significant role in the living systems, especially through gene regulation. However, short nucleic acids sequences (aptamers) with specific binding affinity to specific proteins exhibit clinical potential as therapeutics. Our capillary and gel electrophoresis selection experiments show that specific sequences of aptamers can be selected that bind specific proteins. Computationally, given the experimentally-determined structure and sequence of a thrombin-binding aptamer, we can successfully dock the aptamer onto thrombin in agreement with experimental structures of the complex. In order to further study the conformational flexibility of this thrombin-binding aptamer and to potentially develop a predictive computational model of aptamer-binding, we use GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations to both examine the conformational flexibility of the aptamer in the absence of binding to thrombin, and to determine our ability to fold an aptamer. This study should help further de-novo predictions of aptamer sequences by enabling the study of structural and sequence-dependent effects on aptamer-protein docking specificity.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the L1 ribosomal protein gene of Xenopus laevis: remarkable sequence homology among introns.

    PubMed Central

    Loreni, F; Ruberti, I; Bozzoni, I; Pierandrei-Amaldi, P; Amaldi, F

    1985-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L1 is encoded by two genes in Xenopus laevis. The comparison of two cDNA sequences shows that the two L1 gene copies (L1a and L1b) have diverged in many silent sites and very few substitution sites; moreover a small duplication occurred at the very end of the coding region of the L1b gene which thus codes for a product five amino acids longer than that coded by L1a. Quantitatively the divergence between the two L1 genes confirms that a whole genome duplication took place in Xenopus laevis approximately 30 million years ago. A genomic fragment containing one of the two L1 gene copies (L1a), with its nine introns and flanking regions, has been completely sequenced. The 5' end of this gene has been mapped within a 20-pyridimine stretch as already found for other vertebrate ribosomal protein genes. Four of the nine introns have a 60-nucleotide sequence with 80% homology; within this region some boxes, one of which is 16 nucleotides long, are 100% homologous among the four introns. This feature of L1a gene introns is interesting since we have previously shown that the activity of this gene is regulated at a post-transcriptional level and it involves the block of the normal splicing of some intron sequences. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:3841512

  11. A Protein Deep Sequencing Evaluation of Metastatic Melanoma Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Welinder, Charlotte; Pawłowski, Krzysztof; Sugihara, Yutaka; Yakovleva, Maria; Jönsson, Göran; Ingvar, Christian; Lundgren, Lotta; Baldetorp, Bo; Olsson, Håkan; Rezeli, Melinda; Jansson, Bo; Laurell, Thomas; Fehniger, Thomas; Döme, Balazs; Malm, Johan; Wieslander, Elisabet; Nishimura, Toshihide; Marko-Varga, György

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma has the highest increase of incidence of malignancies in the western world. In early stages, front line therapy is surgical excision of the primary tumor. Metastatic disease has very limited possibilities for cure. Recently, several protein kinase inhibitors and immune modifiers have shown promising clinical results but drug resistance in metastasized melanoma remains a major problem. The need for routine clinical biomarkers to follow disease progression and treatment efficacy is high. The aim of the present study was to build a protein sequence database in metastatic melanoma, searching for novel, relevant biomarkers. Ten lymph node metastases (South-Swedish Malignant Melanoma Biobank) were subjected to global protein expression analysis using two proteomics approaches (with/without orthogonal fractionation). Fractionation produced higher numbers of protein identifications (4284). Combining both methods, 5326 unique proteins were identified (2641 proteins overlapping). Deep mining proteomics may contribute to the discovery of novel biomarkers for metastatic melanoma, for example dividing the samples into two metastatic melanoma “genomic subtypes”, (“pigmentation” and “high immune”) revealed several proteins showing differential levels of expression. In conclusion, the present study provides an initial version of a metastatic melanoma protein sequence database producing a total of more than 5000 unique protein identifications. The raw data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001724 and PXD001725. PMID:25874936

  12. MannDB – A microbial database of automated protein sequence analyses and evidence integration for protein characterization

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Carol L Ecale; Lam, Marisa W; Smith, Jason R; Zemla, Adam T; Dyer, Matthew D; Kuczmarski, Thomas A; Vitalis, Elizabeth A; Slezak, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    representing organisms listed as high-priority agents on the websites of several governmental organizations concerned with bio-terrorism. MannDB provides the user with a BLAST interface for comparison of native and non-native sequences and a query tool for conveniently selecting proteins of interest. In addition, the user has access to a web-based browser that compiles comprehensive and extensive reports. Access to MannDB is freely available at . PMID:17044936

  13. How Does a Simplified-Sequence Protein Fold?

    PubMed Central

    Guarnera, Enrico; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2009-01-01

    To investigate a putatively primordial protein we have simplified the sequence of a 56-residue α/β fold (the immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G) by replacing it with polyalanine, polythreonine, and diglycine segments at regions of the sequence that in the folded structure are α-helical, β-strand, and turns, respectively. Remarkably, multiple folding and unfolding events are observed in a 15-μs molecular dynamics simulation at 330 K. The most stable state (populated at ∼20%) of the simplified-sequence variant of protein G has the same α/β topology as the wild-type but shows the characteristics of a molten globule, i.e., loose contacts among side chains and lack of a specific hydrophobic core. The unfolded state is heterogeneous and includes a variety of α/β topologies but also fully α-helical and fully β-sheet structures. Transitions within the denatured state are very fast, and the molten-globule state is reached in <1 μs by a framework mechanism of folding with multiple pathways. The native structure of the wild-type is more rigid than the molten-globule conformation of the simplified-sequence variant. The difference in structural stability and the very fast folding of the simplified protein suggest that evolution has enriched the primordial alphabet of amino acids mainly to optimize protein function by stabilization of a unique structure with specific tertiary interactions. PMID:19751679

  14. How does a simplified-sequence protein fold?

    PubMed

    Guarnera, Enrico; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2009-09-16

    To investigate a putatively primordial protein we have simplified the sequence of a 56-residue alpha/beta fold (the immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G) by replacing it with polyalanine, polythreonine, and diglycine segments at regions of the sequence that in the folded structure are alpha-helical, beta-strand, and turns, respectively. Remarkably, multiple folding and unfolding events are observed in a 15-micros molecular dynamics simulation at 330 K. The most stable state (populated at approximately 20%) of the simplified-sequence variant of protein G has the same alpha/beta topology as the wild-type but shows the characteristics of a molten globule, i.e., loose contacts among side chains and lack of a specific hydrophobic core. The unfolded state is heterogeneous and includes a variety of alpha/beta topologies but also fully alpha-helical and fully beta-sheet structures. Transitions within the denatured state are very fast, and the molten-globule state is reached in <1 micros by a framework mechanism of folding with multiple pathways. The native structure of the wild-type is more rigid than the molten-globule conformation of the simplified-sequence variant. The difference in structural stability and the very fast folding of the simplified protein suggest that evolution has enriched the primordial alphabet of amino acids mainly to optimize protein function by stabilization of a unique structure with specific tertiary interactions. PMID:19751679

  15. Extracting protein alignment models from the sequence database.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A F; Liu, J S; Lipman, D J; Lawrence, C E

    1997-01-01

    Biologists often gain structural and functional insights into a protein sequence by constructing a multiple alignment model of the family. Here a program called Probe fully automates this process of model construction starting from a single sequence. Central to this program is a powerful new method to locate and align only those, often subtly, conserved patterns essential to the family as a whole. When applied to randomly chosen proteins, Probe found on average about four times as many relationships as a pairwise search and yielded many new discoveries. These include: an obscure subfamily of globins in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans ; two new superfamilies of metallohydrolases; a lipoyl/biotin swinging arm domain in bacterial membrane fusion proteins; and a DH domain in the yeast Bud3 and Fus2 proteins. By identifying distant relationships and merging families into superfamilies in this way, this analysis further confirms the notion that proteins evolved from relatively few ancient sequences. Moreover, this method automatically generates models of these ancient conserved regions for rapid and sensitive screening of sequences. PMID:9108146

  16. Clustering protein sequences with a novel metric transformed from sequence similarity scores and sequence alignments with neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qicheng; Chirn, Gung-Wei; Cai, Richard; Szustakowski, Joseph D; Nirmala, NR

    2005-01-01

    Background The sequencing of the human genome has enabled us to access a comprehensive list of genes (both experimental and predicted) for further analysis. While a majority of the approximately 30000 known and predicted human coding genes are characterized and have been assigned at least one function, there remains a fair number of genes (about 12000) for which no annotation has been made. The recent sequencing of other genomes has provided us with a huge amount of auxiliary sequence data which could help in the characterization of the human genes. Clustering these sequences into families is one of the first steps to perform comparative studies across several genomes. Results Here we report a novel clustering algorithm (CLUGEN) that has been used to cluster sequences of experimentally verified and predicted proteins from all sequenced genomes using a novel distance metric which is a neural network score between a pair of protein sequences. This distance metric is based on the pairwise sequence similarity score and the similarity between their domain structures. The distance metric is the probability that a pair of protein sequences are of the same Interpro family/domain, which facilitates the modelling of transitive homology closure to detect remote homologues. The hierarchical average clustering method is applied with the new distance metric. Conclusion Benchmarking studies of our algorithm versus those reported in the literature shows that our algorithm provides clustering results with lower false positive and false negative rates. The clustering algorithm is applied to cluster several eukaryotic genomes and several dozens of prokaryotic genomes. PMID:16202129

  17. Purification and sequencing of the active site tryptic peptide from penicillin-binding protein 1b of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, R.A.; Suzuki, H.; Hirota, Y.; Strominger, J.L.

    1985-07-02

    This paper reports the sequence of the active site peptide of penicillin-binding protein 1b from Escherichia coli. Purified penicillin-binding protein 1b was labeled with (/sup 14/C)penicillin G, digested with trypsin, and partially purified by gel filtration. Upon further purification by high-pressure liquid chromatography, two radioactive peaks were observed, and the major peak, representing over 75% of the applied radioactivity, was submitted to amino acid analysis and sequencing. The sequence Ser-Ile-Gly-Ser-Leu-Ala-Lys was obtained. The active site nucleophile was identified by digesting the purified peptide with aminopeptidase M and separating the radioactive products on high-pressure liquid chromatography. Amino acid analysis confirmed that the serine residue in the middle of the sequence was covalently bonded to the (/sup 14/C)penicilloyl moiety. A comparison of this sequence to active site sequences of other penicillin-binding proteins and beta-lactamases is presented.

  18. Homolog detection using global sequence properties suggests an alternate view of structural encoding in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scheraga, Harold A.; Rackovsky, S.

    2014-01-01

    We show that a Fourier-based sequence distance function is able to identify structural homologs of target sequences with high accuracy. It is shown that Fourier distances correlate very strongly with independently determined structural distances between molecules, a property of the method that is not attainable using conventional representations. It is further shown that the ability of the Fourier approach to identify protein folds is statistically far in excess of random expectation. It is then shown that, in actual searches for structural homologs of selected target sequences, the Fourier approach gives excellent results. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the global information detected by the Fourier representation is an essential feature of structure encoding in protein sequences and a key to structural homology detection. PMID:24706836

  19. Determinants of the rate of protein sequence evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianzhi; Yang, Jian-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The rate and mechanism of protein sequence evolution have been central questions in evolutionary biology since the 1960s. Although the rate of protein sequence evolution depends primarily on the level of functional constraint, exactly what constitutes functional constraint has remained unclear. The increasing availability of genomic data has allowed for much needed empirical examinations on the nature of functional constraint. These studies found that the evolutionary rate of a protein is predominantly influenced by its expression level rather than functional importance. A combination of theoretical and empirical analyses have identified multiple mechanisms behind these observations and demonstrated a prominent role that selection against errors in molecular and cellular processes plays in protein evolution. PMID:26055156

  20. Co-evolution of metabolism and protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Moritz; Klitgord, Niels; Segrè, Daniel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The set of chemicals producible and usable by metabolic pathways must have evolved in parallel with the enzymes that catalyze them. One implication of this common historical path should be a correspondence between the innovation steps that gradually added new metabolic reactions to the biosphere-level biochemical toolkit, and the gradual sequence changes that must have slowly shaped the corresponding enzyme structures. However, global signatures of a long-term co-evolution have not been identified. Here we search for such signatures by computing correlations between inter-reaction distances on a metabolic network, and sequence distances of the corresponding enzyme proteins. We perform our calculations using the set of all known metabolic reactions, available from the KEGG database. Reaction-reaction distance on the metabolic network is computed as the length of the shortest path on a projection of the metabolic network, in which nodes are reactions and edges indicate whether two reactions share a common metabolite, after removal of cofactors. Estimating the distance between enzyme sequences in a meaningful way requires some special care: for each enzyme commission (EC) number, we select from KEGG a consensus set of protein sequences using the cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG) database. We define the evolutionary distance between protein sequences as an asymmetric transition probability between two enzymes, derived from the corresponding pair-wise BLAST scores. By comparing the distances between sequences to the minimal distances on the metabolic reaction graph, we find a small but statistically significant correlation between the two measures. This suggests that the evolutionary walk in enzyme sequence space has locally mirrored, to some extent, the gradual expansion of metabolism. PMID:20238426

  1. Intermediate divergence levels maximize the strength of structure-sequence correlations in enzymes and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Eleisha L; Shahmoradi, Amir; Spielman, Stephanie J; Jack, Benjamin R; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-07-01

    Structural properties such as solvent accessibility and contact number predict site-specific sequence variability in many proteins. However, the strength and significance of these structure-sequence relationships vary widely among different proteins, with absolute correlation strengths ranging from 0 to 0.8. In particular, two recent works have made contradictory observations. Yeh et al. (Mol. Biol. Evol. 31:135-139, 2014) found that both relative solvent accessibility (RSA) and weighted contact number (WCN) are good predictors of sitewise evolutionary rate in enzymes, with WCN clearly out-performing RSA. Shahmoradi et al. (J. Mol. Evol. 79:130-142, 2014) considered these same predictors (as well as others) in viral proteins and found much weaker correlations and no clear advantage of WCN over RSA. Because these two studies had substantial methodological differences, however, a direct comparison of their results is not possible. Here, we reanalyze the datasets of the two studies with one uniform analysis pipeline, and we find that many apparent discrepancies between the two analyses can be attributed to the extent of sequence divergence in individual alignments. Specifically, the alignments of the enzyme dataset are much more diverged than those of the virus dataset, and proteins with higher divergence exhibit, on average, stronger structure-sequence correlations. However, the highest structure-sequence correlations are observed at intermediate divergence levels, where both highly conserved and highly variable sites are present in the same alignment. PMID:26971720

  2. Bioinformatics comparison of sulfate-reducing metabolism nucleotide sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, G.; Dehipawala, Sunil; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria can be traced back to 3.5 billion years ago. The thermodynamics details of the sulfur cycle have been well documented. A recent sulfate-reducing bacteria report (Robator, Jungbluth, et al , 2015 Jan, Front. Microbiol) with Genbank nucleotide data has been analyzed in terms of the sulfite reductase (dsrAB) via fractal dimension and entropy values. Comparison to oil field sulfate-reducing sequences was included. The AUCG translational mass fractal dimension versus ATCG transcriptional mass fractal dimension for the low temperature dsrB and dsrA sequences reported in Reference Thirteen shows correlation R-sq ~ 0.79 , with a probably of about 3% in simulation. A recent report of using Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequence to produce CdS quantum dot in a biological method, where the sulfur is reduced just like in the H2S production process, was included for comparison. The AUCG mass fractal dimension versus ATCG mass fractal dimension for the Cystathionine gamma-lyase sequences was found to have R-sq of 0.72, similar to the low temperature dissimilatory sulfite reductase dsr group with 3% probability, in contrary to the oil field group having R-sq ~ 0.94, a high probable outcome in the simulation. The other two simulation histograms, namely, fractal dimension versus entropy R-sq outcome values, and di-nucleotide entropy versus mono-nucleotide entropy R-sq outcome values are also discussed in the data analysis focusing on low probability outcomes.

  3. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. PMID:2296575

  4. Rapid Evolution of Virus Sequences in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hagai, Tzachi; LaBarbera, Anthony; Solovey, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Nodamura Virus (NoV) is a nodavirus originally isolated from insects that can replicate in a wide variety of hosts, including mammals. Because of their simplicity and ability to replicate in many diverse hosts, NoV, and the Nodaviridae in general, provide a unique window into the evolution of viruses and host-virus interactions. Here we show that the C-terminus of the viral polymerase exhibits extreme structural and evolutionary flexibility. Indeed, fewer than 10 positively charged residues from the 110 amino acid-long C-terminal region of protein A are required to support RNA1 replication. Strikingly, this region can be replaced by completely unrelated protein sequences, yet still produce a functional replicase. Structure predictions, as well as evolutionary and mutational analyses, indicate that the C-terminal region is structurally disordered and evolves faster than the rest of the viral proteome. Thus, the function of an intrinsically unstructured protein region can be independent of most of its primary sequence, conferring both functional robustness and sequence plasticity on the protein. Our results provide an experimental explanation for rapid evolution of unstructured regions, which enables an effective exploration of the sequence space, and likely function space, available to the virus. PMID:25502394

  5. nWayComp: a genome-wide sequence comparison tool for multiple strains/species of phylogenetically related microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiqiang; Lin, Hong; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of whole genomic sequences of microorganisms has led to the complexity of genome-wide annotation and gene sequence comparison among multiple microorganisms. To address this problem, we have developed nWayComp software that compares DNA and protein sequences of phylogenetically-related microorganisms. This package integrates a series of bioinformatics tools such as BLAST, ClustalW, ALIGN, PHYLIP and PRIMER3 for sequence comparison. It searches for homologous sequences among multiple organisms and identifies genes that are unique to a particular organism. The homologous gene sets are then ranked in the descending order of the sequence similarity. For each set of homologous sequences, a table of sequence identity among homologous genes along with sequence variations such as SNPs and INDELS is developed, and a phylogenetic tree is constructed. In addition, a common set of primers that can amplify all the homologous sequences are generated. The nWayComp package provides users with a quick and convenient tool to compare genomic sequences among multiple organisms at the whole-genome level. PMID:17688445

  6. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  7. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  8. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library’s heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  9. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Ludlow, Andrew T; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library's heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  10. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Antão, José M; Mason, James M; Déjardin, Jérôme; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in different cell types or during the response to internal and external signals. Proteomic analysis of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) was developed as a tool to target, purify, and identify proteins associated with a defined locus and was shown to allow the purification of human telomeric chromatin. Here we have developed this method to identify proteins that interact with the Drosophila telomere-associated sequence (TAS) repeats. Several of the purified factors were validated as novel TAS-bound proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the Brahma complex was confirmed as a dominant modifier of telomeric position effect through the use of a genetic test. These results offer information on the efficacy of applying the PICh protocol to loci with sequence more complex than that found at human telomeres and identify proteins that bind to the TAS repeats, which might contribute to TAS biology and chromatin silencing. PMID:22493064

  11. Will my protein crystallize? A sequence-based predictor.

    PubMed

    Smialowski, Pawel; Schmidt, Thorsten; Cox, Jürgen; Kirschner, Andreas; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2006-02-01

    We propose a machine-learning approach to sequence-based prediction of protein crystallizability in which we exploit subtle differences between proteins whose structures were solved by X-ray analysis [or by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy] and those proteins whose structures were solved by NMR spectroscopy alone. Because the NMR technique is usually applied on relatively small proteins, sequence length distributions of the X-ray and NMR datasets were adjusted to avoid predictions biased by protein size. As feature space for classification, we used frequencies of mono-, di-, and tripeptides represented by the original 20-letter amino acid alphabet as well as by several reduced alphabets in which amino acids were grouped by their physicochemical and structural properties. The classification algorithm was constructed as a two-layered structure in which the output of primary support vector machine classifiers operating on peptide frequencies was combined by a second-level Naive Bayes classifier. Due to the application of metamethods for cost sensitivity, our method is able to handle real datasets with unbalanced class representation. An overall prediction accuracy of 67% [65% on the positive (crystallizable) and 69% on the negative (noncrystallizable) class] was achieved in a 10-fold cross-validation experiment, indicating that the proposed algorithm may be a valuable tool for more efficient target selection in structural genomics. A Web server for protein crystallizability prediction called SECRET is available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de:8080/secret. PMID:16315316

  12. FAB overlapping: a strategy for sequencing homologous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, P.; Malorni, A.; Marino, G.; Pucci, P.; di Luccia, A.; Ferrara, L.

    1991-12-01

    Extensive similarity has been shown to exist between the primary structures of closely related proteins from different species, the only differences being restricted to a few amino acid variations. A new mass spectrometric procedure, which has been called FAB-overlapping, has been developed for sequencing highly homologous proteins based on the detection of these small differences as compared with a known protein used as a reference. Several complementary peptide maps are constructed using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis of different proteolytic digests of the unknown protein and the mass values are related to those expected on the basis of the sequence of the reference protein. The mass signals exhibiting unusual mass values identify those regions where variations have taken place; fine location of the mutations can be obtained by coupling simple protein chemistry methodologies with FAB-MS. Using the FAB-overlapping procedure, it was possible to determine the sequence of [alpha]1, [alpha]3 and [beta] globins from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis hemoglobins (phenotype AA). Two amino acid substitutions were detected in the buffalo [beta] chain (Lys16 --> His and Asn118 --> His) whereas the [alpha]1 chains were found the [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 chains were found to contain four amino acid replacements, three of which were identical (Glu23 --> Asp, Glu71 --> Gly, Phe117 --> Cys), and the insertion of an alanine residue in position 124. The only differences between [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 globins were identified in the C -terminal region; [alpha]1 contains a Phe residue at position 130 whereas [alpha]3 shows serine at position 132.

  13. The Protein Information Resource (PIR) and the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database.

    PubMed Central

    George, D G; Dodson, R J; Garavelli, J S; Haft, D H; Hunt, L T; Marzec, C R; Orcutt, B C; Sidman, K E; Srinivasarao, G Y; Yeh, L S; Arminski, L M; Ledley, R S; Tsugita, A; Barker, W C

    1997-01-01

    From its origin, the PIR has aspired to support research in computational biology and genomics through the compilation of a comprehensive, quality controlled and well-organized protein sequence information resource. The resource originated with the pioneering work of the late Margaret O. Dayhoff in the early 1960s. Since 1988, the Protein Sequence Database has been maintained collaboratively by PIR-International, an association of macromolecular sequence data collection centers dedicated to fostering international cooperation as an essential element in the development of scientific databases. The work of the resource is widely distributed and is available on the World Wide Web, via FTP, E-mail server, CD-ROM and magnetic media. It is widely redistributed and incorporated into many other protein sequence data compilations including SWISS-PROT and theEntrezsystem of the NCBI. PMID:9016497

  14. Identification of short peptide sequences in complex milk protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Martina B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    Numerous low molecular mass bioactive peptides (BAPs) can be generated during the hydrolysis of bovine milk proteins. Low molecular mass BAP sequences are less likely to be broken down by digestive enzymes and are thus more likely to be active in vivo. However, the identification of short peptides remains a challenge during mass spectrometry (MS) analysis due to issues with the transfer and over-fragmentation of low molecular mass ions. A method is described herein using time-of-flight ESI-MS/MS to effectively fragment and identify short peptides. This includes (a) short synthetic peptides, (b) short peptides within a defined hydrolysate sample, i.e. a prolyl endoproteinase hydrolysate of β-casein and (c) short peptides within a complex hydrolysate, i.e. a Corolase PP digest of sodium caseinate. The methodology may find widespread utilisation in the efficient identification of low molecular mass peptide sequences in food protein hydrolysates. PMID:25872436

  15. Nucleotide sequence of the phosphoglycerate kinase gene from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the mesophilic yeast phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D; Littlechild, J A; Fothergill, J E; Watson, H C; Hall, L

    1988-01-01

    Using oligonucleotide probes derived from amino acid sequencing information, the structural gene for phosphoglycerate kinase from the extreme thermophile, Thermus thermophilus, was cloned in Escherichia coli and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. The gene consists of an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of 390 amino acid residues (calculated Mr 41,791) with an extreme bias for G or C (93.1%) in the codon third base position. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with that of the corresponding mesophilic yeast enzyme indicated a number of significant differences. These are discussed in terms of the unusual codon bias and their possible role in enhanced protein thermal stability. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3052437

  16. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasenko, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  17. Successful Recovery of Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes from Small Insects in Museums Using Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Kojun; Pflug, James M; Sproul, John S; Dasenko, Mark A; Maddison, David R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore high-throughput Illumina sequencing of nuclear protein-coding, ribosomal, and mitochondrial genes in small, dried insects stored in natural history collections. We sequenced one tenebrionid beetle and 12 carabid beetles ranging in size from 3.7 to 9.7 mm in length that have been stored in various museums for 4 to 84 years. Although we chose a number of old, small specimens for which we expected low sequence recovery, we successfully recovered at least some low-copy nuclear protein-coding genes from all specimens. For example, in one 56-year-old beetle, 4.4 mm in length, our de novo assembly recovered about 63% of approximately 41,900 nucleotides in a target suite of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments, and 70% using a reference-based assembly. Even in the least successfully sequenced carabid specimen, reference-based assembly yielded fragments that were at least 50% of the target length for 34 of 67 nuclear protein-coding gene fragments. Exploration of alternative references for reference-based assembly revealed few signs of bias created by the reference. For all specimens we recovered almost complete copies of ribosomal and mitochondrial genes. We verified the general accuracy of the sequences through comparisons with sequences obtained from PCR and Sanger sequencing, including of conspecific, fresh specimens, and through phylogenetic analysis that tested the placement of sequences in predicted regions. A few possible inaccuracies in the sequences were detected, but these rarely affected the phylogenetic placement of the samples. Although our sample sizes are low, an exploratory regression study suggests that the dominant factor in predicting success at recovering nuclear protein-coding genes is a high number of Illumina reads, with success at PCR of COI and killing by immersion in ethanol being secondary factors; in analyses of only high-read samples, the primary significant explanatory variable was body length, with small beetles

  18. Computational identification of MoRFs in protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Malhis, Nawar; Gsponer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Intrinsically disordered regions of proteins play an essential role in the regulation of various biological processes. Key to their regulatory function is the binding of molecular recognition features (MoRFs) to globular protein domains in a process known as a disorder-to-order transition. Predicting the location of MoRFs in protein sequences with high accuracy remains an important computational challenge. Method: In this study, we introduce MoRFCHiBi, a new computational approach for fast and accurate prediction of MoRFs in protein sequences. MoRFCHiBi combines the outcomes of two support vector machine (SVM) models that take advantage of two different kernels with high noise tolerance. The first, SVMS, is designed to extract maximal information from the general contrast in amino acid compositions between MoRFs, their surrounding regions (Flanks), and the remainders of the sequences. The second, SVMT, is used to identify similarities between regions in a query sequence and MoRFs of the training set. Results: We evaluated the performance of our predictor by comparing its results with those of two currently available MoRF predictors, MoRFpred and ANCHOR. Using three test sets that have previously been collected and used to evaluate MoRFpred and ANCHOR, we demonstrate that MoRFCHiBi outperforms the other predictors with respect to different evaluation metrics. In addition, MoRFCHiBi is downloadable and fast, which makes it useful as a component in other computational prediction tools. Availability and implementation: http://www.chibi.ubc.ca/morf/. Contact: gsponer@chibi.ubc.ca. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25637562

  19. Functional analysis of bipartite begomovirus coat protein promoter sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Lacatus, Gabriela; Sunter, Garry

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate that the AL2 gene of Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) activates the CP promoter in mesophyll and acts to derepress the promoter in vascular tissue, similar to that observed for Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Binding studies indicate that sequences mediating repression and activation of the TGMV and CaLCuV CP promoter specifically bind different nuclear factors common to Nicotiana benthamiana, spinach and tomato. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TGMV AL2 can interact with both sequences independently. Binding of nuclear protein(s) from different crop species to viral sequences conserved in both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses, including TGMV, CaLCuV, Pepper golden mosaic virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus suggests that bipartite begomoviruses bind common host factors to regulate the CP promoter. This is consistent with a model in which AL2 interacts with different components of the cellular transcription machinery that bind viral sequences important for repression and activation of begomovirus CP promoters.

  20. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  1. GlobPlot: exploring protein sequences for globularity and disorder

    PubMed Central

    Linding, Rune; Russell, Robert B.; Neduva, Victor; Gibson, Toby J.

    2003-01-01

    A major challenge in the proteomics and structural genomics era is to predict protein structure and function, including identification of those proteins that are partially or wholly unstructured. Non-globular sequence segments often contain short linear peptide motifs (e.g. SH3-binding sites) which are important for protein function. We present here a new tool for discovery of such unstructured, or disordered regions within proteins. GlobPlot (http://globplot.embl.de) is a web service that allows the user to plot the tendency within the query protein for order/globularity and disorder. We show examples with known proteins where it successfully identifies inter-domain segments containing linear motifs, and also apparently ordered regions that do not contain any recognised domain. GlobPlot may be useful in domain hunting efforts. The plots indicate that instances of known domains may often contain additional N- or C-terminal segments that appear ordered. Thus GlobPlot may be of use in the design of constructs corresponding to globular proteins, as needed for many biochemical studies, particularly structural biology. GlobPlot has a pipeline interface—GlobPipe—for the advanced user to do whole proteome analysis. GlobPlot can also be used as a generic infrastructure package for graphical displaying of any possible propensity. PMID:12824398

  2. Binding of CCAAT displacement protein CDP to adenovirus packaging sequences.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Ece; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Wells, Susanne I; Yang, Jihong; Gregg, Keqin; Nepveu, Alain; Dudley, Jaquelin P; Hearing, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) type 5 DNA packaging is initiated in a polar fashion from the left end of the genome. The packaging process is dependent upon the cis-acting packaging domain located between nucleotides 194 and 380. Seven A/T-rich repeats have been identified within this domain that direct packaging. A1, A2, A5, and A6 are the most important repeats functionally and share a bipartite sequence motif. Several lines of evidence suggest that there is a limiting trans-acting factor(s) that plays a role in packaging. Two cellular activities that bind to minimal packaging domains in vitro have been previously identified. These binding activities are P complex, an uncharacterized protein(s), and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF). In this work, we report that a third cellular protein, octamer-1 protein (Oct-1), binds to minimal packaging domains. In vitro binding analyses and in vivo packaging assays were used to examine the relevance of these DNA binding activities to Ad DNA packaging. The results of these experiments reveal that COUP-TF and Oct-1 binding does not play a functional role in Ad packaging, whereas P-complex binding directly correlates with packaging function. We demonstrate that P complex contains the cellular protein CCAAT displacement protein (CDP) and that full-length CDP is found in purified virus particles. In addition to cellular factors, previous evidence indicates that viral factors play a role in the initiation of viral DNA packaging. We propose that CDP, in conjunction with one or more viral proteins, binds to the packaging sequences of Ad to initiate the encapsidation process. PMID:12743282

  3. Methods for optimizing the structure alphabet sequences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi-wen; Wang, Xiao-long; Lin, Lei

    2007-11-01

    Protein structure prediction based on fragment assemble has made great progress in recent years. Local protein structure prediction is receiving increased attention. One essential step of local protein structure prediction method is that the three-dimensional conformations must be compressed into one-dimensional series of letters of a structural alphabet. The traditional method assigns each structure fragment the structure alphabet that has the best local structure similarity. However, such locally optimal structure alphabet sequence does not guarantee to produce the globally optimal structure. This study presents two efficient methods trying to find the optimal structure alphabet sequence, which can model the native structures as accuracy as possible. First, a 28-letter structure alphabet is derived by clustering fragment in Cartesian space with fragment length of seven residues. The average quantization error of the 28 letters is 0.82 A in term of root mean square deviation. Then, two efficient methods are presented to encode the protein structures into series of structure alphabet letters, that is, the greedy and dynamic programming algorithm. They are tested on PDB database using the structure alphabet developed in Cartesian coordinates space (our structure alphabet) and in torsion angles space (the PB structure alphabet), respectively. The experimental results show that these two methods can find the approximately optimal structure alphabet sequences by searching a small fraction of the modeling space. The traditional local-optimization method achieves 26.27 A root mean square deviations between the reconstructed structures and the native one, while the modeling accuracy is improved to 3.28 A by the greedy algorithm. The results are helpful for local protein structure prediction. PMID:17493604

  4. Isolation and characterization of adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP) related sequences in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Geraghty, M.T.; Stetten, G.; Kearns, W.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a disorder of peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. It presents either as progressive dementia in childhood or as progressive paraparesis in later years. Adrenal insufficiency occurs in both phenotypes. The gene of the ALD protein has been mapped to Xq28 and has recently been cloned and characterized. The ALD protein has significant homology to the peroxisomal membrane protein, PMP70 and belongs to the ATP binding cassette superfamily of transporters. We screened a human genomic library with an ALDP cDNA and isolated 5 different but highly similar clones containing sequences corresponding to the 3{prime} end of the ALDP gene. Comparison of the sequences over the region corresponding to exon 9 through the 3{prime} end of the ALDP gene reveals {approximately}96% nucleotide identity in both exonic and intronic regions. Splice sites and open reading frames are maintained. Using both FISH and human-rodent DNA mapping panels, we positively assign these ALDP-related sequences to chromosomes 2, 16 and 22, and provisionally to 1 and 20. Southern blot of primate DNA probed with a partial ALDP cDNA (exon 2-10) shows that expansion of ALDP-related sequences occurred in higher primates (chimp, gorilla and human). Although Northern blots show multiple ALDP-hybridizing transcripts in certain tissues, we have no evidence to date for expression of these ALDP-related sequences. In conclusion, our data show there has been an unusual and recent dispersal to multiple chromosomes of structural gene sequences related to the ALDP gene. The functional significance of these sequences remains to be determined but their existence complicates PCR and mutation analysis of the ALDP gene.

  5. A New Hidden Markov Model for Protein Quality Assessment Using Compatibility Between Protein Sequence and Structure

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiquan; Ma, Wenji; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein structure Quality Assessment (QA) is an essential component in protein structure prediction and analysis. The relationship between protein sequence and structure often serves as a basis for protein structure QA. In this work, we developed a new Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to assess the compatibility of protein sequence and structure for capturing their complex relationship. More specifically, the emission of the HMM consists of protein local structures in angular space, secondary structures, and sequence profiles. This model has two capabilities: (1) encoding local structure of each position by jointly considering sequence and structure information, and (2) assigning a global score to estimate the overall quality of a predicted structure, as well as local scores to assess the quality of specific regions of a structure, which provides useful guidance for targeted structure refinement. We compared the HMM model to state-of-art single structure quality assessment methods OPUSCA, DFIRE, GOAP, and RW in protein structure selection. Computational results showed our new score HMM.Z can achieve better overall selection performance on the benchmark datasets. PMID:26221066

  6. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  7. Substrate-Driven Mapping of the Degradome by Comparison of Sequence Logos

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Huber, Roland G.; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2013-01-01

    Sequence logos are frequently used to illustrate substrate preferences and specificity of proteases. Here, we employed the compiled substrates of the MEROPS database to introduce a novel metric for comparison of protease substrate preferences. The constructed similarity matrix of 62 proteases can be used to intuitively visualize similarities in protease substrate readout via principal component analysis and construction of protease specificity trees. Since our new metric is solely based on substrate data, we can engraft the protease tree including proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin. Thereby, our analyses confirm pronounced overlaps in substrate recognition not only between proteases closely related on sequence basis but also between proteolytic enzymes of different evolutionary origin and catalytic type. To illustrate the applicability of our approach we analyze the distribution of targets of small molecules from the ChEMBL database in our substrate-based protease specificity trees. We observe a striking clustering of annotated targets in tree branches even though these grouped targets do not necessarily share similarity on protein sequence level. This highlights the value and applicability of knowledge acquired from peptide substrates in drug design of small molecules, e.g., for the prediction of off-target effects or drug repurposing. Consequently, our similarity metric allows to map the degradome and its associated drug target network via comparison of known substrate peptides. The substrate-driven view of protein-protein interfaces is not limited to the field of proteases but can be applied to any target class where a sufficient amount of known substrate data is available. PMID:24244149

  8. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Erin R.; Howe, Christopher J.; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron–sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  9. Identification of Sequences Encoding Symbiodinium minutum Mitochondrial Proteins.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Erin R; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, R Ellen R

    2016-02-01

    The dinoflagellates are an extremely diverse group of algae closely related to the Apicomplexa and the ciliates. Much work has previously been undertaken to determine the presence of various biochemical pathways within dinoflagellate mitochondria. However, these studies were unable to identify several key transcripts including those encoding proteins involved in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, and protein import. Here, we analyze the draft nuclear genome of the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum, as well as RNAseq data to identify nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins. The results confirm the presence of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle in the dinoflagellates. Results also demonstrate the difficulties in using the genome sequence for the identification of genes due to the large number of introns, but show that it is highly useful for the determination of gene duplication events. PMID:26798115

  10. Evaluation of intra- and interspecific divergence of satellite DNA sequences by nucleotide frequency calculation and pairwise sequence comparison

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences are known to be highly variable and to have been subjected to concerted evolution that homogenizes member sequences within species. We have analyzed the mode of evolution of satellite DNA sequences in four fishes from the genus Diplodus by calculating the nucleotide frequency of the sequence array and the phylogenetic distances between member sequences. Calculation of nucleotide frequency and pairwise sequence comparison enabled us to characterize the divergence among member sequences in this satellite DNA family. The results suggest that the evolutionary rate of satellite DNA in D. bellottii is about two-fold greater than the average of the other three fishes, and that the sequence homogenization event occurred in D. puntazzo more recently than in the others. The procedures described here are effective to characterize mode of evolution of satellite DNA. PMID:12734555

  11. Evaluation of intra- and interspecific divergence of satellite DNA sequences by nucleotide frequency calculation and pairwise sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mikio

    2003-01-01

    Satellite DNA sequences are known to be highly variable and to have been subjected to concerted evolution that homogenizes member sequences within species. We have analyzed the mode of evolution of satellite DNA sequences in four fishes from the genus Diplodus by calculating the nucleotide frequency of the sequence array and the phylogenetic distances between member sequences. Calculation of nucleotide frequency and pairwise sequence comparison enabled us to characterize the divergence among member sequences in this satellite DNA family. The results suggest that the evolutionary rate of satellite DNA in D. bellottii is about two-fold greater than the average of the other three fishes, and that the sequence homogenization event occurred in D. puntazzo more recently than in the others. The procedures described here are effective to characterize mode of evolution of satellite DNA. PMID:12734555

  12. DNA topology confers sequence specificity to nonspecific architectural proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Juan; Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2014-11-25

    Topological constraints placed on short fragments of DNA change the disorder found in chain molecules randomly decorated by nonspecific, architectural proteins into tightly organized 3D structures. The bacterial heat-unstable (HU) protein builds up, counter to expectations, in greater quantities and at particular sites along simulated DNA minicircles and loops. Moreover, the placement of HU along loops with the "wild-type" spacing found in the Escherichia coli lactose (lac) and galactose (gal) operons precludes access to key recognition elements on DNA. The HU protein introduces a unique spatial pathway in the DNA upon closure. The many ways in which the protein induces nearly the same closed circular configuration point to the statistical advantage of its nonspecificity. The rotational settings imposed on DNA by the repressor proteins, by contrast, introduce sequential specificity in HU placement, with the nonspecific protein accumulating at particular loci on the constrained duplex. Thus, an architectural protein with no discernible DNA sequence-recognizing features becomes site-specific and potentially assumes a functional role upon loop formation. The locations of HU on the closed DNA reflect long-range mechanical correlations. The protein responds to DNA shape and deformability—the stiff, naturally straight double-helical structure—rather than to the unique features of the constituent base pairs. The structures of the simulated loops suggest that HU architecture, like nucleosomal architecture, which modulates the ability of regulatory proteins to recognize their binding sites in the context of chromatin, may influence repressor-operator interactions in the context of the bacterial nucleoid. PMID:25385626

  13. Whole Chloroplast Genome Sequencing in Fragaria Using Deep Sequencing: A Comparison of Three Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast sequences previously investigated in Fragaria revealed low amounts of variation. Deep sequencing technologies enable economical sequencing of complete chloroplast genomes. These sequences can potentially provide robust phylogenetic resolution, even at low taxonomic levels within plant gr...

  14. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  15. Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins: sequence motifs in structural and evolutionary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, Gerald J.; Solidar, Ada; Yoden, Marilyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are a family of monomeric proteins that bind and transfer phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine between membrane compartments. They are required for production of inositol and diacylglycerol second messengers, and are found in most metazoan organisms. While PITPs are known to carry out crucial cell-signaling roles in many organisms, the structure, function and evolution of the majority of family members remains unexplored; primarily because the ubiquity and diversity of the family thwarts traditional methods of global alignment. To surmount this obstacle, we instead took a novel approach, using MEME and a parsimony-based analysis to create a cladogram of conserved sequence motifs in 56 PITP family proteins from 26 species. In keeping with previous functional annotations, three clades were supported within our evolutionary analysis; two classes of soluble proteins and a class of membrane-associated proteins. By, focusing on conserved regions, the analysis allowed for in depth queries regarding possible functional roles of PITP proteins in both intra- and extra- cellular signaling.

  16. Probing protein sequences as sources for encrypted antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Brand, Guilherme D; Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Tinoco, Maria L P; Aragão, Francisco J L; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  17. Sequence comparisons in the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with emphasis on regions of likely homology with sequences in the Rossmann fold in the methionyl and tyrosyl enzymes.

    PubMed

    Walker, E J; Jeffrey, P D

    1988-02-01

    Amino acid sequences of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases specific for 12 different amino acids have now been published. Differences in origin at the species and organelle level result in 20 distinct sequences being available for comparison. Some of these were compared in small groups as they were determined and, although some homologies were detected, it was generally concluded that there was surprisingly little sequence homology in this functionally related group of enzymes. We have made comparisons of all of the available sequences by using a combination of computer and manual alignment methods and knowledge of the sequences in the Rossmann fold region of methionyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase from B. stearothermophilus, enzymes whose three-dimensional structures have been described. It emerges that all of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase sequences thus examined show considerable homology with each other over at least parts of this region, some over virtually all of it. We conclude that a great deal more similarity than had previously been suspected exists in these proteins. In particular, the alignments we have made strongly imply the existence of a mononucleotide binding site of the Rossmann fold configuration in all of the synthetases compared. PMID:3283733

  18. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/. PMID:22805427

  19. Alignment-free comparison of genome sequences by a new numerical characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guohua; Zhou, Houqing; Li, Yongfan; Xu, Lixin

    2011-07-21

    In order to compare different genome sequences, an alignment-free method has proposed. First, we presented a new graphical representation of DNA sequences without degeneracy, which is conducive to intuitive comparison of sequences. Then, a new numerical characterization based on the representation was introduced to quantitatively depict the intrinsic nature of genome sequences, and considered as a 10-dimensional vector in the mathematical space. Alignment-free comparison of sequences was performed by computing the distances between vectors of the corresponding numerical characterizations, which define the evolutionary relationship. Two data sets of DNA sequences were constructed to assess the performance on sequence comparison. The results illustrate well validity of the method. The new numerical characterization provides a powerful tool for genome comparison. PMID:21536050

  20. Prediction of neddylation sites from protein sequences and sequence-derived properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Neddylation is a reversible post-translational modification that plays a vital role in maintaining cellular machinery. It is shown to affect localization, binding partners and structure of target proteins. Disruption of protein neddylation was observed in various diseases such as Alzheimer's and cancer. Therefore, understanding the neddylation mechanism and determining neddylation targets possibly bears a huge importance in further understanding the cellular processes. This study is the first attempt to predict neddylated sites from protein sequences by using several sequence and sequence-based structural features. Results We have developed a neddylation site prediction method using a support vector machine based on various sequence properties, position-specific scoring matrices, and disorder. Using 21 amino acid long lysine-centred windows, our model was able to predict neddylation sites successfully, with an average 5-fold stratified cross validation performance of 0.91, 0.91, 0.75, 0.44, 0.95 for accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Matthew's correlation coefficient and area under curve, respectively. Independent test set results validated the robustness of reported new method. Additionally, we observed that neddylation sites are commonly flexible and there is a significant positively charged amino acid presence in neddylation sites. Conclusions In this study, a neddylation site prediction method was developed for the first time in literature. Common characteristics of neddylation sites and their discriminative properties were explored for further in silico studies on neddylation. Lastly, up-to-date neddylation dataset was provided for researchers working on post-translational modifications in the accompanying supplementary material of this article. PMID:26679222

  1. MutaBind estimates and interprets the effects of sequence variants on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Simonetti, Franco L; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins engage in highly selective interactions with their macromolecular partners. Sequence variants that alter protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. There exists a persistent need to develop a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on proteins. To address this need we introduce a new computational method MutaBind to evaluate the effects of sequence variants and disease mutations on protein interactions and calculate the quantitative changes in binding affinity. The MutaBind method uses molecular mechanics force fields, statistical potentials and fast side-chain optimization algorithms. The MutaBind server maps mutations on a structural protein complex, calculates the associated changes in binding affinity, determines the deleterious effect of a mutation, estimates the confidence of this prediction and produces a mutant structural model for download. MutaBind can be applied to a large number of problems, including determination of potential driver mutations in cancer and other diseases, elucidation of the effects of sequence variants on protein fitness in evolution and protein design. MutaBind is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutabind/. PMID:27150810

  2. A minimal sequence code for switching protein structure and function.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Patrick A; He, Yanan; Chen, Yihong; Orban, John; Bryan, Philip N

    2009-12-15

    We present here a structural and mechanistic description of how a protein changes its fold and function, mutation by mutation. Our approach was to create 2 proteins that (i) are stably folded into 2 different folds, (ii) have 2 different functions, and (iii) are very similar in sequence. In this simplified sequence space we explore the mutational path from one fold to another. We show that an IgG-binding, 4beta+alpha fold can be transformed into an albumin-binding, 3-alpha fold via a mutational pathway in which neither function nor native structure is completely lost. The stabilities of all mutants along the pathway are evaluated, key high-resolution structures are determined by NMR, and an explanation of the switching mechanism is provided. We show that the conformational switch from 4beta+alpha to 3-alpha structure can occur via a single amino acid substitution. On one side of the switch point, the 4beta+alpha fold is >90% populated (pH 7.2, 20 degrees C). A single mutation switches the conformation to the 3-alpha fold, which is >90% populated (pH 7.2, 20 degrees C). We further show that a bifunctional protein exists at the switch point with affinity for both IgG and albumin. PMID:19923431

  3. Sequence Heterogeneity Accelerates Protein Search for Targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey; Kolomeisky, Anatoly

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry and heterogeneity of a genome. The work was supported by the Welch Foundation (Grant C-1559), by the NSF (Grant CHE-1360979), and by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  4. Phenotypic comparisons of consensus variants versus laboratory resurrections of Precambrian proteins.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Consensus-sequence engineering has generated protein variants with enhanced stability, and sometimes, with modulated biological function. Consensus mutations are often interpreted as the introduction of ancestral amino acid residues. However, the precise relationship between consensus engineering and ancestral protein resurrection is not fully understood. Here, we report the properties of proteins encoded by consensus sequences derived from a multiple sequence alignment of extant, class A β-lactamases, as compared with the properties of ancient Precambrian β-lactamases resurrected in the laboratory. These comparisons considered primary sequence, secondary, and tertiary structure, as well as stability and catalysis against different antibiotics. Out of the three consensus variants generated, one could not be expressed and purified (likely due to misfolding and/or low stability) and only one displayed substantial stability having substrate promiscuity, although to a lower extent than ancient β-lactamases. These results: (i) highlight the phenotypic differences between consensus variants and laboratory resurrections of ancestral proteins; (ii) question interpretations of consensus proteins as phenotypic proxies of ancestral proteins; and (iii) support the notion that ancient proteins provide a robust approach toward the preparation of protein variants having large numbers of mutational changes while possessing unique biomolecular properties. PMID:24710963

  5. Comparison of Complete Genome Sequences of Usutu Virus Strains Detected in Spain, Central Europe, and Africa

    PubMed Central

    Busquets, Núria; Nowotny, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The complete genomic sequence of Usutu virus (USUV, genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) strain MB119/06, detected in a pool of Culex pipiens mosquitoes in northeastern Spain (Viladecans, Catalonia) in 2006, was determined and analyzed. The phylogenetic relationship with all other available complete USUV genome sequences was established. The Spanish sequence investigated showed the closest relationship to the USUV prototype strain SA AR 1776 isolated in South Africa in 1959 (96.9% nucleotide and 98.8% amino acid identities). Conserved structural elements and enzyme motifs of the putative polyprotein precursor were identified. Unique amino acid substitutions were recognized; however, their potential roles as virulence markers could not be verified. Comparisons of the polyprotein precursor sequences of USUV strains detected in mosquitoes, birds, and humans could not confirm the predicted role of unique amino acid substitutions in relation to virulence in humans. Phylogenetic analysis of a partial coding section of the NS5 protein gene region indicated that USUV strains circulating in Europe form three different genetic clusters. Broad and targeted surveys for USUV in mosquitoes could reveal further details of the geographic distribution and genetic diversity of the virus in Europe and in Africa. PMID:24746182

  6. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  7. Sequence-Specific Solvent Accessibilities of Protein Residues in Unfolded Protein Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Bernadó, Pau; Blackledge, Martin; Sancho, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Protein stability cannot be understood without the correct description of the unfolded state. We present here an efficient method for accurate calculation of atomic solvent exposures for denatured protein ensembles. The method used to generate the ensembles has been shown to reproduce diverse biophysical experimental data corresponding to natively and chemically unfolded proteins. Using a data set of 19 nonhomologous proteins containing from 98 to 579 residues, we report average accessibilities for all residue types. These averaged accessibilities are considerably lower than those previously reported for tripeptides and close to the lower limit reported by Creamer and co-workers. Of importance, we observe remarkable sequence dependence for the exposure to solvent of all residue types, which indicates that average residue solvent exposures can be inappropriate to interpret mutational studies. In addition, we observe smaller influences of both protein size and protein amino acid composition in the averaged residue solvent exposures for individual proteins. Calculating residue-specific solvent accessibilities within the context of real sequences is thus necessary and feasible. The approach presented here may allow a more precise parameterization of protein energetics as a function of polar- and apolar-area burial and opens new ways to investigate the energetics of the unfolded state of proteins. PMID:17012314

  8. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 and comparison with Pyrococcus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Toshiaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Kanai, Tamotsu; Matsumi, Rie; Fujiwara, Shinsuke; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2005-01-01

    The genus Thermococcus, comprised of sulfur-reducing hyperthermophilic archaea, belongs to the order Thermococcales in Euryarchaeota along with the closely related genus Pyrococcus. The members of Thermococcus are ubiquitously present in natural high-temperature environments, and are therefore considered to play a major role in the ecology and metabolic activity of microbial consortia within hot-water ecosystems. To obtain insight into this important genus, we have determined and annotated the complete 2,088,737-base genome of Thermococcus kodakaraensis strain KOD1, followed by a comparison with the three complete genomes of Pyrococcus spp. A total of 2306 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) have been identified, among which half (1165 CDSs) are annotatable, whereas the functions of 41% (936 CDSs) cannot be predicted from the primary structures. The genome contains seven genes for probable transposases and four virus-related regions. Several proteins within these genetic elements show high similarities to those in Pyrococcus spp., implying the natural occurrence of horizontal gene transfer of such mobile elements among the order Thermococcales. Comparative genomics clarified that 1204 proteins, including those for information processing and basic metabolisms, are shared among T. kodakaraensis and the three Pyrococcus spp. On the other hand, among the set of 689 proteins unique to T. kodakaraensis, there are several intriguing proteins that might be responsible for the specific trait of the genus Thermococcus, such as proteins involved in additional pyruvate oxidation, nucleotide metabolisms, unique or additional metal ion transporters, improved stress response system, and a distinct restriction system. PMID:15710748

  9. Identification of Sequence Specificity of 5-Methylcytosine Oxidation by Tet1 Protein with High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kizaki, Seiichiro; Chandran, Anandhakumar; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Tet (ten-eleven translocation) family proteins have the ability to oxidize 5-methylcytosine (mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), 5-formylcytosine (fC), and 5-carboxycytosine (caC). However, the oxidation reaction of Tet is not understood completely. Evaluation of genomic-level epigenetic changes by Tet protein requires unbiased identification of the highly selective oxidation sites. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the sequence specificity of mC oxidation by Tet1. A 6.6×10(4) -member mC-containing random DNA-sequence library was constructed. The library was subjected to Tet-reactive pulldown followed by high-throughput sequencing. Analysis of the obtained sequence data identified the Tet1-reactive sequences. We identified mCpG as a highly reactive sequence of Tet1 protein. PMID:26715454

  10. NCBI Reference Sequence (RefSeq): a curated non-redundant sequence database of genomes, transcripts and proteins.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Kim D; Tatusova, Tatiana; Maglott, Donna R

    2005-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Reference Sequence (RefSeq) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/RefSeq/) provides a non-redundant collection of sequences representing genomic data, transcripts and proteins. Although the goal is to provide a comprehensive dataset representing the complete sequence information for any given species, the database pragmatically includes sequence data that are currently publicly available in the archival databases. The database incorporates data from over 2400 organisms and includes over one million proteins representing significant taxonomic diversity spanning prokaryotes, eukaryotes and viruses. Nucleotide and protein sequences are explicitly linked, and the sequences are linked to other resources including the NCBI Map Viewer and Gene. Sequences are annotated to include coding regions, conserved domains, variation, references, names, database cross-references, and other features using a combined approach of collaboration and other input from the scientific community, automated annotation, propagation from GenBank and curation by NCBI staff. PMID:15608248

  11. Fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes: sequence of the binding domain involved in adherence of streptococci to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Talay, S R; Valentin-Weigand, P; Jerlström, P G; Timmis, K N; Chhatwal, G S

    1992-01-01

    The sequence of the fibronectin-binding domain of the fibronectin-binding protein of Streptococcus pyogenes (Sfb protein) was determined, and its role in streptococcal adherence was investigated by use of an Sfb fusion protein in adherence studies. A 1-kb DNA fragment coding for the binding domain of Sfb protein was cloned into the expression vector pEX31 to produce an Sfb fusion protein consisting of the N-terminal part of MS2 polymerase and a C-terminal fragment of the streptococcal protein. Induction of the vector promoter resulted in hyperexpression of fibronectin-binding fusion protein in the cytoplasm of the recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Sequence determination of the cloned 1-kb fragment revealed an in-frame reading frame for a 268-amino-acid peptide composed of a 37-amino-acid sequence which is completely repeated three times and incompletely repeated a fourth time. Cloning of one repeat into pEX31 resulted in expression of small fusion peptides that show fibronectin-binding activity, indicating that one repeat contains at least one binding domain. Each repeat exhibits two charged domains and shows high homology with the 38-amino-acid D3 repeat of the fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus. Sequence comparison with other streptococcal ligand-binding surface proteins, including M protein, failed to reveal significant homology, which suggests that Sfb protein represents a novel type of functional protein in S. pyogenes. The Sfb fusion protein isolated from the cytoplasm of recombinant cells was purified by fast protein liquid chromatography. It showed a strong competitive inhibition of fibronectin binding to S. pyogenes and of the adherence of bacteria to cultured epithelial cells. In contrast, purified streptococcal lipoteichoic acid showed only a weak inhibition of fibronectin binding and streptococcal adherence. These results demonstrate that Sfb protein is directly involved in the fibronectin-mediated adherence of S. pyogenes to

  12. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  13. Sequence comparison on a cluster of workstations using the PVM system

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1995-02-01

    We have implemented a distributed sequence comparison algorithm on a cluster of workstations using the PVM paradigm. This implementation has achieved similar performance to the intel iPSC/860 Hypercube, a massively parallel computer. The distributed sequence comparison algorithm serves as a search tool for two Internet servers GRAIL and GENQUEST. This paper describes the implementation and the performance of the algorithm.

  14. Genome sequence comparison of two United States live attenuated vaccines of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Yohanna Gita; Lee, Jeongyoon; Kong, Byung-Whi

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to identify unique nucleotide differences in two U.S. chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines [LT Blen (GenBank accession: JQ083493) designated as vaccine 1; Laryngo-Vac(®) (GenBank accession: JQ083494) designated as vaccine 2] of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) genomes compared to an Australian Serva vaccine reference ILTV genome sequence [Gallid herpesvirus 1 (GaHV-1); GenBank accession number: HQ630064]. Genomes of the two vaccine ILTV strains were sequenced using Illumina Genome Analyzer 2X of 36 cycles of single-end reads. Results revealed that few nucleotide differences (23 in vaccine 1; 31 in vaccine 2) were found and indicate that the US CEO strains are practically identical to the Australian Serva CEO strain, which is a European-origin vaccine. The sequence differences demonstrated the spectrum of variability among vaccine strains. Only eight amino acid differences were found in ILTV proteins including UL54, UL27, UL28, UL20, UL1, ICP4, and US8 in vaccine 1. Similarly, in vaccine 2, eight amino acid differences were found in UL54, UL27, UL28, UL36, UL1, ICP4, US10, and US8. Further comparison of US CEO vaccines to several ILTV genome sequences revealed that US CEO vaccines are genetically close to both the Serva vaccine and 63140/C/08/BR (GenBank accession: HM188407) and are distinct from the two Australian-origin CEO vaccines, SA2 (GenBank accession: JN596962) and A20 (GenBank accession: JN596963), which showed close similarity to each other. These data demonstrate the potential of high-throughput sequencing technology to yield insight into the sequence variation of different ILTV strains. This information can be used to discriminate between vaccine ILTV strains and further, to identify newly emerging mutant strains of field isolates. PMID:22382591

  15. No genome-wide protein sequence convergence for echolocation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2015-05-01

    Toothed whales and two groups of bats independently acquired echolocation, the ability to locate and identify objects by reflected sound. Echolocation requires physiologically complex and coordinated vocal, auditory, and neural functions, but the molecular basis of the capacity for echolocation is not well understood. A recent study suggested that convergent amino acid substitutions widespread in the proteins of echolocators underlay the convergent origins of mammalian echolocation. Here, we show that genomic signatures of molecular convergence between echolocating lineages are generally no stronger than those between echolocating and comparable nonecholocating lineages. The same is true for the group of 29 hearing-related proteins claimed to be enriched with molecular convergence. Reexamining the previous selection test reveals several flaws and invalidates the asserted evidence for adaptive convergence. Together, these findings indicate that the reported genomic signatures of convergence largely reflect the background level of sequence convergence unrelated to the origins of echolocation. PMID:25631925

  16. Sequence-dependent Prion Protein Misfolding and Neurotoxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; Zhang, Yan; Casas-Tinto, Sergio; Xiao, Xiangzhu; Zou, Wen-Quan; Rincon-Limas, Diego E.

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by misfolding of the normal prion protein (PrP) into a pathogenic “scrapie” conformation. To better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern the conformational changes (conversion) of PrP, we compared the dynamics of PrP from mammals susceptible (hamster and mouse) and resistant (rabbit) to prion diseases in transgenic flies. We recently showed that hamster PrP induces spongiform degeneration and accumulates into highly aggregated, scrapie-like conformers in transgenic flies. We show now that rabbit PrP does not induce spongiform degeneration and does not convert into scrapie-like conformers. Surprisingly, mouse PrP induces weak neurodegeneration and accumulates small amounts of scrapie-like conformers. Thus, the expression of three highly conserved mammalian prion proteins in transgenic flies uncovered prominent differences in their conformational dynamics. How these properties are encoded in the amino acid sequence remains to be elucidated. PMID:20817727

  17. No Genome-Wide Protein Sequence Convergence for Echolocation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhengting; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Toothed whales and two groups of bats independently acquired echolocation, the ability to locate and identify objects by reflected sound. Echolocation requires physiologically complex and coordinated vocal, auditory, and neural functions, but the molecular basis of the capacity for echolocation is not well understood. A recent study suggested that convergent amino acid substitutions widespread in the proteins of echolocators underlay the convergent origins of mammalian echolocation. Here, we show that genomic signatures of molecular convergence between echolocating lineages are generally no stronger than those between echolocating and comparable nonecholocating lineages. The same is true for the group of 29 hearing-related proteins claimed to be enriched with molecular convergence. Reexamining the previous selection test reveals several flaws and invalidates the asserted evidence for adaptive convergence. Together, these findings indicate that the reported genomic signatures of convergence largely reflect the background level of sequence convergence unrelated to the origins of echolocation. PMID:25631925

  18. Alignment-Free Sequence Comparison Based on Next-Generation Sequencing Reads

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Ren, Jie; Zhai, Zhiyuan; Liu, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have generated enormous amounts of shotgun read data, and assembly of the reads can be challenging, especially for organisms without template sequences. We study the power of genome comparison based on shotgun read data without assembly using three alignment-free sequence comparison statistics, D2, \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$\\textbf{\\textit{D}}_{\\bf 2}^{\\bf *}$$ \\end{document}, and \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$\\textbf{\\textit{D}}_{\\bf 2}^S$$ \\end{document}, both theoretically and by simulations. Theoretical formulas for the power of detecting the relationship between two sequences related through a common motif model are derived. It is shown that both \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin{document} $$\\textbf{\\textit{D}}_{\\bf 2}^{\\bf *}$$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland, xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath, amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6}\\begin

  19. Transitive Homology-Guided Structural Studies Lead to Discovery of Cro Proteins With 40% Sequence Identify But Different Folds

    SciTech Connect

    Roessler, C.G.; Hall, B.M.; Anderson, W.J.; Ingram, W.M.; Roberts, S.A.; Montfort, W.R.; Cordes, M.H.J.

    2009-05-27

    Proteins that share common ancestry may differ in structure and function because of divergent evolution of their amino acid sequences. For a typical diverse protein superfamily, the properties of a few scattered members are known from experiment. A satisfying picture of functional and structural evolution in relation to sequence changes, however, may require characterization of a larger, well chosen subset. Here, we employ a 'stepping-stone' method, based on transitive homology, to target sequences intermediate between two related proteins with known divergent properties. We apply the approach to the question of how new protein folds can evolve from preexisting folds and, in particular, to an evolutionary change in secondary structure and oligomeric state in the Cro family of bacteriophage transcription factors, initially identified by sequence-structure comparison of distant homologs from phages P22 and {lambda}. We report crystal structures of two Cro proteins, Xfaso 1 and Pfl 6, with sequences intermediate between those of P22 and {lambda}. The domains show 40% sequence identity but differ by switching of {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheet in a C-terminal region spanning {approx}25 residues. Sedimentation analysis also suggests a correlation between helix-to-sheet conversion and strengthened dimerization.

  20. Gleditsia sinensis: Transcriptome Sequencing, Construction, and Application of Its Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liucun; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Wenna; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Gleditsia sinensis is a genus of deciduous tree in the family Caesalpinioideae, native to China, and is of great economic importance. However, despite its economic value, gene sequence information is strongly lacking. In the present study, transcriptome sequencing of G. sinensis was performed resulting in approximately 75.5 million clean reads assembled into 142155 unique transcripts generating 58583 unigenes. The average length of the unigenes was 900 bp, with an N50 of 549 bp. The obtained unigene sequences were then compared to four protein databases to include NCBI nonredundant protein (NRDB), Swiss-prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG). Using BLAST procedure, 31385 unigenes (53.6%) were generated to have functional annotations. Additionally, sequence homologies between identified unigenes and genes of known species in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network facilitated G. sinensis PPI network construction. Based on this network construction, new stress resistance genes (including cold, drought, and high salinity) were predicted. The present study is the first investigation of genome-wide gene expression in G. sinensis with the results providing a basis for future functional genomic studies relating to this species. PMID:24982878

  1. A Parallel Non-Alignment Based Approach to Efficient Sequence Comparison using Longest Common Subsequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, S.; Shafiullah, M.; Rai, H.; Bastola, D.

    2010-11-01

    Biological sequence comparison programs have revolutionized the practice of biochemistry, and molecular and evolutionary biology. Pairwise comparison of genomic sequences is a popular method of choice for analyzing genetic sequence data. However the quality of results from most sequence comparison methods are significantly affected by small perturbations in the data and furthermore, there is a dearth of computational tools to compare sequences beyond a certain length. In this paper, we describe a parallel algorithm for comparing genetic sequences using an alignment free-method based on computing the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS) between genetic sequences. We validate the quality of our results by comparing the phylogenetic tress obtained from ClustalW and LCS. We also show through complexity analysis of the isoefficiency and by empirical measurement of the running time that our algorithm is very scalable.

  2. Comparison of Whole-Genome Sequences from Two Colony Morphovars of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Pei-Tan; Chen, Yao-Shen; Lin, Hsi-Hsu; Liu, Pei-Ju; Ni, Wen-Fan; Liu, Mei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The entire genomes of two isogenic morphovars (vgh16W and vgh16R) of Burkholderia pseudomallei were sequenced. A comparison of the sequences from both strains indicates that they show 99.99% identity, are composed of 22 tandem repeated sequences with <100 bp of indels, and have 199 single-base variants. PMID:26472836

  3. Nucleotide and derived amino acid sequences of the major porin of Comamonas acidovorans and comparison of porin primary structures.

    PubMed Central

    Gerbl-Rieger, S; Peters, J; Kellermann, J; Lottspeich, F; Baumeister, W

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene which codes for the major outer membrane porin (Omp32) of Comamonas acidovorans has been determined. The structural gene encodes a precursor consisting of 351 amino acid residues with a signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues. Comparisons with amino acid sequences of outer membrane proteins and porins from several other members of the class Proteobacteria and of the Chlamydia trachomatis porin and the Neurospora crassa mitochondrial porin revealed a motif of eight regions of local homology. The results of this analysis are discussed with regard to common structural features of porins. PMID:1848840

  4. The amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba) venom.

    PubMed

    Joubert, F J

    1985-01-01

    Protein CM-3 from Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis venom was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. It comprises 65 amino acids including eight half-cystines. The complete amino acid sequence of protein CM-3 has been elucidated. The sequence (residues 1-50) resembles that of the N-terminal sequence of the subunits of a synergistic type protein and residues 51-65 that of the C-terminal sequence of an angusticeps type protein. Mixtures of protein CM-3 and angusticeps type proteins showed no apparent synergistic effect, in that their toxicity in combination was no greater than the sum of their individual toxicities. PMID:4029488

  5. Protein multiple sequence alignment by hybrid bio-inspired algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Nicosia, Giuseppe; Pavone, Mario; Prizzi, Igor

    2011-03-01

    This article presents an immune inspired algorithm to tackle the Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) problem. MSA is one of the most important tasks in biological sequence analysis. Although this paper focuses on protein alignments, most of the discussion and methodology may also be applied to DNA alignments. The problem of finding the multiple alignment was investigated in the study by Bonizzoni and Vedova and Wang and Jiang, and proved to be a NP-hard (non-deterministic polynomial-time hard) problem. The presented algorithm, called Immunological Multiple Sequence Alignment Algorithm (IMSA), incorporates two new strategies to create the initial population and specific ad hoc mutation operators. It is based on the 'weighted sum of pairs' as objective function, to evaluate a given candidate alignment. IMSA was tested using both classical benchmarks of BAliBASE (versions 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0), and experimental results indicate that it is comparable with state-of-the-art multiple alignment algorithms, in terms of quality of alignments, weighted Sums-of-Pairs (SP) and Column Score (CS) values. The main novelty of IMSA is its ability to generate more than a single suboptimal alignment, for every MSA instance; this behaviour is due to the stochastic nature of the algorithm and of the populations evolved during the convergence process. This feature will help the decision maker to assess and select a biologically relevant multiple sequence alignment. Finally, the designed algorithm can be used as a local search procedure to properly explore promising alignments of the search space. PMID:21071394

  6. A novel approach to sequence validating protein expression clones with automated decision making

    PubMed Central

    Taycher, Elena; Rolfs, Andreas; Hu, Yanhui; Zuo, Dongmei; Mohr, Stephanie E; Williamson, Janice; LaBaer, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Background Whereas the molecular assembly of protein expression clones is readily automated and routinely accomplished in high throughput, sequence verification of these clones is still largely performed manually, an arduous and time consuming process. The ultimate goal of validation is to determine if a given plasmid clone matches its reference sequence sufficiently to be "acceptable" for use in protein expression experiments. Given the accelerating increase in availability of tens of thousands of unverified clones, there is a strong demand for rapid, efficient and accurate software that automates clone validation. Results We have developed an Automated Clone Evaluation (ACE) system – the first comprehensive, multi-platform, web-based plasmid sequence verification software package. ACE automates the clone verification process by defining each clone sequence as a list of multidimensional discrepancy objects, each describing a difference between the clone and its expected sequence including the resulting polypeptide consequences. To evaluate clones automatically, this list can be compared against user acceptance criteria that specify the allowable number of discrepancies of each type. This strategy allows users to re-evaluate the same set of clones against different acceptance criteria as needed for use in other experiments. ACE manages the entire sequence validation process including contig management, identifying and annotating discrepancies, determining if discrepancies correspond to polymorphisms and clone finishing. Designed to manage thousands of clones simultaneously, ACE maintains a relational database to store information about clones at various completion stages, project processing parameters and acceptance criteria. In a direct comparison, the automated analysis by ACE took less time and was more accurate than a manual analysis of a 93 gene clone set. Conclusion ACE was designed to facilitate high throughput clone sequence verification projects. The

  7. Detecting protein candidate fragments using a structural alphabet profile comparison approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yimin; Picord, Géraldine; Guyon, Frédéric; Tuffery, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Predicting accurate fragments from sequence has recently become a critical step for protein structure modeling, as protein fragment assembly techniques are presently among the most efficient approaches for de novo prediction. A key step in these approaches is, given the sequence of a protein to model, the identification of relevant fragments - candidate fragments - from a collection of the available 3D structures. These fragments can then be assembled to produce a model of the complete structure of the protein of interest. The search for candidate fragments is classically achieved by considering local sequence similarity using profile comparison, or threading approaches. In the present study, we introduce a new profile comparison approach that, instead of using amino acid profiles, is based on the use of predicted structural alphabet profiles, where structural alphabet profiles contain information related to the 3D local shapes associated with the sequences. We show that structural alphabet profile-profile comparison can be used efficiently to retrieve accurate structural fragments, and we introduce a fully new protocol for the detection of candidate fragments. It identifies fragments specific of each position of the sequence and of size varying between 6 and 27 amino-acids. We find it outperforms present state of the art approaches in terms (i) of the accuracy of the fragments identified, (ii) the rate of true positives identified, while having a high coverage score. We illustrate the relevance of the approach on complete target sets of the two previous Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) rounds 9 and 10. A web server for the approach is freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/SAFrag. PMID:24303019

  8. Detecting Protein Candidate Fragments Using a Structural Alphabet Profile Comparison Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yimin; Picord, Géraldine; Guyon, Frédéric; Tuffery, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Predicting accurate fragments from sequence has recently become a critical step for protein structure modeling, as protein fragment assembly techniques are presently among the most efficient approaches for de novo prediction. A key step in these approaches is, given the sequence of a protein to model, the identification of relevant fragments - candidate fragments - from a collection of the available 3D structures. These fragments can then be assembled to produce a model of the complete structure of the protein of interest. The search for candidate fragments is classically achieved by considering local sequence similarity using profile comparison, or threading approaches. In the present study, we introduce a new profile comparison approach that, instead of using amino acid profiles, is based on the use of predicted structural alphabet profiles, where structural alphabet profiles contain information related to the 3D local shapes associated with the sequences. We show that structural alphabet profile-profile comparison can be used efficiently to retrieve accurate structural fragments, and we introduce a fully new protocol for the detection of candidate fragments. It identifies fragments specific of each position of the sequence and of size varying between 6 and 27 amino-acids. We find it outperforms present state of the art approaches in terms (i) of the accuracy of the fragments identified, (ii) the rate of true positives identified, while having a high coverage score. We illustrate the relevance of the approach on complete target sets of the two previous Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) rounds 9 and 10. A web server for the approach is freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/SAFrag. PMID:24303019

  9. Identification of a 35-kilodalton serovar-cross-reactive flagellar protein, FlaB, from Leptospira interrogans by N-terminal sequencing, gene cloning, and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, M; Surujballi, O; Nielsen, K; Nadin-Davis, S; Randall, G

    1997-01-01

    During the screening of antibodies to pathogenic leptospires, a murine monoclonal antibody (designated M138) was found to react with various serovars. An antigen of approximately 35 kDa from Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona, which reacted strongly with M138, was characterized by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and identified as a flagellin, a class B polypeptide subunit (FlaB) of the periplasmic flagella. The gene encoding the FlaB protein, flaB, was amplified from the genomic DNA of several pathogenic serovars by PCR with a single pair of oligonucleotide primers, suggesting that FlaB is highly conserved among these serovars. Cloning and sequence analysis of flaB from serovar pomona revealed that it contains an 849-bp open reading frame with a G + C content of 46.88% which encodes a 283-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 31.297 kDa and a predicted pI of 9.065. A sequence comparison of flagellin proteins revealed that the amino acid sequence is most variable in the central portion of the serovar pomona FlaB, which is believed to contain specific sequence information and which may thus be useful in the design of DNA or synthetic peptide probes suitable for the detection of infection with pathogenic leptospires. PMID:9317049

  10. Comparison of seven techniques for typing international epidemic strains of Clostridium difficile: restriction endonuclease analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, PCR-ribotyping, multilocus sequence typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and surface layer protein A gene sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Killgore, George; Thompson, Angela; Johnson, Stuart; Brazier, Jon; Kuijper, Ed; Pepin, Jacques; Frost, Eric H; Savelkoul, Paul; Nicholson, Brad; van den Berg, Renate J; Kato, Haru; Sambol, Susan P; Zukowski, Walter; Woods, Christopher; Limbago, Brandi; Gerding, Dale N; McDonald, L Clifford

    2008-02-01

    Using 42 isolates contributed by laboratories in Canada, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States, we compared the results of analyses done with seven Clostridium difficile typing techniques: multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), surface layer protein A gene sequence typing (slpAST), PCR-ribotyping, restriction endonuclease analysis (REA), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). We assessed the discriminating ability and typeability of each technique as well as the agreement among techniques in grouping isolates by allele profile A (AP-A) through AP-F, which are defined by toxinotype, the presence of the binary toxin gene, and deletion in the tcdC gene. We found that all isolates were typeable by all techniques and that discrimination index scores for the techniques tested ranged from 0.964 to 0.631 in the following order: MLVA, REA, PFGE, slpAST, PCR-ribotyping, MLST, and AFLP. All the techniques were able to distinguish the current epidemic strain of C. difficile (BI/027/NAP1) from other strains. All of the techniques showed multiple types for AP-A (toxinotype 0, binary toxin negative, and no tcdC gene deletion). REA, slpAST, MLST, and PCR-ribotyping all included AP-B (toxinotype III, binary toxin positive, and an 18-bp deletion in tcdC) in a single group that excluded other APs. PFGE, AFLP, and MLVA grouped two, one, and two different non-AP-B isolates, respectively, with their AP-B isolates. All techniques appear to be capable of detecting outbreak strains, but only REA and MLVA showed sufficient discrimination to distinguish strains from different outbreaks. PMID:18039796

  11. Design of Protein Multi-specificity Using an Independent Sequence Search Reduces the Barrier to Low Energy Sequences.

    PubMed

    Sevy, Alexander M; Jacobs, Tim M; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Computational protein design has found great success in engineering proteins for thermodynamic stability, binding specificity, or enzymatic activity in a 'single state' design (SSD) paradigm. Multi-specificity design (MSD), on the other hand, involves considering the stability of multiple protein states simultaneously. We have developed a novel MSD algorithm, which we refer to as REstrained CONvergence in multi-specificity design (RECON). The algorithm allows each state to adopt its own sequence throughout the design process rather than enforcing a single sequence on all states. Convergence to a single sequence is encouraged through an incrementally increasing convergence restraint for corresponding positions. Compared to MSD algorithms that enforce (constrain) an identical sequence on all states the energy landscape is simplified, which accelerates the search drastically. As a result, RECON can readily be used in simulations with a flexible protein backbone. We have benchmarked RECON on two design tasks. First, we designed antibodies derived from a common germline gene against their diverse targets to assess recovery of the germline, polyspecific sequence. Second, we design "promiscuous", polyspecific proteins against all binding partners and measure recovery of the native sequence. We show that RECON is able to efficiently recover native-like, biologically relevant sequences in this diverse set of protein complexes. PMID:26147100

  12. Sequence analysis and expression of the M1 and M2 matrix protein genes of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishizawa, T.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 2318 nucleotide region of the genomic RNA of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), an important viral pathogen of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. This region comprises approximately two-thirds of the 3' end of the nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and the complete matrix protein (M1 and M2) genes with the associated intergenic regions. The partial N gene sequence was 812 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded the carboxyl-terminal 250 amino acids of the N protein. The M1 and M2 genes were 771 and 700 nucleotides in length, respectively, with ORFs encoding proteins of 227 and 193 amino acids. The M1 gene sequence contained an additional small ORF that could encode a highly basic, arginine-rich protein of 25 amino acids. Comparisons of the N, M1, and M2 gene sequences of HIRRV with the corresponding sequences of the fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) indicated that HIRRV was more closely related to IHNV than to VHSV, but was clearly distinct from either. The putative consensus gene termination sequence for IHNV and VHSV, AGAYAG(A)(7), was present in the N-M1, M1-M2, and M2-G intergenic regions of HIRRV as were the putative transcription initiation sequences YGGCAC and AACA. An Escherichia coli expression system was used to produce recombinant proteins from the M1 and M2 genes of HIRRV. These were the same size as the authentic M1 and M2 proteins and reacted with anti-HIRRV rabbit serum in western blots. These reagents can be used for further study of the fish immune response and to test novel control methods.

  13. Sequence-Specific Protein Aggregation Generates Defined Protein Knockdowns in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vuylsteke, Marnik; Aesaert, Stijn; Rombaut, Debbie; De Smet, Frederik; Xu, Jie; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is determined by short (5–15 amino acids) aggregation-prone regions (APRs) of the polypeptide sequence that self-associate in a specific manner to form β-structured inclusions. Here, we demonstrate that the sequence specificity of APRs can be exploited to selectively knock down proteins with different localization and function in plants. Synthetic aggregation-prone peptides derived from the APRs of either the negative regulators of the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, the glycogen synthase kinase 3/Arabidopsis SHAGGY-like kinases (GSK3/ASKs), or the starch-degrading enzyme α-glucan water dikinase were designed. Stable expression of the APRs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays) induced aggregation of the target proteins, giving rise to plants displaying constitutive BR responses and increased starch content, respectively. Overall, we show that the sequence specificity of APRs can be harnessed to generate aggregation-associated phenotypes in a targeted manner in different subcellular compartments. This study points toward the potential application of induced targeted aggregation as a useful tool to knock down protein functions in plants and, especially, to generate beneficial traits in crops. PMID:27208282

  14. Sequence-Specific Protein Aggregation Generates Defined Protein Knockdowns in Plants.

    PubMed

    Betti, Camilla; Vanhoutte, Isabelle; Coutuer, Silvie; De Rycke, Riet; Mishev, Kiril; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Aesaert, Stijn; Rombaut, Debbie; Gallardo, Rodrigo; De Smet, Frederik; Xu, Jie; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Van Breusegem, Frank; Inzé, Dirk; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-06-01

    Protein aggregation is determined by short (5-15 amino acids) aggregation-prone regions (APRs) of the polypeptide sequence that self-associate in a specific manner to form β-structured inclusions. Here, we demonstrate that the sequence specificity of APRs can be exploited to selectively knock down proteins with different localization and function in plants. Synthetic aggregation-prone peptides derived from the APRs of either the negative regulators of the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, the glycogen synthase kinase 3/Arabidopsis SHAGGY-like kinases (GSK3/ASKs), or the starch-degrading enzyme α-glucan water dikinase were designed. Stable expression of the APRs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays) induced aggregation of the target proteins, giving rise to plants displaying constitutive BR responses and increased starch content, respectively. Overall, we show that the sequence specificity of APRs can be harnessed to generate aggregation-associated phenotypes in a targeted manner in different subcellular compartments. This study points toward the potential application of induced targeted aggregation as a useful tool to knock down protein functions in plants and, especially, to generate beneficial traits in crops. PMID:27208282

  15. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis. PMID:25329378

  16. Accurate prediction of protein–protein interactions from sequence alignments using a Bayesian method

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Lukas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and large-scale prediction of protein–protein interactions directly from amino-acid sequences is one of the great challenges in computational biology. Here we present a new Bayesian network method that predicts interaction partners using only multiple alignments of amino-acid sequences of interacting protein domains, without tunable parameters, and without the need for any training examples. We first apply the method to bacterial two-component systems and comprehensively reconstruct two-component signaling networks across all sequenced bacteria. Comparisons of our predictions with known interactions show that our method infers interaction partners genome-wide with high accuracy. To demonstrate the general applicability of our method we show that it also accurately predicts interaction partners in a recent dataset of polyketide synthases. Analysis of the predicted genome-wide two-component signaling networks shows that cognates (interacting kinase/regulator pairs, which lie adjacent on the genome) and orphans (which lie isolated) form two relatively independent components of the signaling network in each genome. In addition, while most genes are predicted to have only a small number of interaction partners, we find that 10% of orphans form a separate class of ‘hub' nodes that distribute and integrate signals to and from up to tens of different interaction partners. PMID:18277381

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing for Binary Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Bernhard; Zhang, Xinmin; Pesce, C. Gustavo; Mendelsohn, Andrew R.; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system exploits host cell genetics in order to display binary protein–protein interactions (PPIs) via defined and selectable phenotypes. Numerous improvements have been made to this method, adapting the screening principle for diverse applications, including drug discovery and the scale-up for proteome wide interaction screens in human and other organisms. Here we discuss a systematic workflow and analysis scheme for screening data generated by Y2H and related assays that includes high-throughput selection procedures, readout of comprehensive results via next-generation sequencing (NGS), and the interpretation of interaction data via quantitative statistics. The novel assays and tools will serve the broader scientific community to harness the power of NGS technology to address PPI networks in health and disease. We discuss examples of how this next-generation platform can be applied to address specific questions in diverse fields of biology and medicine. PMID:26734059

  18. Detecting protein-protein interactions with a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Li, Jianqiang; Gao, Xin; He, Zhou; Zhu, Lin; Lei, Ying-Ke; Ji, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and their interactions lie at the heart of most underlying biological processes. Consequently, correct detection of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is of fundamental importance to understand the molecular mechanisms in biological systems. Although the convenience brought by high-throughput experiment in technological advances makes it possible to detect a large amount of PPIs, the data generated through these methods is unreliable and may not be completely inclusive of all possible PPIs. Targeting at this problem, this study develops a novel computational approach to effectively detect the protein interactions. This approach is proposed based on a novel matrix-based representation of protein sequence combined with the algorithm of support vector machine (SVM), which fully considers the sequence order and dipeptide information of the protein primary sequence. When performed on yeast PPIs datasets, the proposed method can reach 90.06% prediction accuracy with 94.37% specificity at the sensitivity of 85.74%, indicating that this predictor is a useful tool to predict PPIs. Achieved results also demonstrate that our approach can be a helpful supplement for the interactions that have been detected experimentally. PMID:26000305

  19. Species-specific protein sequence and fold optimizations

    PubMed Central

    Dumontier, Michel; Michalickova, Katerina; Hogue, Christopher WV

    2002-01-01

    Background An organism's ability to adapt to its particular environmental niche is of fundamental importance to its survival and proliferation. In the largest study of its kind, we sought to identify and exploit the amino-acid signatures that make species-specific protein adaptation possible across 100 complete genomes. Results Environmental niche was determined to be a significant factor in variability from correspondence analysis using the amino acid composition of over 360,000 predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from 17 archae, 76 bacteria and 7 eukaryote complete genomes. Additionally, we found clusters of phylogenetically unrelated archae and bacteria that share similar environments by amino acid composition clustering. Composition analyses of conservative, domain-based homology modeling suggested an enrichment of small hydrophobic residues Ala, Gly, Val and charged residues Asp, Glu, His and Arg across all genomes. However, larger aromatic residues Phe, Trp and Tyr are reduced in folds, and these results were not affected by low complexity biases. We derived two simple log-odds scoring functions from ORFs (CG) and folds (CF) for each of the complete genomes. CF achieved an average cross-validation success rate of 85 ± 8% whereas the CG detected 73 ± 9% species-specific sequences when competing against all other non-redundant CG. Continuously updated results are available at . Conclusion Our analysis of amino acid compositions from the complete genomes provides stronger evidence for species-specific and environmental residue preferences in genomic sequences as well as in folds. Scoring functions derived from this work will be useful in future protein engineering experiments and possibly in identifying horizontal transfer events. PMID:12487631

  20. Sequence-based prediction of protein-protein interaction sites with L1-logreg classifier.

    PubMed

    Dhole, Kaustubh; Singh, Gurdeep; Pai, Priyadarshini P; Mondal, Sukanta

    2014-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of central importance for virtually every process in a living cell. Information about the interaction sites in proteins improves our understanding of disease mechanisms and can provide the basis for new therapeutic approaches. Since a multitude of unique residue-residue contacts facilitate the interactions, protein-protein interaction sites prediction has become one of the most important and challenging problems of computational biology. Although much progress in this field has been reported, this problem is yet to be satisfactorily solved. Here, a novel method (LORIS: L1-regularized LOgistic Regression based protein-protein Interaction Sites predictor) is proposed, that identifies interaction residues, using sequence features and is implemented via the L1-logreg classifier. Results show that LORIS is not only quite effective, but also, performs better than existing state-of-the art methods. LORIS, available as standalone package, can be useful for facilitating drug-design and targeted mutation related studies, which require a deeper knowledge of protein interactions sites. PMID:24486250

  1. An optimized approach to the rapid assessment and detection of sequence variants in recombinant protein products.

    PubMed

    Brady, Lowell J; Scott, Rebecca A; Balland, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The development of sensitive techniques to detect sequence variants (SVs), which naturally arise due to DNA mutations and errors in transcription/translation (amino acid misincorporations), has resulted in increased attention to their potential presence in protein-based biologic drugs in recent years. Often, these SVs may be below 0.1%, adding challenges for consistent and accurate detection. Furthermore, the presence of false-positive (FP) signals, a hallmark of SV analysis, requires time-consuming analyst inspection of the data to sort true from erroneous signal. Consequently, gaps in information about the prevalence, type, and impact of SVs in marketed and in-development products are significant. Here, we report the results of a simple, straightforward, and sensitive approach to sequence variant analysis. This strategy employs mixing of two samples of an antibody or protein with the same amino acid sequence in a dilution series followed by subsequent sequence variant analysis. Using automated peptide map analysis software, a quantitative assessment of the levels of SVs in each sample can be made based on the signal derived from the mass spectrometric data. We used this strategy to rapidly detect differences in sequence variants in a monoclonal antibody after a change in process scale, and in a comparison of three mAbs as part of a biosimilar program. This approach is powerful, as true signals can be readily distinguished from FP signal, even at a level well below 0.1%, by using a simple linear regression analysis across the data set with none to minimal inspection of the MS/MS data. Additionally, the data produced from these studies can also be used to make a quantitative assessment of relative levels of product quality attributes. The information provided here extends the published knowledge about SVs and provides context for the discussion around the potential impact of these SVs on product heterogeneity and immunogenicity. PMID:25795027

  2. Evolutionary sequence comparisons using high-density oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hacia, J G; Makalowski, W; Edgemon, K; Erdos, M R; Robbins, C M; Fodor, S P; Brody, L C; Collins, F S

    1998-02-01

    We explored the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays (DNA chips) for obtaining sequence information from homologous genes in closely related species. Orthologues of the human BRCA1 exon 11, all approximately 3.4 kb in length and ranging from 98.2% to 83.5% nucleotide identity, were subjected to hybridization-based and conventional dideoxysequencing analysis. Retrospective guidelines for identifying high-fidelity hybridization-based sequence calls were formulated based upon dideoxysequencing results. Prospective application of these rules yielded base-calling with at least 98.8% accuracy over orthologous sequence tracts shown to have approximately 99% identity. For higher primate sequences with greater than 97% nucleotide identity, base-calling was made with at least 99.91% accuracy covering a minimum of 97% of the sequence. Using a second-tier confirmatory hybridization chip strategy, shown in several cases to confirm the identity of predicted sequence changes, the complete sequence of the chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan orthologues should be deducible solely through hybridization-based methodologies. Analysis of less highly conserved orthologues can still identify conserved nucleotide tracts of at least 15 nucleotides and can provide useful information for designing primers. DNA-chip based assays can be a valuable new technology for obtaining high-throughput cost-effective sequence information from related genomes. PMID:9462745

  3. ClusCo: clustering and comparison of protein models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development, optimization and validation of protein modeling methods require efficient tools for structural comparison. Frequently, a large number of models need to be compared with the target native structure. The main reason for the development of Clusco software was to create a high-throughput tool for all-versus-all comparison, because calculating similarity matrix is the one of the bottlenecks in the protein modeling pipeline. Results Clusco is fast and easy-to-use software for high-throughput comparison of protein models with different similarity measures (cRMSD, dRMSD, GDT_TS, TM-Score, MaxSub, Contact Map Overlap) and clustering of the comparison results with standard methods: K-means Clustering or Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering. Conclusions The application was highly optimized and written in C/C++, including the code for parallel execution on CPU and GPU, which resulted in a significant speedup over similar clustering and scoring computation programs. PMID:23433004

  4. Impaired nuclear import of mammalian Dlx4 proteins as a consequence of rapid sequence divergence

    SciTech Connect

    Coubrough, Melissa L.; Bendall, Andrew J. . E-mail: abendall@uoguelph.ca

    2006-11-15

    Dlx genes encode a developmentally important family of transcription factors with a variety of functions and sites of action during vertebrate embryogenesis. The murine Dlx4 gene is an enigmatic member of the family; little is known about the normal developmental function(s) of Dlx4. Here, we show that Dlx4 is expressed in the murine placenta and in a trophoblast cell line where the protein localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Despite the presence of several leucine/valine-rich motifs that match known nuclear export sequences, cytoplasmic Dlx4 is not due to CRM-1-mediated nuclear export. Rather, nuclear import of Dlx4 is compromised by specific residues that flank the nuclear localization signal. One of these residues represents a novel conserved feature of the Dlx4 protein in placental mammals, and the second represents novel variation within mouse Dlx4 isoforms. Comparison of orthologous protein sequences reveals a particularly high rate of non-synonymous change in the coding regions of mammalian Dlx4 genes. Since impaired nuclear localization is unlikely to enhance the function of a nuclear transcription factor, these data point to reduced selection pressure as the basis for the rapid divergence of the Dlx4 gene within the mammalian clade.

  5. The Bioinformatics Report of Mutation Outcome on NADPH Flavin Oxidoreductase Protein Sequence in Clinical Isolates of H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Nasrin; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghaempanah, Abdol Majid; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2016-05-01

    frxA gene has been implicated in the metronidazole nitro reduction by H. pylori. Alternatively, frxA is expected to contribute to the protection of urease and to the in vivo survival of H. pylori. The aim of present study is to report the mutation effects on the frxA protein sequence in clinical isolates of H. pylori in our community. Metronidazole resistance was proven in 27 of 48 isolates. glmM and frxA genes were used for molecular confirmation of H. pylori isolates. The primer set for detection of whole sequence of frxA gene for the effect of mutation on protein sequence was used. DNA and protein sequence evaluation and analysis were done by blast, Clustal Omega, and T COFFEE programs. Then, FrxA protein sequences from six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates were analyzed by web-based bioinformatics tools. The result of six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates in comparison with strain 26695 showed ten missense mutations. The result with the STRING program revealed that no change was seen after alterations in these sequences. According to consensus data involving four methods, residue substitutions at 40, 13, and 141 increase the stability of protein sequence after mutation, while other alterations decrease. Residue substitutions at 40, 43, 141, 138, 169, and 179 are deleterious, while, V7I, Q10R, V34I, and V96I alterations are neutral. As FrxA contribute to survival of bacterium and in regard to the effect of mutations on protein function, it might affect the survival and bacterium phenotype and it need to be studied more. Also, none of the stability prediction tool is perfect; iStable is the best predictor method among all methods. PMID:26821239

  6. X-ray sequence and crystal structure of luffaculin 1, a novel type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomin; Chen, Minghuang; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J; Xie, Jieming; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein sequence can be obtained through Edman degradation, mass spectrometry, or cDNA sequencing. High resolution X-ray crystallography can also be used to derive protein sequence information, but faces the difficulty in distinguishing the Asp/Asn, Glu/Gln, and Val/Thr pairs. Luffaculin 1 is a new type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated from the seeds of Luffa acutangula. Besides rRNA N-glycosidase activity, luffaculin 1 also demonstrates activities including inhibiting tumor cells' proliferation and inducing tumor cells' differentiation. Results The crystal structure of luffaculin 1 was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. Its amino-acid sequence was derived from this high resolution structure using the following criteria: 1) high resolution electron density; 2) comparison of electron density between two molecules that exist in the same crystal; 3) evaluation of the chemical environment of residues to break down the sequence assignment ambiguity in residue pairs Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr; 4) comparison with sequences of the homologous proteins. Using the criteria 1 and 2, 66% of the residues can be assigned. By incorporating with criterion 3, 86% of the residues were assigned, suggesting the effectiveness of chemical environment evaluation in breaking down residue ambiguity. In total, 94% of the luffaculin 1 sequence was assigned with high confidence using this improved X-ray sequencing strategy. Two N-acetylglucosamine moieties, linked respectively to the residues Asn77 and Asn84, can be identified in the structure. Residues Tyr70, Tyr110, Glu159 and Arg162 define the active site of luffaculin 1 as an RNA N-glycosidase. Conclusion X-ray sequencing method can be effective to derive sequence information of proteins. The evaluation of the chemical environment of residues is a useful method to break down the assignment ambiguity in Glu/Gln, Asp/Asn, and Val/Thr pairs. The sequence and the crystal structure confirm that luffaculin 1 is a new

  7. Quantitative Comparison of Large-Scale DNA Enrichment Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, Matthias; Chavez, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    DNA enrichment followed by sequencing (DNA-IP seq) is a versatile tool in molecular biology with a wide variety of applications. Computational analysis of differential DNA enrichment between conditions is important for identifying epigenetic alterations in disease compared to healthy controls and for revealing dynamic epigenetic modifications throughout normal and distorted cell differentiation and development. We present a protocol for genome-wide comparative analysis of DNA-IP sequencing data to identify statistically significant differential sequencing coverage between two conditions by considering variation across replicates. The protocol provides a detailed description for the comparative analysis of DNA-IP sequencing data including basic data processing, quality controls, and identification of differential enrichment using the Bioconductor package "MEDIPS". PMID:27008016

  8. Close sequence comparisons are sufficient to identify human cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A

    2006-07-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons. To address this problem, we identified evolutionarily conserved noncoding regions in primate, mammalian, and more distant comparisons using a uniform approach (Gumby) that facilitates unbiased assessment of the impact of evolutionary distance on predictive power. We benchmarked computational predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using an in vivo enhancer assay in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity (53%-80%) and true-positive rate (27%-67%) by comparison with one to five other eutherian mammals or six other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian, and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. Our results highlight the practical utility of close sequence comparisons, and the loss of sensitivity entailed by more distant comparisons. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole-genome comparative analysis that explains most of the observations from empirical benchmarking. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for in vivo testing at embryonic time points. PMID:16769978

  9. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Cammue, B P; Thevissen, K; Hendriks, M; Eggermont, K; Goderis, I J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F; Kader, J C

    1995-01-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibits all 12 tested plant pathogenic fungi at concentrations below 10 micrograms mL-1. Its antifungal activity is either not at all or is weakly affected by the presence of different cations at concentrations approximating physiological ionic strength conditions. Ace-AMP1 is also active on two Gram-positive bacteria but is apparently not toxic for Gram-negative bacteria and cultured human cells. In contrast to nsLTPs such as those isolated from radish or maize seeds, Ace-AMP1 was unable to transfer phospholipids from liposomes to mitochondria. On the other hand, lipid transfer proteins from wheat and maize seeds showed little or no antimicrobial activity, whereas the radish lipid transfer protein displayed antifungal activity only in media with low cation concentrations. The relevance of these findings with regard to the function of nsLTPs is discussed. PMID:7480341

  10. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-01-01

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome. PMID:17183484