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Sample records for protein subunit interfaces

  1. A protein residing at the subunit interface of the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Nazimov, I V; Spirin, A S

    1999-10-26

    Surface labeling of Escherichia coli ribosomes with the use of the tritium bombardment technique has revealed a minor unidentified ribosome-bound protein (spot Y) that is hidden in the 70S ribosome and becomes highly labeled on dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. In the present work, the N-terminal sequence of the protein Y was determined and its gene was identified as yfia, an ORF located upstream the phe operon of E. coli. This 12.7-kDa protein was isolated and characterized. An affinity of the purified protein Y for the 30S subunit, but not for the 50S ribosomal subunit, was shown. The protein proved to be exposed on the surface of the 30S subunit. The attachment of the 50S subunit resulted in hiding the protein Y, thus suggesting the protein location at the subunit interface in the 70S ribosome. The protein was shown to stabilize ribosomes against dissociation. The possible role of the protein Y as ribosome association factor in translation is discussed. PMID:10535924

  2. R-subunit Isoform Specificity in Protein Kinase A: Distinct Features of Protein Interfaces in PKA Types I and II by Amide H/2H exchange Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ganesh S.; Hotchko, Matthew; Brown, Simon H.J.; Ten Eyck, Lynn F.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The two isoforms (RI and RII) of the regulatory (R) subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) are similar in sequence yet have different biochemical properties and physiological functions. To further understand the molecular basis for R-isoform-specificity, the interactions of the RIIβ isoform with the PKA catalytic (C) subunit were analyzed by amide H/2H exchange mass spectrometry to compare solvent accessibility of RIIβ and the C subunit in their free and complexed states. Direct mapping of the RIIβ-C interface revealed important differences between the intersubunit interfaces in the type I and type II holoenzyme complexes. These differences are seen in both the R-subunits as well as the C-subunit. Unlike the type I isoform, the type II isoform complexes require both cAMP-binding domains, and ATP is not obligatory for high affinity interactions with the C-subunit. Surprisingly, the C-subunit mediates distinct, overlapping surfaces of interaction with the two R-isoforms despite a strong homology in sequence and similarity in domain organization. Identification of a remote allosteric site on the C-subunit that is essential for interactions with RII, but not RI subunits, further highlights the considerable diversity in interfaces found in higher order protein complexes mediated by the C-subunit of PKA. PMID:17942118

  3. Direct evidence for the localization of the steroid-binding site of the plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) at the interface between the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sui, L. M.; Hughes, W.; Hoppe, A. J.; Pétra, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complete dissociation of dimeric plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) was obtained in 6 M urea at 10 degrees C. Removal of urea resulted in the refolding of monomers, followed by reformation of dimeric SBP, which migrates with the same mobility as the native protein. Dimerization does not require Ca+2 or steroid. Renatured monomers yield dimers with dissociation constants for 5 alpha-dihydrotesterone (DHT) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) indistinguishable from those of native human SBP. This phenomenon was also demonstrated by mixing human and rabbit SBPs that, upon renaturation, form a hybrid dimer composed of one human subunit and one rabbit subunit. The hybrid binds both DHT and E2 in contrast to rSBP, which only binds the androgen. Therefore, we conclude that (1) docking of the two subunits creates an asymmetric steroid-binding site located at the interface between the subunits, and (2) only one face of the dimer defines the specificity for binding E2 by encompassing portion of a structural motif that recognizes the flat ring A of E2. The remaining portion, which recognizes the saturated ring A of DHT, is shared by both faces of the dimer. Because native monomers do not exist alone, the often-asked question of whether the SBP monomer binds steroid can be considered meaningless; steroid-binding activity is expressed only in the dimeric state. Finally, formation of the hybrid indicates that SBP dimerization represents a conserved event during the molecular evolution of SBP, suggesting that the structural elements responsible for dimerization will be homologous in SBPs from other species. PMID:8976560

  4. The acidic transcription activator Gcn4 binds the mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 using a simple protein interface forming a fuzzy complex.

    PubMed

    Brzovic, Peter S; Heikaus, Clemens C; Kisselev, Leonid; Vernon, Robert; Herbig, Eric; Pacheco, Derek; Warfield, Linda; Littlefield, Peter; Baker, David; Klevit, Rachel E; Hahn, Steven

    2011-12-23

    The structural basis for binding of the acidic transcription activator Gcn4 and one activator-binding domain of the Mediator subunit Gal11/Med15 was examined by NMR. Gal11 activator-binding domain 1 has a four-helix fold with a small shallow hydrophobic cleft at its center. In the bound complex, eight residues of Gcn4 adopt a helical conformation, allowing three Gcn4 aromatic/aliphatic residues to insert into the Gal11 cleft. The protein-protein interface is dynamic and surprisingly simple, involving only hydrophobic interactions. This allows Gcn4 to bind Gal11 in multiple conformations and orientations, an example of a "fuzzy" complex, where the Gcn4-Gal11 interface cannot be described by a single conformation. Gcn4 uses a similar mechanism to bind two other unrelated activator-binding domains. Functional studies in yeast show the importance of residues at the protein interface, define the minimal requirements for a functional activator, and suggest a mechanism by which activators bind to multiple unrelated targets. PMID:22195967

  5. Structural Similarity and Classification of Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Pang, Bin; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between proteins play a key role in many cellular processes. Studying protein-protein interactions that share similar interaction interfaces may shed light on their evolution and could be helpful in elucidating the mechanisms behind stability and dynamics of the protein complexes. When two complexes share structurally similar subunits, the similarity of the interaction interfaces can be found through a structural superposition of the subunits. However, an accurate detection of similarity between the protein complexes containing subunits of unrelated structure remains an open problem. Here, we present an alignment-free machine learning approach to measure interface similarity. The approach relies on the feature-based representation of protein interfaces and does not depend on the superposition of the interacting subunit pairs. Specifically, we develop an SVM classifier of similar and dissimilar interfaces and derive a feature-based interface similarity measure. Next, the similarity measure is applied to a set of 2,806×2,806 binary complex pairs to build a hierarchical classification of protein-protein interactions. Finally, we explore case studies of similar interfaces from each level of the hierarchy, considering cases when the subunits forming interactions are either homologous or structurally unrelated. The analysis has suggested that the positions of charged residues in the homologous interfaces are not necessarily conserved and may exhibit more complex conservation patterns. PMID:21589874

  6. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Goo; Muniyappan, Srinivasan; Oang, Key Young; Kim, Tae Wu; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2016-01-01

    Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI) consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3) and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI. PMID:27158635

  7. Identification of New Mutations at the PCNA Subunit Interface that Block Translesion Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratick, Christine M; Boehm, Elizabeth M; Dieckman, Lynne M; Powers, Kyle T; Sanchez, Julio C; Mueting, Samuel R; Washington, M Todd

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an essential role in DNA replication and repair by interacting with a large number of proteins involved in these processes. Two amino acid substitutions in PCNA, both located at the subunit interface, have previously been shown to block translesion synthesis (TLS), a pathway for bypassing DNA damage during replication. To better understand the role of the subunit interface in TLS, we used random mutagenesis to generate a set of 33 PCNA mutants with substitutions at the subunit interface. We assayed the full set of mutants for viability and sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We then selected a subset of 17 mutants and measured their rates of cell growth, spontaneous mutagenesis, and UV-induced mutagenesis. All except three of these 17 mutants were partially or completely defective in induced mutagenesis, which indicates a partial or complete loss of TLS. These results demonstrate that the integrity of the subunit interface of PCNA is essential for efficient TLS and that even conservative substitutions have the potential to disrupt this process. PMID:27258147

  8. Identification of New Mutations at the PCNA Subunit Interface that Block Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kondratick, Christine M.; Boehm, Elizabeth M.; Dieckman, Lynne M.; Powers, Kyle T.; Sanchez, Julio C.; Mueting, Samuel R.; Washington, M. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an essential role in DNA replication and repair by interacting with a large number of proteins involved in these processes. Two amino acid substitutions in PCNA, both located at the subunit interface, have previously been shown to block translesion synthesis (TLS), a pathway for bypassing DNA damage during replication. To better understand the role of the subunit interface in TLS, we used random mutagenesis to generate a set of 33 PCNA mutants with substitutions at the subunit interface. We assayed the full set of mutants for viability and sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We then selected a subset of 17 mutants and measured their rates of cell growth, spontaneous mutagenesis, and UV-induced mutagenesis. All except three of these 17 mutants were partially or completely defective in induced mutagenesis, which indicates a partial or complete loss of TLS. These results demonstrate that the integrity of the subunit interface of PCNA is essential for efficient TLS and that even conservative substitutions have the potential to disrupt this process. PMID:27258147

  9. Operon structure and cotranslational subunit association direct protein assembly in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yu-Wei; Minguez, Pablo; Bork, Peer; Auburger, Josef J; Guilbride, D Lys; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Assembly of protein complexes is considered a posttranslational process involving random collision of subunits. We show that within the Escherichia coli cytosol, bacterial luciferase subunits LuxA and LuxB assemble into complexes close to the site of subunit synthesis. Assembly efficiency decreases markedly if subunits are synthesized on separate messenger RNAs from genes integrated at distant chromosomal sites. Subunit assembly initiates cotranslationally on nascent LuxB in vivo. The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor delays the onset of cotranslational interactions until the LuxB dimer interface is fully exposed. Protein assembly is thus directly coupled to the translation process and involves spatially confined, actively chaperoned cotranslational subunit interactions. Bacterial gene organization into operons therefore reflects a fundamental cotranslational mechanism for spatial and temporal regulation that is vital to effective assembly of protein complexes. PMID:26405228

  10. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Halmai, Miklos; Frittmann, Orsolya; Szabo, Zoltan; Daraba, Andreea; Gali, Vamsi K.; Balint, Eva; Unk, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well. PMID:27537501

  11. Homodimeric Intrinsic Membrane Proteins. Identification and Modulation of Interactions between Mitochondrial Transporter (Carrier) Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wohlrab, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Transporter (carrier) proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane link metabolic pathways within the matrix and the cytosol with transport/exchange of metabolites and inorganic ions. Their strict control of these fluxes is required for oxidative phosphorylation. Understanding the ternary complex transport mechanism with which most of these transporters function requires an accounting of the number and interactions of their subunits. The phosphate transporter (PTP, Mir1p) subunit readily forms homodimers with intersubunit affinities changeable by mutations. Cys28, likely at the subunit interface, is a site for mutations yielding transport inhibition or a channel-like transport mode. Such mutations yield a small increase or decrease in affinity between the subunits. The PTP inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide decreases subunit affinity by a small amount. PTP mutations that yield the highest (40%) and the lowest (2%) liposome incorporation efficiencies (LIE) are clustered near Cys28. Such mutant subunits show the lowest and highest subunit affinities respectively. The oxaloacetate transporter (Oac1p) subunit has an almost 2-fold lower affinity than the PTP subunit. The Oac1p, dicarboxylate (Dic1p) and PTP transporter subunits form heterodimers with even lower affinities. These results form a firm basis for detailed studies to establish the effect of subunit affinities on transport mode and activity and for the identification of the mechanism that prevents formation of heterodimers that surely will negatively impact oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels with serious consequences for the cell. PMID:20171189

  12. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  13. Control of the efficiency of agonist-induced information transfer and stability of the ternary complex containing the delta opioid receptor and the alpha subunit of G(i1) by mutation of a receptor/G protein contact interface.

    PubMed

    Moon, H E; Bahia, D S; Cavalli, A; Hoffmann, M; Milligan, G

    2001-09-01

    Fusion proteins were constructed between the delta opioid receptor and forms of the alpha subunit of G(i1) in which cysteine(351) was mutated to a range of amino acids. GDP reduced the binding of the agonist [(3)H]DADLE but not the antagonist [(3)H]naltrindole to both the receptor alone and all the delta opioid receptor-Cys(351)XaaG(i1)alpha fusion proteins. For the fusion proteins the pEC(50) for GDP was strongly correlated with the n-octanol/H(2)O partition co-efficient of G protein residue(351). Fusion proteins in which this residue was either isoleucine or glycine had similar observed binding kinetics for [(3)H]DADLE. However, the rate of dissociation of [(3)H]DADLE was substantially greater for the glycine-containing fusion protein than that containing isoleucine, indicating that more hydrophobic residues imbued greater stability to the agonist-receptor-G protein ternary complex. This resulted in a higher affinity of binding of [(3)H]DADLE to the fusion protein containing isoleucine(351). In expectation with the binding data, maximal DADLE-stimulated GTP hydrolysis by the isoleucine(351)-containing fusion protein was two-fold greater and the potency of DADLE seven-fold higher than for the version containing glycine. These results demonstrate that the stability of the ternary complex between delta opioid receptor, G(i1)alpha and an agonist (but not antagonist) ligand is dependent upon the nature of residue(351) of the G protein and that this determines the effectiveness of information flow from the receptor to the G protein. PMID:11522323

  14. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  15. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  16. Method for the detection of a polypeptide subunit in the presence of a quaternary protein containing the subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Wands, J.R.; Ozturk, M.; Bellet, D.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a method for the determination of a free protein subunit of hCG in a sample containing intact quaternary hCG. It comprises: contacting the sample with a first monoclonal antibody which is bound to a carrier, wherein the first monoclonal antibody binds epitopic determinants bindable only on the free protein subunit; incubating the components for a period of time and under conditions sufficient to form an immune complex between the free protein subunit, the first monoclonal antibody, and the carrier; separating the carrier from the sample; adding to the carrier a detectably labeled second monoclonal antibody, wherein the second monoclonal antibody binds epitopic determinants bindable on both the free protein subunit and the intact quaternary hCG; separating the carrier from the liquid phase; and determining the detectably labeled second monoclonal antibody in the carrier or in the liquid phase, which is a measure of the amount of the free protein subunit in the sample.

  17. Heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gγ13 is critical to olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ponissery-Saidu, Samsudeen; Yee, Karen; Wang, Hong; Chen, Meng-Ling; Iguchi, Naoko; Zhang, Genhua; Jiang, Ping; Reisert, Johannes; Huang, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    The activation of G-protein-coupled olfactory receptors on the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) triggers a signaling cascade, which is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α, β and γ subunits. Although its α subunit, Gαolf, has been identified and well characterized, the identities of its β and γ subunits and their function in olfactory signal transduction, however, have not been well established yet. We and others have found the expression of Gγ13 in the olfactory epithelium, particularly in the cilia of the OSNs. In this study, we generated a conditional gene knockout mouse line to specifically nullify Gγ13 expression in the olfactory marker protein-expressing OSNs. Immunohistochemical and Western blot results showed that Gγ13 subunit was indeed eliminated in the mutant mice’s olfactory epithelium. Intriguingly, Gαolf, β1 subunits, Ric-8B and CEP290 proteins were also absent in the epithelium whereas the presence of the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase III remained largely unaltered. Electro-olfactogram studies showed that the mutant animals had greatly reduced responses to a battery of odorants including three presumable pheromones. Behavioral tests indicated that the mutant mice had a remarkably reduced ability to perform an odor-guided search task although their motivation and agility seemed normal. Our results indicate that Gαolf exclusively forms a functional heterotrimeric G protein with Gβ1 and Gγ13 in OSNs, mediating olfactory signal transduction. The identification of the olfactory G protein’s βγ moiety has provided a novel approach to understanding the feedback regulation of olfactory signal transduction pathways as well as the control of subcellular structures of OSNs. PMID:23637188

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunits reveals a role of subunit interfaces in the allosteric properties of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Shaw, Janine R; Hannah, L Curtis

    2009-09-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes a rate-limiting step in glycogen and starch synthesis in bacteria and plants, respectively. Plant AGPase consists of two large and two small subunits that were derived by gene duplication. AGPase large subunits have functionally diverged, leading to different kinetic and allosteric properties. Amino acid changes that could account for these differences were identified previously by evolutionary analysis. In this study, these large subunit residues were mapped onto a modeled structure of the maize (Zea mays) endosperm enzyme. Surprisingly, of 29 amino acids identified via evolutionary considerations, 17 were located at subunit interfaces. Fourteen of the 29 amino acids were mutagenized in the maize endosperm large subunit (SHRUNKEN-2 [SH2]), and resulting variants were expressed in Escherichia coli with the maize endosperm small subunit (BT2). Comparisons of the amount of glycogen produced in E. coli, and the kinetic and allosteric properties of the variants with wild-type SH2/BT2, indicate that 11 variants differ from the wild type in enzyme properties or in vivo glycogen level. More interestingly, six of nine residues located at subunit interfaces exhibit altered allosteric properties. These results indicate that the interfaces between the large and small subunits are important for the allosteric properties of AGPase, and changes at these interfaces contribute to AGPase functional specialization. Our results also demonstrate that evolutionary analysis can greatly facilitate enzyme structure-function analyses. PMID:19625637

  19. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  20. Cavities and Atomic Packing in Protein Structures and Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sonavane, Shrihari; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2008-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cavities enclosed in a tertiary structure of proteins and interfaces formed by the interaction of two protein subunits in obligate and non-obligate categories (represented by homodimeric molecules and heterocomplexes, respectively) is presented. The total volume of cavities increases with the size of the protein (or the interface), though the exact relationship may vary in different cases. Likewise, for individual cavities also there is quantitative dependence of the volume on the number of atoms (or residues) lining the cavity. The larger cavities tend to be less spherical, solvated, and the interfaces are enriched in these. On average 15 Å3 of cavity volume is found to accommodate single water, with another 40–45 Å3 needed for each additional solvent molecule. Polar atoms/residues have a higher propensity to line solvated cavities. Relative to the frequency of occurrence in the whole structure (or interface), residues in β-strands are found more often lining the cavities, and those in turn and loop the least. Any depression in one chain not complemented by a protrusion in the other results in a cavity in the protein–protein interface. Through the use of the Voronoi volume, the packing of residues involved in protein–protein interaction has been compared to that in the protein interior. For a comparable number of atoms the interface has about twice the number of cavities relative to the tertiary structure. PMID:19005575

  1. Lys-315 at the Interfaces of Diagonal Subunits of δ-Crystallin Plays a Critical Role in the Reversibility of Folding and Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Hui-Chen; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Kao, Wei-Chuo; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Lee, Hwei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    δ-Crystallin is the major structural protein in avian eye lenses and is homologous to the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. This protein is structurally assembled as double dimers. Lys-315 is the only residue which is arranged symmetrically at the diagonal subunit interfaces to interact with each other. This study found that wild-type protein had both dimers and monomers present in 2–4 M urea whilst only monomers of the K315A mutant were observed under the same conditions, as judged by sedimentation velocity analysis. The assembly of monomeric K315A mutant was reversible in contrast to wild-type protein. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the dissociation of primary dimers is prior to the diagonal dimers in wild-type protein. These results suggest the critical role of Lys-315 in stabilization of the diagonal dimer structure. Guanidinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) denatured wild-type or K315A mutant protein did not fold into functional protein. However, the urea dissociated monomers of K315A mutant protein in GdmCl were reversible folding through a multiple steps mechanism as measured by tryptophan and ANS fluorescence. Two partly unfolded intermediates were detected in the pathway. Refolding of the intermediates resulted in a conformation with greater amounts of hydrophobic regions exposed which was prone to the formation of protein aggregates. The formation of aggregates was not prevented by the addition of α-crystallin. These results highlight that the conformational status of the monomers is critical for determining whether reversible oligomerization or aggregate formation occurs. PMID:26731266

  2. A Mechanism of Subunit Recruitment in Human Small Heat Shock Protein Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) make up a class of molecular chaperones broadly observed across organisms. Many sHSPs form large oligomers that undergo dynamic subunit exchange that is thought to play a role in chaperone function. Though remarkably heterogeneous, sHSP oligomers share three types of intermolecular interactions that involve all three defined regions of a sHSP: the N-terminal region (NTR), the conserved α-crystallin domain (ACD), and a C-terminal region (CTR). Here we define the structural interactions involved in incorporation of a subunit into a sHSP oligomer. We demonstrate that a minimal ACD dimer of the human sHSP, HSPB5, interacts with an HSPB5 oligomer through two types of interactions: (1) interactions with CTRs in the oligomer and (2) via exchange into and out of the dimer interface composed of two ACDs. Unexpectedly, although dimers are thought to be the fundamental building block for sHSP oligomers, our results clearly indicate that subunit exchange into and out of oligomers occurs via monomers. Using structure-based mutants, we show that incorporation of a subunit into an oligomer is predicated on recruitment of the subunit via its interaction with CTRs on an oligomer. Both the rate and extent of subunit incorporation depend on the accessibility of CTRs within an HSPB5 oligomer. We show that this mechanism also applies to formation of heterooligomeric sHSP species composed of HSPB5 and HSPB6 and is likely general among sHSPs. Finally, our observations highlight the importance of NTRs in the thermodynamic stability of sHSP oligomers. PMID:26098708

  3. Effective polymer adjuvants for sustained delivery of protein subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Adams, Justin R; Haughney, Shannon L; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2015-03-01

    We have synthesized thermogelling cationic amphiphilic pentablock copolymers that have the potential to act as injectable vaccine carriers and adjuvants that can simultaneously provide sustained delivery and enhance the immunogenicity of released antigen. While these pentablock copolymers have shown efficacy in DNA delivery in past studies, the ability to deliver both DNA and protein for subunit vaccines using the same polymeric carrier can provide greater flexibility and efficacy. We demonstrate the ability of these pentablock copolymers, and the parent triblock Pluronic copolymers to slowly release structurally intact and antigenically stable protein antigens in vitro, create an antigen depot through long-term injection-site persistence and enhance the in vivo immune response to these antigens. We show release of the model protein antigen ovalbumin in vitro from the thermogelling block copolymers with the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of the released protein unchanged compared to the native protein, and its antigenicity preserved upon release. The block copolymers form a gel at physiological temperatures that serves as an antigenic depot and persists in vivo at the site of injection for over 50days. The pentablock copolymers show a significant fivefold enhancement in the immune response compared to soluble protein alone, even 6weeks after the administration, based on measurement of antibody titers. These results demonstrate the potential of these block copolymers hydrogels to persist for several weeks and sustain the release of antigen with minimal effects on protein stability and antigenicity; and their ability to be used simultaneously as a sustained delivery device as well as a subunit vaccine adjuvant platform. PMID:25484331

  4. Interactions between RNase P protein subunits in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Thomas A.; Brown, James W.

    2004-01-01

    A yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify protein–protein interactions between the ribonuclease P (RNase P) protein subunits Mth11p, Mth687p, Mth688p and Mth1618p from the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus. Clear interactions between Mth688p and Mth687p, and between Mth1618p and Mth11p, were confirmed by HIS3 and LacZ reporter expression. Weaker interactions of Mth687p and Mth688p with Mth11p, and Mth11p with itself, are also suggested. These interactions resemble, and confirm, those previously seen among the homologs of these proteins in the more complex yeast RNase P holoenzyme. PMID:15810434

  5. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  6. Revisiting the Voronoi description of protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cazals, Frédéric; Proust, Flavien; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Janin, Joël

    2006-09-01

    We developed a model of macromolecular interfaces based on the Voronoi diagram and the related alpha-complex, and we tested its properties on a set of 96 protein-protein complexes taken from the Protein Data Bank. The Voronoi model provides a natural definition of the interfaces, and it yields values of the number of interface atoms and of the interface area that have excellent correlation coefficients with those of the classical model based on solvent accessibility. Nevertheless, some atoms that do not lose solvent accessibility are part of the interface defined by the Voronoi model. The Voronoi model provides robust definitions of the curvature and of the connectivity of the interfaces, and leads to estimates of these features that generally agree with other approaches. Our implementation of the model allows an analysis of protein-water contacts that highlights the role of structural water molecules at protein-protein interfaces. PMID:16943442

  7. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology. PMID:27309817

  8. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  9. The dipole moment of membrane proteins: potassium channel protein and beta-subunit.

    PubMed

    Takashima, S

    2001-12-25

    The mechanism of ion channel opening is one of the most fascinating problems in membrane biology. Based on phenomenological studies, early researchers suggested that the elementary process of ion channel opening may be the intramembrane charge movement or the orientation of dipolar proteins in the channel. In spite of the far reaching significance of these hypotheses, it has not been possible to formulate a comprehensive molecular theory for the mechanism of channel opening. This is because of the lack of the detailed knowledge on the structure of channel proteins. In recent years, however, the research on the structure of channel proteins made marked advances and, at present, we are beginning to have sufficient information on the structure of some of the channel proteins, e.g. potassium-channel protein and beta-subunits. With these new information, we are now ready to have another look at the old hypothesis, in particular, the dipole moment of channel proteins being the voltage sensor for the opening and closing of ion channels. In this paper, the dipole moments of potassium channel protein and beta-subunit, are calculated using X-ray diffraction data. A large dipole moment was found for beta-subunits while the dipole moment of K-channel protein was found to be considerably smaller than that of beta-subunits. These calculations were conducted as a preliminary study of the comprehensive research on the dipolar structure of channel proteins in excitable membranes, above all, sodium channel proteins. PMID:11804731

  10. Dependency Map of Proteins in the Small Ribosomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of the ribosome has recently become an interesting target for antibiotics in several bacteria. In this work, we extended an analytical procedure to determine native state fluctuations and contact breaking to investigate the protein stability dependence in the 30S small ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus. We determined the causal influence of the presence and absence of proteins in the 30S complex on the binding free energies of other proteins. The predicted dependencies are in overall agreement with the experimentally determined assembly map for another organism, Escherichia coli. We found that the causal influences result from two distinct mechanisms: one is pure internal energy change, the other originates from the entropy change. We discuss the implications on how to target the ribosomal assembly most effectively by suggesting six proteins as targets for mutations or other hindering of their binding. Our results show that by blocking one out of this set of proteins, the association of other proteins is eventually reduced, thus reducing the translation efficiency even more. We could additionally determine the binding dependency of THX—a peptide not present in the ribosome of E. coli—and suggest its assembly path. PMID:16485038

  11. Oncogenic protein interfaces: small molecules, big challenges.

    PubMed

    Nero, Tracy L; Morton, Craig J; Holien, Jessica K; Wielens, Jerome; Parker, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    Historically, targeting protein-protein interactions with small molecules was not thought possible because the corresponding interfaces were considered mostly flat and featureless and therefore 'undruggable'. Instead, such interactions were targeted with larger molecules, such as peptides and antibodies. However, the past decade has seen encouraging breakthroughs through the refinement of existing techniques and the development of new ones, together with the identification and exploitation of unexpected aspects of protein-protein interaction surfaces. In this Review, we describe some of the latest techniques to discover modulators of protein-protein interactions and how current drug discovery approaches have been adapted to successfully target these interfaces. PMID:24622521

  12. Accommodation of profound sequence differences at the interfaces of eubacterial RNA polymerase multi-protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Lakshmipuram Seshadri; Rekha, Nambudiry; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionarily divergent proteins have been shown to change their interacting partners. RNA polymerase assembly is one of the rare cases which retain its component proteins in the course of evolution. This ubiquitous molecular assembly, involved in transcription, consists of four core subunits (alpha, beta, betaprime, and omega), which assemble to form the core enzyme. Remarkably, the orientation of the four subunits in the complex is conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes although their sequence similarity is low. We have studied how the sequence divergence of the core subunits of RNA polymerase is accommodated in the formation of the multi-molecular assembly, with special reference to eubacterial species. Analysis of domain composition and order of the core subunits in >85 eubacterial species indicates complete conservation. However, sequence analysis indicates that interface residues of alpha and omega subunits are more divergent than those of beta, betaprime, and sigma70 subunits. Although beta and betaprime are generally well-conserved, residues involved in interaction with divergent subunits are not conserved. Insertions/deletions are also observed near interacting regions even in case of the most conserved subunits, beta and betaprime. Homology modelling of three divergent RNA polymerase complexes, from Helicobacter pylori, Mycoplasma pulmonis and Onion yellows phytoplasma, indicates that insertions/deletions can be accommodated near the interface as they generally occur at the periphery. Evaluation of the modeled interfaces indicates that they are physico-chemically similar to that of the template interfaces in Thermus thermophilus, indicating that nature has evolved to retain the obligate complex in spite of substantial substitutions and insertions/deletions. PMID:22359428

  13. Visualization and molecular analysis of nuclear import of protein kinase CK2 subunits in living cells.

    PubMed

    Martel, V; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Gerber, D; Benitez, M J; Cochet, C

    2001-11-01

    We have generated fusion proteins between the subunits of CK2 and GFP and characterized their behaviour in living cells. The expressed fusion proteins were functional and interacted with endogenous CK2. Imaging of NIH3T3 cells expressing low level of GFP-CK2alpha or GFP-CK2beta showed that both proteins were mostly nuclear in interphase. Both CK2 subunits contain nuclear localization domains that target them independently to the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, both subunits diffused rapidly in the nucleoplasm. In mitotic cells, CK2 subunits were dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and were not associated to chromatin. Our data are compatible with the idea that each subunit can translocate individually to the nucleus to interact with each other or with important cellular partners. Understanding the molecular mechanisms which regulate the dynamic localization of CK2 subunits will be of central importance. PMID:11827178

  14. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  15. The Protein-DNA Interface database

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The Protein-DNA Interface database (PDIdb) is a repository containing relevant structural information of Protein-DNA complexes solved by X-ray crystallography and available at the Protein Data Bank. The database includes a simple functional classification of the protein-DNA complexes that consists of three hierarchical levels: Class, Type and Subtype. This classification has been defined and manually curated by humans based on the information gathered from several sources that include PDB, PubMed, CATH, SCOP and COPS. The current version of the database contains only structures with resolution of 2.5 Å or higher, accounting for a total of 922 entries. The major aim of this database is to contribute to the understanding of the main rules that underlie the molecular recognition process between DNA and proteins. To this end, the database is focused on each specific atomic interface rather than on the separated binding partners. Therefore, each entry in this database consists of a single and independent protein-DNA interface. We hope that PDIdb will be useful to many researchers working in fields such as the prediction of transcription factor binding sites in DNA, the study of specificity determinants that mediate enzyme recognition events, engineering and design of new DNA binding proteins with distinct binding specificity and affinity, among others. Finally, due to its friendly and easy-to-use web interface, we hope that PDIdb will also serve educational and teaching purposes. PMID:20482798

  16. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Randall J; Jones, Miller B; Shutes, Adam; Yerxa, Benjamin R; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2003-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that couple serpentine receptors to intracellular effector pathways and the regulation of cell physiology. Ligand-bound receptors cause G-protein alpha subunits to bind guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and activate effector pathways. Signal termination is facilitated by the intrinsic GTPase activity of G-protein alpha subunits. Regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the GTPase activity of the G-protein alpha subunit, and thus negatively regulate G-protein-mediated signal transduction. In vitro biochemical assays of heterotrimeric G-proteins commonly include measurements of nucleotide binding, GTPase activity, and interaction with RGS proteins. However, the conventional assays for most of these processes involve radiolabeled guanine nucleotide analogues and scintillation counting. In this article, we focus on fluorescence-based methodologies to study heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit regulation in vitro. Furthermore, we consider the potential of such techniques in high-throughput screening and drug discovery. PMID:12769684

  17. Interaction of Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit with nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Dynan, W S; Yoo, S

    1998-01-01

    The Ku protein-DNA-dependent protein kinase system is one of the major pathways by which cells of higher eukaryotes respond to double-strand DNA breaks. The components of the system are evolutionarily conserved and homologs are known from a number of organisms. The Ku protein component binds directly to DNA ends and may help align them for ligation. Binding of Ku protein to DNA also nucleates formation of an active enzyme complex containing the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The interaction between Ku protein, DNA-PKcs and nucleic acids has been extensively investigated. This review summarizes the results of these biochemical investigations and relates them to recent molecular genetic studies that reveal highly characteristic repair and recombination defects in mutant cells lacking Ku protein or DNA-PKcs. PMID:9512523

  18. Matrix Proteins of Nipah and Hendra Viruses Interact with Beta Subunits of AP-3 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S.; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for the M proteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hinge-derived polypeptide was sufficient for M protein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding and M protein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, M protein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses cause deadly infections in humans, with a mortality rate of about 40%. Hendra virus outbreaks in Australia, all involving horses and some involving transmission to humans, have been a continuing problem. Nipah virus caused a large outbreak in Malaysia in 1998

  19. Investigation of Phycobilisome Subunit Interaction Interfaces by Coupled Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Ofir; Trabelcy, Beny; Gerchman, Yoram; Adir, Noam

    2014-01-01

    The phycobilisome (PBS) is an extremely large light-harvesting complex, common in cyanobacteria and red algae, composed of rods and core substructures. These substructures are assembled from chromophore-bearing phycocyanin and allophycocyanin subunits, nonpigmented linker proteins and in some cases additional subunits. To date, despite the determination of crystal structures of isolated PBS components, critical questions regarding the interaction and energy flow between rods and core are still unresolved. Additionally, the arrangement of minor PBS components located inside the core cylinders is unknown. Different models of the general architecture of the PBS have been proposed, based on low resolution images from electron microscopy or high resolution crystal structures of isolated components. This work presents a model of the assembly of the rods onto the core arrangement and for the positions of inner core components, based on cross-linking and mass spectrometry analysis of isolated, functional intact Thermosynechococcus vulcanus PBS, as well as functional cross-linked adducts. The experimental results were utilized to predict potential docking interactions of different protein pairs. Combining modeling and cross-linking results, we identify specific interactions within the PBS subcomponents that enable us to suggest possible functional interactions between the chromophores of the rods and the core and improve our understanding of the assembly, structure, and function of PBS. PMID:25296757

  20. Characterization of the Aalpha and Abeta subunit isoforms of protein phosphatase 2A: differences in expression, subunit interaction, and evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Pham, Huong T; Ruediger, Ralf; Walter, Gernot

    2003-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is very versatile owing to a large number of regulatory subunits and its ability to interact with numerous other proteins. The regulatory A subunit exists as two closely related isoforms designated Aalpha and Abeta. Mutations have been found in both isoforms in a variety of human cancers. Although Aalpha has been intensely studied, little is known about Abeta. We generated Abeta-specific antibodies and determined the cell cycle expression, subcellular distribution, and metabolic stability of Abeta in comparison with Aalpha. Both forms were expressed at constant levels throughout the cell cycle, but Aalpha was expressed at a much higher level than Abeta. Both forms were found predominantly in the cytoplasm, and both had a half-life of approx. 10 h. However, Aalpha and Abeta differed substantially in their expression patterns in normal tissues and in tumour cell lines. Whereas Aalpha was expressed at similarly high levels in all tissues and cell lines, Abeta expression varied greatly. In addition, in vivo studies with epitope-tagged Aalpha and Abeta subunits demonstrated that Abeta is a markedly weaker binder of regulatory B and catalytic C subunits than Aalpha. Construction of phylogenetic trees revealed that the conservation of Aalpha during the evolution of mammals is extraordinarily high in comparison with both Abeta and cytochrome c, suggesting that Aalpha is involved in more protein-protein interactions than Abeta. We also measured the binding of polyoma virus middle tumour antigen and simian virus 40 (SV40) small tumour antigen to Aalpha and Abeta. Whereas both isoforms bound polyoma virus middle tumour antigen equally well, only Aalpha bound SV40 small tumour antigen. PMID:12370081

  1. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. PMID:26687711

  2. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  3. Protein-protein interface prediction based on hexagon structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Ding, Yijie; Li, Shuai Cheng; Shen, Chao; Wang, Lusheng

    2016-08-01

    Studies on protein-protein interaction are important in proteome research. How to build more effective models based on sequence information, structure information and physicochemical characteristics, is the key technology in protein-protein interface prediction. In this paper, we study the protein-protein interface prediction problem. We propose a novel method for identifying residues on interfaces from an input protein with both sequence and 3D structure information, based on hexagon structure similarity. Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein interface. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves F-measure value by at least 0.03. On a common dataset consisting of 41 complexes, our method has overall precision and recall values of 63% and 57%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has overall precision and recall values of 55% and 56%. On CAPRI targets, our method has overall precision and recall values of 52% and 55%. PMID:26936323

  4. Bigenomic transcriptional regulation of all thirteen cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes by specificity protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T. T.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is one of only four known bigenomic proteins, with three mitochondria-encoded subunits and 10 nucleus-encoded ones derived from nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multi-subunit, bigenomic enzyme is not fully understood. We hypothesize that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) functionally regulates the 10 nucleus-encoded COX subunit genes directly and the three mitochondrial COX subunit genes indirectly by regulating mitochondrial transcription factors A and B (TFAM, TFB1M and TFB2M) in neurons. By means of in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference and over-expression experiments, the present study documents that Sp1 is a critical regulator of all 13 COX subunit genes in neurons. This regulation is intimately associated with neuronal activity. Silencing of Sp1 prevented the upregulation of all COX subunits by KCl, and over-expressing Sp1 rescued all COX subunits from being downregulated by tetrodotoxin. Thus, Sp1 and our previously described nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 are the three key regulators of all 13 COX subunit genes in neurons. The binding sites for Sp1 on all 10 nucleus-encoded COX subunits, TFAM, TFB1M and TFB2M are highly conserved among mice, rats and humans. PMID:23516108

  5. Exposing the subunit diversity within protein complexes: a mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Shelly; Tieri, Alessandra; Ridner, Gabriela; Stark, Ann-Kathrin; Schmaler, Tilo; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Sharon, Michal

    2013-03-01

    Identifying the list of subunits that make up protein complexes constitutes an important step towards understanding their biological functions. However, such knowledge alone does not reveal the full complexity of protein assemblies, as each subunit can take on multiple forms. Proteins can be post-translationally modified or cleaved, multiple products of alternative splicing can exist, and a single subunit may be encoded by more than one gene. Thus, for a complete description of a protein complex, it is necessary to expose the diversity of its subunits. Adding this layer of information is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms that regulate the activity of protein assemblies. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based approach that exposes the array of protein variants that comprise protein complexes. Our method relies on denaturing the protein complex, and separating its constituent subunits on a monolithic column prepared in-house. Following the subunit elution from the column, the flow is split into two fractions, using a Triversa NanoMate robot. One fraction is directed straight into an on-line ESI-QToF mass spectrometer for intact protein mass measurements, while the rest of the flow is fractionated into a 96-well plate for subsequent proteomic analysis. The heterogeneity of subunit composition is then exposed by correlating the subunit sequence identity with the accurate mass. Below, we describe in detail the methodological setting of this approach, its application on the endogenous human COP9 signalosome complex, and the significance of the method for structural mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes. PMID:23296018

  6. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  7. Scoring docking conformations using predicted protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since proteins function by interacting with other molecules, analysis of protein-protein interactions is essential for comprehending biological processes. Whereas understanding of atomic interactions within a complex is especially useful for drug design, limitations of experimental techniques have restricted their practical use. Despite progress in docking predictions, there is still room for improvement. In this study, we contribute to this topic by proposing T-PioDock, a framework for detection of a native-like docked complex 3D structure. T-PioDock supports the identification of near-native conformations from 3D models that docking software produced by scoring those models using binding interfaces predicted by the interface predictor, Template based Protein Interface Prediction (T-PIP). Results First, exhaustive evaluation of interface predictors demonstrates that T-PIP, whose predictions are customised to target complexity, is a state-of-the-art method. Second, comparative study between T-PioDock and other state-of-the-art scoring methods establishes T-PioDock as the best performing approach. Moreover, there is good correlation between T-PioDock performance and quality of docking models, which suggests that progress in docking will lead to even better results at recognising near-native conformations. Conclusion Accurate identification of near-native conformations remains a challenging task. Although availability of 3D complexes will benefit from template-based methods such as T-PioDock, we have identified specific limitations which need to be addressed. First, docking software are still not able to produce native like models for every target. Second, current interface predictors do not explicitly consider pairwise residue interactions between proteins and their interacting partners which leaves ambiguity when assessing quality of complex conformations. PMID:24906633

  8. The variable subunit associated with protein phosphatase 2A0 defines a novel multimember family of regulatory subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Zolnierowicz, S; Van Hoof, C; Andjelković, N; Cron, P; Stevens, I; Merlevede, W; Goris, J; Hemmings, B A

    1996-01-01

    Two protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) holoenzymes were isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle containing, in addition to the catalytic and PR65 regulatory subunits, proteins of apparent molecular masses of 61 and 56 kDa respectively. Both holoenzymes displayed low basal phosphorylase phosphatase activity, which could be stimulated by protamine to an extent similar to that of previously characterized PP2A holoenzymes. Protein micro-sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from the 61 kDa protein, termed PR61, yielded 117 residues of amino acid sequence. Molecular cloning by enrichment of specific mRNAs, followed by reverse transcription-PCR and cDNA library screening, revealed that this protein exists in multiple isoforms encoded by at least three genes, one of which gives rise to several splicing variants. Comparisons of these sequences with the available databases identified one more human gene and predicted another based on a rabbit cDNA-derived sequence, thus bringing the number of genes encoding PR61 family members to five. Peptide sequences derived from PR61 corresponded to the deduced amino acid sequences of either alpha or beta isoforms, indicating that the purified PP2A preparation was a mixture of at least two trimers. In contrast, the 56 kDa subunit (termed PR56) seems to correspond to the epsilon isoform of PR61. Several regulatory subunits of PP2A belonging to the PR61 family contain consensus sequences for nuclear localization and might therefore target PP2A to nuclear substrates. PMID:8694763

  9. Myristoylated. cap alpha. subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, J.E.; Mumby, S.M.; Casey, P.J.; Gilman, A.G.; Sefton, B.M.

    1987-11-01

    Antisera directed against specific subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to immunoprecipitate these polypeptides from metabolically labeled cells. This technique detects, in extracts of a human astrocytoma cell line, the ..cap alpha.. subunits of G/sub s/ (stimulatory) (..cap alpha../sub 45/ and ..cap alpha../sub 52/), a 41-kDa subunit of G/sub i/ (inhibitory) (..cap alpha../sub 41/), a 40-kDa protein (..cap alpha../sub 40/), and the 36-kDa ..beta.. subunit. No protein that comigrated with the ..cap alpha.. subunit of G/sup 0/ (unknown function) (..cap alpha../sub 39/) was detected. In cells grown in the presence of (/sup 3/H)myristic acid, ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 40/ contained /sup 3/H label, while the ..beta.. subunit did not. Chemical analysis of lipids attached covalently to purified ..cap alpha../sub 41/ and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ from bovine brain also revealed myristic acid. Similar analysis of brain G protein ..beta.. and ..gamma.. subunits and of G/sub t/ (Transducin) subunits (..cap alpha.., ..beta.., and ..gamma..) failed to reveal fatty acids. The fatty acid associated with ..cap alpha../sub 41/ , ..cap alpha../sub 40/, and ..cap alpha../sub 39/ was stable to treatment with base, suggesting that the lipid is linked to the polypeptide via an amide bond. These GTP binding proteins are thus identified as members of a select group of proteins that contains myristic acid covalently attached to the peptide backbone. Myristate may play an important role in stabilizing interactions of G proteins with phospholipid or with membrane-bound proteins.

  10. Proteins at the Biomaterial Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengvall, Pentti

    2005-03-01

    Proteins adsorb rapidly onto solid and polymeric surfaces because the association process is in the vast majority of cases energetically favourable, i.e. exothermic. The most common exceptions to this rule are hydrophilic interfaces with low net charge and high mobility, e.g. immobilized PEGs. Current research in the research area tries to understand and control unwanted and wanted adsorption by studying the adsorption kinetics, protein surface binding specificity, protein exchange at interfaces, and surface protein repulsion mechanisms. In blood plasma model systems humoral cascade reactions such as surface mediated coagulation and immune complement raise considerable interest due to the immediate association to blood compatibility, and in tissue applications the binding between surfaces and membrane receptors in cells and tissues. Thus, the understanding of interfacial events at the protein level is of large importance in applications such as blood and tissue contacting biomaterials, in vitro medical and biological diagnostics, food industry and in marine anti-fouling technology. Well described consequences of adsorption are a lowered system energy, increased system entropy, irreversible binding, conformational changes, specific surface/protein interactions, and in biomedical materials applications surface opsonization followed by cell-surface interactions and a host tissue response. This lecture will deal with some mechanisms known to be of importance for the adsorption processes, such as the influence of surface chemistry and surface energy, the composition of the protein solution, the Vroman effect, and residence time. Examples will be shown from ellipsometric experiments using different model surfaces in single/few protein solutions, and specific attention be given to blood serum and plasma experiments on coagulation and immune complement at interfaces.

  11. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  12. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  13. The modular architecture of protein-protein binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, D; Rahat, O; Albeck, S; Meged, R; Dym, O; Schreiber, G

    2005-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential for life. Yet, our understanding of the general principles governing binding is not complete. In the present study, we show that the interface between proteins is built in a modular fashion; each module is comprised of a number of closely interacting residues, with few interactions between the modules. The boundaries between modules are defined by clustering the contact map of the interface. We show that mutations in one module do not affect residues located in a neighboring module. As a result, the structural and energetic consequences of the deletion of entire modules are surprisingly small. To the contrary, within their module, mutations cause complex energetic and structural consequences. Experimentally, this phenomenon is shown on the interaction between TEM1-beta-lactamase and beta-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) by using multiple-mutant analysis and x-ray crystallography. Replacing an entire module of five interface residues with Ala created a large cavity in the interface, with no effect on the detailed structure of the remaining interface. The modular architecture of binding sites, which resembles human engineering design, greatly simplifies the design of new protein interactions and provides a feasible view of how these interactions evolved. PMID:15618400

  14. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  15. Interface-Resolved Network of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret E.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    We define an interface-interaction network (IIN) to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI). This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked in the coarser

  16. Crystal Structures of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM) Protein Vps33, Alone and Bound to the Homotypic Fusion and Vacuolar Protein Sorting (HOPS) Subunit Vps16*

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard W.; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Hughson, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires the regulated assembly of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor) proteins anchored in the apposed membranes. To exert the force required to drive fusion between lipid bilayers, juxtamembrane SNARE motifs zipper into four-helix bundles. Importantly, SNARE function is regulated by additional factors, none more extensively studied than the SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) proteins. SM proteins interact with both individual SNAREs and SNARE complexes, likely chaperoning SNARE complex formation and protecting assembly intermediates from premature disassembly by NSF. Four families of SM proteins have been identified, and representative members of two of these families (Sec1/Munc18 and Sly1) have been structurally characterized. We report here the 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of an SM protein from the third family, Vps33. Although Vps33 shares with the first two families the same basic three-domain architecture, domain 1 is displaced by 15 Å, accompanied by a 40° rotation. A unique feature of the Vps33 family of SM proteins is that its members function as stable subunits within a multi-subunit tethering complex called HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuolar protein sorting). Integration into the HOPS complex depends on the interaction between Vps33 and a second HOPS subunit, Vps16. The crystal structure of Vps33 bound to a C-terminal portion of Vps16, also at 2.6 Å resolution, reveals the structural basis for this interaction. Despite the extensive interface between the two HOPS subunits, the conformation of Vps33 is only subtly affected by binding to Vps16. PMID:23840694

  17. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  18. Type B Heterotrimeric G Protein γ-Subunit Regulates Auxin and ABA Signaling in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Gayathery; Trusov, Yuri; Lopez-Encina, Carlos; Hayashi, Satomi; Batley, Jacqueline; Botella, José Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins composed of α, β, and γ subunits are central signal transducers mediating the cellular response to multiple stimuli in most eukaryotes. Gγ subunits provide proper cellular localization and functional specificity to the heterotrimer complex. Plant Gγ subunits, divided into three structurally distinct types, are more diverse than their animal counterparts. Type B Gγ subunits, lacking a carboxyl-terminal isoprenylation motif, are found only in flowering plants. We present the functional characterization of type B Gγ subunit (SlGGB1) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We show that SlGGB1 is the most abundant Gγ subunit in tomato and strongly interacts with the Gβ subunit. Importantly, the green fluorescent protein-SlGGB1 fusion protein as well as the carboxyl-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-SlGGB1/amino-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-Gβ heterodimer were localized in the plasma membrane, nucleus, and cytoplasm. RNA interference-mediated silencing of SlGGB1 resulted in smaller seeds, higher number of lateral roots, and pointy fruits. The silenced lines were hypersensitive to exogenous auxin, while levels of endogenous auxins were lower or similar to those of the wild type. SlGGB1-silenced plants also showed strong hyposensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination but not in other related assays. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic seeds revealed abnormal expression of genes involved in ABA sensing, signaling, and response. We conclude that the type B Gγ subunit SlGGB1 mediates auxin and ABA signaling in tomato. PMID:26668332

  19. Heterotrimeric G protein subunits differentially respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Yu, Chao-Yuan; Iwasa, Tatsuo; Kanehara, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    Canonical heterotrimeric G proteins in eukaryotes are major components that localize at plasma membrane and transmit extracellular stimuli into the cell. Genome of a seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana encodes at least one Gα (GPA1), one Gβ (AGB1), and 3 Gγ (AGG1, AGG2 and AGG3) subunits. The loss-of-function mutations of G protein subunit(s) cause multiple defects in development as well as biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, it remains elusive how these subunits differentially express these defects. Here, we report that Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein subunits differentially respond to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. An isolated homozygous mutant of AGB1, agb1-3, was more sensitive to the tunicamycin-induced ER stress compared to the wild type and the other loss-of-function mutants of G protein subunits. Moreover, ER stress responsive genes were highly expressed in the agb1-3 plant. Our results indicate that AGB1 positively contributes to ER stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:26237103

  20. Visualization of Subunit Interactions and Ternary Complexes of Protein Phosphatase 2A in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shu-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Ju; Lai, Tai-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Chung, Cheng-En; Kuo, Spencer C. H.; Reece, Kelie M.; Chen, Yung-Cheng; Chang, Nan-Shan; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Chiang, Chi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous phospho-serine/threonine phosphatase that controls many diverse cellular functions. The predominant form of PP2A is a heterotrimeric holoenzyme consisting of a scaffolding A subunit, a variable regulatory B subunit, and a catalytic C subunit. The C subunit also associates with other interacting partners, such as α4, to form non-canonical PP2A complexes. We report visualization of PP2A complexes in mammalian cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis of PP2A subunit interactions demonstrates that the B subunit plays a key role in directing the subcellular localization of PP2A, and confirms that the A subunit functions as a scaffold in recruiting the B and C subunits to form a heterotrimeric holoenzyme. BiFC analysis also reveals that α4 promotes formation of the AC core dimer. Furthermore, we demonstrate visualization of specific ABC holoenzymes in cells by combining BiFC and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET). Our studies not only provide direct imaging data to support previous biochemical observations on PP2A complexes, but also offer a promising approach for studying the spatiotemporal distribution of individual PP2A complexes in cells. PMID:25536081

  1. Structure-based design of small peptide inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 subunit interaction

    PubMed Central

    Laudet, Béatrice; Barette, Caroline; Dulery, Vincent; Renaudet, Olivier; Dumy, Pascal; Metz, Alexandra; Prudent, Renaud; Deshiere, Alexandre; Dideberg, Otto; Filhol, Odile; Cochet, Claude

    2007-01-01

    X-ray crystallography studies, as well as live-cell fluorescent imaging, have recently challenged the traditional view of protein kinase CK2. Unbalanced expression of catalytic and regulatory CK2 subunits has been observed in a variety of tissues and tumours. Thus the potential intersubunit flexibility suggested by these studies raises the likely prospect that the CK2 holoenzyme complex is subject to disassembly and reassembly. In the present paper, we show evidence for the reversible multimeric organization of the CK2 holoenzyme complex in vitro. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, binding experiments and functional assays to show that, both in vitro and in vivo, only a small set of primary hydrophobic residues of CK2β which contacts at the centre of the CK2α/CK2β interface dominates affinity. The results indicate that a double mutation in CK2β of amino acids Tyr188 and Phe190, which are complementary and fill up a hydrophobic pocket of CK2α, is the most disruptive to CK2α binding both in vitro and in living cells. Further characterization of hotspots in a cluster of hydrophobic amino acids centred around Tyr188–Phe190 led us to the structure-based design of small-peptide inhibitors. One conformationally constrained 11-mer peptide (Pc) represents a unique CK2β-based small molecule that was particularly efficient (i) to antagonize the interaction between the CK2 subunits, (ii) to inhibit the assembly of the CK2 holoenzyme complex, and (iii) to strongly affect its substrate preference. PMID:17714077

  2. Structure-based design of small peptide inhibitors of protein kinase CK2 subunit interaction.

    PubMed

    Laudet, Béatrice; Barette, Caroline; Dulery, Vincent; Renaudet, Olivier; Dumy, Pascal; Metz, Alexandra; Prudent, Renaud; Deshiere, Alexandre; Dideberg, Otto; Filhol, Odile; Cochet, Claude

    2007-12-15

    X-ray crystallography studies, as well as live-cell fluorescent imaging, have recently challenged the traditional view of protein kinase CK2. Unbalanced expression of catalytic and regulatory CK2 subunits has been observed in a variety of tissues and tumours. Thus the potential intersubunit flexibility suggested by these studies raises the likely prospect that the CK2 holoenzyme complex is subject to disassembly and reassembly. In the present paper, we show evidence for the reversible multimeric organization of the CK2 holoenzyme complex in vitro. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis, binding experiments and functional assays to show that, both in vitro and in vivo, only a small set of primary hydrophobic residues of CK2beta which contacts at the centre of the CK2alpha/CK2beta interface dominates affinity. The results indicate that a double mutation in CK2beta of amino acids Tyr188 and Phe190, which are complementary and fill up a hydrophobic pocket of CK2alpha, is the most disruptive to CK2alpha binding both in vitro and in living cells. Further characterization of hotspots in a cluster of hydrophobic amino acids centred around Tyr188-Phe190 led us to the structure-based design of small-peptide inhibitors. One conformationally constrained 11-mer peptide (Pc) represents a unique CK2beta-based small molecule that was particularly efficient (i) to antagonize the interaction between the CK2 subunits, (ii) to inhibit the assembly of the CK2 holoenzyme complex, and (iii) to strongly affect its substrate preference. PMID:17714077

  3. Influence of Conformation of M. tuberculosis RNase P Protein Subunit on Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Alla; Ubaid-ullah, Shah; Ramteke, Anup K.; Batra, Janendra K

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is an essential enzyme that processes 5' end leader sequence of pre-tRNA to generate mature tRNA. The bacterial RNase Ps contain a RNA subunit and one protein subunit, where the RNA subunit contains the catalytic activity. The protein subunit which lacks any catalytic activity, relaxes the ionic requirements for holoenzyme reaction and is indispensable for pre-tRNA cleavage in vivo. In the current study, we reconstituted the M. tuberculosis RNase P holoenzyme in vitro. We prepared the RNase P protein through two different strategies that differ in the conditions under which the recombinant M. tuberculosis protein, expressed in E. coli was purified. The mycobacterial RNase P protein which was purified under native conditions subsequent to isolation from inclusion bodies and in vitro renaturation, was capable of cleaving pre-tRNA specifically without the requirement of RNase P RNA. However, the preparation that was purified under denaturing conditions and refolded subsequently lacked any inherent pre-tRNA processing activity and cleaved the substrate only as a component of the holoenzyme with the RNA subunit. We found that the two RNase P protein preparations attained alternative conformations and differed with respect to their stability as well. PMID:27088505

  4. AMP-activated protein kinase kinase: detection with recombinant AMPK alpha1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Stephen R; O'Donnell, John B; Hammet, Andrew; Stapleton, David; Habinowski, Susan A; Means, Anthony R; Kemp, Bruce E; Witters, Lee A

    2002-05-10

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase important for the responses to metabolic stress. It consists of a catalytic alpha subunit and two non-catalytic subunits, beta and gamma, and is regulated both by the allosteric action of AMP and by phosphorylation of the alpha and beta subunits catalyzed by AMPKK(s) and autophosphorylation. The Thr172 site on the alpha subunit has been previously characterized as an activating phosphorylation site. Using bacterially expressed AMPK alpha1 subunit proteins, we have explored the role of Thr172-directed AMPKKs in alpha subunit regulation. Recombinant alpha1 subunit proteins, representing the N-terminus, have been expressed as maltose binding protein (MBP) 6x His fusion proteins and purified to homogeneity by Ni(2+) chromatography. Both wild-type alpha1(1-312) and alpha1(1-312)T172D are inactive when expressed in bacteria, but the former can be fully phosphorylated (1 mol/mol) on Thr172 and activated by a surrogate AMPKK, CaMKKbeta. The corresponding AMPKalpha1(1-392), an alpha construct containing its autoinhibitory sequence, can be similarly phosphorylated, but it remains inactive. In an insulinoma cell line, either low glucose or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) treatment leads to activation and T172 phosphorylation of endogenous AMPK. Under the same conditions of cell incubation, we have identified an AMPKK activity that both phosphorylates and activates the recombinant alpha1(1-312), but this Thr172-directed AMPKK activity is unaltered by low glucose or AICAR, indicating that it is constitutively active. PMID:12051742

  5. Coordinate inhibition of expression of several genes for protein subunits of human nuclear RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Kovrigina, Elizaveta; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney

    2003-01-01

    The deliberate inhibition of expression of one of the protein subunits (Rpp38) of human nuclear RNase P is achievable by using external guide sequence (EGS) technology. Both the protein product and the mRNA are greatly reduced 24 h after transient transfection with a gene coding for an appropriate EGS. Control experiments indicated that four other protein subunits of RNase P and their RNAs are also inhibited with no external manipulation. The remaining RNase P proteins, their mRNAs, and the RNA subunit of RNase P all are unchanged. Several short nucleotide sequences adjacent to the ORFs for the inhibited genes are similar and could be targets for transcriptional repression. The explanation of coordinate inhibition of the expression of the product of one particular gene by the transfection of an EGS (or RNA interference) requires some care in terms of interpreting phenotypic effects because, in our case, several gene products that are not targeted are also inhibited. PMID:12552092

  6. The interface of protein structure, protein biophysics, and molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Liberles, David A; Teichmann, Sarah A; Bahar, Ivet; Bastolla, Ugo; Bloom, Jesse; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Colwell, Lucy J; de Koning, A P Jason; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Echave, Julian; Elofsson, Arne; Gerloff, Dietlind L; Goldstein, Richard A; Grahnen, Johan A; Holder, Mark T; Lakner, Clemens; Lartillot, Nicholas; Lovell, Simon C; Naylor, Gavin; Perica, Tina; Pollock, David D; Pupko, Tal; Regan, Lynne; Roger, Andrew; Rubinstein, Nimrod; Shakhnovich, Eugene; Sjölander, Kimmen; Sunyaev, Shamil; Teufel, Ashley I; Thorne, Jeffrey L; Thornton, Joseph W; Weinreich, Daniel M; Whelan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The interface of protein structural biology, protein biophysics, molecular evolution, and molecular population genetics forms the foundations for a mechanistic understanding of many aspects of protein biochemistry. Current efforts in interdisciplinary protein modeling are in their infancy and the state-of-the art of such models is described. Beyond the relationship between amino acid substitution and static protein structure, protein function, and corresponding organismal fitness, other considerations are also discussed. More complex mutational processes such as insertion and deletion and domain rearrangements and even circular permutations should be evaluated. The role of intrinsically disordered proteins is still controversial, but may be increasingly important to consider. Protein geometry and protein dynamics as a deviation from static considerations of protein structure are also important. Protein expression level is known to be a major determinant of evolutionary rate and several considerations including selection at the mRNA level and the role of interaction specificity are discussed. Lastly, the relationship between modeling and needed high-throughput experimental data as well as experimental examination of protein evolution using ancestral sequence resurrection and in vitro biochemistry are presented, towards an aim of ultimately generating better models for biological inference and prediction. PMID:22528593

  7. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  8. A surface plasmon resonance study of the interactions between the component subunits of protein kinase CK2 and two protein substrates, casein and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Benítez, M J; Cochet, C; Jiménez, J S

    2001-11-01

    Surface plasmon resonance has been used to study the interaction between the subunits composing protein kinase CK2 (two catalytic, alpha-subunits, and two regulatory, beta-subunits), as well as the interaction of each subunit with two types of protein substrates, casein, the phosphorylation of which is activated by the regulatory subunit, and calmodulin, which belongs to the kind of substrates on which the catalytic subunit is downregulated by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of casein with the catalytic subunit differs from the interaction with the holoenzyme. Similarly to the interaction with the regulatory subunit, the catalytic subunit interacts with the protein substrate forming a very stable, irreversible complex. The reconstituted holoenzyme, however, binds casein reversibly, displaying a binding mode similar to that displayed by the regulatory subunit. The interaction of calmodulin with the catalytic subunit gives place, like in the case of casein, to an irreversible complex. The interactions with the regulatory subunit and with the holoenzyme were practically negligible, and the interaction with the regulatory subunit disappeared upon increasing the temperature value to close to 30 degrees C. The presence of polylysine induced a high increase in the extent of calmodulin binding to the holoenzyme. The results obtained suggest that CK2beta subunit and protein substrates share a common, or at least an overlapping, site of interaction on the catalytic subunit. The interaction between both subunits would prevent substrates from binding irreversibly to alpha subunit, and, at the same time, it would generate a new and milder site of interaction between the whole holoenzyme and the protein substrate. The main difference between casein and calmodulin would consist in the lower affinity display by the last for the new site generated upon the binding of the regulatory subunit, in the absence of polycations like polylysine. PMID:11827172

  9. Implication of Terminal Residues at Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olivier M F; Etheve, Loïc; Launay, Guillaume; Martin, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Terminal residues of protein chains are charged and more flexible than other residues since they are constrained only on one side. Do they play a particular role in protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces? To answer this question, we considered large sets of non-redundant protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes and analyzed the status of terminal residues and their involvement in interfaces. In protein-protein complexes, we found that more than half of terminal residues (62%) are either modified by attachment of a tag peptide (10%) or have missing coordinates in the analyzed structures (52%). Terminal residues are almost exclusively located at the surface of proteins (94%). Contrary to charged residues, they are not over or under-represented in protein-protein interfaces, but strongly prefer the peripheral region of interfaces when present at the interface (83% of terminal residues). The almost exclusive location of terminal residues at the surface of the proteins or in the rim regions of interfaces explains that experimental methods relying on tail hybridization can be successfully applied without disrupting the complexes under study. Concerning conformational rearrangement in protein-protein complexes, despite their expected flexibility, terminal residues adopt similar locations between the free and bound forms of the docking benchmark. In protein-DNA complexes, N-terminal residues are twice more frequent than C-terminal residues at interfaces. Both N-terminal and C-terminal residues are under-represented in interfaces, in contrast to positively charged residues, which are strongly favored. When located in protein-DNA interfaces, terminal residues prefer the periphery. N-terminal and C-terminal residues thus have particular properties with regard to interfaces, which cannot be reduced to their charged nature. PMID:27611671

  10. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  11. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  12. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  13. Tandem Subunits Effectively Constrain GABAA Receptor Stoichiometry and Recapitulate Receptor Kinetics But Are Insensitive to GABAA Receptor-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Andrew J.; Pearce, Robert A.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    GABAergic synapses likely contain multiple GABAA receptor subtypes, making postsynaptic currents difficult to dissect. However, even in heterologous expression systems, analysis of receptors composed of α, β, and γ subunits can be confounded by receptors expressed from α and β subunits alone. To produce recombinant GABAA receptors containing fixed subunit stoichiometry, we coexpressed individual subunits with a “tandem” α1 subunit linked to a β2 subunit. Cotransfection of the γ2 subunit with αβ-tandem subunits in human embryonic kidney 293 cells produced currents that were similar in their macroscopic kinetics, single-channel amplitudes, and pharmacology to overexpression of the γ subunit with nonlinked α1 and β2 subunits. Similarly, expression of α subunits together with αβ-tandem subunits produced receptors having physiological and pharmacological characteristics that closely matched cotransfection of α with β subunits. In this first description of tandem GABAA subunits measured with patch-clamp and rapid agonist application techniques, we conclude that incorporation of αβ-tandem subunits can be used to fix stoichiometry and to establish the intrinsic kinetic properties of α1β2 and α1β2γ2 receptors. We used this method to test whether the accessory protein GABAA receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) alters GABAA receptor properties directly or influences subunit composition. In recombinant receptors with fixed stoichiometry, coexpression of GABARAP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein had no effect on desensitization, deactivation, or diazepam potentiation of GABA-mediated currents. However, in α1β2γ2S transfections in which stoichiometry was not fixed, GABARAP-EGFP altered desensitization, deactivation, and diazepam potentiation of GABA-mediated currents. The data suggest that GABARAP does not alter receptor kinetics directly but by facilitating surface expression of αβγ receptors. PMID:16339017

  14. A novel protein-mineral interface.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Dmitriy; Zhu, Haizhong; Guo, Maolin; Zhong, Weiqing; Hunter, Dominic J B; Yang, Weiping; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sadler, Peter J

    2003-04-01

    Transferrins transport Fe3+ and other metal ions in mononuclear-binding sites. We present the first evidence that a member of the transferrin superfamily is able to recognize multi-nuclear oxo-metal clusters, small mineral fragments that are the most abundant forms of many metals in the environment. We show that the ferric ion-binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (nFbp) readily binds clusters of Fe3+, Ti4+, Zr4+ or Hf4+ in solution. The 1.7 A resolution crystal structure of Hf-nFbp reveals three distinct types of clusters in an open, positively charged cleft between two hinged protein domains. A di-tyrosyl cluster nucleation motif (Tyr195-Tyr196) is situated at the bottom of this cleft and binds either a trinuclear oxo-Hf cluster, which is capped by phosphate, or a pentanuclear cluster, which in turn can be capped with phosphate. This first high-resolution structure of a protein-mineral interface suggests a novel metal-uptake mechanism and provides a model for protein-mediated mineralization/dissimilation, which plays a critical role in geochemical processes. PMID:12598891

  15. G protein beta gamma subunits stimulate phosphorylation of Shc adapter protein.

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, K; Hawes, B E; van Biesen, T; Lefkowitz, R J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi-coupled receptors is known to involve the beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (G beta gamma), p21ras activation, and an as-yet-unidentified tyrosine kinase. To investigate the mechanism of G beta gamma-stimulated p21ras activation, G beta gamma-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation was examined by overexpressing G beta gamma or alpha 2-C10 adrenergic receptors (ARs) that couple to Gi in COS-7 cells. Immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins revealed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation of two proteins of approximately 50 kDa (designated as p52) in G beta gamma-transfected cells or in alpha 2-C10 AR-transfected cells stimulated with the agonist UK-14304. The latter response was pertussis toxin sensitive. These proteins (p52) were also specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibodies and comigrated with two Shc proteins, 46 and 52 kDa. The G beta gamma- or alpha 2-C10 AR-stimulated p52 (Shc) phosphorylation was inhibited by coexpression of the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (a G beta gamma-binding pleckstrin homology domain peptide) or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, but not by a dominant negative mutant of p21ras. Worthmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibited phosphorylation of p52 (Shc), implying involvement of PI3K. These results suggest that G beta gamma-stimulated Shc phosphorylation represents an early step in the pathway leading to p21ras activation, similar to the mechanism utilized by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7568118

  16. Domain interaction between NMDA receptor subunits and the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Schenker, L T; Kennedy, M B; Seeburg, P H

    1995-09-22

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subserves synaptic glutamate-induced transmission and plasticity in central neurons. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to show that the cytoplasmic tails of NMDA receptor subunits interact with a prominent postsynaptic density protein PSD-95. The second PDZ domain in PSD-95 binds to the seven-amino acid, COOH-terminal domain containing the terminal tSXV motif (where S is serine, X is any amino acid, and V is valine) common to NR2 subunits and certain NR1 splice forms. Transcripts encoding PSD-95 are expressed in a pattern similar to that of NMDA receptors, and the NR2B subunit co-localizes with PSD-95 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The interaction of these proteins may affect the plasticity of excitatory synapses. PMID:7569905

  17. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-07-16

    We have found that soybean cotyledons could be cultured in vitro and that the storage proteins were formed essentially as on a plant. When methionine was added to the medium, the cotyledons grew faster, and the methionine content of the protein fraction was increased by over 20 percent. The high methionine content of the protein fraction was found to be due to a shift in the relative amounts of the two major storage proteins. The later effect was the result of methionine treatment suppressing the expression of one storage protein subunit gene. The goal was to determine the mechanism by which methionine is able to regulate the expression of the ..beta..-subunit gene.

  18. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum: lessons from the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddon, R. W.; Sherman, S. A.; Bedows, E.

    1996-01-01

    There have been few studies of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum of intact mammalian cells. In the one case where the in vivo and in vitro folding pathways of a mammalian secretory protein have been compared, the folding of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit (hCG-beta), the order of formation of the detected folding intermediates is the same. The rate and efficiency with which multidomain proteins such as hCG-beta fold to native structure in intact cells is higher than in vitro, although intracellular rates of folding of the beta subunit can be approached in vitro in the presence of an optimal redox potential and protein disulfide isomerase. Understanding how proteins fold in vivo may provide a new way to diagnose and treat human illnesses that occur due to folding defects. PMID:8844836

  19. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  20. Protection of mice against H. somni septicemia by vaccination with recombinant immunoglobulin binding protein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Geertsema, Roger S.; Worby, Carolyn; Kruger, Robert P.; Tagawa, Yuichi; Russo, Riccardo; Herdman, D. Scott; Lo, Kimby; Kimball, Richard A.; Dixon, Jack; Corbeil, Lynette B.

    2008-01-01

    Haemophilus somni causes bovine pneumonia as well as septicemia and its sequelae but mechanisms of virulence and protective immunity are poorly understood. Since surface immunoglobulin binding proteins are virulence factors, we addressed their role as protective antigens in a mouse model of H. somni septicemia. Immunoglobulin binding protein A (IbpA), has homology to Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin and other large bacterial exoproteins. IbpA is a major surface antigen encoded by the ibpA gene with many domains that may be important in pathogenesis and immune protection. Three IbpA recombinant protein subunits, IbpA3, IbpA5 and IbpADR2 were chosen for study because of putative functional domains and motifs. These recombinant GST fusion subunit proteins were compared with GST (negative control), formalin-killed H. somni (commercial vaccine control), live H. somni (to induce convalescent immunity) and H. somni culture supernatant (containing IbpA shed from the bacterial surface). In vaccination/challenge studies, both live H. somni (convalescent immunity) and supernatant protected equally but formalin-killed H. somni and GST did not protect against septicemia. The DR2 and A3 subunits protected moderately well and induced antibody responses against supernatant antigen and the homologous subunit in ELISA but not against whole cell antigens. Supernatant immunization protected better than the IbpA subunit antigens and induced high antibody activity against both whole cells and supernatant antigens. The results indicate that culture supernatant antigens or perhaps recombinant IbpA subunits may be useful in H. somni vaccines. These studies also provide insight into the contribution of IbpA domains to pathogenesis of H. somni septicemia. PMID:18590787

  1. Protection of mice against H. somni septicemia by vaccination with recombinant immunoglobulin binding protein subunits.

    PubMed

    Geertsema, Roger S; Worby, Carolyn; Kruger, Robert P; Tagawa, Yuichi; Russo, Riccardo; Herdman, D Scott; Lo, Kimby; Kimball, Richard A; Dixon, Jack; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2008-08-18

    Histophilus somni causes bovine pneumonia as well as septicemia and its sequelae but mechanisms of virulence and protective immunity are poorly understood. Since surface immunoglobulin binding proteins are virulence factors, we addressed their role as protective antigens in a mouse model of H. somni septicemia. Immunoglobulin binding protein A (IbpA), has homology to Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin and other large bacterial exoproteins. IbpA is a major surface antigen encoded by the ibpA gene with many domains that may be important in pathogenesis and immune protection. Three IbpA recombinant protein subunits, IbpA3, IbpA5 and IbpADR2 were chosen for study because of putative functional domains and motifs. These recombinant GST fusion subunit proteins were compared with GST (negative control), formalin-killed H. somni (commercial vaccine control), live H. somni (to induce convalescent immunity) and H. somni culture supernatant (containing IbpA shed from the bacterial surface). In vaccination/challenge studies, both live H. somni (convalescent immunity) and supernatant protected equally but formalin-killed H. somni and GST did not protect against septicemia. The DR2 and A3 subunits protected moderately well and induced antibody responses against supernatant antigen and the homologous subunit in ELISA but not against whole cell antigens. Supernatant immunization protected better than the IbpA subunit antigens and induced high antibody activity against both whole cells and supernatant antigens. The results indicate that culture supernatant antigens or perhaps recombinant IbpA subunits may be useful in H. somni vaccines. These studies also provide insight into the contribution of IbpA domains to pathogenesis of H. somni septicemia. PMID:18590787

  2. The association between phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase activity and a specific subunit of microtubular protein in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. Supernatant proteins from rat brain were separated into two fractions containing phosphatidylinositol phosphodiesterase activity by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. 2. The first fraction sediments in linear sucrose density gradients in two bands corresponding to molecular weights of 66000 and 36000. There was presumptive evidence that the lighter protein constituted the monomeric form of the enzyme. The second fraction sediments predominantly as a single protein of molecular weight 86000. 3. Treatment of rat brain supernatant with [3H]colchicine abolished the second DEAE-Sephadex peak and removed the lighter protein from the first peak. These proteins emerged in the same position as the protein binding [3H]colchicine at high salt concentration; phospholipase activity was recovered from linear sucrose density gradients in positions corresponding to molecular weights 88000 and 43000, together with an aggregate of molecular weight 140000. Electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulphate–urea–polyacrylamide gels of this fraction revealed only three proteins: the α and β-subunits of microtubular protein, of molecular weights 56000 and 52000 respectively, and a protein of molecular weight 38000. 4. A sample of microtubular protein from mouse, labelled in vivo with [3H]proline and 32Pi, was added to rat brain supernatant together with an equal amount of the same microtubular protein treated with cyclic AMP and [γ-32P]ATP and the mixture subsequently characterized by ion-exchange chromatography. Some phospholipase activity characteristic of the second peak from DEAE-Sephadex was associated with one fraction of added microtubular protein. This fraction was identified on the basis of the 3H:32P ratio as the β subunit of the protein treated with ATP and cyclic AMP. The subunit of added microtubular protein untreated with nucleotides was not associated with phospholipase activity. PMID:4353236

  3. Replication protein A subunit 3 and the iron efficiency response in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], iron deficiency results in interveinal chlorosis and decreased photosynthetic capacity, leading to stunting and yield loss. In this study, gene expression analyses investigated the role of soybean replication protein A (RPA) subunits during iron stress. Nine RP...

  4. Homologous and unique G protein alpha subunits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Lochrie, M A; Mendel, J E; Sternberg, P W; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a known G protein alpha subunit, the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha), was isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of C. elegans Go alpha is 80-87% identical to other Go alpha sequences. An mRNA that hybridizes to the C. elegans Go alpha cDNA can be detected on Northern blots. A C. elegans protein that crossreacts with antibovine Go alpha antibody can be detected on immunoblots. A cosmid clone containing the C. elegans Go alpha gene (goa-1) was isolated and mapped to chromosome I. The genomic fragments of three other C. elegans G protein alpha subunit genes (gpa-1, gpa-2, and gpa-3) have been isolated using the polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding cosmid clones were isolated and mapped to disperse locations on chromosome V. The sequences of two of the genes, gpa-1 and gpa-3, were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences of gpa-1 and gpa-3 are only 48% identical to each other. Therefore, they are likely to have distinct functions. In addition they are not homologous enough to G protein alpha subunits in other organisms to be classified. Thus C. elegans has G proteins that are identifiable homologues of mammalian G proteins as well as G proteins that appear to be unique to C. elegans. Study of identifiable G proteins in C. elegans may result in a further understanding of their function in other organisms, whereas study of the novel G proteins may provide an understanding of unique aspects of nematode physiology. Images PMID:1907494

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar protein Nop7p is necessary for biogenesis of 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Cynthia C; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Roman, Judibelle; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Woolford, John L

    2002-01-01

    To identify new gene products that participate in ribosome biogenesis, we carried out a screen for mutations that result in lethality in combination with mutations in DRS1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleolar DEAD-box protein required for synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. We identified the gene NOP7that encodes an essential protein. The temperature-sensitive nop7-1 mutation or metabolic depletion of Nop7p results in a deficiency of 60S ribosomal subunits and accumulation of halfmer polyribosomes. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicates that nop7 mutants exhibit a delay in processing of 27S pre-rRNA to mature 25S rRNA and decreased accumulation of 25S rRNA. Thus Nop7p, like Drs1p, is required for essential steps leading to synthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits. In addition, inactivation or depletion of Nop7p also affects processing at the A0, A1, and A2 sites, which may result from the association of Nop7p with 35S pre-rRNA in 90S pre-rRNPs. Nop7p is localized primarily in the nucleolus, where most steps in ribosome assembly occur. Nop7p is homologous to the zebrafish pescadillo protein necessary for embryonic development. The Nop7 protein contains the BRCT motif, a protein-protein interaction domain through which, for example, the human BRCA1 protein interacts with RNA helicase A. PMID:11911362

  6. A novel approach to analyze membrane proteins by laser mass spectrometry: from protein subunits to the integral complex.

    PubMed

    Morgner, Nina; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Barth, Hans-Dieter; Ludwig, Bernd; Brutschy, Bernhard

    2007-08-01

    A novel laser-based mass spectrometry method termed LILBID (laser-induced liquid bead ion desorption) is applied to analyze large integral membrane protein complexes and their subunits. In this method the ions are IR-laser desorbed from aqueous microdroplets containing the hydrophobic protein complexes solubilized by detergent. The method is highly sensitive, very efficient in sample handling, relatively tolerant to various buffers, and detects the ions in narrow, mainly low-charge state distributions. The crucial experimental parameter determining whether the integral complex or its subunits are observed is the laser intensity: At very low intensity level corresponding to an ultrasoft desorption, the intact complexes, together with few detergent molecules, are transferred into vacuum. Under these conditions the oligomerization state of the complex (i.e., its quaternary structure) may be analyzed. At higher laser intensity, complexes are thermolyzed into subunits, with any residual detergent being stripped off to yield the true mass of the polypeptides. The model complexes studied are derived from the respiratory chain of the soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans and include complexes III (cytochrome bc(1) complex) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase). These are well characterized multi-subunit membrane proteins, with the individual hydrophobic subunits being composed of up to 12 transmembrane helices. PMID:17544294

  7. Kinetics of acrylodan-labelled cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit denaturation.

    PubMed

    Kivi, Rait; Loog, Mart; Jemth, Per; Järv, Jaak

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study denaturation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit labeled with an acrylodan moiety. The dye was covalently bound to a cystein residue introduced into the enzyme by replacement of arginine in position 326 in the native sequence, located near the enzyme active center. This labeling had no effect on catalytic activity of the enzyme, but provided possibility to monitor changes in protein structure through measuring the fluorescence spectrum of the dye, which is sensitive to changes in its environment. This method was used to monitor denaturation of the protein kinase catalytic subunit and study the kinetics of this process as well as influence of specific ligands on stability of the protein. Stabilization of the enzyme structure was observed in the presence of adenosine triphosphate, peptide substrate RRYSV and inhibitor peptide PKI[5-24]. PMID:24048767

  8. Structural determinants within the subunit protein of Ty1 virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, E; Marfany, G; Wilson, S; Ferguson, D J; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1996-11-01

    The Ty virus-like particles (VLPs) are functionally analogous to retroviral particles. They package the enzymes and the RNA necessary for retrotransposition, and mediate the integration of the reverse-transcription product into the genome of the host cell. Here we map three structural determinants of particle assembly in the subunit protein. We have also identified key residues in these regions that seem to be involved in subunit interaction and particle morphology. In particular, two point mutations in putative amphipathic helices have remarkable effects on VLP morphology, increasing the diameter as much as eightfold. PMID:8951814

  9. Regulatory-auxiliary subunits of CLC chloride channel-transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Gradogna, Antonella; Zanardi, Ilaria; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-09-15

    The CLC family of chloride channels and transporters is composed by nine members, but only three of them, ClC-Ka/b, ClC-7 and ClC-2, have been found so far associated with auxiliary subunits. These CLC regulatory subunits are small proteins that present few common characteristics among them, both structurally and functionally, and their effects on the corresponding CLC protein are different. Barttin, a protein with two transmembrane domains, is essential for the membrane localization of ClC-K proteins and their activity in the kidney and inner ear. Ostm1 is a protein with a single transmembrane domain and a highly glycosylated N-terminus. Unlike the other two CLC auxiliary subunits, Ostm1 shows a reciprocal relationship with ClC-7 for their stability. The subcellular localization of Ostm1 depends on ClC-7 and not the other way around. ClC-2 is active on its own, but GlialCAM, a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule with two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, regulates its subcellular localization and activity in glial cells. The common theme for these three proteins is their requirement for a proper homeostasis, since their malfunction leads to distinct diseases. We will review here their properties and their role in normal chloride physiology and the pathological consequences of their improper function. PMID:25762128

  10. Interactions of protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins in relation to tofu gel properties.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew T; Yang, Aijun

    2016-03-01

    The content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins are known to affect tofu quality and food-grade soybeans usually have higher levels of proteins. We studied the tofu quality of soybeans with high (44.8%) or low (39.1%) protein content and with or without the 11S globulin polypeptide, 11SA4. Both protein content and 11SA4 significantly affected tofu gel properties. Soybeans containing more protein had smaller seeds which produced significantly firmer (0.663 vs.0.557 N, p<0.001) tofu gels with creamier colour. The absence of 11SA4 was positively correlated with seed size, tofu hardness and water holding capacity and led to significant changes to the profile of storage protein subunits, which may have contributed to the improvement in tofu gel properties. These results suggest that, in combination with higher protein content, certain protein subunits or their polypeptides can also be targeted in selecting soybeans to further improve soy food quality. PMID:26471556

  11. Suppression of conformational heterogeneity at a protein-protein interface.

    PubMed

    Deis, Lindsay N; Wu, Qinglin; Wang, You; Qi, Yang; Daniels, Kyle G; Zhou, Pei; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-21

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is an important virulence factor from Staphylococcus aureus responsible for the bacterium's evasion of the host immune system. SpA includes five small three-helix-bundle domains that can each bind with high affinity to many host proteins such as antibodies. The interaction between a SpA domain and the Fc fragment of IgG was partially elucidated previously in the crystal structure 1FC2. Although informative, the previous structure was not properly folded and left many substantial questions unanswered, such as a detailed description of the tertiary structure of SpA domains in complex with Fc and the structural changes that take place upon binding. Here we report the 2.3-Å structure of a fully folded SpA domain in complex with Fc. Our structure indicates that there are extensive structural rearrangements necessary for binding Fc, including a general reduction in SpA conformational heterogeneity, freezing out of polyrotameric interfacial residues, and displacement of a SpA side chain by an Fc side chain in a molecular-recognition pocket. Such a loss of conformational heterogeneity upon formation of the protein-protein interface may occur when SpA binds its multiple binding partners. Suppression of conformational heterogeneity may be an important structural paradigm in functionally plastic proteins. PMID:26157136

  12. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  13. Structure-based energetics of protein interfaces guides foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Scott, Katherine; Burman, Alison; Loureiro, Silvia; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Ginn, Helen M; Jackson, Terry; Perez-Martin, Eva; Siebert, C Alistair; Paul, Guntram; Huiskonen, Juha T; Jones, Ian M; Esnouf, Robert M; Fry, Elizabeth E; Maree, Francois F; Charleston, Bryan; Stuart, David I

    2015-10-01

    Virus capsids are primed for disassembly, yet capsid integrity is key to generating a protective immune response. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids comprise identical pentameric protein subunits held together by tenuous noncovalent interactions and are often unstable. Chemically inactivated or recombinant empty capsids, which could form the basis of future vaccines, are even less stable than live virus. Here we devised a computational method to assess the relative stability of protein-protein interfaces and used it to design improved candidate vaccines for two poorly stable, but globally important, serotypes of FMDV: O and SAT2. We used a restrained molecular dynamics strategy to rank mutations predicted to strengthen the pentamer interfaces and applied the results to produce stabilized capsids. Structural analyses and stability assays confirmed the predictions, and vaccinated animals generated improved neutralizing-antibody responses to stabilized particles compared to parental viruses and wild-type capsids. PMID:26389739

  14. Blind predictions of protein interfaces by docking calculations in CAPRI.

    PubMed

    Lensink, Marc F; Wodak, Shoshana J

    2010-11-15

    Reliable prediction of the amino acid residues involved in protein-protein interfaces can provide valuable insight into protein function, and inform mutagenesis studies, and drug design applications. A fast-growing number of methods are being proposed for predicting protein interfaces, using structural information, energetic criteria, or sequence conservation or by integrating multiple criteria and approaches. Overall however, their performance remains limited, especially when applied to nonobligate protein complexes, where the individual components are also stable on their own. Here, we evaluate interface predictions derived from protein-protein docking calculations. To this end we measure the overlap between the interfaces in models of protein complexes submitted by 76 participants in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of Predicted Interactions) and those of 46 observed interfaces in 20 CAPRI targets corresponding to nonobligate complexes. Our evaluation considers multiple models for each target interface, submitted by different participants, using a variety of docking methods. Although this results in a substantial variability in the prediction performance across participants and targets, clear trends emerge. Docking methods that perform best in our evaluation predict interfaces with average recall and precision levels of about 60%, for a small majority (60%) of the analyzed interfaces. These levels are significantly higher than those obtained for nonobligate complexes by most extant interface prediction methods. We find furthermore that a sizable fraction (24%) of the interfaces in models ranked as incorrect in the CAPRI assessment are actually correctly predicted (recall and precision ≥50%), and that these models contribute to 70% of the correct docking-based interface predictions overall. Our analysis proves that docking methods are much more successful in identifying interfaces than in predicting complexes, and suggests that these methods have an excellent

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  16. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  17. A high temperature transfer procedure for detection of G protein gamma subunits by immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Robishaw, J D; Balcueva, E A

    1993-02-01

    The production of antibodies against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences common or unique to a particular protein(s) is an important tool in the identification of structurally related members of an ever-increasing number of protein families. The successful use of anti-peptide antibodies requires that the protein(s) of interest be properly transferred and fully denatured prior to detection by Western-type immunoblotting. In this paper, we demonstrate that conventional transfer procedures are not successful in presenting the G protein gamma subunits in a suitable state for immunodetection. We describe a high temperature (70 degrees C) transfer procedure that results in a more than 20-fold enhancement in the sensitivity of immunodetection of the various G protein gamma subunits. The effect of high temperature transfer could not be duplicated by including 0.2% SDS in the buffer during transfer to nitrocellulose, or by baking or autoclaving the nitrocellulose after transfer. Thus, high temperature transfer is a powerful procedure for enhancing immunoblot detection of protein(s) that may be resistant to denaturation and/or subject to renaturation during the transfer and/or binding to nitrocellulose. PMID:7680843

  18. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  19. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  20. Nuclear Export and Centrosome Targeting of the Protein Phosphatase 2A Subunit B56α

    PubMed Central

    Flegg, Cameron P.; Sharma, Manisha; Medina-Palazon, Cahora; Jamieson, Cara; Galea, Melanie; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Mills, Kate; Henderson, Beric R.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A is a heterotrimeric enzyme regulated by specific subunits. The B56 (or B′/PR61/PPP2R5) class of B-subunits direct PP2A or its substrates to different cellular locations, and the B56α, -β, and -ϵ isoforms are known to localize primarily in the cytoplasm. Here we studied the pathways that regulate B56α subcellular localization. We detected B56α in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and at the nuclear envelope and centrosomes, and show that cytoplasmic localization is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. The inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B or by siRNA knockdown caused nuclear accumulation of ectopic and endogenous B56α. Conversely, CRM1 overexpression shifted B56α to the cytoplasm. We identified a functional nuclear export signal at the C terminus (NES; amino acids 451–469), and site-directed mutagenesis of the NES (L461A) caused nuclear retention of full-length B56α. Active NESs were identified at similar positions in the cytoplasmic B56-β and ϵ isoforms, but not in the nuclear-localized B56-δ or γ isoforms. The transient expression of B56α induced nuclear export of the PP2A catalytic (C) subunit, and this was blocked by the L461A NES mutation. In addition, B56α co-located with the PP2A active (A) subunit at centrosomes, and its centrosome targeting involved sequences that bind to the A-subunit. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) assays revealed dynamic and immobile pools of B56α-GFP, which was rapidly exported from the nucleus and subject to retention at centrosomes. We propose that B56α can act as a PP2A C-subunit chaperone and regulates PP2A activity at diverse subcellular locations. PMID:20378546

  1. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E.; Milner, Matthew J.; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling. PMID:26157115

  2. Function and subnuclear distribution of Rpp21, a protein subunit of the human ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrous, N; Reiner, R; Wesolowski, D; Mann, H; Guerrier-Takada, C; Altman, S

    2001-01-01

    Rpp21, a protein subunit of human nuclear ribonuclease P (RNase P) was cloned by virtue of its homology with Rpr2p, an essential subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear RNase P. Rpp21 is encoded by a gene that resides in the class I gene cluster of the major histocompatibility complex, is associated with highly purified RNase P, and binds precursor tRNA. Rpp21 is predominantly localized in the nucleoplasm but is also observed in nucleoli and Cajal bodies when expressed at high levels. Intron retention and splice-site selection in Rpp21 precursor mRNA regulate the intranuclear distribution of the protein products and their association with the RNase P holoenzyme. Our study reveals that dynamic nuclear structures that include nucleoli, the perinucleolar compartment and Cajal bodies are all involved in the production and assembly of human RNase P. PMID:11497433

  3. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta (i.e., in alpha 2 beta, alpha 2 beta beta', and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma), and amino acids 175-210 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta' (i.e., in alpha 2 beta beta' and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma). The protected regions are conserved in the alpha homologs of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, archaeal, and chloroplast RNAPs and contain sites of substitutions that affect RNAP assembly. We conclude that the protected regions define determinants of alpha for direct functional interaction with beta and beta'. The observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta and the observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta' both correspond to the expected value for complete protection of one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP (i.e., 50% protection). We propose that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta and that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta'. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8816769

  4. Are protein-protein interfaces special regions on a protein's surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in many cellular processes. Experimentally obtained protein quaternary structures provide the location of protein-protein interfaces, the surface region of a given protein that interacts with another. These regions are termed half-interfaces (HIs). Canonical HIs cover roughly one third of a protein's surface and were found to have more hydrophobic residues than the non-interface surface region. In addition, the classical view of protein HIs was that there are a few (if not one) HIs per protein that are structurally and chemically unique. However, on average, a given protein interacts with at least a dozen others. This raises the question of whether they use the same or other HIs. By copying HIs from monomers with the same folds in solved quaternary structures, we introduce the concept of geometric HIs (HIs whose geometry has a significant match to other known interfaces) and show that on average they cover three quarters of a protein's surface. We then demonstrate that in some cases, these geometric HI could result in real physical interactions (which may or may not be biologically relevant). The composition of the new HIs is on average more charged compared to most known ones, suggesting that the current protein interface database is biased towards more hydrophobic, possibly more obligate, complexes. Finally, our results provide evidence for interface fuzziness and PPI promiscuity. Thus, the classical view of unique, well defined HIs needs to be revisited as HIs are another example of coarse-graining that is used by nature.

  5. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  6. A Web Interface for Easy Flexible Protein-Protein Docking with ATTRACT

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Schindler, Christina E.M.; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Zacharias, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking programs can give valuable insights into the structure of protein complexes in the absence of an experimental complex structure. Web interfaces can facilitate the use of docking programs by structural biologists. Here, we present an easy web interface for protein-protein docking with the ATTRACT program. While aimed at nonexpert users, the web interface still covers a considerable range of docking applications. The web interface supports systematic rigid-body protein docking with the ATTRACT coarse-grained force field, as well as various kinds of protein flexibility. The execution of a docking protocol takes up to a few hours on a standard desktop computer. PMID:25650913

  7. Inter-Subunit Interactions across the Upper Voltage Sensing-Pore Domain Interface Contribute to the Concerted Pore Opening Transition of Kv Channels

    PubMed Central

    Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Irit, Orr; Yifrach, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    The tight electro-mechanical coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains of Kv channels lies at the heart of their fundamental roles in electrical signaling. Structural data have identified two voltage sensor pore inter-domain interaction surfaces, thus providing a framework to explain the molecular basis for the tight coupling of these domains. While the contribution of the intra-subunit lower domain interface to the electro-mechanical coupling that underlies channel opening is relatively well understood, the contribution of the inter-subunit upper interface to channel gating is not yet clear. Relying on energy perturbation and thermodynamic coupling analyses of tandem-dimeric Shaker Kv channels, we show that mutation of upper interface residues from both sides of the voltage sensor-pore domain interface stabilizes the closed channel state. These mutations, however, do not affect slow inactivation gating. We, moreover, find that upper interface residues form a network of state-dependent interactions that stabilize the open channel state. Finally, we note that the observed residue interaction network does not change during slow inactivation gating. The upper voltage sensing-pore interaction surface thus only undergoes conformational rearrangements during channel activation gating. We suggest that inter-subunit interactions across the upper domain interface mediate allosteric communication between channel subunits that contributes to the concerted nature of the late pore opening transition of Kv channels. PMID:24340010

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H; McDermott, Ann E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  9. The Caulobacter crescentus CgtAC Protein Cosediments with the Free 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Thayer, Desiree A.; Maddock, Janine R.

    2004-01-01

    The Obg family of GTPases is widely conserved and predicted to play an as-yet-unknown role in translation. Recent reports provide circumstantial evidence that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Obg proteins are associated with the large ribosomal subunit. Here we provide direct evidence that the Caulobacter crescentus CgtAC protein is associated with the free large (50S) ribosomal subunit but not with 70S monosomes or with translating ribosomes. In contrast to the Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli proteins, CgtAC does not fractionate in a large complex by gel filtration, indicating a moderately weak association with the 50S subunit. Moreover, binding of CgtAC to the 50S particle is sensitive to salt concentration and buffer composition but not guanine nucleotide occupancy of CgtAC. Assays of epitope-tagged wild-type and mutant variants of CgtAC indicate that the C terminus of CgtAC is critical for 50S association. Interestingly, the addition of a C-terminal epitope tag also affected the ability of various cgtAC alleles to function in vivo. Depletion of CgtAC led to perturbations in the polysome profile, raising the possibility that CgtAC is involved in ribosome assembly or stability. PMID:14702318

  10. Protein-Protein Interface Detection Using the Energy Centrality Relationship (ECR) Characteristic of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sudarshan, Sanjana; Kodathala, Sasi B.; Mahadik, Amruta C.; Mehta, Isha; Beck, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Specific protein interactions are responsible for most biological functions. Distinguishing Functionally Linked Interfaces of Proteins (FLIPs), from Functionally uncorrelated Contacts (FunCs), is therefore important to characterizing these interactions. To achieve this goal, we have created a database of protein structures called FLIPdb, containing proteins belonging to various functional sub-categories. Here, we use geometric features coupled with Kortemme and Baker's computational alanine scanning method to calculate the energetic sensitivity of each amino acid at the interface to substitution, identify hotspots, and identify other factors that may contribute towards an interface being FLIP or FunC. Using Principal Component Analysis and K-means clustering on a training set of 160 interfaces, we could distinguish FLIPs from FunCs with an accuracy of 76%. When these methods were applied to two test sets of 18 and 170 interfaces, we achieved similar accuracies of 78% and 80%. We have identified that FLIP interfaces have a stronger central organizing tendency than FunCs, due, we suggest, to greater specificity. We also observe that certain functional sub-categories, such as enzymes, antibody-heavy-light, antibody-antigen, and enzyme-inhibitors form distinct sub-clusters. The antibody-antigen and enzyme-inhibitors interfaces have patterns of physical characteristics similar to those of FunCs, which is in agreement with the fact that the selection pressures of these interfaces is differently evolutionarily driven. As such, our ECR model also successfully describes the impact of evolution and natural selection on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we indicate how our ECR method may be of use in reducing the false positive rate of docking calculations. PMID:24830938

  11. Myristoylation of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein. alpha. subunit is essential for its membrane attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.Z.; Simonds, W.F.; Merendino, J.J. Jr.; Brann, M.R.; Spiegel, A.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors transfected COS cells with cDNAs for the {alpha} subunits of stimulatory and inhibitory GTP-binding proteins, {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i1}, respectively, and immunoprecipitated the metabolically labeled products with specific peptide antibodies. Cells were separated into particulate and soluble fractions before immunoprecipitation; ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i} were both found primarily in the particulate fraction. ({sup 3}H)Myristate was incorporated into endogenous and transfected {alpha}{sub i} but could not be detected in {alpha}{sub s} even when it was overexpressed. They converted the second residue, glycine, of {alpha}{sub i1} into alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Upon transfection of the mutant {alpha}{sub i1} into COS cells, the ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled product was localized primarily to the soluble fraction, and, also unlike normal {alpha}{sub i1}, the mutant failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)myristate. The unmyristoylated mutant {alpha}{sub i1} could still interact with the {beta}-{gamma} complex, since purified {beta}{gamma} subunits promoted pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of both the normal and mutant {alpha}{sub i1} subunits. These results indicate that myristoylation is critical for membrane attachment of {alpha}{sub i} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits.

  12. The methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 is involved in biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Richa; Johnson, Arlen W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified Bud23 as the methyltransferase that methylates G1575 of rRNA in the P-site of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit. In this paper, we show that Bud23 requires the methyltransferase adaptor protein Trm112 for stability in vivo. Deletion of Trm112 results in a bud23Δ-like mutant phenotype. Thus Trm112 is required for efficient small-subunit biogenesis. Genetic analysis suggests the slow growth of a trm112Δ mutant is due primarily to the loss of Bud23. Surprisingly, suppression of the bud23Δ-dependent 40S defect revealed a large (60S) biogenesis defect in a trm112Δ mutant. Using sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, we show that Trm112 is also involved in 60S subunit biogenesis. The 60S defect may be dependent on Nop2 and Rcm1, two additional Trm112 interactors that we identify. Our work extends the known range of Trm112 function from modification of tRNAs and translation factors to both ribosomal subunits, showing that its effects span all aspects of the translation machinery. Although Trm112 is required for Bud23 stability, our results suggest that Trm112 is not maintained in a stable complex with Bud23. We suggest that Trm112 stabilizes its free methyltransferase partners not engaged with substrate and/or helps to deliver its methyltransferase partners to their substrates. PMID:22956767

  13. HSV Usurps Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3 Subunit M for Viral Protein Translation: Novel Prevention Target

    PubMed Central

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Trepanier, Janie B.; Segarra, Theodore J.; Fuller, A. Oveta; Herold, Betsy C.

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of genital herpes is a global health priority. B5, a recently identified ubiquitous human protein, was proposed as a candidate HSV entry receptor. The current studies explored its role in HSV infection. Viral plaque formation was reduced by ∼90% in human cells transfected with small interfering RNA targeting B5 or nectin-1, an established entry receptor. However, the mechanisms were distinct. Silencing of nectin-1 prevented intracellular delivery of viral capsids, nuclear transport of a viral tegument protein, and release of calcium stores required for entry. In contrast, B5 silencing had no effect on these markers of entry, but inhibited viral protein translation. Specifically, viral immediate early genes, ICP0 and ICP4, were transcribed, polyadenylated and transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, but the viral transcripts did not associate with ribosomes or polysomes in B5-silenced cells. In contrast, immediate early gene viral transcripts were detected in polysome fractions isolated from control cells. These findings are consistent with sequencing studies demonstrating that B5 is eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit m (eIF3m). Although B5 silencing altered the polysome profile of cells, silencing had little effect on cellular RNA or protein expression and was not cytotoxic, suggesting that this subunit is not essential for host cellular protein synthesis. Together these results demonstrate that B5 plays a major role in the initiation of HSV protein translation and could provide a novel target for strategies to prevent primary and recurrent herpetic disease. PMID:20676407

  14. The low-affinity ATP binding site of the Escherichia coli SecA dimer is localized at the subunit interface.

    PubMed

    van der Wolk, J P; Boorsma, A; Knoche, M; Schäfer, H J; Driessen, A J

    1997-12-01

    The homodimeric SecA protein is the ATP-dependent force generator in the Escherichia coli precursor protein translocation cascade. SecA contains two essential nucleotide binding sites (NBSs), i.e., NBS1 and NBS2 that bind ATP with high and low affinity, respectively. The photoactivatable bifunctional cross-linking agent 3'-arylazido-8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (diN3ATP) was used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the nucleotide binding sites of SecA. DiN3ATP is an authentic ATP analogue as it supports SecA-dependent precursor protein translocation and translocation ATPase. UV-induced photo-cross-linking of the diN3ATP-bound SecA results in the formation of stable dimeric species of SecA. D209N SecA, a mutant unable to bind nucleotides at NBS1, was also photo-cross-linked by diN3ATP, whereas no cross-linking occurred with the NBS2 mutant R509K SecA. We concluded that the low-affinity NBS2, which is located in the carboxyl-terminal half of SecA, is the site of crosslinking and that NBS2 binds nucleotides at or near the subunit interface of the SecA dimer. PMID:9398216

  15. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  16. Protein degradation corrects for imbalanced subunit stoichiometry in OST complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Susanne; Wahlander, Asa; Selevsek, Nathalie; Otto, Claudia; Ngwa, Elsy Mankah; Poljak, Kristina; Frey, Alexander D.; Aebi, Markus; Gauss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is essential for cellular homeostasis. We developed a sensitive approach to examining protein degradation rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by coupling a SILAC approach to selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Combined with genetic tools, this analysis made it possible to study the assembly of the oligosaccharyl transferase complex. The ER-associated degradation machinery compensated for disturbed homeostasis of complex components by degradation of subunits in excess. On a larger scale, protein degradation in the ER was found to be a minor factor in the regulation of protein homeostasis in exponentially growing cells, but ERAD became relevant when the gene dosage was affected, as demonstrated in heterozygous diploid cells. Hence the alleviation of fitness defects due to abnormal gene copy numbers might be an important function of protein degradation. PMID:25995378

  17. A Protein-Based Pentavalent Inhibitor of the Cholera Toxin B-Subunit**

    PubMed Central

    Branson, Thomas R; McAllister, Tom E; Garcia-Hartjes, Jaime; Fascione, Martin A; Ross, James F; Warriner, Stuart L; Wennekes, Tom; Zuilhof, Han; Turnbull, W Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins produced by bacteria are the cause of many life-threatening diarrheal diseases. Many of these toxins, including cholera toxin (CT), enter the cell by first binding to glycolipids in the cell membrane. Inhibiting these multivalent protein/carbohydrate interactions would prevent the toxin from entering cells and causing diarrhea. Here we demonstrate that the site-specific modification of a protein scaffold, which is perfectly matched in both size and valency to the target toxin, provides a convenient route to an effective multivalent inhibitor. The resulting pentavalent neoglycoprotein displays an inhibition potency (IC50) of 104 pm for the CT B-subunit (CTB), which is the most potent pentavalent inhibitor for this target reported thus far. Complexation of the inhibitor and CTB resulted in a protein heterodimer. This inhibition strategy can potentially be applied to many multivalent receptors and also opens up new possibilities for protein assembly strategies. PMID:24989497

  18. G-protein beta-subunit specificity in the fast membrane-delimited inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    García, D E; Li, B; García-Ferreiro, R E; Hernández-Ochoa, E O; Yan, K; Gautam, N; Catterall, W A; Mackie, K; Hille, B

    1998-11-15

    We investigated which subtypes of G-protein beta subunits participate in voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. Calcium currents were recorded from cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons injected intranuclearly with DNA encoding five different G-protein beta subunits. Gbeta1 and Gbeta2 strongly mimicked the fast voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium channels produced by many G-protein-coupled receptors. The Gbeta5 subunit produced much weaker effects than Gbeta1 and Gbeta2, whereas Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 were nearly inactive in these electrophysiological studies. The specificity implied by these results was confirmed and extended using the yeast two-hybrid system to test for protein-protein interactions. Here, Gbeta1 or Gbeta2 coupled to the GAL4-activation domain interacted strongly with a channel sequence corresponding to the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II of a alpha1 subunit of the class B calcium channel fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. In this assay, the Gbeta5 subunit interacted weakly, and Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 failed to interact. Together, these results suggest that Gbeta1 and/or Gbeta2 subunits account for most of the voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels and that the linker between domains I and II of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit is a principal receptor for this inhibition. PMID:9801356

  19. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  1. Subunit Interactions and Organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Intraflagellar Transport Complex A Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Behal, Robert H.; Miller, Mark S.; Qin, Hongmin; Lucker, Ben F.; Jones, Alexis; Cole, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles can be biochemically resolved into two smaller assemblies, complexes A and B, that contain up to six and 15 protein subunits, respectively. We provide here the proteomic and immunological analyses that verify the identity of all six Chlamydomonas A proteins. Using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and antibody pulldowns, we show that all six A subunits are associated in a 16 S complex in both the cell bodies and flagella. A significant fraction of the cell body IFT43, however, exhibits a much slower sedimentation of ∼2 S and is not associated with the IFT A complex. To identify interactions between the six A proteins, we combined exhaustive yeast-based two-hybrid analysis, heterologous recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the newly identified complex A mutants, ift121 and ift122. We show that IFT121 and IFT43 interact directly and provide evidence for additional interactions between IFT121 and IFT139, IFT121 and IFT122, IFT140 and IFT122, and IFT140 and IFT144. The mutant analysis further allows us to propose that a subset of complex A proteins, IFT144/140/122, can form a stable 12 S subcomplex that we refer to as the IFT A core. Based on these results, we propose a model for the spatial arrangement of the six IFT A components. PMID:22170070

  2. Structure–function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure–function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein–RNA and protein–protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not. PMID:27417296

  3. Size-dependent protein segregation at membrane interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Eva M.; Bakalar, Matthew H.; Choudhuri, Kaushik; Weichsel, Julian; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Geissler, Phillip L.; Dustin, Michael L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane interfaces formed at cell-cell junctions are associated with characteristic patterns of membrane proteins whose organization is critical for intracellular signalling. To isolate the role of membrane protein size in pattern formation, we reconstituted model membrane interfaces in vitro using giant unilamellar vesicles decorated with synthetic binding and non-binding proteins. We show that size differences between membrane proteins can drastically alter their organization at membrane interfaces, with as little as a ~5 nm increase in non-binding protein size driving its exclusion from the interface. Combining in vitro measurements with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that non-binding protein exclusion is also influenced by lateral crowding, binding protein affinity, and thermally driven membrane height fluctuations that transiently limit access to the interface. This sensitive and highly effective means of physically segregating proteins has implications for cell-cell contacts such as T-cell immunological synapses (for example, CD45 exclusion) and epithelial cell junctions (for example, E-cadherin enrichment), as well as for protein sorting at intracellular contact points between membrane-bound organelles.

  4. Enzymatic assembly of epothilones: the EpoC subunit and reconstitution of the EpoA-ACP/B/C polyketide and nonribosomal peptide interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E; Chen, Huawei; Walsh, Christopher T

    2002-04-30

    The biosynthesis of epothilones, a family of hybrid polyketide (PK)/nonribosomal peptide (NRP) antitumor agents, provides an ideal system to study a hybrid PK/NRP natural product with significant biomedical value. Here the third enzyme involved in epothilone production, the five domain 195 kDa polyketide synthase (PKS) EpoC protein, has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. EpoC was combined with the first two enzymes of the epothilone biosynthesis pathway, the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of EpoA and EpoB, to reconstitute the early steps in epothilone biosynthesis. The acyltransferase (AT) domain of EpoC transfers the methylmalonyl moiety from methylmalonyl-CoA to the holo HS-acyl carrier protein (ACP) in an autoacylation reaction. The ketosynthase (KS) domain of EpoC decarboxylates the methylmalonyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme to generate the carbon nucleophile that reacts with methylthiazolylcarboxyl-S-EpoB. The resulting condensation product can be reduced in the presence of NADPH by the ketoreductase (KR) domain of EpoC and then dehydrated by the dehydratase (DH) domain to produce the methylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediate that serves as the acyl donor for subsequent elongation of the epothilone chain. The acetyl-CoA donor can be replaced with propionyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA and the acyl chains accepted by both EpoB and EpoC subunits to produce ethyl-, isopropyl-, and phenylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediates, suggesting that future combinatorial biosynthetic variations in epothilone assembly may be feasible. These results demonstrate in vitro reconstitution of both the PKS/NRPS interface (EpoA-ACP/B) and the NRPS/PKS interface (EpoB/C) in the assembly line for this antitumor natural product. PMID:11969430

  5. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  6. Molecular model of the G protein. alpha. subunit based on the crystal structure of the HRAS protein

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, S.R.; Kim, Sunghou )

    1989-03-01

    A structural model of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein {alpha} subunits (G{sub {alpha}} subunits) is proposed based on the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the human HRAS protein (p21{sup ras}). Because of low overall sequence similarity, structural and functional constraints were used to align the G{sub {alpha}} consensus sequence with that of p21{sup ras}. The resulting G{sub {alpha}} model specifies the spatial relationship among the guanine nucleotide-binding site, the binding site of the {beta}{gamma} subunit complex, likely regions of effector and receptor interaction, and sites of cholera and pertussis toxin modification. The locations in the model of the experimentally determined sites of proteolytic digestion, point mutation, monoclonal antibody binding, and toxin modification are consistent with and help explain the observed biological activity. Two important findings from our model are (i) the orientation of the G{sub {alpha}} model with respect to the membrane and (ii) the identification of the spatial proximity of the N- and C-terminal regions. Furthermore, by analogy to p21{sup ras}, the model assigns specific residues in G{sub {alpha}} required for binding the guanosine (G-box) and phosphates (PO{sub 4}-box) and identifies residues potentially involved in the conformational switch mechanism (S-box). Specification of these critical regions in the G{sub {alpha}} model suggests guidelines for construction of mutants and chimeric proteins to experimentally test structural and functional hypotheses.

  7. Acireductone Dioxygenase 1 (ARD1) Is an Effector of the Heterotrimeric G Protein β Subunit in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Erin J.; Wang, Helen X.; Jiang, Kun; Perovic, Iva; Deshpande, Aditi; Pochapsky, Thomas C.; Temple, Brenda R. S.; Hicks, Stephanie N.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jones, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein complexes are conserved from plants to mammals, but the complexity of each system varies. Arabidopsis thaliana contains one Gα, one Gβ (AGB1), and at least three Gγ subunits, allowing it to form three versions of the heterotrimer. This plant model is ideal for genetic studies because mammalian systems contain hundreds of unique heterotrimers. The activation of these complexes promotes interactions between both the Gα subunit and the Gβγ dimer with enzymes and scaffolds to propagate signaling to the cytoplasm. However, although effectors of Gα and Gβ are known in mammals, no Gβ effectors were previously known in plants. Toward identifying AGB1 effectors, we genetically screened for dominant mutations that suppress Gβ-null mutant (agb1-2) phenotypes. We found that overexpression of acireductone dioxygenase 1 (ARD1) suppresses the 2-day-old etiolated phenotype of agb1-2. ARD1 is homologous to prokaryotic and eukaryotic ARD proteins; one function of ARDs is to operate in the methionine salvage pathway. We show here that ARD1 is an active metalloenzyme, and AGB1 and ARD1 both control embryonic hypocotyl length by modulating cell division; they also may contribute to the production of ethylene, a product of the methionine salvage pathway. ARD1 physically interacts with AGB1, and ARD enzymatic activity is stimulated by AGB1 in vitro. The binding interface on AGB1 was deduced using a comparative evolutionary approach and tested using recombinant AGB1 mutants. A possible mechanism for AGB1 activation of ARD1 activity was tested using directed mutations in a loop near the substrate-binding site. PMID:21712381

  8. Inhibition of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Toner-Webb, J.; Taylor, S.S.

    1987-11-17

    The hydrophobic carbodiimide dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) has been shown to inhibit the catalytic (C) subunit of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate dependent protein kinase in a time-dependent, irreversible manner. The rate of inactivation was first order and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent K/sub i/ of 60 ..mu..M. Magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate (MgATP) was capable of protecting against this inhibition, whereas neither a synthetic peptide substrate nor histone afforded protection. Mg alone afforded some protection. When the catalytic subunit was aggregated with the regulatory subunit in the holoenzyme complex, no inhibition was observed. The inhibition was enhanced at low pH, suggesting that a carboxylic acid group was the target for interaction with DCCD. On the basis of the protection studies, it is most likely that this carboxylic acid group is associated with the MgATP binding site, perhaps serving as a ligand for the metal. Efforts to identify the site that was modified by DCCD were made. In no case was radioactivity incorporated into the protein, suggesting that the irreversible inhibition was due to an intramolecular cross-link between a reactive carboxylic acid group and a nearby amino group. Differential peptide mapping identified a single peptide that was consistently lost as a consequence of DCCD inhibition. This peptide (residues 166-189) contained four carboxylic acid residues as well as an internal Lys. Two of these carboxyl groups, Asp-166 and Asp-184, are conserved in all protein kinases, including oncogene transforming proteins and growth factor receptors, and thus are likely to play an essential role.

  9. Expression of the type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Saraswat, L.D.; Filutowicz, M.

    1986-05-01

    The cDNA for the bovine type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been inserted into the expression vector pUC7. When E. coli JM105 was transformed with this plasmid, R-subunit was expressed in amounts that approached 2-4 mg/liter. The expressed protein was visualized in total cell extracts by photolabeling with 8-N/sub 3/-(/sup 32/P)-cAMP following transfer from SDS polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose. Expression of R-subunit was independent of IPTG. R-subunit accumulated in large amounts only in the stationary phase of growth. The addition of IPTG during the log phase of growth actually blocked the accumulation of R-subunit. The soluble, dimeric R-subunit was purifided to homogeneity by affinity chromatography. This R-subunit bound 2 mol cAMP/mol R monomer, reassociated with C-subunit to form cAMP-dependent holoenzyme, and migrated as a dimer on SDS polyacrylamide gels in the absence of reducing agents. The expressed protein was also susceptible to limited proteolysis yielding a monomeric cAMP-binding fragment having a molecular weight of 35,000. In all of these properties the expressed protein was indistinguishable from R/sup I/ purified from bovine tissue even though the R-subunit expressed in E. coli represents a fusion protein that contains 10 additional amino acids at the amino terminus that are provided by the lac Z gene of the vector. The NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence was confirmed by amino acid sequencing.

  10. Localization of individual subunits of protein kinase CK2 to the endoplasmic reticulum and to the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Faust, M; Jung, M; Günther, J; Zimmermann, R; Montenarh, M

    2001-11-01

    The protein kinase CK2 is composed of two catalytic alpha- or alpha'- and two regulatory beta-subunits. In mammalian cells there is ample evidence for the presence of individual CK2 subunits beside the holoenzyme. By immunofluorescence studies using peptide antibodies which allow us to detect the CK2alpha-, alpha'- and beta-subunits we found all three subunits to be co-localized with a 58 KDa Golgi protein which is specific for the Golgi complex. Subfractionation studies using dog pancreas cells revealed the presence of all three subunits of CK2 at the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER)/Golgi fraction whereas the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) harboured only the catalytic alpha- and alpha'-subunits. We found that the microsomal preparation from dog pancreas cells contained CK2 which phosphorylated a CK2 specific synthetic peptide and which was heparin sensitive. Furthermore, we could immunoprecipitate the CK2alpha-subunit that exhibited a kinase activity which phosphorylated a CK2 specific substrate and which was heparin sensitive. Protease digestion experiments revealed that the CK2 subunits were located on the cytosolic side of the rER and the sER/Golgi complex. Thus, we could demonstrate an asymmetric distribution of the CK2 subunits at the rER and sER/Golgi complex. Since the CK2alpha- and alpha'-subunits exhibit a substrate specificity which is different from the CK2 holoenzyme one might speculate that the asymmetric distribution of the CK2 holoenzyme and the CK2 catalytic subunits may have regulatory functions. PMID:11827177

  11. Inhibition of GDP/GTP exchange on G alpha subunits by proteins containing G-protein regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Natochin, M; Gasimov, K G; Artemyev, N O

    2001-05-01

    A novel Galpha binding consensus sequence, termed G-protein regulatory (GPR) or GoLoco motif, has been identified in a growing number of proteins, which are thought to modulate G-protein signaling. Alternative roles of GPR proteins as nucleotide exchange factors or as GDP dissociation inhibitors for Galpha have been proposed. We investigated the modulation of the GDP/GTP exchange of Gialpha(1), Goalpha, and Gsalpha by three proteins containing GPR motifs (GPR proteins), LGN-585-642, Pcp2, and RapIGAPII-23-131, to elucidate the mechanisms of GPR protein function. The GPR proteins displayed similar patterns of interaction with Gialpha(1) with the following order of affinities: Gialpha(1)GDP > Gialpha(1)GDPAlF(4)(-) > or = Gialpha(1)GTPgammaS. No detectable binding of the GPR proteins to Gsalpha was observed. LGN-585-642, Pcp2, and RapIGAPII-23-131 inhibited the rates of spontaneous GTPgammaS binding and blocked GDP release from Gialpha(1) and Goalpha. The inhibitory effects of the GPR proteins on Gialpha(1) were significantly more potent, indicating that Gi might be a preferred target for these modulators. Our results suggest that GPR proteins are potent GDP dissociation inhibitors for Gialpha-like Galpha subunits in vitro, and in this capacity they may inhibit GPCR/Gi protein signaling in vivo. PMID:11318657

  12. Evolution of protein interactions: from interactomes to interfaces.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphael

    2014-07-15

    Protein-protein interactions lie at the heart of most cellular processes. Many experimental and computational studies aim to deepen our understanding of these interactions and improve our capacity to predict them. In this respect, the evolutionary perspective is most interesting, since the preservation of structure and function puts constraints on the evolution of proteins and their interactions. However, uncovering these constraints remains a challenge, and the description and detection of evolutionary signals in protein-protein interactions is currently a very active field of research. Here, we review recent works dissecting the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction evolution and exploring how to use evolutionary information to predict interactions, both at the global level of the interactome and at the detailed level of protein-protein interfaces. We first present to what extent protein-protein interactions are found to be conserved within interactomes and which properties can influence their conservation. We then discuss the evolutionary and co-evolutionary pressures applied on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we describe how the computational prediction of interfaces can benefit from evolutionary inputs. PMID:24853495

  13. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA-protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hellmich, Ute A; Weis, Benjamin L; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-09-17

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  14. DIRECT MODULATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE A CATALYTIC SUBUNIT α BY GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, George B.; Howe, Alan K.; Nickl, Christian K.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Deming, Paula B.

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates processes such as cell proliferation and migration following activation of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), yet the signaling mechanisms that link PKA with growth factor receptors remain largely undefined. Here we report that RTKs can directly modulate the function of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKA-C) through post-translational modification. In vitro kinase assays revealed that both the epidermal growth factor and platelet derived growth factor receptors (EGFR and PDGFR, respectively) tyrosine phosphorylate PKA-C. Mass spectrometry identified tyrosine 330 (Y330) as a receptor-mediated phosphorylation site and mutation of Y330 to phenylalanine (Y330F) all but abolished the RTK-mediated phosphorylation of PKA-C in vitro. Y330 resides within a conserved region at the C-terminal tail of PKA-C that allosterically regulates enzymatic activity. Therefore, the effect of phosphorylation at Y330 on the activity of PKA-C was investigated. The Km for a peptide substrate was markedly decreased when PKA-C subunits were tyrosine phosphorylated by the receptors as compared to un-phosphorylated controls. Importantly, tyrosine-phosphorylated PKA-C subunits were detected in cells stimulated with EGF, PDGF and FGF2 and in fibroblasts undergoing PDGF-mediated chemotaxis. These results demonstrate a direct, functional interaction between RTKs and PKA-C and identify tyrosine phosphorylation as a novel mechansim for regulating PKA activity. PMID:21866565

  15. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Berthon, Annabel S; Szarek, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS) from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH). More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα), were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C) recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA's role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway. PMID:26042218

  16. Structural determinants of G-protein alpha subunit selectivity by regulator of G-protein signaling 2 (RGS2).

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Soundararajan, Meera; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Roos, Annette K; Urban, Daniel J; Setola, Vincent; Temple, Brenda R S; Roth, Bryan L; Knapp, Stefan; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2009-07-17

    "Regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins facilitate the termination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling via their ability to increase the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate of Galpha subunits (known as GTPase-accelerating protein or "GAP" activity). RGS2 is unique in its in vitro potency and selectivity as a GAP for Galpha(q) subunits. As many vasoconstrictive hormones signal via G(q) heterotrimer-coupled receptors, it is perhaps not surprising that RGS2-deficient mice exhibit constitutive hypertension. However, to date the particular structural features within RGS2 determining its selectivity for Galpha(q) over Galpha(i/o) substrates have not been completely characterized. Here, we examine a trio of point mutations to RGS2 that elicits Galpha(i)-directed binding and GAP activities without perturbing its association with Galpha(q). Using x-ray crystallography, we determined a model of the triple mutant RGS2 in complex with a transition state mimetic form of Galpha(i) at 2.8-A resolution. Structural comparison with unliganded, wild type RGS2 and of other RGS domain/Galpha complexes highlighted the roles of these residues in wild type RGS2 that weaken Galpha(i) subunit association. Moreover, these three amino acids are seen to be evolutionarily conserved among organisms with modern cardiovascular systems, suggesting that RGS2 arose from the R4-subfamily of RGS proteins to have specialized activity as a potent and selective Galpha(q) GAP that modulates cardiovascular function. PMID:19478087

  17. Computational modeling of acrylodan-labeled cAMP dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Aleksei; Kivi, Rait; Järv, Jaak

    2016-04-01

    Structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, where the asparagine residue 326 was replaced with acrylodan-cystein conjugate to implement this fluorescence reporter group into the enzyme, was modeled by molecular dynamics (MD) method and the positioning of the dye molecule in protein structure was characterized at temperatures 300K, 500K and 700K. It was found that the acrylodan moiety, which fluorescence is very sensitive to solvating properties of its microenvironment, was located on the surface of the native protein at 300K that enabled its partial solvation with water. At high temperatures the protein structure significantly changed, as the secondary and tertiary structure elements were unfolded and these changes were sensitively reflected in positioning of the dye molecule. At 700K complete unfolding of the protein occurred and the reporter group was entirely expelled into water. However, at 500K an intermediate of the protein unfolding process was formed, where the fluorescence reporter group was directed towards the protein interior and buried in the core of the formed molten globule state. This different positioning of the reporter group was in agreement with the two different shifts of emission spectrum of the covalently bound acrylodan, observed in the unfolding process of the protein. PMID:26896699

  18. Structural diversity in the RGS domain and its interaction with heterotrimeric G protein alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Meera; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J; Turnbull, Andrew P; Ball, Linda J; Schoch, Guillaume A; Gileadi, Carina; Fedorov, Oleg Y; Dowler, Elizabeth F; Higman, Victoria A; Hutsell, Stephanie Q; Sundström, Michael; Doyle, Declan A; Siderovski, David P

    2008-04-29

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate GTP hydrolysis by Galpha subunits and thus facilitate termination of signaling initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS proteins hold great promise as disease intervention points, given their signature role as negative regulators of GPCRs-receptors to which the largest fraction of approved medications are currently directed. RGS proteins share a hallmark RGS domain that interacts most avidly with Galpha when in its transition state for GTP hydrolysis; by binding and stabilizing switch regions I and II of Galpha, RGS domain binding consequently accelerates Galpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis. The human genome encodes more than three dozen RGS domain-containing proteins with varied Galpha substrate specificities. To facilitate their exploitation as drug-discovery targets, we have taken a systematic structural biology approach toward cataloging the structural diversity present among RGS domains and identifying molecular determinants of their differential Galpha selectivities. Here, we determined 14 structures derived from NMR and x-ray crystallography of members of the R4, R7, R12, and RZ subfamilies of RGS proteins, including 10 uncomplexed RGS domains and 4 RGS domain/Galpha complexes. Heterogeneity observed in the structural architecture of the RGS domain, as well as in engagement of switch III and the all-helical domain of the Galpha substrate, suggests that unique structural determinants specific to particular RGS protein/Galpha pairings exist and could be used to achieve selective inhibition by small molecules. PMID:18434541

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunits perform distinct functional roles in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joon-Hee; Kim, Jung-Eun; Malapi-Wight, Martha; Choi, Yoon-E; Shaw, Brian D; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-06-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize causing ear rot and stalk rot. The fungus also produces fumonisins, a group of mycotoxins linked to disorders in animals and humans. A cluster of genes, designated FUM genes, plays a key role in the synthesis of fumonisins. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of fumonisin biosynthesis is still incomplete. We have demonstrated previously that Cpp1, a protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit, negatively regulates fumonisin production and is involved in cell shape maintenance. In general, three PP2A subunits, structural A, regulatory B and catalytic C, make up a heterotrimer complex to perform regulatory functions. Significantly, we identified two PP2A regulatory subunits in the F. verticillioides genome, Ppr1 and Ppr2, which are homologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cdc55 and Rts1, respectively. In this study, we hypothesized that Ppr1 and Ppr2 are involved in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and/or cell development in F. verticillioides, and generated a series of mutants to determine the functional role of Ppr1 and Ppr2. The PPR1 deletion strain (Δppr1) resulted in drastic growth defects, but increased microconidia production. The PPR2 deletion mutant strain (Δppr2) showed elevated fumonisin production, similar to the Δcpp1 strain. Germinating Δppr1 conidia formed abnormally swollen cells with a central septation site, whereas Δppr2 showed early hyphal branching during conidia germination. A kernel rot assay showed that the mutants were slow to colonize kernels, but this is probably a result of growth defects rather than a virulence defect. Results from this study suggest that two PP2A regulatory subunits in F. verticillioides carry out distinct roles in the regulation of fumonisin biosynthesis and fungal development. PMID:23452277

  20. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion. PMID:26519625

  1. Protein partners of the calcium channel β subunit highlight new cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Rima, Mohamad; Daghsni, Marwa; Fajloun, Ziad; M'rad, Ridha; Brusés, Juan L; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Calcium plays a key role in cell signalling by its intervention in a wide range of physiological processes. Its entry into cells occurs mainly via voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC), which are found not only in the plasma membrane of excitable cells but also in cells insensitive to electrical signals. VGCC are composed of different subunits, α1, β, α2δ and γ, among which the cytosolic β subunit (Cavβ) controls the trafficking of the channel to the plasma membrane, its regulation and its gating properties. For many years, these were the main functions associated with Cavβ. However, a growing number of proteins have been found to interact with Cavβ, emphasizing the multifunctional role of this versatile protein. Interestingly, some of the newly assigned functions of Cavβ are independent of its role in the regulation of VGCC, and thus further increase its functional roles. Based on the identity of Cavβ protein partners, this review emphasizes the diverse cellular functions of Cavβ and summarizes both past findings as well as recent progress in the understanding of VGCC. PMID:27354560

  2. G-protein alpha subunits distribution in the cyprid of Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) (Cirripedia, Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Gambardella, Chiara; Amaroli, Andrea; Faimali, Marco; Piazza, Veronica; Masini, Maria Angela

    2012-12-01

    The acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a marine crustacean with six nauplius and one cyprid larval stages and a sessile adult, that represent one of the main constituents of sea biofouling. The cyprid is the last larval stage, specialized for settlement, and the study of its biology is interesting also in the frame of antifouling strategies. In this study, a novel approach to the neurobiology of B. amphitrite cyprid has undertaken, studying immunohistochemically the distribution of some G-protein α subunits (Gαs, Gαo Gαi, and Gαq) on B. amphitrite cyprid. Gαs-like immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal mucosa, oral cone, epithelial cells along the outer face of the mantle and thorax; Gαo into the fibers of the neuropile of the central nervous system; Gαi in oil cells, epithelial cells, and limbs and thorax muscles; Gαq was not detected. The results suggest the involvement of the G-protein α subunits in different tissues and functions that seem to be in agreement with the distribution of the ones from the same class of G-proteins in vertebrates. PMID:22833248

  3. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  4. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  5. Type B Heterotrimeric G Protein γ-Subunit Regulates Auxin and ABA Signaling in Tomato[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Gayathery; Trusov, Yuri; Hayashi, Satomi; Batley, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins composed of α, β, and γ subunits are central signal transducers mediating the cellular response to multiple stimuli in most eukaryotes. Gγ subunits provide proper cellular localization and functional specificity to the heterotrimer complex. Plant Gγ subunits, divided into three structurally distinct types, are more diverse than their animal counterparts. Type B Gγ subunits, lacking a carboxyl-terminal isoprenylation motif, are found only in flowering plants. We present the functional characterization of type B Gγ subunit (SlGGB1) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We show that SlGGB1 is the most abundant Gγ subunit in tomato and strongly interacts with the Gβ subunit. Importantly, the green fluorescent protein-SlGGB1 fusion protein as well as the carboxyl-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-SlGGB1/amino-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-Gβ heterodimer were localized in the plasma membrane, nucleus, and cytoplasm. RNA interference-mediated silencing of SlGGB1 resulted in smaller seeds, higher number of lateral roots, and pointy fruits. The silenced lines were hypersensitive to exogenous auxin, while levels of endogenous auxins were lower or similar to those of the wild type. SlGGB1-silenced plants also showed strong hyposensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination but not in other related assays. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic seeds revealed abnormal expression of genes involved in ABA sensing, signaling, and response. We conclude that the type B Gγ subunit SlGGB1 mediates auxin and ABA signaling in tomato. PMID:26668332

  6. The cAMP-binding proteins of Leishmania are not the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, C; Sarkar, D

    2001-09-01

    The most commonly used method to determine the cAMP binding activity in cytosolic extracts of promastigotes of Leishmania spp. underestimated by approximately 11.5-fold the total amount of [(3)H]cAMP bound, when compared with results obtained by the modified Millipore filter technique. Three cAMP-binding proteins (BPI, BPII and BPIII) were partially purified and characterized. The native molecular masses of BPI, BPII and BPIII were estimated to be 105, 155 and 145 kDa, respectively. The binding of [(3)H]cAMP to these proteins was affected to different extents by several cAMP analogues. Antibodies directed against the types I and II regulatory subunits of PKA did not cross-react with the leishmanial extract. Photoaffinity labeling of the cytosolic extracts with 8-N(3)-[(32)P]cAMP specifically labeled a band of M(r) 116000 and a band of M(r) 80000 partially saturable by cAMP. From these results, it is concluded that the leishmanial cAMP-binding proteins appear to belong to a different class distinct from the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases. PMID:11544092

  7. Structure of Mth11/Mth Rpp29, an essential protein subunit of archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, William P; McElroy, Craig A; Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Wilson, Ross C; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P

    2003-12-23

    We have determined the solution structure of Mth11 (Mth Rpp29), an essential subunit of the RNase P enzyme from the archaebacterium Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (Mth). RNase P is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme primarily responsible for cleaving the 5' leader sequence during maturation of tRNAs in all three domains of life. In eubacteria, this enzyme is made up of two subunits: a large RNA ( approximately 120 kDa) responsible for mediating catalysis, and a small protein cofactor ( approximately 15 kDa) that modulates substrate recognition and is required for efficient in vivo catalysis. In contrast, multiple proteins are associated with eukaryotic and archaeal RNase P, and these proteins exhibit no recognizable homology to the conserved bacterial protein subunit. In reconstitution experiments with recombinantly expressed and purified protein subunits, we found that Mth Rpp29, a homolog of the Rpp29 protein subunit from eukaryotic RNase P, is an essential protein component of the archaeal holoenzyme. Consistent with its role in mediating protein-RNA interactions, we report that Mth Rpp29 is a member of the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold family. In addition to a structured beta-barrel core, it possesses unstructured N- and C-terminal extensions bearing several highly conserved amino acid residues. To identify possible RNA contacts in the protein-RNA complex, we examined the interaction of the 11-kDa protein with the full 100-kDa Mth RNA subunit by using NMR chemical shift perturbation. Our findings represent a critical step toward a structural model of the RNase P holoenzyme from archaebacteria and higher organisms. PMID:14673079

  8. Alpha subunit of eukaryotic translational initiation factor-2 is a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed

    Colbert, R A; Hucul, J A; Scorsone, K A; Young, D A

    1987-12-15

    The use of ultra high resolution giant two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has expanded the number of recognizable heat-shock proteins to 68 inductions in rat thymic lymphocytes, many of which are among the less abundant cellular proteins (Maytin, E. V., Colbert, R. A., and Young, D. A. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 2384-2392). Previous studies also show that cells receiving a prior heat shock recover more rapidly from the inhibition of protein synthesis induced by a second heat shock. In this report we use a monoclonal antibody to identify the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor-2 (eIF-2 alpha) as a heat-shock protein. Its relative rate of synthesis increases approximately 40% in the 2nd h and 5-fold in the 4th h of a continuous heat shock and is stimulated more dramatically, 15-fold, in the 3rd h of recovery from a 1-h heat shock. These results suggest that the induction of eIF-2 alpha in the heat-shock response may be important for restoring the cell's ability to initiate protein synthesis. In addition to identifying a function for one of the heat-shock proteins, our findings draw attention to the likelihood that other low-abundance heat-shock proteins may play critical roles in the heat-shock response. PMID:3500171

  9. Protein stability at a carbon nanotube interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Garcia, A. E.

    2011-03-01

    The interactions of proteins with solid surfaces occur in a variety of situations. Motivated by the many nanoengineering applications of protein-carbon nanotube hybrids, we investigate the conformational transitions of hen egg white lysozyme adsorbed on a carbon nanotube. Using a Cα structure-based model and replica exchange molecular dynamics, we show how the folding/unfolding equilibrium of the adsorbed protein varies with the strength of its coupling to the surface. The stability of the native state depends on the balance between the favorable entropy and unfavorable enthalpy change on adsorption. In the case of a weakly attractive surface when the former dominates, the protein is stabilized. In this regime, the protein can fold and unfold while maintaining the same binding fraction. With increasing surface attraction, the unfavorable enthalpic effect dominates, the native state is destabilized, and the protein has to extensively unbind before changing states from unfolded to folded. At the highest surface coupling, the entropic penalty of folding vanishes, and a folding intermediate is strongly stabilized. In this intermediate state, the α-domain of lysozyme is disrupted, while the β-sheet remains fully structured. We rationalize the relative stability of the two domains on the basis of the residue contact order.

  10. Local Conformational Changes in the DNA Interfaces of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sunami, Tomoko; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    When a protein binds to DNA, a conformational change is often induced so that the protein will fit into the DNA structure. Therefore, quantitative analyses were conducted to understand the conformational changes in proteins. The results showed that conformational changes in DNA interfaces are more frequent than in non-interfaces, and DNA interfaces have more conformational variations in the DNA-free form. As expected, the former indicates that interaction with DNA has some influence on protein structure. The latter suggests that the intrinsic conformational flexibility of DNA interfaces is important for adjusting their conformation for DNA. The amino acid propensities of the conformationally changed regions in DNA interfaces indicate that hydrophilic residues are preferred over the amino acids that appear in the conformationally unchanged regions. This trend is true for disordered regions, suggesting again that intrinsic flexibility is of importance not only for DNA binding but also for interactions with other molecules. These results demonstrate that fragments destined to be DNA interfaces have an intrinsic flexibility and are composed of amino acids with the capability of binding to DNA. This information suggests that the prediction of DNA binding sites may be improved by the integration of amino acid preference for DNA and one for disordered regions. PMID:23418514

  11. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein-protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of 6-fold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement affect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces. PMID:25828256

  12. Variation in the structural subunit and basal protein antigens of Bacteroides nodosus fimbriae.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B J; Kristo, C L; Egerton, J R; Mattick, J S

    1986-01-01

    The fimbriae of Bacteroides nodosus play a major role in protective immunity against ovine footrot and are an important determinant in the serological classification system that divides field isolates into at least eight serogroups and 16 serotypes. Purified fimbriae contain two polypeptide antigens, the structural subunit of the fimbrial strand (molecular weight about 17,000) and a basal protein (molecular weight about 80,000), both of which exhibit structural variation. Fimbriae were prepared from all prototype strains, as well as from a number of other isolates representative of each of the B. nodosus serotypes, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Substantial variation was observed in the electrophoretic mobility of the fimbrial subunits from the prototypes of each of the eight serogroups. With the exception of serogroup H, which is an unusual case, the apparent molecular weights of the fimbrial subunits ranged from about 16,500 in serogroup D to 19,000 in serogroup F (serotype 1); in serogroup A, B, C and E, the apparent molecular weights were clustered in the range of 17,000 to 17,500, whereas serogroup G was about 18,500. Serogroup H fimbriae appeared to consist of two smaller polypeptides, which in the prototype (H1) had apparent molecular weights of about 6,000 and 10,000 and which seem to have arisen as a consequence of an internal proteolytic nick in the original subunit. Electrophoretic variation in the fimbrial subunit was also observed between different serotypes, although with the exceptions of serogroups F and H, this was not as pronounced as between the serogroups. Examination of a number of isolates classified within the same serotypes showed that some variation, although minor, also occurred at this level. The basal antigen exhibited significant variation at all levels of the serotypic hierarchy in a manner apparently unrelated to the classification system. Among the range of isolates examined, the apparent

  13. Cordycepin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via interaction with the γ1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chongming; Guo, Yanshen; Su, Yan; Zhang, Xue; Luan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaopo; Zhu, Huixin; He, Huixia; Wang, Xiaoliang; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Guo, Peng; Zhu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cordycepin is a bioactive component of the fungus Cordyceps militaris. Previously, we showed that cordycepin can alleviate hyperlipidemia through enhancing the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but the mechanism of this stimulation is unknown. Here, we investigated the potential mechanisms of cordycepin-induced AMPK activation in HepG2 cells. Treatment with cordycepin largely reduced oleic acid (OA)-elicited intracellular lipid accumulation and increased AMPK activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cordycepin-induced AMPK activation was not accompanied by changes in either the intracellular levels of AMP or the AMP/ATP ratio, nor was it influenced by calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibition; however, this activation was significantly suppressed by liver kinase B1 (LKB1) knockdown. Molecular docking, fluorescent and circular dichroism measurements showed that cordycepin interacted with the γ1 subunit of AMPK. Knockdown of AMPKγ1 by siRNA substantially abolished the effects of cordycepin on AMPK activation and lipid regulation. The modulating effects of cordycepin on the mRNA levels of key lipid regulatory genes were also largely reversed when AMPKγ1 expression was inhibited. Together, these data suggest that cordycepin may inhibit intracellular lipid accumulation through activation of AMPK via interaction with the γ1 subunit. PMID:24286368

  14. RNase P protein subunit Rpp29 represses histone H3.3 nucleosome deposition

    PubMed Central

    Newhart, Alyshia; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Shastrula, Prashanth Krishna; Sierra, Isabel; Joo, Lucy M.; Hayden, James E.; Cohen, Andrew R.; Janicki, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, histone H3.3 is a critical regulator of transcription state change and heritability at both euchromatin and heterochromatin. The H3.3-specific chaperone, DAXX, together with the chromatin-remodeling factor, ATRX, regulates H3.3 deposition and transcriptional silencing at repetitive DNA, including pericentromeres and telomeres. However, the events that precede H3.3 nucleosome incorporation have not been fully elucidated. We previously showed that the DAXX-ATRX-H3.3 pathway regulates a multi-copy array of an inducible transgene that can be visualized in single living cells. When this pathway is impaired, the array can be robustly activated. H3.3 is strongly recruited to the site during activation where it accumulates in a complex with transcribed sense and antisense RNA, which is distinct from the DNA/chromatin. This suggests that transcriptional events regulate H3.3 recruited to its incorporation sites. Here we report that the nucleolar RNA proteins Rpp29, fibrillarin, and RPL23a are also components of this H3.3/RNA complex. Rpp29 is a protein subunit of RNase P. Of the other subunits, POP1 and Rpp21 are similarly recruited suggesting that a variant of RNase P regulates H3.3 chromatin assembly. Rpp29 knockdown increases H3.3 chromatin incorporation, which suggests that Rpp29 represses H3.3 nucleosome deposition, a finding with implications for epigenetic regulation. PMID:26842893

  15. Impact of subunit linkages in an engineered homodimeric binding protein to α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Gauhar, Aziz; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein (α-syn) has been implicated in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as synucleinopathies. The β-wrapin AS69 is a small engineered binding protein to α-syn that stabilizes a β-hairpin conformation of monomeric α-syn and inhibits α-syn aggregation at substoichiometric concentrations. AS69 is a homodimer whose subunits are linked via a disulfide bridge between their single cysteine residues, Cys-28. Here we show that expression of a functional dimer as a single polypeptide chain is achievable by head-to-tail linkage of AS69 subunits. Choice of a suitable linker is essential for construction of head-to-tail dimers that exhibit undiminished α-syn affinity compared with the solely disulfide-linked dimer. We characterize AS69-GS3, a head-to-tail dimer with a glycine-serine-rich linker, under oxidized and reduced conditions in order to evaluate the impact of the Cys28-disulfide bond on structure, stability and α-syn binding. Formation of the disulfide bond causes compaction of AS69-GS3, increases its thermostability, and is a prerequisite for high-affinity binding to α-syn. Comparison of AS69-GS3 and AS69 demonstrates that head-to-tail linkage promotes α-syn binding by affording accelerated disulfide bond formation. PMID:25332193

  16. Activity, Expression and Function of a Second Drosophila Protein Kinase a Catalytic Subunit Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-01-01

    The DC2 gene was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DCO, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 did not affect the viability or phenotype of imaginal disc cells lacking DC0 activity or embryonic hatching of animals with reduced DC0 activity. Furthermore, transgenes expressing DC2 from a DC0 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. PMID:8601490

  17. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  18. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A link between the cytoplasmic engulfment protein Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Joshua P; Lu, Mingjian; Das, Soumita; Park, Daeho; Ernst, Peter B; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2013-01-21

    The cytoplasmic Elmo1:Dock180 complex acts as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Rac and functions downstream of the phagocytic receptor BAI1 during apoptotic cell clearance, and in the entry of Salmonella and Shigella into cells. We discovered an unexpected binding between Elmo1 and the Mediator complex subunit Med31. The Mediator complex is a regulatory hub for nearly all gene transcription via RNA polymerase II, bridging the general transcription machinery with gene-specific regulatory proteins. Med31 is the smallest and the most evolutionarily conserved Mediator subunit, and knockout of Med31 results in embryonic lethality in mice; however, Med31 function in specific biological contexts is poorly understood. We observed that in primary macrophages, during Salmonella infection, Elmo1 and Med31 specifically affected expression of the cytokine genes Il10 and Il33 among the >25 genes monitored. Although endogenous Med31 is predominantly nuclear localized, Elmo1 increased the cytoplasmic localization of Med31. We identify ubiquitination as a novel posttranslational modification of Med31, with the cytoplasmic monoubiquitinated form of Med31 being enhanced by Elmo1. These data identify Elmo1 as a novel regulator of Med31, revealing a previously unrecognized link between cytoplasmic signaling proteins and the Mediator complex. PMID:23273896

  20. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  1. Cofilin-induced cooperative conformational changes of actin subunits revealed using cofilin-actin fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Umeki, Nobuhisa; Hirose, Keiko; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments induced by cofilin binding, we engineered a fusion protein made of Dictyostelium cofilin and actin. The filaments of the fusion protein were functionally similar to actin filaments bound with cofilin in that they did not bind rhodamine-phalloidin, had quenched fluorescence of pyrene attached to Cys374 and showed enhanced susceptibility of the DNase loop to cleavage by subtilisin. Quantitative analyses of copolymers made of different ratios of the fusion protein and control actin further demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the structure of multiple neighboring actin subunits in copolymers. Based on these and other recent related studies, we propose a mechanism by which conformational changes induced by cofilin binding is propagated unidirectionally to the pointed ends of the filaments, and cofilin clusters grow unidirectionally to the pointed ends following this path. Interestingly, the fusion protein was unable to copolymerize with control actin at pH 6.5 and low ionic strength, suggesting that the structural difference between the actin moiety in the fusion protein and control actin is pH-sensitive. PMID:26842224

  2. Proteomic analysis of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of protein components in the 28 S small subunit.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Terasaki, M; Takemoto-Hori, C; Hanada, T; Ueda, T; Wada, A; Watanabe, K

    2001-08-31

    The mammalian mitochondrial ribosome (mitoribosome) has a highly protein-rich composition with a small sedimentation coefficient of 55 S, consisting of 39 S large and 28 S small subunits. In the previous study, we analyzed 39 S large subunit proteins from bovine mitoribosome (Suzuki, T., Terasaki, M., Takemoto-Hori, C., Hanada, T., Ueda, T., Wada, A., and Watanabe, K. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 21724-21736). The results suggested structural compensation for the rRNA deficit through proteins of increased molecular mass in the mitoribosome. We report here the identification of 28 S small subunit proteins. Each protein was separated by radical-free high-reducing two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization/ion trap mass spectrometer to identify cDNA sequence by expressed sequence tag data base searches in silico. Twenty one proteins from the small subunit were identified, including 11 new proteins along with their complete cDNA sequences from human and mouse. In addition to these proteins, three new proteins were also identified in the 55 S mitoribosome. We have clearly identified a mitochondrial homologue of S12, which is a key regulatory protein of translation fidelity and a candidate for the autosomal dominant deafness gene, DFNA4. The apoptosis-related protein DAP3 was found to be a component of the small subunit, indicating a new function for the mitoribosome in programmed cell death. In summary, we have mapped a total of 55 proteins from the 55 S mitoribosome on the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. PMID:11402041

  3. Agonist-Specific Conformational Changes in the α1-γ2 Subunit Interface of the GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2012-01-01

    The GABAA receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  4. Agonist-specific conformational changes in the α1-γ2 subunit interface of the GABA A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Lim, You Bin; Bracamontes, John; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2012-08-01

    The GABA(A) receptor undergoes conformational changes upon the binding of agonist that lead to the opening of the channel gate and a flow of small anions across the cell membrane. Besides the transmitter GABA, allosteric ligands such as the general anesthetics pentobarbital and etomidate can activate the receptor. Here, we have investigated the agonist specificity of structural changes in the extracellular domain of the receptor. We used the substituted cysteine accessibility method and focused on the γ2(S195C) site (loop F). We show that modification of the site with (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) results in an enhanced response to GABA, indicating accessibility of the resting receptor to the modifying agent. Coapplication of GABA or muscimol, but not of gabazine, with MTSES prevented the effect, suggesting that GABA and muscimol elicit a conformational change that reduces access to the γ2(S195C) site. Exposure of the receptors to MTSES in the presence of the allosteric activators pentobarbital and etomidate resulted in an enhanced current response indicating accessibility and labeling of the γ2(S195C) site. However, comparison of the rates of modification indicated that labeling in the presence of etomidate was significantly faster than that in the presence of pentobarbital or gabazine or in resting receptors. We infer from the data that the structure of the α1-γ2 subunit interface undergoes agonist-specific conformational changes. PMID:22572883

  5. Coordinate pretranslational control of cAMP-dependent protein kinase subunit expression during development in the water mold Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Marques, M do V; Borges, A C; de Oliveira, J C; Gomes, S L

    1992-02-01

    The aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii provides a system for studying the regulation of expression of regulatory (R) and catalytic (C) subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Blastocladiella cells contain a single PKA with properties very similar to type II kinases of mammalian tissues. During development cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and its associated cAMP-binding activity change drastically. We have previously shown that the increase in cAMP-binding activity during sporulation is due to de novo synthesis of R subunit and to an increase in the translatable mRNA coding for R (Marques et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 178, 803, 1989). In the present work we have continued these studies to investigate the mechanism by which the changes in the level of kinase activity take place. The C subunit of Blastocladiella has been purified; antiserum has been raised against it and used to determine amounts of C subunit throughout the fungus' life cycle. A sharp increase in C subunit content occurs during sporulation and peaks at the zoospore stage. Northern blot analyses, using Blastocladiella C and R cDNA probes, have shown that the levels of C and R mRNAs parallel their intracellular protein concentrations. These results indicate a coordinate pretranslational control for C and R subunit expression during differentiation in Blastocladiella. PMID:1309711

  6. The nano-plasma interface: Implications of the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  7. The nano-plasma interface: implications of the protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Joy; Yang, Yong; Shen, Jianliang; Moten, Asad; Chen, Chunying; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhao, Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between nanoparticles and macromolecules in the blood plasma dictate the biocompatibility and efficacy of nanotherapeutics. Accordingly, the properties of nanoparticles and endogenous biomolecules change at the nano-plasma interface. Here, we review the implications of such changes including toxicity, immunological recognition, molecular targeting, biodistribution, intracellular uptake, and drug release. Although this interface poses several challenges for nanomedicine, it also presents opportunities for exploiting nanoparticle-protein interactions. PMID:24656615

  8. Mammalian farnesyltransferase α subunit regulates vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (Vps4A)--dependent intracellular trafficking through recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kubala, Marta H; Norwood, Suzanne J; Gomez, Guillermo A; Jones, Alun; Johnston, Wayne; Yap, Alpha S; Mureev, Sergey; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-12-25

    The protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) mediates posttranslational modification of proteins with isoprenoid lipids. FTase is a heterodimer and although the β subunit harbors the active site, it requires the α subunit for its activity. Here we explore the other functions of the FTase α subunit in addition to its established role in protein prenylation. We found that in the absence of the β subunit, the α subunit of FTase forms a stable autonomous dimeric structure in solution. We identify interactors of FTase α using mass spectrometry, followed by rapid in vitro analysis using the Leishmania tarentolae cell - free system. Vps4A was validated for direct binding to the FTase α subunit both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the interaction with Vps4A in Hek 293 cells demonstrated that FTase α controls trafficking of transferrin receptor upstream of this protein. These results point to the existence of previously undetected biological functions of the FTase α subunit that includes control of intracellular membrane trafficking. PMID:26551458

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to amyloid subunit proteins for in vivo radioimmunodetection of amyloid diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Gorevic, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Fand, I.; Marshall, J.; McNally, W.; Muller, D.; Wood, D.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils of systemic amyloidosis are low molecular weight subunit proteins with poor immunogenicity and a tendency to polymerize. Antibodies to these proteins are useful for the detection of amyloid deposits in-situ. The extracellular location of amyloid deposits and proximity to congophilic angiopathy suggest the potential of labeled monocional antibodies (MAb) for in vivo radioimmunodetection. The authors tested feasibility of this approach using two rat MAbs to mouse AA protein in casein-induced amyloidosis, a model system for human secondary amyloidosis. The antibodies were labeled with I-125, I-123, and In-111 with good specificity retention. Amyloidotic mice were pretreated with 50 ..mu..g colchicine ip 3 hr before receiving radioiodinated MAb via the tall vein. Controls included injection of MAb to normal mice and of labeled polyclonal normal rat IgG (pIg) into amyloidotic and control mice. Blood clearance of MAb was faster in amyloidotic than control groups. Fractionation studies showed that both MAb and pIg were uncomplexed. Studies up to 96 hr showed specific and high uptake at sites of amyloid deposition (saline perfused liver, spleen, kidney. Specific localization was confirmed by whole body autoradiography (I-125, 20 ..mu..Ci/animal; 50 ..mu..g MAb) and by external imaging (I-123, 200 ..mu..Ci/animal, 10-15 ..mu..g MAb) of amyloidotic mice studied at 4-72 hr. Amyloidotic animals showed perifollicular localization in spleen, periportal in liver, and glomerular in kidney; scans of controls showed diffuse early washout. These results document the feasibility of using MAbs to fibril subunit proteins for the in vivo detection and therapy of amyloidosis.

  10. Membrane pore formation at protein-lipid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Froelich, Christopher J; Wallace, Mark I; Anderluh, Gregor

    2014-11-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) interact with lipid bilayers to compromise membrane integrity. Many PFPs function by inserting a ring of oligomerized subunits into the bilayer to form a protein-lined hydrophilic channel. However, mounting evidence suggests that PFPs can also generate 'proteolipidic' pores by contributing to the fusion of inner and outer bilayer leaflets to form a toroidal structure. We discuss here toroidal pore formation by peptides including melittin, protegrin, and Alzheimer's Aβ1-41, as well as by PFPs from several evolutionarily unrelated families: the colicin/Bcl-2 grouping including the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, actinoporins derived from sea anemones, and the membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) set of proteins. We also explore how the structure and biological role of toroidal pores might be investigated further. PMID:25440714

  11. Protein bodies from the cotyledons of Cytisus scoparius L. (Link). Ultrastructure, isolation, and subunit composition of albumin, legumin and vicilin.

    PubMed

    Citharel, L; Citharel, J

    1985-09-01

    The structure of protein bodies differs in the upper and lower parts of the cotyledons of mature seeds of Cytisus scoparius L. The palisade-mesophyll cells contain essentially homogeneous protein bodies, without globoids, but the protein bodies of the spongy-mesophyll cells are heterogeneous, with numerous globoids. Albumins, legumins and vicilins were selectively extracted from isolated protein bodies and their subunits separated by SDS-PAGE, under non-reducing and reducing conditions. PMID:24241309

  12. Structure of Mth11/Mth Rpp29, an essential protein subunit of archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Boomershine, William P.; McElroy, Craig A.; Tsai, Hsin-Yue; Wilson, Ross C.; Gopalan, Venkat; Foster, Mark P.

    2003-01-01

    We have determined the solution structure of Mth11 (Mth Rpp29), an essential subunit of the RNase P enzyme from the archaebacterium Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (Mth). RNase P is a ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme primarily responsible for cleaving the 5′ leader sequence during maturation of tRNAs in all three domains of life. In eubacteria, this enzyme is made up of two subunits: a large RNA (≈120 kDa) responsible for mediating catalysis, and a small protein cofactor (≈15 kDa) that modulates substrate recognition and is required for efficient in vivo catalysis. In contrast, multiple proteins are associated with eukaryotic and archaeal RNase P, and these proteins exhibit no recognizable homology to the conserved bacterial protein subunit. In reconstitution experiments with recombinantly expressed and purified protein subunits, we found that Mth Rpp29, a homolog of the Rpp29 protein subunit from eukaryotic RNase P, is an essential protein component of the archaeal holoenzyme. Consistent with its role in mediating protein–RNA interactions, we report that Mth Rpp29 is a member of the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold family. In addition to a structured β-barrel core, it possesses unstructured N- and C-terminal extensions bearing several highly conserved amino acid residues. To identify possible RNA contacts in the protein–RNA complex, we examined the interaction of the 11-kDa protein with the full 100-kDa Mth RNA subunit by using NMR chemical shift perturbation. Our findings represent a critical step toward a structural model of the RNase P holoenzyme from archaebacteria and higher organisms. PMID:14673079

  13. Profiles of embryonic nuclear protein binding to the proximal promoter region of the soybean β-conglycinin α subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Tsutsumi, K; Kanazawa, A

    2015-01-01

    β-Conglycinin, a major component of seed storage protein in soybean, comprises three subunits: α, α' and β. The expression of genes for these subunits is strictly controlled during embryogenesis. The proximal promoter region up to 245 bp upstream of the transcription start site of the α subunit gene sufficiently confers spatial and temporal control of transcription in embryos. Here, the binding profile of nuclear proteins in the proximal promoter region of the α subunit gene was analysed. DNase I footprinting analysis indicated binding of proteins to the RY element and DNA regions including box I, a region conserved in cognate gene promoters. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) using different portions of box I as a probe revealed that multiple portions of box I bind to nuclear proteins. In addition, an EMSA using nuclear proteins extracted from embryos at different developmental stages indicated that the levels of major DNA-protein complexes on box I increased during embryo maturation. These results are consistent with the notion that box I is important for the transcriptional control of seed storage protein genes. Furthermore, the present data suggest that nuclear proteins bind to novel motifs in box I including 5'-TCAATT-3' rather than to predicted cis-regulatory elements. PMID:24943483

  14. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  15. SPLINTS: small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Park, Eunyoung; Eck, Michael J; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous in biology, and small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors are an important focus in drug discovery. Remarkably little attention has been given to the opposite strategy-stabilization of protein-protein interactions, despite the fact that several well-known therapeutics act through this mechanism. From a structural perspective, we consider representative examples of small molecules that induce or stabilize the association of protein domains to inhibit, or alter, signaling for nuclear hormone, GTPase, kinase, phosphatase, and ubiquitin ligase pathways. These SPLINTS (small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers) drive interactions that are in some cases physiologically relevant, and in others entirely adventitious. The diverse structural mechanisms employed suggest approaches for a broader and systematic search for such compounds in drug discovery. PMID:26829757

  16. Identification of Methylated Proteins in the Yeast Small Ribosomal Subunit: A Role for SPOUT Methyltransferases in Protein Arginine Methylation†

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brian D.; Weiss, David I.; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Clarke, Steven G.; McBride, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    We have characterized the posttranslational methylation of Rps2, Rps3, and Rps27a, three small ribosomal subunit proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. We found that Rps2 is substoichiometrically modified at arginine-10 by the Rmt1 methyltransferase. We demonstrated that Rps3 is stoichiometrically modified by ω-monomethylation at arginine-146 by mass spectrometric and site-directed mutagenic analyses. Substitution of alanine for arginine at position 146 is associated with slow cell growth, suggesting that the amino acid identity at this site may influence ribosomal function and/or biogenesis. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Rps3 in S. cerevisiae shows that arginine-146 makes contacts with the small subunit rRNA. Screening of deletion mutants encoding potential yeast methyltransferases revealed that the loss of the YOR021C gene results in the absence of methylation on Rps3. We demonstrated that recombinant Yor021c catalyzes ω-monomethylarginine formation when incubated with S-adenosylmethionine and hypomethylated ribosomes prepared from a YOR021C deletion strain. Interestingly, Yor021c belongs to the family of SPOUT methyltransferases that, to date, have only been shown to modify RNA substrates. Our findings suggest a wider role for SPOUT methyltransferases in nature. Finally, we have demonstrated the presence of a stoichiometrically methylated cysteine residue at position 39 of Rps27a in a zinc-cysteine cluster. The discovery of these three novel sites of protein modification within the small ribosomal subunit will now allow for an analysis of their functional roles in translation and possibly other cellular processes. PMID:22650761

  17. Case study on the evolution of hetero-oligomer interfaces based on the differences in paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Saki; Yura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We addressed the evolutionary trace of hetero-oligomer interfaces by comparing the structures of paralogous proteins; one of them is a monomer or homo-oligomer and the other is a hetero-oligomer. We found different trends in amino acid conservation pattern and hydrophobicity between homo-oligomer and hetero-oligomer. The degree of amino acid conservation in the interface of homo-oligomer has no obvious difference from that in the surface, whereas the degree of conservation is much higher in the interface of hetero-oligomer. The interface of homo-oligomer has a few very conserved residue positions, whereas the residue conservation in the interface of hetero-oligomer tends to be higher. In addition, the interface of hetero-oligomer has a tendency of being more hydrophobic compared with the one in homo-oligomer. We conjecture that these differences are related to the inherent symmetry in homo-oligomers that cannot exist in hetero-oligomers. Paucity of the structural data precludes statistical tests of these tendencies, yet the trend can be applied to the prediction of the interface of hetero-oligomer. We obtained putative interfaces of the subunits in CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor), one of the human pre-mRNA 3′-processing complexes. The locations of predicted interface residues were consistent with the known experimental data. PMID:27493859

  18. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the β-subunit gene in 7S globulin protein in soybean using RNAi technology.

    PubMed

    Qu, J; Liu, S Y; Wang, P W; Guan, S Y; Fan, Y G; Yao, D; Zhang, L; Dai, J L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use RNA interference (RNAi) to improve protein quality and decrease anti-nutritional effects in soybean. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was conducted using RNAi and an expression vector containing the 7S globulin β-subunit gene. The BAR gene was used as the selective marker and cotyledonary nodes of soybean genotype Jinong 27 were chosen as explant material. Regenerated plants were detected by molecular biology techniques. Transformation of the β-subunit gene in the 7S protein was detected by PCR, Southern blot, and q-PCR. Positive plants (10 T0, and 6 T1, and 13 T2) were tested by PCR. Hybridization bands were detected by Southern blot analysis in two of the T1 transgenic plants. RNAi expression vectors containing the soybean 7S protein β-subunit gene were successfully integrated into the genome of transgenic plants. qRT-PCR analysis in soybean seeds showed a clear decrease in expression of the soybean β-subunit gene. The level of 7S protein β-subunit expression in transgenic plants decreased by 77.5% as compared to that of the wild-type plants. This study has established a basis for the application of RNAi to improve the anti-nutritional effects of soybean. PMID:27173254

  19. Characterization of a Low-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunit Gene from Bread Wheat and the Corresponding Protein That Represents a Major Subunit of the Glutenin Polymer1

    PubMed Central

    Masci, Stefania; D'Ovidio, Renato; Lafiandra, Domenico; Kasarda, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    Both high- and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) play the major role in determining the viscoelastic properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) flour. To date there has been no clear correspondence between the amino acid sequences of LMW-GS derived from DNA sequencing and those of actual LMW-GS present in the endosperm. We have characterized a particular LMW-GS from hexaploid bread wheat, a major component of the glutenin polymer, which we call the 42K LMW-GS, and have isolated and sequenced the putative corresponding gene. Extensive amino acid sequences obtained directly for this 42K LMW-GS indicate correspondence between this protein and the putative corresponding gene. This subunit did not show a cysteine (Cys) at position 5, in contrast to what has frequently been reported for nucleotide-based sequences of LMW-GS. This Cys has been replaced by one occurring in the repeated-sequence domain, leaving the total number of Cys residues in the molecule the same as in various other LMW-GS. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequence and literature-based assignment of disulfide linkages, a computer-generated molecular model of the 42K subunit was constructed. PMID:9847089

  20. Oestrogen receptors interact with the α-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Chen, Hao; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal and pathological stressors engage the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling axis to protect the cell from energetic pressures. Sex steroid hormones also play a critical role in energy metabolism and significantly modify pathological progression of cardiac disease, diabetes/obesity and cancer. AMPK is targeted by 17β-oestradiol (E2), the main circulating oestrogen, but the mechanism by which E2 activates AMPK is currently unknown. Using an oestrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β) positive (T47D) breast cancer cell line, we validated E2-dependent activation of AMPK that was mediated through ERα (not ERβ) by using three experimental strategies. A series of co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both ERs associated with AMPK in cancer and striated (skeletal and cardiac) muscle cells. We further demonstrated direct binding of ERs to the α-catalytic subunit of AMPK within the βγ-subunit-binding domain. Finally, both ERs interacted with the upstream liver kinase B 1 (LKB1) kinase complex, which is required for E2-dependent activation of AMPK. We conclude that E2 activates AMPK through ERα by direct interaction with the βγ-binding domain of AMPKα. PMID:26374855

  1. Subcelluar compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits during palate ontogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Linask, K.K.; Greene, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Mammalian palatal ontogeny involves epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, cell differentiation, and cell movement. These events occur on days 12, 13, and 14 of gestation in the C57BL/6J mouse embryo. During this period intracellular cAMP levels and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-dPK) levels in the palate transiently elevate. Cyclic AMP activates cAMP-dPK by binding primarily to two types of regulatory subunits of this enzyme, designated as R{sub I} and R{sub II}. To assess whether differential compartmentalization of the regulatory subunits occurs during palatal ontogeny, cytosolic, nuclear, and particulate fractions were prepared from day 12, 13, and 14 embryonic maxillary and palatal tissue. After photo-affinity labeling of each fraction with 8-azido ({sup 32}P) cAMP, SDS-PAGE, and autoradiography, autoradiograms were analyzed densitometrically. The R{sub I} isoform predominated in the nuclear and particulate fractions on all three developmental days; whereas R{sub II} predominated in the cytosolic fractions. Thus, differential compartmentalization of cAMP-dPK may be a means by which cAMP dependent responses are regulated during palatogenesis.

  2. Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms of Pertussis Toxin Subunit S2 (PtxB) Affect Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Scott H.; Watanabe, Mineo; Komatsu, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Nagasawa, Yuki; Suzuki, Eri; Monaco, Haleigh; Weiss, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    Whooping cough due to Bordetella pertussis is increasing in incidence, in part due to accumulation of mutations which increase bacterial fitness in highly vaccinated populations. Polymorphisms in the pertussis toxin, ptxA and ptxB genes, and the pertactin, prn genes of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis collected in Cincinnati from 1989 through 2005 were examined. While the ptxA and prn genotypes were variable, all 48 strains had the ptxB2 genotype; ptxB1 encodes glycine at amino acid 18 of the S2 subunit of pertussis toxin, while ptxB2 encodes serine. We investigated antigenic and functional differences of PtxB1 and PtxB2. The S2 protein was not very immunogenic. Only a few vaccinated or individuals infected with B. pertussis developed antibody responses to the S2 subunit, and these sera recognized both polymorphic forms equally well. Amino acid 18 of S2 is in a glycan binding domain, and the PtxB forms displayed differences in receptor recognition and toxicity. PtxB1 bound better to the glycoprotein, fetuin, and Jurkat T cells in vitro, but the two forms were equally effective at promoting CHO cell clustering. To investigate in vivo activity of Ptx, one μg of Ptx was administered to DDY mice and blood was collected on 4 days after injection. PtxB2 was more effective at promoting lymphocytosis in mice. PMID:26375454

  3. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Stefano; Vaira, Valentina; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Vicentini, Leonardo; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna; Lania, Andrea G

    2015-04-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in both cell growth and cell differentiation control. Mutations of the PRKAR1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the expression of different PKA regulatory subunits in benign and non benign human thyroid tumours and to correlate their expression with clinical phenotype. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant increase in PRKAR2B expression in both differentiated and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid tumors in comparison with normal thyroid tissues. Conversely, a significant increase in PRKAR1A expression was only demonstrated in undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas in comparison with normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid tumors. In thyroid cancers without lymph nodal metastases PRKAR1A expression was higher in tumours of more than 2 cm in size (T2 and T3) compared to smaller ones (T1). In conclusion, our data shows that an increased PRKAR1A expression is associated with aggressive and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. PMID:25393625

  4. Mys protein regulates protein kinase A activity by interacting with regulatory type Ialpha subunit during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Kawakami, Koichi; Yamashita, Masakane

    2010-02-12

    During embryonic development, protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role in cell fate specification by antagonizing the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we show that the Misty somites (Mys) protein regulates the level of PKA activity during embryonic development in zebrafish. We isolate PKA regulatory type Ialpha subunit (Prkar1a) as a protein interacting with Mys by pulldown assay in HEK293 cells followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We show an interaction between endogenous Mys and Prkar1a in the zebrafish embryo. Mys binds to Prkar1a in its C terminus region, termed PRB domain, and activates PKA in vitro. Conversely, knockdown of Mys in zebrafish embryos results in reduction in PKA activity. We also show that knockdown of Mys induces ectopic activation of Hh target genes in the eyes, neural tube, and somites downstream of Smoothened, a protein essential for transduction of Hh signaling activity. The altered patterning of gene expression is rescued by activation of PKA. Together, our results reveal a molecular mechanism of regulation of PKA activity that is dependent on a protein-protein interaction and demonstrate that PKA activity regulated by Mys is indispensable for negative regulation of the Hh signaling pathway in Hh-responsive cells. PMID:20018846

  5. Cooperative folding kinetics of BBL protein and peripheral subunit-binding domain homologues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wookyung; Chung, Kwanghoon; Cheon, Mookyung; Heo, Muyoung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Ham, Sihyun; Chang, Iksoo

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments claiming that Naf-BBL protein follows a global downhill folding raised an important controversy as to the folding mechanism of fast-folding proteins. Under the global downhill folding scenario, not only do proteins undergo a gradual folding, but folding events along the continuous folding pathway also could be mapped out from the equilibrium denaturation experiment. Based on the exact calculation using a free energy landscape, relaxation eigenmodes from a master equation, and Monte Carlo simulation of an extended Muñoz–Eaton model that incorporates multiscale-heterogeneous pairwise interactions between amino acids, here we show that the very nature of a two-state cooperative transition such as a bimodal distribution from an exact free energy landscape and biphasic relaxation kinetics manifest in the thermodynamics and folding–unfolding kinetics of BBL and peripheral subunit-binding domain homologues. Our results provide an unequivocal resolution to the fundamental controversy related to the global downhill folding scheme, whose applicability to other proteins should be critically reexamined. PMID:18272497

  6. Functional control of the Candida albicans cell wall by catalytic protein kinase A subunit Tpk1

    PubMed Central

    Fanning, S; Xu, W; Beaurepaire, C; Suhan, JP; Nantel, A; Mitchell, AP

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway governs numerous biological features of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. The catalytic protein kinase A subunits, Tpk1 (orf19.4892) and Tpk2 (orf19.2277), have divergent roles, and most studies indicate a more pronounced role for Tpk2. Here we dissect two Tpk1-responsive properties: adherence and cell wall integrity. Homozygous tpk1/tpk1 mutants are hyperadherent, and a Tpk1 defect enables biofilm formation in the absence of Bcr1, a transcriptional regulator of biofilm adhesins. A quantitative gene expression-based assay reveals that tpk1/tpk1 and bcr1/bcr1 genotypes show mixed epistasis, as expected if Tpk1 and Bcr1 act mainly in distinct pathways. Overexpression of individual Tpk1-repressed genes indicates that cell surface proteins Als1, Als2, Als4, Csh1, and Csp37 contribute to Tpk1-regulated adherence. Tpk1 is also required for cell wall integrity, but has no role in the gene expression response to cell wall inhibition by caspofungin. Interestingly, increased expression of the adhesin gene ALS2 confers a cell wall defect, as manifested in hypersensitivity to the cell wall inhibitor caspofungin and a shallow cell wall structure. Our findings indicate that Tpk1 governs C. albicans cell wall properties through repression of select cell surface protein genes. PMID:22882910

  7. Regulation of exocytosis by the exocyst subunit Sec6 and the SM protein Sec1.

    PubMed

    Morgera, Francesca; Sallah, Margaret R; Dubuke, Michelle L; Gandhi, Pallavi; Brewer, Daniel N; Carr, Chavela M; Munson, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking of protein and lipid cargo through the secretory pathway in eukaryotic cells is mediated by membrane-bound vesicles. Secretory vesicle targeting and fusion require a conserved multisubunit protein complex termed the exocyst, which has been implicated in specific tethering of vesicles to sites of polarized exocytosis. The exocyst is directly involved in regulating soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes and membrane fusion through interactions between the Sec6 subunit and the plasma membrane SNARE protein Sec9. Here we show another facet of Sec6 function-it directly binds Sec1, another SNARE regulator, but of the Sec1/Munc18 family. The Sec6-Sec1 interaction is exclusive of Sec6-Sec9 but compatible with Sec6-exocyst assembly. In contrast, the Sec6-exocyst interaction is incompatible with Sec6-Sec9. Therefore, upon vesicle arrival, Sec6 is proposed to release Sec9 in favor of Sec6-exocyst assembly and to simultaneously recruit Sec1 to sites of secretion for coordinated SNARE complex formation and membrane fusion. PMID:22114349

  8. GABA(B) receptor subunit 1 binds to proteins affected in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zunner, Dagmar; Deschermeier, Christina; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-03-01

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors composed of the seven-transmembrane domain proteins GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), which are linked through a coiled-coil interaction. The ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1) is at first retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is transported to the cell surface only upon assembly with GABA(B2). Here, we report that GABA(B1), via the coiled-coil domain, can also bind to soluble proteins of unknown function, that are affected in 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome and are therefore referred to as DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6). In transfected neurons the GABA(B1)-DGCR6 association resulted in a redistribution of both proteins into intracellular clusters. Furthermore, the C-terminus of GABA(B2) interfered with the novel interaction, consistent with heterodimer formation overriding transient DGCR6-binding to GABA(B1). Thus, sequential coiled-coil interactions may direct GABA(B1) into functional receptors. PMID:20036641

  9. Brain Gαi2-subunit proteins and the prevention of salt sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Casey Y.; Wainford, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    To counter the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, multiple brain G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) systems are activated to facilitate sympathoinhibition, sodium homeostasis, and normotension. Currently there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the role of down-stream GPCR-activated Gα-subunit proteins in these critically important physiological regulatory responses required for long-term blood pressure regulation. We have determined that brain Gαi2-proteins mediate natriuretic and sympathoinhibitory responses produced by acute pharmacological (exogenous central nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP) and α2-adrenoceptor activation) and physiological challenges to sodium homeostasis (intravenous volume expansion and 1 M sodium load) in conscious Sprague–Dawley rats. We have demonstrated that in salt-resistant rat phenotypes, high dietary salt intake evokes site-specific up-regulation of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) Gαi2-proteins. Further, we established that PVN Gαi2 protein up-regulation prevents the development of renal nerve-dependent sympathetically mediated salt-sensitive hypertension in Sprague–Dawley and Dahl salt-resistant rats. Additionally, failure to up-regulate PVN Gαi2 proteins during high salt-intake contributes to the pathophysiology of Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) hypertension. Collectively, our data demonstrate that brain, and likely PVN specific, Gαi2 protein pathways represent a central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal-nerve dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Further, impairment of this endogenous “anti-hypertensive” mechanism contributes to the pathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26347659

  10. Altering the ribosomal subunit ratio in yeast maximizes recombinant protein yield

    PubMed Central

    Bonander, Nicklas; Darby, Richard AJ; Grgic, Ljuban; Bora, Nagamani; Wen, Jikai; Brogna, Saverio; Poyner, David R; O'Neill, Michael AA; Bill, Roslyn M

    2009-01-01

    Background The production of high yields of recombinant proteins is an enduring bottleneck in the post-genomic sciences that has yet to be addressed in a truly rational manner. Typically eukaryotic protein production experiments have relied on varying expression construct cassettes such as promoters and tags, or culture process parameters such as pH, temperature and aeration to enhance yields. These approaches require repeated rounds of trial-and-error optimization and cannot provide a mechanistic insight into the biology of recombinant protein production. We published an early transcriptome analysis that identified genes implicated in successful membrane protein production experiments in yeast. While there has been a subsequent explosion in such analyses in a range of production organisms, no one has yet exploited the genes identified. The aim of this study was to use the results of our previous comparative transcriptome analysis to engineer improved yeast strains and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in high-yielding protein production hosts. Results We show that tuning BMS1 transcript levels in a doxycycline-dependent manner resulted in optimized yields of functional membrane and soluble protein targets. Online flow microcalorimetry demonstrated that there had been a substantial metabolic change to cells cultured under high-yielding conditions, and in particular that high yielding cells were more metabolically efficient. Polysome profiling showed that the key molecular event contributing to this metabolically efficient, high-yielding phenotype is a perturbation of the ratio of 60S to 40S ribosomal subunits from approximately 1:1 to 2:1, and correspondingly of 25S:18S ratios from 2:1 to 3:1. This result is consistent with the role of the gene product of BMS1 in ribosome biogenesis. Conclusion This work demonstrates the power of a rational approach to recombinant protein production by using the results of transcriptome analysis to engineer

  11. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  12. Molecular characterization of the 28- and 31-kilodalton subunits of the Legionella pneumophila major outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P S; Seyer, J H; Butler, C A

    1992-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila exhibits an apparent molecular mass of 100 kDa. Previous studies revealed the oligomer to be composed of 28- and 31-kDa subunits; the latter subunit is covalently bound to peptidoglycan. These proteins exhibit cross-reactivity with polyclonal anti-31-kDa protein serum. In this study, we present evidence to confirm that the 31-kDa subunit is a 28-kDa subunit containing a bound fragment of peptidoglycan. Peptide maps of purified proteins were generated following cyanogen bromide cleavage or proteolysis with staphylococcal V8 protease. A comparison of the banding patterns resulting from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed a common pattern. Selected peptide fragments were sequenced on a gas phase microsequencer, and the sequence was compared with the sequence obtained for the 28-kDa protein. While the amino terminus of the 31-kDa protein was blocked, peptide fragments generated by cyanogen bromide treatment exhibited a sequence identical to that of the amino terminus of the 28-kDa protein, but beginning at amino acid four (glycine), which is preceded by methionine at the third position. This sequence, (Gly-Thr-Met)-Gly-Pro-Val-Trp-Thr-Pro-Gly-Asn ... , confirms that these proteins have a common amino terminus. An oligonucleotide synthesized from the codons of the common N-terminal amino acid sequence was used to establish by Southern and Northern (RNA) blot analyses that a single gene coded for both proteins. With regard to the putative porin structure, we have identified two major bands at 70 kDa and at approximately 120 kDa by nonreducing SDS-PAGE. The former may represent the typical trimeric motif, while the latter may represent either a double trimer or an aggregate. Analysis of these two forms by two-dimensional SDS-PAGE (first dimensions, nonreducing; second dimensions, reducing) established that both were composed of 31- and 28-kDa subunits cross-linked via

  13. Kinetics of Protein Adsorption at liquid/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellion, Markus; Santen, Ludger; Nagel, Armin; Mantz, Hubert; Quinn, Anthony; Jacobs, Karin

    2006-03-01

    Protein adsorption processes are of crucial importance in many biomedical processes. From a physical point of view these processes raise a number of challenging questions, e.g.: How does the surface influence the conformation of proteins at the surface? What are the characteristics of the protein film at the liquid/solid interface? In this work we investigate the adsorption kinetics of salivary proteins on different kinds of surfaces in a liquid environment. The adsorbed protein layers are analyzed by means of ellipsometry, plasmon resonance, and SPM. It turns out that the adsorbed amount of proteins is sensitive to the long ranged interactions of the solid surface. The experimental data are compared to extensive Monte Carlo simulation of a colloidal protein model. The Monte Carlo results strongly suggest that induced conformal changes lead to the experimentally observed three step kinetics of amylase.

  14. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-04-23

    We have found that the methionine repression of the ..beta..-subunit gene expression is not due to degradation of the ..beta..-subunit but is due to an effect on synthesis of the ..beta..-subunit. The effect of methionine on the synthesis of the ..beta..-is due to an inhibition of ..beta..-subunit mRNA synthesis. 3 references, 1 figure.

  15. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  16. Distinct Roles for Two Gα–Gβ Interfaces in Cell Polarity Control by a Yeast Heterotrimeric G Protein

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Gαβγ) into Gα-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gβγ. The Gβγ dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gβγ in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gβγ, either alone or with Gα-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor–Gαβγ module and GTP hydrolysis by Gα. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor–Gαβγ communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gβγ by Gα, we mutated Gβ residues in two structurally distinct Gα–Gβ binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gβ–Gα fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor–Gαβγ coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Gαβγ heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  17. Distinct roles for two Galpha-Gbeta interfaces in cell polarity control by a yeast heterotrimeric G protein.

    PubMed

    Strickfaden, Shelly C; Pryciak, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromones trigger dissociation of a heterotrimeric G protein (Galphabetagamma) into Galpha-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and Gbetagamma. The Gbetagamma dimer regulates both mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade signaling and cell polarization. Here, by independently activating the MAP kinase pathway, we studied the polarity role of Gbetagamma in isolation from its signaling role. MAP kinase signaling alone could induce cell asymmetry but not directional growth. Surprisingly, active Gbetagamma, either alone or with Galpha-GTP, could not organize a persistent polarization axis. Instead, following pheromone gradients (chemotropism) or directional growth without pheromone gradients (de novo polarization) required an intact receptor-Galphabetagamma module and GTP hydrolysis by Galpha. Our results indicate that chemoattractant-induced cell polarization requires continuous receptor-Galphabetagamma communication but not modulation of MAP kinase signaling. To explore regulation of Gbetagamma by Galpha, we mutated Gbeta residues in two structurally distinct Galpha-Gbeta binding interfaces. Polarity control was disrupted only by mutations in the N-terminal interface, and not the Switch interface. Incorporation of these mutations into a Gbeta-Galpha fusion protein, which enforces subunit proximity, revealed that Switch interface dissociation regulates signaling, whereas the N-terminal interface may govern receptor-Galphabetagamma coupling. These findings raise the possibility that the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer can function in a partially dissociated state, tethered by the N-terminal interface. PMID:17978098

  18. Identification of a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 which mediates blue light signaling for stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Shota; Yano, Takayuki; Ariyoshi, Chie; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprised of a catalytic subunit (PP1c) and a regulatory subunit that modulates catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate specificity. PP1c positively regulates stomatal opening through blue light signaling between phototropins and the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in guard cells. However, the regulatory subunit functioning in this process is unknown. We identified Arabidopsis PRSL1 (PP1 regulatory subunit2-like protein1) as a regulatory subunit of PP1c. Tautomycin, a selective inhibitor of PP1c, inhibited blue light responses of stomata in the single mutants phot1 and phot2, supporting the idea that signals from phot1 and phot2 converge on PP1c. We obtained PRSL1 based on the sequence similarity to Vicia faba PRS2, a PP1c-binding protein isolated by a yeast two-hybrid screen. PRSL1 bound to Arabidopsis PP1c through its RVxF motif, a consensus PP1c-binding sequence. Arabidopsis prsl1 mutants were impaired in blue light-dependent stomatal opening, H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the H(+)-ATPase, but showed normal phototropin activities. PRSL1 complemented the prsl1 phenotype, but not if the protein carried a mutation in the RVxF motif, suggesting that PRSL1 functions through binding PP1c via the RVxF motif. PRSL1 did not affect the catalytic activity of Arabidopsis PP1c but it stimulated the localization of PP1c in the cytoplasm. We conclude that PRSL1 functions as a regulatory subunit of PP1 and regulates blue light signaling in stomata. PMID:22585556

  19. Expression of GABA A receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein in rat neocortex following photothrombotic infarction.

    PubMed

    Kharlamov, Elena A; Downey, Kathy L; Jukkola, Peter I; Grayson, Dennis R; Kelly, Kevin M

    2008-05-19

    Photothrombotic infarcts of the neocortex result in structural and functional alterations of cortical networks, including decreased GABAergic inhibition, and can generate epileptic seizures within 1 month of lesioning. In our study, we assessed the involvement and potential changes of cortical GABA A receptor (GABA AR) alpha1 subunits at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days after photothrombosis. Quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis were used to investigate GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA and protein levels in proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex and in homotopic areas of young adult Sprague-Dawley rats. GABA AR alpha1 subunit mRNA levels were decreased ipsilateral and contralateral to the infarct at 7 days, but were increased bilaterally at 30 days. GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein levels revealed no significant change in neocortical areas of both hemispheres of lesioned animals compared with protein levels of sham-operated controls at 1, 3, 7, and 30 days. At 30 days, GABA AR alpha1 subunit protein expression was significantly increased in lesioned animals within proximal and distal regions of perilesional cortex compared with distal neocortical areas contralaterally (Student's t-test, p<0.05). Short- and long-term alterations of mRNA and protein levels of the GABA AR alpha1 subunit ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion may influence alterations in cell surface receptor subtype expression and GABA AR function following ischemic infarction and may be associated with formative mechanisms of poststroke epileptogenesis. PMID:18407248

  20. The Gα subunit signals through the Ste50 protein during the mating pheromone response in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Paredes, Edith; Kawasaki, Laura; Ongay-Larios, Laura; Coria, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    Yeast mating signal transduction pathways require a heterotrimeric G protein composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits connected to a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) module. While in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elimination of Gα induces constitutive activation of the mating pathway, in Kluyveromyces lactis it produces partial sterility, which indicates that K. lactis Gα (KlGα) is required to positively activate mating. We use physical interaction experiments to determine that KlGα interacts with the adaptor protein KlSte50p. The Ras association (RA) domain of KlSte50p favored interaction with the GDP-bound KlGα subunit, and when the KlGα protein is constitutively activated, the interaction drops significantly. Additionally, KlSte50p strongly associates with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) KlSte11p through its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. Genetic experiments placed KlSte50p downstream of the G protein α subunit, indicating that KlGα may stimulate the mating pathway via KlSte50p. Fusion of KlSte50p to the KlGβ subunit partially eliminated the requirement of KlGα for mating, indicating that one contribution of KlGα to the mating pathway is to facilitate plasma membrane anchoring of KlSte50p. PMID:21335532

  1. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  2. Structural basis of a rationally rewired protein-protein interface critical to bacterial signaling.

    PubMed

    Podgornaia, Anna I; Casino, Patricia; Marina, Alberto; Laub, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a sensor histidine kinase that specifically phosphorylates a single, cognate response regulator. This protein-protein interaction relies on molecular recognition via a small set of residues in each protein. To better understand how these residues determine the specificity of kinase-substrate interactions, we rationally rewired the interaction interface of a Thermotoga maritima two-component system, HK853-RR468, to match that found in a different two-component system, Escherichia coli PhoR-PhoB. The rewired proteins interacted robustly with each other, but no longer interacted with the parent proteins. Analysis of the crystal structures of the wild-type and mutant protein complexes and a systematic mutagenesis study reveal how individual mutations contribute to the rewiring of interaction specificity. Our approach and conclusions have implications for studies of other protein-protein interactions and protein evolution and for the design of novel protein interfaces. PMID:23954504

  3. Structural basis of a rationally rewired protein-protein interface critical to bacterial signaling

    PubMed Central

    Podgornaia, Anna I.; Casino, Patricia; Marina, Alberto; Laub, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Two-component signal transduction systems typically involve a sensor histidine kinase that specifically phosphorylates a single, cognate response regulator. This protein-protein interaction relies on molecular recognition via a small set of residues in each protein. To better understand how these residues determine the specificity of kinase-substrate interactions, we rationally rewired the interaction interface of a Thermotoga maritima two-component system, HK853-RR468, to match that found in a different two-component system, E. coli PhoR-PhoB. The rewired proteins interacted robustly with each other, but no longer interacted with the parent proteins. Analysis of the crystal structures of the wild-type and mutant protein complexes, along with a systematic mutagenesis study, reveals how individual mutations contribute to the rewiring of interaction specificity. Our approach and conclusions have implications for studies of other protein-protein interactions, protein evolution, and the design of novel protein interfaces. PMID:23954504

  4. Genome-wide RNAi Screening Identifies Protein Modules Required for 40S Subunit Synthesis in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Badertscher, Lukas; Wild, Thomas; Montellese, Christian; Alexander, Leila T; Bammert, Lukas; Sarazova, Marie; Stebler, Michael; Csucs, Gabor; Mayer, Thomas U; Zamboni, Nicola; Zemp, Ivo; Horvath, Peter; Kutay, Ulrike

    2015-12-29

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex process requiring many assisting factors. Studies in yeast have yielded comprehensive knowledge of the cellular machinery involved in this process. However, many aspects of ribosome synthesis are different in higher eukaryotes, and the global set of mammalian ribosome biogenesis factors remains unexplored. We used an imaging-based, genome-wide RNAi screen to find human proteins involved in 40S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Our analysis identified ∼ 300 factors, many part of essential protein modules such as the small subunit (SSU) processome, the eIF3 and chaperonin complexes, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We demonstrate a role for the vertebrate-specific factor RBIS in ribosome synthesis, uncover a requirement for the CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in nucleolar ribosome biogenesis, and reveal that intracellular glutamine synthesis supports 40S subunit production. PMID:26711351

  5. Phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins by protein kinase C correlates with leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Valmu, L; Autero, M; Siljander, P; Patarroyo, M; Gahmberg, C G

    1991-11-01

    Adhesion of activated leukocytes to cells is of critical functional importance. The adhesion is known to be mediated mainly by the CD11/CD18 integrins, also known as leukocytic cell adhesion molecules, or Leu-CAM. We have now studied the phosphorylation of Leu-CAM by protein kinase C and the correlation of phosphorylation with the generation of the adhesive phenotype among human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes during cell activation. We here show that a good correlation exists between the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of Leu-CAM (CD18), and the extent of cell-to-cell adhesion. The phosphorylated CD18 subunit was associated with both CD11a and CD11b. Purified protein kinase C was able to phosphorylate the beta subunit of isolated Leu-CAM in vitro. The phosphorylation occurred mainly on serine residues. PMID:1682156

  6. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs. PMID:26723252

  7. Interplay between Ku, Artemis, and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit at DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Jérôme; Frit, Philippe; Delteil, Christine; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2006-09-22

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in mammals requires at least seven proteins involved in a simplified two-step process: (i) recognition and synapsis of the DNA ends dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) formed by the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs in association with Artemis; (ii) ligation dependent on the DNA ligase IV.XRCC4.Cernunnos-XLF complex. The Artemis protein exhibits exonuclease and endonuclease activities that are believed to be involved in the processing of a subclass of DSB. Here, we have analyzed the interactions of Artemis and nonhomologous end-joining pathway proteins both in a context of human nuclear cell extracts and in cells. DSB-inducing agents specifically elicit the mobilization of Artemis to damaged chromatin together with DNA-PK and XRCC4/ligase IV proteins. DNA-PKcs is necessary for the loading of Artemis on damaged DNA and is the main kinase that phosphorylates Artemis in cells damaged with highly efficient DSB producers. Under kinase-preventive conditions, both in vitro and in cells, Ku-mediated assembly of DNA-PK on DNA ends is responsible for a dissociation of the DNA-PKcs. Artemis complex. Conversely, DNA-PKcs kinase activity prevents Artemis dissociation from the DNA-PK.DNA complex. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a model in which a DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation is necessary both to activate Artemis endonuclease activity and to maintain its association with the DNA end site. This tight functional coupling between the activation of both DNA-PKcs and Artemis may avoid improper processing of DNA. PMID:16857680

  8. Genomic organization of the murine G protein beta subunit genes and related processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, J; Wang, X B; Kitanaka, N; Hembree, C M; Uhl, G R

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) for the many physiological processes including the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction have been described. In investigating the changes of mRNA expression after acute psychostimulant administration, we previously identified a cDNA encoding a G protein beta1 subunit (Gbeta1) that was increased up to four-fold in certain brain regions after administration of psychostimulants. The mouse Gbeta1 gene (the mouse genetic symbol, GNB1) was mapped to chromosome 4, but little was known of its genetic features. To characterize the GNB1 gene further, we have cloned and analyzed the genomic structures of the mouse GNBI gene and its homologous sequences. The GNBI gene spans at least 50 kb, and consists of 12 exons and 11 introns. The exon/intron boundaries were determined and found to follow the GT/AG rule. Exons 3-11 encode the Gbeta1 protein, and the exon 2 is an alternative, resulting in putative two splicing variants. Although intron 11 is additional for GNBI compared with GNB2 and GNB3, the intron positions within the protein coding region of GNB1, GNB2 and GNB3 are identical, suggesting that GNB1 should have diverged from the ancestral gene family earlier than the genes for GNB2 and GNB3. We also found the 5'-truncated processed pseudogenes with 71-89% similarities to GNBI mRNA sequence, suggesting that the truncated cDNA copies, which have been reverse-transcribed from a processed mRNA for GNB1, might have been integrated into several new locations in the mouse genome. PMID:11913780

  9. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dragan Isailovic

    2005-12-17

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  10. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein/DNA interface

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bohdan; Černý, Jiří; Svozil, Daniel; Čech, Petr; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the principles driving recognition between proteins and DNA, we analyzed more than thousand crystal structures of protein/DNA complexes. We classified protein and DNA conformations by structural alphabets, protein blocks [de Brevern, Etchebest and Hazout (2000) (Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks. Prots. Struct. Funct. Genet., 41:271–287)] and dinucleotide conformers [Svozil, Kalina, Omelka and Schneider (2008) (DNA conformations and their sequence preferences. Nucleic Acids Res., 36:3690–3706)], respectively. Assembling the mutually interacting protein blocks and dinucleotide conformers into ‘interaction matrices’ revealed their correlations and conformer preferences at the interface relative to their occurrence outside the interface. The analyzed data demonstrated important differences between complexes of various types of proteins such as transcription factors and nucleases, distinct interaction patterns for the DNA minor groove relative to the major groove and phosphate and importance of water-mediated contacts. Water molecules mediate proportionally the largest number of contacts in the minor groove and form the largest proportion of contacts in complexes of transcription factors. The generally known induction of A-DNA forms by complexation was more accurately attributed to A-like and intermediate A/B conformers rare in naked DNA molecules. PMID:24335080

  11. Two Chlamydomonas OPR proteins stabilize chloroplast mRNAs encoding small subunits of photosystem II and cytochrome b6 f.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Johnson, Xenie; Cavaiuolo, Marina; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Nickelsen, Joerg; Vallon, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In plants and algae, chloroplast gene expression is controlled by nucleus-encoded proteins that bind to mRNAs in a specific manner, stabilizing mRNAs or promoting their splicing, editing, or translation. Here, we present the characterization of two mRNA stabilization factors of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which both belong to the OctotricoPeptide Repeat (OPR) family. MCG1 is necessary to stabilize the petG mRNA, encoding a small subunit of the cytochrome b6 f complex, while MBI1 stabilizes the psbI mRNA, coding for a small subunit of photosystem II. In the mcg1 mutant, the small RNA footprint corresponding to the 5'-end of the petG transcript is reduced in abundance. In both cases, the absence of the small subunit perturbs assembly of the cognate complex. Whereas PetG is essential for formation of a functional cytochrome b6 f dimer, PsbI appears partly dispensable as a low level of PSII activity can still be measured in its absence. Thus, nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression is not only exerted on the major core subunits of the complexes, but also on small subunits with a single transmembrane helix. While OPR proteins have thus far been involved in translation or trans-splicing of plastid mRNAs, our results expand the potential roles of this repeat family to their stabilization. PMID:25898982

  12. Crystal structure of the human protein kinase CK2 regulatory subunit reveals its zinc finger-mediated dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Chantalat, L; Leroy, D; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Benitez, M J; Chambaz, E M; Cochet, C; Dideberg, O

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a tetramer composed of two alpha catalytic subunits and two beta regulatory subunits. The structure of a C-terminal truncated form of the human beta subunit has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.7 A resolution. One dimer is observed in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. The most striking feature of the structure is the presence of a zinc finger mediating the dimerization. The monomer structure consists of two domains, one entirely alpha-helical and one including the zinc finger. The dimer has a crescent shape holding a highly acidic region at both ends. We propose that this acidic region is involved in the interactions with the polyamines and/or catalytic subunits. Interestingly, conserved amino acid residues among beta subunit sequences are clustered along one linear ridge that wraps around the entire dimer. This feature suggests that protein partners may interact with the dimer through a stretch of residues in an extended conformation. PMID:10357806

  13. Expression profile of G-protein βγ subunit gene transcripts in the mouse olfactory sensory epithelia.

    PubMed

    Sathyanesan, Aaron; Feijoo, Adrian A; Mehta, Saloni T; Nimarko, Akua F; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate a variety of cellular functions, including signal transduction in sensory neurons of the olfactory system. Whereas the Gα subunits in these neurons are well characterized, the gene transcript expression profile of Gβγ subunits is largely missing. Here we report our comprehensive expression analysis to identify Gβ and Gγ subunit gene transcripts in the mouse main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Our reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and realtime qPCR analyses of all known Gβ (β1,2,3,4,5) and Gγ (γ1,2,2t,3,4,5,7,8,10,11,12,13) subunits indicate presence of multiple Gβ and Gγ subunit gene transcripts in the MOE and the VNO at various expression levels. These results are supported by our RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) experiments, which reveal the expression patterns of two Gβ subunits and four Gγ subunits in the MOE as well as one Gβ and four Gγ subunits in the VNO. Using double-probe fluorescence RISH and line intensity scan analysis of the RISH signals of two dominant Gβγ subunits, we show that Gγ13 is expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), while Gβ1 is present in both mature and immature OSNs. Interestingly, we also found Gβ1 to be the dominant Gβ subunit in the VNO and present throughout the sensory epithelium. In contrast, we found diverse expression of Gγ subunit gene transcripts with Gγ2, Gγ3, and Gγ13 in the Gαi2-expressing neuronal population, while Gγ8 is expressed in both layers. Further, we determined the expression of these Gβγ gene transcripts in three post-natal developmental stages (p0, 7, and 14) and found their cell-type specific expression remains largely unchanged, except the transient expression of Gγ2 in a single basal layer of cells in the MOE during P7 and P14. Taken together, our comprehensive expression analyses reveal cell-type specific gene expression of multiple Gβ and Gγ in sensory neurons of the olfactory system. PMID:23759900

  14. Expression profile of G-protein βγ subunit gene transcripts in the mouse olfactory sensory epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanesan, Aaron; Feijoo, Adrian A.; Mehta, Saloni T.; Nimarko, Akua F.; Lin, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate a variety of cellular functions, including signal transduction in sensory neurons of the olfactory system. Whereas the Gα subunits in these neurons are well characterized, the gene transcript expression profile of Gβγ subunits is largely missing. Here we report our comprehensive expression analysis to identify Gβ and Gγ subunit gene transcripts in the mouse main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Our reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and realtime qPCR analyses of all known Gβ (β1,2,3,4,5) and Gγ (γ1,2,2t,3,4,5,7,8,10,11,12,13) subunits indicate presence of multiple Gβ and Gγ subunit gene transcripts in the MOE and the VNO at various expression levels. These results are supported by our RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) experiments, which reveal the expression patterns of two Gβ subunits and four Gγ subunits in the MOE as well as one Gβ and four Gγ subunits in the VNO. Using double-probe fluorescence RISH and line intensity scan analysis of the RISH signals of two dominant Gβγ subunits, we show that Gγ13 is expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), while Gβ1 is present in both mature and immature OSNs. Interestingly, we also found Gβ1 to be the dominant Gβ subunit in the VNO and present throughout the sensory epithelium. In contrast, we found diverse expression of Gγ subunit gene transcripts with Gγ2, Gγ3, and Gγ13 in the Gαi2-expressing neuronal population, while Gγ8 is expressed in both layers. Further, we determined the expression of these Gβγ gene transcripts in three post-natal developmental stages (p0, 7, and 14) and found their cell-type specific expression remains largely unchanged, except the transient expression of Gγ2 in a single basal layer of cells in the MOE during P7 and P14. Taken together, our comprehensive expression analyses reveal cell-type specific gene expression of multiple Gβ and Gγ in sensory neurons of the olfactory system. PMID:23759900

  15. The GIRK1 subunit potentiates G protein activation of cardiac GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, Kouki K; Wang, Weiwei; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    G protein gated inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels are gated by direct binding of G protein beta-gamma subunits (Gβγ), signaling lipids, and intracellular Na+. In cardiac pacemaker cells, hetero-tetramer GIRK1/4 channels and homo-tetramer GIRK4 channels play a central role in parasympathetic slowing of heart rate. It is known that the Na+ binding site of the GIRK1 subunit is defective, but the functional difference between GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers and GIRK4 homo-tetramers remains unclear. Here, using purified proteins and the lipid bilayer system, we characterize Gβγ and Na+ regulation of GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers and GIRK4 homo-tetramers. We find in GIRK4 homo-tetramers that Na+ binding increases Gβγ affinity and thereby increases the GIRK4 responsiveness to G protein stimulation. GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers are not activated by Na+, but rather are in a permanent state of high responsiveness to Gβγ, suggesting that the GIRK1 subunit functions like a GIRK4 subunit with Na+ permanently bound. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15750.001 PMID:27074664

  16. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  17. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Julian E.; Huber, Roland G.; Waldner, Birgit J.; Kahler, Ursula; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm “dynamics govern specificity” might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design. PMID:26496636

  18. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Glycine Receptor β Subunit (GlyRβ)-interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Isabel; Koch, Dennis; Schemm, Rudolf; Qualmann, Britta; Betz, Heinrich; Paarmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in spinal cord and brainstem. They are clustered at inhibitory postsynapses via a tight interaction of their β subunits (GlyRβ) with the scaffolding protein gephyrin. In an attempt to isolate additional proteins interacting with GlyRβ, we performed pulldown experiments with rat brain extracts using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein encompassing amino acids 378–455 of the large intracellular loop of GlyRβ as bait. This identified syndapin I (SdpI) as a novel interaction partner of GlyRβ that coimmunoprecipitates with native GlyRs from brainstem extracts. Both SdpI and SdpII bound efficiently to the intracellular loop of GlyRβ in vitro and colocalized with GlyRβ upon coexpression in COS-7 cells. The SdpI-binding site was mapped to a proline-rich sequence of 22 amino acids within the intracellular loop of GlyRβ. Deletion and point mutation analysis disclosed that SdpI binding to GlyRβ is Src homology 3 domain-dependent. In cultured rat spinal cord neurons, SdpI immunoreactivity was found to partially colocalize with marker proteins of inhibitory and excitatory synapses. When SdpI was acutely knocked down in cultured spinal cord neurons by viral miRNA expression, postsynaptic GlyR clusters were significantly reduced in both size and number. Similar changes in GlyR cluster properties were found in spinal cultures from SdpI-deficient mice. Our results are consistent with a role of SdpI in the trafficking and/or cytoskeletal anchoring of synaptic GlyRs. PMID:24509844

  20. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex. PMID:3100577

  1. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  2. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  3. Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Primed for Action: Time-Lapse Crystallography of Michaelis Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana; Parks, Jerry M; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Heller, William T

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg(2+) binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg(2+) binding to the M2 site. Concurrently, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. Lastly, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer. PMID:26585512

  4. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  5. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, C; DeLong, A; Deruére, J; Bernasconi, P; Söll, D

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Images PMID:8641277

  6. The Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Twins stabilizes Plk4 to induce centriole amplification

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, Christopher W.; Klebba, Joey E.; Buster, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Centriole duplication is a tightly regulated process that must occur only once per cell cycle; otherwise, supernumerary centrioles can induce aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) activity initiates centriole duplication and is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Throughout interphase, Plk4 autophosphorylation triggers its degradation, thus preventing centriole amplification. However, Plk4 activity is required during mitosis for proper centriole duplication, but the mechanism stabilizing mitotic Plk4 is unknown. In this paper, we show that PP2A (Protein Phosphatase 2ATwins) counteracts Plk4 autophosphorylation, thus stabilizing Plk4 and promoting centriole duplication. Like Plk4, the protein level of PP2A’s regulatory subunit, Twins (Tws), peaks during mitosis and is required for centriole duplication. However, untimely Tws expression stabilizes Plk4 inappropriately, inducing centriole amplification. Paradoxically, expression of tumor-promoting simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (ST), a reported PP2A inhibitor, promotes centrosome amplification by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that ST actually mimics Tws function in stabilizing Plk4 and inducing centriole amplification. PMID:21987638

  7. The zinc finger protein ZNF297B interacts with BDP1, a subunit of TFIIIB.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Frank; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2006-03-01

    The human gene BDP1, localized on chromosome 5q13 in close proximity to the spinal muscular atrophy determining gene SMN, encodes a large protein consisting of 2254 amino acids (aa). In the first third of the gene, the subunit of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription factor complex (TFIIIB alpha/beta) is encoded. To further characterize the function of BDP1, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using various parts of BDP1. With the clone BDP1-(1-640) we identified a novel interaction partner, ZNF297B. The ZNF297B gene is localized on chromosome 9q24 and encodes a zinc finger protein of 467 aa possessing the typical structure of a transcription factor. The interaction found in yeast was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and refined to the N-terminal region of ZNF297B-(1-127) containing the BTB/POZ domain and the N-terminal end of BDP1-(1-299). The ZNF297B transcript is 5.7 kb in length and ubiquitously expressed, with highest levels found in muscles. Immunofluorescence staining revealed a speckled pattern in the nuclei of HEK293 cells. Due to the essential role of BDP1 in Pol III transcription, we propose that ZNF297B may also regulate these transcriptional pathways. PMID:16542149

  8. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  9. miR-200c dampens cancer cell migration via regulation of protein kinase A subunits.

    PubMed

    Sigloch, Florian Christoph; Burk, Ulrike Christina; Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Brabletz, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-09-15

    Expression of miR-200c is a molecular switch to determine cellular fate towards a mesenchymal or epithelial phenotype. miR-200c suppresses the early steps of tumor progression by preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and intravasation of tumor cells. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms might pinpoint to novel therapeutic options. To better understand these mechanisms it is crucial to identify targets of miR-200c. Here, we employ a combination of quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic strategies to identify novel miR-200c targets. We identify and confirm two subunits of the central cellular kinase protein kinase A (PKA), namely PRKAR1A and PRKACB, to be directly regulated by miR-200c. Notably, siRNA-mediated downregulation of both proteins phenocopies the migratory behavior of breast cancer cells after miR-200c overexpression. Patient data from publicly accessible databases supports a miR-200c-PKA axis. Thus, our study identifies the PKA heteroprotein as an important mediator of miR-200c induced repression of migration in breast cancer cells. By bioinformatics, we define a miRNA target cluster consisting of PRKAR1A, PRKAR2B, PRKACB, and COF2, which is targeted by a group of 14 miRNAs. PMID:26203557

  10. miR-200c dampens cancer cell migration via regulation of protein kinase a subunits

    PubMed Central

    Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Brabletz, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Expression of miR-200c is a molecular switch to determine cellular fate towards a mesenchymal or epithelial phenotype. miR-200c suppresses the early steps of tumor progression by preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and intravasation of tumor cells. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms might pinpoint to novel therapeutic options. To better understand these mechanisms it is crucial to identify targets of miR-200c. Here, we employ a combination of quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic strategies to identify novel miR-200c targets. We identify and confirm two subunits of the central cellular kinase protein kinase A (PKA), namely PRKAR1A and PRKACB, to be directly regulated by miR-200c. Notably, siRNA-mediated downregulation of both proteins phenocopies the migratory behavior of breast cancer cells after miR-200c overexpression. Patient data from publicly accessible databases supports a miR-200c-PKA axis. Thus, our study identifies the PKA heteroprotein as an important mediator of miR-200c induced repression of migration in breast cancer cells. By bioinformatics, we define a miRNA target cluster consisting of PRKAR1A, PRKAR2B, PRKACB, and COF2, which is targeted by a group of 14 miRNAs. PMID:26203557

  11. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  12. Signal transduction by Tga3, a novel G protein alpha subunit of Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Susanne; Reithner, Barbara; Scala, Valeria; Peissl, Isabel; Lorito, Matteo; Mach, Robert L

    2005-03-01

    Trichoderma species are used commercially as biocontrol agents against a number of phytopathogenic fungi due to their mycoparasitic characterisitics. The mycoparasitic response is induced when Trichoderma specifically recognizes the presence of the host fungus and transduces the host-derived signals to their respective regulatory targets. We made deletion mutants of the tga3 gene of Trichoderma atroviride, which encodes a novel G protein alpha subunit that belongs to subgroup III of fungal Galpha proteins. Deltatga3 mutants had changes in vegetative growth, conidiation, and conidial germination and reduced intracellular cyclic AMP levels. These mutants were avirulent in direct confrontation assays with Rhizoctonia solani or Botrytis cinerea, and mycoparasitism-related infection structures were not formed. When induced with colloidal chitin or N-acetylglucosamine in liquid culture, the mutants had reduced extracellular chitinase activity even though the chitinase-encoding genes ech42 and nag1 were transcribed at a significantly higher rate than they were in the wild type. Addition of exogenous cyclic AMP did not suppress the altered phenotype or restore mycoparasitic overgrowth, although it did restore the ability to produce the infection structures. Thus, T. atroviride Tga3 has a general role in vegetative growth and can alter mycoparasitism-related characteristics, such as infection structure formation and chitinase gene expression. PMID:15746364

  13. Musashi1 Impacts Radio-Resistance in Glioblastoma by Controlling DNA-Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Patricia Rosa; Gorthi, Aparna; da Silva, Acarizia E; Tonapi, Sonal S; Vo, Dat T; Burns, Suzanne C; Qiao, Mei; Uren, Philip J; Yuan, Zhi-Min; Bishop, Alexander J R; Penalva, Luiz O F

    2016-09-01

    The conserved RNA-binding protein Musashi1 (MSI1) has been characterized as a stem cell marker, controlling the balance between self-renewal and differentiation and as a key oncogenic factor in numerous solid tumors, including glioblastoma. To explore the potential use of MSI1 targeting in therapy, we studied MSI1 in the context of radiation sensitivity. Knockdown of MSI1 led to a decrease in cell survival and an increase in DNA damage compared to control in cells treated with ionizing radiation. We subsequently examined mechanisms of double-strand break repair and found that loss of MSI1 reduces the frequency of nonhomologous end-joining. This phenomenon could be attributed to the decreased expression of DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit, which we have previously identified as a target of MSI1. Collectively, our results suggest a role for MSI1 in double-strand break repair and that its inhibition may enhance the effect of radiotherapy. PMID:27470713

  14. Analysis of r-protein and RNA conformation of 30S subunit intermediates in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Nathan; Culver, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large macromolecular complex that must be assembled efficiently and accurately for the viability of all organisms. In bacteria, this process must be robust and tunable to support life in diverse conditions from the ice of arctic glaciers to thermal hot springs. Assembly of the Small ribosomal SUbunit (SSU) of Escherichia coli has been extensively studied and is highly temperature-dependent. However, a lack of data on SSU assembly for other bacteria is problematic given the importance of the ribosome in bacterial physiology. To broaden the understanding of how optimal growth temperature may affect SSU assembly, in vitro SSU assembly of two thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus kaustophilus and Thermus thermophilus, was compared with that of E. coli. Using these phylogenetically, morphologically, and environmentally diverse bacteria, we show that SSU assembly is highly temperature-dependent and efficient SSU assembly occurs at different temperatures for each organism. Surprisingly, the assembly landscape is characterized by at least two distinct intermediate populations in the organisms tested. This novel, second intermediate, is formed in the presence of the full complement of r-proteins, unlike the previously observed RI* particle formed in the absence of late-binding r-proteins in E. coli. This work reveals multiple distinct intermediate populations are present during SSU assembly in vitro for several bacteria, yielding insights into RNP formation and possible antimicrobial development toward this common SSU target. PMID:25999315

  15. Unintended consequences? Water molecules at biological and crystallographic protein-protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mostafa H; Habtemariam, Mesay; Safo, Martin K; Scarsdale, J Neel; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Kellogg, Glen E

    2013-12-01

    The importance of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly appreciated, as these interactions lie at the core of virtually every biological process. Small molecule modulators that target PPIs are under exploration as new therapies. One of the greatest obstacles faced in crystallographically determining the 3D structures of proteins is coaxing the proteins to form "artificial" PPIs that lead to uniform crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction. This work compares interactions formed naturally, i.e., "biological", with those artificially formed under crystallization conditions or "non-biological". In particular, a detailed analysis of water molecules at the interfaces of high-resolution (≤2.30 Å) X-ray crystal structures of protein-protein complexes, where 140 are biological protein-protein complex structures and 112 include non-biological protein-protein interfaces, was carried out using modeling tools based on the HINT forcefield. Surprisingly few and relatively subtle differences were observed between the two types of interfaces: (i) non-biological interfaces are more polar than biological interfaces, yet there is better organized hydrogen bonding at the latter; (ii) biological associations rely more on water-mediated interactions with backbone atoms compared to non-biological associations; (iii) aromatic/planar residues play a larger role in biological associations with respect to water, and (iv) Lys has a particularly large role at non-biological interfaces. A support vector machines (SVMs) classifier using descriptors from this study was devised that was able to correctly classify 84% of the two interface types. PMID:24076743

  16. Rpm2, the protein subunit of mitochondrial RNase P in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also has a role in the translation of mitochondrially encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Stribinskis, V; Gao, G J; Ellis, S R; Martin, N C

    2001-01-01

    RPM2 is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear gene that encodes the protein subunit of mitochondrial RNase P and has an unknown function essential for fermentative growth. Cells lacking mitochondrial RNase P cannot respire and accumulate lesions in their mitochondrial DNA. The effects of a new RPM2 allele, rpm2-100, reveal a novel function of RPM2 in mitochondrial biogenesis. Cells with rpm2-100 as their only source of Rpm2p have correctly processed mitochondrial tRNAs but are still respiratory deficient. Mitochondrial mRNA and rRNA levels are reduced in rpm2-100 cells compared to wild type. The general reduction in mRNA is not reflected in a similar reduction in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Incorporation of labeled precursors into mitochondrially encoded Atp6, Atp8, Atp9, and Cytb protein was enhanced in the mutant relative to wild type, while incorporation into Cox1p, Cox2p, Cox3p, and Var1p was reduced. Pulse-chase analysis of mitochondrial translation revealed decreased rates of translation of COX1, COX2, and COX3 mRNAs. This decrease leads to low steady-state levels of Cox1p, Cox2p, and Cox3p, loss of visible spectra of aa(3) cytochromes, and low cytochrome c oxidase activity in mutant mitochondria. Thus, RPM2 has a previously unrecognized role in mitochondrial biogenesis, in addition to its role as a subunit of mitochondrial RNase P. Moreover, there is a synthetic lethal interaction between the disruption of this novel respiratory function and the loss of wild-type mtDNA. This synthetic interaction explains why a complete deletion of RPM2 is lethal. PMID:11404323

  17. Inactivation of the protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A results in morphological and transcriptional defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, W; Huang, W; Sneddon, A A; Stark, M; Camier, S; Werner, M; Marck, C; Sentenac, A; Broach, J R

    1992-01-01

    We have determined that TPD3, a gene previously identified in a screen for mutants defective in tRNA biosynthesis, most likely encodes the A regulatory subunit of the major protein phosphatase 2A species in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The predicted amino acid sequence of the product of TPD3 is highly homologous to the sequence of the mammalian A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, antibodies raised against Tpd3p specifically precipitate a significant fraction of the protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell, and extracts of tpd3 strains yield a different chromatographic profile of protein phosphatase 2A than do extracts of isogenic TPD3 strains. tpd3 deletion strains generally grow poorly and have at least two distinct phenotypes. At reduced temperatures, tpd3 strains appear to be defective in cytokinesis, since most cells become multibudded and multinucleate following a shift to 13 degrees C. This is similar to the phenotype obtained by overexpression of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit or by loss of CDC55, a gene that encodes a protein with homology to a second regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A. At elevated temperatures, tpd3 strains are defective in transcription by RNA polymerase III. Consistent with this in vivo phenotype, extracts of tpd3 strains fail to support in vitro transcription of tRNA genes, a defect that can be reversed by addition of either purified RNA polymerase III or TFIIIB. These results reinforce the notion that protein phosphatase 2A affects a variety of biological processes in the cell and provide an initial identification of critical substrates for this phosphatase. Images PMID:1328868

  18. Moving Iron through ferritin protein nanocages depends on residues throughout each four α-helix bundle subunit.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Suranjana; Bevers, Loes E; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-07-22

    Eukaryotic H ferritins move iron through protein cages to form biologically required, iron mineral concentrates. The biominerals are synthesized during protein-based Fe²⁺/O₂ oxidoreduction and formation of [Fe³⁺O](n) multimers within the protein cage, en route to the cavity, at sites distributed over ~50 Å. Recent NMR and Co²⁺-protein x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies identified the entire iron path and new metal-protein interactions: (i) lines of metal ions in 8 Fe²⁺ ion entry channels with three-way metal distribution points at channel exits and (ii) interior Fe³⁺O nucleation channels. To obtain functional information on the newly identified metal-protein interactions, we analyzed effects of amino acid substitution on formation of the earliest catalytic intermediate (diferric peroxo-A(650 nm)) and on mineral growth (Fe³⁺O-A(350 nm)), in A26S, V42G, D127A, E130A, and T149C. The results show that all of the residues influenced catalysis significantly (p < 0.01), with effects on four functions: (i) Fe²⁺ access/selectivity to the active sites (Glu¹³⁰), (ii) distribution of Fe²⁺ to each of the three active sites near each ion channel (Asp¹²⁷), (iii) product (diferric oxo) release into the Fe³⁺O nucleation channels (Ala²⁶), and (iv) [Fe³⁺O](n) transit through subunits (Val⁴², Thr¹⁴⁹). Synthesis of ferritin biominerals depends on residues along the entire length of H subunits from Fe²⁺ substrate entry at 3-fold cage axes at one subunit end through active sites and nucleation channels, at the other subunit end, inside the cage at 4-fold cage axes. Ferritin subunit-subunit geometry contributes to mineral order and explains the physiological impact of ferritin H and L subunits. PMID:21592958

  19. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  20. Immunogenicity of IMS 1113 plus soluble subunit and chimeric proteins containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae P97 C-terminal repeat regions.

    PubMed

    Barate, Abhijit K; Cho, Youngjae; Truong, Quang Lam; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2014-03-01

    The surface adhesin P97 mediates the adherence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to swine cilia. Two reiterated repeats R1 and R2 are located at the C-terminus of P97. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immunogenicity of Montanide adjuvant IMS 1113 plus soluble subunit proteins rR1, rR1R2 and their chimeric forms coupled with B subunit of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTB). Each recombinant protein in this study was capable of eliciting anti-R1 specific humoral antibodies (IgG), mucosal antibodies (IgG and IgA) and IFN-γ production. The chimeric protein rLTBR1R2 elicited the quickest humoral antibody response among the recombinant proteins. Serum and bronchoalveolar lavage analysis revealed that each recombinant protein was capable of inducing both Th1 and Th2 responses. Importantly, all of the proteins induced an anti-R1-specific Th2-biased response in both humoral and mucosal compartments, similar to the response observed in a natural infection or vaccination process. These observations indicate that rR1, rR1R2, rLTBR1 and rLTBR1R2 with IMS 1113 might represent a promising subunit vaccine strategy against porcine enzootic pneumonia in pigs. PMID:24461070

  1. Tax1-binding protein 1 is expressed in the retina and interacts with the GABAC receptor ρ1 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Melanie; Seeber, Silke; Becker, Cord-Michael; Enz, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Macromolecular signalling complexes that link neurotransmitter receptors to functionally and structurally associated proteins play an important role in the regulation of neurotransmission. Thus the identification of proteins binding to neurotransmitter receptors describes molecular mechanisms of synaptic signal transduction. To identify interacting proteins of GABAC (where GABA is γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors in the retina, we used antibodies specific for GABAC receptor ρ1–3 subunits. Analysis of immunoprecipitated proteins by MALDI–TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight MS) identified the liver regeneration-related protein 2 that is identical with amino acids 253–813 of the Tax1BP1 (Tax1-binding protein 1). A C-terminal region of Tax1BP1 bound to an intracellular domain of the ρ1 subunit, but not to other subunits of GABAC, GABAA or glycine receptors. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy demonstrated co-localization of Tax1BP1 and ρ1 in clusters at the cell membrane of transfected cells. Furthermore, Tax1BP1 and GABAC receptors were co-expressed in both synaptic layers of the retina, indicating that Tax1BP1 is a component of GABAC receptor-containing signal complexes. PMID:16999686

  2. Analysis of the interface variability in NMR structure ensembles of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Calvanese, Luisa; D'Auria, Gabriella; Vangone, Anna; Falcigno, Lucia; Oliva, Romina

    2016-06-01

    NMR structures consist in ensembles of conformers, all satisfying the experimental restraints, which exhibit a certain degree of structural variability. We analyzed here the interface in NMR ensembles of protein-protein heterodimeric complexes and found it to span a wide range of different conservations. The different exhibited conservations do not simply correlate with the size of the systems/interfaces, and are most probably the result of an interplay between different factors, including the quality of experimental data and the intrinsic complex flexibility. In any case, this information is not to be missed when NMR structures of protein-protein complexes are analyzed; especially considering that, as we also show here, the first NMR conformer is usually not the one which best reflects the overall interface. To quantify the interface conservation and to analyze it, we used an approach originally conceived for the analysis and ranking of ensembles of docking models, which has now been extended to directly deal with NMR ensembles. We propose this approach, based on the conservation of the inter-residue contacts at the interface, both for the analysis of the interface in whole ensembles of NMR complexes and for the possible selection of a single conformer as the best representative of the overall interface. In order to make the analyses automatic and fast, we made the protocol available as a web tool at: https://www.molnac.unisa.it/BioTools/consrank/consrank-nmr.html. PMID:26968364

  3. SLIRP stabilizes LRPPRC via an RRM-PPR protein interface.

    PubMed

    Spåhr, Henrik; Rozanska, Agata; Li, Xinping; Atanassov, Ilian; Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Rackham, Oliver; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-08-19

    LRPPRC is a protein that has attracted interest both for its role in post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and more recently because numerous mutated variants have been characterized as causing severe infantile mitochondrial neurodegeneration. LRPPRC belongs to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family, originally defined by their RNA binding capacity, and forms a complex with SLIRP that harbours an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain. We show here that LRPPRC displays a broad and strong RNA binding capacity in vitro in contrast to SLIRP that associates only weakly with RNA. The LRPPRC-SLIRP complex comprises a hetero-dimer via interactions by polar amino acids in the single RRM domain of SLIRP and three neighbouring PPR motifs in the second quarter of LRPPRC, which critically contribute to the LRPPRC-SLIRP binding interface to enhance its stability. Unexpectedly, specific amino acids at this interface are located within the PPRs of LRPPRC at positions predicted to interact with RNA and within the RNP1 motif of SLIRP's RRM domain. Our findings thus unexpectedly establish that despite the prediction that these residues in LRPPRC and SLIRP should bind RNA, they are instead used to facilitate protein-protein interactions, enabling the formation of a stable complex between these two proteins. PMID:27353330

  4. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  5. Expression of protein kinase A regulatory subunits in benign and malignant human thyroid tissues: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Lania, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms and prognostic implications of the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in human tumors, with special emphasis on the malignant thyroid. The PKA signaling pathway is differentially activated by the expression of regulatory subunits 1 (R1) and 2 (R2), whose levels change during development, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Following the identification of gene mutations within the PKA regulatory subunit R1A (PRKAR1A) that cause Carney complex-associated neoplasms, several investigators have studied PRKAR1A expression in sporadic thyroid tumors. The PKA regulatory subunit R2B (PRKAR2B) is highly expressed in benign, as well as in malignant differentiated and undifferentiated lesions. PRKAR1A is highly expressed in follicular adenomas and malignant lesions with a statistically significant gradient between benign and malignant tumors; however, it is not expressed in hyperplastic nodules. Although the importance of PKA in human malignancy outcomes is not completely understood, PRKAR1A expression correlates with tumor dimension in malignant lesions. Additional studies are needed to determine whether a relationship exists between PKA subunit expression and clinical outcomes, particularly in undifferentiated tumors. In conclusion, the R1A subunit might be a good molecular candidate for the targeted treatment of malignant thyroid tumors. PMID:27321957

  6. Proteins at flowing interfaces: From understanding structure to treating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Young, James; Hirsa, Amir

    2012-11-01

    The field of soft matter offers vast opportunities for scientific and technological developments, with many challenges that need to be addressed by various disciplines. Fluid dynamics has a tremendous potential for greater impact, from broadening fundamental understanding to treating disease. Here we demonstrate the use of fluid dynamics in two biotechnology problems involving proteins at the air/water interface: a) 2-Dimensional protein crystallization and b) amyloid fibril formation. Protein crystallization is usually the most challenging step in X-ray diffraction analysis of protein structure. Recently it was demonstrated that flow can induce 2-D protein crystallization at conditions under which quiescent systems do not form crystals. A different form of protein structuring, namely amyloid fibrillization, is also of interest due to its association with several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein denaturation, which is the root of the fibrillization process, is also a significant concern in biotherapeutics production. Both problems are studied by using shearing free-surface flows in simple geometries. The common finding is that flow can significantly enhance the growth of protein structures.

  7. Histidine Methylation of Yeast Ribosomal Protein Rpl3p Is Required for Proper 60S Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadid, Qais; Roy, Kevin; Munroe, William; Dzialo, Maria C.; Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2014-01-01

    Histidine protein methylation is an unusual posttranslational modification. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the large ribosomal subunit protein Rpl3p is methylated at histidine 243, a residue that contacts the 25S rRNA near the P site. Rpl3p methylation is dependent upon the presence of Hpm1p, a candidate seven-beta-strand methyltransferase. In this study, we elucidated the biological activities of Hpm1p in vitro and in vivo. Amino acid analyses reveal that Hpm1p is responsible for all of the detectable protein histidine methylation in yeast. The modification is found on a polypeptide corresponding to the size of Rpl3p in ribosomes and in a nucleus-containing organelle fraction but was not detected in proteins of the ribosome-free cytosol fraction. In vitro assays demonstrate that Hpm1p has methyltransferase activity on ribosome-associated but not free Rpl3p, suggesting that its activity depends on interactions with ribosomal components. hpm1 null cells are defective in early rRNA processing, resulting in a deficiency of 60S subunits and translation initiation defects that are exacerbated in minimal medium. Cells lacking Hpm1p are resistant to cycloheximide and verrucarin A and have decreased translational fidelity. We propose that Hpm1p plays a role in the orchestration of the early assembly of the large ribosomal subunit and in faithful protein production. PMID:24865971

  8. Glucagon induces disaggregation of polymer-like structures of the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory G protein in liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Rodbell, M. )

    1991-08-15

    The hydrodynamic behavior of G{alpha}{sub s}, the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein), in octyl glucoside extracts of rat liver membranes was investigated. As was previously shown for G proteins similarly extracted from brain synaptoneurosomes, G{alpha}{sub s} behaved as polydisperse structures with S values higher than that of heterotrimeric G proteins. When G{alpha}{sub s} in its membrane-bound form was ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin and the treated membranes were extracted with octyl glucoside, > 35% of the labeled G{alpha}{sub s} was found in material that sedimented through sucrose gradients and contained relatively low levels of immunoreactive G{alpha}{sub s}. These finding suggest that the glucagon receptor selectivity interacts with polymer-like structures of G{alpha}{sub 2} and that activation by GTP({gamma}S) results in disaggregation. The role of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of G proteins in the hormone-induced process is not clear since the polymer-like structures extracted with octyl glucoside are devoid of {beta} and {gamma} subunits.

  9. Evolution, Expression Differentiation and Interaction Specificity of Heterotrimeric G-Protein Subunit Gene Family in the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Gulab C.; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID

  10. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Arya, Gulab C; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID