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Sample records for proteins primary radicals

  1. Primary radical yields in pulse irradiated alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielden, E. M.; Hart, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primary radical yields of hydrated electrons, H atoms, and OH radicals are determined by measuring hydrated electron formation following a 4 microsecond pulse of X rays. The pH dependence of free radical yields beyond pH 12 is determined by observation of the hydrated electrons.

  2. Radical Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Vaginectomy for Primary Vaginal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozgul, Nejat; Basaran, Derman; Boyraz, Gokhan; Salman, Coskun; Yuce, Kunter

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this surgical video is to demonstrate en bloc radical removal of uterus and vagina in a patient with clinical early-stage vaginal cancer. Surgical treatment was offered to our patient for clinical early-stage primary vaginal cancer. An en bloc radical hysterectomy, systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy, and total abdominal vaginectomy were performed. Postoperative adjuvant radiation or chemotherapy was not recommended for completely resected pathologic stage I disease with no lymph node involvement and negative surgical margins. Radical surgery can be a treatment option for selected patients with primary vaginal cancer. PMID:26825828

  3. Hydroxyl Radical Dosimetry for High Flux Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Applications Using a Simple Optical Detection Method.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) is a powerful benchtop tool used to probe protein structure, interactions, and conformational changes in solution. However, the reproducibility of all HRPF techniques is limited by the ability to deliver a defined concentration of hydroxyl radicals to the protein. This ability is impacted by both the amount of radical generated and the presence of radical scavengers in solution. In order to compare HRPF data from sample to sample, a hydroxyl radical dosimeter is needed that can measure the effective concentration of radical that is delivered to the protein, after accounting for both differences in hydroxyl radical generation and nonanalyte radical consumption. Here, we test three radical dosimeters (Alexa Fluor 488, terepthalic acid, and adenine) for their ability to quantitatively measure the effective radical dose under the high radical concentration conditions of FPOP. Adenine has a quantitative relationship between UV spectrophotometric response, effective hydroxyl radical dose delivered, and peptide and protein oxidation levels over the range of radical concentrations typically encountered in FPOP. The simplicity of an adenine-based dosimeter allows for convenient and flexible incorporation into FPOP applications, and the ability to accurately measure the delivered radical dose will enable reproducible and reliable FPOP across a variety of platforms and applications. PMID:26455423

  4. Absence of an effect of vitamin E on protein and lipid radical formation during lipoperoxidation of LDL by lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ganini, Douglas; Mason, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    LDL oxidation is the primary event in atherosclerosis, where LDL lipoperoxidation leads to modifications in the apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100) and lipids. Intermediate species of lipoperoxidation are known to be able to generate amino acid-centered radicals. Thus, we hypothesized that lipoperoxidation intermediates induce protein-derived free radical formation during LDL oxidation. Using DMPO and immuno spin-trapping, we detected the formation of protein free radicals on LDL incubated with Cu2+ or the soybean lipoxidase (LPOx)/phospholipase A2 (PLA2). With low concentrations of DMPO (1 mM), Cu2+ dose-dependently induced oxidation of LDL and easily detected apo B-100 radicals. Protein radical formation in LDL incubated with Cu2+ showed maximum yields after 30 minutes. In contrast, the yields of apo B-100-radicals formed by LPOx/PLA2 followed a typical enzyme-catalyzed kinetics that was unaffected by DMPO concentrations of up to 50 mM. Furthermore, when we analyzed the effect of antioxidants on protein radical formation during LDL oxidation, we found that ascorbate, urate and Trolox dose-dependently reduced apo B-100-free radical formation in LDL exposed to Cu2+. In contrast, Trolox was the only antioxidant that even partially protected LDL from LPOx/PLA2. We also examined the kinetics of lipid radical formation and protein radical formation induced by Cu2+ or LPOx/PLA2 for LDL supplemented with α-tocopherol. In contrast to the potent antioxidant effect of α-tocopherol on the delay of LDL oxidation induced by Cu2+, when we used the oxidizing system LPOx/PLA2, no significant protection was detected. The lack of protection of α-tocopherol on the apo B-100 and lipid free radical formation by LPOx may explain the failure of vitamin E as a cardiovascular protective agent for humans. PMID:25091900

  5. [Reasons of non-radical surgery for patients with primary skin melanoma].

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, A A; Gafmon, G I; Anisimov, V V; Semiletova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    It was found that up to now a significant number of patients with primary skin melanoma continued to have non-radical surgery. Based on the analysis of clinical and morphological data on 288 of these patients it was revealed that most non-radical treatment was performed for patients who had had primary skin melanoma of linear dimensions of 1 cm and a pink color. It was proved that patients with tumors of the skin should first be examined by the oncologist. A lack of knowledge of semiotics of primary skin melanoma was revealed among doctors. Widely used diagnostic biopsy of the primary tumor with subsequent cytology is recommended. PMID:24919268

  6. (Bi)sulfite Oxidation by Copper,Zinc-Superoxide Dismutase: Sulfite-Derived, Radical-Initiated Protein Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sulfur dioxide, formed during the combustion of fossil fuels, is a major air pollutant near large cities. Its two ionized forms in aqueous solution, sulfite and (bi)sulfite, are widely used as preservatives and antioxidants to prevent food and beverage spoilage. (Bi)sulfite can be oxidized by peroxidases to form the very reactive sulfur trioxide anion radical (•SO3−). This free radical further reacts with oxygen to form the peroxymonosulfate anion radical (−O3SOO•) and sulfate anion radical (SO4• −). Objective To explore the critical role of these radical intermediates in further oxidizing biomolecules, we examined the ability of copper,zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) to initiate this radical chain reaction, using human serum albumin (HSA) as a model target. Methods We used electron paramagnetic resonance, optical spectroscopy, oxygen uptake, and immuno-spin trapping to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. Results We found that when Cu,Zn-SOD reacted with (bi)sulfite, •SO3− was produced, with the concomitant reduction of SOD-Cu(II) to SOD-Cu(I). Further, we demonstrated that sulfite oxidation mediated by Cu,Zn-SOD induced the formation of radical-derived 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin-trapped HSA radicals. Conclusions The present study suggests that protein oxidative damage resulting from (bi)sulfite oxidation promoted by Cu,Zn-SOD could be involved in oxidative damage and tissue injury in (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions. PMID:20348042

  7. Free-radical-mediated protein inactivation and recovery during protein photoencapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chi; Sawicki, Suzanne M; Metters, Andrew T

    2008-01-01

    Photoencapsulation of protein therapeutics is very attractive for preparing biomolecule-loaded hydrogels for a variety of biomedical applications. However, detrimental effects of highly active radical species generated during photoencapsulation must be carefully evaluated to maintain efficient hydrogel cross-linking while preserving the structure and bioactivity of encapsulated biomolecules. Here, we examine the free-radical-mediated inactivation and incomplete release of proteins from photocurable hydrogels utilizing lysozyme as a conservative model system. Various protein photoencapsulation conditions were tested to determine the factors affecting lysozyme structural integrity and bioactivity. It was found that a portion of the lysozyme becomes conjugated to polymer chains at high photoinitiator concentrations and long polymerization times. We also found that the more hydrophilic photoinitiator Irgacure-2959 (I-2959, 2-hydroxy-1-[4-(hydroxyethoxy)phenyl]-2-methyl-1-propanone) causes more damage to lysozyme compared to the hydrophobic photoinitiator Irgacure-651 (I-651, 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenylacetophenone), even though I-2959 has been previously shown to be more cytocompatible. Furthermore, while nonacrylated PEG provides only limited protection from the denaturing free radicals that are present during hydrogel curing, acrylated PEG macromers effectively preserve lysozyme structural integrity and bioactivity in the presence of either photoinitiator. Overall, these findings indicate how photopolymerization conditions (e.g., photoinitiator type and concentration, UV exposure time, etc.) must be optimized to obtain a functional hydrogel device that can preserve protein bioactivity and provide maximal protein release. PMID:18088094

  8. Primary Reactions in Retinal Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, R.

    Conversion of sunlight into energy or information and their storage on a chemical level is essential for life on earth. An important family of chromoproteins performing these tasks is that of retinal binding proteins. Prominent examples are rhodopsin (Rh) [1,2] as the visual pigment in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, the archaeal rhodopsins bacteriorhodopsin (BR) [3] as a light driven proton pump, halorhodopsin (HR) [4,5] as a light driven chloride pump, sensory rhodopsin I and II (SRI, SRII) [6] as photoreceptors, and proteorhodopsin (PR) [7] as another bacterial proton pump.

  9. Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols.

    PubMed

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne N; Skibsted, Leif H; Davies, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    Radical transfer from perferrylmyoglobin to other target species (myofibrillar proteins, MPI) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), extracts from green tea (GTE), maté (ME), and rosemary (RE), and three phenolic compounds, catechin, caffeic acid, and carnosic acid) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the concentrations of plant extracts required to protect against protein oxidation. Blocking of MPI thiol groups by N-ethylmaleimide was found to reduce the rate of reaction of MPI with perferrylmyoglobin radicals, signifying the importance of protein thiols as radical scavengers. GTE had the highest phenolic content of the three extracts and was most effective as a radical scavenger. IC50 values indicated that the molar ratio between phenols in plant extract and MPI thiols needs to be >15 in order to obtain efficient protection against protein-to-protein radical transfer in meat. Caffeic acid was found most effective among the plant phenols. PMID:25343706

  10. Hearing outcomes following primary malleostapedial rotation ossiculoplasty in patients undergoing modified radical mastoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kanegaonkar, RG; Najuko-Mafemera, A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of cholesteatoma consists of either excision or exteriorisation of disease. Approaches have traditionally included a radical or modified radical mastoidectomy and combined approach tympanoplasty. Hearing thresholds following a modified radical mastoidectomy alone have been reported as poor. We assessed hearing outcomes in patients undergoing a primary malleostapedial reconstruction combined with their open cavity surgery. Methods All patients undergoing open cavity mastoidectomy with primary malleostapedial rotation ossiculoplasty between 2009 and 2013 were identified. Case notes were reviewed, and demographic data, recurrence rate and audiometry were recorded. Results Twenty-one patients were identified. The age range was 10–65 years. There was no evidence of recurrence of cholesteatoma. The mean postoperative air-bone gap was 20dBHL, 23dBHL, 10dBHL and 27dBHL at 0.5kHz, 1kHz, 2kHz and 4kHz respectively. Excluding cases consistent with a postoperative ossicular discontinuity (n=3), the mean postoperative air-bone gap was 15dBHL, 19dBHL, 8dBHL and 26dBHL at 0.5kHz, 1kHz, 2kHz and 4kHz respectively. Conclusions The improvement in hearing thresholds demonstrated in this cohort of patients supports the use of this form of ossiculoplasty in those undergoing open cavity procedures. This would also suggest that the subsequent use of hearing aids in these patients would require less amplification and therefore provide superior hearing outcomes. As hearing loss remains a significant concern following modified radical mastoidectomy, we suggest an open cavity with primary malleostapedial rotation ossiculoplasty as a viable alternative to modified radical mastoidectomy alone, in selected cases. PMID:25198979

  11. Primary quantum yields of ketyl radicals in photoreduction by amines. Abstraction of H from N

    SciTech Connect

    Inbar, S.; Linschitz, H.; Cohen, S.G.

    1980-02-13

    Results of laser flash photolysis studies of the primary reaction of benzophenone triplet with aliphatic amines in benzene solution are reported. Quantum yield of formation of benzophenone ketyl radical was 0.9 - 1.0. Quantum yields for reduction of ketone also were determined for various amines, and the effects of tert-butyl alcohol on radical formation was investigated. Data indicated that H is not abstracted from -CH/sub 3/ but is abstracted efficiently from -NH/sub 2/. The very high quantum yields observed with tertiary and secondary amines were thought to imply exciplex formation, but lower quantum yields with primary amines were conditionally attributed to higher ionization potentials. (BLM)

  12. Photolysis of nitrous acid as a primary source of OH radicals indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C.; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker, C.; Fittschen, C. M.; Doussin, J.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    reactions, potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. This calculation indicates that, since the levels of concentration of OH radicals found in this study are one order of magnitude higher than predicted before, reactivity with OH becomes relevant as these reactions take place during a smaller time scale than typical air exchange rates indoors. Gómez Alvarez, E.; Amedro, D.; Afif, C. ; Gligorovski, S.; Schoemacker , C.; Fittschen, C. ; Doussin, J. F.; Wortham, H. (2013) Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Accepted.

  13. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  14. Radicality of initial surgery for primary malignant melanoma of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Todo, Yukiharu; Okamoto, Kazuhira; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Minobe, Shinichiro; Kato, Hidenori

    2016-04-01

    Radical surgery is considered not to improve the prognosis of primary malignant melanoma of the vagina (PMMV). This study was carried out to review the general consensus. A systematic review was performed on the basis of data from 10 patients in our cohort and 147 patients in the previous literature. The radicality of the initial surgery (RAINS) score was defined as the total number of points in terms of the resected organs. The target organs were the vagina, vulva, urethra, bladder, uterus, anus, rectum, pelvic lymph nodes, and inguinal lymph nodes. Overall survival (OS) according to the RAINS score was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Information on tumor stage, size, and depth of invasion was not obtained in 15, 47, and 43% of patients, respectively. The median follow-up period was 18 months. OS with a RAINS score of at least 7 was significantly longer than that with a RAINS score of up to 6 (median survival time, 41 vs. 19 months; log-rank test, P=0.037), despite the fact that the former group included significantly more patients with advanced-stage disease. A significant difference in OS was not found between patients with a RAINS score of at least 6 and up to 5. The therapeutic significance of radical surgery for PMMV has not been assessed appropriately in previous studies because of the lack of comparability among groups and differences in the definitions of surgical radicality. Patients with PMMV might benefit from initial surgery with appropriate surgical radicality, despite incomplete validation of the RAINS score. PMID:26825038

  15. Detection Of Ras GTPase Protein Radicals Through Immuno-Spin Trapping*

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael F.; Zhou, Li; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Ranguelova, Kalina; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Chen, Xian; Bonini, Marcelo; Mason, Ronald P.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade immuno-spin trapping (IST) has been used to detect and identify protein radical sites in numerous heme and metalloproteins. To date, however, the technique has had little application toward non-metalloproteins. In this study, we demonstrate the successful application of IST in a system free of transition metals and present the first conclusive evidence of ·NO-mediated protein radical formation in the HRas GTPase. HRas is a non-metalloprotein that plays a critical role in regulating cell growth control. Protein radical formation in Ras GTPases has long been suspected of initiating premature release of bound guanine nucleotide. This action results in altered Ras activity both in vitro and in vivo. As described herein, successful application of IST may provide a means for detecting and identifying radical-mediated Ras activation in many different cancers and disease states where Ras GTPases play an important role. PMID:22819983

  16. Artifacts Generated During Azoalkane Peroxy Radical Oxidative Stress Testing of Pharmaceuticals Containing Primary and Secondary Amines.

    PubMed

    Nefliu, Marcela; Zelesky, Todd; Jansen, Patrick; Sluggett, Gregory W; Foti, Christopher; Baertschi, Steven W; Harmon, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    We report artifactual degradation of pharmaceutical compounds containing primary and secondary amines during peroxy radical-mediated oxidative stress carried out using azoalkane initiators. Two degradation products were detected when model drug compounds dissolved in methanol/water were heated to 40°C with radical initiators such as 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN). The primary artifact was identified as an α-aminonitrile generated from the reaction of the amine group of the model drug with formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, generated as byproducts of the stress reaction. A minor artifact was generated from the reaction between the amine group and isocyanic acid, also a byproduct of the stress reaction. We report the effects of pH, initiator/drug molar ratio, and type of azoalkane initiator on the formation of these artifacts. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used for structure elucidation, whereas mechanistic studies, including stable isotope labeling experiments, cyanide analysis, and experiments exploring the effects of butylated hydroxyanisole addition, were employed to support the degradation pathways. PMID:26565996

  17. Long-lived mutagenic radicals induced in mammalian cells by ionizing radiation are mainly localized to proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Jun; Masui, Kiyonao; Itagaki, Yoshiteru; Shiotani, Masaru; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami; Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    2003-07-01

    We have provided evidence that long-lived radicals, produced by ionizing radiation, are highly mutagenic and transforming in mammalian cells. Long-lived radicals are scavenged effectively by vitamin C or by epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG). Long-lived radicals are not involved in lethality or in the induction of chromosome aberrations. We now report the results of experiments that define the relative amounts of long-lived radicals in DNA and proteins and identify the major protein radicals as sulfinyl radicals (R-CH2-S-O*). To make these assignments, yields of long-lived radicals in gamma-irradiated salmon sperm DNA and albumin were compared by ESR. ESR spectra of long-lived radicals produced in irradiated Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells were analyzed precisely and compared with ESR parameters obtained by density functional theory calculations. Long-lived radicals yields of 99.8% were produced in proteins. We also identified a new type of long-lived radical as H-added phenylalanine radicals. While our evidence does not rule out the possibility of important biological consequences of the low-level long-lived radicals created by radiation, it implicates radicals in proteins as playing a key role in genetic effects of ionizing radiation. We suggest that these novel radicals, wherever they reside, need to be considered in explanations of biological sequela of radiation. PMID:12816528

  18. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  19. Concerning the production of free radicals in proteins by ultraviolet light.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Androes, G. M.; Gloria, H. R.; Reinisch, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The response to UV light of several solid proteins and model compounds has been studied in vacuum and at low temperature, using electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. The results indicate that the details of amino acid composition and sequence, and the tertiary structure of a protein are important in determining both the rate of, and the mechanism for, the production of free radicals, and in determining the conditions under which sulfur-type radicals can be produced. The results presented are related to enzyme inactivation and to the UV stability of proteins generally.

  20. Beta-carotene encapsulated in food protein nanoparticles reduces peroxyl radical oxidation in Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene (BC) was encapsulated by sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and soybean protein isolate (SPI) by the homogenization-evaporation method forming nanoparticles of 78, 90 and 370 nm diameter. Indices of the chemical antioxidant assays, the reducing power, DPPH radical scave...

  1. Pulsed Electron Beam Water Radiolysis for Sub-Microsecond Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on sub-microsecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for sub-microsecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one sub-microsecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a timescale shorter than that of large scale protein motions. PMID:19265387

  2. Hydroxyl radical-induced cross-linking of thymine and lysine: identification of the primary structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, S; Hatta, H; Fujita, S; Matsuyama, T; Ueno, T; Nishimoto, S

    1998-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced formation of a cross-link of thymine (Thy) and lysine (Lys) in the gamma-radiolysis of N2O-saturated aqueous solution was studied. A Thy-Lys cross-link (I) of the formal structure that OH radical and 4-carbon-centered Lys radical added respectively to C(5) and C(6) positions of Thy was isolated by a preparative HPLC and identified by a FAB-HRMS. The primary cross-link I was dehydrated by treatment with HCl at 120 degrees C to yield the secondary structure (II) possessing a C(5)-C(6) double bond in the Thy moiety: the latter structure II was reported previously (Dizdaroglu, M.; Gajewski, E. Cancer Res. 1989, 49, 3463-3467). A pulse radiolysis study with a redox titration method indicated that 4-carbon centered Lys radical intermediate was of neutral redox reactivity in contrast to reducing reactivity of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymin-6-yl radical intermediate. The cross-link I could be formed by a conventional radical recombination mechanism, but not by an ionic recombination mechanism involving a redox reaction between the radical intermediates. PMID:9871556

  3. Dosimetry determines the initial OH radical concentration in fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP).

    PubMed

    Niu, Ben; Zhang, Hao; Giblin, Daryl; Rempel, Don L; Gross, Michael L

    2015-05-01

    Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) employs laser photolysis of hydrogen peroxide to give OH radicals that label amino acid side-chains of proteins on the microsecond time scale. A method for quantitation of hydroxyl radicals after laser photolysis is of importance to FPOP because it establishes a means to adjust the yield of •OH, offers the opportunity of tunable modifications, and provides a basis for kinetic measurements. The initial concentration of OH radicals has yet to be measured experimentally. We report here an approach using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine quantitatively the initial •OH concentration (we found ~0.95 mM from 15 mM H2O2) from laser photolysis and to investigate the quenching efficiencies for various •OH scavengers. PMID:25712620

  4. Markers of protein oxidation by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species in tissues of aging rats.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburgh, C; Hansen, P; Shaish, A; Holloszy, J O; Heinecke, J W

    1998-02-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidative damage in aging. Possible pathways include reactions that modify aromatic amino acid residues on proteins. o-Tyrosine is a stable marker for oxidation of protein-bound phenylalanine by hydroxyl radical, whereas 3-nitrotyrosine is a marker for oxidation of protein-bound tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species. To test the hypothesis that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen accumulate with aging, we used isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure levels of o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver from young adult (9 mo) and old (24 mo) female Long-Evans/Wistar hybrid rats. We also measured these markers in young adult and old rats that received antioxidant supplements (alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, butylated hydroxytoluene, and ascorbic acid) from the age of 5 mo. We found that aging did not significantly increase levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine or 3-nitrotyrosine in any of the tissues. Antioxidant supplementation had no effect on the levels of protein-bound o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine in either young or old animals. These observations indicate that the o-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine do not increase significantly in heart, skeletal muscle, and liver in old rats, suggesting that proteins damaged by hydroxyl radical and reactive nitrogen species do not accumulate in these tissues with advancing age. PMID:9486304

  5. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation of proteins is mediated by the photogeneration of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Liao, J C; Roider, J; Jay, D G

    1994-03-29

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that selectively inactivates proteins of interest to elucidate their in vivo functions. This method has application to a wide array of biological questions and an understanding of its mechanism is required for its judicious application. We report here that CALI is not mediated by photoinduced thermal denaturation but by photogenerated free radicals. Thermal diffusion calculations suggest that the temperature changes resulting from CALI are too small to cause thermal denaturation, and Arrhenius plots of CALI are inconsistent with a photothermal mechanism. CALI shows an energy dose reciprocity above a threshold and can be inhibited by free-radical quenchers, thus demonstrating a photochemical mechanism of protein inactivation. The type of quenchers that are effective in inhibiting CALI indicates that the active species is a hydrogen abstractor which is not derived from molecular oxygen. We suggest that the active free-radical species is the hydroxyl radical and its very short lifetime explains the spatial specificity of CALI such that half-maximal damage is effected within 15 A from the dye moiety and no significant damage occurs at 34 A. The data are consistent with free-radical formation resulting from a sequential two-photon process. PMID:8146171

  6. Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation of proteins is mediated by the photogeneration of free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, J C; Roider, J; Jay, D G

    1994-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI) is a technique that selectively inactivates proteins of interest to elucidate their in vivo functions. This method has application to a wide array of biological questions and an understanding of its mechanism is required for its judicious application. We report here that CALI is not mediated by photoinduced thermal denaturation but by photogenerated free radicals. Thermal diffusion calculations suggest that the temperature changes resulting from CALI are too small to cause thermal denaturation, and Arrhenius plots of CALI are inconsistent with a photothermal mechanism. CALI shows an energy dose reciprocity above a threshold and can be inhibited by free-radical quenchers, thus demonstrating a photochemical mechanism of protein inactivation. The type of quenchers that are effective in inhibiting CALI indicates that the active species is a hydrogen abstractor which is not derived from molecular oxygen. We suggest that the active free-radical species is the hydroxyl radical and its very short lifetime explains the spatial specificity of CALI such that half-maximal damage is effected within 15 A from the dye moiety and no significant damage occurs at 34 A. The data are consistent with free-radical formation resulting from a sequential two-photon process. Images PMID:8146171

  7. Ultrafast primary processes of the stable neutral organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid solution.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Christoph; Wezisla, Boris; Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-05-28

    Femtosecond spectroscopy with hyperspectral white-light detection was used to elucidate the ultrafast primary processes of the thermodynamically stable organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid acetonitrile solution at room temperature. The radical was excited with optical pulses having a duration of 39 fs and a center wavelength of 800 nm thereby accessing its energetically lowest electronically excited state (D1). The apparent spectrotemporal response is understood in terms of an ultrafast primary D1-to-D0 internal conversion that generates the electronic ground state of the radical in a highly vibrationally excited fashion within a few hundred femtoseconds. The replenished electronic ground state subsequently undergoes vibrational cooling on a time scale of a few picoseconds. The instantaneous absorption spectra of the radical derived from the femtosecond pump-probe data are analyzed within the Sulzer-Wieland formalism for calculating the electronic spectra of "hot" polyatomic molecules. The pump-probe spectra together with transient anisotropy data in the region of the D0 → D1 ground-state bleach gives evidence for an additional transient absorption that arises from a dark excited state, which gains oscillator strength with increasing vibrational excitation of the radical by virtue of vibronic coupling. PMID:25941968

  8. Stereoselective bimolecular phenoxyl radical coupling by an auxiliary (dirigent) protein without an active center

    SciTech Connect

    Davin, L.B.; Wang, Huai-Bin; Crowell, A.L.

    1997-01-17

    The regio- and stereospecificity of bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling reactions, of especial importance in lignin and lignan biosynthesis, are clearly controlled in some manner in vivo; yet in vitro coupling by oxidases, such as laccases, only produce racemic products. In other words, laccases, peroxidases, and comparable oxidases are unable to control regio- or stereospecificity by themselves and thus some other agent must exist. A 78-kilodalton protein has been isolated that, in the presence of an oxidase or one electron oxidant, effects stereoselective bimolecular phenoxy radical coupling in vitro. Itself lacking a catalytically active (oxidative) center, its mechanism of action is presumed to involve capture of E-coniferyl alcohol-derived free-radical intermediates, with consequent stereoselective coupling to give (+)-pinoresinol. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A chaperonin as protein nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Renggli, Kasper; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Urbani, Raphael; Pfohl, Thomas; Bruns, Nico

    2014-01-27

    The group II chaperonin thermosome (THS) from the archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum is reported as nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A copper catalyst was entrapped into the THS to confine the polymerization into this protein cage. THS possesses pores that are wide enough to release polymers into solution. The nanoreactor favorably influenced the polymerization of N-isopropyl acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol)methylether acrylate. Narrowly dispersed polymers with polydispersity indices (PDIs) down to 1.06 were obtained in the protein nanoreactor, while control reactions with a globular protein-catalyst conjugate only yielded polymers with PDIs above 1.84. PMID:24459061

  10. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  11. Chlorine as a primary radical: evaluation of methods to understand its role in initiation of oxidative cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Edwards, P. M.; Parrish, D. D.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Mielke, L. H.; Osthoff, H. D.; Tsai, C.; Pikelnaya, O.; Stutz, J.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Flynn, J.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B.; Holloway, J. S.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Brown, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    The role of chlorine atoms (Cl) in atmospheric oxidation has been traditionally thought to be limited to the marine boundary layer, where they are produced through heterogeneous reactions involving sea salt. However, recent observation of photolytic Cl precursors (ClNO2 and Cl2) formed from anthropogenic pollution has expanded the potential importance of Cl to include coastal and continental urban areas. Measurements of ClNO2 in Los Angeles during CalNex (California Nexus - Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) showed it to be an important primary (first generation) radical source. Evolution of ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been proposed as a method to quantify Cl oxidation, but we find no evidence from this approach for a significant role of Cl oxidation in Los Angeles. We use a box model with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) chemistry scheme, constrained by observations in Los Angeles, to examine the Cl sensitivity of commonly used VOC ratios as a function of NOx and secondary radical production. Model results indicate VOC tracer ratios could not detect the influence of Cl unless the ratio of [OH] to [Cl] was less than 200 for at least a day. However, the model results also show that secondary (second generation) OH production resulting from Cl oxidation of VOCs is strongly influenced by NOx, and that this effect obscures the importance of Cl as a primary oxidant. Calculated concentrations of Cl showed a maximum in mid-morning due to a photolytic source from ClNO2 and loss primarily to reactions with VOCs. The [OH] to [Cl] ratio was below 200 for approximately 3 h in the morning, but Cl oxidation was not evident from the measured ratios of VOCs. Instead, model simulations show that secondary OH production causes VOC ratio evolution to follow that expected for OH oxidation, despite the significant input of primary Cl from ClNO2 photolysis in the morning. Even though OH is by far the dominant oxidant in Los Angeles, Cl

  12. Probing the solution structure of Factor H using hydroxyl radical protein footprinting and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Baud, Anna; Gonnet, Florence; Salard, Isabelle; Le Mignon, Maxime; Giuliani, Alexandre; Mercère, Pascal; Sclavi, Bianca; Daniel, Régis

    2016-06-15

    The control protein Factor H (FH) is a crucial regulator of the innate immune complement system, where it is active on host cell membranes and in the fluid phase. Mutations impairing the binding capacity of FH lead to severe autoimmune diseases. Here, we studied the solution structure of full-length FH, in its free state and bound to the C3b complement protein. To do so, we used two powerful techniques, hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) and chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), to probe the structural rearrangements and to identify protein interfaces. The footprint of C3b on the FH surface matches existing crystal structures of C3b complexed with the N- and C-terminal fragments of FH. In addition, we revealed the position of the central portion of FH in the protein complex. Moreover, cross-linking studies confirmed the involvement of the C-terminus in the dimerization of FH. PMID:27099340

  13. A substrate radical intermediate in catalysis by the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler L; Livada, Jovan; Schwalm, Erica L; Green, Michael T; Booker, Squire J; Silakov, Alexey

    2013-07-01

    Cfr-dependent methylation of C8 of A2503 in 23S ribosomal RNA confers bacterial resistance to an array of clinically important antibiotics that target the large subunit of the ribosome, including the synthetic oxazolidinone antibiotic linezolid. The key element of the proposed mechanism for Cfr, a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme, is the addition of a methylene radical, generated by hydrogen-atom abstraction from the methyl group of an S-methylated cysteine, onto C8 of A2503 to form a protein-nucleic acid crosslinked species containing an unpaired electron. Herein we use continuous-wave and pulsed EPR techniques to provide direct spectroscopic evidence for this intermediate, showing a spin-delocalized radical with maximum spin density at N7 of the adenine ring. In addition, we use rapid freeze-quench EPR to show that the radical forms and decays with rate constants that are consistent with the rate of formation of the methylated product. PMID:23644479

  14. Differential Motion Between Mediastinal Lymph Nodes and Primary Tumor in Radically Irradiated Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake, Eva E.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Buikhuisen, Wieneke A.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; Smit, Adrianus A.J.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: In patients with locally advanced lung cancer, planning target volume margins for mediastinal lymph nodes and tumor after a correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration typically range from 1 to 1.5 cm. Detailed information about lymph node motion variability and differential motion with the primary tumor, however, is lacking from large series. In this study, lymph node and tumor position variability were analyzed in detail and correlated to the main carina to evaluate possible margin reduction. Methods and Materials: Small gold fiducial markers (0.35 × 5 mm) were placed in the mediastinal lymph nodes of 51 patients with non-small cell lung cancer during routine diagnostic esophageal or bronchial endoscopic ultrasonography. Four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily 4D cone beam (CB) CT scans were acquired before and during radical radiation therapy (66 Gy in 24 fractions). Each CBCT was registered in 3-dimensions (bony anatomy) and 4D (tumor, marker, and carina) to the planning CT scan. Subsequently, systematic and random residual misalignments of the time-averaged lymph node and tumor position relative to the bony anatomy and carina were determined. Additionally, tumor and lymph node respiratory amplitude variability was quantified. Finally, required margins were quantified by use of a recipe for dual targets. Results: Relative to the bony anatomy, systematic and random errors ranged from 0.16 to 0.32 cm for the markers and from 0.15 to 0.33 cm for the tumor, but despite similar ranges there was limited correlation (0.17-0.71) owing to differential motion. A large variability in lymph node amplitude between patients was observed, with an average motion of 0.56 cm in the cranial-caudal direction. Margins could be reduced by 10% (left-right), 27% (cranial-caudal), and 10% (anteroposterior) for the lymph nodes and −2%, 15%, and 7% for the tumor if an online carina registration protocol replaced a

  15. Effects of oxidative modification on gel properties of isolated porcine myofibrillar protein by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feibai; Zhao, Mouming; Zhao, Haifeng; Sun, Weizheng; Cui, Chun

    2014-04-01

    AAPH-derived (2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride) peroxyl radicals were selected as representative free radicals of lipid peroxidation to investigate the effects of oxidative modifications on isolated porcine myofibrillar protein structures as well as their rheological and gelling properties. Incubation of myofibrillar protein with increasing concentrations of AAPH resulted in a gradual increase (p<0.05) in carbonyl content and SH→S-S conversion. Results from SDS-PAGE indicated that medium (~1 mM) and relatively high (>3 mM) concentrations of AAPH induced aggregation of myosin and denaturation of myosin, troponin and tropomyosin, respectively. These structural changes resulted in changes on gelation of myofibrillar protein. Low level protein oxidation (AAPH≤0.5 mM) had no remarkable effect (p>0.05) on the viscoelastic pattern of myofibrillar protein gelation. Moderate oxidative modification (AAPH~1mM) enhanced the water-holding capacity (WHC) and texture properties of gels, while further oxidation (AAPH>3mM) significantly reduced the gel quality. PMID:24406430

  16. Primary carcinoma of the ureteral stump following radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    JIN, SHIHUA; WANG, GANG; YU, CHENGFAN; LI, NINGCHEN

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of primary carcinoma of the ureteral stump following radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma is extremely rare; 7 patients with the disease have been reported previously. All these patients were males with transitional cell carcinoma. The current study reports the case of a 61-year-old woman, who presented with gross hematuria following a radical nephrectomy for local clear cell renal carcinoma. A computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a mass on the ureteral stump. The patient underwent a left ureteral stump and bladder cuff excision. The histological diagnosis was high-grade transitional cell carcinoma of the ureteral stump, with focal interstitial cancer cell infiltrates. There was no evidence of recurrence during a follow-up period of 35 months. In addition, the present study reviewed the literature for previous patients with ureteral stump carcinoma following a radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma; 7 previous patients with the disease were identified. The present study suggests that, if patients who have previously undergone a radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma present with hematuria, the possibility of ureteral stump carcinoma should be considered, particularly in East Asian countries. The existence or a history of bladder carcinoma should be considered as a high-risk factor for developing ureteral stump carcinoma. A ureteral stump and bladder cuff excision should be performed once ureteral stump carcinoma is diagnosed. PMID:27123110

  17. Laser induced photoluminiscence studies of primary photochemical production processes of cometary radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable vacuum ultraviolet flash lamp was constructed. This unique flash lamp was coupled with a tunable dye laser detector and permits the experimenter to measure the production rates of ground state radicals as a function of wavelength. A new technique for producing fluorescent radicals was discovered. This technique called multiphoton ultraviolet photodissociation is currently being applied to several problems of both cometary and stratospheric interest. It was demonstrated that NO2 will dissociate to produce an excited fragment and the radiation can possibly be used for remote detection of this species.

  18. Oxidative stress induction of DJ-1 protein in reactive astrocytes scavenges free radicals and reduces cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Yanagida, Takashi; Tsushima, Jun; Yanagisawa, Daijiro; Takata, Kazuyuki; Shibaike, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Atsuko; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Taira, Takahiro; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes, one of the predominant types of glial cells, function as both supportive and metabolic cells for the brain. Under cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced oxidative conditions, astrocytes accumulate and activate in the ischemic region. DJ-1 has recently been shown to be a sensor of oxidative stress in living cells. However, the function of astrocytic DJ-1 is still unknown. In the present study, to clarify the effect of astrocytic DJ-1 protein under massive oxidative insult, we used a focal ischemic rat model that had been subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. We then investigated changes in the distribution of DJ-1 in astrocytes, DJ-1 release from cultured astrocytes, and the effects of recombinant DJ-1 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced death in normal and DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells and on in vitro scavenging of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) by electron spin resonance spectrometry. At 24 h after 2-h MCAO and reperfusion, an infarct lesion was markedly observed using magnetic resonance imaging and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. In addition, reactive astrocytes enhanced DJ-1 expression in the penumbral zone of the ischemic core and that DJ-1 protein was extracellularly released from astrocytes by H2O2 in in vitro primary cultures. Although DJ-1-knockdown SH-SY5Y cells were markedly vulnerable to oxidative stress, treatment with glutathione S-transferase-tagged recombinant human DJ-1 protein (GST-DJ-1) significantly inhibited H2O2-induced cell death. In addition, GST-DJ-1 protein directly scavenged •OH. These results suggest that oxidative stress induces the release of astrocytic DJ-1 protein, which may contribute to astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection. PMID:20046643

  19. Procainamide, but not N-Acetylprocainamide, Induces Protein Free Radical Formation on Myeloperoxidase: A Potential Mechanism of Agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siraki, Arno G.; Deterding, Leesa J.; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Jiang, JinJie; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Procainamide (PA) is a drug that is used to treat tachycardia in post-operative patients or for long term maintenance of cardiac arrythmias. Unfortunately, its use has also been associated with agranulocytosis. Here we have investigated the metabolism of PA by myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the formation of an MPO protein free radical. We hypothesized that PA oxidation by MPO/H2O2 would produce a PA cation radical that, in the absence of a biochemical reductant, would lead to the free-radical oxidation of MPO. We utilized a novel anti-DMPO antibody to detect DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) covalently bound to protein, which forms only by the reaction of DMPO with a protein free radical. We found that PA metabolism by MPO/H2O2 induced the formation of DMPO-MPO, which was inhibited by MPO inhibitors and ascorbate. N-acetyl-PA did not cause DMPO-MPO formation, indicating that the unsubstituted aromatic amine was more oxidizable. PA had a lower calculated ionization potential than N-acetyl-PA. The DMPO adducts of MPO metabolism, as analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, included a nitrogen-centered radical and a phenyl radical derived from PA, either of which may be involved in the free radical formation on MPO. Furthermore, we also found protein-DMPO adducts in MPO-containing, intact human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). MPO was affinity-purified from HL-60 cells treated with PA/H2O2 and was found to contain DMPO using the anti-DMPO antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the identity of the protein as human MPO. These findings were also supported by the detection of protein free radicals with electron spin resonance in the cellular cytosolic lysate. The formation of an MPO protein free radical is believed to be mediated by free radical metabolites of PA, which we characterized by spin trapping. We propose that drug-induced free radical formation on MPO may play a role in the origin of agranulocytosis. PMID:18489081

  20. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  1. Supercharging by m-NBA Improves ETD-Based Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) is an MS-based technique for analyzing protein structure based on measuring the oxidation of amino acid side chains by hydroxyl radicals diffusing in solution. Spatial resolution of HRPF is limited by the smallest portion of the protein for which oxidation amounts can be accurately quantitated. Previous work has shown electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to be the most reliable method for quantifying the amount of oxidation of each amino acid side chain in a mixture of peptide oxidation isomers, but efficient ETD requires high peptide charge states, which limits its applicability for HRPF. Supercharging reagents have been used to enhance peptide charge state for ETD analysis, but previous work has shown supercharging reagents to enhance charge state differently for different peptides sequences; it is currently unknown if different oxidation isomers will experience different charge enhancement effects. Here, we report the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) on the ETD-based quantification of peptide oxidation. The addition of m-NBA to both a defined mixture of synthetic isomeric oxidized peptides and Robo-1 protein subjected to HRPF increased the abundance of higher charge state ions, improving our ability to perform efficient ETD of the mixture. No differences in the reported quantitation by ETD were noted in the presence or absence of m-NBA, indicating that all oxidation isomers were charge-enhanced to a similar extent. These results indicate the utility of m-NBA for residue-level quantification of peptide oxidation in HRPF and other applications.

  2. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  3. Protein microarrays based on polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Raphael; Kauffmann, Ekkehard; Ehrat, Markus; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2010-12-13

    Polymer brushes represent an interesting platform for the development of high-capacity protein binding surfaces. Whereas the protein binding properties of polymer brushes have been investigated before, this manuscript evaluates the feasibility of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) and PGMA-co-poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PGMA-co-PDEAEMA) (co)polymer brushes grown via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as protein reactive substrates in a commercially available microarray system using tantalum-pentoxide-coated optical waveguide-based chips. The performance of the polymer-brush-based protein microarray chips is assessed using commercially available dodecylphosphate (DDP)-modified chips as the benchmark. In contrast to the 2D planar, DDP-coated chips, the polymer-brush-covered chips represent a 3D sampling volume. This was reflected in the results of protein immobilization studies, which indicated that the polymer-brush-based coatings had a higher protein binding capacity as compared to the reference substrates. The protein binding capacity of the polymer-brush-based coatings was found to increase with increasing brush thickness and could also be enhanced by copolymerization of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA), which catalyzes epoxide ring-opening of the glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) units. The performance of the polymer-brush-based microarray chips was evaluated in two proof-of-concept microarray experiments, which involved the detection of biotin-streptavidin binding as well as a model TNFα reverse assay. These experiments revealed that the use of polymer-brush-modified microarray chips resulted not only in the highest absolute fluorescence readouts, reflecting the 3D nature and enhanced sampling volume provided by the brush coating, but also in significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. These characteristics make the proposed polymer brushes an attractive alternative to commercially available, 2D microarray

  4. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  5. Combined radical radiation therapy and chemotherapy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Cummings, B J; Rider, W D; Harwood, A R; Keane, T J; Thomas, G M; Erlichman, C; Fine, S

    1982-03-01

    Radical radiation therapy (5000 rads in 20 fractions in 4 weeks) combined with iv mitomycin (10 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2/24 hours for 4 days) was used to treat 13 patients with locally advanced but operable squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. All patients achieved local control and retained anal continence, and none developed metastases. The patients were followed from 4 to 34 months (median, 12). Severe acute gastrointestinal toxic effects were seen in three patients; the same patients had significant thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. Treatment with this combined program may allow conservative management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and should be considered as an alternative to abdominoperineal resection. PMID:6800654

  6. Changes in structural characteristics of antioxidative soy protein hydrolysates resulting from scavenging of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Xiong, Youling L; McNear, Dave H

    2013-02-01

    Antioxidant activity of soy protein (SP) and its hydrolyzed peptides has been widely reported. During scavenging of radicals, these antioxidative compounds would be oxidatively modified, but their fate is not understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the structural characteristics of SP hydrolysates (SPHs), compared to intact SP, when used to neutralize hydroxyl radicals (•OH). SPHs with degree of hydrolysis (DH) 1 to 5 were prepared with Alcalase. Antioxidant activity of SPHs was confirmed by lipid oxidation inhibition measured with thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, ability to scavenge 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) radicals, and ferrous ion chelation capability. Oxidation of SPHs was initiated by reaction with •OH generated from 0.1 mM FeCl(3) , 20 mM H(2) O(2) , and 1.0 mM ascorbate. After oxidative stress, carbonyl content of SPHs increased by 2- to 3-fold and sulfhydryl groups decreased by up to 42% compared to nonoxidized samples (P < 0.05). Methionine, histidine, and lysine residues were significantly reduced as a result of inactivating •OH (P < 0.05). Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggested the conversion of helical structure to strands and turns. Oxidatively modified SPHs had a lower intrinsic fluorescence intensity but similar solubility when compared to nonoxidized samples. These structural changes due to •OH stress may impact the ingredient interaction and functionality of SPHs in food products. PMID:23331209

  7. Radical prostatectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Prostatectomy - radical; Radical retropubic prostatectomy; Radical perineal prostatectomy; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; LRP; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy; RALP; Pelvic lymphadenectomy; ...

  8. Protein-coding and microRNA biomarkers of recurrence of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Long, Qi; Johnson, Brent A; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Lai, Yu-Heng; Zhou, Wei; Abramovitz, Mark; Xia, Mingjing; Bouzyk, Mark B; Nam, Robert K; Sugar, Linda; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Williams, Daron J; Leyland-Jones, Brian R; Seth, Arun K; Petros, John A; Moreno, Carlos S

    2011-07-01

    An important challenge in prostate cancer research is to develop effective predictors of tumor recurrence following surgery to determine whether immediate adjuvant therapy is warranted. To identify biomarkers predictive of biochemical recurrence, we isolated the RNA from 70 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded radical prostatectomy specimens with known long-term outcomes to perform DASL expression profiling with a custom panel that we designed of 522 prostate cancer-relevant genes. We identified a panel of 10 protein-coding genes and two miRNA genes (RAD23B, FBP1, TNFRSF1A, CCNG2, NOTCH3, ETV1, BID, SIM2, LETMD1, ANXA1, miR-519d, and miR-647) that could be used to separate patients with and without biochemical recurrence (P < 0.001), as well as for the subset of 42 Gleason score 7 patients (P < 0.001). We performed an independent validation analysis on 40 samples and found that the biomarker panel was also significant at prediction of biochemical recurrence for all cases (P = 0.013) and for a subset of 19 Gleason score 7 cases (P = 0.010), both of which were adjusted for relevant clinical information including T-stage, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score. Importantly, these biomarkers could significantly predict clinical recurrence for Gleason score 7 patients. These biomarkers may increase the accuracy of prognostication following radical prostatectomy using formalin-fixed specimens. PMID:21703393

  9. INVESTIGATION OF THE RADICAL-MEDIATED PRODUCTION OF BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    High background levels of benzene oxide (BO) adducts with hemoglobin and albumin (BO-Hb and BO-Alb) have been measured in unexposed humans and animals. To test the influence of radical-mediated pathways on production of these BO-protein adducts, we employed Fenton chemistry to...

  10. Protein oxidative modifications during electrospray ionization: solution phase electrochemistry or corona discharge-induced radical attack?

    PubMed

    Boys, Brian L; Kuprowski, Mark C; Noël, James J; Konermann, Lars

    2009-05-15

    The exposure of solution-phase proteins to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes oxidative modifications, giving rise to the formation of covalent +16 Da adducts. Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is the most widely used method for monitoring the extent of these modifications. Unfortunately, protein oxidation can also take place as an experimental artifact during ESI, such that it may be difficult to assess the actual level of oxidation in bulk solution. Previous work has demonstrated that ESI-induced oxidation is highly prevalent when operating at strongly elevated capillary voltage V(0) (e.g., +8 kV) and with oxygen nebulizer gas in the presence of a clearly visible corona discharge. Protein oxidation under these conditions is commonly attributed to OH radicals generated in the plasma of the discharge. On the other hand, charge balancing oxidation reactions are known to take place at the metal/liquid interface of the emitter. Previous studies have not systematically explored whether such electrochemical processes could be responsible for the formation of oxidative +16 Da adducts instead of (or in combination with) plasma-generated ROS. Using hemoglobin as a model system, this work illustrates the occurrence of extensive protein oxidation even under typical operating conditions (e.g., V(0) = 3.5 kV, N(2) nebulizer gas). Surprisingly, measurements of the current flowing in the ESI circuit demonstrate that a weak corona discharge persists for these relatively gentle settings. On the basis of comparative experiments with nebulizer gases of different dielectric strength, it is concluded that ROS generated under discharge conditions are solely responsible for ESI-induced protein oxidation. This result is corroborated through off-line electrolysis experiments designed to mimic the electrochemical processes taking place during ESI. Our findings highlight the necessity of using easily oxidizable internal standards in biophysical or biomedical ESI

  11. Adverse Outcomes Associated with Cigarette Smoke Radicals Related to Damage to Protein-disulfide Isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kenche, Harshavardhan; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Vedagiri, Kokilavani; Richards, Dylan M; Gao, Xing-Huang; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Blumental-Perry, Anna

    2016-02-26

    Identification of factors contributing to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is crucial for developing new treatments. An increase in the levels of protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), a multifaceted endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperone, has been demonstrated in human smokers, presumably as a protective adaptation to cigarette smoke (CS) exposure. We found a similar increase in the levels of PDI in the murine model of COPD. We also found abnormally high levels (4-6 times) of oxidized and sulfenilated forms of PDI in the lungs of murine smokers compared with non-smokers. PDI oxidation progressively increases with age. We begin to delineate the possible role of an increased ratio of oxidized PDI in the age-related onset of COPD by investigating the impact of exposure to CS radicals, such as acrolein (AC), hydroxyquinones (HQ), peroxynitrites (PN), and hydrogen peroxide, on their ability to induce unfolded protein response (UPR) and their effects on the structure and function of PDIs. Exposure to AC, HQ, PN, and CS resulted in cysteine and tyrosine nitrosylation leading to an altered three-dimensional structure of the PDI due to a decrease in helical content and formation of a more random coil structure, resulting in protein unfolding, inhibition of PDI reductase and isomerase activity in vitro and in vivo, and subsequent induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Addition of glutathione prevented the induction of UPR, and AC and HQ induced structural changes in PDI. Exposure to PN and glutathione resulted in conjugation of PDI possibly at active site tyrosine residues. The findings presented here propose a new role of PDI in the pathogenesis of COPD and its age-dependent onset. PMID:26728460

  12. Non-local photo-polymerization kinetics including multiple termination mechanisms and dark reactions: Part III. Primary radical generation and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Michael R.; Liu Shui; Guo Jinxin; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-09-15

    Photopolymers are playing an ever more important role in diverse areas of research such as holographic data storage, hybrid photonic circuits, and solitary waves. In each of these applications, the production of primary radicals is the driving force of the polymerization processes. Therefore an understanding of the production, removal, and scavenging processes of free radicals in a photopolymer system is crucial in determining a material's response to a given exposure. One such scavenging process is inhibition. In this paper the non-local photo-polymerization driven diffusion model is extended to more accurately model the effects of (i) time varying primary radical production, (ii) the rate of removal of photosensitizer, and (iii) inhibition. The model is presented to specifically analyze the effects of inhibition, which occur most predominantly at the start of grating growth, and comparisons between theory and experiment are performed which quantify these effects.

  13. A Metal and Base-Free Chemoselective Primary Amination of Boronic Acids Using Cyanamidyl/Arylcyanamidyl Radical as Aminating Species: Synthesis and Mechanistic Studies by Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nachiketa; Arfeen, Minhajul; Bharatam, Prasad V; Goswami, Avijit

    2016-06-17

    An efficient, metal and base-free, chemoselective synthesis of aryl-, heteroaryl-, and alkyl primary amines from the corresponding boronic acids has been achieved at ambient temperature mediated by [bis(trifluoroacetoxy)iodo]benzene (PIFA) and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) using cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radicals as the aminating species. The primary amine compounds were initially obtained as their corresponding ammonium trifluoroacetate salts which, on treatment with aq NaOH, provide the free amines. Finally, the primary amines were isolated through column chromatography over silica-gel using hexane-EtOAc solvent system as the eluent. The reactions are sufficiently fast, completing within 1 h. Quantum chemical calculations in combination with experimental observations validate that the ipso amination of substituted boronic acids involves the formation of cyanamidyl/arylcyanamidyl radical, followed by regiospecific interaction of its nitrile-N center with boron atom of the boronic acids, leading to chemoselective primary amination. PMID:27182931

  14. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ṡOH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ṡOH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics.

  15. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyl radical (⋅OH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ⋅OH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ⋅OH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27067899

  16. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ṡOH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ṡOH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics.

  17. Long-lived radicals produced by γ-irradiation or vital activity in plants, animals, cells, and protein solution: their observation and inhomogeneous decay dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Morikawa, Akiyuki; Kumagai, Jun; Ikehata, Masateru; Koana, Takao; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2002-09-01

    Long-lived radicals produced by γ-irradiation or vital activity in plants, animals, cells, and protein (albumin) solution were studied by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Long-lived radicals produced by vital activity exist in biological systems, such as plants, animals, and cells, in the range of 0.1-20 nmol g -1. Since vital organs keep the radicals at a constant concentration, the radicals are probably related to life conservation. Long-lived radicals are also produced by γ-irradiation of cells or protein solution. The radicals decay after death of living things or after γ-irradiation. We found that the decay dynamics in all biological systems can be expressed by the same kinetic equation of an inhomogeneous reaction.

  18. Signaling the Unfolded Protein Response in primary brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Avril, Tony; Quillien, Véronique; Morandi, Xavier; Chevet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is an adaptive cellular program used by eukaryotic cells to cope with protein misfolding stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). During tumor development, cancer cells are facing intrinsic (oncogene activation) and extrinsic (limiting nutrient or oxygen supply; exposure to chemotherapies) challenges, with which they must cope to survive. Primary brain tumors are relatively rare but deadly and present a significant challenge in the determination of risk factors in the population. These tumors are inherently difficult to cure because of their protected location in the brain. As such surgery, radiation and chemotherapy options carry potentially lasting patient morbidity and incomplete tumor cure. Some of these tumors, such as glioblastoma, were reported to present features of ER stress and to depend on UPR activation to sustain growth, but to date there is no clear general representation of the ER stress status in primary brain tumors. In this review, we describe the key molecular mechanisms controlling the UPR and their implication in cancers. Then we extensively review the literature reporting the status of ER stress in various primary brain tumors and discuss the potential impact of such observation on patient stratification and on the possibility of developing appropriate targeted therapies using the UPR as therapeutic target. PMID:27016056

  19. Thermodynamics and Kinetics for the Free Radical Oxygen Protein Oxidation Pathway in a Model for β-Structured Peptides.

    PubMed

    Green, Mandy C; Dubnicka, Laura J; Davis, Alex C; Rypkema, Heather A; Francisco, Joseph S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2016-04-28

    Oxidative stress plays a role in many biological phenomena, but involved mechanisms and individual reactions are not well understood. Correlated electronic structure calculations with the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) methods detail thermodynamic and kinetic information for the free radical oxygen protein oxidation pathway studied in a trialanine model system. The pathway includes aerobic, anaerobic and termination reactions. The course of the oxidation process depends on local conditions and availability of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS). A chemical mechanism is proposed for how oxidative stress promotes β-structure formation in the amyloid diseases. The work can be used to aid experimentalists as they explore individual reactions and mechanisms involving oxygen free radicals and oxidative stress in β-structured proteins. PMID:27055125

  20. Characterization of a Cross-Linked Protein-Nucleic Acid Substrate Radical in the Reaction Catalyzed by RlmN

    SciTech Connect

    Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Bauerle, Matthew R.; Green, Michael T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Boal, Amie K.; Booker, Squire J.

    2014-08-14

    RlmN and Cfr are methyltransferases/methylsynthases that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily of enzymes. RlmN catalyzes C2 methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) of 23S rRNA, while Cfr catalyzes C8 methylation of the exact same nucleotide, and will subsequently catalyze C2 methylation if the site is unmethylated. A key feature of the unusual mechanisms of catalysis proposed for these enzymes is the attack of a methylene radical, derived from a methylcysteine residue, onto the carbon center undergoing methylation to generate a paramagnetic protein–nucleic acid cross-linked species. This species has been thoroughly characterized during Cfr-dependent C8 methylation, but does not accumulate to detectible levels in RlmN-dependent C2 methylation. Herein, we show that inactive C118S/A variants of RlmN accumulate a substrate-derived paramagnetic species. Characterization of this species by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in concert with strategic isotopic labeling shows that the radical is delocalized throughout the adenine ring of A2503, although predominant spin density is on N1 and N3. Moreover, 13C hyperfine interactions between the radical and the methylene carbon of the formerly [methyl-13C]Cys355 residue show that the radical species exists in a covalent cross-link between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate. X-ray structures of RlmN C118A show that, in the presence of SAM, the substitution does not alter the active site structure compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Together, these findings have new mechanistic implications for the role(s) of C118 and its counterpart in Cfr (C105) in catalysis, and suggest involvement of the residue in resolution of the cross-linked species via a radical mediated process

  1. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  2. P2X7 receptor-NADPH oxidase axis mediates protein radical formation and Kupffer cell activation in carbon tetrachloride-mediated steatohepatitis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saurabh; Rana, Ritu; Corbett, Jean; Kadiiska, Maria B; Goldstein, Joyce; Mason, Ronald P

    2012-05-01

    While some studies show that carbon tetrachloride-mediated metabolic oxidative stress exacerbates steatohepatitic-like lesions in obese mice, the redox mechanisms that trigger the innate immune system and accentuate the inflammatory cascade remain unclear. Here we have explored the role of the purinergic receptor P2X7-NADPH oxidase axis as a primary event in recognizing the heightened release of extracellular ATP from CCl(4)-treated hepatocytes and generating redox-mediated Kupffer cell activation in obese mice. We found that an underlying condition of obesity led to the formation of protein radicals and posttranslational nitration, primarily in Kupffer cells, at 24h post-CCl(4) administration. The free radical-mediated oxidation of cellular macromolecules, which was NADPH oxidase and P2X7 receptor-dependent, correlated well with the release of TNF-α and MCP-2 from Kupffer cells. The Kupffer cells in CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited increased expression of MHC Class II proteins and showed an activated phenotype. Increased expression of MHC Class II was inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin , P2X7 receptor antagonist A438709 hydrochloride, and genetic deletions of the NADPH oxidase p47 phox subunit or the P2X7 receptor. The P2X7 receptor acted upstream of NADPH oxidase activation by up-regulating the expression of the p47 phox subunit and p47 phox binding to the membrane subunit, gp91 phox. We conclude that the P2X7 receptor is a primary mediator of oxidative stress-induced exacerbation of inflammatory liver injury in obese mice via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms. PMID:22343416

  3. Free radical damage to protein and DNA: mechanisms involved and relevant observations on brain undergoing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Floyd, R A; Carney, J M

    1992-01-01

    Iron mediates damage to proteins and DNA. The mechanisms of damage not only involve iron but also oxygen free radical intermediates. Oxidative damage to DNA causes not only strand breaks, but also formation of specific base adducts, such as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Oxidative damage also inactivates certain enzymes such as glutamine synthetase. Novel methods of assessing oxidative damage to tissue, including quantitation of salicylate hydroxylation as an index of hydroxyl free radical flux as well as specific lesions to proteins and DNA, have yielded results that clearly show that ischemia/reperfusion injury to mongolian gerbil brain involves oxidatively damaging events. Aging in gerbil as well as human brain is also associated with increased oxidative damage. Recent novel observations have shown that the spin-trapping agent phenyl alpha-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) offers protection in gerbil brain during ischemia/reperfusion injury. We also show that oxidative damage to brain during aging is decreased by chronic administration of PBN. The mechanism of action of PBN may be related to its trapping of specific free radicals, which triggers a cascade of oxidative events that eventually lead to tissue injury. PMID:1510377

  4. The primary structure of a non-histone chromosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Walker, J M; Hastings, J R; Johns, E W

    1977-06-15

    The primary structure of the calf thymus non-histone chromosomal protein HMG-17 has been determined. The sequence was determined mainly from data provided by the peptides obtained by cleavage with staphylococcal protease. Additional information was obtained from peptides produced by cleavage with trypsin and alpha-protease (from Crotalus atrox venom) and by partial acid hydrolysis. The protein is 89 amino acid residues in length, and has molecular weight of 9247. The N-terminal two-thirds of the molecule is highly basic, 22 of the first 58 residues being lysine or arginine, whereas only seven residues are aspartic or glutamic acid residues. In contrast, the C-terminal region of the molecule has an overall negative charge, only four of the last 31 residues being basic, whereas seven aspartic and glutamic acid residues are present. The protein is also characterised by a region of high density of proline residues, there being six proline residues between residues 31 and 40. A region of 19 residues sequence similarity with the trout-specific histone, H6, is noted together with some smaller regions of sequence similarity with histones H1 and H5. PMID:330164

  5. Identification of a Unique Fe-S Cluster Binding Site in a Glycyl-Radical Type Microcompartment Shell Protein

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael C.; Wheatley, Nicole M.; Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gidaniyan, Soheil D.; Ahmed, Hoda; Yang, Zhongyu; McCarty, Krystal N.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the functional diversity of bacterial microcompartment (MCP) systems, which serve as protein-based metabolic organelles in diverse microbes. New types of MCPs have been identified, including the glycyl-radical propanediol (Grp) MCP. Within these elaborate protein complexes, BMC-domain shell proteins assemble to form a polyhedral barrier that encapsulates the enzymatic contents of the MCP. Interestingly, the Grp MCP contains a number of shell proteins with unusual sequence features. GrpU is one such shell protein, whose amino acid sequence is particularly divergent from other members of the BMC-domain superfamily of proteins that effectively defines all MCPs. Expression, purification, and subsequent characterization of the protein showed, unexpectedly, that it binds an iron-sulfur cluster. We determined X-ray crystal structures of two GrpU orthologs, providing the first structural insight into the homohexameric BMC-domain shell proteins of the Grp system. The X-ray structures of GrpU, both obtained in the apo form, combined with spectroscopic analyses and computational modeling, show that the metal cluster resides in the central pore of the BMC shell protein at a position of broken 6-fold symmetry. The result is a structurally polymorphic iron-sulfur cluster binding site that appears to be unique among metalloproteins studied to date. PMID:25102080

  6. Protein-resistant polyurethane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2009-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated simultaneous normal and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)). Oxygen plasma treatment was employed for initial activation of the PU surface. The grafted polymer chain length was adjusted by varying the molar ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution from 5:1 to 200:1. The modified PU surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Protein adsorption experiments from tris-buffered saline (TBS) and plasma were carried out to evaluate the protein-resistance of the surfaces. Adsorption from single and binary protein solutions as well as from plasma was significantly reduced after modification. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. Fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption on the 200:1 monomer/initiator surface was in the range of 3-33 ng/cm(2) representing 96-99% reduction compared with the unmodified PU. Fg adsorption from 0.01-10% plasma was as low as 1-5 ng/cm(2). Moreover, binary protein adsorption experiments using Fg and lysozyme (Lys) showed that protein size is a factor in the protein resistance of these surfaces. PMID:19148931

  7. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O((3)P)+allyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L; Alligood, Bridget W; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-09-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H(2)COCH)CH(2)Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H(2)COCH)CH(2)+Cl, c-(H(2)COCH)+CH(2)Cl, and C(3)H(4)O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H(2)COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C(2)H(3)O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H(2)CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C(3)H(4)O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H(2)COC)=CH(2); the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C(3)H(5)O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O((3)P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C(2)H(4) and H(2)CO+C(2)H(3) product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C(2)H(4) products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H(2)CO+C(2)H(3) product channel of the O((3)P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this

  8. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  9. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  10. Everolimus for Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Hori, Tomohiro; Kanda, Kaori; Kawamoto, Norio; Ibuka, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is an exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities in the intestinal lymphatics. In this article, we describe a 12-year-old boy with PIL that led to protein-losing enteropathy characterized by diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia associated with edema (serum albumin level: 1.0 g/dL), and hypogammaglobulinemia (serum IgG level: 144 mg/dL). Severe hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and tetany persisted despite a low-fat diet and propranolol. Everolimus (1.6 mg/m(2)/day) was added to his treatment as an antiangiogenic agent. With everolimus treatment, the patient's diarrhea resolved and replacement therapy for hypoproteinemia was less frequent. Hematologic and scintigraphy findings also improved (serum albumin level: 2.5 g/dL). There were no adverse reactions during the 12-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of everolimus use in a patient with PIL. PMID:26908672

  11. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  12. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Fibrinogen levels were found to be lowered to 62.8% of initial values (P < 0.05) in response to Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation. PMID:19017467

  13. Determinants of RNA polymerase alpha subunit for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma subunits: hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed Central

    Heyduk, T; Heyduk, E; Severinov, K; Tang, H; Ebright, R H

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) alpha subunit serves as the initiator for RNAP assembly, which proceeds according to the pathway 2 alpha-->alpha 2-->alpha 2 beta-->alpha 2 beta beta'-->alpha 2 beta beta' sigma. In this work, we have used hydroxyl-radical protein footprinting to define determinants of alpha for interaction with beta, beta', and sigma. Our results indicate that amino acids 30-75 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta (i.e., in alpha 2 beta, alpha 2 beta beta', and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma), and amino acids 175-210 of alpha are protected from hydroxyl-radical-mediated proteolysis upon interaction with beta' (i.e., in alpha 2 beta beta' and alpha 2 beta beta' sigma). The protected regions are conserved in the alpha homologs of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, archaeal, and chloroplast RNAPs and contain sites of substitutions that affect RNAP assembly. We conclude that the protected regions define determinants of alpha for direct functional interaction with beta and beta'. The observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta and the observed maximal magnitude of protection upon interaction with beta' both correspond to the expected value for complete protection of one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP (i.e., 50% protection). We propose that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta and that only one of the two alpha protomers of RNAP interacts with beta'. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8816769

  14. Principles of hydrogen radical mediated peptide/protein fragmentation during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki

    2016-07-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a very easy way to obtain large sequence tags and, thereby, reliable identification of peptides and proteins. Recently discovered new matrices have enhanced the MALDI-ISD yield and opened new research avenues. The use of reducing and oxidizing matrices for MALDI-ISD of peptides and proteins favors the production of fragmentation pathways involving "hydrogen-abundant" and "hydrogen-deficient" radical precursors, respectively. Since an oxidizing matrix provides information on peptide/protein sequences complementary to that obtained with a reducing matrix, MALDI-ISD employing both reducing and oxidizing matrices is a potentially useful strategy for de novo peptide sequencing. Moreover, a pseudo-MS(3) method provides sequence information about N- and C-terminus extremities in proteins and allows N- and C-terminal side fragments to be discriminated within the complex MALDI-ISD mass spectrum. The combination of high mass resolution of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) analyzer and the software suitable for MALDI-ISD facilitates the interpretation of MALDI-ISD mass spectra. A deeper understanding of the MALDI-ISD process is necessary to fully exploit this method. Thus, this review focuses first on the mechanisms underlying MALDI-ISD processes, followed by a discussion of MALDI-ISD applications in the field of proteomics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Mass Spec Rev 35:535-556, 2016. PMID:25286767

  15. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. Here, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms of IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site. PMID:25675500

  16. Using hydroxyl radical footprinting to explore the free energy landscape of protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Antonio N.; Ault, James R.; Radford, Sheena E.; Ashcroft, Alison E.

    2015-01-01

    Characterisation of the conformational states adopted during protein folding, including globally unfolded/disordered structures and partially folded intermediate species, is vital to gain fundamental insights into how a protein folds. In this work we employ fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) to map the structural changes that occur in the folding of the four-helical bacterial immunity protein, Im7. Oxidative footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is used to probe changes in the solvent accessibility of amino acid side-chains concurrent with the folding process, by quantifying the degree of oxidation experienced by the wild-type protein relative to a kinetically trapped, three-helical folding intermediate and an unfolded variant that lacks secondary structure. Analysis of the unfolded variant by FPOP–MS shows oxidative modifications consistent with the species adopting a solution conformation with a high degree of solvent accessibility. The folding intermediate, by contrast, experiences increased levels of oxidation relative to the wild-type, native protein only in regions destabilised by the amino acid substitutions introduced. The results demonstrate the utility of FPOP–MS to characterise protein variants in different conformational states and to provide insights into protein folding mechanisms that are complementary to measurements such as hydrogen/deuterium exchange labelling and Φ-value analysis. PMID:25746386

  17. Primary tumor SUVmax on preoperative FDG-PET/CT is a prognostic indicator in stage IA2-IIB cervical cancer patients treated with radical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shigetaka; Yahata, Tamaki; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Tanizaki, Yuko; Kobayashi, Aya; Shiro, Michihisa; Ota, Nami; Minami, Sawako; Terada, Masaki; Ino, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake by primary tumors on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in surgically resectable cervical cancer. A total of 59 patients with stage IA2-IIB cervical cancer who underwent preoperative FDG-PET/CT, followed by radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy, were included in the study. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured, and the association between the SUVmax and clinicopathological factors or patient outcomes was analyzed. The SUVmax was significantly higher in patients with an advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, lymph-vascular space involvement and large tumors. The overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with a high SUVmax were significantly lower compared with patients with a low SUVmax, using an optimal cut-off value of 7.36 for OS and 5.59 for PFS obtained from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Similarly, OS and PFS in patients with a high SUVmax were significantly lower in 39 patients with stage IB using a cut-off value of 7.90 and 6.69 for OS and PFS, respectively. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that the SUVmax of the primary tumor was an independent prognostic factor for impaired PFS in all patients and those with stage IB alone. These findings demonstrated that a high SUVmax on preoperative PET/CT was correlated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients receiving radical hysterectomy, suggesting that the SUVmax of the primary tumor may be a prognostic indicator for surgically-treated, early-stage invasive cervical cancer.

  18. The effectiveness of clove extracts in the inhibition of hydroxyl radical oxidation-induced structural and rheological changes in porcine myofibrillar protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongsheng; Diao, Jingjing; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation is a major cause of protein quality deterioration during the storage and processing of food. This study investigated the effects of clove extract (CE) on structural and rheological changes in porcine longissimus myofibrillar proteins (MP) and the effects of oxidizing radicals produced by a Fenton reaction system (FRS). Increased oxidation time was accompanied by increased carbonyl content, reduced Ca-ATPase activity, decreased enthalpy of denaturation, decreased thermal transition temperatures (P<0.05), and increased protein susceptibility to thermal aggregation. The addition of CE significantly inhibited carbonyl formation (P<0.05), enhanced solubility and thermal stability, and improved the gel formation ability (storage modulus, loss modulus) of MP. The protective effect of CE on protein denaturation was demonstrated by its efficacy in maintaining Ca-ATPase activity and decreasing the degree of protein aggregation. Overall, the hydroxyl radical-induced loss of the structural and functional properties of MP was significantly reduced by the presence of CE. PMID:26340742

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis of HOCl- and free-radical-induced damage to lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Andrew R; Spickett, Corinne M

    2008-10-01

    In inflammatory diseases, release of oxidants leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules. HOCl (hypochlorous acid), released by the myeloperoxidase/H2O2/Cl- system, can cause formation of phospholipid chlorohydrins, or alpha-chloro-fatty aldehydes from plasmalogens. It can attack several amino acid residues in proteins, causing post-translational oxidative modifications of proteins, but the formation of 3-chlorotyrosine is one of the most stable markers of HOCl-induced damage. Soft-ionization MS has proved invaluable for detecting the occurrence of oxidative modifications to both phospholipids and proteins, and characterizing the products generated by HOCl-induced attack. For both phospholipids and proteins, the application of advanced mass spectrometric methods such as product or precursor ion scanning and neutral loss analysis can yield information both about the specific nature of the oxidative modification and the biomolecule modified. The ideal is to be able to apply these methods to complex biological or clinical samples, to determine the site-specific modifications of particular cellular components. This is important for understanding disease mechanisms and offers potential for development of novel biomarkers of inflammatory diseases. In the present paper, we review some of the progress that has been made towards this goal. PMID:18793192

  20. Radical scavenging and reducing ability of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sivakumar; Kristinsson, Hordur G; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2008-11-12

    Enzymatically hydrolyzed fish protein hydrolysates could be used as a source of antioxidative nutraceuticals. In our current work, we have investigated alkali-solubilized tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus) protein hydrolysates for their ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and for their reducing power. Tilapia protein isolate was prepared by an alkaline solubilization technique and used as a substrate for enzyme hydrolysis. Cryotin, protease A 'Amano' 2, protease N 'Amano', Neutrase and Flavourzyme, were used separately to determine their effectiveness in hydrolyzing tilapia protein isolate. ROS scavenging ability was quantified using an isoluminol enhanced chemiluminescent assay in the presence of a) hydrogen peroxide or b) mononuclear cells isolated from human blood. Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of the hydrolysates using 2, 2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) or 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), were also investigated. Results showed that, in general, the TEAC, FRAP values and ROS scavenging ability of the hydrolysates increased with an increase in the degree of hydrolysis. Among the different hydrolysates, those prepared using Cryotin were most effective and Amano A2 hydrolysates were least effective in scavenging ABTS*(+) and ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide. However, FRAP assay showed that hydrolysates prepared using Flavourzyme were most effective, and Amano N and Neutrase hydrolysates were least effective in reducing ferric ions. No significant difference was observed among the hydrolysates produced with different enzymes in their ability to scavenge ROS generated by phorbol myristate acetate stimulated mononuclear cells. These results shed light on the in vitro ROS scavenging ability of alkali solubilized tilapia protein hydrolysates, as well as potential nutraceutical use of these hydrolysates. PMID:18828605

  1. Primary processes in heme-based sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Ursula; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Vos, Marten H

    2013-09-01

    A wide and still rapidly increasing range of heme-based sensor proteins has been discovered over the last two decades. At the molecular level, these proteins function as bistable switches in which the catalytic activity of an enzymatic domain is altered mostly by binding or dissociation of small gaseous ligands (O2, NO or CO) to the heme in a sensor domain. The initial "signal" at the heme level is subsequently transmitted within the protein to the catalytic site, ultimately leading to adapted expression levels of specific proteins. Making use of the photolability of the heme-ligand bond that mimics thermal dissociation, early processes in this intra-protein signaling pathway can be followed using ultrafast optical spectroscopic techniques; they also occur on timescales accessible to molecular dynamics simulations. Experimental studies performed over the last decade on proteins including the sensors FixL (O2), CooA (CO) and soluble guanylate cyclase (NO) are reviewed with an emphasis on emerging general mechanisms. After heme-ligand bond breaking, the ligand can escape from the heme pocket and eventually from the protein, or rebind directly to the heme. Remarkably, in all sensor proteins the rebinding, specifically of the sensed ligand, is highly efficient. This "ligand trap" property possibly provides means to smoothen the effects of fast environmental fluctuations on the switching frequency. For 6-coordinate proteins, where exchange between an internal heme-bound residue and external gaseous ligands occurs, the study of early processes starting from the unliganded form indicates that mobility of the internal ligand may facilitate signal transfer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. PMID:23485911

  2. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-09-07

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}+Cl, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)+CH{sub 2}Cl, and C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H{sub 2}COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H{sub 2}CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H{sub 2}COC)=CH{sub 2}; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O({sup 3}P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channel of the O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from

  3. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  4. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  5. DPPH radical scavenging activity of a mixture of fatty acids and peptide-containing compounds in a protein hydrolysate of Jatropha curcas seed cake.

    PubMed

    Phengnuam, Thanyarat; Goroncy, Alexander K; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2013-12-01

    Jatropha curcas, a tropical plant, has great potential commercial relevance as its seeds have high oil content. The seeds can be processed into high-quality biofuel producing seed cake as a byproduct. The seed cake, however, has not gotten much attention toward its potential usefulness. This work was aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of different fractions of a protein hydrolysate from J. curcas seed cake and to elucidate the molecular structures of the antioxidants. Seed cake was first processed into crude protein isolate and the protein was hydrolyzed by Neutrase. The hydrolysate obtained from 1 h of Neutrase hydrolysis showed the strongest antioxidant activity against DPPH radical (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl). After a purification series of protein hydrolysate by liquid chromatography, chemicals acting as DPPH radical inhibitors were found to be a mixture of fatty acids, fatty acid derivatives, and a small amount of peptides characterized by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. PMID:24191657

  6. Cigarette smoke-induced reduction in binding of the salivary translocator protein is not mediated by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy of the head and neck and its main inducer is exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) in the presence of saliva. It is commonly accepted that CS contributes to the pathogenesis of oral cancer via reactive free radicals and volatile aldehydes. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is an intracellular receptor involved in proliferation and apoptosis, and has been linked to various types of cancer. The presence of TSPO in human saliva has been linked to oral cancer, and its binding affinity to its ligand is reduced following exposure to CS. In the present study we wished to further investigate the mechanism behind the CS-induced reduction of TSPO binding by exploring the possible mediatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volatile aldehydes in this process. We first analyzed TSPO binding in control saliva and in saliva exposed to CS in the presence and absence of various antioxidants. These experiments found that TSPO binding ability was not reversed by any of the antioxidants added, suggesting that CS exerts its effect on TSPO via mechanisms that do not involve volatile aldehydes and free radicals tested. Next, we analyzed TSPO binding in saliva following addition of exogenous ROS in the form of H2O2. These experiments found that TSPO binding was enhanced due to the treatment, once again showing that the CS-induced TSPO binding reduction is not mediated by this common form of ROS. However, the previously reported CS-induced reduction in salivary TSPO binding together with the role of TSPO in cells and its link to cancer strongly suggest that TSPO has a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced oral cancer. The importance of further elucidating the mechanisms behind it should be emphasized. PMID:26582415

  7. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Michael J; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Leapman, Richard D; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W; Kemner, Kenneth M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-01-01

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of Mn-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR-resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR-sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions that inhibited Mn accumulation or Mn redox cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR-resistant and IR-sensitive wild-type bacteria, our findings support the idea that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection. PMID:17373858

  8. Protein oxidation implicated as the primary determinant of bacterial radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Daly, Michael J; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Leapman, Richard D; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W; Kemner, Kenneth M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-04-01

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of Mn-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR-resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR-sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications that introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions that inhibited Mn accumulation or Mn redox cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR-resistant and IR-sensitive wild-type bacteria, our findings support the idea that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection. PMID:17373858

  9. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Vasilenko, A.; Zhai, M.; leapman, Richard D.; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-04-02

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of manganese-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications which introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions which inhibited Mn-accumulation or Mn redox-cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR resistant and sensitive bacteria, our findings support that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  10. The fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic coating by electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichuan; Yang, Guang; Liang, Bo; Fang, Lu; Ma, Guanglong; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Shengfu; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-02-01

    A well-controllable electrochemically mediated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (e-siATRP) method for the fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic hydrogel coatings based on poly(sulbetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) was developed in this work. The effects of the electric condition on polymerization as well as its antifouling performances both in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. Different potentials (-0.08 V, -0.15 V and -0.22 V) and polymerization times (from 8 to 48 h) were chosen to study the polymerization procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the properties of the polymer layers. Ellipsometry measurements showed that a higher potential provided faster polymerization and thicker polymer layers; however, the protein absorption experiments showed that the best polymerization condition was under a constant potential of -0.15 V and 32 h, under which the protein absorption was 0.8% in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (compared to a bare gold electrode). The electrodes with a pSBMA coating effectively deduced the current sensitivity decay both in undiluted serum and in vivo. The usage of the commercially available polymerization monomer of SBMA, the simple convenient synthesis process regardless of the presence of oxygen and the excellent controllability of e-siATRP make it a very promising and universal technique in the preparation of zwitterionic polymer coatings, especially in the development of biocompatible material for implantable devices such as neural and biosensor electrodes. PMID:25463508

  11. The primary dynamics in protein folding: the earliest kinetic steps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    1996-03-01

    A novel laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) of 20 C or more is used to initiate the unfolding process of peptides and proteins on the picosecond time scale, and amide I time-resolved infrared absorbance transients are used to characterize the resulting kinetics. We have used this method to study the kinetics of folding and unfolding of a small 21 residue alanine based peptide and molten globule and native states of apomyoglobin, models for the helix which is an basic motif found in proteins. An essential result of our study is that the folding kinetics of a short length of peptide can occur within a few tens of nanoseconds which is much shorter than the time scale of the formation of intramolecular tertiary contacts from one point of a polypeptide chain to another. Furthermore, we observed that helices stabilized by tertiary contact formation unfold slower than helices surrounded by solvent by three orders of magnitude. These results bear directly on the protein folding problem, that is how do proteins fold from a large number of heterogeneous unfolded states to find the specific biologically active folded state on biologically relevent time scales, by suggesting that secondary structure forms first followed by tertiary structure. This work is a collaborative effort with R. GILMANSHIN at City College and S. WILLIAMS, R. B. DYER, and W. H. WOODRUFF at CST-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  12. Primary photoinduced protein response in bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Gross, Ruth; Wolf, Matthias M N; Schumann, Christian; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Li, Lin; Engelhard, Martin; Trentmann, Oliver; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Diller, Rolf

    2009-10-21

    Essential for the biological function of the light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin (BR), and the light sensor, sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), is the coupling of the activated retinal chromophore to the hosting protein moiety. In order to explore the dynamics of this process we have performed ultrafast transient mid-infrared spectroscopy on isotopically labeled BR and SRII samples. These include SRII in D(2)O buffer, BR in H(2)(18)O medium, SRII with (15)N-labeled protein, and BR with (13)C(14)(13)C(15)-labeled retinal chromophore. Via observed shifts of infrared difference bands after photoexcitation and their kinetics we provide evidence for nonchromophore bands in the amide I and the amide II region of BR and SRII. A band around 1550 cm(-1) is very likely due to an amide II vibration. In the amide I region, contributions of modes involving exchangeable protons and modes not involving exchangeable protons can be discerned. Observed bands in the amide I region of BR are not due to bending vibrations of protein-bound water molecules. The observed protein bands appear in the amide I region within the system response of ca. 0.3 ps and in the amide II region within 3 ps, and decay partially in both regions on a slower time scale of 9-18 ps. Similar observations have been presented earlier for BR5.12, containing a nonisomerizable chromophore (R. Gross et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 7851-7860). Thus, the results suggest a common mechanism for ultrafast protein response in the artificial and the native system besides isomerization, which could be induced by initial chromophore polarization. PMID:19778046

  13. Autoregulation of Free Radicals via Uncoupling Protein Control in Pancreatic β-Cell Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Heuett, William J.; Periwal, Vipul

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cells sense the ambient blood-glucose concentration and secrete insulin to signal other tissues to take up glucose. Mitochondria play a key role in this response as they metabolize nutrients to produce ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), both of which are involved in insulin secretion signaling. Based on data available in the literature and previously developed mathematical models, we present a model of glucose-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and ROS production and control in β-cells. The model is consistent with a number of experimental observations reported in the literature. Most notably, it captures the nonlinear rise in the proton leak rate at high membrane potential and the increase in this leak due to uncoupling protein (UCP) activation by ROS. The functional forms used to model ROS production and UCP regulation yield insight into these mechanisms, as many details have not yet been unraveled in the experimental literature. We examine short- and long-term effects of UCP activation inhibition and changes in the mitochondrial density on mitochondrial responses to glucose. Results suggest increasing mitochondrial density while decreasing UCP activity may be an effective way to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:20338842

  14. Radical surgical resection for giant primary mediastinal endodermal sinus tumour with pulmonary metastasis after chemotherapy: can be curative

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Ikram Ulhaq; Rahhal, Mohammed; Khurshid, Imtiaz; Mutairi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Primary non-seminomatous germ cell tumours of anterior mediastinum are uncommon. Endodermal sinus tumour of the anterior mediastinum (yolk sac) is a rare but lethal neoplasm. We present a case of an 18-year-old man who presented with chest pain, cough and haemosputum with markedly raised serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels above 112 000 ng/mL. Chest roentgenogram and CT showed a giant anterior mediastinal mass. CT guided biopsy revealed a diagnosis of endodermal sinus tumour. After the completion of chemotherapy, extensive surgical resection was carried out along with the right lung metastastectomy. Five years postresection follow-up the patient is disease free with normal serum tumour markers. This is the longest survival ever reported of such tumours with highest AFP level (>112 000 ng/mL) and lung metastasis. PMID:24939455

  15. Theoretical fluorescence induction curves derived from coupled differential equations describing the primary photochemistry of photosystem II by an exciton-radical pair equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Trissl, H.-W.; Gao, Y.; Wulf, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence induction curves were calculated from a molecular model for the primary photophysical and photochemical processes of photosystem II that includes reversible exciton trapping by open (PHQA) and closed (PHQ-A) reaction centers (RCs), charge stabilization as well as quenching by oxidized (P+HQ(-)A) RCs. For the limiting case of perfectly connected photosynthetic units (“lake model”) and thermal equilibrium between the primary radical pair (P+H-) and the excited singlet state, the primary reactions can be mathematically formulated by a set of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE). These were numerically solved for weak flashes in a recursive way to simulate experiments with continuous illumination. Using recently published values for the molecular rate constants, this procedure yielded the time dependence of closed RCs as well as of the fluorescence yield (= fluorescence induction curves). The theoretical curves displayed the same sigmoidal shapes as experimental fluorescence induction curves. From the time development of closed RCs and the fluorescence yield, it was possible to check currently assumed proportionalities between the fraction of closed RCs and either (a) the variable fluorescence, (b) the complementary area above the fluorescence induction curve, or (c) the complementary area normalized to the variable fluorescence. By changing selected molecular rate constants, it is shown that, in contrast to current beliefs, none of these correlations obeys simple laws. The time dependence of these quantities is strongly nonexponential. In the presence of substances that quench the excited state, the model predicts straight lines in Stern-Volmer plots. We further conclude that it is impossible to estimate the degree of physical interunit energy transfer from the sigmoidicity of the fluorescence induction curve or from the curvature of the variable fluorescence plotted versus the fraction of closed RCs. PMID:19431889

  16. The quantification of the histochemical protein staining with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HNA) demonstrating primary amino groups of proteins.

    PubMed

    Nöhammer, G

    1991-01-01

    The usefulness of the HNA-pH4-1d staining, which histochemically demonstrates primary protein amino groups under the conditions used, for the microphotometric quantification of proteins was investigated. A correlation (r = 0.986) has been found between the mean protein contents of fresh frozen and fixed sections prepared from different tissues of rats and the corresponding mean integrated extinction values determined histophotometrically after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A histophotometric extinction of E = 0.284 corresponded to 10(-12) g protein. The mean integrated extinction values determined cytophotometrically of different single cells and nuclei stained using the tetrazonium coupling method for proteins correlated (r = 0.989) with corresponding extinction values measured after HNA-pH4-1d staining. A cytophotometric extinction after HNA-pH4-1d staining of E = 0.130 correspond to 10(-12) g protein. PMID:2048388

  17. Interaction of myelin basic protein with cytoskeletal and signaling proteins in cultured primary oligodendrocytes and N19 oligodendroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) isoforms are intrinsically-disordered proteins of 14–21.5 kDa in size arising from the Golli (Gene in the Oligodendrocyte Lineage) gene complex, and are responsible for formation of the multilayered myelin sheath in the central nervous system. The predominant membrane-associated isoform of MBP is not simply a structural component of compact myelin but is highly post-translationally modified and multi-functional, having interactions with numerous proteins such as Ca2+-calmodulin, and with actin, tubulin, and proteins with SH3-domains, which it can tether to a lipid membrane in vitro. It co-localizes with such proteins in primary oligodendrocytes (OLGs) and in early developmental N19-OLGs transfected with fluorescently-tagged MBP. Results To provide further evidence for MBP associations with these proteins in vivo, we show here that MBP isoforms are co-immunoprecipitated from detergent extracts of primary OLGs together with actin, tubulin, zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), cortactin, and Fyn kinase. We also carry out live-cell imaging of N19-OLGs co-transfected with fluorescent MBP and actin, and show that when actin filaments re-assemble after recovery from cytochalasin D treatment, MBP and actin are rapidly enriched and co-localized at certain sites at the plasma membrane and in newly-formed membrane ruffles. The MBP and actin distributions change similarly with time, suggesting a specific and dynamic association. Conclusions These results provide more direct evidence for association of the predominant 18.5-kDa MBP isoform with these proteins in primary OLGs and in live cells than previously could be inferred from co-localization observations. This study supports further a role for classic MBP isoforms in protein-protein interactions during membrane and cytoskeletal extension and remodeling in OLGs. PMID:24956930

  18. E22Δ Mutation in Amyloid β-Protein Promotes β-Sheet Transformation, Radical Production, and Synaptotoxicity, But Not Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Murakami, Kazuma; Izuo, Naotaka; Kume, Toshiaki; Akaike, Akinori; Nagata, Tetsu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki; Tomiyama, Takami; Takuma, Hiroshi; Mori, Hiroshi; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Oligomers of 40- or 42-mer amyloid β-protein (Aβ40, Aβ42) cause cognitive decline and synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. We proposed the importance of a turn at Glu22 and Asp23 of Aβ42 to induce its neurotoxicity through the formation of radicals. Recently, a novel deletion mutant at Glu22 (E22Δ) of Aβ42 was reported to accelerate oligomerization and synaptotoxicity. To investigate this mechanism, the effects of the E22Δ mutation in Aβ42 and Aβ40 on the transformation of β-sheets, radical production, and neurotoxicity were examined. Both mutants promoted β-sheet transformation and the formation of radicals, while their neurotoxicity was negative. In contrast, E22P-Aβ42 with a turn at Glu22 and Asp23 exhibited potent neurotoxicity along with the ability to form radicals and potent synaptotoxicity. These data suggest that conformational change in E22Δ-Aβ is similar to that in E22P-Aβ42 but not the same, since E22Δ-Aβ42 exhibited no cytotoxicity, unlike E22P-Aβ42 and wild-type Aβ42. PMID:21234376

  19. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  20. The Radical-Pair Mechanism of Magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Hore, P J; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Although it has been known for almost half a century that migratory birds can detect the direction of the Earth's magnetic field, the primary sensory mechanism behind this remarkable feat is still unclear. The leading hypothesis centers on radical pairs-magnetically sensitive chemical intermediates formed by photoexcitation of cryptochrome proteins in the retina. Our primary aim here is to explain the chemical and physical aspects of the radical-pair mechanism to biologists and the biological and chemical aspects to physicists. In doing so, we review the current state of knowledge on magnetoreception mechanisms. We dare to hope that this tutorial will stimulate new interdisciplinary experimental and theoretical work that will shed much-needed additional light on this fascinating problem in sensory biology. PMID:27216936

  1. Predictability of gene ontology slim-terms from primary structure information in Embryophyta plant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are the key elements on the path from genetic information to the development of life. The roles played by the different proteins are difficult to uncover experimentally as this process involves complex procedures such as genetic modifications, injection of fluorescent proteins, gene knock-out methods and others. The knowledge learned from each protein is usually annotated in databases through different methods such as the proposed by The Gene Ontology (GO) consortium. Different methods have been proposed in order to predict GO terms from primary structure information, but very few are available for large-scale functional annotation of plants, and reported success rates are much less than the reported by other non-plant predictors. This paper explores the predictability of GO annotations on proteins belonging to the Embryophyta group from a set of features extracted solely from their primary amino acid sequence. Results High predictability of several GO terms was found for Molecular Function and Cellular Component. As expected, a lower degree of predictability was found on Biological Process ontology annotations, although a few biological processes were easily predicted. Proteins related to transport and transcription were particularly well predicted from primary structure information. The most discriminant features for prediction were those related to electric charges of the amino-acid sequence and hydropathicity derived features. Conclusions An analysis of GO-slim terms predictability in plants was carried out, in order to determine single categories or groups of functions that are most related with primary structure information. For each highly predictable GO term, the responsible features of such successfulness were identified and discussed. In addition to most published studies, focused on few categories or single ontologies, results in this paper comprise a complete landscape of GO predictability from primary structure encompassing 75 GO

  2. A conserved BURP domain defines a novel group of plant proteins with unusual primary structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Boutilier, K A; van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Miki, B L

    1998-09-01

    We have identified a new class of plant proteins containing a common C-terminal region, which we have termed the BURP domain. These proteins are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consist of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain -- a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. These individual modules appear to be combined to form two main classes of BURP domain proteins. The BURP domain proteins, despite the similarities in their primary structural features, show no obvious similarities in the tissues or conditions under which they are expressed. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. PMID:9790599

  3. Low plasma protein nitrotyrosine levels distinguish primary Raynaud's phenomenon from scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Kingdon, E J; Mani, A R; Frost, M T; Denton, C P; Powis, S H; Black, C M; Moore, K P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hypothesis that increased formation of reactive nitrogen species may contribute to the vascular pathology that develops in patients with connective tissue disease such as scleroderma. Patients and methods The level of protein‐bound nitrotyrosine in plasma was measured by stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in 11 patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon, 37 with scleroderma, 13 with chronic renal impairment, and in 23 healthy controls. Results Plasma protein‐bound nitrotyrosine was markedly decreased in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (mean (SEM) 0.60 (0.06) ng/mg dry protein) compared with patients with scleroderma (1.78 (0.21) ng/mg protein), chronic renal impairment (1.42 (0.17) ng/mg protein) or healthy controls (1.63±0.15 ng/mg protein, ANOVA p<0.001). Conclusion These data suggest that there is decreased nitration of plasma proteins, or increased degradation of nitrated proteins from the circulation of patients with primary but not secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:16308344

  4. Ramipril-induced delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury involves bradykinin B2 receptor-NO pathway and protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhu-Qiu; Chen, Xiu

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injuries ex vivo and to determine the possible role of the bradykinin B2–nitric oxide (NO) pathway, prostaglandins(PGs) and protein synthesis in this delayed adaptive response.Rats were pretreated with ramipril (10 or 50 μg kg−1, i.v.) and hearts were isolated after 24, 48 and 72 h. Langendorff hearts were subjected to 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-induced injury.Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximal increase velocity (+dP/dtmax), coronary flow (CF), heart rate (HR), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in coronary effluent and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the myocardium were measured.The results showed that in the DPPH control group, 20 min after free radical-induced injury, LVDP, +dP/dtmax, CF, HR declined, whereas TBARS and LDH increased significantly. The above cardiac function parameters were significantly improved in RAM-pretreated rats after 24 and 48 h.Pretreatment with HOE 140, the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, NG-nitro-L-arginine, the NO synthase inhibitor, and actinomycin D, the RNA transcription inhibitor, prior to ramipril injection abolished the beneficial effects of ramipril at 24 h while indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, pretreatment had no effect on ramipril-induced delayed protection.In conclusion, ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury in the rat heart. This delayed protection was sustained for 48 h, is associated with the bradykinin B2 receptor–NO pathway and depends on protein but not prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:9806340

  5. Protein transport into secondary plastids and the evolution of primary and secondary plastids.

    PubMed

    Kroth, Peter G

    2002-01-01

    Chloroplasts are key organelles in algae and plants due to their photosynthetic abilities. They are thought to have evolved from prokaryotic cyanobacteria taken up by a eukaryotic host cell in a process termed primary endocytobiosis. In addition, a variety of organisms have evolved by subsequent secondary endocytobioses, in which a heterotrophic host cell engulfed a eukaryotic alga. Both processes dramatically enhanced the complexity of the resulting cells. Since the first version of the endosymbiotic theory was proposed more than 100 years ago, morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular data have been collected substantiating the emerging picture about the origin and the relationship of individual organisms with different primary or secondary chloroplast types. Depending on their origin, plastids in different lineages may have two, three, or four envelope membranes. The evolutionary success of endocytobioses depends, among other factors, on the specific exchange of molecules between the host and endosymbiont. This raises questions concerning how targeting of nucleus-encoded proteins into the different plastid types occurs and how these processes may have developed. Most studies of protein translocation into plastids have been performed on primary plastids, but in recent years more complex protein-translocation systems of secondary plastids have been investigated. Analyses of transport systems in different algal lineages with secondary plastids reveal that during evolution existing translocation machineries were recycled or recombined rather than being developed de novo. This review deals with current knowledge about the evolution and function of primary and secondary plastids and the respective protein-targeting systems. PMID:12455749

  6. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  7. Expression of Yes Associated Protein, YAP, Modulates Survivin Expression in Primary Liver Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F.; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Klein, Alison P.; Nayar, Suresh K.; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice following genetic manipulation of Yes associated protein (YAP), a transcription co-activator. Here we comprehensively documented YAP protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear YAP expression is significantly increased in human ICC and HCC. We found that increased YAP protein levels in HCC are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification, transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein (IAPs) family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both HCC and ICC. We found nuclear YAP expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both ICC and HCC. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress YAP in the liver, we found Survivin mRNA expression depends upon YAP protein levels. Our findings suggested that YAP contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression. PMID:22436626

  8. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  9. The use of high field/frequency EPR in studies of radical and metal sites in proteins and small inorganic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Barra, Anne-Laure

    2002-04-01

    Low temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with frequencies between 95 and 345 GHz and magnetic fields up to 12 T have been used to study radicals and metal sites in proteins and small inorganic model complexes. We have studied radicals, Fe, Cu and Mn containing proteins. For S=1/2 systems, the high frequency method can resolve the g-value anisotropy. It was used in mouse ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to show the presence of a hydrogen bond to the tyrosyl radical oxygen. At 285 GHz the type 2 Cu(II) signal in the complex enzyme laccase is clearly resolved from the Hg(II) containing laccase peroxide adduct. For simple metal sites, the systems over S=1/2 can be described by the spin Hamiltonian: HS= BgS+ D[ Sz2- S( S+1)/3+ E/ D ( Sx2- Sy2)]. From the high frequency EPR the D-value can be determined directly by, (I) shifts of geff for half-integer spin systems with large D-values as observed at 345 GHz on an Fe(II)NOEDTA complex, which is best described as S=3/2 system with D=11.5 cm -1, E=0.1 cm -1 and gx= gy= gz=2.0; (II) measuring the outermost signal, for systems with small D values, distant of (2 S-1)*∣ D∣ from the center of the spectrum as observed in S=5/2 Fe(III)EDTA. In Mn(II) substituted mouse RNR R2 protein the weakly interacting Mn(II) at X-band could be observed as decoupled Mn(II) at 285 GHz.

  10. The Radical S-Adenosyl-L-methionine Enzyme QhpD Catalyzes Sequential Formation of Intra-protein Sulfur-to-Methylene Carbon Thioether Bonds.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Hori, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Motonari; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Okajima, Toshihide

    2015-04-24

    The bacterial enzyme designated QhpD belongs to the radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes and participates in the post-translational processing of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. QhpD is essential for the formation of intra-protein thioether bonds within the small subunit (maturated QhpC) of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. We overproduced QhpD from Paracoccus denitrificans as a stable complex with its substrate QhpC, carrying the 28-residue leader peptide that is essential for the complex formation. Absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra together with the analyses of iron and sulfur contents suggested the presence of multiple (likely three) [4Fe-4S] clusters in the purified and reconstituted QhpD. In the presence of a reducing agent (sodium dithionite), QhpD catalyzed the multiple-turnover reaction of reductive cleavage of SAM into methionine and 5'-deoxyadenosine and also the single-turnover reaction of intra-protein sulfur-to-methylene carbon thioether bond formation in QhpC bound to QhpD, producing a multiknotted structure of the polypeptide chain. Homology modeling and mutagenic analysis revealed several conserved residues indispensable for both in vivo and in vitro activities of QhpD. Our findings uncover another challenging reaction catalyzed by a radical SAM enzyme acting on a ribosomally translated protein substrate. PMID:25778402

  11. The Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme QhpD Catalyzes Sequential Formation of Intra-protein Sulfur-to-Methylene Carbon Thioether Bonds*

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Hori, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Motonari; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Okajima, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme designated QhpD belongs to the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes and participates in the post-translational processing of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. QhpD is essential for the formation of intra-protein thioether bonds within the small subunit (maturated QhpC) of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. We overproduced QhpD from Paracoccus denitrificans as a stable complex with its substrate QhpC, carrying the 28-residue leader peptide that is essential for the complex formation. Absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra together with the analyses of iron and sulfur contents suggested the presence of multiple (likely three) [4Fe-4S] clusters in the purified and reconstituted QhpD. In the presence of a reducing agent (sodium dithionite), QhpD catalyzed the multiple-turnover reaction of reductive cleavage of SAM into methionine and 5′-deoxyadenosine and also the single-turnover reaction of intra-protein sulfur-to-methylene carbon thioether bond formation in QhpC bound to QhpD, producing a multiknotted structure of the polypeptide chain. Homology modeling and mutagenic analysis revealed several conserved residues indispensable for both in vivo and in vitro activities of QhpD. Our findings uncover another challenging reaction catalyzed by a radical SAM enzyme acting on a ribosomally translated protein substrate. PMID:25778402

  12. Overexpression of Membrane Proteins in Primary and Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghong; Dahdaleh, Fadi S.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; O’Dorisio, M. Sue; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Small bowel and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (SBNETs and PNETs) are rare tumors whose incidence is increasing. Drugs targeting the somatostatin receptor are beneficial in these tumors. To identify additional cell-surface targets, we recently found receptors and membrane proteins with gene expression significantly different from adjacent normal tissues in a small number of primary SBNETs and PNETs. We set out to validate these expression differences in a large group of primary neuroendocrine tumors and to determine whether they are present in corresponding liver and lymph node metastases. Methods Primary SBNETs and PNETs, normal tissue, nodal, and liver metastases were collected and mRNA expression of six target genes was determined by quantitative PCR. Expression was normalized to GAPDH and POLR2A internal controls, and differences as compared to normal tissue were assessed by Welch’s t test. Results Gene expression was determined in 45 primary PNETs with 20 nodal and 17 liver metastases, and 51 SBNETs with 50 nodal and 29 liver metastases. Compared to normal tissue, the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) showed significant overexpression in both primary and metastatic SBNETs and PNETs. Significant overexpression was observed for MUC13 and MEP1B in PNET primary tumors, and for GPR113 in primary SBNETs and their metastases. SCTR and ADORA1 were significantly underexpressed in PNETs and their metastases. OXTR protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions OXTR is significantly overexpressed relative to normal tissue in primary SBNETs and PNETs, and this overexpression is present in their liver and lymph node metastases, making OXTR a promising target for imaging and therapeutic interventions. PMID:24114056

  13. Podocalyxin-like protein expression in primary colorectal cancer and synchronous lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have shown that membranous expression of podocalyxin-like protein (PODXL) is associated with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we compared PODXL expression in primary CRC and synchronous lymph node metastases. We further analyzed whether its expression changed in rectal tumours after neoadjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and results The studied cohort consists of 73 consecutive patients from the South-Swedish Colorectal Cancer Biobank. Immunohistochemical PODXL expression was examined on full-face sections from all primary tumours and all 140 available lymph node metastases from 31 cases. Membranous PODXL expression was denoted in 18/73 (24,7%) primary tumours, with a high concordance between primary and metastatic lesions. While all negative primary tumours had negative metastases, some PODXL positive primaries had a varying proportion of positive and negative metastatic lymph nodes. PODXL expression was also found to be mainly unaltered in pre- and post-irradiation surgically resected tumour specimens in rectal cancer patients (n=16). Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that analysis of PODXL expression in the primary tumour is sufficient for its use as a prognostic and treatment predictive biomarker in CRC, also in patients with metastatic disease. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9014177329634352 PMID:23819542

  14. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  15. Efficient delivery of nuclease proteins for genome editing in human stem cells and primary cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Yang, Yifeng; Wang, Nan; Shui, Sailan; Kim, Sojung; Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Kim, Jin-Soo; Barbas, Carlos F

    2015-11-01

    Targeted nucleases, including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), have provided researchers with the ability to manipulate nearly any genomic sequence in human cells and model organisms. However, realizing the full potential of these genome-modifying technologies requires their safe and efficient delivery into relevant cell types. Unlike methods that rely on expression from nucleic acids, the direct delivery of nuclease proteins to cells provides rapid action and fast turnover, leading to fewer off-target effects while maintaining high rates of targeted modification. These features make nuclease protein delivery particularly well suited for precision genome engineering. Here we describe procedures for implementing protein-based genome editing in human embryonic stem cells and primary cells. Protocols for the expression, purification and delivery of ZFN proteins, which are intrinsically cell-permeable; TALEN proteins, which can be internalized via conjugation with cell-penetrating peptide moieties; and Cas9 ribonucleoprotein, whose nucleofection into cells facilitates rapid induction of multiplexed modifications, are described, along with procedures for evaluating nuclease protein activity. Once they are constructed, nuclease proteins can be expressed and purified within 6 d, and they can be used to induce genomic modifications in human cells within 2 d. PMID:26492140

  16. Primary structure of a structural protein from the cuticle of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed Central

    Højrup, P; Andersen, S O; Roepstorff, P

    1986-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a structural protein isolated from pharate cuticle of the locust Locusta migratoria was determined. The protein has an unusual amino acid composition: 42% of the residues are alanine and only 14 of the 20 common amino acid residues are present. The primary structure consists of regions enriched in particular amino acid residues. The N-terminal region and a region close to the C-terminus are enriched in glycine. The rest of the protein is dominated by alanine, except for two short regions enriched in hydrophilic residues. Almost all the proline residues are situated in the alanine-rich regions in a conserved sequence 'A-A-P-A/V'. An internal duplication has taken place covering most of the protein except for the glycine-rich regions. Owing to the unusual features of the protein a combination of automated Edman degradations and plasma-desorption m.s. was used to determine the complete sequence. The protein does not show sequence homology to other proteins, but proteins divided into regions enriched in the same kind of amino acid residues have been isolated from other insect structures. PMID:3790088

  17. Identification of differentially expressed proteins from primary versus metastatic pancreatic cancer cells using subcellular proteomics.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Kimberly Q; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Sindram, David; Russo, Mark W; Han, David K; Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Hwang, Sun-Il

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with nearly equal yearly rates of diagnosis and death. Current therapies have failed to improve outcomes due to rapid disease progression and late stage at presentation. Recently, pathways involved in progression and metastasis have been elucidated; however, new knowledge has not generated more effective therapies. We report on the use of subcellular fractionation and liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry to identify 3,907 proteins in four pancreatic cancer cell lines, 540 of which are unique to primary cancer cells, and 487 unique to cells derived from metastatic sites. Statistical analysis identified 134 proteins significantly differentially expressed between the two populations. The subcellular localization of these proteins was determined and expression levels for four targets were validated using western blot techniques. These identified proteins can be further investigated to determine their roles in progression and metastasis and may serve as therapeutic targets in the development of more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer. PMID:22990105

  18. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  19. Molecular cloning and primary structure of human glial fibrillary acidic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, S.A.; Helman, L.J.; Allison, A.; Israel, M.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate-filament (IF) protein that is highly specific for cells of astroglial lineage, although its tissue-specific role is speculative. Determination of the primary structure of this protein should be of importance for understanding the functional role it plays in astroglia. Therefore, the authors isolated a cDNA clone encoding this protein and determined its nucleotide sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence indicates that GFAP shares structural similarities-particularly in the central rod domain and to a lesser degree in the carboxyl-terminal domain-with other IF proteins found in nonepithelial cell types. Considerable sequence divergence in the amino-terminal region of GFAP suggests that the tissue-specific functions of this IF protein might be mediated through this region of the molecule. In contrast, conservation of structural characteristics and a moderate degree of sequence conservation in the carboxyl-terminal region suggest functional similarities. Blot hybridization analysis using the GFAP cDNA as a probe failed to detect GFAP mRNA in both normal and neoplastic human tissues in which IF proteins other than GFAP are known to be expressed.

  20. Zinc Regulates a Switch between Primary and Alternative S18 Ribosomal Proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Prisic, Sladjana; Hwang, Hyonson; Dow, Allexa; Barnaby, Omar; Pan, Tenny S.; Lonzanida, Jaymes A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Steen, Hanno; Husson, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes five putative “alternative” ribosomal proteins whose expression is repressed at high Zn2+ concentration. Each alternative protein has a primary homolog that is predicted to bind Zn2+. We hypothesized that zinc triggers a switch between these paired homologous proteins and therefore chose one of these pairs, S18-1/S18-2, to study mechanisms of the predicted competition for their incorporation into ribosomes. As predicted, our data show that Zn2+-depletion causes accumulation of both S18-2 mRNA and protein. In contrast, S18-1 mRNA levels are unchanged to slightly elevated under Zn2+-limited conditions. However the amount of S18-1 protein is markedly decreased. We further demonstrate that both S18 proteins interact with ribosomal protein S6, a committed step in ribosome biogenesis. Zn2+ is absolutely required for the S18-1/S6 interaction, while it is dispensable for S18-2/S6 dimer formation. These data suggest a model in which the S18-1 is the dominant ribosome constituent in high zinc conditions, e.g. inside of phagosomes, but that it can be replaced by S18-2 when zinc is deficient, e.g. in the extracellular milieu. Consequently, Zn2+-depletion may serve as a signal for building alternative ribosomes when M. tuberculosis is released from macrophages, to allow survival in the extracellular environment. PMID:25858183

  1. Carbohydrase inhibition and anti-cancerous and free radical scavenging properties along with DNA and protein protection ability of methanolic root extracts of Rumex crispus

    PubMed Central

    Shiwani, Supriya; Singh, Naresh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The study elucidated carbohydrase inhibition, anti-cancerous, free radical scavenging properties and also investigated the DNA and protein protection abilities of methanolic root extract of Rumex crispus (RERC). For this purpose, pulverized roots of Rumex crispus was extracted in methanol (80% and absolute conc.) for 3 hrs for 60℃ and filtered and evaporated with vacuum rotary evaporator. RERC showed high phenolic content (211 µg/GAE equivalent) and strong 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging (IC50 = 42.86 (absolute methanol) and 36.91 µg/mL (80% methanolic extract)) and reduced power ability. Furthermore, RERC exhibited significant protective ability in H2O2/Fe3+/ascorbic acid-induced protein or DNA damage and percentage inhibition of the HT-29 cell growth rate following 80% methanolic RERC exposure at 400 µg/mL was observed to be highest (10.2% ± 1.03). Moreover, methanolic RERC inhibited α-glucosidase and amylase effectively and significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusively, RERC could be considered as potent carbohydrase inhibitor, anti-cancerous and anti-oxidant. PMID:23198017

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coat Protein Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide in Primary Cortical Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Uhl, George R.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1993-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein, gp120, kills neurons in primary cortical cultures at low picomolar concentrations. The toxicity requires external glutamate and calcium and is blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists. Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to gp120 toxicity, since nitroarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, prevents toxicity as does deletion of arginine from the incubation medium and hemoglobin, which binds NO. Superoxide dismutase also attenuates toxicity, implying a role for superoxide anions.

  3. Exploiting sulphur-carrier proteins from primary metabolism for 2-thiosugar biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Eita; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, He G.; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Liu, Tsung-lin; Ou, Albert; Li, Jeng-yi; Chen, Yu-hsiang; Ealick, Steven E.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2014-01-01

    Sulphur is an essential element for life and exists ubiquitously in living systems1,2. Yet, how the sulphur atom is incorporated in many sulphur-containing secondary metabolites remains poorly understood. For C-S bond formation in primary metabolites, the major ionic sulphur sources are the protein-persulphide and protein-thiocarboxylate3,4. In each case, the persulphide and thiocarboxylate group on these sulphur-carrier (donor) proteins are post-translationally generated through the action of a specific activating enzyme. In all bacterial cases reported thus far, the genes encoding the enzyme that catalyzes the actual C-S bond formation reaction and its cognate sulphur-carrier protein co-exist in the same gene cluster5. To study 2-thiosugar production in BE-7585A, an antibiotic from Amycolatopsis orientalis, we identified a putative 2-thioglucose synthase, BexX, whose protein sequence and mode of action appear similar to those of ThiG, the enzyme catalyzing thiazole formation in thiamin biosynthesis6,7. However, no sulphur-carrier protein gene could be located in the BE-7585A cluster. Subsequent genome sequencing revealed the presence of a few sulphur-carrier proteins likely involved in the biosynthesis of primary metabolites, but surprisingly only a single activating enzyme gene in the entire genome of A. orientalis. Further experiments showed that this activating enzyme is capable of adenylating each of these sulphur-carrier proteins, and likely also catalyzing the subsequent thiolation taking advantage of its rhodanese activity. A proper combination of these sulphur delivery systems is effective for BexX-catalyzed 2-thioglucose production. The ability of BexX to selectively distinguish sulphur-carrier proteins is given a structural basis using X-ray crystallography. These studies represent the first complete characterization of a thiosugar formation in nature and also demonstrate the receptor promiscuity of the sulphur-delivery system in A. orientalis. Our

  4. Protein Kinase C Controls Vesicular Transport and Secretion of Apolipoprotein E from Primary Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Kockx, Maaike; Owen, Dylan M.; Burnett, John R.; Jessup, Wendy; Kritharides, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage-specific apolipoprotein E (apoE) secretion plays an important protective role in atherosclerosis. However, the precise signaling mechanisms regulating apoE secretion from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs) remain unclear. Here we investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in regulating basal and stimulated apoE secretion from HMDMs. Treatment of HMDMs with structurally distinct pan-PKC inhibitors (calphostin C, Ro-31-8220, Go6976) and a PKC inhibitory peptide all significantly decreased apoE secretion without significantly affecting apoE mRNA or apoE protein levels. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulated apoE secretion, and both PMA-induced and apoAI-induced apoE secretion were inhibited by PKC inhibitors. PKC regulation of apoE secretion was found to be independent of the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCA1. Live cell imaging demonstrated that PKC inhibitors inhibited vesicular transport of apoE to the plasma membrane. Pharmacological or peptide inhibitor and knockdown studies indicate that classical isoforms PKCα/β and not PKCδ, -ϵ, -θ, or -ι/ζ isoforms regulate apoE secretion from HMDMs. The activity of myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) correlated with modulation of PKC activity in these cells, and direct peptide inhibition of MARCKS inhibited apoE secretion, implicating MARCKS as a downstream effector of PKC in apoE secretion. Comparison with other secreted proteins indicated that PKC similarly regulated secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and chitinase-3-like-1 protein but differentially affected the secretion of other proteins. In conclusion, PKC regulates the secretion of apoE from primary human macrophages. PMID:23288845

  5. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  6. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  7. Turnover of thylakoid membrane proteins during senescence of primary bean leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Mattoo, A.K.; Thompson, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    Pulse-labelling of primary bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris) with /sup 35/S-methionine has revealed differential changes in the rates at which proteins in thylakoid membranes are synthesized during senescence. In particular, synthesis of the 32 Kd herbicide-binding protein remains highly active throughout senescence, whereas turnover of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of ATPase and of the LHCP declines. During a 24-h pulse chase experiment with unlabelled methionine, only the 32 KD protein showed evidence of degradation. Degradation of the 32 Kd unit and, to a lesser extent, of other thylakoid proteins was also observed when the membranes were aged in vitro. The latter process resembled that observed in vivo in that it was light dependent, sensitive to DCMU, and it was inhibited by spermine and Ca/sup 2 +/, both of which alter membrane fluidity. Collectively, these observations suggest that in vitro aging of thylakoid membranes is a useful model system for studying the characteristics of the thylakoid protein degradation.

  8. New approach for pseudo-MS(3) analysis of peptides and proteins via MALDI in-source decay using radical recombination with 1,5-diaminonaphthalene.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2014-03-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) is a useful method for top-down sequencing of proteins and preferentially produces the c'/z(•) fragment pair. Subsequently, radical z(•) fragments undergo a variety of radical reactions. This work is focused on the chemical properties of the 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) adducts on z fragment ions (zn*), which are abundant in MALDI-ISD spectra. Postsource decay (PSD) of the zn* fragments resulted in specific peptide bond cleavage adjacent to the binding site of 1,5-DAN, leading to the preferential formation of y'n-1 fragments. The dominant loss of an amino acid with 1,5-DAN from zn* can be used in pseudo-MS(3) mode to identify the C-terminal side fragments from a complex MALDI-ISD spectrum or to determine missed cleavage residues using MALDI-ISD. Although the N-Cα bond at the N-terminal side of Pro is not cleaved by MALDI-ISD, pseudo-MS(3) via zn* can confirm the presence of a Pro residue. PMID:24512348

  9. Antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of a protein-enriched fraction from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Lingyao; Lei, Chaoliang

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, protein-enriched fraction (PEF) that was isolated from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), showed excellent hepatoprotective activity as well as the potential for clinical application in therapy for liver diseases. In this study, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of PEF were evaluated. The antiviral results demonstrated that PEF inhibited the infection of avian influenza virus H9N2 and had a virucidal effect against the multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica Speyer (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in vitro. The mortality of silkworm larve in a PEF treatment group decreased significantly compared with a negative control. PEF showed excellent scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion radicals, which were similar to those of ascorbic acid. The imunomodulatory results suggested that PEF could effectively improve immune function in experimental mice. Our results indicated that PEF could possibly be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by avian influenza virus infection. In addition, PEF with virucidal activity against insect viruses might provide useful for the development of antimicrobial breeding technology for economically important insects. As a natural product from insects, PEF could be a potential source for the discovery of potent antioxidant and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24735244

  10. Antiviral, Immunomodulatory, and Free Radical Scavenging Activities of a Protein-Enriched Fraction from the Larvae of the Housefly, Musca domestica

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hui; Wang, Furong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Lingyao; Lei, Chaoliang

    2013-01-01

    In our previous study, protein-enriched fraction (PEF) that was isolated from the larvae of the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), showed excellent hepatoprotective activity as well as the potential for clinical application in therapy for liver diseases. In this study, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and free radical scavenging activities of PEF were evaluated. The antiviral results demonstrated that PEF inhibited the infection of avian influenza virus H9N2 and had a virucidal effect against the multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus of the alfalfa looper, Autographa californica Speyer (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in vitro. The mortality of silkworm larve in a PEF treatment group decreased significantly compared with a negative control. PEF showed excellent scavenging activity for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide anion radicals, which were similar to those of ascorbic acid. The imunomodulatory results suggested that PEF could effectively improve immune function in experimental mice. Our results indicated that PEF could possibly be used for the prophylaxis and treatment of diseases caused by avian influenza virus infection. In addition, PEF with virucidal activity against insect viruses might provide useful for the development of antimicrobial breeding technology for economically important insects. As a natural product from insects, PEF could be a potential source for the discovery of potent antioxidant and immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24735244

  11. Molecular Recognition of PTS-1 Cargo Proteins by Pex5p: Implications for Protein Mistargeting in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3–4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state. PMID:25689234

  12. Maturin is a novel protein required for differentiation during primary neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I.; Ku, Ray Yueh; Lyou, Yung; Zuber, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation are tightly controlled during neural development. In the embryonic neural plate, primary neurogenesis is driven by the proneural pathway. Here we report the characterization of Maturin, a novel, evolutionarily conserved protein that is required for normal primary neurogenesis. Maturin is detected throughout the early nervous system, yet it is most strongly expressed in differentiating neurons of the embryonic fish, frog and mouse nervous systems. Maturin expression can be induced by the proneural transcription factors Neurog2, Neurod1, and Ebf3. Maturin overexpression promotes neurogenesis, while loss-of-function inhibits the differentiation of neuronal progenitors, resulting in neural plate expansion. Maturin knockdown blocks the ability of Neurog2, Neurod1, and Ebf3 to drive ectopic neurogenesis. Maturin and Pak3, are both required for, and can synergize to promote differentiation of the primary neurons in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Maturin functions during primary neurogenesis and is required for the proneural pathway to regulate neural differentiation. PMID:24095902

  13. TP53 gene mutations and protein accumulation in primary vaginal carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Skomedal, H.; Kristensen, G.; Helland, A.; Nesland, J. M.; Kooi, S.; Børresen, A. L.; Holm, R.

    1995-01-01

    Primary carcinomas from 46 patients were screened for TP53 alterations. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated nuclear TP53 protein accumulation in 22 (48%) cases using the polyclonal CM1 antiserum, whereas 15 (33%) cases showed positive nuclear staining with the mononuclear antibody PAb 1801. Constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE) was used to screen 27 of the vaginal carcinomas for mutations in the conserved regions of the TP53 gene (exons 5-8). Six of these tumours (22%) contained mutations: four were found in exon 5 and two in exon 8. A total of 50% of the primary vaginal carcinomas carried a TP53 alteration. These results indicate that TP53 abnormalities may be involved in the development of these tumours. However, there was no significant association between TP53 abnormalities and survival. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7599041

  14. Aging lowers steady-state antioxidant enzyme and stress protein expression in primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hall, D M; Sattler, G L; Sattler, C A; Zhang, H J; Oberley, L W; Pitot, H C; Kregel, K C

    2001-06-01

    It has been reported that the isolation and culture of primary hepatocytes can compromise cellular ability to constituitively express antioxidant enzyme (AE) genes, making it difficult to study their regulation ex vivo. In the present study, the steady-state expression of manganese-containing superoxide dismutase, copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase was assessed in primary hepatocytes isolated from young and senescent rats and cultured in MATRIGEL: There was no change in steady-state superoxide dismutase protein or activity levels in cells collected from young animals and cultured for 7 days. Catalase expression was initially increased, and then it declined 30%. In contrast, superoxide dismutase expression declined 60% and catalase expression declined 50% in cells from senescent animals. Constitutive and inducible 70-kDa heat shock protein expression increased coincident with declining AE levels in the young cells but not senescent cells. For both age groups, electron micrographs showed rounded hepatocytes with abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Hepatocytes were organized into clusters of 6-12 cells surrounding a large central lumen devoid of microvilli. Each cluster also contained smaller microvilli-lined lumens between adjacent hepatocytes that resembled canniculi. The plasma membranes of these lumens were sealed from the extracellular space by junctional complexes. Gap junctions in the plasma membrane suggest that hepatocytes were capable of intercellular communication. We conclude that the Matrigel system can be used to study AE regulation in primary hepatocytes from young and senescent animals, provided that experiments can be conducted within a time frame of 5-7 days in culture. These data also support the hypothesis that aging compromises hepatocellular ability to maintain AE status and upregulate stress protein expression. PMID:11382788

  15. Comparative study on the separation behavior of monolithic columns prepared via ring-opening metathesis polymerization and via electron beam irradiation triggered free radical polymerization for proteins.

    PubMed

    Bandari, Rajendar; Knolle, Wolfgang; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2008-05-16

    Monolithic columns have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis polymerization using different monomers and crosslinkers, i.e. norborn-2-ene, 1,4,4a,5,8,8a-hexahydro-1,4,5,8-exo,endo-dimethanonaphthalene, cyclooctene and tris(cyclooct-4-en-1-yloxy)methylsilane. 2-Propanol and toluene were used as macro- and microporogens. Alternatively, monolithic supports were realized via electron beam triggered free radical polymerization using trimethylolpropane triacrylate and ethylmethacrylate. Here, 2-propanol, 1-dodecanol and toluene were used as porogens. The three monolithic supports were structurally characterized by inverse size exclusion chromatography and investigated for their separation capabilities for a series of proteins. Separation efficiencies are discussed within the context of the different structural features of the monolithic supports and are compared to the separation data obtained on a commercial silica-based Chromolith RP-18e column. PMID:18037426

  16. Modulation of primary antibody response by protein A in tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, S I; Singh, K P; Raisuddin, S; Jafri, A; Saxena, A K; Choudhary, S; Ray, P K

    1995-11-01

    Protein A (PA) is a cell wall glycoprotein of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, which possess a number of immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. We have previously shown that PA suppresses the anti-sheep erythrocyte primary antibody response in normal mice. The present investigation evaluates the effect of protein A on the anti-sheep erythrocyte primary antibody response in tumor-bearing mice. The primary antibody response in tumor-bearing mice immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was suppressed by the intraperitoneal administration of PA in a dose-dependent fashion. The plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was used to assess this response. Maximum suppression of the PFC response was observed at 12 micrograms PA/animal (p < 0.001) and could be observed at doses as low as 1 microgram PA/animal (p < 0.01). The amount of suppression was proportional to the number of PA doses administered. In addition this effect was critically dependent on the timing of PA administration. PA showed no significant effect on PFC when injected after immunization, but it produced pronounced suppression when injected prior to the immunization with SRBC. Maximum suppression of the PFC response was observed when PA was administered one day before the antigen challenge. PA also reduced splenic localization of 51Cr labeled SRBC to 42% (p < 0.01). The altered localization of antigen in spleen may be responsible for reduced PFC response in tumor-bearing mice. Depletion of B-lymphocyte is reported to exhibit tumor inhibition. Therefore, we propose that the suppression of the primary antibody response by PA helps in tumor regression by reducing the soluble immunosuppressive immune complexes. PMID:8537611

  17. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  18. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation in the Structurally Well-Defined α3Y Protein: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Long-Lived Tyrosine Radical

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine oxidation–reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+ oxidant provides high-quality Y32–O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 105 M–1 s–1 (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 103 M–1 s–1 (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pD 8.5). kH/kD of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32–O• is 28–58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+. Y32–O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2–10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical–radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32–O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32–O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y. PMID:25121576

  19. Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma B Cell Receptors Recognize CNS Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Purschke, Frauke G; Brunn, Anna; May, Caroline; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Marcus, Katrin; Deckert, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma confined to the CNS. To elucidate its peculiar organ tropism, we generated recombinant Abs (recAbs) identical to the BCR of 23 PCNSLs from immunocompetent patients. Although none of the recAbs showed self-reactivity upon testing with common autoantigens, they recognized 1547 proteins present on a large-scale protein microarray, indicating polyreactivity. Interestingly, proteins (GRINL1A, centaurin-α, BAIAP2) recognized by the recAbs are physiologically expressed by CNS neurons. Furthermore, 87% (20/23) of the recAbs, including all Abs derived from IGHV4-34 using PCNSL, recognized galectin-3, which was upregulated on microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells upon CNS invasion by PCNSL. Thus, PCNSL Ig may recognize CNS proteins as self-Ags. Their interaction may contribute to BCR signaling with sustained NF-κB activation and, ultimately, may foster tumor cell proliferation and survival. These data may also explain, at least in part, the affinity of PCNSL cells for the CNS. PMID:26116512

  20. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  1. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia in Mice Lacking the Novel Ciliary Protein Pcdp1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lance; Campagna, Dean R.; Pinkus, Jack L.; Mulhern, Howard; Wyatt, Todd A.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Pinkus, Geraldine S.; Fleming, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) results from ciliary dysfunction and is commonly characterized by sinusitis, male infertility, hydrocephalus, and situs inversus. Mice homozygous for the nm1054 mutation develop phenotypes associated with PCD. On certain genetic backgrounds, homozygous mutants die perinatally from severe hydrocephalus, while mice on other backgrounds have an accumulation of mucus in the sinus cavity and male infertility. Mutant sperm lack mature flagella, while respiratory epithelial cilia are present but beat at a slower frequency than wild-type cilia. Transgenic rescue demonstrates that the PCD in nm1054 mutants results from the loss of a single gene encoding the novel primary ciliary dyskinesia protein 1 (Pcdp1). The Pcdp1 gene is expressed in spermatogenic cells and motile ciliated epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry shows that Pcdp1 protein localizes to sperm flagella and the cilia of respiratory epithelial cells and brain ependymal cells in both mice and humans. This study demonstrates that Pcdp1 plays an important role in ciliary and flagellar biogenesis and motility, making the nm1054 mutant a useful model for studying the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of PCD. PMID:18039845

  2. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. PMID:27457987

  3. Localization of sarcomeric proteins during myofibril assembly in cultured mouse primary skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    White, Jennifer; Barro, Marietta V; Makarenkova, Helen P; Sanger, Joseph W; Sanger, Jean M

    2014-09-01

    It is important to understand how muscle forms normally in order to understand muscle diseases that result in abnormal muscle formation. Although the structure of myofibrils is well understood, the process through which the myofibril components form organized contractile units is not clear. Based on the staining of muscle proteins in avian embryonic cardiomyocytes, we previously proposed that myofibrils formation occurred in steps that began with premyofibrils followed by nascent myofibrils and ending with mature myofibrils. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the premyofibril model of myofibrillogenesis developed from studies developed from studies in avian cardiomyocytes was supported by our current studies of myofibril assembly in mouse skeletal muscle. Emphasis was on establishing how the key sarcomeric proteins, F-actin, nonmuscle myosin II, muscle myosin II, and α-actinin were organized in the three stages of myofibril assembly. The results also test previous reports that nonmuscle myosins II A and B are components of the Z-bands of mature myofibrils, data that are inconsistent with the premyofibril model. We have also determined that in mouse muscle cells, telethonin is a late assembling protein that is present only in the Z-bands of mature myofibrils. This result of using specific telethonin antibodies supports the approach of using YFP-tagged proteins to determine where and when these YFP-sarcomeric fusion proteins are localized. The data presented in this study on cultures of primary mouse skeletal myocytes are consistent with the premyofibril model of myofibrillogenesis previously proposed for both avian cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. PMID:25125171

  4. Primary and secondary malignant involvement of gynaecological organs at radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: review of literature and retrospective analysis of 360 cases.

    PubMed

    Salem, H; El-Mazny, A

    2012-08-01

    The pathological analysis of cystectomy specimens from 360 female patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer was retrospectively reported. The uterus was not available in 29 specimens, while one ovary was absent in 18 specimens and the two ovaries were absent in 20 specimens. Uterine involvement was observed in one case of transitional cell carcinoma, and benign uterine pathology was detected in 37 cases. All patients had normal ovaries, while the vagina was involved in 13 cases. A total of 12% of the patients had urethral involvement. None of the 29 patients, in whom the internal genitalia were totally or partially preserved, had late ovarian, vaginal or uterine recurrence at the last follow-up. Thus, the preservation of female internal genitalia in young patients undergoing radical cystectomy should be considered under strict criteria (low-grade, low-stage tumours away from the bladder neck). This will improve the quality-of-life (QoL) and the functional outcome without compromising cancer control. PMID:22779969

  5. Roaming Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Joel M.; Shepler, Benjamin C.

    2011-05-01

    Roaming is a recently verified unusual pathway to molecular products from unimolecular dissociation of an energized molecule. Here we present the evidence for this pathway for H2CO and CH3CHO. Theoretical analysis shows that this path visits the plateau region of the potential energy surface near dissociation to radical products. It is not clear whether roaming is a distinct isolated pathway, in addition to the conventional one via the well-known molecular saddle-point transition state. Evidence is presented to suggest that the two pathways may originate from a single, but highly complicated, dividing surface. Other examples of unusual reaction dynamics are also reviewed.

  6. How protein targeting to primary plastids via the endomembrane system could have evolved? A new hypothesis based on phylogenetic studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that a heterotrophic ancestor of the supergroup Archaeplastida/Plantae engulfed a cyanobacterium that was transformed into a primary plastid; however, it is still unclear how nuclear-encoded proteins initially were imported into the new organelle. Most proteins targeted to primary plastids carry a transit peptide and are transported post-translationally using Toc and Tic translocons. There are, however, several proteins with N-terminal signal peptides that are directed to higher plant plastids in vesicles derived from the endomembrane system (ES). The existence of these proteins inspired a hypothesis that all nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted proteins initially carried signal peptides and were targeted to the ancestral primary plastid via the host ES. Results We present the first phylogenetic analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana α-carbonic anhydrase (CAH1), Oryza sativa nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP1), and two O. sativa α-amylases (αAmy3, αAmy7), proteins that are directed to higher plant primary plastids via the ES. We also investigated protein disulfide isomerase (RB60) from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii because of its peculiar dual post- and co-translational targeting to both the plastid and ES. Our analyses show that these proteins all are of eukaryotic rather than cyanobacterial origin, and that their non-plastid homologs are equipped with signal peptides responsible for co-translational import into the host ES. Our results indicate that vesicular trafficking of proteins to primary plastids evolved long after the cyanobacterial endosymbiosis (possibly only in higher plants) to permit their glycosylation and/or transport to more than one cellular compartment. Conclusions The proteins we analyzed are not relics of ES-mediated protein targeting to the ancestral primary plastid. Available data indicate that Toc- and Tic-based translocation dominated protein import into primary plastids from the

  7. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  8. Immobilization of proteins as a tool for studying primary structure around their cysteinyl residues.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Bohak, Z

    1981-09-01

    The primary structure around the single cysteinyl residue of chicken pepsin was investigated by binding the protein via this residue to an insoluble carrier. Carriers stable towards reagents used for the fragmentation of proteins and sequence analysis were prepared by coupling a spacer arm to polyN-hydroxymethyl acrylamide using a thioether bond that is potentially cleavable by mercuric ions (1). Phenacyl bromide group, attached to the free end of the spacer, reacted rapidly and specifically with the cysteinyl residue of chicken pepsin. Up to 300 mg of the enzyme were bound to 1 g of carrier.The polymer-bound protein was cleaved by trypsin or by cyanogen bromide or by a sequence of both. Fragments of 40-120 amino acid residues, depending on the method of cleavage, remained attached to the polymer through the cysteinyl residue. The compositions and partial sequences of these fragments revealed that the cysteinyl residue is located within or in the vicinity of a loop in the molecule formed by a disulfide bond. PMID:24233884

  9. Genome-wide analysis of high risk human papillomavirus E2 proteins in human primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sunthamala, Nuchsupha; Pang, Chai Ling; Thierry, Francoise; Teissier, Sebastien; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2014-12-01

    The E2 protein is expressed in the early stage of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection that is associated with cervical lesions. This protein plays important roles in regulation of viral replication and transcription. To characterize the role of E2 protein in modulation of cellular gene expression in HPV infected cells, genome-wide expression profiling of human primary keratinocytes (HPK) harboring HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 was investigated using microarray. The Principle Components Analysis (PCA) revealed that the expression data of HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2-transduced HPKs were rather closely clustered. The Venn diagram of modulated genes showed an overlap of 10 common genes in HPV16 E2 expressing HPK and HPV18 E2 expressing HPK. These genes were expressed with significant difference by comparison with control cells. In addition, the distinct sets of modulated genes were detected 14 and 34 genes in HPV16 E2 and HPV18 E2 expressing HPKs, respectively. PMID:26484085

  10. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. PMID:2296575

  11. Free Radical Scavenging Activity: Antiproliferative and Proteomics Analyses of the Differential Expression of Apoptotic Proteins in MCF-7 Cells Treated with Acetone Leaf Extract of Diospyros lycioides (Ebenaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pilane, M. C.; Bagla, V. P.; Mokgotho, M. P.; Mbazima, V.; Matsebatlela, T. M.; Ncube, I.; Mampuru, L.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in South Africa. The acetone leaf extract of Diospyros lycioides was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for its antioxidant potential using DPPH assay and nitric oxide radical scavenging effect, while the viability of MCF-7 cells was evaluated using the MTT. MCF-7 treated cells were stained with Hoechst 335258 dye and annexin-V-FITC to be evaluated for apoptotic effect of the extract, while mRNA expression levels of apoptotic genes were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and deferential protein expression levels using 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Results revealed presence of antioxidant constituents in the extract. Extract was shown to be cytotoxic in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Cytotoxicity was demonstrated to be due to apoptosis, with 70% of the extract-treated cells being annexin-V-positive/PI negative at 48 hours. The extract was also shown to upregulate the expression of p53 gene with concomitant downregulation of the Bcl-2 antiapoptotic gene while differentially expressed proteins were identified as enolase, pyruvate kinase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The extract in this study was shown to induce apoptosis at an early stage which makes it an ideal source that can be explored for compounds that may be used in the treatment and management of cancer. PMID:26457109

  12. S100A9 is a Biliary Protein Marker of Disease Activity in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Thomas; Giese, Thomas; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schirmacher, Peter; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Bile analysis has the potential to serve as a surrogate marker for inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the biliary epithelium and may provide insight into biliary pathophysiology and possible diagnostic markers. We aimed to identify biliary protein markers of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) by a proteomic approach. Methods Bile duct-derived bile samples were collected from PSC patients (n = 45) or patients with choledocholithiasis (n = 24, the control group). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was performed to analyse the proteins, 2-D-gel patterns were compared by densitometry, and brush cytology specimens were analysed by RT-PCR. Results A reference bile-duct bile proteome was established in the control group without signs of inflammation or maligancy comprising a total of 379 non-redundant biliary proteins; 21% were of unknown function and 24% had been previously described in serum. In PSC patients, the biliary S100A9 expression was elevated 95-fold (p<0.005), serum protein expression was decreased, and pancreatic enzyme expression was unchanged compared to controls. The S100A9 expression was 2-fold higher in PSC patients with high disease activity than in those with low activity (p<0.05). The brush cytology specimens from the PSC patients with high disease activity showed marked inflammatory activity and leukocyte infiltration compared to the patients with low activity, which correlated with S100A9 mRNA expression (p<0.05). Conclusions The bile-duct bile proteome is complex and its analysis might enhance the understanding of cholestatic liver disease. Biliary S100A9 levels may be a useful marker for PSC activity, and its implication in inflammation and carcinogenesis warrants further investigation. PMID:22253789

  13. On the Involvement of Single-Bond Rotation in the Primary Photochemistry of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Andreas D.; Hospes, Marijke; Singhal, Kushagra; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, have led to the proposal that C4-C7 single-bond rotation may play an important role in the primary photochemistry of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We therefore synthesized an analog of this protein's 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore, (5-hydroxy indan-(1E)-ylidene)acetic acid, in which rotation across the C4-C7 single bond has been locked with an ethane bridge, and we reconstituted the apo form of the wild-type protein and its R52A derivative with this chromophore analog. In PYP reconstituted with the rotation-locked chromophore, 1), absorption spectra of ground and intermediate states are slightly blue-shifted; 2), the quantum yield of photochemistry is ∼60% reduced; 3), the excited-state dynamics of the chromophore are accelerated; and 4), dynamics of the thermal recovery reaction of the protein are accelerated. A significant finding was that the yield of the transient ground-state intermediate in the early phase of the photocycle was considerably higher in the rotation-locked samples than in the corresponding samples reconstituted with p-coumaric acid. In contrast to theoretical predictions, the initial photocycle dynamics of PYP were observed to be not affected by the charge of the amino acid residue at position 52, which was varied by 1), varying the pH of the sample between 5 and 10; and 2), site-directed mutagenesis to construct R52A. These results imply that C4-C7 single-bond rotation in PYP is not an alternative to C7=C8 double-bond rotation, in case the nearby positive charge of R52 is absent, but rather facilitates, presumably with a compensatory movement, the physiological Z/E isomerization of the blue-light-absorbing chromophore. PMID:21889456

  14. RBRIdent: An algorithm for improved identification of RNA-binding residues in proteins from primary sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dapeng; Zeng, Jianyang; Gong, Haipeng

    2015-06-01

    Rapid and correct identification of RNA-binding residues based on the protein primary sequences is of great importance. In most prevalent machine-learning-based identification methods; however, either some features are inefficiently represented, or the redundancy between features is not effectively removed. Both problems may weaken the performance of a classifier system and raise its computational complexity. Here, we addressed the above problems and developed a better classifier (RBRIdent) to identify the RNA-binding residues. In an independent benchmark test, RBRIdent achieved an accuracy of 76.79%, Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.3819 and F-measure of 75.58%, remarkably outperforming all prevalent methods. These results suggest the necessity of proper feature description and the essential role of feature selection in this project. All source data and codes are freely available at http://166.111.152.91/RBRIdent. PMID:25846271

  15. Novel Recombinant Hepatitis B Virus Vectors Efficiently Deliver Protein and RNA Encoding Genes into Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ran; Bai, Weiya; Zhai, Jianwei; Liu, Wei; Li, Xinyan; Zhang, Jiming; Cui, Xiaoxian; Zhao, Xue; Ye, Xiaoli; Deng, Qiang; Tiollais, Pierre; Wen, Yumei

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has extremely restricted host and hepatocyte tropism. HBV-based vectors could form the basis of novel therapies for chronic hepatitis B and other liver diseases and would also be invaluable for the study of HBV infection. Previous attempts at developing HBV-based vectors encountered low yields of recombinant viruses and/or lack of sufficient infectivity/cargo gene expression in primary hepatocytes, which hampered follow-up applications. In this work, we constructed a novel vector based on a naturally occurring, highly replicative HBV mutant with a 207-bp deletion in the preS1/polymerase spacer region. By applying a novel insertion strategy that preserves the continuity of the polymerase open reading frame (ORF), recombinant HBV (rHBV) carrying protein or small interfering RNA (siRNA) genes were obtained that replicated and were packaged efficiently in cultured hepatocytes. We demonstrated that rHBV expressing a fluorescent reporter (DsRed) is highly infective in primary tree shrew hepatocytes, and rHBV expressing HBV-targeting siRNA successfully inhibited antigen expression from coinfected wild-type HBV. This novel HBV vector will be a powerful tool for hepatocyte-targeting gene delivery, as well as the study of HBV infection. PMID:23552416

  16. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials. PMID:25678029

  17. Spatiotemporal Alterations in Primary Odorant Representations in Olfactory Marker Protein Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Marley D.; Moberly, Andrew H.; McGann, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is highly and selectively expressed in primary olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) across species, but its physiological function remains unclear. Previous studies in the olfactory epithelium suggest that it accelerates the neural response to odorants and may modulate the odorant-selectivity of OSNs. Here we used a line of gene-targeted mice that express the fluorescent exocytosis indicator synaptopHluorin in place of OMP to compare spatiotemporal patterns of odorant-evoked neurotransmitter release from OSNs in adult mice that were heterozygous for OMP or OMP-null. We found that these patterns, which constitute the primary neural representation of each odorant, developed more slowly during the odorant presentation in OMP knockout mice but eventually reached the same magnitude as in heterozygous mice. In the olfactory bulb, each glomerulus receives synaptic input from a subpopulation of OSNs that all express the same odor receptor and thus typically respond to a specific subset of odorants. We observed that in OMP knockout mice, OSNs innervating a given glomerulus typically responded to a broader range of odorants than in OMP heterozygous mice and thus each odorant evoked synaptic input to a larger number of glomeruli. In an olfactory habituation task, OMP knockout mice behaved differently than wild-type mice, exhibiting a delay in their onset to investigate an odor stimulus during its first presentation and less habituation to that stimulus over repeated presentations. These results suggest that the actions of OMP in olfactory transduction carry through to the primary sensory representations of olfactory stimuli in adult mice in vivo. PMID:23630588

  18. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  19. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Geoffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or 'free' fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the 'primary gatekeepers of steroid action'. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  20. The Fusion Protein Specificity of the Parainfluenza Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Is Not Solely Defined by the Primary Structure of Its Stalk Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Morihiro; Ohtsuka, Junpei; Hara, Kenichiro; Komada, Hiroshi; Nishio, Machiko; Nosaka, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus-specific interaction between the attachment protein (HN) and the fusion protein (F) is prerequisite for the induction of membrane fusion by parainfluenza viruses. This HN-F interaction presumably is mediated by particular amino acids in the HN stalk domain and those in the F head domain. We found in the present study, however, that a simian virus 41 (SV41) F-specific chimeric HPIV2 HN protein, SCA, whose cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and stalk domains were derived from the SV41 HN protein, could not induce cell-cell fusion of BHK-21 cells when coexpressed with an SV41 HN-specific chimeric PIV5 F protein, no. 36. Similarly, a headless form of the SV41 HN protein failed to induce fusion with chimera no. 36, whereas it was able to induce fusion with the SV41 F protein. Interestingly, replacement of 13 amino acids of the SCA head domain, which are located at or around the dimer interface of the head domain, with SV41 HN counterparts resulted in a chimeric HN protein, SCA-RII, which induced fusion with chimera no. 36 but not with the SV41 F protein. More interestingly, retroreplacement of 11 out of the 13 amino acids of SCA-RII with the SCA counterparts resulted in another chimeric HN protein, IM18, which induced fusion either with chimera no. 36 or with the SV41 F protein, similar to the SV41 HN protein. Thus, we conclude that the F protein specificity of the HN protein that is observed in the fusion event is not solely defined by the primary structure of the HN stalk domain. IMPORTANCE It is appreciated that the HN head domain initially conceals the HN stalk domain but exposes it after the head domain has bound to the receptors, which allows particular amino acids in the stalk domain to interact with the F protein and trigger it to induce fusion. However, other regulatory roles of the HN head domain in the fusion event have been ill defined. We have shown in the current study that removal of the head domain or amino acid substitutions in a particular

  1. Expression of c-erbB3 protein in primary breast carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, R.; Yadav, M.; Nair, S.; Kutty, M. K.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of c-erbB3 protein was investigated in 104 primary breast carcinomas comprising nine comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 91 invasive ductal carcinomas and four invasive lobular carcinomas using two monoclonal antibodies, RTJ1 and RTJ2. Of the 91 invasive ductal carcinomas, seven contained the comedo DCIS component adjacent to the invasive component. An immunohistochemical technique was used to evaluate the association between expression of c-erbB3 and clinical parameters and tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-erbB2, cathepsin-D and p53 in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour tissues. Our results indicated that RTJ1 and RTJ2 gave identical staining patterns and concordant results. It was found that the overexpression of c-erbB3 protein was observed in 67% (6/9) of comedo DCIS, 52% (44/84) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 71% (5/7) of carcinomas containing both the in situ and invasive lesions and 25% (1/4) of invasive lobular carcinomas. A significant relationship (P < 0.05) was observed between strong immunoreactivity of c-erbB3 protein and histological grade, EGFR and cathepsin-D, but not with expression of c-erbB2, p53, oestrogen receptor status, lymph node metastases or age of patient. However, we noted that a high percentage of oestrogen receptor-negative tumours (59%), lymph node-positive tumours (63%) and c-erbB2 (63%) were strongly positive for c-erbB3 protein. We have also documented that a high percentage of EGFR (67%), c-erbB2 (67%), p53 (75%) and cathepsin-D-positive DCIS (60%) were strongly positive for c-erbB3. These observations suggest that overexpression of c-erbB3 protein could play an important role in tumour progression from non-invasive to invasive and, also, that it may have the potential to be used as a marker for poor prognosis of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9823984

  2. Mutations in STIL, encoding a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, cause primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Girimaji, Satish C; Duvvari, Mahesh R; Blanton, Susan H

    2009-02-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder characterized by smaller-than-normal brain size and mental retardation. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous with six known loci: MCPH1-MCPH6. We report mapping of a novel locus, MCPH7, to chromosome 1p32.3-p33 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417, corresponding to a physical distance of 8.39 Mb. Heterogeneity analysis of 24 families previously excluded from linkage to the six known MCPH loci suggested linkage of five families (20.83%) to the MCPH7 locus. In addition, four families were excluded from linkage to the MCPH7 locus as well as all of the six previously known loci, whereas the remaining 15 families could not be conclusively excluded or included. The combined maximum two-point LOD score for the linked families was 5.96 at marker D1S386 at theta = 0.0. The combined multipoint LOD score was 6.97 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417. Previously, mutations in four genes, MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ, that code for centrosomal proteins have been shown to cause this disorder. Three different homozygous mutations in STIL, which codes for a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, were identified in patients from three of the five families linked to the MCPH7 locus; all are predicted to truncate the STIL protein. Further, another recently ascertained family was homozygous for the same mutation as one of the original families. There was no evidence for a common haplotype. These results suggest that the centrosome and its associated structures are important in the control of neurogenesis in the developing human brain. PMID:19215732

  3. Tyrosine-Lipid Peroxide Adducts from Radical Termination: Para-Coupling and Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N.; Kim, Hye-young H.; Hatch, Duane M.; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogs of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR as well as by mass spectrometry. The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic 13C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl 13C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignment of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision induced dissociation. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion giving a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found either in the primary or the cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein crosslinks via interprotein Michael adducts. PMID:21090613

  4. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hazemann, I; Dauvergne, M T; Blakeley, M P; Meilleur, F; Haertlein, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Mitschler, A; Myles, D A A; Podjarny, A

    2005-10-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Angstrom resolution from a small (0.15 mm(3)) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm(3) are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 Angstrom resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 Angstrom. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples. PMID:16204895

  5. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M. T.; Blakeley, M. P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A A; Podjarny, A.

    2005-08-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution from a small (0.15 mm{sup 3}) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm{sup 3} are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 {angstrom} resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 {angstrom}. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  6. Methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum protects murine peritoneal macrophages from nicotine toxicity by decreasing free radical generation, lipid and protein damage and enhances antioxidant protection

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Das, Subhasis

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn (ME-Og) was tested against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro. Phytochemical analysis of ME-Og shown high amount of flavonoid and phenolic compound present in it. The cytotoxic effect of ME-Og was studied in murine peritoneal macrophages at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 µg/ml) using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. To establish the protective role of ME-Og against nicotine toxicity, peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10 mM), nicotine + ME-Og (1 to 25 µg/ml) for 12 h in culture media. The significantly (p < 0.05) increased super oxide anion generation, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to control group; those were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in ME-Og supplemented groups in concentration dependent manner. More over, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced antioxidant status due to nicotine exposure was effectively ameliorated by ME-Og supplementation in murine peritoneal macrophages. Among the different concentration of ME-Og, maximum protective effect was observed by 25 µg/ml, which does not produce significant cell cytotoxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced free radical generation, lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in important immune cell, peritoneal macrophages. PMID:20716908

  7. IcmF Is a Fusion between the Radical B12 Enzyme Isobutyryl-CoA Mutase and Its G-protein Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Cracan, Valentin; Padovani, Dominique; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme B12 is used by two highly similar radical enzymes, which catalyze carbon skeleton rearrangements, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and isobutyryl-CoA mutase (ICM). ICM catalyzes the reversible interconversion of isobutyryl-CoA and n-butyryl-CoA and exists as a heterotetramer. In this study, we have identified >70 bacterial proteins, which represent fusions between the subunits of ICM and a P-loop GTPase and are currently misannotated as methylmalonyl-CoA mutases. We designate this fusion protein as IcmF (isobutyryl-CoA mutase fused). All IcmFs are composed of the following three domains: the N-terminal 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin binding region that is homologous to the small subunit of ICM (IcmB), a middle P-loop GTPase domain, and a C-terminal part that is homologous to the large subunit of ICM (IcmA). The P-loop GTPase domain has very high sequence similarity to the Methylobacterium extorquens MeaB, which is a chaperone for methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. We have demonstrated that IcmF is an active ICM by cloning, expressing, and purifying the IcmFs from Geobacillus kaustophilus, Nocardia farcinica, and Burkholderia xenovorans. This finding expands the known distribution of ICM activity well beyond the genus Streptomyces, where it is involved in polyketides biosynthesis, and suggests a role for this enzyme in novel bacterial pathways for amino acid degradation, myxalamid biosynthesis, and acetyl-CoA assimilation. PMID:19864421

  8. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20nm and about 110nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio. PMID:26896657

  9. Mutations in Centrosomal Protein CEP152 in Primary Microcephaly Families Linked to MCPH4

    PubMed Central

    Guernsey, Duane L.; Jiang, Haiyan; Hussin, Julie; Arnold, Marc; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Perry, Scott; Babineau-Sturk, Tina; Beis, Jill; Dumas, Nadine; Evans, Susan C.; Ferguson, Meghan; Matsuoka, Makoto; Macgillivray, Christine; Nightingale, Mathew; Patry, Lysanne; Rideout, Andrea L.; Thomas, Aidan; Orr, Andrew; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Michaud, Jacques L.; Awadalla, Philip; Meek, David C.; Ludman, Mark; Samuels, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Primary microcephaly is a rare condition in which brain size is substantially diminished without other syndromic abnormalities. Seven autosomal loci have been genetically mapped, and the underlying causal genes have been identified for MCPH1, MCPH3, MCPH5, MCPH6, and MCPH7 but not for MCPH2 or MCPH4. The known genes play roles in mitosis and cell division. We ascertained three families from an Eastern Canadian subpopulation, each with one microcephalic child. Homozygosity analysis in two families using genome-wide dense SNP genotyping supported linkage to the published MCPH4 locus on chromosome 15q21.1. Sequencing of coding exons of candidate genes in the interval identified a nonconservative amino acid change in a highly conserved residue of the centrosomal protein CEP152. The affected children in these two families were both homozygous for this missense variant. The third affected child was compound heterozygous for the missense mutation plus a second, premature-termination mutation truncating a third of the protein and preventing its localization to centrosomes in transfected cells. CEP152 is the putative mammalian ortholog of Drosphila asterless, mutations in which affect mitosis in the fly. Published data from zebrafish are also consistent with a role of CEP152 in centrosome function. By RT-PCR, CEP152 is expressed in the embryonic mouse brain, similar to other MCPH genes. Like some other MCPH genes, CEP152 shows signatures of positive selection in the human lineage. CEP152 is a strong candidate for the causal gene underlying MCPH4 and may be an important gene in the evolution of human brain size. PMID:20598275

  10. The location of protein S8 and surrounding elements of 16S rRNA in the 70S ribosome from combined use of directed hydroxyl radical probing and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, L; Culver, G M; Yusupova, G Z; Cate, J H; Yusupov, M M; Noller, H F

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S8, which is essential for the assembly of the central domain of 16S rRNA, is one of the most thoroughly studied RNA-binding proteins. To map its surrounding RNA in the ribosome, we carried out directed hydroxyl radical probing of 16S rRNA using Fe(II) tethered to nine different positions on the surface of protein S8 in 70S ribosomes. Hydroxyl radical-induced cleavage was observed near the classical S8-binding site in the 620 stem, and flanking the other S8-footprinted regions of the central domain at the three-helix junction near position 650 and the 825 and 860 stems. In addition, cleavage near the 5' terminus of 16S rRNA, in the 300 region of its 5' domain, and in the 1070 region of its 3'-major domain provide information about the proximity to S8 of RNA elements not directly involved in its binding. These data, along with previous footprinting and crosslinking results, allowed positioning of protein S8 and its surrounding RNA elements in a 7.8-A map of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. The resulting model is in close agreement with the extensive body of data from previous studies using protein-protein and protein-RNA crosslinking, chemical and enzymatic footprinting, and genetics. PMID:10836793

  11. Life-time expression of the proteins peroxiredoxin, beta-synuclein, PARK7/DJ-1, and stathmin in the primary visual and primary somatosensory cortices in rats

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Michael R. R.; Melkonyan, Harutyun; Thanos, Solon

    2015-01-01

    Four distinct proteins are regulated in the aging neuroretina and may be regulated in the cerebral cortex, too: peroxiredoxin, beta-synuclein, PARK[Parkinson disease(autosomal recessive, early onset)]7/DJ-1, and Stathmin. Thus, we performed a comparative analysis of these proteins in the the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and primary visual cortex (V1) in rats, in order to detect putative common development-, maturation- and age-related changes. The expressions of peroxiredoxin, beta-synuclein, PARK[Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset)]7/DJ-1, and Stathmin were compared in the newborn, juvenile, adult, and aged S1 and V1. Western blot (WB), quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses were employed to determine whether the changes identified by proteomics were verifiable at the cellular and molecular levels. All of the proteins were detected in both of the investigated cortical areas. Changes in the expressions of the four proteins were found throughout the life-time of the rats. Peroxiredoxin expression remained unchanged over life-time. Beta-Synuclein expression was massively increased up to the adult stage of life in both the S1 and V1. PARK[Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset)]7/DJ-1 exhibited a massive up-regulation in both the S1 and V1 at all ages. Stathmin expression was massively down regulated after the neonatal period in both the S1 and V1. The detected protein alterations were analogous to their retinal profiles. This study is the first to provide evidence that peroxiredoxin, beta-synuclein, PARK[Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset)]7/DJ-1, and Stathmin are associated with postnatal maturation and aging in both the S1 and V1 of rats. These changes may indicate their involvement in key functional pathways and may account for the onset or progression of age-related pathologies. PMID:25788877

  12. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. PMID:26921255

  13. Cadmium induces apoptosis in primary rat osteoblasts through caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dai, Nannan; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xuezhong; Bian, Jianchun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd) induces apoptosis in osteoblasts (OBs); however, little information is available regarding the specific mechanisms of Cd-induced primary rat OB apoptosis. In this study, Cd reduced cell viability, damaged cell membranes and induced apoptosis in OBs. We observed decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potentials, ultrastructure collapse, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and increased concentrations of cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 following Cd treatment. Cd also increased the phosphorylation of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in OBs. Pretreatment with the caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone, ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 inhibitor (SB203580) and JNK inhibitor (SP600125) abrogated Cd-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, Cd-treated OBs exhibited signs of oxidative stress protection, including increased antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase levels and decreased formation of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, the results of our study clarified that Cd has direct cytotoxic effects on OBs, which are mediated by caspase- and MAPK pathways in Cd-induced apoptosis of OBs. PMID:26425111

  14. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms. PMID:26921255

  15. Regulation of follistatin-like protein 1 expression and secretion in primary human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Sven W; Raschke, Silja; Holven, Kirsten Bjørklund; Jensen, Jørgen; Eckardt, Kristin; Eckel, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    Follistatin-like protein 1 (Fstl1) is a secreted glycoprotein of the follistatin family. Fstl1 is secreted by C2C12 cells, and Akt1 over-expression in skeletal muscle leads to its induction in muscle and increased circulating levels. So far, secretion of Fstl1 by human myotubes and the effect of exercise on its circulating levels have not been investigated. Here, we examined both the regulation of Fstl1 expression and secretion in primary human skeletal muscle cells and the effect of acute exercise on Fstl1 serum concentrations in humans. We show that human myotubes express and secrete Fstl1 in a differentiation-dependent manner. Furthermore, IFNγ and IL-1β significantly increase Fstl1 secretion. Electrical pulse stimulation (EPS)-induced contractile activity of myotubes did not regulate Fstl1. Interestingly, we observed that 60 min cycling increased serum Fstl1 level by 22%. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Fstl1 is expressed and secreted by human myotubes and plasma Fstl1 levels are increased after exercise. PMID:23419164

  16. EFFECT OF ARSENICALS ON THE EXPRESSION OF CELL CYCLE PROTEINS AND EARLY SIGNALING EVENTS IN PRIMARY HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Arsenicals on the Expression of Cell Cycle Proteins and Early Signaling Events in Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    Mudipalli, A, Owen R. D. and R. J. Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711.

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is a m...

  17. The RNA binding and transport proteins staufen and fragile X mental retardation protein are expressed by rat primary afferent neurons and localize to peripheral and central axons.

    PubMed

    Price, T J; Flores, C M; Cervero, F; Hargreaves, K M

    2006-09-15

    Neuronal proteins have been traditionally viewed as being derived solely from the soma; however, accumulating evidence indicates that dendritic and axonal sites are capable of a more autonomous role in terms of new protein synthesis. Such extra-somal translation allows for more rapid, on-demand regulation of neuronal structure and function than would otherwise be possible. While mechanisms of dendritic RNA transport have been elucidated, it remains unclear how RNA is trafficked into the axon for this purpose. Primary afferent neurons of the dorsal root (DRG) and trigeminal (TG) ganglia have among the longest axons in the neuraxis and such axonal protein synthesis would be advantageous, given the greater time involved for protein trafficking to occur via axonal transport. Therefore, we hypothesized that these primary sensory neurons might express proteins involved in RNA transport. Rat DRG and TG neurons expressed staufen (stau) 1 and 2 (detected at the mRNA level) and stau2 and fragile x mental retardation protein (FMRP; detected at the protein level). Stau2 mRNA was also detected in human TG neurons. Stau2 and FMRP protein were localized to the sciatic nerve and dorsal roots by immunohistochemistry and to dorsal roots by Western blot. Stau2 and FMRP immunoreactivities colocalized with transient receptor potential channel type 1 immunoreactivity in sensory axons of the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, suggesting that these proteins are being transported into the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive sensory axons. Based on these findings, we propose that stau2 and FMRP proteins are attractive candidates to subserve RNA transport in sensory neurons, linking somal transcriptional events to axonal translation. PMID:16809002

  18. Radical formation and radiation damage in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.V.; DiGregorio, S.; DiMauro, L.; Wood, D.E.

    1980-10-30

    Unequivocal samples of the 1-adamantyl (1-Ad) and 2-Ad radicals have been prepared in a matrix of adamantane (Ad) by the simultaneous deposition of atomic sodium, 1- or 2-bromoadamantane, and adamantance at 77 K. The EPR spectrum of the 1-Ad radical contrary to previous reports has a clearly resolved hyperfine structure that can be analyzed in terms of the solution parameters of Krusic et al., and the spectrum of the 2-Ad radical is identical with that previously reported by Ferrell et al. It is also shown that conditions of purification and irradiation can greatly affect the spectra obtained upon X irradiation of Ad itself. Depending upon conditions, alicyclic radicals that are primary products of ring-opening reactions or benzylic-type radicals that are probably secondary reaction products can also be obtained in addition to 1-Ad and 2-Ad radicals.

  19. Monosodium Urate Activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 Kinase and Cathepsin Dependent Unconventional Protein Secretion From Human Primary Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J.; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2013-01-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  20. Influence of the primary emulsification procedure on the characteristics of small protein-loaded PLGA microparticles for antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Wischke, C; Borchert, H-H

    2006-06-01

    Microparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) using a W1/O/W2 double emulsion solvent evaporation method are suitable vehicles for the delivery of proteins to antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells. In this study, the influence of different techniques for the preparation of the primary W1/O emulsion was investigated with respect to the protein localization within the microparticles, morphological characteristics of these particles, protein burst release and the native state of the released protein. Bovine serum albumin bearing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-BSA) was used as model protein. A static micromixer was applied for the preparation of the W1/O/W2 double emulsion. Employing a rotor-stator homogenizer (Ultra-Turrax) for primary emulsification, microcapsules with a high burst release were produced, because nearly all FITC-BSA was attached to the outside of the particle wall. Using a high pressure homogenizer or an ultrasonic procedure resulted in the formation of microspheres with homogeneous protein distribution and a reduced burst release. PMID:16854818

  1. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. The primary structure of the gamma 1 protein chain.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    The primary structure of the gamma 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme gamma 1 gamma 1 was deduced by characterization of 36 tryptic and 2 CNBr peptides. The polypeptide chain is composed of 373 amino acid residues. gamma 1 differs from the beta 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 21 positions, and from the E subunit of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 43 positions including a gap at position 128 as in the beta 1 subunit. All zinc-liganding residues from the E subunit of the horse protein and the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme are conserved, but like beta 1, gamma 1 also has an additional cysteine residue at position 286 (in the positional numbering system of the horse enzyme) due to a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most amino acid exchanges preserve the properties of the residues affected and are largely located on the surface of the molecules, away from the active site and the coenzyme binding region. However, eight positions with charge differences in relation to the E subunit of the horse enzyme are noticed. These result in a net positive charge increase of one in gamma 1 versus E, explaining the electrophoretic mobilities on starch gels. Of functional significance is the conservation of Ser-48 in gamma 1 relative to E. The residue is close to the active site but different (Thr-48) in the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme. Thus, the closer structural relationship between human gamma 1 and horse E enzyme subunit than between beta 1 and E is also reflected in functionally important residues, explaining a greater similarity between gamma 1 gamma 1 and EE than between beta 1 beta 1 and EE. PMID:6391921

  2. Effect of serum proteins on haem uptake and metabolism in primary cultures of liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, P R; Bement, W J; Gorman, N; Liem, H H; Wolkoff, A W; Muller-Eberhard, U

    1988-01-01

    A role of haemopexin in transporting haem to hepatocytes for degradation has been inferred from the high affinity of haemopexin for haem. We have examined this question in primary cultures of chick-embryo and adult rat liver cells. We present here the results of four sets of experiments which indicate that haemopexin retarded haem uptake by hepatocytes in culture. (1) Haem bound to bovine serum albumin is known to repress the activity of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase in chick cultures as indicated by decreased porphyrin accumulation. When haem-albumin was added in the presence of excess purified or freshly secreted chicken haemopexin, no haem-mediated repression of porphyrin production was observed. The haem-mediated repression of porphyrin accumulation was partially prevented when human, but not chicken, albumin was added to cultures. This finding reflected the higher affinity of human albumin for haem compared with that of chicken albumin. (2) Haemopexin inhibited the ability of haem to be incorporated into cytochrome P-450 induced in the chick cultures in the presence of the iron chelator desferrioxamine. (3) The rate of association of [55Fe]haem with cultured rat hepatocytes when [55Fe]haem-haemopexin was added was one-eighth of the rate observed when [55Fe]haem-bovine serum albumin was used as the haem donor. (4) The presence of haemopexin also diminished the catabolism of haem by both rat and chick-embryo liver cell cultures. It is concluded that the uptake and subsequent metabolic effects of haem are inhibited in cultured hepatocytes by proteins such as haemopexin which have a high affinity for haem. PMID:3223898

  3. Diagnostic value of serum Golgi protein 73 for HBV-related primary hepatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guosheng; Dong, Feibo; Xu, Xiaozhen; Hu, Airong; Hu, Yaoren

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels are routinely used for diagnosis and monitoring of hepatic diseases, but it has a limited value. Golgi protein 73 (GP73) has been suggested as a new marker for hepatic diseases. Objective: To explore the clinical value of serum GP73 in different diseases associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Method: Between January 2010 and August 2014, serum samples from 88 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), 78 patients with HBV-related liver cirrhosis (LC), and 194 patients with HBV-related primary hepatic cancer (PHC) were collected. Serum samples from 30 healthy volunteers were used as controls. ELISA and microparticle enzyme immunoassay were used to measure serum GP73 and AFP levels. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the diagnostic value of serum GP73 and AFP for PHC. Results: For the diagnosis of PHC, GP73 showed a sensitivity of 65.5% and specificity of 66.3%, while AFP levels showed sensitivity of 64.4% and specificity of 76.5%. Serial testing (both tests are positive) could increase the specificity (sensitivity of 45.9% and specificity of 85.5%) while parallel testing (any single positive test result) could increase the sensitivity (sensitivity of 84.0% and specificity of 57.2%). Serum GP73 and AFP levels were significantly different between Child-Pugh grades (P<0.001 for GP73 and P=0.044 for AFP). Significant differences in serum GP73 and AFP were found between TNM stages (all P<0.001). Conclusion: Serum GP73 had limited diagnostic value for HBV-related PHC. The combined use of serum GP73 and AFP levels improved the diagnostic efficacy. PMID:26617863

  4. Bcl-2 protein expression is the strongest independent prognostic factor of survival in primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grange, Florent; Petrella, Tony; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Joly, Pascal; D'Incan, Michel; Delaunay, Michele; Machet, Laurent; Avril, Marie-Francoise; Dalac, Sophie; Bernard, Philippe; Carlotti, Agnes; Esteve, Eric; Vergier, Beatrice; Dechelotte, Pierre; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Courville, Philippe; Saiag, Philippe; Laroche, Liliane; Bagot, Martine; Wechsler, Janine

    2004-05-15

    Bcl-2 protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with noncutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, the location on the leg, the round-cell morphology defined as the predominance of centroblasts and immunoblasts over large centrocytes, and multiple skin lesions were identified as adverse prognostic factors. The prognostic value of bcl-2 protein expression has not been studied in large series of patients. We evaluated 80 primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas collected by the French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas. The prognostic value of age, sex, number of lesions, cutaneous extent, location, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, B symptoms, morphology, and bcl-2 protein expression was studied. The overall 5-year specific survival rate was 65%. In univariate analysis, advanced age, multiple skin lesions (n = 48), location on the leg (n = 25), round-cell morphology (n = 32), and bcl-2 expression (n = 39) were significantly related to death from lymphoma. In multivariate analysis, bcl-2 expression (P =.0003), multiple skin lesions (P =.004), and age remained independent prognostic factors. The 5-year specific survival rates in bcl-2-positive and bcl-2-negative patients were 41% and 89%, respectively (P <.0001). A new prognostic classification of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should be based primarily on bcl-2 protein expression rather than the location of skin lesions. PMID:14726400

  5. Differential proteomic profiling reveals regulatory proteins and novel links between primary metabolism and spinosad production in Saccharopolyspora spinosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saccharopolyspora spinosa is an important producer of antibiotic spinosad with clarified biosynthesis pathway but its complex regulation networks associated with primary metabolism and secondary metabolites production almost have never been concerned or studied before. The proteomic analysis of a novel Saccharopolyspora spinosa CCTCC M206084 was performed and aimed to provide a global profile of regulatory proteins. Results Two-dimensional-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 1090, 1166, 701, and 509 proteins from four phases respectively, i.e., the logarithmic growth phase (T1), early stationary phase (T2), late stationary phase (T3), and decline phase (T4). Among the identified proteins, 1579 were unique to the S. spinosa proteome, including almost all the enzymes for spinosad biosynthesis. Trends in protein expression over the various time phases were deduced from using the modified protein abundance index (PAI), revealed the importance of stress pathway proteins and other global regulatory network proteins during spinosad biosynthesis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis followed by one-dimensional LC-MS/MS identification revealed similar trend of protein expression from four phases with the results of semi-quantification by PAI. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 6 different expressed genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Expression of three proteins that likely promote spinosad biosynthesis, namely, 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (MHSM), glutamine synthetase (GS) and cyclic nucleotide-binding domain-containing protein (CNDP) was validated by western blot, which confirmed the results of proteomic analysis. Conclusions This study is the first systematic analysis of the S. spinosa proteome during fermentation and its valuable proteomic data of regulatory proteins may be used to enhance

  6. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  7. The contribution of genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variability of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V P; Polonikov, A V; Solodilova, M A

    2005-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that, compared with healthy individuals, patients with primary arterial hypotension (PAH) have significant quantitative changes in erythrocyte membrane proteins. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the contribution made by genetic and environmental factors to quantitative variation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in PAH. We studied 109 hypotensive patients, 124 normotensive subjects, 222 of their first-degree relatives and 24 twin pairs by sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The decomposition of total phenotypic variance of erythrocyte membrane proteins to genetic and environmental components was performed on the basis of correlations among first-degree relatives by the least squares method. The genetic dominance and shared environmental factors were found to influence the variability of cytoskeletal membrane proteins whose contents were changed in PAH. Furthermore, variations in alpha-spectrin, actin and anion exchanger in hypotensives were substantially influenced by major gene and maternal effects. Ankyrin 2.1 and actin content was under the control of common underlying genes. Variations in membrane-associated glutathione-S-transferase and tropomyosin were predominantly affected by polygenes. These findings suggest that the putative major genes with pleiotropic effects appear to be involved in the control of quantitative disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins in primary hypotension. PMID:15638825

  8. Two-color SERS microscopy for protein co-localization in prostate tissue with primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Mohammad; Schneider, Lilli; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Packeisen, Jens; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    SERS microscopy is a novel staining technique in immunohistochemistry, which is based on antibodies labeled with functionalized noble metal colloids called SERS labels or nanotags for optical detection. Conventional covalent bioconjugation of these SERS labels cannot prevent blocking of the antigen recognition sites of the antibody. We present a rational chemical design for SERS label-antibody conjugates which addresses this issue. Highly sensitive, silica-coated gold nanoparticle clusters as SERS labels are non-covalently conjugated to primary antibodies by using the chimeric protein A/G, which selectively recognizes the Fc part of antibodies and therefore prevents blocking of the antigen recognition sites. In proof-of-concept two-color imaging experiments for the co-localization of p63 and PSA on non-neoplastic prostate tissue FFPE specimens, we demonstrate the specificity and signal brightness of these rationally designed primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates.SERS microscopy is a novel staining technique in immunohistochemistry, which is based on antibodies labeled with functionalized noble metal colloids called SERS labels or nanotags for optical detection. Conventional covalent bioconjugation of these SERS labels cannot prevent blocking of the antigen recognition sites of the antibody. We present a rational chemical design for SERS label-antibody conjugates which addresses this issue. Highly sensitive, silica-coated gold nanoparticle clusters as SERS labels are non-covalently conjugated to primary antibodies by using the chimeric protein A/G, which selectively recognizes the Fc part of antibodies and therefore prevents blocking of the antigen recognition sites. In proof-of-concept two-color imaging experiments for the co-localization of p63 and PSA on non-neoplastic prostate tissue FFPE specimens, we demonstrate the specificity and signal brightness of these rationally designed primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates

  9. Improved protocols for protein and RNA isolation from three-dimensional collagen sandwich cultures of primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heidebrecht, F; Schulz, I; Keller, M; Behrens, S-E; Bader, A

    2009-10-01

    The sandwich culture is the most widely used long-term culture system for functional primary hepatocytes. Despite its advantages, the currently available protocols for protein and RNA extraction are either time-consuming or contain steps that may skewer the results. This paper describes improved protocols for RNA and protein extraction from sandwich cultures that are easy to perform, require short working time, and use no additional enzymatic reactions that could change the expression profile of the cells. The quality of the RNA is excellent, allowing also applications requiring high purity such as microarrays. In general, the protocols are suited for any cells in 3D collagen culture. PMID:19539596

  10. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals

  11. The Cholinergic Signaling Responsible for the Expression of a Memory-Related Protein in Primary Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Ju; Chen, Shun-Sheng; Wang, Dean-Chuan; Hung, Hui-Shan

    2016-11-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction in the brain is closely related to cognitive impairment including memory loss. In addition to the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, deficits in the cholinergic receptor signaling may also play an important role. In the present study, to examine the cholinergic signaling pathways responsible for the induction of a memory-related postsynaptic protein, a cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce the expression of activity-regulated cytoskeleton associated protein (Arc) in primary rat cortical neurons. After pretreating neurons with various antagonists or inhibitors, the levels of carbachol-induced Arc protein expression were detected by Western blot analysis. The results show that carbachol induces Arc protein expression mainly through activating M1 acetylcholine receptors and the downstream phospholipase C pathway, which may lead to the activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. Importantly, carbachol-mediated M2 receptor activation exerts negative effects on Arc protein expression and thus counteracts the enhanced effects of M1 activation. Furthermore, it is suggested for the first time that M1-mediated enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) responses, leading to Ca(2+) entry through NMDARs, contributes to carbachol-induced Arc protein expression. These findings reveal a more complete cholinergic signaling that is responsible for carbachol-induced Arc protein expression, and thus provide more information for developing treatments that can modulate cholinergic signaling and consequently alleviate cognitive impairment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2428-2438, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895748

  12. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  13. Complex Biotransformations Catalyzed by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Liu, Wen

    2011-01-01

    The radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) superfamily currently comprises thousands of proteins that participate in numerous biochemical processes across all kingdoms of life. These proteins share a common mechanism to generate a powerful 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates a highly diverse array of biotransformations. Recent studies are beginning to reveal the role of radical AdoMet proteins in the catalysis of highly complex and chemically unusual transformations, e.g. the ThiC-catalyzed complex rearrangement reaction. The unique features and intriguing chemistries of these proteins thus demonstrate the remarkable versatility and sophistication of radical enzymology. PMID:21771780

  14. Alterations in skeletal protein, distribution of PKCalpha, and level of phospholipids in erythrocyte membranes of women with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Jolanta; Thieleman, Anna; Kopczyński, Zygmunt; Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanisław Kazimierz; Rybczyńska, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work was to study the influence of primary breast cancer on mature erythrocyte membranes. Blood was sampled from 29 women with primary breast cancer, aged 35-86 years, in different stages of clinical progression of the disease. In red blood cell membranes an increase of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-diphosphate levels was observed. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in phospholipase C activity. Simultaneously, a significant decrease in concentration of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol was found. Quantitative protein evaluation showed an increase in band 4.1 protein content with no changes in the level of constitutive PKCalpha responsible for the phosphorylation of this protein and its affinity to glycophorine C. In parallel a greater increase of PKCalpha translocation after PMA treatment compared to controls was observed. Possible oxidative damage of erythrocyte membranes indicated by an increase in malonyldialdehyde level and decrease in SH-group content as well as by an increase in the w/ ratio was documented. From the results it is concluded that primary breast cancer seems to affect the membranes of mature erythrocytes. PMID:12490289

  15. Free radicals, antioxidants, and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun-Zhong; Yang, Sheng; Wu, Guoyao

    2002-10-01

    Radiation hazards in outer space present an enormous challenge for the biological safety of astronauts. A deleterious effect of radiation is the production of reactive oxygen species, which result in damage to biomolecules (e.g., lipid, protein, amino acids, and DNA). Understanding free radical biology is necessary for designing an optimal nutritional countermeasure against space radiation-induced cytotoxicity. Free radicals (e.g., superoxide, nitric oxide, and hydroxyl radicals) and other reactive species (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and hypochlorous acid) are produced in the body, primarily as a result of aerobic metabolism. Antioxidants (e.g., glutathione, arginine, citrulline, taurine, creatine, selenium, zinc, vitamin E, vitamin C, vitamin A, and tea polyphenols) and antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidases) exert synergistic actions in scavenging free radicals. There has been growing evidence over the past three decades showing that malnutrition (e.g., dietary deficiencies of protein, selenium, and zinc) or excess of certain nutrients (e.g., iron and vitamin C) gives rise to the oxidation of biomolecules and cell injury. A large body of the literature supports the notion that dietary antioxidants are useful radioprotectors and play an important role in preventing many human diseases (e.g., cancer, atherosclerosis, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, neurodegeneration, and diabetes). The knowledge of enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative defense mechanisms will serve as a guiding principle for establishing the most effective nutrition support to ensure the biological safety of manned space missions. PMID:12361782

  16. Elliptocytosis in patients with C-terminal domain mutations of protein 4.1 correlates with encoded messenger RNA levels rather than with alterations in primary protein structure.

    PubMed

    Morinière, M; Ribeiro, L; Dalla Venezia, N; Deguillien, M; Maillet, P; Cynober, T; Delhommeau, F; Almeida, H; Tamagnini, G; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    2000-03-01

    Early biochemical studies defined 4 functional domains of the erythroid protein 4.1 (4.1R). From amino-terminal to carboxy-terminal, these are 30 kd, 16 kd, 10 kd, and 22/24 kd in size. Although the functional properties of both the 30-kd and the 10-kd domain have been demonstrated in red cells, no functional activities have been assigned to either the 16-kd or the 22/24-kd domain in these cells. We here describe new mutations in the sequence encoding the C-terminal 22/24-kd domain that are associated with hereditary elliptocytosis. An unusually mild phenotype observed in heterozygous and homozygous members of 1 family suggested heterogeneity in the pattern of expression of 4.1R deficiency. Using a variety of protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) quantification strategies, we showed that, regardless of the alteration in the C-terminal primary sequence, when the protein is produced, it assembles at the cell membrane. In addition, we found that alterations in red cell morphologic features and membrane function correlate with the amount of membrane-associated protein-and therefore with the amount of mRNA accumulated-rather than with the primary structure of the variant proteins. These data suggest that an intact sequence at exons 19 through 21 encoding part of the C-terminal 22/24-kd region is not required for proper protein 4.1R assembly in mature red cells. (Blood. 2000;95:1834-1841) PMID:10688845

  17. Flies, worms and the Free Radical Theory of ageing.

    PubMed

    Clancy, David; Birdsall, John

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans have provided the largest body of evidence addressing the Free Radical Theory of ageing, however the evidence has not been unequivocally supportive. Oxidative damage to DNA is probably not a major contributor, damage to lipids is assuming greater importance and damage to proteins probably the source of pathology. On balance the evidence does not support a primary role of oxidative damage in ageing in C. elegans, perhaps because of its particular energy metabolic and stress resistance profile. Evidence is more numerous, varied and consistent and hence more compelling for Drosophila, although not conclusive. However there is good evidence for a role of oxidative damage in later life pathology. Future work should: 1/ make more use of protein oxidative damage measurements; 2/ use inducible transgenic systems or pharmacotherapy to ensure genetic equivalence of controls and avoid confounding effects during development; 3/ to try to delay ageing, target interventions which reduce and/or repair protein oxidative damage. PMID:22504404

  18. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  19. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  20. [Primary Sjögren's syndrome presenting as unconsciousness associated with IgA-lambda M-protein].

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Fujimoto, T; Umemura, Y; Nakamura, S; Dohi, K

    1999-06-01

    We describe the case of a 43-year-old woman who presented with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) which manifestated as unconsciousness due to M protein. A diagnosis of SS was made based on a ten-year history of dryness, a Shirmer test, and the histological findings of labial biopsy. A rouleaux formation was observed and serum protein electrophoresis revealed a monoclonal spike of 4.0 gm/dl in the gamma-region, which was characterized as IgA-lambda. Biopsy of the minor salivary glands showed marked polyclonal lymphoproliferation with lymphoid follicles, including both T cells and B cells as revealed by immunohistological staining. Therefore, the patient had a lymphoproliferative lesion of the minor salivary glands, which is also known as pseudolymphoma. We conclude that fainting associated with marked M protein may be manifestation of SS. Such cases should be followed carefully since the subsequent neoplastic transformation of pseudolymphomas have been previously reported. PMID:11126667

  1. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - ...

  2. Sunlight and free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Thomas Tidwell reflects on the overlooked -- but prescient -- proposal by the British chemists Arthur Downes and Thomas Blunt for photochemical free-radical formation, decades before Moses Gomberg launched the field of radical chemistry by preparing triphenylmethyl, the first stable organic radical.

  3. Semiconduction of proteins as an attribute of the living state: the ideas of Albert Szent-Györgyi revisited in light of the recent knowledge regarding oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagy, I Z

    1995-01-01

    Oxyradicals have been considered as harmful byproducts causing molecular damage during aging. However, evidence is accumulating to show that the actual situation is more complex: the living state implicitly involves the production of oxyradicals. (1) Blast type cells produce much less oxyradicals than the differentiated ones, and an increased production of OH radicals induce differentiation of various lines of leukemia cells; meanwhile, their superoxide dismutase expression increases to a very high extent. (2) The supramolecular organization of the cells is developed by means of "useful" crosslinking effects OH radicals. (3) Repiratory inhibition of oxyradical production (KCN-intoxication, suffocation, etc.) would kill living organisms prior to the exhaustion of energy reserves. It is assumed that the continuous flux of OH radicals is a prerequisite for a electron delocalization on the proteins, which is a semiconduction of p-type, proposes already in 1941 by Albert Szent-Györgyi, and refuted on a "theoretical" basis. It has become clear by now that the carbon-based semiconduction is possible because diamond transistors are known to exist. The recently developed atomic force microscopy offers some real possibilities for experimental testing of this assumption. This concept may lead us to new horizons in interpretation of living functions, such as the basic memory mechanisms in brain cells and their impairment during aging. PMID:7556511

  4. Inactivation efficiencies of radical reactions with biologically active DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, M. V. M.; Retèl, J.; Loman, H.

    Dilute aqueous solutions of biologically active θX174 DNA may serve as a simplified model system of the cell. Damage to the DNA after irradiation with γ-rays, may be ascribed to reactions with .OH, .H and e -aq or secondary radicals, arising from reactions of water radicals with added scavengers. Conversion of primary (water) radicals into secondary (scavenger) radicals leads to a considerable protection of the DNA, which, however, would have been larger if these secondary radicals did not contribute to DNA inactivation. The inactivation yield due to isopropanol or formate (secondary) radicals depends on dose rate as well as DNA concentration. Furthermore the inactivation efficiencies of the reactions of both the primary and the secondary radicals with single-stranded DNA could be established.

  5. Expressions and clinical significances of CD133 protein and CD133 mRNA in primary lesion of gastric adenocacinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study on expressions and clinical significances of CD133 protein and CD133 mRNA in primary lesion of gastric adenocarcinoma (GC). Methods Expressions of CD133 protein by immunostaining (99 cases) and CD133 mRNA by semi-quantitative RT-PCR (31 cases) were detected in primary lesion and in noncancerous gastric mucosa tissue (NCGT). Correlations of CD133 protein expression with clinicopathological parameters and post-operative survival were analyzed. Relations of CD133 mRNA level with Ki-67 labeling index (LI), and lymphatic metastasis were assessed too. Results Brown particles indicating CD133 protein positivity occurred in some parts of tumor cells and epithelium. Expressive percentage of CD133 protein positivity was significantly higher in subgroups with >5 cm diameter (P = 0.041), later TNM stage (P = 0.044), severer lymph node metastasis (P = 0.017), occurrences of lymphatic invasion (P = 0.000) and vascular invasion (P = 0.000) respectively. Severer invasion depth (P = 0.011), lymph node metastasis occurrence (P = 0.043) and later TNM stage (P = 0.049) were the independent risk factors for CD133 protein expression. Average brightness scale value (BSV) of CD133 mRNA was significantly higher in subgroups with >5 cm diameter (P = 0.041), lymph node metastasis occurrence (P = 0.004) and in lower Ki-67 LI (P = 0.02). Relative analysis revealed that BSV of CD133 mRNA related positively to metastatic lymphatic nodes ratio (P = 0.008) and metastatic lymph node number (P = 0.009), but negatively to Ki-67 LI (P = 0.009). Survival of positive subgroup of CD 133 protein was significantly poorer (P = 0.047). Lymph node metastasis occurrence (P = 0.042), later TNM stage (P = 0.046) and CD 133 protein positive expression (P = 0.046) were respectively the independent risk factors to survival. Conclusion Higher expressive level of CD133 mRNA is associated to lower Ki-67 LI and severer lymphatic metastasis. Therefore, the expressive level of CD133 mRNA can play an

  6. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  7. Purification and primary structure of novel lipid transfer proteins from germinated lentil (Lens culinaris) seeds.

    PubMed

    Finkina, E I; Balandin, S V; Serebryakova, M V; Potapenko, N A; Tagaev, A A; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2007-04-01

    A subfamily of eight novel lipid transfer proteins designated as Lc-LTP1-8 was found in the lentil Lens culinaris. Lc-LTP2, Lc-LTP4, Lc-LTP7, and Lc-LTP8 were purified from germinated lentil seeds, and their molecular masses (9268.7, 9282.7, 9121.5, 9135.5 daltons) and complete amino acid sequences were determined. The purified proteins consist of 92-93 amino acid residues, have four disulfide bonds, and inhibit growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Total RNA was isolated from germinated lentil seeds, RT-PCR and cloning were performed, and the cDNAs of six LTPs were sequenced. Precursor 116-118-residue proteins with 24-25-residue signal peptides were found, and two of them are purified proteins Lc-LTP2 and Lc-LTP4. PMID:17511608

  8. Nuclear Protein of the Testis Midline Carcinoma Masquerading as a Primary Mediastinal Seminoma

    PubMed Central

    Sayapina, Maria S.; Savelov, Nikita A.; Karseladze, Apollon I.; Bulanov, Anatoly A.; Tryakin, Alexey A.; Nosov, Dmitry A.; Garin, Avgust M.; Tjulandin, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear protein of the testis (NUT) midline carcinomas are rare aggressive carcinomas characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that involve the gene encoding the NUT. This article reviews the clinicopathologic features and the differential diagnosis of these malignancies. PMID:27441078

  9. The primary structure of fatty-acid-binding protein from nurse shark liver. Structural and evolutionary relationship to the mammalian fatty-acid-binding protein family.

    PubMed

    Medzihradszky, K F; Gibson, B W; Kaur, S; Yu, Z H; Medzihradszky, D; Burlingame, A L; Bass, N M

    1992-02-01

    The primary structure of a fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) isolated from the liver of the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) was determined by high-performance tandem mass spectrometry (employing multichannel array detection) and Edman degradation. Shark liver FABP consists of 132 amino acids with an acetylated N-terminal valine. The chemical molecular mass of the intact protein determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (Mr = 15124 +/- 2.5) was in good agreement with that calculated from the amino acid sequence (Mr = 15121.3). The amino acid sequence of shark liver FABP displays significantly greater similarity to the FABP expressed in mammalian heart, peripheral nerve myelin and adipose tissue (61-53% sequence similarity) than to the FABP expressed in mammalian liver (22% similarity). Phylogenetic trees derived from the comparison of the shark liver FABP amino acid sequence with the members of the mammalian fatty-acid/retinoid-binding protein gene family indicate the initial divergence of an ancestral gene into two major subfamilies: one comprising the genes for mammalian liver FABP and gastrotropin, the other comprising the genes for mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins I and II, cellular retinoic-acid-binding protein myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP, heart FABP and shark liver FABP, the latter having diverged from the ancestral gene that ultimately gave rise to the present day mammalian heart-FABP, adipocyte FABP and myelin P2 protein sequences. The sequence for intestinal FABP from the rat could be assigned to either subfamily, depending on the approach used for phylogenetic tree construction, but clearly diverged at a relatively early evolutionary time point. Indeed, sequences proximately ancestral or closely related to mammalian intestinal FABP, liver FABP, gastrotropin and the retinoid-binding group of proteins appear to have arisen prior to the divergence of shark liver FABP and should therefore also be present in elasmobranchs

  10. Primary structure and androgen regulation of a 20-kilodalton protein specific to rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Ho, K C; Snoek, R; Quarmby, V; Viskochil, D H; Rennie, P S; Wilson, E M; French, F S; Bruchovsky, N

    1989-07-25

    Nuclear and cytosolic forms of a 20-kdalton rat ventral prostate protein were purified and partially sequenced from their N-termini. Isolated nuclei were treated with micrococcal nuclease and extracted in 0.6 M NaCl, and proteins were separated by affinity chromatography on Matrex gel green A, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superose 12. The 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the nuclear 20-kdalton protein was identical with the cytosolic protein except it lacked 7 N-terminal amino acids present in the cytosolic form. The DNA sequence of a full-length complementary DNA clone isolated from a ventral prostate gt11 library extended the N-terminal sequence of the cytosolic form by an additional nine amino acids from the predicted initiation methionine. The cDNA included the nucleotide sequence for the 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the purified 20-kdalton protein and predicted molecular weights of 16,686, 17,521, and 18,650, respectively, for the nuclear, cytoplasmic, and nonprocessed proteins. Northern blot analyses of reproductive tract tissue RNAs using the 20-kdalton protein cDNA as probe revealed a single mRNA species of 0.92 kb detectable only in extracts of rat ventral prostate. Expression of the 0.92-kb mRNA was androgen dependent since the mRNA was undetectable in extracts obtained 4 days after castration and was restored 16 h after restimulation with androgen. PMID:2477055

  11. An Exercise on the Determination of the Primary Structure of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leader, David P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an exercise that extends the actual determination of the amino acid sequence of a simple dipeptide to the theoretical determination of the complete primary structure of a larger polypeptide. Includes diagrams of display cards and duplicated sheets used in the theoretical portion of the exercise. (CS)

  12. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  13. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  14. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    PubMed

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Yoshida, Satoyo; Irie, Shoichi; Tsujii, Toshinori; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR), neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1), and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1), localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S) is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L) is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control. PMID:26053317

  15. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  16. Primary radiation damage of protein crystals by an intense synchrotron X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Teng, T Y; Moffat, K

    2000-09-01

    X-ray radiation damage of a lysozyme single crystal by an intense monochromatic beam from a third-generation radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source has been studied. The results show that primary radiation damage is linearly dependent on the X-ray dose even when the crystal is at cryogenic temperatures. The existence of an upper limit for the primary radiation damage was observed. Above the threshold of approximately 1 x 10(7) Gy, excessive damage of the crystal develops which is interpreted as the onset of secondary and/or tertiary radiation damage. This upper limit of X-ray dose is compared with Henderson's limit [Henderson (1990). Proc. R. Soc. London, B241, 6-8], and its implication for the amount of useful X-ray diffraction data that can be obtained for crystals of a given scattering power is also discussed. PMID:16609214

  17. Contemporary Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Moul, Judd W.; Sun, Leon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer have more surgical treatment options than in the past. This paper focuses on the procedures' oncological or functional outcomes and perioperative morbidities of radical retropubic prostatectomy, radical perineal prostatectomy, and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods. A MEDLINE/PubMed search of the literature on radical prostatectomy and other new management options was performed. Results. Compared to the open procedures, robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy has no confirmed significant difference in most literatures besides less blood loss and blood transfusion. Nerve sparing is a safe means of preserving potency on well-selected patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Positive surgical margin rates of radical prostatectomy affect the recurrence and survival of prostate cancer. The urinary and sexual function outcomes have been vastly improved. Neoadjuvant treatment only affects the rate of positive surgical margin. Adjuvant therapy can delay and reduce the risk of recurrence and improve the survival of the high risk prostate cancer. Conclusions. For the majority of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy remains a most effective approach. Radical perineal prostatectomy remains a viable approach for patients with morbid obesity, prior pelvic surgery, or prior pelvic radiation. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) has become popular among surgeons but has not yet become the firmly established standard of care. Long-term data have confirmed the efficacy of radical retropubic prostatectomy with disease control rates and cancer-specific survival rates. PMID:22110994

  18. The Primary Role of Fibrinogen-Related Proteins in Invertebrates Is Defense, Not Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanington, Patrick C.; Zhang, Si-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin is an essential process that underlies the establishment of the supporting protein framework required for coagulation. In invertebrates, fibrinogen-domain-containing proteins play a role in the defense response generated against pathogens; however, they do not function in coagulation, suggesting that this role has been recently acquired. Molecules containing fibrinogen motifs have been identified in numerous invertebrate organisms, and most of these molecules known to date have been linked to defense. Moreover, recent genome projects of invertebrate animals have revealed surprisingly high numbers of fibrinogen-like loci in their genomes, suggesting important and perhaps diverse functions of fibrinogen-like proteins in invertebrates. The ancestral role of molecules containing fibrinogen-related domains (FReDs) with immunity is the focus of this review, with emphasis on specific FReDs called fibrinogen-related proteins (FREPs) identified from the schistosome-transmitting mollusc Biomphalaria glabrata. Herein, we outline the range of invertebrate organisms FREPs can be found in, and detail the roles these molecules play in defense and protection against infection. PMID:21063081

  19. Leucine and isoleucine reduce protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myoblast cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myogenic precursor cells were isolated from rainbow trout skeletal muscle and incubated in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 7 days, thereby differentiating into myoblasts. Rates of protein degradation were determined in response to minimal essential media (MEM) of various amino acid (AA)...

  20. Microsecond atomic force sensing of protein conformational dynamics: Implications for the primary light-induced events in bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Rousso, Itay; Khachatryan, Edward; Gat, Yahaloma; Brodsky, Igor; Ottolenghi, Michael; Sheves, Mordechai; Lewis, Aaron

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a new atomic force sensing technique is presented for dynamically probing conformational changes in proteins. The method is applied to the light-induced changes in the membrane-bound proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR). The microsecond time-resolution of the method, as presently implemented, covers many of the intermediates of the bR photocycle which is well characterized by spectroscopical methods. In addition to the native pigment, we have studied bR proteins substituted with chemically modified retinal chromophores. These synthetic chromophores were designed to restrict their ability to isomerize, while maintaining the basic characteristic of a large light-induced charge redistribution in the vertically excited Franck–Condon state. An analysis of the atomic force sensing signals lead us to conclude that protein conformational changes in bR can be initiated as a result of a light-triggered redistribution of electronic charge in the retinal chromophore, even when isomerization cannot take place. Although the coupling mechanism of such changes to the light-induced proton pump is still not established, our data question the current working hypothesis which attributes all primary events in retinal proteins to an initial trans⇔cis isomerization. PMID:9223291

  1. Nuclear transition protein 1 from ram elongating spermatids. Mass spectrometric characterization, primary structure and phosphorylation sites of two variants.

    PubMed

    Chirat, F; Martinage, A; Briand, G; Kouach, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Loir, M; Sautière, P

    1991-05-23

    The ram transition protein 1 (TP1) is present in spermatid cell nuclei in the nonphosphorylated, monophosphorylated and diphosphorylated forms. Its primary structure was determined by automated Edman degradation of S-carboxamidomethylated protein and of peptides generated by cleavage with thermolysin and endoproteinase Lys-C. The ram TP1 is a small basic protein of 54 residues and structurally very close to other mammalian TP1. The mass spectrometric data obtained from the protein and its fragments reveal that ram TP1 is indeed a mixture (approximately 5:1) of two structural variants (Mr 6346 and 6300). These variants differ only by the nature of the residue at position 27 (Cys in the major variant and Gly in the minor variant). The study of phosphorylation sites has shown that four different serine residues could be phosphorylated in the monophosphorylated TP1, at positions 8, 35, 36 or 39. From previous physical studies, it has been postulated that the Tyr32 surrounded by two highly conserved basic clusters was responsible for the destabilization of chromatin by intercalation of its phenol ring between the bases of double-stranded DNA. The presence of three phosphorylatable serine residues in the very conserved sequence 29-42 is another argument for the involvement of this region in the interaction with DNA. PMID:2040274

  2. The transition zone protein Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity at the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Johanna Maria; Burmühl, Stephan; Struchtrup, Andreas; Deutschmann, Kathleen; Vetter, Maik; Leu, Tristan; Reeg, Sandra; Grune, Tilman; Rüther, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in RPGRIP1L result in severe human diseases called ciliopathies. To unravel the molecular function of RPGRIP1L, we analyzed Rpgrip1l−/− mouse embryos, which display a ciliopathy phenotype and die, at the latest, around birth. In these embryos, cilia-mediated signaling was severely disturbed. Defects in Shh signaling suggested that the Rpgrip1l deficiency causes an impairment of protein degradation and protein processing. Indeed, we detected a cilia-dependent decreased proteasomal activity in the absence of Rpgrip1l. We found different proteasomal components localized to cilia and identified Psmd2, a component of the regulatory proteasomal 19S subunit, as an interaction partner for Rpgrip1l. Quantifications of proteasomal substrates demonstrated that Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity specifically at the basal body. Our study suggests that Rpgrip1l controls ciliary signaling by regulating the activity of the ciliary proteasome via Psmd2. PMID:26150391

  3. An Unusual Natural Product Primary Sulfonamide: Synthesis, Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibition, and Protein X-ray Structures of Psammaplin C.

    PubMed

    Mujumdar, Prashant; Teruya, Kanae; Tonissen, Kathryn F; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Peat, Thomas S; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Psammaplin C is one of only two described natural product primary sulfonamides. Here we report the synthesis of psammaplin C and evaluate the inhibition profile against therapeutically relevant carbonic anhydrase (CA) zinc metalloenzymes. The compound exhibited unprecedented inhibition of an important cancer-associated isozyme, hCA XII, with a Ki of 0.79 nM. The compound also displayed good isoform selectivity for hCA XII over other CAs. We present the first reported protein X-ray crystal structures of psammaplin C in complex with human CAs. We engineered the easily crystallized hCA II enzyme to mimic both the hCA IX and hCA XII binding sites and then utilized protein X-ray crystallography to determine the binding pose of psammaplin C within the hCA II, hCA IX, and hCA XII mimic active sites, all to high resolution. This is the first time a natural product primary sulfonamide inhibitor has been assessed for inhibition and binding to CAs. PMID:27172398

  4. UL16-binding proteins, novel MHC class I-related proteins, bind to NKG2D and activate multiple signaling pathways in primary NK cells.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Claire L; Chalupny, N Jan; Schooley, Kenneth; VandenBos, Tim; Kubin, Marek; Cosman, David

    2002-01-15

    The UL16-binding proteins (ULBPs) are a novel family of MHC class I-related molecules that were identified as targets of the human CMV glycoprotein, UL16. We have previously shown that ULBP expression renders a relatively resistant target cell sensitive to NK cytotoxicity, presumably by engaging NKG2D, an activating receptor expressed by NK and other immune effector cells. In this study we show that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and that its expression is up-regulated by IL-15 stimulation. Soluble forms of ULBPs induce marked protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and activation of the Janus kinase 2, STAT5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/Akt signal transduction pathways. ULBP-induced activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and ULBP-induced IFN-gamma production are blocked by inhibitors of PI 3-kinase, consistent with the known binding of PI 3-kinase to DAP10, the membrane-bound signal-transducing subunit of the NKG2D receptor. While all three ULBPs activate the same signaling pathways, ULBP3 was found to bind weakly and to induce the weakest signal. In summary, we have shown that NKG2D is the ULBP counterstructure on primary NK cells and for the first time have identified signaling pathways that are activated by NKG2D ligands. These results increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which NKG2D activates immune effector cells and may have implications for immune surveillance against pathogens and tumors. PMID:11777960

  5. Predicting whole genome protein interaction networks from primary sequence data in model and non-model organisms using ENTS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The large-scale identification of physical protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is an important step toward understanding how biological networks evolve and generate emergent phenotypes. However, experimental identification of PPIs is a laborious and error-prone process, and current methods of PPI prediction tend to be highly conservative or require large amounts of functional data that may not be available for newly-sequenced organisms. Results In this study we demonstrate a random-forest based technique, ENTS, for the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions based only on primary sequence data. Our approach is able to efficiently predict interactions on a whole-genome scale for any eukaryotic organism, using pairwise combinations of conserved domains and predicted subcellular localization of proteins as input features. We present the first predicted interactome for the forest tree Populus trichocarpa in addition to the predicted interactomes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparing our approach to other PPI predictors, we find that ENTS performs comparably to or better than a number of existing approaches, including several that utilize a variety of functional information for their predictions. We also find that the predicted interactions are biologically meaningful, as indicated by similarity in functional annotations and enrichment of co-expressed genes in public microarray datasets. Furthermore, we demonstrate some of the biological insights that can be gained from these predicted interaction networks. We show that the predicted interactions yield informative groupings of P. trichocarpa metabolic pathways, literature-supported associations among human disease states, and theory-supported insight into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes in paleopolyploid plants. Conclusion We conclude that the ENTS classifier will be a valuable tool for the de novo annotation of genome

  6. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I, insulin, and leucine on protein turnover and pathways that regulate ubiquitin ligase expression in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), insulin, and leucine on protein turnover and pathways that regulate proteolytic gene expression and protein polyubiquitination were investigated in primary cultures of four day old rainbow trout myocytes. Supplementing media with 100 nM IGF-I inc...

  7. Loss of p53 protein during radiation transformation of primary human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wazer, D.E.; Chu, Qiuming; Liu, Xiao Long; Gao, Qingshen; Safaii, H.; Band, V. )

    1994-04-01

    The causative factors leading to breast cancer are largely unknown. Increased incidence of breast cancer following diagnostic or therapeutic radiation suggests that radiation may contribute to mammary oncogenesis. This report describes the in vitro neoplastic transformation of a normal human mammary epithelial cell strain, 76N, by fractionated [gamma]-irradiation at a clinically used dose (30 Gy). The transformed cells (76R-30) were immortal, had reduced growth factor requirements, and produced tumors in nude mice. Remarkably, the 76R-30 cells completely lacked the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Loss of p53 was due to deletion of the gene on one allele and a 26-bp deletion within the third intron on the second allele which resulted in abnormal splicing out of either the third or fourth exon from the mRNA. PCR with a mutation-specific primer showed that intron 3 mutation was present in irradiated cells before selection for immortal phenotype. 76R-30 cells did not exhibit G[sub 1] arrest in response to radiation, indicating a loss of p53-mediated function. Expression of the wild-type p53 gene in 76R-30 cells led to their growth inhibition. Thus, loss of p53 protein appears to have contributed to neoplastic transformation of these cells. This unique model should facilitate analyses of molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced breast cancer and allow identification of p53-regulated cellular genes in breast cells. 44 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Smoothened determines β-arrestin-mediated removal of the G protein-coupled receptor Gpr161 from the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kasturi; Hwang, Sun-Hee; Somatilaka, Bandarigoda; Badgandi, Hemant; Jackson, Peter K; DeFea, Kathryn; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2016-03-28

    Dynamic changes in membrane protein composition of the primary cilium are central to development and homeostasis, but we know little about mechanisms regulating membrane protein flux. Stimulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway in vertebrates results in accumulation and activation of the effector Smoothened within cilia and concomitant disappearance of a negative regulator, the orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), Gpr161. Here, we describe a two-step process determining removal of Gpr161 from cilia. The first step involves β-arrestin recruitment by the signaling competent receptor, which is facilitated by the GPCR kinase Grk2. An essential factor here is the ciliary trafficking and activation of Smoothened, which by increasing Gpr161-β-arrestin binding promotes Gpr161 removal, both during resting conditions and upon Shh pathway activation. The second step involves clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which functions outside of the ciliary compartment in coordinating Gpr161 removal. Mechanisms determining dynamic compartmentalization of Gpr161 in cilia define a new paradigm for down-regulation of GPCRs during developmental signaling from a specialized subcellular compartment. PMID:27002170

  9. Reassessing Radical Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    Responds to comments about, and critiques of, his own article on radical pedagogy. Outlines major points of contention raised by other commentators and responds to them, including matters of definition, power relations in the classroom, and tempering radical theory with pragmatism. (DSK)

  10. [Alchemists' humid radical].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The term radical has been used by chemists since the beginnings and even when they still were alchemists. The term "humid radical" is present in numerous alchemists' texts. It was used to represent a kind of "humid", which was considered as different from what is nowadays called "humid", but was a sort of principle necessary for life. PMID:17575839

  11. Predicting protein-protein interactions from primary protein sequences using a novel multi-scale local feature representation scheme and the random forest.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Chan, Keith C C; Hu, Pengwei

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) can be very important for the understanding of biological cellular functions. However, detecting PPIs in the laboratories are both time-consuming and expensive. For this reason, there has been much recent effort to develop techniques for computational prediction of PPIs as this can complement laboratory procedures and provide an inexpensive way of predicting the most likely set of interactions at the entire proteome scale. Although much progress has already been achieved in this direction, the problem is still far from being solved. More effective approaches are still required to overcome the limitations of the current ones. In this study, a novel Multi-scale Local Descriptor (MLD) feature representation scheme is proposed to extract features from a protein sequence. This scheme can capture multi-scale local information by varying the length of protein-sequence segments. Based on the MLD, an ensemble learning method, the Random Forest (RF) method, is used as classifier. The MLD feature representation scheme facilitates the mining of interaction information from multi-scale continuous amino acid segments, making it easier to capture multiple overlapping continuous binding patterns within a protein sequence. When the proposed method is tested with the PPI data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it achieves a prediction accuracy of 94.72% with 94.34% sensitivity at the precision of 98.91%. Extensive experiments are performed to compare our method with existing sequence-based method. Experimental results show that the performance of our predictor is better than several other state-of-the-art predictors also with the H. pylori dataset. The reason why such good results are achieved can largely be credited to the learning capabilities of the RF model and the novel MLD feature representation scheme. The experiment results show that the proposed approach can be very promising for predicting PPIs and can be a useful tool for future

  12. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  13. Recombinant soluble gp130 protein reduces DEN-induced primary hepatocellular carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jing; Wang, Hang; Shen, Guoying; Lin, Da; Lin, Yanxue; Ye, Nanhui; Guo, Yashan; Li, Qiaoling; Ye, Nanhui; Deng, Chengjun; Meng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 (interleukin 6) plays an important role in the development and growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) via both classic signaling and trans-signaling pathways. Soluble gp130 (sgp130) is known to be a natural inhibitor of the trans-signaling pathway. In the present study, our goal was to investigate whether recombinant sgp130 could suppress the initiation and progression of HCC in mouse models. Our results demonstrate that sgp130 induced an apoptosis of HepG2 cells and inhibited the clonogenicity of HepG2 in vitro. Moreover, the IL-6 trans-signaling pathway is significantly suppressed by sgp130 as reflected by the decrease in the level of STAT3 phosphorylation and other inflammatory factors both in vitro and in vivo. In the DEN-induced HCC mouse model, intravenous injection of sgp130 attenuated hepatic fibrosis at 16 weeks and reduced the initiation and progression of primary HCC at 36 weeks. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that intravenous administration of sgp130 significantly suppressed the growth and metastasis of xenograft human HCC in NOD/SCID mice. PMID:27080032

  14. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein gene expression during differentiation of human preadipocytes to adipocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, B; Robb, M; McPherson, R

    1999-02-01

    The expression pattern of the CETP gene in relationship to that of LPL, adipsin, PPARgamma, C/EBPalpha, ADD1/SREBPI and actin was examined by RT-PCR during differentiation of human fibroblastic preadipocytes to adipocytes in primary culture. Preadipocytes were isolated from subcutaneous fat obtained from healthy female subjects undergoing mammary reduction procedures, and induced to differentiate in culture. Morphologically, adipogenesis was confirmed by the accumulation of lipid droplets in cells. We show that the gene encoding CETP is expressed in preadipocytes and is present throughout differentiation as compared to LPL and adipsin which were detected in the majority of samples by day 2 or 3 of adipogenesis. The transcription factors, PPARgamma, ADD1/SREBP1 and C/EBPalpha were expressed by day 2, concomitant with the appearance of LPL and adipsin but subsequent to the appearance of CETP. CETP mRNA was not detectable in human skin fibroblasts. These studies demonstrate that CETP. expression is induced at an early stage of commitment to the adipocyte lineage and may be activated by transcription factor(s), which are not members of the PPAR, ADD1/SREBP1 or C/EBP families. PMID:10030381

  15. Single-molecule imaging of Hedgehog pathway protein Smoothened in primary cilia reveals binding events regulated by Patched1

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Weiss, Lucien E.; Yoon, Joshua; Roth, Theodore L.; Su, YouRong S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Scott, Matthew P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of the signaling protein Smoothened (Smo) in the membrane of primary cilia is an essential step in Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction, yet the molecular mechanisms of Smo movement and localization are poorly understood. Using ultrasensitive single-molecule tracking with high spatial/temporal precision (30 nm/10 ms), we discovered that binding events disrupt the primarily diffusive movement of Smo in cilia at an array of sites near the base. The affinity of Smo for these binding sites was modulated by the Hh pathway activation state. Activation, by either a ligand or genetic loss of the negatively acting Hh receptor Patched-1 (Ptch), reduced the affinity and frequency of Smo binding at the base. Our findings quantify activation-dependent changes in Smo dynamics in cilia and highlight a previously unknown step in Hh pathway activation. PMID:26100903

  16. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  17. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) improves chemotherapy drug response in primary and recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Amanda; Zakaria, Zaitun; O'Leary, Caitrín; Kögel, Donat; Pokorny, Jenny L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer with extremely poor prognostic outcome despite intensive treatment. All chemotherapeutic agents currently used have no greater than 30-40% response rate, many fall into the range of 10-20%, with delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) or chemoresistance contributing to the extremely poor outcomes despite treatment. Increased expression of the multidrug resistance protein 1(MRP1) in high grade glioma, and it's role in BBB active transport, highlights this member of the ABC transporter family as a target for improving drug responses in GBM. In this study we show that small molecule inhibitors and gene silencing of MRP1 had a significant effect on GBM cell response to temozolomide (150 μM), vincristine (100 nM), and etoposide (2 μM). Pre-treatment with Reversan (inhibitor of MRP1 and P-glycoprotein) led to a significantly improved response to cell death in the presence of all three chemotherapeutics, in both primary and recurrent GBM cells. The presence of MK571 (inhibitor of MRP1 and multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) led to an enhanced effect of vincristine and etoposide in reducing cell viability over a 72 h period. Specific MRP1 inhibition led to a significant increase in vincristine and etoposide-induced cell death in all three cell lines assessed. Treatment with MK571, or specific MRP1 knockdown, did not have any effect on temozolomide drug response in these cells. These findings have significant implications in providing researchers an opportunity to improve currently used chemotherapeutics for the initial treatment of primary GBM, and improved treatment for recurrent GBM patients. PMID:26136652

  18. Positive selection in bone morphogenetic protein 15 targets a natural mutation associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in human.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Rossetti, Raffaella; Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  19. Hydroxyl radical detection in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chevion, M.; Floyd, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Hydroxyl radicals have been implicated as the actual species responsible for the deleterious effects of active oxygen in biology. However, in most cases, its presence has only been inferred by circumstantial evidence. Using electrochemical detection coupled to HPLC separation technique the authors can identify and quantitate (at sub-picomole level) the hydroxylated products of 3 aromatic compounds (phenol, salicylate, and 2-deoxy-guanosine) as a direct measure of hydroxyl radical formation. Firstly, the authors showed that mixing ascorbate with copper ions (in the absence of presence of a protein) yields catechols, dihydroxybenzoic acids and 8-OH-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). This approach has been used to study the formation of OH in vivo. Human granulocytes stimulated with TPA showed that 8-OHdG was formed in the cellular DNA at high levels (one 8-OHdG/800 DNA bases). Unstimulated granulocytes contained 8-OHdG below detection level. Formation of 8-OHdG in the TPA-stimulated granulocytes DNA was decreased by the addition of SOD and catalase. Using salicylate as an in vivo scavenger of hydroxyl radicals the authors showed that the level of trapped-dihydroxybenzoic acids is increased approx.8 and approx.3 fold in the lungs and liver of paraquat-poisoned mice, respectively, as compared to normal animals. Similarly, the detected level of dihydroxybenzoic acids in the hearts of adriamycin-treated rats was increased over 100-fold as compared to the hearts of control animals.

  20. Increased Mitochondrial Pro-oxidant Activity Mediates Up-regulation of Complex I S-glutathionylation via Protein Thiyl Radical in the Murine Heart of eNOS−/−

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-01-01

    In response to oxidative stress, mitochondrial Complex I is reversibly S-glutathionylated. We hypothesized that protein S-glutathionylation (PrSSG) of Complex I is mediated by a kinetic mechanism involving reactive protein thiyl radical (PrS•) and GSH in vivo. Previous studies have shown that in vitro S-glutathionylation of isolated Complex I at the 51 kDa and 75 kDa subunits was detected under the conditions of •O2− production, and mass spectrometry confirmed that formation of Complex I PrS• mediates PrSSG. Exposure of myocytes to menadione resulted in enhanced Complex I PrSSG and PrS• (Kang et al Free Radical Biol. Med. 2012; 52: 962–73). In this investigation, we tested our hypothesis in the murine heart of eNOS−/−. The eNOS−/− mouse is known to be hypertensive and develops the pathological phenotype of progressive cardiac hypertrophy. The mitochondria isolated from the eNOS−/− myocardium exhibited a marked dysfunction with impaired state 3 respiration, a declining respiratory control index, and decreasing enzymatic activities of ETC components. Further biochemical analysis and EPR measurement indicated defective aconitase activity, a marked increase in •O2− generation activity, and a more oxidized physiological setting. These results suggest increasing prooxidant activity and subsequent oxidative stress in the mitochondria of the eNOS−/− murine heart. When Complex I from the mitochondria of the eNOS−/− murine heart was analyzed by immuno-spin trapping and probed with anti-GSH antibody, both PrS• and PrSSG of Complex I were significantly enhanced. Overexpression of SOD2 in the murine heart dramatically diminished the detected PrS•, supporting the conclusion that mediation of Complex I PrSSG by oxidative stress-induced PrS• is a unique pathway for the redox regulation of mitochondrial function in vivo. PMID:25445401

  1. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation. PMID:26198867

  2. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  3. Secreted frizzled-related protein disrupts PCP in eye lens fiber cells that have polarised primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Stump, Richard J W; Nguyen, Anke; Wen, Li; Chen, Yongjuan; Wang, Yanshu; Murdoch, Jennifer N; Lovicu, Frank J; McAvoy, John W

    2010-02-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling polarises cells along tissue axes. Although pathways involved are becoming better understood, outstanding issues include; (i) existence/identity of cues that orchestrate global polarisation in tissues, and (ii) the generality of the link between polarisation of primary cilia and asymmetric localisation of PCP proteins. Mammalian lenses are mainly comprised of epithelial-derived fiber cells. Concentrically arranged fibers are precisely aligned as they elongate along the anterior-posterior axis and orientate towards lens poles where they meet fibers from other segments to form characteristic sutures. We show that lens exhibits PCP, with each fiber cell having an apically situated cilium and in most cases this is polarised towards the anterior pole. Frizzled and other PCP proteins are also asymmetrically localised along the equatorial-anterior axis. Mutations in core PCP genes Van Gogh-like 2 and Celsr1 perturb oriented fiber alignment and suture formation. Suppression of the PCP pathway by overexpressing Sfrp2 shows that whilst local groups of fibers are often similarly oriented, they lack global orientation; consequently when local groups of fibers with different orientations meet they form multiple, small, ectopic suture-like configurations. This indicates that this extracellular inhibitor disrupts a global polarising signal that utilises a PCP-mediated mechanism to coordinate the global alignment and orientation of fibers to lens poles. PMID:19968984

  4. RABL6A, a Novel RAB-Like Protein, Controls Centrosome Amplification and Chromosome Instability in Primary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Smith, Tarik; Coombs, Gary S.; Eischen, Christine M.; Mackie, Duncan I.; Roman, David L.; Van Rheeden, Richard; Darbro, Benjamin; Tompkins, Van S.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2013-01-01

    RABL6A (RAB-like 6 isoform A) is a novel protein that was originally identified based on its association with the Alternative Reading Frame (ARF) tumor suppressor. ARF acts through multiple p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to prevent cancer. How RABL6A functions, to what extent it depends on ARF and p53 activity, and its importance in normal cell biology are entirely unknown. We examined the biological consequences of RABL6A silencing in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) that express or lack ARF, p53 or both proteins. We found that RABL6A depletion caused centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and multinucleation in MEFs regardless of ARF and p53 status. The centrosome amplification in RABL6A depleted p53−/− MEFs resulted from centrosome reduplication via Cdk2-mediated hyperphosphorylation of nucleophosmin (NPM) at threonine-199. Thus, RABL6A prevents centrosome amplification through an ARF/p53-independent mechanism that restricts NPM-T199 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate an essential role for RABL6A in centrosome regulation and maintenance of chromosome stability in non-transformed cells, key processes that ensure genomic integrity and prevent tumorigenesis. PMID:24282525

  5. Effects of nutritional and hormonal factors on the metabolism of retinol-binding protein by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.L.; Goodman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to explore hormonal and nutritional factors that might be involved in the regulation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis and secretion by the liver. The studies employed primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats. When cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium alone, a high rate of RBP secretion was observed initially, which declined and became quite low by 24 hr. Supplementing the medium with amino acids maintained RBP and albumin secretion at moderate (but less than initial) rates for at least 3 days. Further addition of dexamethasone maintained the production and secretion rates of RBP, transthyretin, and albumin close to the initial rates for up to 3-5 days in culture as measured by radioimmunoassay. Hormonally treated hepatocytes produced and secreted RBP, transthyretin, and albumin at both absolute and relative rates similar to physiological values, as estimated from rates reported by others from studies in vivo and with perfused livers. Glucagon addition partially maintained the secretion rates of these 3 proteins, but less effectively than did dexamethasone. A number of other hormones, added singly or in combination, did not affect RBP production or secretion. Addition of retinol to the cultured normal hepatocytes was without effect upon RBP secretion. These studies show that supplementing the culture medium of hepatocytes with amino acids and dexamethasone maintains RBP production and secretion for several days. In normal hepatocytes, with ample supply of retinol available within the cell, addition of exogenous retinol does not appear to influence RBP metabolism or secretion by the cells.

  6. A general approach to the localization of antigenic determinants of a linear type in proteins of unknown primary structure.

    PubMed

    Beresten, S F; Rubikaite, B I; Kisselev, L L

    1988-10-26

    A method is proposed which permits the localization of antigenic determinants of a linear type on the polypeptide chain of a protein molecule of unknown primary structure. An antigen modified with maleic anhydride at the amino-terminal groups and at the epsilon-NH2 groups of lysine residues was subjected to partial enzymic digestion, so that the antigenic protein had, on average, less than one cleavage site per polypeptide chain. The resultant ends were labeled with 125I-labeled Bolton and Hunter reagent and the maleic group removed. The detection of the two larger labeled fragments (a longer one which still could bind to a monoclonal antibody and a shorter one which was incapable of binding) made it possible to determine the distance from the antigenic determinant to the C-terminus of the polypeptide chain. The position of the antigenic determinant could be established in more detail using partial chemical degradation of the original antigen using information about the maximal length of a fragment which has lost its ability to interact with the monoclonal antibody. The method has been applied to bovine tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.2). PMID:2459255

  7. Evaluation of DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, radical scavenging and in vitro cytotoxic activities of ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2,4-dihydroxy benzylidene ligands.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-12-01

    The new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, 4-Methyl-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), 4-Methoxy-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)), 4-Bromo-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)), were synthesized and characterized by various spectro analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligands were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The DNA binding studies of the ligands and complexes were examined by absorption, fluorescence, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods. The results indicated that the ligands and complexes could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis assay, which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleaving agents. The binding interaction of the ligands and complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method. Antioxidant studies showed that the complexes have a strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibit significant anticancer activity. PMID:27612830

  8. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of cobalt(III) complexes containing 2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazones: DNA/protein interaction, radical scavenging and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Rajendran; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy; Velmurugan, Krishnaswamy; Nandhakumar, Raju; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Endo, Akira

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis, structure and biological studies of cobalt(III) complexes supported by NNS-tridentate ligands are reported. Reactions of 2-acetylpyridine N-substituted thiosemicarbazone (HL(1-3)) with [CoCl2(PPh3)2] resulted [Co(L(1-3))2]Cl (1-3) which were characterized by elemental analysis and various spectral studies. The molecular structure of the complex 1 has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. In vitro DNA binding studies of complexes 1-3 carried out by fluorescence studies and the results revealed the binding of complexes to DNA via intercalation. The binding constant (Kb) values of complexes 1-3 from fluorescence experiments showed that the complex 3 has greater binding propensity for DNA. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes 1 and 3 were ascertained by gel electrophoresis assay which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleavage agents. Further, the interactions of the complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method, which showed that the complexes 1-3 could bind strongly with BSA. The antioxidant property of the complexes was evaluated to test their free-radical scavenging ability. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes against MCF-7 and A431 cell lines was assayed which showed higher activity and efficiently vanished the cancer cells even at low concentrations. PMID:24342132

  9. PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone that forms a ternary complex with the radical S-adenosylmethionine protein PqqE in the pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Latham, John A; Iavarone, Anthony T; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V; Klinman, Judith P

    2015-05-15

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  10. PqqD Is a Novel Peptide Chaperone That Forms a Ternary Complex with the Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Protein PqqE in the Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  11. Kinetics of phycocyanine bilin groups destruction by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Lissi, E A; Pizarro, M; Aspee, A; Romay, C

    2000-04-01

    Bilin groups in c-phycocyanine are readily bleached by peroxyl radicals produced in the thermolysis of 2, 2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane). From an evaluation of the bilin groups destroyed per radical that interacts with the protein, it is concluded that the bilin moiety is the main target of the radicals. Kinetic expressions are derived that allows an estimation of the substrate reactivity from the analysis of the rate of bilin group modification as a function of the protein concentration. From this analysis it is concluded that micromolar concentrations of c-phycocyanine are able to reduce the steady state concentration of the peroxyl radicals by one half, indicating a high antioxidant activity for this compound. This conclusion is confirmed by measuring the capacity of the protein to protect 1-naphthol from modification by peroxyl radicals. The results obtained show that the bilin groups have, on a molar basis, an antioxidant activity similar to that of potent antioxidants such as catechin. PMID:10832066

  12. Dynamics of Protein Expression Reveals Primary Targets and Secondary Messengers of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Signaling in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Pavlou, Maria P; Schiza, Christina; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated proliferation of breast cancer cells is facilitated through expression of multiple primary target genes, products of which induce a secondary response to stimulation. To differentiate between the primary and secondary target proteins of ERα signaling, we measured dynamics of protein expression induced by 17β-estradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Measurement of the global proteomic effects of estradiol by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) resulted in identification of 103 estrogen-regulated proteins, with only 40 of the corresponding genes having estrogen response elements. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays were used to validate the differential expression of 19 proteins and measure the dynamics of their expression within 72 h after estradiol stimulation, and in the absence or presence of 4-hydroxytamoxifen, to confirm ERα-mediated signaling. Dynamics of protein expression unambiguously revealed early and delayed response proteins and well correlated with presence or absence of estrogen response elements in the corresponding genes. Finally, we quantified dynamics of protein expression in a rarely studied network of transcription factors with a negative feedback loop (ERα-EGR3-NAB2). Because NAB2 protein is a repressor of EGR3-induced transcription, siRNA-mediated silencing of NAB2 resulted in the enhanced expression of the EGR3-induced protein ITGA2. To conclude, we provided a high-quality proteomic resource to supplement genomic and transcriptomic studies of ERα signaling. PMID:27067054

  13. Discovery and Validation of Predictive Biomarkers of Survival for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiotherapy: Two Proteins With Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Zhou, Cong; Backen, Alison; Pernemalm, Maria; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Priest, Lynsey J.C.; Koh, Pek; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona H.; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death world-wide. Radiotherapy alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Currently there is no predictive marker with clinical utility to guide treatment decisions in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Identification of such markers would allow treatment options to be considered for more effective therapy. To enable the identification of appropriate protein biomarkers, plasma samples were collected from patients with non-small cell lung cancer before and during radiotherapy for longitudinal comparison following a protocol that carries sufficient power for effective discovery proteomics. Plasma samples from patients pre- and during radiotherapy who had survived > 18 mo were compared to the same time points from patients who survived < 14 mo using an 8 channel isobaric tagging tandem mass spectrometry discovery proteomics platform. Over 650 proteins were detected and relatively quantified. Proteins which showed a change during radiotherapy were selected for validation using an orthogonal antibody-based approach. Two of these proteins were verified in a separate patient cohort: values of CRP and LRG1 combined gave a highly significant indication of extended survival post one week of radiotherapy treatment. PMID:26425690

  14. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  15. Andrographolide stimulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2-heme oxygenase 1 signaling in primary cerebral endothelial cells for definite protection against ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Ray-Jade; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lu, Wan-Jung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Stroke pathogenesis involves complex oxidative stress-related pathways. The nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) pathways have been considered molecular targets in pharmacologic intervention for ischemic diseases. Andrographolide, a labdane diterpene, has received increasing attention in recent years because of its various pharmacologic activities. We determined that andrographolide modulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling cascade in primary cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) to provide positive protection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic stroke in rats. In the present study, andrographolide (10 μM) increased HO-1 protein and messenger RNA expressions, Nrf2 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation in CECs, and these activities were disrupted by a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125. Similar results were observed in confocal microscopy analysis. Moreover, andrographolide-induced Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expressions were significantly inhibited by Nrf2 small interfering RNA. Moreover, HO-1 knockdown attenuated the protective effect of andrographolide against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced CEC death. Andrographolide (0.1 mg/kg) significantly suppressed free radical formation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and brain infarction in MCAO-insulted rats, and these effects were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX. The mechanism is attributable to HO-1 activation, as directly evidenced by andrographolide-induced pronounced HO-1 expression in brain tissues, which was highly localized in the cerebral capillary. In conclusion, andrographolide increased Nrf2-HO-1 expression through p38 MAPK regulation, confirming that it provides protection against MCAO-induced brain injury. These findings provide strong evidence that andrographolide could

  16. Gross Cystic Disease Fluid Protein-15(GCDFP-15)/Prolactin-Inducible Protein (PIP) as Functional Salivary Biomarker for Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, A; Martini, D; Sernissi, F; Giacomelli, C; Pepe, P; Rossi, C; Riveros, PP; Mosca, M; Alevizos, I; Baldini, C

    2013-01-01

    Background Gross cystic disease fluid protein-15(GCDFP-15)/prolactin-inducible protein (PIP) is a secretory acinar glycoprotein of 14 KDa which we have recently described as significantly lower in salivary samples of patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) in comparison to healthy volunteers by proteomic analysis. Aims of the study (1) to validate our previous data on the decrease of GCDFP-15/PIP protein in a larger number of subjects with pSS (2) to integrate the proteomic results with complementary immunoassays in order better clarify the pathophysiological relevance of GCDFP-15/PIP in pSS exocrinopathy (3) to assess both the glandular expression of the GCDFP-15/PIP and the levels of glandular GCDFP-15/PIP mRNA in the patients’ minor salivary gland (MSG) biopsies in order to verify whether the observed reduction of GCDFP-15/PIP in saliva may be related to a decrease in the protein production. Patients and methods A total of 123 salivary samples from patients affected by pSS, no-SS sicca syndrome and sex- age-matched healthy volunteers were analyzed by different proteomic techniques (SELDI-TOF-MS, 2DE, MALDI-TOF-MS). The expression of GCDFP-15/PIP was then validated by western blot analysis. Real Time PCR and immunohistochemistry for GCDFP-15/PIP in the minor salivary glands (MSG) biopsies were then carried out. Results By using complementary proteomic analysis we found that a putative peak of 16547 m/z was among the best independent biomarkers for pSS able to discriminate between patients and healthy controls with a sensitivity of 96 % and a specificity of 70%, with a global cross validated error of 29%. We identified the peak as the GCDFP-15/PIP protein and verified that the intensity of GCDFP-15/PIP was significantly lower in pSS patients when compared to both no-SS sicca subjects and healthy controls (p<0.0001). GCDFP-15/PIP expression also correlated with both the salivary flow rate (r=0.312, p=0.023) and MSG biopsies focus score (r=−0.377, p=0

  17. Conformational stability of a model protein (bovine serum albumin) during primary emulsification process of PLGA microspheres synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Feirong; Singh, Jagdish

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the conformational stability of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), during the primary emulsification process of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres preparation. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was utilized to assess the conformational structure of BSA during primary emulsification in the presence and absence of PLGA. Three excipients [i.e. mannitol, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)] were investigated for their stabilizing effect on BSA during emulsification process. The DSC profile of intact BSA was best fitted by a non-2-state model with two peaks, which have midpoint temperatures (T(m1), 60.9 +/- 0.4 degrees C and T(m2), 66.4 +/- 1.0 degrees C), respectively, and a total calorimetric enthalpy Delta H(tot) of 599 +/- 42 kJ/mol. After emulsifying BSA aqueous solution with methylene chloride, an additional apparent peak at a higher temperature was observed. The T(m) of this peak was 77.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C. HP-beta-CD was able to suppress the occurrence of an additional peak, whereas mannitol failed. SDS increased the thermal stability of BSA dramatically. Furthermore, HP-beta-CD increased BSA recovery from 72 +/- 8% to 89 +/- 7% after extraction from w/o in the presence of PLGA. These results provided evidence that HP-beta-CD could be a promising excipient for conformational stability of BSA during synthesis of PLGA microspheres. PMID:12818819

  18. Primary endosymbiosis events date to the later Proterozoic with cross-calibrated phylogenetic dating of duplicated ATPase proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patrick M; Matzke, Nicholas J

    2013-07-23

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria descended from bacterial ancestors, but the dating of these primary endosymbiosis events remains very uncertain, despite their importance for our understanding of the evolution of both bacteria and eukaryotes. All phylogenetic dating in the Proterozoic and before is difficult: Significant debates surround potential fossil calibration points based on the interpretation of the Precambrian microbial fossil record, and strict molecular clock methods cannot be expected to yield accurate dates over such vast timescales because of strong heterogeneity in rates. Even with more sophisticated relaxed-clock analyses, nodes that are distant from fossil calibrations will have a very high uncertainty in dating. However, endosymbiosis events and gene duplications provide some additional information that has never been exploited in dating; namely, that certain nodes on a gene tree must represent the same events, and thus must have the same or very similar dates, even if the exact date is uncertain. We devised techniques to exploit this information: cross-calibration, in which node date calibrations are reused across a phylogeny, and cross-bracing, in which node date calibrations are formally linked in a hierarchical Bayesian model. We apply these methods to proteins with ancient duplications that have remained associated and originated from plastid and mitochondrial endosymbionts: the α and β subunits of ATP synthase and its relatives, and the elongation factor thermo unstable. The methods yield reductions in dating uncertainty of 14-26% while only using date calibrations derived from phylogenetically unambiguous Phanerozoic fossils of multicellular plants and animals. Our results suggest that primary plastid endosymbiosis occurred ∼900 Mya and mitochondrial endosymbiosis occurred ∼1,200 Mya. PMID:23776247

  19. Biosynthesis of the carbohydrate moieties of arabinogalactan proteins by membrane-bound β-glucuronosyltransferases from radish primary roots.

    PubMed

    Endo, Maya; Kotake, Toshihisa; Watanabe, Yoko; Kimura, Kazumasa; Tsumuraya, Yoichi

    2013-12-01

    A membrane fraction from etiolated 6-day-old primary radish roots (Raphanus sativus L. var hortensis) contained β-glucuronosyltransferases (GlcATs) involved in the synthesis of the carbohydrate moieties of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). The GlcATs transferred [(14)C]GlcA from UDP-[(14)C]GlcA on to β-(1 → 3)-galactan as an exogenous acceptor substrate, giving a specific activity of 50-150 pmol min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). The enzyme specimen also catalyzed the transfer of [(14)C]GlcA on to an enzymatically modified AGP from mature radish root. Analysis of the transfer products revealed that the transfer of [(14)C]GlcA occurred preferentially on to consecutive (1 → 3)-linked β-Gal chains as well as single branched β-(1 → 6)-Gal residues through β-(1 → 6) linkages, producing branched acidic side chains. The enzymes also transferred [(14)C]GlcA residues on to several oligosaccharides, such as β-(1 → 6)- and β-(1 → 3)-galactotrioses. A trisaccharide, α-L-Araf-(1 → 3)-β-Gal-(1 → 6)-Gal, was a good acceptor, yielding a branched tetrasaccharide, α-L-Araf-(1 → 3)[β-GlcA-(1 → 6)]-β-Gal-(1 → 6)-Gal. We report the first in vitro assay system for β-GlcATs involved in the AG synthesis as a step toward full characterization and cloning. PMID:24057431

  20. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  1. Increased protein kinase A type Iα regulatory subunit expression in parathyroid gland adenomas of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yatsuka; Kambe, Fukushi; Imai, Tsuneo; Ogawa, Kimio; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Shibata, Masahiro; Kagawa, Chikara; Mizuno, Yutaka; Ito, Asako; Iwase, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) is a major regulatory subunit that functions as an inhibitor of PKA kinase activity. We have previously demonstrated that elevated RIα expression is associated with diffuse-to-nodular transformation of hyperplasia in parathyroid glands of renal hyperparathyroidism. The aim of the current study was to determine whether or not RIα expression is increased in adenomas of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), because monoclonal proliferation has been demonstrated in both adenomas and nodular hyperplasia. Surgical specimens comprising 22 adenomas and 11 normal glands, obtained from 22 patients with PHPT, were analyzed. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were employed to evaluate RIα expression. PKA activities were determined in several adenomas highly expressing RIα. RIα expression was also separately evaluated in chief and oxyphilic cells using the "Allred score" system. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a proliferation marker, was also immunohistochemically examined. Western blot analysis revealed that 5 out of 8 adenomas highly expressed RIα, compared with normal glands. PKA activity in adenomas was significantly less than in normal glands. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated high expression of RIα in 20 out of 22 adenomas. In adenomas, the greater RIα expression and more PCNA positive cells were observed in both chief and oxyphilic cells. The present study suggested that high RIα expression could contribute to monoclonal proliferation of parathyroid cells by impairing the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23197043

  2. Development of immunoblotting techniques for DNA radical detection

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Fiona A.; Mason, Ronald P.; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Radical damage to DNA has been implicated in cell death, cellular dysfunction and cancer. A recently developed method for detecting DNA radicals uses the nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to trap radicals. The trapped radicals then decay into stable nitrone adducts detectable with anti-DMPO antibodies and quantifiable by ELISA or dot blot assays. However, the sequences of DNA that are damaged are likely to be as important as the total level of damage. Therefore, we have developed immunoblotting methods for detection of DNA nitrone adducts on electrophoretically separated DNA, comparable to Western blotting for proteins. These new techniques not only allow the assessment of relative radical adduct levels, but can reveal specific DNA fragments, and ultimately nucleotides, as radical targets. Moreover, we have determined that denaturation of samples into single-stranded DNA enhances the detection of DNA-DMPO adducts in our new blotting methods and also ELISA assays. PMID:23142572

  3. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO + hν{sub 248nm} → CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + HCO ϕ{sub 1a} = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + H + CO ϕ{sub 1e} = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}→{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO + HO{sub 2} ϕ{sub 1f} = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 4} + CO ϕ{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be

  4. Interaction of nuclear protein p140 with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 TAR RNA in mitogen-activated primary human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothblum, C J; Jackman, J; Mikovits, J; Shukla, R R; Kumar, A

    1995-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that cellular proteins play a role during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat-mediated trans activation. A recent report from this laboratory has shown that a 140-kDa HeLa nuclear protein (p140) binds specifically to the lower stem region of the Tat response element, TAR RNA. Since HIV-1 trans activation is most efficient in proliferating T cells, we investigated the binding of p140 to TAR RNA in unstimulated and mitogen-activated, G1-phase primary T lymphocytes. TAR RNA/protein-binding activity was low in resting cells but increased significantly within 2 h of activation and remained elevated for at least 48 h. Corresponding increases in p140 protein levels were observed with most but not all donors, suggesting that an additional nuclear factor(s) may be required for efficient binding of this protein to TAR RNA in activated T cells. PMID:7609087

  5. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  6. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  7. Correlation of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter 1 and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Transport Activities With Protein Expression Levels in Primary Cultured Human Tracheal, Bronchial, and Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how transporters contribute to the distribution of inhaled drugs in the lung is important for the discovery and development of such drugs. Protein expression levels may be useful to predict and understand drug distribution. As previously reported, organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) have higher levels of protein expression among transporters in primary cultured human lung cells. Nevertheless, it is unclear to what extent transport activity correlates with transporter protein expression. The purpose is to evaluate whether differences in OCTN1 and MRP1 protein expression govern the respective transport activity in primary cultured human lung cells. The model substrates of 4-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) and carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (CDF) for OCTN1 and MRP1, respectively, were used in the lung cells from five donors. Significant correlation was found between the kinetic parameter Vmax for ASP(+) and OCTN1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.965, 0.834, and 0.877, respectively), and between the efflux of CDF and MRP1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.800, 0.904, and 0.790, respectively). These findings suggest that OCTN1 and MRP1 protein concentrations are determinants for drug distribution in the lung. PMID:26429295

  8. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  9. [Aging and free radicals].

    PubMed

    Manso, C

    1992-02-01

    Several theories on aging are presented. All of them give important contributions but none explains all the aspects of the problem. Oxygen radicals produced during cellular combustion contribute to aging through multiple cumulative microlesions throughout life. The importance of glucose is emphasized; it forms early and late Maillard compounds. Other causes of aging are discussed. PMID:1595373

  10. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  11. Catalytically impaired hMYH and NEIL1 mutant proteins identified in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Forsbring, Monika; Vik, Erik S.; Dalhus, Bjørn; Karlsen, Tom H.; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Bjørås, Magnar; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Alseth, Ingrun

    2009-01-01

    The human hMYH and NEIL1 genes encode DNA glycosylases involved in repair of oxidative base damage and mutations in these genes are associated with certain cancers. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammatory destruction of the biliary tree, is often complicated by the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, we aimed to investigate the influence of genetic variations in the hMYH and NEIL1 genes on risk of CCA in PSC patients. The hMYH and NEIL1 gene loci in addition to the DNA repair genes hOGG1, NTHL1 and NUDT1 were analyzed in 66 PSC patients (37 with CCA and 29 without cancer) by complete genomic sequencing of exons and adjacent intronic regions. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms and mutations were identified and severe impairment of protein function was observed for three non-synonymous variants. The NEIL1 G83D mutant was dysfunctional for the major oxidation products 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG), thymine glycol and dihydrothymine in duplex DNA, and the ability to perform δ-elimination at abasic sites was significantly reduced. The hMYH R260Q mutant had severe defect in adenine DNA glycosylase activity, whereas hMYH H434D could excise adenines from A:8oxoG pairs but not from A:G mispairs. We found no overall associations between the 18 identified variants and susceptibility to CCA in PSC patients; however, the impaired variants may be of significance for carcinogenesis in general. Our findings demonstrate the importance of complete resequencing of selected candidate genes in order to identify rare genetic variants and their possible contribution to individual susceptibility to cancer development. PMID:19443904

  12. Effects of ER stress on unfolded protein responses, cell survival, and viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shigemi, Zenpei; Baba, Yusuke; Hara, Naoko; Matsuhiro, Jumpei; Kagawa, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tadashi; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2016-01-15

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a subtype of non-Hodgkin's B-lymphoma, is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in immunosuppressed patients. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induces activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which induces expression of ER chaperones, which in turn decrease ER stress, leading to ER homeostasis. The UPR is necessary for not only ER homeostasis but also persistent infection by, and replication of, many viruses. However, the precise roles and regulation of the UPR in KSHV infection remain poorly understood. Here, we found that IRE1α and PERK were significantly downregulated in PEL cells cultured under normal conditions, compared with KSHV-uninfected B-lymphoma cells. IRE1α and PERK mRNA levels were decreased in PEL cells, and KSHV-encoded LANA and v-cyclin D led to suppressed IRE1α transcription. Thapsigargin-induced ER stress activated the UPR and increased the mRNA levels of UPR-related molecules, including IRE1α and PERK, in PEL cells. However the IRE1α and PERK mRNA levels in PEL cells were lower than those in KSHV-uninfected cells. Furthermore, ER stress induced by brefeldin A and thapsigargin dramatically reduced the viability of PEL cells, compared with KSHV-uninfected cells, and induced apoptosis of PEL cells via the pro-apoptotic UPR through expression of CHOP and activation of caspase-9. In addition to the pro-apoptotic UPR, thapsigargin-induced ER stress enhanced transcription of lytic genes, including RTA, K-bZIP and K8.1, and viral production in PEL cells resulted in induction of the lytic cycle. Thus, we demonstrated downregulation of IRE1α and PERK in PEL cells, transcriptional suppression of IRE1α by LANA and v-cyclin D, apoptosis induction in PEL cells by ER stress, and potentiation of lytic replication by ER stress. PMID:26692493

  13. Antibodies against carbamylated proteins are present in primary Sjögren's syndrome and are associated with disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Bergum, Brith; Koro, Catalin; Delaleu, Nicolas; Solheim, Magne; Hellvard, Annelie; Binder, Veronika; Jonsson, Roland; Valim, Valeria; Hammenfors, Daniel S; Jonsson, Malin V; Mydel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Herein, we investigate the presence and prognostic value of autoantibodies against carbamylated proteins (anti-CarP) in the serum of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Patients and methods Serum levels of anti-CarP antibodies were measured in Norwegian patients with pSS (n=78) and corresponding controls (n=74) using ELISA and analysed in relation with exocrine gland function, degree of salivary gland inflammation, signs of ectopic germinal centre (GC) formation and immunological markers. For univariate comparisons, the Mann–Whitney U test and χ2 or Fisher's exact tests were used. Correlations were assessed with Spearman's rank testing. Multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the effect of anti-CarP positivity on clinical manifestations. Results Of the patients with pSS, 27% were positive for anti-CarP IgG antibodies. Levels of anti-CarP correlated positively with total IgG, IgM, rheumatoid factor and β2-microglobulin. Importantly, after adjusting for confounding factors, patients positive for anti-CarP had significantly higher focus score. Furthermore, positive anti-CarP status coincided with 9.2-fold higher odds of having developed GC-like structures in the minor salivary glands. As a patient group considered having worse disease outcome, individuals with ectopic GC-like structures also presented with significantly higher levels of anti-CarP antibodies. Conclusions Presence of anti-CarP in patients with pSS is strongly associated with increased focal lymphocytic infiltration, formation of ectopic GC-like structures in minor salivary glands, and diminished salivary gland function. Even taking into consideration our relatively small cohort we believe that anti-CarP antibodies offer new possibilities for identifying patients with more active disease and at risk of developing additional comorbidity. PMID:26350884

  14. HTLV-1 bZIP factor protein targets the Rb/E2F-1 pathway to promote proliferation and apoptosis of primary CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kawatsuki, A; Yasunaga, J-I; Mitobe, Y; Green, P L; Matsuoka, M

    2016-08-25

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that induces a fatal T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Among several regulatory/accessory genes in HTLV-1, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene constitutively expressed in infected cells. Our previous study showed that HBZ functions in two different molecular forms, HBZ protein and HBZ RNA. In this study, we show that HBZ protein targets retinoblastoma protein (Rb), which is a critical tumor suppressor in many types of cancers. HBZ protein interacts with the Rb/E2F-1 complex and activates the transcription of E2F-target genes associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Mouse primary CD4(+) T cells transduced with HBZ show accelerated G1/S transition and apoptosis, and importantly, T cells from HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice also demonstrate enhanced cell proliferation and apoptosis. To evaluate the functions of HBZ protein alone in vivo, we generated a new transgenic mouse strain that expresses HBZ mRNA altered by silent mutations but encoding intact protein. In these mice, the numbers of effector/memory and Foxp3(+) T cells were increased, and genes associated with proliferation and apoptosis were upregulated. This study shows that HBZ protein promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis in primary CD4(+) T cells through activation of the Rb/E2F pathway, and that HBZ protein also confers onto CD4(+) T-cell immunophenotype similar to those of ATL cells, suggesting that HBZ protein has important roles in dysregulation of CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. PMID:26804169

  15. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Serous Ovarian Cancer using Reverse Phase Protein Array: TGFβ Pathway Signaling Indicates Response to Primary Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Mark S.; Agarwal, Roshan; Gilks, Blake; Swenerton, Kenneth; Kalloger, Steve; Santos, Jennifer; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Coombes, Kevin; Miller, Dianne; Huntsman, David; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) we measured protein expression associated with response to primary chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Experimental Design: Tumor samples were obtained from forty-five patients with advanced high-grade serous cancers from the Gynecology Tumor Bank at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Treatment consisted of platinum-based chemotherapy following debulking surgery. Protein lysates were prepared from fresh frozen tumor samples and 80 validated proteins from signaling pathways implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis were measured by RPPA. Normalization of Ca-125 by the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was chosen as the primary outcome measure of chemotherapy response. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis to identify protein predictors of Ca-125 normalization, and Cox regression to test for the association between protein expression and PFS. A significance level of p ≤ 0.05 was used. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 56.8 years. EGFR, YKL-40 and several TGFβ pathway proteins (c-Jun N-terminal kinase JNK, JNK phosphorylated at residues 183 and 185, PAI-1, Smad3, TAZ) showed significant associations with Ca-125 normalization on univariate testing. On multivariate analysis, EGFR (p < 0.02), JNK (p < 0.01), and Smad3 (p < 0.04) were significantly associated with normalization of Ca-125. Contingency table analysis of pathway-classified proteins revealed that the selection of TGFβ pathway proteins was unlikely due to false discovery (p < 0.007, Bonferroni-adjusted). Conclusion: TGFβ pathway signaling likely plays an important role as a marker or mediator of chemoresistance in advanced serous ovarian cancer. On this basis, future studies to develop and validate a useful predictor of treatment failure are warranted. PMID:20460476

  16. Tyrosyl Radicals in Dehaloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Dumarieh, Rania; D'Antonio, Jennifer; Deliz-Liang, Alexandria; Smirnova, Tatyana; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2013-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, having been shown to catalyze the hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of trihalophenols to dihaloquinones, is the first oxygen binding globin that possesses a biologically relevant peroxidase activity. The catalytically competent species in DHP appears to be Compound ES, a reactive intermediate that contains both a ferryl heme and a tyrosyl radical. By simulating the EPR spectra of DHP activated by H2O2, Thompson et al. (Thompson, M. K., Franzen, S., Ghiladi, R. A., Reeder, B. J., and Svistunenko, D. A. (2010) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 17501–17510) proposed that two different radicals, depending on the pH, are formed, one located on either Tyr-34 or Tyr-28 and the other on Tyr-38. To provide additional support for these simulation-based assignments and to deduce the role(s) that tyrosyl radicals play in DHP, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench EPR spectroscopic methods were employed to study radical formation in DHP when three tyrosine residues, Tyr-28, Tyr-34, and Tyr-38, were replaced either individually or in combination with phenylalanines. The results indicate that radicals form on all three tyrosines in DHP. Evidence for the formation of DHP Compound I in several tyrosine mutants was obtained. Variants that formed Compound I showed an increase in the catalytic rate for substrate oxidation but also an increase in heme bleaching, suggesting that the tyrosines are necessary for protecting the enzyme from oxidizing itself. This protective role of tyrosines is likely an evolutionary adaptation allowing DHP to avoid self-inflicted damage in the oxidative environment. PMID:24100039

  17. Mechanistic Diversity of Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent Methylation*

    PubMed Central

    Bauerle, Matthew R.; Schwalm, Erica L.; Booker, Squire J.

    2015-01-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use the oxidizing power of a 5′-deoxyadenosyl 5′-radical to initiate an amazing array of transformations, usually through the abstraction of a target substrate hydrogen atom. A common reaction of radical SAM (RS) enzymes is the methylation of unactivated carbon or phosphorous atoms found in numerous primary and secondary metabolites, as well as in proteins, sugars, lipids, and RNA. However, neither the chemical mechanisms by which these unactivated atoms obtain methyl groups nor the actual methyl donors are conserved. In fact, RS methylases have been grouped into three classes based on protein architecture, cofactor requirement, and predicted mechanism of catalysis. Class A methylases use two cysteine residues to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers. Class B methylases require a cobalamin cofactor to methylate both sp2-hybridized and sp3-hybridized carbon centers as well as phosphinate phosphorous atoms. Class C methylases share significant sequence homology with the RS enzyme, HemN, and may bind two SAM molecules simultaneously to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers. Lastly, we describe a new class of recently discovered RS methylases. These Class D methylases, unlike Class A, B, and C enzymes, which use SAM as the source of the donated methyl carbon, are proposed to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers using methylenetetrahydrofolate as the source of the appended methyl carbon. PMID:25477520

  18. Mechanistic diversity of radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methylation.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, Matthew R; Schwalm, Erica L; Booker, Squire J

    2015-02-13

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use the oxidizing power of a 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical to initiate an amazing array of transformations, usually through the abstraction of a target substrate hydrogen atom. A common reaction of radical SAM (RS) enzymes is the methylation of unactivated carbon or phosphorous atoms found in numerous primary and secondary metabolites, as well as in proteins, sugars, lipids, and RNA. However, neither the chemical mechanisms by which these unactivated atoms obtain methyl groups nor the actual methyl donors are conserved. In fact, RS methylases have been grouped into three classes based on protein architecture, cofactor requirement, and predicted mechanism of catalysis. Class A methylases use two cysteine residues to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers. Class B methylases require a cobalamin cofactor to methylate both sp(2)-hybridized and sp(3)-hybridized carbon centers as well as phosphinate phosphorous atoms. Class C methylases share significant sequence homology with the RS enzyme, HemN, and may bind two SAM molecules simultaneously to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers. Lastly, we describe a new class of recently discovered RS methylases. These Class D methylases, unlike Class A, B, and C enzymes, which use SAM as the source of the donated methyl carbon, are proposed to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers using methylenetetrahydrofolate as the source of the appended methyl carbon. PMID:25477520

  19. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  20. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  1. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(ii) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal–ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol−1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  2. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  3. Effect of Heating on DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity of Meat Substitute

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyeun Sung; Bae, Jun Kyu; Park, Inshik

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the increase of DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute by heating. The meat substitute showed higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than those of other foods rich in protein such as beef, pork, chicken, and soybean curd. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute was dependent upon concentration, heating temperature and heating time of meat substitute. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of meat substitute was enhanced with increasing heating temperature and time. The increase of DPPH radical scavenging activity was only applied to meat substitute without showing any activation in other foods rich in protein such as beef, pork, chicken, and soybean curd. PMID:24471114

  4. Alternative radical pairs for cryptochrome-based magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Lau, Jason C S; Hogben, Hannah J; Biskup, Till; Kattnig, Daniel R; Hore, P J

    2014-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the remarkable ability of animals, in particular birds, to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field relies on magnetically sensitive photochemical reactions of the protein cryptochrome. It is generally assumed that the magnetic field acts on the radical pair [FAD•- TrpH•+] formed by the transfer of an electron from a group of three tryptophan residues to the photo-excited flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor within the protein. Here, we examine the suitability of an [FAD•- Z•] radical pair as a compass magnetoreceptor, where Z• is a radical in which the electron spin has no hyperfine interactions with magnetic nuclei, such as hydrogen and nitrogen. Quantum spin dynamics simulations of the reactivity of [FAD•- Z•] show that it is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to the direction of the geomagnetic field than is [FAD•- TrpH•+] under the same conditions (50 µT magnetic field, 1 µs radical lifetime). The favourable magnetic properties of [FAD•- Z•] arise from the asymmetric distribution of hyperfine interactions among the two radicals and the near-optimal magnetic properties of the flavin radical. We close by discussing the identity of Z• and possible routes for its formation as part of a spin-correlated radical pair with an FAD radical in cryptochrome. PMID:24671932

  5. Differential expression of proteins in naïve and IL-2 stimulated primary human NK cells identified by global proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Di; Felder, Mildred; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Patankar, Manish S.; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells efficiently cytolyse tumors and virally infected cells. Despite the important role that interleukin (IL)-2 plays in stimulating the proliferation of NK cells and increasing NK cell activity, little is known about the alterations in the global NK cell proteome following IL-2 activation. To compare the proteomes of naïve and IL-2-activated primary NK cells and identify key cellular pathways involved in IL-2 signaling, we isolated proteins from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells from healthy donors, the proteins were trypsinized and the resulting peptides were analyzed by 2D LC ESI-MS/MS followed by label-free quantification. In total, more than 2000 proteins were identified from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells where 383 proteins were found to be differentially expressed following IL-2 activation. Functional annotation of IL-2 regulated proteins revealed potential targets for future investigation of IL-2 signaling in human primary NK cells. A pathway analysis was performed and revealed several pathways that were not previously known to be involved in IL-2 response, including ubiquitin proteasome pathway, integrin signaling pathway, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling pathway, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:23806757

  6. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  7. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  8. Data on gene and protein expression changes induced by apabetalone (RVX-208) in ex vivo treated human whole blood and primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wasiak, Sylwia; Gilham, Dean; Tsujikawa, Laura M; Halliday, Christopher; Norek, Karen; Patel, Reena G; McLure, Kevin G; Young, Peter R; Gordon, Allan; Kulikowski, Ewelina; Johansson, Jan; Sweeney, Michael; Wong, Norman C

    2016-09-01

    Apabetalone (RVX-208) inhibits the interaction between epigenetic regulators known as bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins and acetyl-lysine marks on histone tails. Data presented here supports the manuscript published in Atherosclerosis "RVX-208, a BET-inhibitor for Treating Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease, Raises ApoA-I/HDL and Represses Pathways that Contribute to Cardiovascular Disease" (Gilham et al., 2016) [1]. It shows that RVX-208 and a comparator BET inhibitor (BETi) JQ1 increase mRNA expression and production of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), the main protein component of high density lipoproteins, in primary human and African green monkey hepatocytes. In addition, reported here are gene expression changes from a microarray-based analysis of human whole blood and of primary human hepatocytes treated with RVX-208. PMID:27570805

  9. Enhanced Expression of Stim, Orai, and TRPC Transcripts and Proteins in Endothelial Progenitor Cells Isolated from Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dragoni, Silvia; Laforenza, Umberto; Bonetti, Elisa; Reforgiato, Marta; Poletto, Valentina; Lodola, Francesco; Bottino, Cinzia; Guido, Daniele; Rappa, Alessandra; Pareek, Sumedha; Tomasello, Mario; Guarrera, Maria Rosa; Cinelli, Maria Pia; Aronica, Adele; Guerra, Germano; Barosi, Giovanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background An increase in the frequency of circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), the only subset of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) truly belonging to the endothelial phenotype, occurs in patients affected by primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Herein, they might contribute to the enhanced neovascularisation of fibrotic bone marrow and spleen. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) activated by the depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ store drives proliferation in ECFCs isolated from both healthy donors (N-ECFCs) and subjects suffering from renal cellular carcinoma (RCC-ECFCs). SOCE is up-regulated in RCC-ECFCs due to the over-expression of its underlying molecular components, namely Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized Ca2+ imaging, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and functional assays to evaluate molecular structure and the functional role of SOCE in ECFCs derived from PMF patients (PMF-ECFCs). SOCE, induced by either pharmacological (i.e. cyclopiazonic acid or CPA) or physiological (i.e. ATP) stimulation, was significantly higher in PMF-ECFCs. ATP-induced SOCE was inhibited upon blockade of the phospholipase C/InsP3 signalling pathway with U73111 and 2-APB. The higher amplitude of SOCE was associated to the over-expression of the transcripts encoding for Stim2, Orai2–3, and TRPC1. Conversely, immunoblotting revealed that Stim2 levels remained constant as compared to N-ECFCs, while Stim1, Orai1, Orai3, TRPC1 and TRPC4 proteins were over-expressed in PMF-ECFCs. ATP-induced SOCE was inhibited by BTP-2 and low micromolar La3+ and Gd3+, while CPA-elicited SOCE was insensitive to Gd3+. Finally, BTP-2 and La3+ weakly blocked PMF-ECFC proliferation, while Gd3+ was ineffective. Conclusions Two distinct signalling pathways mediate SOCE in PMF-ECFCs; one is activated by passive store depletion and is Gd3+-resistant, while the other one is regulated by the InsP3-sensitive Ca2

  10. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  11. Laparoscopic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fergany, Amr

    2012-01-01

    Objective Laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) has emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to open radical cystectomy (ORC). This review focuses on patient selection criteria, technical aspects and postoperative outcomes of LRC. Methods Material for the review was obtained by a PubMed search over the last 10 years, using the keywords ‘laparoscopic radical cystectomy’ and ‘laparoscopic bladder cancer’ in human subjects. Results Twenty-two publications selected for relevance and content were used for this review from the total search yield. The level of evidence was IIb and III. LRC results in comparable short- and intermediate-range oncological outcomes to ORC, with generally longer operative times but decreased blood loss, postoperative pain and hospital stay. Overall operative and postoperative morbidity are equivalent. Conclusion In experienced hands, LRC is an acceptable minimally invasive alternative to ORC in selected patients, with the main advantage of decreased blood loss and postoperative pain, as well as a shorter hospital stay and recovery. PMID:26558003

  12. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  13. Photo-induced free radicals on a simulated Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, S.-S.; Chang, S.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an electron spin resonance study of free radicals in the ultraviolet irradiation of a simulated Martian surface suggest that the ultraviolet photolysis of CO or CO2, or a mixture of both, adsorbed on silica gel at minus 170 C involves the formation of OH radicals and possibly of H atoms as the primary process, followed by the formation of CO2H radicals. It is concluded that the photochemical synthesis of organic compounds could occur on Mars if the siliceous surface dust contains enough silanol groups and/or adsorbed H2O in the form of bound water.

  14. Ischemia, reperfusion and oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Manso, C F

    1992-11-01

    Alterations which occur during ischemia are reviewed. They modify the metabolic status in such a way they prepare the cell to an anomalous response to reoxygenation. The consequence of this disturbance is the generation of oxygen free radicals through several mechanisms, including the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the arachidonic acid cascade, the activation of xanthine oxidase, activation of phagocytes, iron mobilization, etc. Reduced glutathione is exhausted, proteins are inactivated. Lipid peroxidation induces membrane breakdown and cellular death. PMID:1290647

  15. Primary structure and possible origin of the non-glycosylated basic proline-rich protein of human submandibular/sublingual saliva.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, R; Kauffman, D L; Waye, M M; Blum, M; Bennick, A; Keller, P J

    1989-01-01

    Human submandibular/sublingual saliva contains one non-glycosylated basic proline-rich protein whereas parotid saliva contains multiple such components. The submandibular protein has a primary structure identical with the C-terminal segment [TZ] of the human parotid acidic proline-rich proteins that contain 150 amino acid residues (Mr 16,000). Northern-blot analyses of human parotid and submandibular glands revealed that mRNAs containing the HaeIII repeat sequence typical for acidic proline-rich proteins are expressed in both of these salivary glands whereas mRNAs for non-glycosylated basic proline-rich proteins containing a typical BstN1 repeat sequence are expressed in the parotid but not in the submandibular gland. Products of translation in vitro of mRNAs from human parotid and submandibular glands were also examined. Two immunoprecipitable bands with Mr 29,000 and 28,000 were obtained by translation of both parotid and submandibular mRNA. In the presence of microsomal membranes these proteins gave rise to proteins electrophoretically identical with the secreted acidic proline-rich proteins of Mr 16,000. These proteins were cleaved by kallikrein, giving rise to proteins with electrophoretic mobilities identical with those of a smaller acidic proline-rich protein with Mr 11,000 and peptide TZ. Additional immunoprecipitable bands with Mr ranging from 35,000 to 46,000 were seen when parotid mRNA was used for translation in vitro, and are believed to be precursors of the basic proline-rich proteins encoded by the BstN1 repeat type mRNA. Neither these bands nor a separate precursor for the basic non-glycosylated proline-rich protein was detected when submandibular mRNA was used for translation in vitro. It is suggested that the non-glycosylated basic proline-rich protein present in human submandibular saliva arises by cleavage of acidic proline-rich proteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2688632

  16. Free radical tissue damage: Protective role of antioxidant nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Machling, L.J.; Bendich, A. )

    1987-12-01

    Highly reactive molecules called free radicals can cause tissue damage by reacting with polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular membranes, nucleotides in DNA, and critical sulfhydryl bonds in proteins. Free radicals can originate endogenously from normal metabolic reactions or exogenously as components of tobacco smoke and air pollutants and indirectly through the metabolism of certain solvents, drugs, and pesticides as well as through exposure to radiation. There is some evidence that free radical damage contributes to the etiology of many chronic health problems such as emphysema, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, cataracts, and cancer. The extent of tissue damage is the result of the balance between the free radicals generated and the antioxidant protective defense system. Several dietary micronutrients contribute greatly to the protective system. Based on the growing interest in free radical biology and the lack of effective therapies for many of the chronic diseases, the usefulness of essential, safe nutrients in protecting against the adverse effects of oxidative injury warrants further study.

  17. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  18. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  19. The role of non-protein sulphydryls in determining the chemical repair rates of free radical precursors of DNA damage and cell killing in Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Prise, K M; Davies, S; Stratford, M R; Michael, B D

    1992-09-01

    Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts were irradiated in the gas explosion apparatus and the chemical repair rates of the oxygen-dependent free radical precursors of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and lethal lesions measured using filter elution (pH 9.6) and a clonogenic assay. Depletion of cellular GSH levels, from 4.16 fmol/cell to 0.05 fmol/cell, by treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (50 mumol dm-3; 18 h), led to sensitization as regards DNA dsb induction and cell killing. This was evident at all time settings but was particularly pronounced when the oxygen shot was given 1 ms after the irradiation pulse. A detailed analysis of the chemical repair kinetics showed that depletion of GSH led to a reduction in the first-order rate constant for dsb precursors from 385 s-1 to 144 s-1, and for lethal lesion precursors from 533 s-1 to 165 s-1. This is generally consistent with the role of GSH in the repair-fixation model of radiation damage at the critical DNA lesions. However, the reduction in chemical repair rate was not proportional to the severe thiol depletion (down to approximately 1% for GSH) and a residual repair capacity remained (approximately 30%). This was found not to be due to compartmentalization of residual GSH in the nucleus, as the repair rate for dsb precursors in isolated nuclei, washed virtually free of GSH, was identical to that found in GSH-depleted cells (144 s-1), also the OER remained substantially above unity. This suggests that other reducing agents may have a role to play in the chemical repair of oxygen-dependent damage. One possible candidate is the significant level of protein sulphydryls present in isolated nuclei. PMID:1356131

  20. SAS1B Protein [Ovastacin] Shows Temporal and Spatial Restriction to Oocytes in Several Eutherian Orders and Initiates Translation at the Primary to Secondary Follicle Transition

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S; Hlavin, Callie; Macnamara, Ellen; Ishola-Gbenla, Khadijat; Doerwaldt, Christa; Chamberlain, Catherine; Klotz, Kenneth; Herr, Austin K.; Khole, Aalok; Chertihin, Olga; Curnow, Eliza; Feldman, Sandford H; Mandal, Arabinda; Shetty, Jagathpala; Flickinger, Charles; Herr, John C

    2014-01-01

    Background Sperm Acrosomal SLLP1 Binding (SAS1B) protein (ovastacin) is an oolemmal binding partner for the intra-acrosomal sperm protein SLLP1. Results Immunohistochemical localization revealed that SAS1B translation is restricted among adult tissues to the ovary and oocytes, SAS1B appearing first in follicles at the primary-secondary transition. Quiescent oocytes within primordial follicles and primary follicles did not stain for SAS1B. Examination of neonatal rat ovaries revealed SAS1B expression first as faint signals in postnatal day 3 oocytes, with SAS1B protein staining intensifying with oocyte growth. Irrespective of animal age or estrus stage, SAS1B was seen only in oocytes of follicles that initiated a second granulosa cell layer. The precise temporal and spatial onset of SAS1B expression was conserved in adult ovaries in 7 eutherian species, including non-human primates. Immunoelectron micrographs localized SAS1B within cortical granules in MII oocytes. A population of SAS1B localized on the oolemma predominantly in the microvillar region anti-podal to the nucleus in ovulated MII rat oocytes and on the oolemma in macaque GV oocytes. Conclusions The restricted expression of SAS1B protein in growing oocytes, absence in the ovarian reserve, and localization on the oolemma suggest this zinc metalloprotease deserves consideration as a candidate target for reversible female contraceptive strategies. PMID:24038607

  1. IL12, IL10, IFNγ and TNFα Expression in Human Primary Monocytes Stimulated with Bacterial Heat Shock GroEL (Hsp64) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ayten; Saygılı, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus (Aggregatibacter) actinomycetemicomitans (Aa) is a bacterium that lives in the oral cavity and plays an important role in periodontal diseases. The effect of A.actinomycetemcomitans’s heat shock family protein GroEL on host or immune cells including monocytes is quite limited. In this study, the recombinant A.actinomycetemcomitans’s GroEL protein (rAaGroEL) was used as an antigen and its effects on monocytes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. To do that, PBMCs were stimulated with rAaGroEL protein at different time points (16h to 96h) and the cytokines of CD14+ monocytes were detected with intracellular cytokine staining by Flow cytometry. Data showed that AaGroEL protein has an antigenic effect on human primary monocytes. AaGroEL protein responsive CD14 monocytes stimulates the expression of IL12, IL10, IFNγ and TNFα cytokines with different kinetics and expression profile. Therefore, A. actinomycetemcomitans’s heat shock GroEL protein can modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and contribute to an inflammatory diseases pathology. PMID:27119521

  2. Port-site metastasis as a primary complication following retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma or nephron-sparing surgery: A report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; WANG, KAI; ZHONG, DACHUAN; LIU, XIA; SUN, JI; LIN, LIANXIANG; GE, LINNA; YANG, BO

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the clinical data of two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma and one patient with renal carcinoma who developed port-site metastasis following retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery. The current study aimed to identify the cause and prognosis of the occurrence of port-site metastasis subsequent to laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma and nephron-sparing surgery. Post-operative pathology confirmed the presence of high-grade urothelial cell carcinoma in two patients and Fuhrman grade 3 renal clear cell carcinoma in one patient. Port-site metastasis was initially detected 1–7 months post-surgery. The two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma succumbed to the disease 2 and 4 months following the identification of the port-site metastasis, respectively, whereas the patient with renal carcinoma survived with no disease progression during the targeted therapy period. The occurrence of port-site metastasis may be attributed to systemic and local factors. Measures to reduce the development of this complication include strict compliance with the operating guidelines for tumor surgery, avoidance of air leakage at the port-site, complete removal of the specimen with an impermeable bag, irrigation of the laparoscopic instruments and incisional wound with povidone-iodine when necessary, and enhancement of the body's immunity. Close post-operative follow-up observation for signs of recurrence or metastasis is essential, and systemic chemotherapy may be required in patients with high-grade renal pelvis carcinoma and renal carcinoma in order to prolong life expectancy. PMID:27313720

  3. Cleavable ester-linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent-exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ujwal S; Osorno, Laura; Ellender, Angela; Grimm, Casey; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    To study the solvent-exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide-linked N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-modified silica-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide reducing agent during protein digestion and allows unwanted disulfide formation between the MNPs and protein. In the current work, the disulfide bond was replaced with a cleavable ester group to synthesize NHS ester-modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs. Use of the cleavable ester group provides an improved method for protein labeling and allows the use of disulfide reducing agents during protein digestion. PMID:25983234

  4. Density functional calculations on model tyrosyl radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Himo, F; Gräslund, A; Eriksson, L A

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-corrected density functional theory approach (PWP86) has been applied, together with large basis sets (IGLO-III), to investigate the structure and hyperfine properties of model tyrosyl free radicals. In nature, these radicals are observed in, e.g., the charge transfer pathways in photosystem II (PSII) and in ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs). By comparing spin density distributions and proton hyperfine couplings with experimental data, it is confirmed that the tyrosyl radicals present in the proteins are neutral. It is shown that hydrogen bonding to the phenoxyl oxygen atom, when present, causes a reduction in spin density on O and a corresponding increase on C4. Calculated proton hyperfine coupling constants for the beta-protons show that the alpha-carbon is rotated 75-80 degrees out of the plane of the ring in PSII and Salmonella typhimurium RNR, but only 20-30 degrees in, e.g., Escherichia coli, mouse, herpes simplex, and bacteriophage T4-induced RNRs. Furthermore, based on the present calculations, we have revised the empirical parameters used in the experimental determination of the oxygen spin density in the tyrosyl radical in E. coli RNR and of the ring carbon spin densities, from measured hyperfine coupling constants. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 5 PMID:9083661

  5. Emerging themes in radical SAM chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes in the radical SAM (RS) superfamily catalyze a wide variety of reactions through unique radical chemistry. The characteristic markers of the superfamily include a [4Fe–4S] cluster coordinated to the protein via a cysteine triad motif, typically CX3CX2C, with the fourth iron coordinated by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The SAM serves as a precursor for a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, the central intermediate in nearly all RS enzymes studied to date. The SAM-bound [4Fe–4S] cluster is located within a partial or full triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel where the radical chemistry occurs protected from the surroundings. In addition to the TIM barrel and a RS [4Fe–4S] cluster, many members of the superfamily contain additional domains and/or additional Fe–S clusters. Recently characterized superfamily members are providing new examples of the remarkable range of reactions that can be catalyzed, as well as new structural and mechanistic insights into these fascinating reactions. PMID:23141873

  6. Neurotoxins: Free Radical Mechanisms and Melatonin Protection

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Russel J.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Tan, Dun-Xian

    2010-01-01

    Toxins that pass through the blood-brain barrier put neurons and glia in peril. The damage inflicted is usually a consequence of the ability of these toxic agents to induce free radical generation within cells but especially at the level of the mitochondria. The elevated production of oxygen and nitrogen-based radicals and related non-radical products leads to the oxidation of essential macromolecules including lipids, proteins and DNA. The resultant damage is referred to as oxidative and nitrosative stress and, when the molecular destruction is sufficiently severe, it causes apoptosis or necrosis of neurons and glia. Loss of brain cells compromises the functions of the central nervous system expressed as motor, sensory and cognitive deficits and psychological alterations. In this survey we summarize the publications related to the following neurotoxins and the protective actions of melatonin: aminolevulinic acid, cyanide, domoic acid, kainic acid, metals, methamphetamine, polychlorinated biphenyls, rotenone, toluene and 6-hydroxydopamine. Given the potent direct free radical scavenging activities of melatonin and its metabolites, their ability to indirectly stimulate antioxidative enzymes and their efficacy in reducing electron leakage from mitochondria, it would be expected that these molecules would protect the brain from oxidative and nitrosative molecular mutilation. The studies summarized in this review indicate that this is indeed the case, an action that is obviously assisted by the fact that melatonin readily crosses the blood brain barrier. PMID:21358970

  7. Radical AdoMet enzymes in complex metal cluster biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duffus, Benjamin R; Hamilton, Trinity L; Shepard, Eric M; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2012-11-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) enzymes comprise a large superfamily of proteins that engage in a diverse series of biochemical transformations through generation of the highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate. Recent advances into the biosynthesis of unique iron-sulfur (FeS)-containing cofactors such as the H-cluster in [FeFe]-hydrogenase, the FeMo-co in nitrogenase, as well as the iron-guanylylpyridinol (FeGP) cofactor in [Fe]-hydrogenase have implicated new roles for radical AdoMet enzymes in the biosynthesis of complex inorganic cofactors. Radical AdoMet enzymes in conjunction with scaffold proteins engage in modifying ubiquitous FeS precursors into unique clusters, through novel amino acid decomposition and sulfur insertion reactions. The ability of radical AdoMet enzymes to modify common metal centers to unusual metal cofactors may provide important clues into the stepwise evolution of these and other complex bioinorganic catalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology. PMID:22269887

  8. Identification of beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase--a non-species-specific bacterial protein--as target of antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Kai-Wolfgang; Schmider, Wolfgang; Kist, Manfred; Batsford, Stephen; Schiltz, Emile; Oelke, Mathias; Tuczek, Anja; Dettenborn, Therese; Behringer, Dirk; Kreisel, Wolfgang

    2003-03-01

    Several observations suggest that bacteria induce autoimmunity in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Since no PBC-specific bacterial species could be identified, it can be speculated that the triggers are non-species-specific bacterial proteins. This hypothesis would imply that several or even all bacterial species can trigger PBC. Therefore, we investigated whether PBC exhibits immune reactions to non-species-specific bacterial antigens. Yersinia enterocolitica O3 was screened for the presence of proteins that were labeled by immunoblotting using PBC sera. We focused our investigations on a 160-kDa protein, which was further enriched and characterized by partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The prevalence of antibodies to this protein was determined by immunoblotting in a variety of diseases. The 160-kDa protein was identified as the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA-polymerase, a highly conserved bacterial protein with a very high degree of sequence identity among all bacterial species. Antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase were specific for this protein. Until now no mammalian protein could be found that cross-reacts with these antibodies. The prevalence of antibodies to the beta-subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (ARPA) using the protein from Yersinia enterocolitica O3 (serum dilution 1:1000) was: healthy controls (HC, N = 101) 7.9%, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC, N = 61) 32.8%, autoimmune hepatitis type 1 (AIH, N = 46) 26.1%, alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC, N = 44) 9.1%, Crohn's disease (CD, N = 38) 7.9%, ulcerative colitis (UC, N = 24) 8.3%, primary sclerosing cholangitis + UC (PSC/UC, N = 11) 0%, acute yersiniosis (Yers, N = 36) 19.4%, acute infection with Campylobacter jejuni (Camp, N = 10) 0%, acute Q-fever (QF, N = 16) 6.25%, chronic hepatitis C (HCV, N = 39) 7.7%, c-ANCA-positive vasculitis (Vasc, N = 40) 15%, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, N = 28) 10.7%, and malaria tropica (MT, N = 24) 16.7%. There was no significant

  9. Expression of SOCS1 and CXCL12 Proteins in Primary Breast Cancer Are Associated with Presence of Circulating Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood1

    PubMed Central

    Smolkova, Bozena; Mego, Michal; Horvathova Kajabova, Viera; Cierna, Zuzana; Danihel, Ludovit; Sedlackova, Tatiana; Minarik, Gabriel; Zmetakova, Iveta; Krivulcik, Tomas; Gronesova, Paulina; Karaba, Marian; Benca, Juraj; Pindak, Daniel; Mardiak, Jozef; Reuben, James M.; Fridrichova, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are independent prognostic factors in the primary and metastatic breast cancer patients and play crucial role in hematogenous tumor dissemination. The aim of this study was to correlate the presence of CTCs in peripheral blood with the expression of proteins in tumor tissue that have a putative role in regulation of cell growth and metastatic potential. This prospective study included 203 primary breast cancer patients treated by definitive surgery. CTCs were detected by quantitative real-time PCR for the expression of epithelial (CK19) or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition–inducing transcription factor genes (TWIST1, SNAIL1, SLUG, and ZEB1). Expression of APC, ADAM23, CXCL12, E-cadherin, RASSF1, SYK, TIMP3, BRMS1, and SOCS1 proteins in primary breast tumor tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CTCs with epithelial markers were found in 17 (9.2%) patients. Their occurrence was associated with inhibition of SOCS1 expression (odds ratio [OR] = 0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03-0.13; P < .001). CTCs with positive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers were detected in 30 (15.8%) patients; however, no association with analyzed protein expressions was found. Overall, CTCs were detected in 44 (22.9%) patients. Presence of any CTC marker was significantly associated with positive CXCL12 expression (OR = 3.08; 95% CI, 1.15-8.26; P = .025) and lack of SOCS1 expression (OR = 0.10; 95% CI, 0.04-0.25; P < .001) in patient’s tumor tissues. As both CXCL12 and SOCS1 proteins are involved in cytokine signaling, our results provide support for the hypothesis that aberrant signaling cross talk between cytokine and chemokine responses could have an important role in hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells in breast cancer.

  10. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) does not inhibit the production of C-reactive protein or serum amyloid A protein by human primary hepatocytes. Differential regulation in normal and tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, C; Genin, B; Mentha, G; Iynedjian, P B; Roux-Lombard, P; Guerne, P A

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of some class 1 acute-phase proteins (APP), including C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) protein is completely blocked by the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), whereas the production of fibrinogen, a class 2 APP, is increased by IL-1Ra in hepatoma cells, but this has never been tested in human hepatocytes in primary culture. Since previous studies on the contributions of cytokine inhibitors in connective tissues diseases suggested that IL-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) might play an important role in the regulation of CRP, we decided to examine in more detail the respective roles of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha and their inhibitors in the production of APP by human primary hepatocytes versus the hepatoma cell line PLC/PRF/5. In the hepatoma cell line, IL-1 beta and/or TNF-alpha had synergistic effects with IL-6 on the production of CRP and SAA. In contrast, these cytokines were devoid of effect in normal hepatocytes. The production of fibrinogen was increased by IL-6 and decreased by IL-1 (and TNF-alpha) in both cell types. The secretion of CRP and SAA by primary hepatocytes incubated with a cytokine-rich mononuclear cell-conditioned medium was totally unaffected by IL-1Ra or anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. In contrast, the addition of IL-1Ra increased the production of fibrinogen by both hepatoma cells and primary hepatocytes incubated with the mononuclear cell-conditioned medium. We therefore conclude that IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha do not exert any significant effect on the synthesis of CRP and SAA by human primary hepatocytes. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7743670

  11. Preventing Cleavage of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Attachment Protein in Vero Cells Rescues the Infectivity of Progeny Virus for Primary Human Airway Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Corry, Jacqueline; Johnson, Sara M.; Cornwell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT All live attenuated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines that have advanced to clinical trials have been produced in Vero cells. The attachment (G) glycoprotein in virions produced in these cells is smaller than that produced in other immortalized cells due to cleavage. These virions are 5-fold less infectious for primary well-differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE) cell cultures. Because HAE cells are isolated directly from human airways, Vero cell-grown vaccine virus would very likely be similarly inefficient at initiating infection of the nasal epithelium following vaccination, and therefore, a larger inoculum would be required for effective vaccination. We hypothesized that Vero cell-derived virus containing an intact G protein would be more infectious for HAE cell cultures. Using protease inhibitors with increasing specificity, we identified cathepsin L to be the protease responsible for cleavage. Our evidence suggests that cleavage occurs in the late endosome or lysosome during endocytic recycling. Cathepsin L activity was 100-fold greater in Vero cells than in HeLa cells. In addition, cathepsin L was able to cleave the G protein in Vero cell-grown virions but not in HeLa cell-grown virions, suggesting a difference in G-protein posttranslational modification in the two cell lines. We identified by mutagenesis amino acids important for cleavage, and these amino acids included a likely cathepsin L cleavage site. Virus containing a modified, noncleavable G protein produced in Vero cells was 5-fold more infectious for HAE cells in culture, confirming our hypothesis and indicating the value of including such a mutation in future live attenuated RSV vaccines. IMPORTANCE Worldwide, RSV is the second leading infectious cause of infant death, but no vaccine is available. Experimental live attenuated RSV vaccines are grown in Vero cells, but during production the virion attachment (G) glycoprotein is cleaved. Virions containing a cleaved G protein

  12. The primary structure of component 8c-1, a subunit protein of intermediate filaments in wool keratin. Relationships with proteins from other intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, L M; Crewther, W G; Inglis, A S

    1986-01-01

    Component 8c-1, one of four highly homologous component-8 subunit proteins present in the microfibrils of wool, was isolated as its S-carboxymethyl derivative and its amino acid sequence was determined. Large peptides were isolated after cleaving the protein chemically or enzymically and the sequence of each was determined with an automatic Sequenator. The peptides were ordered by sequence overlaps and, in some instances, by homology with known sequences from other component-8 subunits. The C-terminal residues were identified by three procedures. Full details of the various procedures used have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50133 (4 pp.) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. The result showed that the protein comprises 412 residues and has an Mr, including the N-terminal acetyl group, of 48,300. The sequence of residues 98-200 of component 8c-1 was found to correspond to the partial or complete sequences of four homologous type I helical segments previously isolated from helical fragments recovered from chymotryptic digests of microfibrillar proteins of wool [Crewther & Dowling (1971) Appl. Polym. Symp. 18, 1-20; Crewther, Gough, Inglis & McKern (1978) Text. Res. J. 48, 160-162; Gough, Inglis & Crewther (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 385]. Considered in relation to amino acid sequences of other intermediate-filament proteins, the sequence is in accord with the view that keratin filament proteins are of two types [Hanukoglu & Fuchs (1983) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 33, 915-924]. Filament proteins from non-keratinous tissues, such as desmin, vimentin, neurofilament proteins and the glial fibrillary acidic protein, which form monocomponent filaments, constitute a third type. It is suggested that as a whole the proteins from intermediate filaments be classed as filamentins, the three types at present identified forming

  13. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  14. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  15. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  16. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  17. Radical-radical interactions among oxidized guanine bases including guanine radical cation and dehydrogenated guanine radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ping; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-09-19

    We present here a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of di-ionized GG base pairs (G(•+)G(•+),G(-H1)(•)G(•+), and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•)) consisting of the guanine cation radical (G(•+)) and/or dehydrogenated guanine radical (G(-H1)(•)) using density functional theory calculations. Different coupling modes (Watson-Crick/WC, Hoogsteen/Hoog, and minor groove/min hydrogen bonding, and π-π stacking modes) are considered. We infer that a series of G(•+)G(•+) complexes can be formed by the high-energy radiation. On the basis of density functional theory and complete active space self-consistent (CASSCF) calculations, we reveal that in the H-bonded and N-N cross-linked modes, (G(•+)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minI, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minIII have the triplet ground states; (G(•+)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))WC, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoogI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minI, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minII, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))minII possess open-shell broken-symmetry diradical-characterized singlet ground states; and (G(•+)G(•+))HoogII, (G(•+)G(•+))minI, (G(•+)G(•+))minII, (G(•+)G(•+))minIII, (G(•+)G(•+))HoHo, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))minIII, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))HoHo, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))HoHo are the closed-shell systems. For these H-bonded diradical complexes, the magnetic interactions are weak, especially in the diradical G(•+)G(•+) series and G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•) series. The magnetic coupling interactions of the diradical systems are controlled by intermolecular interactions (H-bond, electrostatic repulsion, and radical coupling). The radical-radical interaction in the π-π stacked di-ionized GG base pairs ((G(•+)G(•+))ππ, (G(-H1)(•)G(•+))ππ, and (G(-H1)(•)G(-H1)(•))ππ) are also considered, and the magnetic coupling interactions in these π-π stacked base pairs are large. This is the first theoretical prediction that some di

  18. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Bigelow, Lance; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E; Lohman, Jeremy R; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Ma, Ming; Yang, Dong; Clancy, Shonda; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 Å, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein-ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics. PMID:26512730

  19. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Bigelow, Lance; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E.; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Ma, Ming; Yang, Dong; Clancy, Shonda; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  20. Kinetics of Propargyl Radical Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Miller, James A; Jasper, Ahren W

    2015-07-16

    Due to the prominent role of the propargyl radical for hydrocarbon growth within combustion environments, it is important to understand the kinetics of its formation and loss. The ab initio transition state theory-based master equation method is used to obtain theoretical kinetic predictions for the temperature and pressure dependence of the thermal decomposition of propargyl, which may be its primary loss channel under some conditions. The potential energy surface for the decomposition of propargyl is first mapped at a high level of theory with a combination of coupled cluster and multireference perturbation calculations. Variational transition state theory is then used to predict the microcanonical rate coefficients, which are subsequently implemented within the multiple-well multiple-channel master equation. A variety of energy transfer parameters are considered, and the sensitivity of the thermal rate predictions to these parameters is explored. The predictions for the thermal decomposition rate coefficient are found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental data. Modified Arrhenius representations of the rate constants are reported for utility in combustion modeling. PMID:25871530

  1. Oxygen radicals and renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S

    1997-01-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and hypochlorous acid) are important mediators of renal damage in acute renal failure and glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. The role of these oxygen metabolites in the above entities is discussed, and the effects of antioxidants and scavengers of O2 radicals are considered. The role of oxygen radicals in the regulation of gene transcription is also considered. PMID:9387104

  2. Neuroprotection by radical avoidance: search for suitable agents.

    PubMed

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is frequently associated with damage by free radicals. However, increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which may ultimately lead to neuronal cell death, do not necessarily reflect its primary cause, but can be a consequence of otherwise induced cellular dysfunction. Detrimental processes which promote free radical formation are initiated, e.g., by disturbances in calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial malfunction, and an age-related decline in the circadian oscillator system. Free radicals generated at high rates under pathophysiological conditions are insufficiently detoxified by scavengers. Interventions at the primary causes of dysfunction, which avoid secondary rises in radical formation, may be more efficient. The aim of such approaches should be to prevent calcium overload, to reduce mitochondrial electron dissipation, to support electron transport capacity, and to avoid circadian perturbations. L-theanine and several amphiphilic nitrones are capable of counteracting excitotoxicity and/or mitochondrial radical formation. Resveratrol seems to promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Mitochondrial effects of leptin include attenuation of electron leakage. Melatonin combines all the requirements mentioned, additionally regulates anti- and pro-oxidant enzymes and is, with few exceptions, very well tolerated. In this review, the perspectives, problems and limits of drugs are compared which may be suitable for reducing the formation of free radicals. PMID:20032877

  3. Radical additions to chiral hydrazones: stereoselectivity and functional group compatibility.

    PubMed

    Friestad, Gregory K

    2012-01-01

    Free radical additions to imino compounds offer increased synthetic accessibility of chiral amines, but lack of general methods for stereocontrol has hindered their development. This review focuses on two asymmetric amine synthesis strategies designed to address this problem, with emphasis on addition of functionalized radicals which may facilitate applications to synthesis of complex targets. First, chiral N-acylhydrazones are acceptors for intermolecular radical additions of a wide range of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl halides to the C=N bond, with radicals generated under manganese-, tin-, or boron-mediated conditions. A variety of aldehydes and ketones serve as viable precursors for the chiral hydrazones, and the highly stereoselective reactions tolerate electrophilic functionality in both coupling components. Second, radical precursors may be linked to chiral α-hydroxyhydrazones via a silicon tether to the hydroxyl group; conformational constraints impart stereocontrol during 5-exo radical cyclization under stannyl- or thiyl-mediated conditions. The silicon tether may later be removed to reveal the formal adducts of hydroxymethyl, vinyl, acetyl, and 2-oxoethyl radicals to the C=N bond. Methodology development and applications to biologically important targets are discussed. PMID:21842359

  4. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  5. Short-chain fatty acids induce cytoskeletal and extracellular protein modifications associated with modulation of proliferation on primary culture of rat intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Le Blay, G; Blottière, H M; Ferrier, L; Le Foll, E; Bonnet, C; Galmiche, J P; Cherbut, C

    2000-08-01

    Short-chain fatty acids are the main end products of bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates. Their role on the metabolism and biology of colonocytes is now well characterized. However, the functional consequences of their presence on intestinal smooth muscle cells remain poorly studied. We aimed to assess the effect of different short-chain fatty acids on ileal and colonic smooth muscle cells in primary culture and on A7R5 line. Butyrate (above 0.1 mM) inhibited A7R5 cell proliferation, while at low concentration (0.05 to 0.5 mM) butyrate significantly stimulated the proliferation of ileal and colonic myocytes in primary culture. An inhibition was observed at higher concentrations. Collagenous and noncollagenous protein synthesis was stimulated by butyrate. Moreover, butyrate stimulated actin and myosin expression. Thus, butyrate, which is produced by dietary fiber fermentation, may affect intestinal muscles by directly acting at the molecular level on myocytes. PMID:11007115

  6. Radical-based alkylation of guanine derivatives in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Caminal, Clara; Mulazzani, Quinto G

    2011-05-01

    The radical-based alkylation of 8-bromoguanosine (1a) and 8-bromo-2'-deoxyguanosine (1b) at the C8 position has been investigated in aqueous solutions. Alkyl radicals were generated by scavenging of the primary species of γ-radiolysis by the alcohol substrate. These reactions result in the efficient formation of intermolecular C-C bonds in aqueous media, by using the reactivity of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals derived from alcohols with 1a and 1b. A mechanism for the formation of C8 guanine alkylated adducts has been proposed, based on the quantification of radiation chemical yields for the disappearance of starting material and the formation of all products. Two α-hydroxyalkyl radicals are needed to form an alkylated guanine, the first one adding to C8 followed by ejection of Br(-) with formation of guanyl adduct and the second one acting as reducing agent of the guanyl adduct. PMID:21431230

  7. Primary structure of dihydrofolate reductase and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L36 genes from the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    PubMed

    Aimi, Tadanori; Fukuhara, Shoji; Ishiguro, Maki; Kitamoto, Yutaka; Morinaga, Tsutomu

    2004-08-01

    We amplified and sequenced the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. Downstream of the DHFR coding region, a mitochondrial (mt) ribosomal protein L36 (RPL36) gene was discovered in the opposite orientation to DHFR gene. Putative polyadenylation signals of the two genes overlapped, both containing the 8-bp palindrome 5'-aatatatt-3'. The finding that C. cinereus DHFR gene is closely clustered with a mt protein gene strongly suggests that C. cinereus DHFR is closely related to mt function and evolution. The amino acid sequence of C. cinereus DHFR is most homologous to eukaryotic proteins such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Pneumocystis carinii DHFRs. However, the sequence of C. cinereus mt RPL36 closely resembles RPL36 of bacteria and cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. and Escherichia coli. This result strongly supports the serial endosymbiotic theory of the development of ancestral eukaryotes, and suggests that C. cinereus mt RPL36 gene originated from the ancestral eubacterial genome. PMID:15620217

  8. Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Leads to Increased Prion Protein in Plasma: A Potential Biomarker for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the “signature injury” of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4–206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL±0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL±0.14 SE; two tailed test p<0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  9. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats leads to increased prion protein in plasma: a potential biomarker for blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the "signature injury" of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4-206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL ± 0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL ± 0.14 SE; two tailed test p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  10. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  11. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  12. Evaluation of the clinical relevance of the expression and function of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein and lung resistance protein in patients with primary acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria; Paterakis, George; Androutsos, George; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Kalmantis, Themistoklis; Meletis, John; Rombos, Yiannis; Sagriotis, Alexandros; Symeonidis, Argyrios; Tiniakou, Maria; Zoumbos, Nikolaos; Yataganas, Xenophon

    2002-02-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter-proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) have been associated with treatment failure. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the clinical significance of expression and function of the MDR proteins, considering other prognostic factors, such as age, immunophenotype, and cytogenetics. Mononuclear cells of peripheral blood or bone marrow from 61 patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies JSB1, MRPm6 and LRP56 were used for expression studies. Accumulation and retention studies were performed using the substrates Daunorubicin, Calcein-AM, Rhodamine-123 and DiOC(2) in the presence or absence of the modifiers Verapamil, Genistein, Probenecid, BIBW22S and PSC833. Induction treatment consisted of a 3+7 combination of Ida/Ara-C for patients < or = 60 years of age and a 3+5 Ida/VP-16 combination per OS for patients >60. MDR function was expressed as the ratio of mean fluorescence intensity substrate in the presence of modifier over the substrate alone (resistance index, RI). Patients with advanced age, low CD15 expression and high RI for accumulation of DiOC(2) in the presence of BIBW22S had significantly lower complete remission (CR) rates. No factor was prognostic for event-free survival analysis, which was limited to remitters only. Overall survival was shorter in patients with advanced age, poor prognosis cytogenetics, high CD7 expression, and high RI for Daunorubicin efflux modulated by Verapamil. These results suggest that MDR transporter-proteins have a limited role in the treatment failure of patients treated with Idarubicin-based regimens. PMID:11755464

  13. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to study the solvent exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide linked N-hydrosuccinimide ester modified silica coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide r...

  14. Principal component analysis and biochemical characterization of protein and starch reveal primary targets for improving sorghum grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large variation characterizes the digestibility of protein and starch in sorghum grain. Since the utility of the grain largely depends on its digestibility, numerous in vitro digestion assays have been developed to assess these variations. In this study, we applied multiple techniques to assess the ...

  15. Infection of primary cells by adeno-associated virus type 2 results in a modulation of cell cycle-regulating proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hermanns, J; Schulze, A; Jansen-Db1urr, P; Kleinschmidt, J A; Schmidt, R; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that infection of primary human cells with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) leads to a decrease in cellular proliferation and to growth arrest. We analyzed the molecular basis of this phenomenon and observed that infection with AAV type 2 (AAV2) had an effect on several factors engaged in the control of the mammalian cell cycle. In particular, all of the pRB family members, pRB, p107, and p130, which are involved in G1 cell cycle checkpoint control, were affected. After infection, a shift from hyper- to hypophosphorylated forms was observed. Cyclins A and B1, which are required for G1/S transition and progression into mitosis, respectively, were downregulated at the transcriptional level as well as at the protein level, whereas the G1 cyclins D1 and E remained unaffected. In addition, the steady-state levels of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK1 and CDK2 and of transcription factor E2F-1 were diminished. Of all the factors known to be involved in phosphorylation of pRB family proteins, only the CDK inhibitor p21WAF1 exhibited a response to AAV2 infection. p21WAF1 mRNA was quickly and progressively upregulated in a p53-independent manner over at least 72 h. Consistent with the increased p21WAF1 protein levels, cyclin E- and cyclin A-dependent kinase activities declined to low levels and E2F-p130-cyclin-CDK2 complexes were disrupted. From these data, we conclude that the major effect of AAV2 infection on primary human fibroblasts appears to be upregulation of p21WAF1 gene expression and thus cell cycle arrest by the suppression of pRB family protein phosphorylation. PMID:9223493

  16. Triptolide inhibits transcription of hTERT through down-regulation of transcription factor specificity protein 1 in primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Cong; Wang, Jingchao; Guo, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Chao; Liu, Yu; Sun, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a key component responsible for the regulation of telomerase activity, plays important roles in cellular immortalization and cancer development. Triptolide purified from Tripterygium extracts displays a broad-spectrum bioactivity profile, including immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor. In this study, it is investigated whether triptolide reduces hTERT expression and suppresses its activity in PEL cells. The mRNA and protein levels of hTERT were examined by real time-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The activity of hTERT promoter was determined by Dual luciferase reporter assay. Our results demonstrated that triptolide decreased expression of hTERT at both mRNA and protein levels. Further gene sequence analysis indicated that the activity of hTERT promoter was suppressed by triptolide. Triptolide also reduced the half-time of hTERT. Additionally, triptolide inhibited the expression of transcription factor specificity protein 1(Sp1) in PEL cells. Furthermore, knock-down of Sp1 by using specific shRNAs resulted in down-regulation of hTERT transcription and protein expression levels. Inhibition of Sp1 by specific shRNAs enhanced triptolide-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of triptolide on hTERT transcription is possibly mediated by inhibition of transcription factor Sp1 in PEL cells. PMID:26631963

  17. Mineral dust exposure and free radical-mediated lung damage

    SciTech Connect

    Doelman, C.J.; Leurs, R.; Oosterom, W.C.; Bast, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure to several types of mineral dust particles induces an inflammatory reaction in the lung. Dust particles activate alveolar macrophages and prime leukocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), leading to an enhanced release of reactive oxygen species. Sometimes mineral dust particles also contain radicals. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen) may lead to tissue damage. These are able to break DNA strands, to destroy proteins, and to induce the process of lipid peroxidation. The effects of oxygen radicals on the beta-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor response of the guinea pig and rat tracheal strip are described. The beta-adrenergic receptor response appeared to be more susceptible to oxidative stress than the muscarinic receptor response. This may lead to an autonomic imbalance on exposure to oxygen radicals. The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2,3-trans-nonenal diminished the beta-adrenergic responsiveness in guinea pig tracheal preparations. Histologic examinations indicated that at low concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide (10(-4) M) the epithelial layer of rat trachea was already destroyed, whereas no effect on the muscarinic response was found. Oxygen radical-mediated damage in lung tissue may lead to lung emphysema, hyperresponsiveness, and hypersensitivity. Pharmacotherapeutic interventions that prevent initiation or propagation of these free radical reactions may have a beneficial effect in mineral dust-associated lung disease. 70 references.

  18. [Research progress on free radicals in human body].

    PubMed

    Wang, Q B; Xu, F P; Wei, C X; Peng, J; Dong, X D

    2016-08-10

    Free radicals are the intermediates of metabolism, widely exist in the human bodies. Under normal circumstances, the free radicals play an important role in the metabolic process on human body, cell signal pathway, gene regulation, induction of cell proliferation and apoptosis, so as to maintain the normal growth and development of human body and to inhibit the growth of bacteria, virus and cancer. However, when organic lesion occurs affected by external factors or when equilibrium of the free radicals is tipped in the human body, the free radicals will respond integratedly with lipids, protein or nucleic acid which may jeopardize the health of human bodies. This paper summarizes the research progress of the free radicals conducted in recent years, in relations to the perspective of the types, origins, test methods of the free radicals and their relationship with human's health. In addition, the possible mechanisms of environmental pollutants (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) mediating oxidative stress and free radicals scavenging in the body were also summarized. PMID:27539355

  19. The fate of free radicals in a cellulose based hydrogel: detection by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Basumallick, Lipika; Ji, J Andrea; Naber, Nariman; Wang, Y John

    2009-07-01

    Cellulose derivatives are commonly used as gelling agents in topical and ophthalmic drug formulations. During the course of manufacturing, cellulose derivatives are believed to generate free radicals. These free radicals may degrade the gelling agent, leading to lower viscosity. Free radicals also may react with the active ingredient in the product. The formation of radicals in a 3% hydrogel of hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and spin trapping techniques. Radicals were trapped with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and quantitated by comparing the EPR intensity with 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL), a stable free radical. Typically, the hydrogels showed an initial increase in the radical concentration within 2 days after autoclaving, followed by a drop in radical concentration in 7 days. EDTA prevented the formation of free radicals in the hypromellose (HPMC) hydrogel, suggesting the involvement of metal ions in the generation of free radicals. The oxidizing potential of the hydrogel was estimated by measuring the rate at which methionine (a model for the protein active pharmaceutical ingredient) was degraded, and was consistent with the amount of radicals present in the gel. This study is the first report investigating the application of EPR spectroscopy in detecting and estimating free radical concentration in cellulose based hydrogels. PMID:19090570

  20. Notch1 Signaling Is Activated in Cells Expressing Embryonic Stem Cell Proteins in Human Primary Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Peng, Jianhua; Zhang, Huxiang; Zhu, Yi; Wan, Li; Chen, Jianfu; Chen, Xiaoyun; Lin, Renyu; Li, He; Mao, XiaoOu; Jin, Kunlin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of Notch1 signaling pathway in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: We performed immunocytochemistry on surgically resected NPC using antibodies against embryonic stem (ES) cell proteins and against Notch1 signaling components. Results: We found that ES cell protein markers SOX2 and OCT4 were expressed in a subpopulation of cells for all three subtypes of NPC but barely in the normal control. Double immunostaining shows that SOX2- and OCT4-positive cells coexpressed proliferative markers, suggesting that human NPC may contain cancer stem–like cells. In addition, we found that Notch1 signaling was activated in NPC. Confocal images show that the Notch1 signaling activated form and Hes1, a downstream target of Notch1 signaling, was predominantly found in SOX2- and OCT4-positive cells. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be a regulator of cancer stem–like cells in NPC. PMID:20211102

  1. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin's potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  2. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  3. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  4. Bureaucratic Activism and Radical School Change in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesz, Tricia; Krishnamurthy, Ramchandar

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Activity Based Learning (ABL), a child-centered, activity-based method of pedagogical practice, transformed classrooms in all of the over 37,000 primary-level government schools in Tamil Nadu, India. The large scale, rapid pace, and radical nature of educational change sets the ABL initiative apart from most school reform efforts.…

  5. The Nectin-4/Afadin Protein Complex and Intercellular Membrane Pores Contribute to Rapid Spread of Measles Virus in Primary Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Hornick, Andrew L.; Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Locke, Anna C.; Mendoza, Crystal A.; Mateo, Mathieu; Miller-Hunt, Catherine L.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that measles virus (MV) uses the adherens junction protein nectin-4 as its epithelial receptor provides a new vantage point from which to characterize its rapid spread in the airway epithelium. We show here that in well-differentiated primary cultures of airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE), MV infectious centers form rapidly and become larger than those of other respiratory pathogens: human respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus 5, and Sendai virus. While visible syncytia do not form after MV infection of HAE, the cytoplasm of an infected cell suddenly flows into an adjacent cell, as visualized through wild-type MV-expressed cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein (GFP). High-resolution video microscopy documents that GFP flows through openings that form on the lateral surfaces between columnar epithelial cells. To assess the relevance of the protein afadin, which connects nectin-4 to the actin cytoskeleton, we knocked down its mRNA. This resulted in more-limited infectious-center formation. We also generated a nectin-4 mutant without the afadin-binding site in its cytoplasmic tail. This mutant was less effective than wild-type human nectin-4 at promoting MV infection in primary cultures of porcine airway epithelia. Thus, in airway epithelial cells, MV spread requires the nectin-4/afadin complex and is based on cytoplasm transfer between columnar cells. Since the viral membrane fusion apparatus may open the passages that allow cytoplasm transfer, we refer to them as intercellular membrane pores. Virus-induced intercellular pores may contribute to extremely efficient measles contagion by promoting the rapid spread of the virus through the upper respiratory epithelium. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), while targeted for eradication, still causes about 120,000 deaths per year worldwide. The recent reemergence of measles in insufficiently vaccinated populations in Europe and North America reminds us that measles is extremely

  6. Ion implanted, radical-rich surfaces for the rapid covalent immobilization of active biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, Stacey L.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Bax, Daniel V.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Kosobrodova, Elena; Tsoutas, Kostadinos; Tran, Clara T. H.; Waterhouse, Anna; Yin, Yongbai; Nosworthy, Neil J.; McKenzie, David R.; dos Remedios, Christobal G.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2013-04-01

    Protein immobilization through the use of direct radical induced covalent coupling is described. Ions implanted in a polymer surface generate a highly cross-linked surface layer that is rich in radicals. These radicals can diffuse to the surface and covalently immobilize physically adsorbed proteins, as illustrated in a kinetic model for the covalent attachment process. Radical induced covalent coupling provides rapid covalent attachment, while also retaining native protein conformation and enabling control over the composition of the adsorbed protein layer when adsorbed from a protein mixture. Advantages of using this method for improving the biocompatibility of implanted biomedical devices and for immobilizing antibodies in protein microarrays for disease diagnosis and early detection are highlighted.

  7. Discovery, Primary, and Crystal Structures and Capacitation-related Properties of a Prostate-derived Heparin-binding Protein WGA16 from Boar Sperm*

    PubMed Central

    Garénaux, Estelle; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Tsuchiyama, Tomoyuki; Hori, Kazuki; Kanazawa, Takeru; Goshima, Ami; Chiba, Mitsuru; Yasue, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Akemi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertility through a functional maturation process called capacitation, where sperm membrane molecules are drastically remodeled. In this study, we found that a wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-reactive protein on lipid rafts, named WGA16, is removed from the sperm surface on capacitation. WGA16 is a prostate-derived seminal plasma protein that has never been reported and is deposited on the sperm surface in the male reproductive tract. Based on protein and cDNA sequences for purified WGA16, it is a homologue of human zymogen granule protein 16 (ZG16) belonging to the Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family in crystal and primary structures. A glycan array shows that WGA16 binds heparin through a basic patch containing Lys-53/Lys-73 residues but not the conventional lectin domain of the JRL family. WGA16 is glycosylated, contrary to other ZG16 members, and comparative mass spectrometry clearly shows its unique N-glycosylation profile among seminal plasma proteins. It has exposed GlcNAc and GalNAc residues without additional Gal residues. The GlcNAc/GalNAc residues can work as binding ligands for a sperm surface galactosyltransferase, which actually galactosylates WGA16 in situ in the presence of UDP-Gal. Interestingly, surface removal of WGA16 is experimentally induced by either UDP-Gal or heparin. In the crystal structure, N-glycosylated sites and a potential heparin-binding site face opposite sides. This geography of two functional sites suggest that WGA16 is deposited on the sperm surface through interaction between its N-glycans and the surface galactosyltransferase, whereas its heparin-binding domain may be involved in binding to sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the female tract, enabling removal of WGA16 from the sperm surface. PMID:25568322

  8. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  9. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  10. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis

  11. Multiple mRNA isoforms of the transcription activator protein CREB: generation by alternative splicing and specific expression in primary spermatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, S; Cole, T J; Boshart, M; Schmid, E; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    We have characterized cDNA clones representing mouse CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) mRNA isoforms. These include CREB delta and CREB alpha, of which the rat and human homologues have been previously identified. Both encode proteins with CRE-binding activity and identical transactivation potential. The additional CREB mRNA isoforms potentially encode CREB related proteins. From the structural organization of the mouse CREB gene we conclude that the multiple transcripts are generated by alternative splicing. Furthermore we show that specific CREB mRNA isoforms are expressed at a high level in the adult testis. Expression of these isoforms is induced after commencement of spermatogenesis. In situ hybridization suggests that this expression occurs predominantly in the primary spermatocytes. Comparison of the CREB gene with the recently isolated CREM (cAMP responsive element modulator) cDNAs illustrates that the two genes have arisen by gene duplication and have diverged to encode transcriptional activators and repressors of the cAMP signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:1532935

  12. MYC protein expression is associated with poor prognosis in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Gustavo; Baptista, Maria-Joao; Muñoz-Marmol, Ana-Maria; Gaafar, Ayman; Puente-Pomposo, Maria; Garcia, Olga; Marginet-Flinch, Ruth; Sanz, Carolina; Navarro, Jose-Tomas; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ariza, Aurelio; Mate, Jose-Luis

    2015-07-01

    MYC and BCL2 gene translocations and protein expression have recently demonstrated to be of prognostic significance in systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, their role in primary central nervous system DLBCL (CNS-DLBCL) prognosis has been scarcely analyzed. We studied the immunophenotype, the status of the MYC, BCL2, and BCL6 genes and the clinical features of a series of 42 CNS-DLBCL and evaluated their prognostic significance. We found high MYC protein expression in 43% of cases, and this was associated with lower overall survival (OS). Cases with concurrent expression of MYC and BCL2 showed a lower OS, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Translocations involving the MYC or BCL2 genes were not detected. The BCL6 gene was frequently translocated, but was unrelated to survival. We conclude that MYC protein expression detected by immunohistochemistry identifies a CNS-DLBCL subset with worse prognosis and may contribute to a more accurate risk stratification of CNS-DLBCL patients. PMID:26010683

  13. Interferon gamma-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and anti-IFI16 antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome: findings in serum and minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Alunno, A; Caneparo, V; Carubbi, F; Bistoni, O; Caterbi, S; Gariglio, M; Bartoloni, E; Landolfo, S; Gerli, R

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) signature, namely the overexpression of IFN-inducible genes is a crucial aspect in the pathogenesis of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). The IFN-inducible IFI16 protein, normally expressed in cell nuclei, may be overexpressed, mislocalized in the cytoplasm and secreted in the extracellular milieu in several autoimmune disorders including pSS. This leads to tolerance breaking to this self-protein and development of anti-IFI16 antibodies. The aim of this study was to identify pathogenic and clinical significance of IFI16 and anti-IFI16 autoantibodies in pSS. IFI16 and anti-IFI16 were assessed in the serum of 30 pSS patients and one-hundred healthy donors (HD) by ELISA. IFI16 was also evaluated in 5 minor salivary glands (MSGs) of pSS patients and 5 MSGs of non-pSS patients with sicca symptoms by immunohistochemistry. Normal MSGs do not constitutively express IFI16. Conversely, in pSS-MSGs a marked expression and cytoplasmic mislocalization of IFI16 by epithelial cells was observed with infiltrations in lymphocytes and peri/ intra-lesional endothelium. pSS patients display higher serum levels of both IFI16 and anti-IFI16 autoantibodies compared to HD. Our data suggest that IFI16 protein may be involved in the initiation and perpetuation of glandular inflammation occurring in pSS. PMID:26876186

  14. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  15. Radiation-induced radicals in different polymorphic modifications of D-mannitol: Structure, conformations and dosimetric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosulin, Ilya S.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2015-12-01

    The structure and conformation of radicals produced by X-ray irradiation of three polymorphic forms of D-mannitol were investigated using EPR spectroscopy. In all the cases, primary species were identified as radicals resulting from hydrogen abstraction from position 3 or 4 of the mannitol molecule. It was found that molecular packing in crystals of different polymorphic modifications had noticeable effect on the conformation of radicals observed after irradiation at room temperature and the dehydration of the primary radicals occurring at 400 K. The radicals trapped in stable modifications (β- and δ-forms) were found to be very stable at room temperature. Relatively high radical yields and remarkable stability of radicals suggest that D-mannitol can be used as an EPR dosimeter or irradiation marker.

  16. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2* = HO2+ΣRO2, R = organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PeRCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  17. Peroxy radical partitioning during the AMMA radical intercomparison exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Hernández, M. D.; Stone, D.; Brookes, D. M.; Commane, R.; Reeves, C. E.; Huntrieser, H.; Heard, D. E.; Monks, P. S.; Burrows, J. P.; Schlager, H.; Kartal, D.; Evans, M. J.; Floquet, C. F. A.; Ingham, T.; Methven, J.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Peroxy radicals were measured onboard two scientific aircrafts during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) campaign in summer 2006. This paper reports results from the flight on 16 August 2006 during which measurements of HO2 by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low pressure (LIF-FAGE) and total peroxy radicals (RO2*=HO2+ΣRO2, R= organic chain) by two similar instruments based on the peroxy radical chemical amplification (PerCA) technique were subject of a blind intercomparison. The German DLR-Falcon and the British FAAM-BAe-146 flew wing tip to wing tip for about 30 min making concurrent measurements on 2 horizontal level runs at 697 and 485 hPa over the same geographical area in Burkina Faso. A full set of supporting measurements comprising photolysis frequencies, and relevant trace gases like CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and a wider range of VOCs were collected simultaneously. Results are discussed on the basis of the characteristics and limitations of the different instruments used. Generally, no data bias are identified and the RO2* data available agree quite reasonably within the instrumental errors. The [RO2*]/[HO2] ratios, which vary between 1:1 and 3:1, as well as the peroxy radical variability, concur with variations in photolysis rates and in other potential radical precursors. Model results provide additional information about dominant radical formation and loss processes.

  18. Role of alkoxyl radicals on the fluorescein-based ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) assay.

    PubMed

    Dorta, E; Atala, E; Aspee, A; Speisky, H; Lissi, E; Lopez-Alarcon, C

    2014-10-01

    During the last decades the ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) assay has been widely employed to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant capacity of polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables and beverages. The method employs fluorescein (FLH) as target molecule and AAPH (2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride) as the source of peroxyl radicals (ROO•). The protection of FLH, afforded by antioxidants (XH), is often characterized by kinetic profiles with clear lag times (LT), which are directly associated with the stoichiometry (n) of the XH-ROO• reaction. However, even for simple phenolic compounds, the LT measured imply large n values (defined as the number of ROO• moles trapped by each antioxidant molecule) which cannot be explained by a simple reaction mechanism. Nonetheless, they can be explained when considering the formation of alkoxyl radicals (RO•) from the recombination of two AAPH-derived ROO•. In the present work, we provide kinetic data showing that, in the zero order kinetic limit of FLH consumption, there is a low reaction rate incompatible with total trapping of ROO•. Thus, the consumption of FLH should be mostly related to its reaction with RO•. In addition, we present data regarding the assumption that in competitive measurements, the LT is due to efficient trapping of the ROO• by the added phenols, leading to high n values (1.7 to 23) for mono and polyphenols. These values are not in agreement with kinetic studies of the antioxidant consumption mediated by the presence of AAPH carried out by HPLC-DAD technique, which imply a competition by RO•. The results suggest that the use of FLH as probe at low concentrations give, for several antioxidants, ORAC values mainly related to their reaction towards RO• radicals instead of primary ROO•radicals. PMID:26461359

  19. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R; Hore, P J

    2016-07-21

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of such motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast. PMID:27448908

  20. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of such motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast.

  1. Analysis of fluid in cysts accompanying various primary and metastatic brain tumours: proteins, lactate and pH.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1998-01-01

    There is a growing interest in cystic lesions of the brain. By examining the cyst content of brain tumours more insight into the pathogenesis of cyst formation has been found. In this study, 39 samples of cyst fluid of 34 patients with a cyst accompanying a brain tumour were collected and studied biochemically regarding their protein content, lactate and pH. In this study we investigated the relation between the grade of malignancy and the lactate-concentration and the discrepancy between the high levels of lactate in cysts and their alkaline environment. The results of the measurements of the concentrations of albumin, immunoglobulines (IgG, IgA, IgM) and alpha 2-macroglobulin in cysts compared to those in sera suggest that cyst formation associated with tumour is based upon a disruption of the blood-brain barrier with exudation of plasma proteins into the brain parenchyma resulting in accumulation of fluid (oedema) and eventually in formation of a cyst. There appears to be a positive relation between the grade of malignancy and the concentration of lactate in the cysts with a significant 2-fold increase in lactate concentration in malignant tumour cysts compared to the more benign tumour cysts (p < 0.001) probably on account of aerobic glycolysis with production of lactate by the tumour. The measured pH values in the cysts were above normal, resulting in a discrepancy of the high levels of lactate in the cyst with the alkaline environment and this suggests efflux of H(+)-ions by a Na/H exchange mechanism to compensate for the change of pH. PMID:9522902

  2. School Finance-Radical Departure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimple, James

    1983-01-01

    It is proposed that New Jersey assume approximately 70 percent of the cost of its public schools. Several other proposals are presented, all a radical departure from current school funding practices. (BW)

  3. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  4. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  5. The connection between selective referrals for radical cystectomy and radical prostatectomy and volume-outcome effects: an instrumental variables analysis.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Ward, Marcia M; Wehby, George L; Konety, Badrinath R

    2012-01-01

    This study delineates the roles of "selective referrals" and "practice makes perfect" in the hospital procedure volume and in-hospital mortality association for radical cystectomy and radical prostatectomy. This is a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2000-2004). All hospitalizations with primary procedure codes for radical cystectomy and radical prostatectomy were selected. The association between hospital procedure volume and in-hospital mortality was examined using generalized estimating equations and by instrumental variables approaches. There was an inverse association between hospital procedure volume and in-hospital mortality for radical cystectomy (odds ratio = 0.57; 95% confidence interval = 0.38-0.87; P < .05). Results from the 2-stages least squares regression approach suggested that receiving treatment in high-volume hospitals decreased the probability of in-hospital mortality by 0.02 points, compared with 0.01 points using the ordinary least squares regression approach. Outcomes following radical cystectomy appear to be driven by "practice makes perfect." PMID:22205768

  6. Cadmium-induced activation of stress signaling pathways, disruption of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and apoptosis in primary rat Sertoli cell-gonocyte cocultures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaozhong; Hong, Sungwoo; Faustman, Elaine M

    2008-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that has been associated with male reproductive toxicity in both humans and animal models. The underlying mechanism of this response, however, is still uncharacterized. To address this issue, we employed a recently developed and optimized three-dimensional primary Sertoli cell-gonocyte coculture system and examined the time- and dose-dependent effects of Cd on morphological alterations, cell viability, activation of stress signaling pathway proteins, and the disruption of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Our results demonstrated that Cd exposure lead to time- and dose-dependent morphological changes that are associated with the induction of apoptosis. In response to Cd, we also saw a disruption of the UPS as evaluated through the accumulation of high-molecular weight polyubiquitinated proteins (HMW-polyUb) as well as alterations in proteasome activity. Robust activation of cellular stress response, measured through the increased phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38, paralleled the accumulation of HMW-polyUb. In addition, p53, a key regulatory protein, was upregulated and underwent increased ubiquitination in response to Cd. To further characterize the role of the UPS in Cd cellular response, we compared the above changes with two classic proteasomal inhibitors, lactacystin, and MG132. The stress response and the accumulation of HWM-polyUb induced by Cd were consistent with the response seen with MG132 but not with lactacystin. In addition, Cd treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent effect on proteasome activity, but the overall Cd-induced proteasomal inhibition was unique as compared to MG132 and lactacystin. Taken together, our studies further characterize Cd-induced in vitro testicular toxicity and highlight the potential role of the UPS in this response. PMID:18463101

  7. [Alcohol and free oxygen radicals].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Manso, C F

    1993-05-01

    Oxygen free radicals may be generated during ethanol metabolization by cytochrome P450, or due to the formation of xanthine oxidase by ethanol effect on xanthine dehydrogenase. After transformation into acetaldehyde, the metabolism of this compound by xanthine oxidase or by aldehyde oxidase also generates oxygen radicals. We present the hypothesis of a vicious cycle during ethanol metabolization by aldehyde oxidase, which would amplify the process and be responsible for an increased degree of lipid peroxidation. PMID:8393265

  8. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Osorno, Laura; Ellender, Angela; Grimm, Casey; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Covalent labeling of solvent exposed amino acid residues using chemical reagents/crosslinkers followed by mass spectrometric analysis can be used to determine the solvent accessible amino acids of a protein. A variety of chemical reagents containing cleavable bonds were developed to label abundantly found lysine residues on the surface of protein. To achieve efficient separation of labeled peptides prior to mass spectrometric analysis, magnetic nanoparticles can be decorated with amino acid reactive functional groups and utilized for quick recovery of labeled peptides. [1] In this work, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) were synthesized by thermal decomposition method and coated with silica (SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs) by reverse micro emulsion approach. The Fe3O4 MNPs and SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were characterized by TEM and XRD. The SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were further coated with amine groups and conjugated to N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) ester groups via a cleavable ester bond. Fluorescence based qualitative analysis of ester linked NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs was performed to confirm the presence of NHS ester group. The active NHS ester sites on the surface of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were determined by depletion approach and found to be 694 active sites per 1 mg of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs. Free amine groups of a small peptide, ACTH (4–11) were labeled by ester linked, NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs under physiological conditions. Superparamagnetic nature of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs allowed quick and efficient magnetic separation of labeled peptides from the solution. The ester bond was further cleaved to separate labeled peptides followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The ester linked, NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs introduced a mass shift of 115.09 Da on amine groups of ACTH (4–11), which was confirmed by mass spectrometry. PMID:26217806

  9. The dopamine transporter protein gene (SLC6A3): Primary linage mapping and linkage studies in Tourette syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, J.; Kruger, S.D.; Pakstis, A.J. |

    1995-12-10

    The dopamine transporter, the molecule responsible for presynaptic reuptake of dopamine and a major site of action of psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine, is encoded by locus SLC6A3 (alias DAT1). The protein`s actions and DAT`s specific localization to dopaminergic neurons make it a candidate gene for several psychiatric illnesses. SLC6A3 has been mapped to distal chromosome 5p, using physical methods. Genetic linkage methods were used to place SLC6A3 in the genetic linkage map. Four extended pedigrees (one of which overlaps with CEPH) were typed. Linkage with Tourette syndrome (TS) was also examined. SLC6A3 showed close linkage with several markers previously mapped to distal chromosome 5p, including D5S11 (Z{sub max} = 16.0, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0.03, results from four families) and D5S678 (Z{sub max} = 7.84, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0, results from two families). Observed crossovers established that SLC6A3 is a distal marker close to D5S10 and D5S678, but these three distal markers could not be ordered. Linkage between TS and SLC6A3 could be excluded independently in two branches of a large kindred segregating TS; the lod score in a third family was also negative, but not significant. Cumulative results show a lod score of -6.2 at {theta} = 0 and of -3.9 at {theta} = 0.05 (dominant model, narrow disease definition). SLC6A3 thus maps to distal chromosome 5p by linkage analysis, in agreement with previous physical mapping data. A mutation at SLC6A3 is not causative for TS in the two large families that generated significant negative lod scores (if the parameters of our analyses were correct) and is unlikely to be causative in the family that generated a negative lod score that did not reach significance. These results do not exclude a role for the dopamine transporter in influencing risk for TS in combination with other loci. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Structural Proteins Are the Primary Viral Determinants of Non-Viraemic Transmission between Ticks whereas Non-Structural Proteins Affect Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khasnatinov, Maxim A.; Tuplin, Andrew; Gritsun, Dmitri J.; Slovak, Mirko; Kazimirova, Maria; Lickova, Martina; Havlikova, Sabina; Klempa, Boris; Gould, Ernest A.

    2016-01-01

    Over 50 million humans live in areas of potential exposure to tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). The disease exhibits an estimated 16,000 cases recorded annually over 30 European and Asian countries. Conventionally, TBEV transmission to Ixodes spp. ticks occurs whilst feeding on viraemic animals. However, an alternative mechanism of non-viraemic transmission (NVT) between infected and uninfected ticks co-feeding on the same transmission-competent host, has also been demonstrated. Here, using laboratory-bred I. ricinus ticks, we demonstrate low and high efficiency NVT for TBEV strains Vasilchenko (Vs) and Hypr, respectively. These virus strains share high sequence similarity but are classified as two TBEV subtypes. The Vs strain is a Siberian subtype, naturally associated with I. persulcatus ticks whilst the Hypr strain is a European subtype, transmitted by I. ricinus ticks. In mammalian cell culture (porcine kidney cell line PS), Vs and Hypr induce low and high cytopathic effects (cpe), respectively. Using reverse genetics, we engineered a range of viable Vs/Hypr chimaeric strains, with substituted genes. No significant differences in replication rate were detected between wild-type and chimaeric viruses in cell culture. However, the chimaeric strain Vs[Hypr str] (Hypr structural and Vs non-structural genomic regions) demonstrated high efficiency NVT in I. ricinus whereas the counterpart Hypr[Vs str] was not transmitted by NVT, indicating that the virion structural proteins largely determine TBEV NVT transmission efficiency between ticks. In contrast, in cell culture, the extent of cpe was largely determined by the non-structural region of the TBEV genome. Chimaeras with Hypr non-structural genes were more cytotoxic for PS cells when compared with Vs genome-based chimaeras. PMID:27341437

  11. Auxiliary iron-sulfur cofactors in radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Booker, Squire J

    2015-06-01

    A vast number of enzymes are now known to belong to a superfamily known as radical SAM, which all contain a [4Fe-4S] cluster ligated by three cysteine residues. The remaining, unligated, iron ion of the cluster binds in contact with the α-amino and α-carboxylate groups of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). This binding mode facilitates inner-sphere electron transfer from the reduced form of the cluster into the sulfur atom of SAM, resulting in a reductive cleavage of SAM to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. The 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical then abstracts a target substrate hydrogen atom, initiating a wide variety of radical-based transformations. A subset of radical SAM enzymes contains one or more additional iron-sulfur clusters that are required for the reactions they catalyze. However, outside of a subset of sulfur insertion reactions, very little is known about the roles of these additional clusters. This review will highlight the most recent advances in the identification and characterization of radical SAM enzymes that harbor auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25597998

  12. A Novel Mutation in the type Iα Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A (PRKAR1A) in a Cushing's Syndrome Patient with Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Ryohei; Tamba, Sachiko; Yamada, Yuya; Okita, Tomonori; Kawachi, Yusuke; Mori, Reiko; Kyo, Mitsuaki; Saisho, Kenji; Kuroda, Yohei; Yamamoto, Koji; Furuya, Akiko; Mukai, Tokuo; Maekawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with Cushing's syndrome due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia with multiple nodules. Computed tomography scan results were atypical demonstrating an enlargement of the bilateral adrenal glands harboring multiple small nodules, but the lesion was clinically diagnosed to be primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) based on both endocrinological test results and his family history. We performed bilateral adrenalectomy and confirmed the diagnosis histologically. An analysis of the patient and his mother's genomic DNA identified a novel mutation in the type Iα regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A) gene; p.E17X (c.49G>T). This confirmed the diagnosis of PPNAD which is associated with Carney Complex. PMID:27580546

  13. Induction of bone formation in biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by bone morphogenetic protein-2 and primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Strobel, L A; Rath, S N; Maier, A K; Beier, J P; Arkudas, A; Greil, P; Horch, R E; Kneser, U

    2014-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies mainly depend on porous scaffold materials. In this study, novel biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) matrices were generated by 3D-printing. High porosity was achieved by starch consolidation. This study aimed to characterise the porous BCP-scaffold properties and interactions of osteogenic cells and growth factors under in vivo conditions. Five differently treated constructs were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic rats: plain BCP constructs (group A), constructs pre-treated with BMP-2 (group B; 1.6 µg BMP-2 per scaffold), seeded with primary osteoblasts (OB) (group C), seeded with OB and BMP-2 (group D) and constructs seeded with OB and pre-cultivated in a flow bioreactor for 6 weeks (group E). After 2, 4 and 6 weeks, specimens were explanted and subjected to histological and molecular biological analyses. Explanted scaffolds were invaded by fibrovascular tissue without significant foreign body reactions. Morphometric analysis demonstrated significantly increased bone formation in samples from group D (OB + BMP-2) compared to all other groups. Samples from groups B-E displayed significant mRNA expression of bone-specific genes after 6 weeks. Pre-cultivation in the flow bioreactor (group E) induced bone formation comparable with group B. In this study, differences in bone distribution between samples with BMP-2 or osteoblasts could be observed. In conclusion, combination of osteoblasts and BMP-2 synergistically enhanced bone formation in novel ceramic scaffolds. These results provide the basis for further experiments in orthotopic defect models with a focus on future applications in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:22740314

  14. Nonviral in situ green fluorescent protein labeling and culture of primary, adult human hair follicle epithelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Stephan; Koop, Norbert; Kloepper, Jennifer E; Fässler, Reinhard; Paus, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    In this article we show that cloning of the human K15 promoter before a green fluorescence protein (GFP)/geneticin-resistance cassette and transfection of microdissected, organ-cultured adult human scalp hair follicles generates specific K15 promoter-driven GFP expression in their stem cell-rich bulge region. K15-GFP+ cells can be visualized in situ by GFP fluorescence and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy. Vital K15-GFP+ progenitor cells can then be selected by using the criteria of their green fluorescence, adhesion to collagen type IV and fibronectin, and geneticin resistance. Propagated K15-GFP+ cells express epithelial progenitor markers, show the expected differential gene expression profile of human bulge epithelium, and form holoclones. This application of nonretroviral, K15 promoter-driven, GFP labeling to adult human hair follicles facilitates the characterization and manipulation of human epithelial stem cells, both in situ and in vitro, and should be transferable to other complex human tissues. PMID:19750535

  15. Identification of a 67 kDa protein that binds specifically to the pre-rRNA primary processing site in a higher plant.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, M; Lahmy, S

    1995-12-25

    In radish pre-rRNA primary processing cleavage occurs at a UUUUCGCGC element (motif P) mapped in the 5'-external transcribed spacer (Delcasso-Tremousaygue et al., 1988). Significantly, motif P is part of a cluster of homologous elements including three UUUUCCGG elements (motifs A123) and a single UUUUGCCCC element (motif B). Here we used the EMSA to identify in radish extracts an RNA-binding activity, NF C, that specifically interacts with the pre-rRNA A123BP sequence. Using different RNA probes and competitors we show that NF C recognises a 38 base RNA sequence including the 3'-end of motif A3 and motifs B and P. NF C binds to poly U, but not to poly A, poly C or poly G. Therefore we used poly (U) Sepharose chromatography as a final step to obtain pure NF C fractions. These, analysed by SDS-PAGE, revealed two major polypeptides of 67 and 60 kDa. According to UV cross-linking analysis the 67 kDa polypeptide corresponds to NF C activity, while the 60 kDa species is a proteolysed form of this protein. We also showed that NF C is enriched in nuclear extracts. Based on its stringent RNA substrate specificity and its nuclear localisation we propose that NF C is involved in pre-rRNA primary processing in plants. PMID:8559652

  16. Correlation of contrast angiography and histologic pattern with gallium uptake in primary liver-cell carcinoma: noncorrelation with alpha-feto protein. Concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, A.D.; Richmond, R.; Juttner, H.; Siemsen, J.K.; Heffelinger, M.J.; Fink, E.

    1980-04-01

    Seventeen patients with histologically proven primary liver-cell carcinoma were evaluated by a technetium-99m sulfur colloid liver scan as well as the gallium-67 citrate. Twelve of the 17 patients (71%) showed gallium uptake in the tumor. Eleven of the 12 patients (92%) with a moderately or well-differentiated tumor showed increased gallium activity in the abnormality seen on the sulfur colloid scan. The exception in this group was a tumor with a large central area of necrosis. Four of five patients with a poorly differentiated or atypical carcinoma showed absence of gallium activity. Only six of 11 patients with a hypervascular tumor showed a marked increase in gallium uptake. Correlation of gallium with alpha-feto protein, and with hepatitis antigen A, was poor. We conclude that gallium uptake in primary liver-cell carcinoma will be significant when the tumor shows a moderately to well-differentiated histologic pattern, unless significant necrosis is present. If the blood supply is markedly impaired, gallium uptake is reduced. However, a hypervascular blood supply does not necessarily ensure increased gallium avidity.

  17. Skeletal response to diet with soya bean seeds used as primary source of protein in growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olkowski, B; Charuta, A; Radzki, R; Bieńko, M; Toczko, R

    2016-08-01

    The study was conducted using 120 commercial broiler chicks (Ross 308) randomly allocated to two experimental groups. The experimental diets, differing only in protein source, either solvent-extracted soya bean meal (SBM) or traditional (non-genetically modified) full-fat soya bean seeds (FFS), were prepared using practical corn-based formulation designed to meet nutritional requirements of broilers. Performance parameters were monitored weekly. Also, the subjects were evaluated daily for overt changes in skeletal anatomy and gait physiology. Randomly selected chickens from each group (seven males and seven females) were euthanized at 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks of age, and bone specimens were collected for further study. Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined in tibiotarsal bones. Broilers fed FFS diet showed retarded growth rate and decreased feed intake (both p < 0.001). Both BMD and BMC parameters were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in bones of chickens from the FFS group in comparison with the SBM group. The chickens fed the FFS diet showed higher incidence of skeletal pathology including angular deformities and torticollis (both p < 0.01). Of note, cases of torticollis were observed only in FFS group. In many cases, skeletal abnormalities resulted in considerable changes in gait pattern, and in some instances, the pathology of leg bones was so advanced that the affected individuals were unable to walk, but this deformity was not seen in SBM group. From this study, it can be inferred that raw soya beans contain factors that have some specific detrimental effects on skeletal system of chickens. PMID:26852739

  18. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  19. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  20. Wilms' tumour-suppressor protein isoforms have opposite effects on Igf2 expression in primary embryonic cells, independently of p53 genotype.

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, A.; Caricasole, A.; Graham, C. F.; Ward, A.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein has been proposed as a modulator of the Wilms' tumour-suppressor protein (WT1) transcriptional regulation activity. To investigate this putative p53 role, the promoter P3 of the mouse insulin-like growth factor II gene (Igf2) was used as a target for WT1 regulation in primary cell cultures derived from p53 wild-type (p53+/+) and knock-out (p53-/-) mouse embryos. In these cells, the WT1 transcriptional activity was observed to be independent of p53 genotype. Furthermore, the two WT1 zinc finger (ZF) isoforms were for the first time found to have opposite effects on gene expression from a single promoter in the same cell type, WT1[-KTS] activating Igf2 P3, whereas WT1[+KTS] repressed its activity. In addition, we have mapped the WT1 binding sites and investigated the effect on WT1 binding activity of individual ZF deletions and Denys-Drash syndrome point mutations to this target. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9460996

  1. Primary cilia membrane assembly is initiated by Rab11 and transport protein particle II (TRAPPII) complex-dependent trafficking of Rabin8 to the centrosome

    PubMed Central

    Westlake, Christopher J.; Baye, Lisa M.; Nachury, Maxence V.; Wright, Kevin J.; Ervin, Karen E.; Phu, Lilian; Chalouni, Cecile; Beck, John S.; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Slusarski, Diane C.; Sheffield, Val C.; Scheller, Richard H.; Jackson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory and signaling pathways are exquisitely organized in primary cilia. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) patients have compromised cilia and signaling. BBS proteins form the BBSome, which binds Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activating the Rab8 GTPase, required for ciliary assembly. We now describe serum-regulated upstream vesicular transport events leading to centrosomal Rab8 activation and ciliary membrane formation. Using live microscopy imaging, we show that upon serum withdrawal Rab8 is observed to assemble the ciliary membrane in ∼100 min. Rab8-dependent ciliary assembly is initiated by the relocalization of Rabin8 to Rab11-positive vesicles that are transported to the centrosome. After ciliogenesis, Rab8 ciliary transport is strongly reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with decreased Rabin8 centrosomal accumulation. Rab11-GTP associates with the Rabin8 COOH-terminal region and is required for Rabin8 preciliary membrane trafficking to the centrosome and for ciliogenesis. Using zebrafish as a model organism, we show that Rabin8 and Rab11 are associated with the BBS pathway. Finally, using tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we determined that the transport protein particle (TRAPP) II complex associates with the Rabin8 NH2-terminal domain and show that TRAPP II subunits colocalize with centrosomal Rabin8 and are required for Rabin8 preciliary targeting and ciliogenesis. PMID:21273506

  2. Mechanisms of radical formation in beef and chicken meat during high pressure processing evaluated by electron spin resonance detection and the addition of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Andersen, Mogens L; Orlien, Vibeke

    2014-05-01

    The generation of radicals during high pressure (HP) processing of beef loin and chicken breast was studied by spin trapping and electron spin resonance detection. The pressurization resulted in a higher level of spin adducts in the beef loin than in the chicken breast. It was shown that radicals were formed in the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions as well as in the non-soluble protein fraction due to the HP treatment, indicating that other radicals than iron-derived radicals were formed, and most likely protein-derived radicals. The addition of iron as well as the natural antioxidants caffeic acid, rosemary extract, and ascorbic acid resulted in an increased formation of radicals during the HP treatment, whereas addition of ethylendiamintetraacetic acid (EDTA) reduced the radical formation. This suggests that iron-species (protein-bound or free) catalyses the formation of radicals when meat systems are submitted to HP. PMID:24360471

  3. Primary Cutaneous Follicle Center Lymphomas Expressing BCL2 Protein Frequently Harbor BCL2 Gene Break and May Present 1p36 Deletion: A Study of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Vanessa; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Baia, Maryse; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Helene; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The classification of cutaneous follicular lymphoma (CFL) into primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) or secondary cutaneous follicular lymphoma (SCFL) is challenging. SCFL is suspected when tumor cells express BCL2 protein, reflecting a BCL2 translocation. However, BCL2 expression is difficult to assess in CFLs because of numerous BCL2+ reactive T cells. To investigate these issues and to further characterize PCFCL, we studied a series of 25 CFLs without any extracutaneous disease at diagnosis, selected on the basis of BCL2 protein expression using 2 BCL2 antibodies (clones 124 and E17) and BOB1/BCL2 double immunostaining. All cases were studied using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization with BCL2, BCL6, IGH, IGK, IGL breakapart, IGH-BCL2 fusion, and 1p36/1q25 dual-color probes. Nineteen CFLs were BCL2 positive, and 6 were negative. After a medium follow-up of 24 (6 to 96) months, 5 cases were reclassified as SCFL and were excluded from a part of our analyses. Among BCL2+ PCFCLs, 60% (9/15) demonstrated a BCL2 break. BCL2-break-positive cases had a tendency to occur in the head and neck and showed the classical phenotype of nodal follicular lymphoma (CD10+, BCL6+, BCL2+, STMN+) compared with BCL2-break-negative PCFCLs. Del 1p36 was observed in 1 PCFCL. No significant clinical differences were observed between BCL2+ or BCL2- PCFCL. In conclusion, we show that a subset of PCFCLs harbor similar genetic alterations, as observed in nodal follicular lymphomas, including BCL2 breaks and 1p36 deletion. As BCL2 protein expression is usually associated with the presence of a BCL2 translocation, fluorescence in situ hybridization should be performed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26658664

  4. CD4+ primary T cells expressing HCV-core protein upregulate Foxp3 and IL-10, suppressing CD4 and CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ponce, Cecilia; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Aguado, Enrique; Garcia-Cozar, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive T cell responses are critical for controlling HCV infection. While there is clinical evidence of a relevant role for regulatory T cells in chronic HCV-infected patients, based on their increased number and function; mechanisms underlying such a phenomena are still poorly understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that proteins from Hepatitis C virus can suppress host immune responses. We and others have shown that HCV is present in CD4+ lymphocytes from chronically infected patients and that HCV-core protein induces a state of unresponsiveness in the CD4+ tumor cell line Jurkat. Here we show that CD4+ primary T cells lentivirally transduced with HCV-core, not only acquire an anergic phenotype but also inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation of bystander CD4+ or CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 stimulation. Core-transduced CD4+ T cells show a phenotype characterized by an increased basal secretion of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, a decreased IFN-γ production upon stimulation, as well as expression of regulatory T cell markers, CTLA-4, and Foxp3. A significant induction of CD4+CD25+CD127(low)PD-1(high)TIM-3(high) regulatory T cells with an exhausted phenotype was also observed. Moreover, CCR7 expression decreased in HCV-core expressing CD4+ T cells explaining their sequestration in inflamed tissues such as the infected liver. This work provides a new perspective on de novo generation of regulatory CD4+ T cells in the periphery, induced by the expression of a single viral protein. PMID:24465502

  5. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed between C- and A-cells. The protein expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was hardly detected in both cells, although a detectable amount of its mRNA was observed. Cyclosporine A, a broad-spectrum inhibitor for ABC transporters, and MK571, a MRP inhibitor, but not PGP-4008, a P-gp specific inhibitor, potently sensitized both cells to As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity. These results suggest that AQP9 and MRP2 are involved in controlling arsenic accumulation in these normal cells, which then contribute to differential sensitivity to As{sup III} cytotoxicity between these cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examination of effect of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion

  6. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  7. Comparison of abnormal isoform of prion protein in prion-infected cell lines and primary-cultured neurons by PrPSc-specific immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Misaki; Fujiwara, Ai; Suzuki, Akio; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hasebe, Rie; Masujin, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-08-01

    We established abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc)-specific double immunostaining using mAb 132, which recognizes aa 119-127 of the PrP molecule, and novel PrPSc-specific mAb 8D5, which recognizes the N-terminal region of the PrP molecule. Using the PrPSc-specific double immunostaining, we analysed PrPSc in immortalized neuronal cell lines and primary cerebral-neuronal cultures infected with prions. The PrPSc-specific double immunostaining showed the existence of PrPSc positive for both mAbs 132 and 8D5, as well as those positive only for either mAb 132 or mAb 8D5. This indicated that double immunostaining detects a greater number of PrPSc species than single immunostaining. Double immunostaining revealed cell-type-dependent differences in PrPSc staining patterns. In the 22 L prion strain-infected Neuro2a (N2a)-3 cells, a subclone of N2a neuroblastoma cell line, or GT1-7, a subclone of the GT1 hypothalamic neuronal cell line, granular PrPSc stains were observed at the perinuclear regions and cytoplasm, whereas unique string-like PrPSc stains were predominantly observed on the surface of the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons. Only 14 % of PrPSc in the 22 L strain-infected N2a-3 cells were positive for mAb 8D5, indicating that most of the PrPSc in N2a-3 lack the N-terminal portion. In contrast, nearly half PrPSc detected in the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons were positive for mAb 8D5, suggesting the abundance of full-length PrPSc that possesses the N-terminal portion of PrP. Further analysis of prion-infected primary neurons using PrPSc-specific immunostaining will reveal the neuron-specific mechanism for prion propagation. PMID:27267758

  8. Mechanically Stabilized Tetrathiafulvalene Radical Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Coskun, Ali; Spruell, Jason M.; Barin, Gokhan; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Forgan, Ross S.; Colvin, Michael T.; Carmieli, Raanan; Benitez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Friedman, Douglas C.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Goddard, William A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Two donor-acceptor [3]catenanes—composed of a tetracationic molecular square, cyclobis(paraquat-4,4'-biphenylene), as the π-electron deficient ring and either two tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP) containing macrocycles or two TTF-butadiyne-containing macrocycles as the π-electron rich components—have been investigated in order to study their ability to form TTF radical dimers. It has been proven that the mechanically interlocked nature of the [3]catenanes facilitates the formation of the TTF radical dimers under redox control, allowing an investigation to be performed on these intermolecular interactions in a so-called “molecular flask” under ambient conditions in considerable detail. In addition, it has also been shown that the stability of the TTF radical-cation dimers can be tuned by varying the secondary binding motifs in the [3]catenanes. By replacing the DNP station with a butadiyne group, the distribution of the TTF radical-cation dimer can be changed from 60% to 100%. These findings have been established by several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, spectroelectrochemistry and UV-vis-NIR and EPR spectroscopies, as well as with X-ray diffraction analysis which has provided a range of solid-state crystal structures. The experimental data are also supported by high-level DFT calculations. The results contribute significantly to our fundamental understanding of the interactions within the TTF radical dimers.

  9. Formation of Reactive Sulfite-Derived Free Radicals by the Activation of Human Neutrophils: An ESR Study

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Garantziotis, Stavros; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) on human neutrophils and the ability of these immune cells to produce reactive free radicals due to (bi)sulfite oxidation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant heme protein in neutrophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma and inflammatory disorders. In the present study sulfite (•SO3−) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals are characterized with the ESR spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in the reaction of (bi)sulfite oxidation by human MPO and human neutrophils via sulfite radical chain reaction chemistry. After treatment with (bi)sulfite, PMA-stimulated neutrophils produced DMPO-sulfite anion radical, -superoxide, and -hydroxyl radical adducts. The latter adduct probably resulted, in part, from the conversion of DMPO-sulfate to DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of the radical adduct. This anion radical (SO4•−) is highly reactive and, presumably, can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. Therefore, we propose that the potential toxicity of (bi)sulfite during pulmonary inflammation or lung-associated diseases such as asthma may be related to free radical formation. PMID:22326772

  10. Missing Peroxy Radical Sources Within a Rural Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (approximately 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  11. Missing peroxy radical sources within a rural forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (~ 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  12. Carnivorous pitcher plant uses free radicals in the digestion of prey.

    PubMed

    Chia, Tet Fatt; Aung, Hnin Hnin; Osipov, Anatoly N; Goh, Ngoh Khang; Chia, Lian Sai

    2004-01-01

    A study of the involvement of free oxygen radicals in trapping and digestion of insects by carnivorous plants was the main goal of the present investigation. We showed that the generation of oxygen free radicals by pitcher fluid of Nepenthes is the first step of the digestion process, as seen by EPR spin trapping assay and gel-electrophoresis. The EPR spectrum of N. gracilis fluid in the presence of DMPO spin trap showed the superposition of the hydroxyl radical spin adduct signal and of the ascorbyl radical signal. Catalase addition decreased the generation of hydroxyl radicals showing that hydroxyl radicals are generated from hydrogen peroxide, which can be derived from superoxide radicals. Gel-electrophoresis data showed that myosin, an abundant protein component of insects, can be rapidly broken down by free radicals and protease inhibitors do not inhibit this process. Addition of myoglobin to the pitcher plant fluid decreased the concentration of detectable radicals. Based on these observations, we conclude that oxygen free radicals produced by the pitcher plant aid in the digestion of the insect prey. PMID:15606978

  13. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  14. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  15. Free radical decay in adamantane

    SciTech Connect

    Tegowski, A.T.; Pratt, D.W.

    1984-01-11

    Kinetic electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques have been used to characterize the decay behavior of the ''stable'' free radical 2-cyclohexanonyl in the plastic crystal phase f an adamantane matrix over the temperature range 257-313 K. Typical plots of the EPR signal intensity as a function of time are biexponential in nature, suggesting the existence of at least two channels for free radical decay. The activation parameters for both processes have been measured in both protonated and deuterated samples. A comparison of these results with those in other systems suggests that the host does, as expected, considerably reduce the pre-exponential factors for decay of the radical by bimolecular processes but has relatively little influence on the corresponding activation energies. 3 figures.

  16. Prognostic Significance of CREB-Binding Protein and CD81 Expression in Primary High Grade Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Bladder Cancer Using Antibody Microarray.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Shin; Kim, Joo Heon; Lee, Ji-Su; Yun, Seok Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae; Ahn, Hanjong; Park, Jinsung

    2015-01-01

    High-grade (HG) bladder cancers (BCs) are genetically unstable and have an unpredictable course. The identification of prognostic factors in HG non-muscle invasive BC (NMIBC) is crucial for improving patients' quality of life and preventing BC-specific mortality. Here, we used an antibody microarray (AbM) to identify novel candidate biomarkers in primary HG NMIBC and validated the prognostic significance of the candidate biomarkers. Three pairs of tissue samples from primary HG NMIBC and normal urothelium were analyzed using an AbM kit containing 656 antibodies, and differentially expressed proteins were identified. Among the 42 upregulated and 14 downregulated proteins with statistical significance in BC tissues, CREB-binding protein and CD81 were selected as representative upregulated and downregulated candidate biomarkers, respectively. We then validated the expression of these candidate biomarkers in primary human urothelial cells and BC cell lines by western blotting and immunofluorescence assays, and the results were consistent with the AbM expression profiles. Additionally, Kaplan-Meier survival using immunohistochemical data from an independent primary HG NMIBC cohort comprising 113 patients showed that expression of the 2 biomarkers was significantly associated with recurrence-free and progression-free survival. In multivariate analysis, the 2 biomarkers remained significant predictors for recurrence-free survival. Taken together, our findings suggest that expression of CREB-binding protein and CD81 in BC tissue specimens may have prognostic value in patients with primary HG NMIBC. PMID:25915404

  17. Formation and Implications of Alpha-Synuclein Radical in Maneb- and Paraquat-Induced Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Leinisch, Fabian; Kadiiska, Maria B; Corbett, Jean; Mason, Ronald P

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and motor deficits. Alpha-synuclein-containing aggregates represent a feature of a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including PD; however, the mechanism that initiates and promotes intraneuronal alpha-synuclein aggregation remains unknown. We hypothesized protein radical formation as an initiating mechanism for alpha-synuclein aggregation. Therefore, we used the highly sensitive immuno-spin trapping technique to investigate protein radical formation as a possible mechanism of alpha-synuclein aggregation as well as to investigate the source of protein radical formation in the midbrains of Maneb- and paraquat-coexposed mice. Coexposure to Maneb and paraquat for 6 weeks resulted in active microgliosis, NADPH oxidase activation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induction, which culminated in protein radical formation in the midbrains of mice. Results obtained with immuno-spin trapping and immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed formation of alpha-synuclein radicals in dopaminergic neurons of exposed mice. Free radical formation requires NADPH oxidase and iNOS, as indicated by decreased protein radical formation in knockout mice (P47phox(-/-) and iNOS(-/-)) and in mice treated with inhibitors such as FeTPPS (a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst), 1400 W (an iNOS inhibitor), or apocynin (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). Concurrence of protein radical formation with dopaminergic neuronal death indicated a link between protein radicals and disease progression. Taken together, these results show for the first time the formation and detection of the alpha-synuclein radical and suggest that NADPH oxidase and iNOS play roles in peroxynitrite-mediated protein radical formation and subsequent neuronal death in the midbrains of Maneb- and paraquat-coexposed mice. PMID:25952542

  18. Radical SAM enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of purine-based natural products

    PubMed Central

    Bandarian, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a widely distributed group of iron-sulfur containing proteins that exploit the reactivity of the high energy intermediate, 5’-deoxyadenosyl radical, which is produced by reductive cleavage of SAM, to carry-out complex radical-mediated transformations. The reactions catalyzed by radical SAM enzymes range from simple group migrations to complex reactions in protein and RNA modification. This review will highlight three radical SAM enzymes that catalyze reactions involving modified guanosines in the biosynthesis pathways of the hypermodified tRNA base wybutosine; secondary metabolites of 7-deazapurine structure, including the hypermodified tRNA base queuosine; and the redox cofactor F420. PMID:22902275

  19. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  20. Orientation resolving dipolar high-field EPR spectroscopy on disordered solids: II. Structure of spin-correlated radical pairs in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Savitsky, A; Niklas, J; Golbeck, J H; Möbius, K; Lubitz, W

    2013-09-26

    The distance and relative orientation of functional groups within protein domains and their changes during chemical reactions determine the efficiency of biological processes. In this work on electron transfer proteins, we report the results of orientation resolving dipolar high-field EPR spectroscopy on the charge-separated state P700•+ A1•– (P700, primary electron donor; A1, phylloquinone electron acceptor) in Photosystem I (PS I). Pulsed high-field EPR spectroscopy at W-band (95 GHz, 3.4 T) with extensions to PELDOR (pulsed electron–electron double resonance) and RIDME (relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement) was utilized to obtain the parameters describing the three-dimensional structure of the laser-flash-induced transient radical pair P700•+ A1•– in a frozen solution of deuterated PS I from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is performing oxygenic photosynthesis. The measured distances and relative orientations of the weakly coupled radical ions in the radical pair P700•+ A1•– are compared with previously reported geometries and with those of the precursor cofactors P700 and A1 known from X-ray crystallography. Cyclic electron transfer was found to proceed exclusively via the A-branch of the cofactor chain of PS I at cryogenic temperature. The position and orientation of the reduced phylloquinone coincide with those of the precursor, revealing that no substantial orientational changes of the phylloquinone molecule upon charge separation occur. Several distinct orientations of the P700•+ g-tensor axes with respect to the molecular frame of the primary donor were found experimentally, which we explain by several conformational substates of the P700•+ radical structure having slightly different electron spin density distributions. PMID:23642108

  1. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macro­molecular crystallography. PMID:22751666

  2. Study of radical pairs generated by photoreduction of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid with thymine by Fourier transform electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geimer, J.; Beckert, D.

    1998-05-01

    Using laser photolysis at 308 nm and FT-EPR, the triplet sensitized electron transfer from thymine to 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate in aqueous solution was studied. The anthraquinone radical anion and the deprotonated thymine-1-yl radical are spin-polarized by the CIDEP triplet mechanism and radical pair mechanism. The structure of the anthraquinone radical anion is strongly influenced by the pH of the solution. In weak acidic solution the radical anion dominates whereas the p K of the radical protonation was determined to be 3.2. The deprotonated thymine-1-yl radical shows two different radical pair polarization patterns which are distinguished by the phase of the polarization. This unusual behavior can be attributed to two different states in the primary radical pair.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yanlan; Wang, Juan; Wang, Tao; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Su, Jin; Yang, Yunyi; Zhou, Xi; Ma, Hailin; He, Bin; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent literature reports that radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy has comparable progression-free survival and overall survival compared to radical radiotherapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB cervical cancer. Now, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness (CE) of these two treatment regimens. Primary and secondary outcome measures A decision-tree model was constructed comparing CE between treatment arms using the published studies for overall survival rates and treatment-related toxicity rates for 5 years. The cost data were obtained from the hospital system of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University. Effectiveness was measured as quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Treatment arms were compared with regard to costs and life expectancy using incremental CE ratio, and the results were presented using costs per QALY. Results The mean cost was $10,872 for radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy versus $5,702 for radical radiotherapy. The incremental CE ratio for surgery-based treatment compared to radiotherapy-based treatment was –$76,453 per QALY. Conclusion Radical radiotherapy would be a cost-effective method for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer and would be favored in settings where resources are limited. PMID:26855584

  4. Paramagnetic Intermediates Generated by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus A [4Fe–4S]+ cluster reduces a bound S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) molecule, cleaving it into methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•). This step initiates the varied chemistry catalyzed by each of the so-called radical SAM enzymes. The strongly oxidizing 5′-dA• is quenched by abstracting a H-atom from a target species. In some cases, this species is an exogenous molecule of substrate, for example, l-tyrosine in the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturase, HydG. In other cases, the target is a proteinaceous residue as in all the glycyl radical forming enzymes. The generation of this initial radical species and the subsequent chemistry involving downstream radical intermediates is meticulously controlled by the enzyme so as to prevent unwanted reactions. But the manner in which this control is exerted is unknown. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable tool used to gain insight into these mechanisms. In this Account, we summarize efforts to trap such radical intermediates in radical SAM enzymes and highlight four examples in which EPR spectroscopic results have shed significant light on the corresponding mechanism. For lysine 2,3-aminomutase, nearly each possible intermediate, from an analogue of the initial 5′-dA• to the product radical l-β-lysine, has been explored. A paramagnetic intermediate observed in biotin synthase is shown to involve an auxiliary [FeS] cluster whose bridging sulfide is a co-substrate for the final step in the biosynthesis of vitamin B7. In HydG, the l-tyrosine substrate is converted in unprecedented fashion to a 4-oxidobenzyl radical on the way to generating CO and CN– ligands for the [FeFe] cluster of hydrogenase. And finally, EPR has confirmed a mechanistic proposal for the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr, which methylates the unactivated sp2-hybridized C8-carbon of an adenosine base of 23S ribosomal RNA. These four systems provide just a brief survey of the ever-growing set

  5. Free radical functionalization of surfaces to prevent adverse responses to biomedical devices

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Bax, Daniel V.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Yin, Yongbai; Nosworthy, Neil J.; Fisher, Keith; Waterhouse, Anna; Weiss, Anthony S.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; McKenzie, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Immobilizing a protein, that is fully compatible with the patient, on the surface of a biomedical device should make it possible to avoid adverse responses such as inflammation, rejection, or excessive fibrosis. A surface that strongly binds and does not denature the compatible protein is required. Hydrophilic surfaces do not induce denaturation of immobilized protein but exhibit a low binding affinity for protein. Here, we describe an energetic ion-assisted plasma process that can make any surface hydrophilic and at the same time enable it to covalently immobilize functional biological molecules. We show that the modification creates free radicals that migrate to the surface from a reservoir beneath. When they reach the surface, the radicals form covalent bonds with biomolecules. The kinetics and number densities of protein molecules in solution and free radicals in the reservoir control the time required to form a full protein monolayer that is covalently bound. The shelf life of the covalent binding capability is governed by the initial density of free radicals and the depth of the reservoir. We show that the high reactivity of the radicals renders the binding universal across all biological macromolecules. Because the free radical reservoir can be created on any solid material, this approach can be used in medical applications ranging from cardiovascular stents to heart-lung machines. PMID:21844370

  6. The Asian-American E6 Variant Protein of Human Papillomavirus 16 Alone Is Sufficient To Promote Immortalization, Transformation, and Migration of Primary Human Foreskin Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Niccoli, Sarah; Abraham, Suraj; Richard, Christina

    2012-01-01

    We examined how well the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncogene can function in the absence of the E7 oncogene during the carcinogenic process in human keratinocytes using a common HPV variant strongly associated with cervical cancer: the Asian-American E6 variant (AAE6). This E6 variant is 20 times more frequently detected in cervical cancer than the prototype European E6 variant, as evidenced by independent epidemiological data. Using cell culture and cell-based functional assays, we assessed how this variant can perform crucial carcinogenesis steps compared to the prototype E6 variant. The ability to immortalize and transform primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFKs) to acquire resilient phenotypes and the ability to promote cell migration were evaluated. The immortalization capability was assayed based on population doublings, number of passages, surpassing mortality stages 1 and 2, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, and the ability to overcome G1 arrest via p53 degradation. Transformation and migration efficiency were analyzed using a combination of functional cell-based assays. We observed that either AAE6 or prototype E6 proteins alone were sufficient to immortalize PHFKs, although AAE6 was more potent in doing so. The AAE6 variant protein alone pushed PHFKs through transformation and significantly increased their migration ability over that of the E6 prototype. Our findings are in line with epidemiological data that the AA variant of HPV16 confers an increased risk over the European prototype for cervical cancer, as evidenced by a superior immortalization, transformation, and metastatic potential. PMID:22951839

  7. Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 2, LTBP2, cause primary congenital glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Narooie-Nejad, Mehrnaz; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Fazlali, Zeinab; Rezaei Kanavi, Mozhgan; Nilforushan, Naveed; Yazdani, Shahin; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Suri, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2009-10-15

    Glaucoma is a heterogeneous group of optic neuropathies that manifests by optic nerve head cupping or degeneration of the optic nerve, resulting in a specific pattern of visual field loss. Glaucoma leads to blindness if left untreated, and is considered the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. The subgroup primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is characterized by an anatomical defect in the trabecular meshwork, and age at onset in the neonatal or infantile period. It is the most severe form of glaucoma. CYP1B1 was the first gene genetically linked to PCG, and CYP1B1 mutations are the cause of disease in 20-100% of patients in different populations. Here, we report that LTBP2 encoding latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein 2 is a PCG causing gene, confirming results recently reported. A disease-associated locus on chromosome 14 was identified by performing whole genome autozygosity mapping in Iranian PCG families using high density single nucleotide polymorphism chips, and two disease-segregating loss of function mutations in LTBP2, p.Ser472fsX3 and p.Tyr1793fsX55, were observed in two families while sequencing candidate genes in the locus. The p.Tyr1793fsX55 mutation affects an amino acid close to the C-terminal of the encoded protein. Subsequently, LTBP2 expression was shown in human eyes, including the trabecular meshwork and ciliary processes that are thought to be relevant to the etiology of PCG. PMID:19656777

  8. Cow's milk protein sensitivity assessed by the mucosal patch technique is related to irritable bowel syndrome in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lidén, M; Kristjánsson, G; Valtysdottir, S; Venge, P; Hällgren, R

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) are reported to have a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms partly attributed to an overrepresentation of celiac disease. We have observed that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms are frequent complaints in this patient group. Allergic manifestations to various drugs are also common in pSS. A role of food allergy in IBS has been proposed. Objective This study is aimed at evaluating the mucosal response to rectal challenge with cow's milk protein (CM) in patients with pSS and relates possible CM reactivity to their intestinal symptoms. Methods A rectal challenge with CM was performed in 21 patients with pSS and 18 healthy controls. Fifteen hours after challenge the mucosal production of nitric oxide (NO) and the release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) as signs of mucosal inflammatory reaction were measured using the mucosal patch technique. Results Eight out of 21 patients with pSS had a definite increase of mucosal NO synthesis and the luminal release of MPO after rectal CM challenge. This sign of milk sensitivity was not linked to IgG/IgA antibodies to milk proteins. The symptoms for IBS according to Rome III criteria were fulfilled in 13 patients. All patients who were CM sensitive suffered from IBS. In a small open study, patients reactive to CM reported an improvement of intestinal symptoms on a CM-free diet. Conclusion A rectal mucosal inflammatory response after CM challenge is seen in 38% of patients with pSS as a sign of CM sensitivity. IBS-like symptoms were common in pSS, linked to CM sensitivity. PMID:18498540

  9. Free radicals, antioxidants and functional foods: Impact on human health

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, V.; Patil, A.; Phatak, A.; Chandra, N.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of attention toward the field of free radical chemistry. Free radicals reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are generated by our body by various endogenous systems, exposure to different physiochemical conditions or pathological states. A balance between free radicals and antioxidants is necessary for proper physiological function. If free radicals overwhelm the body's ability to regulate them, a condition known as oxidative stress ensues. Free radicals thus adversely alter lipids, proteins, and DNA and trigger a number of human diseases. Hence application of external source of antioxidants can assist in coping this oxidative stress. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene and butylated hydroxyanisole have recently been reported to be dangerous for human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with antioxidative activity has been intensified in recent years. The present review provides a brief overview on oxidative stress mediated cellular damages and role of dietary antioxidants as functional foods in the management of human diseases. PMID:22228951

  10. Fine-tuning of a radical-based reaction by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase.

    PubMed

    Sicoli, Giuseppe; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Zeppieri, Laura; Amara, Patricia; Martin, Lydie; Barra, Anne-Laure; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Gambarelli, Serge; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-03-18

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine tryptophan lyase NosL converts L-tryptophan into 3-methylindolic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic nosiheptide. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and multiple L-tryptophan isotopologues, we trapped and characterized radical intermediates that indicate a carboxyl fragment migration mechanism for NosL. This is in contrast to a proposed fragmentation-recombination mechanism that implied Cα-Cβ bond cleavage of L-tryptophan. Although NosL resembles related tyrosine lyases, subtle substrate motions in its active site are responsible for a fine-tuned radical chemistry, which selects the Cα-C bond for disruption. This mechanism highlights evolutionary adaptation to structural constraints in proteins as a route to alternative enzyme function. PMID:26989252

  11. Students' Ideas and Radical Constructivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez Gómez, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I study, from the point of view of the analytic philosophy of mind, the compatibility of students' ideas studies (SIS) with radical constructivism (RC). I demonstrate that RC is based on a psychology of "narrow mental states"; that is, the idea that the mental content of an individual can be fully characterised without…

  12. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Raj; Woods, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) has rapidly penetrated the field of urology since its inception in 2003. Several observational studies, retrospective reports, and three randomized controlled trials (RCT) have preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of (RARC). Additionally, results from the RAZOR RCT will be available in 2016-2017 to better substantiate the use of (RARC). PMID:26310514

  13. Radical Coupling Mechanisms in Lignification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechansim by which lignification, the polymerization process by which lignins are formed, is via combinatorial radical coupling reactions. Understanding such reactions allows the range of structures in lignins to be understood, and the ability of lignins to accommodate various phenolic precursor...

  14. The Other Women: Radicalizing Feminism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puigvert, Lidia; Darder, Antonia; Merrill, Barbara; de los Reyes, Eileen; Stromquist, Nelly

    A recent international symposium on radicalizing feminism explored ways of developing a dialogic feminism that emphasizes working in different settings under the common goal of including women who have been invisible in the dominant feminist literature by furthering theories and practices based on the principles of dialogic feminism. The seminar…

  15. A comparison of fenuron degradation by hydroxyl and carbonate radicals in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mazellier, Patrick; Busset, Cécile; Delmont, Anne; De Laat, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    A comparative study of the transformation of the herbicide fenuron (1,1-dimethyl-3-phenylurea) by hydroxyl radicals and carbonate radicals in aqueous solution (pH 7.2-phosphate buffer) has been undertaken. Hydroxyl radical was generated by the well-known photolysis of hydrogen peroxide at 254 nm and carbonate radical was formed by photolysis of Co(NH(3))(5)CO(3)(+) at 254 nm. Competitive kinetic experiments were performed with atrazine used as the main competitor for both processes. Accordingly, the second-order rate constant of reaction between fenuron and carbonate radical was found to be (7-12+/-3)x10(6)M(-1)s(-1) [(7+/-1)x10(9)M(-1)s(-1) for hydroxyl radical]. The formation of degradation products was studied by LC-MS in the two cases and a comparison has been performed. The reaction with carbonate radical leads to the formation of a quinone-imine derivative which appears as the major primary product together with ortho and para hydroxylated compounds. These two compounds represent the major products in the reaction with hydroxyl radicals. The reaction of both radicals also leads to the transformation of the dimethylurea moiety. PMID:17675205

  16. Free radical scavenging reactions of sulfasalazine, 5-aminosalicylic acid and sulfapyridine: mechanistic aspects and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ravi; Kumar, Sudheer; Unnikrishnan, M; Mukherjee, T

    2005-11-01

    Reactions of sulfasalazine (SAZ) and its metabolites, 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) and sulfapyridine (SP), with various oxidizing and reducing free radicals (hydroxyl, haloperoxyl, one-electron oxidizing, lipid peroxyl, glutathiyl, superoxide, tryptophanyl, etc.) have been studied to understand the mechanistic aspects of its action against free radicals produced during inflammation. Nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique coupled with transient spectrophotometry has been used for in situ generation of free radicals and to follow their reaction pathways. The transients produced in these reactions have been assigned and radical scavenging rate constants have been measured. In addition to scavenging of various primary and secondary free radicals by SAZ, 5-ASA and SP, 5-ASA has also been observed to efficiently scavenge radicals of biomolecules. 5-ASA has been found to be the active moiety of SAZ involved in the scavenging of oxidizing free radicals whereas reduction of SAZ produced molecular radical anion. The study suggests that free radical scavenging activity of 5-ASA may be a major path of pharmacological action of SAZ against inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). PMID:16298742

  17. Characterization of Kevlar 49 fibers by electron paramagnetic resonance. Final report, 20 May 1981-20 June 1982. [Radicals induced by ultraviolet or fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.M.; Sandreczki, T.C.

    1982-06-20

    EPR was used to investigate the free radicals created in Kevlar 49 fibers by stress-induced and photo-induced macromolecular chain scissions. Mn/sup +2/ ions were identified from the EPR spectrum of frozen solutions of concentrated sulfuric acid containing Kevlar 49. Other ions present are Cu/sup +2/, and possibly Fe/sup +3/, Cr/sup +3/, and Ti/sup +3/. EPR lineshape anisotropy indicates that some of the metal ions and first coordinate spheres are oriented. The concentration of stress-induced radicals (2 x 10/sup 10/ per filament) suggest that chain scission occurs in more weak planes than are estimated to exist in the fracture surfaces of the fiber core. These radicals are unstable in air and have some aromatic character. Several different types of radicals were obtained following uv irradiations of the Kevlar 49 fibers in vacuum (photodegradative radicals) and in air (photo-oxidative radicals). The photodegradative radicals are identified with primary radicals involved in the photo-Fries rearrangement reaction, secondary radicals formed as a result of a hydrogen atom abstraction by the primary radical, and/or ketyl radicals produced as a result of uv irradiation of the photo-Fries rearrangement product. The photo-oxidative radicals are identified with the uv irradiation products of a peroxide intermediate. Lineshape anisotropy indicates that both radical types are oriented. 31 figures.

  18. Infectious Morbidity After Radical Vulvectomy

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Linda F.; Brooker, Doris C.; Carter, Jonathan R.; Twiggs, Leo B.

    1994-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective investigation describes the infectious morbidity of patients following radical vulvectomy with or without inguinal lymph node dissection. Methods: The charts of patients undergoing radical vulvectomy between January 1, 1986, and September 1, 1989, were reviewed for age, weight, cancer type, tumor stage, operative procedure(s), prophylactic antibiotic and its length of use, febrile morbidity, infection site, culture results, significant medical history, and length of use and number of drains or catheters used. Results: The study group was composed of 61 patients, 14 of whom underwent a radical vulvectomy and 47 who also had inguinal lymph node dissection performed. Twenty-nine patients (48%) had at least 1 postoperative infection. Five patients (8%) had 2 or more postoperative infections. The site and incidence of the infections were as follows: urinary tract 23%, wound 23%, lymphocyst 3%, lymphatics (lymphangitis) 5%, and bowel (pseudomembranous colitis) 3%. The most common pathogens isolated from both urine and wound sites were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enterococcus, and Escherichia coli. A significant decrease in wound infection was demonstrated when separate incisions were made for inguinal lymph node dissection (P <0.05). The mean number of days to onset of postoperative infection for wound, urine, lymphatics, lymphocyst, and bowel were 11, 8, 57, 48, and 5, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that the clinical appearance of post-radical vulvectomy infections is delayed when compared with other post-surgical wound infections. Second, utilizing separate inguinal surgical incisions may reduce infectious morbidity. Finally, tumor stage and type do not necessarily increase the infectious morbidity of radical vulvar surgery. PMID:18475379

  19. The major human erythroid DNA-binding protein (GF-1): Primary sequence and localization of the gene to the X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zon, L.I.; Tsai, S.F.; Burgess, S.; Orkin, S.H. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA ); Matsudaira, P. ); Bruns, G.A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Genes expressed in erythroid cells contain binding sites for a cell-specific nuclear factor, GF-1 (NF-E1, Eryf 1), believed to be an important transcriptional regulator. Previously the authors characterized murine GF-1 as a 413-amino acid polypeptide containing two cysteine-cysteine regions reminiscent of zinc-finger DNA-binding domains. By cross-hybridization to the finger domain of murine GF-1 they have isolated cDNA encoding the human homolog. Peptide sequencing of purified human GF-1 confirmed the authenticity of the human cDNA. The predicted primary sequence of human GF-1 is highly similar to that of murine GF-1, particularly in the DNA-binding region. Although the DNA-binding domains of human, murine, and chicken proteins are remarkably conserved, the mammalian polypeptides are strikingly divergent from the avian counterpart in other regions, most likely those responsible for transcriptional activation. By hybridization to panels of human-rodent DNAs they have assigned the human GF-1 locus to Xp21-11. The localization of the gene to the X chromosome has important implications for hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin syndromes unlinked to the {beta}-globin cluster and for genetic experiments designed to test the role of the factor in erythroid cell gene expression.

  20. Thyrotropin but not epidermal growth factor down-regulates the isozyme I (PKa I) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases in dog thyroid cells in primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Breton, M F; Roger, P P; Omri, B; Dumont, J E; Pavlovic-Hournac, M

    1989-01-01

    The activity of the two cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKa I and PKa II) was evaluated in dog thyroid cells in primary cultures after a 6-day growth period induced by either thyrotropin (TSH) or epidermal growth factor (EGF). Although the total PKa activity was not affected in cells cultured in the presence of TSH or EGF, their actions on the PKa I and PKa II expressions were significantly different. The activity of PKa I was strongly inhibited by TSH (70-80%) while with EGF it was either stimulated or unaffected with respect to controls. The two mitogens did not have a significant effect on the activity of PKa II. Forskolin (Fk) mimicked the effect of TSH. The expression of the two regulatory subunits (R I and R II), evaluated by the covalent binding of 8-azido-cAMP, was similar to the expression of the corresponding catalytic activities, suggesting a coregulation of the catalytic and regulatory subunits from the same isozyme. After chronic stimulation by TSH, differentiated dog thyroid cells are almost completely deprived of PKa I. PMID:2545480

  1. Notch and TGF-β pathways cooperatively regulate receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) gene expression in human primary keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiru; Xue, Siliang; Zhou, Jin; Voorhees, John J.; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-κ (PTPRK) specifically and directly dephosphorylates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thereby limiting EGFR function in primary human keratinocytes. PTPRK expression is increased by the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway and cell–cell contact. Because the Notch receptor pathway is responsive to cell–cell contact and regulates keratinocyte growth and differentiation, we investigated the interplay between Notch and TGF-β pathways in regulation of PTPRK expression in human keratinocytes. Suppression of Notch signaling by γ-secretase inhibitors substantially reduced cell contact induction of PTPRK gene expression. In sparse keratinocyte cultures, addition of soluble Notch-activating ligand jagged one peptide (Jag1) induced PTPRK. Of interest, cell contact–induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 inhibited contact-induced expression of PTPRK. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling, via knockdown of Notch1 or by γ-secretase inhibitors, significantly reduced TGF-β–induced PTPRK gene expression, indicating that Notch and TGF-β pathways function together to regulate PTPRK. Of importance, the combination of Jag1 plus TGF-β results in greater PTPRK expression and lower EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation than either ligand alone. These data indicate that Notch and TGF-β act in concert to stimulate induction of PTPRK, which suppresses EGFR activation in human keratinocytes. PMID:25609089

  2. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Methylation: A Tale of Two SAMS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Methylation is an essential and ubiquitous reaction that plays an important role in a wide range of biological processes. Most biological methylations use S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the methyl donor and proceed via an SN2 displacement mechanism. However, researchers have discovered an increasing number of methylations that involve radical chemistry. The enzymes known to catalyze these reactions all belong to the radical SAM superfamily. This family of enzymes utilizes a specialized [4Fe-4S] cluster for reductive cleavage of SAM to yield a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. Radical chemistry is then imposed on a variety of organic substrates, leading to a diverse array of transformations. Until recently, researchers had not fully understood how these enzymes employ radical chemistry to mediate a methyl transfer reaction. Sequence analyses reveal that the currently identified radical SAM methyltransferases (RSMTs) can be grouped into three classes, which appear distinct in protein architecture and mechanism. Class A RSMTs mainly include the rRNA methyltransferases RlmN and Cfr from various origins. As exemplified by Escherichia coli RlmN, these proteins have a single canonical radical SAM core domain that includes an (βα)6 partial barrel most similar to that of pyruvate formate lyase-activase. The exciting recent studies on RlmN and Cfr are beginning to provide insights into the intriguing chemistry of class A RSMTs. These enzymes utilize a methylene radical generated on a unique methylated cysteine residue. However, based on the variety of substrates used by the other classes of RSMTs, alternative mechanisms are likely to be discovered. Class B RSMTs contain a proposed N-terminal cobalamin binding domain in addition to a radical SAM domain at the C-terminus. This class of proteins methylates diverse substrates at inert sp3 carbons, aromatic heterocycles, and phosphinates, possibly involving a cobalamin-mediated methyl transfer process. Class C

  3. Observation of OH radicals produced by pulsed discharges on the surface of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Seiji; Kawano, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Satoshi; Furuki, Takashi; Akamine, Shuichi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Ohkubo, Toshikazu; Kocik, Marek; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2011-06-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure. OH radicals have a higher oxidation potential compared with other oxidative species such as free radical O, atomic oxygen, hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) and ozone. In this study, surface discharges on liquids (water and its solutions) were investigated experimentally. A pulsed streamer discharge was generated on the liquid surface using a point-to-plane electrode geometry. The primary generation process of OH radicals is closely related to the streamer propagation, and the subsequent secondary process after the discharge has an influence on the chemical reaction. Taking into account the timescale of these processes, we investigated the behavior of OH radicals using two different diagnostic methods. Time evolution of the ground-state OH radicals above the liquid surface after the discharge was observed by a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. In order to observe the ground-state OH, an OH [A 2∑+(v' = 1) <-- X 2Π(v'' = 0)] system at 282 nm was used. As the secondary process, a portion of OH radicals diffused from gas phase to the liquid surface and dissolved in the liquid. These dissolved OH radicals were measured by a chemical probe method. Terephthalic acid was used as an OH radical trap and fluorescence of the resulting 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid was measured. This paper directly presents visualization of OH radicals over the liquid surface by means of LIF, and indirectly describes OH radicals dissolved in water by means of a chemical method.

  4. Photoisomerization and photodissociation dynamics of reactive free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bise, Ryan T.

    2000-08-24

    The photofragmentation pathways of chemically reactive free radicals have been examined using the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Measurements of the photodissociation cross-sections, product branching ratios, product state energy distributions, and angular distributions provide insight into the excited state potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic processes involved in the dissociation mechanisms. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the predissociative {tilde A}{sup 2}A{sub 1} and {tilde B}{sup 2}A{sub 2} states of CH{sub 3}S have been investigated. At all photon energies, CH{sub 3} + S({sup 3}P{sub j}), was the main reaction channel. The translational energy distributions reveal resolved structure corresponding to vibrational excitation of the CH{sub 3} umbrella mode and the S({sup 3}P{sub j}) fine-structure distribution from which the nature of the coupled repulsive surfaces is inferred. Dissociation rates are deduced from the photofragment angular distributions, which depend intimately on the degree of vibrational excitation in the C-S stretch. Nitrogen combustion radicals, NCN, CNN and HNCN have also been studied. For all three radicals, the elimination of molecular nitrogen is the primary reaction channel. Excitation to linear excited triplet and singlet electronic states of the NCN radical generates resolved vibrational structure of the N{sub 2} photofragment. The relatively low fragment rotational excitation suggests dissociation via a symmetric C{sub 2V} transition state. Resolved vibrational structure of the N{sub 2} photofragment is also observed in the photodissociation of the HNCN radical. The fragment vibrational and rotational distributions broaden with increased excitation energy. Simple dissociation models suggest that the HNCN radical isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate (c-HCNN) which then dissociates via a tight cyclic transition state. In contrast to the radicals mentioned above, resolved

  5. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment preserves and protects primary rat hippocampal neurons and primary human brain cultures against oxidative insults.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Ray, Balmiki

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deleterious accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into senile plaque, neurofibrillary tangles formed from hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and loss of cholinergic synapses in the cerebral cortex. The deposition of Aβ-loaded plaques results in microglial activation and subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including free radicals. Neurons in aging and AD brains are particularly vulnerable to ROS and other toxic stimuli. Therefore, agents that decrease the vulnerability of neurons against ROS may provide therapeutic values for the treatment or prevention of AD. In the present study, our goal was to test whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment could preserve as well as protect neurons from oxidative damage. We report that treatment with IVIG protects neuronal viability and synaptic proteins in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Further, we demonstrate the tolerability of IVIG treatment in the primary human fetal mixed brain cultures. Indeed, a high dose (20 mg/ml) of IVIG treatment was well-tolerated by primary human brain cultures that exhibit a normal neuronal phenotype. We also observed a potent neuropreservatory effect of IVIG against ROS-mediated oxidative insults in these human fetal brain cultures. These results indicate that IVIG treatment has great potential to preserve and protect primary human neuronal-enriched cultures and to potentially rescue dying neurons from oxidative insults. Therefore, our findings suggest that IVIG treatment may represent an important therapeutic agent for clinical trials designed to prevent and delay the onset of neurodegeneration as well as AD pathology. PMID:25115544

  6. Free radical metabolites in myocardium during ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ruuge, E K; Ledenev, A N; Lakomkin, V L; Konstantinov, A A; Ksenzenko MYu

    1991-10-01

    Low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and spin traps were used to measure paramagnetic species generation in rat hearts and isolated mitochondria. The hearts were freeze-clamped at 77 K during control perfusion by the Langendorff procedure, after 20-30 min of normothermic ischemia or 10-30 s of reperfusion with oxygenated perfusate. All EPR spectra measured at 4.5-50 K exhibited signals of both mitochondrial free radical centers and FeS proteins. The analysis of spectral parameters measured at 243 K showed that free radicals in heart tissue were semiquinones of coenzyme Q10 and flavins. The appearance of a typical "doublet" signal at g = 1.99 in low-temperature spectra indicated that a part of ubisemiquinones formed a complex with a high potential FeS protein of succinate dehydrogenase. Ischemia decreased the free radical species in myocardium approximately 50%; the initiation of reflow of perfusate resulted in quick increase of the EPR signal. Mitochondria isolated from hearts during control perfusion and after 20-30 min of ischemia were able to produce superoxide radicals in both the NADH-coenzyme Q10 reductase and the bc1 segments of the respiratory chain. The rate of oxyradical generation was significantly higher in mitochondria isolated from ischemic heart. PMID:1656795

  7. Polyvalent HIV-1 Env vaccine formulations delivered by the DNA priming plus protein boosting approach are effective in generating neutralizing antibodies against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from subtypes A, B, C, D and E.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixia; Pal, Ranajit; Mascola, John R; Chou, Te-Hui W; Mboudjeka, Innocent; Shen, Siyuan; Liu, Qin; Whitney, Stephen; Keen, Timothy; Nair, B C; Kalyanaraman, V S; Markham, Philip; Lu, Shan

    2006-06-20

    A major challenge in developing an HIV-1 vaccine is to identify immunogens and their delivery methods that can elicit broad neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates of different genetic subtypes. Recently, we demonstrated that priming with DNA vaccines expressing primary HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) followed by recombinant Env protein boosting was successful in generating positive neutralizing antibody responses against a clade B primary HIV-1 isolate, JR-FL, that was not easily neutralized. In the current study, we examined whether the DNA priming plus recombinant protein boosting approach delivering a polyvalent primary Env formulation was able to generate neutralizing antibodies against primary HIV-1 viral isolates from various genetic subtypes. New Zealand White rabbits were first immunized with DNA vaccines expressing one, three or eight primary HIV-1 gp120 antigens delivered by a gene gun followed by recombinant gp120 protein boosting. Neutralizing antibody responses were examined by two independently executed neutralization assays: the first one was a single round infection neutralization assay against a panel of 10 primary HIV-1 isolates of subtypes A, B, C and E and the second one used the PhenoSense assay against a panel of 12 pseudovirues expressing primary HIV-1 Env antigens from subtypes A, B, C, D and E as well as 2 pseudoviruses expressing the Env antigens from MN and NL4-3 viruses. Rabbit sera immunized with the DNA priming plus protein boosting approach, but not DNA vaccine alone or Env protein alone, were capable of neutralizing 7 of 10 viruses in the first assay and 12 of 14 viruses in the second assay. More importantly, sera immunized with the polyvalent Env antigens were able to neutralize a significantly higher percentage of viruses than the sera immunized with the monovalent antigens. Our results suggest that DNA priming followed by recombinant Env protein boosting can be used to deliver polyvalent Env-antigen-based HIV-1

  8. Reactions of Hydroxyalkyl Radicals with Cysteinyl Peptides in a NanoESI Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Craig A.; Xia, Yu

    2014-07-01

    In biological systems, carbon-centered small molecule radicals are primarily formed via external radiation or internal radical reactions. These radical species can react with a variety of biomolecules, most notably nucleic acids, the consequence of which has possible links to gene mutation and cancer. Sulfur-containing peptides and proteins are reactive toward a variety of radical species and many of them behave as radical scavengers. In this study, the reactions between alkyl alcohol carbon-centered radicals (e.g., •CH2OH for methanol) and cysteinyl peptides within a nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) plume were explored. The reaction system involved ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of a nanoESI plume using a low pressure mercury lamp consisting of 185 and 254 nm emission bands. The alkyl alcohol was added as solvent into the nanoESI solution and served as the precursor of hydroxyalkyl radicals upon UV irradiation. The hydroxyalkyl radicals subsequently reacted with cysteinyl peptides either containing a disulfide linkage or free thiol, which led to the formation of peptide- S-hydroxyalkyl product. This radical reaction coupled with subsequent MS/MS was shown to have analytical potential by cleaving intrachain disulfide linked peptides prior to CID to enhance sequence information. Tandem mass spectrometry via collision-induced dissociation (CID), stable isotope labeling, and accurate mass measurement were employed to verify the identities of the reaction products.

  9. Electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Most plasma environments contain populations of short-lived species such as radicals, the chemistry of which can have significant effects on the overall chemistry of the system. However, few experimental measurements of the kinetics of electron attachment to radicals exist due to the inherent difficulties of working with transient species. Calculations from first principles have been attempted, but are arduous and, because electron attachment is so sensitive to the specifics of the potential surface, their accuracy has not been established. Electron attachment to small fluorocarbon radicals is particularly important, as the data are needed for predictive modeling of plasma etching of semiconductor materials, a key process in the industrial fabrication of microelectronics. We have recently developed a novel flowing afterglow technique to measure several types of otherwise difficult to study plasma processes, including thermal electron attachment to radicals. Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry (VENDAMS) exploits dissociative electron attachment in a weakly ionized plasma as a radical source. Here, we apply VENDAMS to a series of halofluorocarbon precursors in order to measure the kinetics of thermal electron attachment to fluorocarbon radicals. Results are presented for CF2, CF3, C2F5,C2F3,1-C3F7, 2-C3F7, and C3F5 from 300 K to 900 K. Both the magnitude and the temperature dependences of rate coefficients as well as product branching between associative and dissociative attachment are highly system specific; however, thermal attachment to all species is inefficient, never exceeding 5% of the collision rate. The data are analyzed using a recently developed kinetic modeling approach, which uses extended Vogt-Wannier theory as a starting point, accounts for dynamic effects such as coupling between the electron and nuclear motions through empirically validated functional forms, and finally uses statistical theory to determine the fate of

  10. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Schoemacker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-08-13

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 10(4)-10(5) molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅10(6) molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  11. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 104–105 molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅106 molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  12. Radical Puppets and the Language of Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2009-01-01

    Radical puppets are puppets with a social message. Radical puppets encourage creative ideas that lead toward understanding global and environmental aspects of society through the "art of the puppet," a phrase coined by American puppeteer Bill Baird (1965). There is a blending of performance and visual art in puppetry. Through radical puppetry,…

  13. Free-radical chemistry of sulfite.

    PubMed Central

    Neta, P; Huie, R E

    1985-01-01

    The free-radical chemistry of sulfite oxidation is reviewed. Chemical transformations of organic and biological molecules induced by sulfite oxidation are summarized. The kinetics of the free-radical oxidations of sulfite are discussed, as are the kinetics of the reactions of the sulfite-derived radicals SO3 and the peroxy derivative SO5 with organic compounds. PMID:3830699

  14. Arsenic affects expression and processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of human APP.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Sergio; Bürger, Susanne; Delgado, Juan M; Jiménez-Capdeville, Maria E; Schliebs, Reinhard

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic poisoning due to contaminated water and soil, mining waste, glass manufacture, select agrochemicals, as well as sea food, affects millions of people world wide. Recently, an involvement of arsenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been hypothesized (Gong and O'Bryant, 2010). The present study stresses the hypothesis whether sodium arsenite, and its main metabolite, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), may affect expression and processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using the cholinergic cell line SN56.B5.G4 and primary neuronal cells overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP, as experimental approaches. Exposure of cholinergic SN56.B5.G4 cells with either sodium arsenite or DMA decreased cell viability in a concentration- and exposure-time dependent manner, and affected the activities of the cholinergic enzymes acetylcholinesterase and choline acetyltransferase. Both sodium arsenite and DMA exposure of SN56.B5.G4 cells resulted in enhanced level of APP, and sAPP in the membrane and cytosolic fractions, respectively. To reveal any effect of arsenic on APP processing, the amounts of APP cleavage products, sAPPβ, and β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, released into the culture medium of primary neuronal cells derived from transgenic Tg2576 mice, were assessed by ELISA. Following exposure of neuronal cells by sodium arsenite for 12h, the membrane-bound APP level was enhanced, the amount of sAPPβ released into the culture medium was slightly higher, while the levels of Aβ peptides in the culture medium were considerably lower as compared to that assayed in the absence of any drug. The sodium arsenite-induced reduction of Aβ formation suggests an inhibition of the APP γ-cleavage step by arsenite. In contrast, DMA exposure of neuronal cells considerably increased formation of Aβ and sAPPβ, accompanied by enhanced membrane APP level. The DMA-induced changes in APP processing may be the result of the enhanced APP expression. Alternatively, increased Aβ production

  15. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49fhighCD61high and CD24+Jagged1-. First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in standard

  16. Selective expression of constitutively active pro-apoptotic protein BikDD gene in primary mammary tumors inhibits tumor growth and reduces tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Omar M; Nie, Lei; Chan, Li-Chuan; Li, Chia-Wei; Hsu, Yi-Hsin; Hsu, Jennifer; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that specifically delivering BikDD, a constitutive active mutant of pro-apoptotic protein Bik, to breast cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice has a potent activity against tumor initiating cells (TICs), and that the combination between tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and BikDD gene therapy yielded synergistic effect on EGFR and HER2 positive breast cancer cells in immunodeficient nude mice. Those encouraging results have allowed us to propose a clinical trial using the liposome-complexing plasmid DNA expressing BikDD gene which has been approved by the NIH RAC Advisory committee. However, it is imperative to test whether systemic delivery of BikDD-expressing plasmid DNAs with liposomes into immunocompetent mice has therapeutic efficacy and tolerable side effects as what we observed in the nude mice model. In this study, we investigated the effects of BikDD gene-therapy on the primary mammary tumors, especially on tumor initiating cells (TICs), of a genetically engineered immunocompetent mouse harboring normal microenvironment and immune response. The effects on TIC population in tumors were determined by FACS analysis with different sets of murine specific TIC markers, CD49f(high)CD61(high) and CD24(+)Jagged1(-). First we showed in vitro that ectopic expression of BikDD in murine N202 cells derived from MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mouse tumors induced apoptosis and decreased the number of TICs. Consistently, systemic delivery of VISA-Claudin4-BikDD by liposome complexes significantly inhibited mammary tumor growth and slowed down residual tumor growth post cessation of therapy in MMTV-HER2/Neu transgenic mice compared to the controls. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of BikDD in vivo were consistent with decreased TIC population assessed by FACS analysis and in vitro tumorsphere formation assay of freshly isolated tumor cells. Importantly, systemic administration of BikDD did not cause significant cytotoxic response in

  17. [Erectile rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Droupy, S; Giuliano, F; Costa, P

    2009-12-01

    The concept of penile rehabilitation involves the procedures designed to improve oxygen delivery the penile erectile tissue to minimized tissue damage during the period of neural recovery following radical prostatectomy. Many basic research studies support the rationale and mechanism of the concept of penile rehabilitation, however they are few clinical studies in the literature that provide a clear medical evidence of its efficacy in patients. Waiting for new data, it is recommended to propose to the patients, following a radical prostatectomy, an active pharmacological penile rehabilitation. This rehabilitation involves counselling with the couple to have regular sexual activities, ideally 1 to 3 times a week. Penile erections could be induced by intracavernosal injections of PGE1 or improved by using PDE5 inhibitors on demand. The results of daily use of PDE5 inhibitor are conflicting and then it cannot be recommended systematically waiting for new data. The rehabilitation could be maintained for about 2 years as results improve with time. PMID:20123519

  18. Mutagenicity of Oxygen Free Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Carmella S.; Hassan, Hosni M.

    1982-05-01

    Paraquat 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) was used as an intracellular generator of oxygen free radicals and was found to be highly mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium. It caused both base-pair substitution and frameshift mutations. Paraquat was much more toxic and mutagenic in a simple nutritionally restricted medium than in a rich complex medium. The mutagenicity of paraquat was dependent upon the presence of a supply of both electrons and oxygen. Cells containing high levels of superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) were more resistant to the toxicity and the mutagenicity of paraquat than were cells containing normal levels of this enzyme. The mutagenicity of paraquat thus appears to be due to its ability to exacerbate the intracellular production of superoxide radicals.

  19. Geoscientists and the Radical Middle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Addressing the great challenges facing society requires industry, government, and academia to work together. I call this overlap space, where compromises are made and real solutions determined, the Radical Middle. Radical because it can appear at times as if the loudest and most publicly influential voices lie outside of the actual solution space, content to provoke but not problem-solve. One key area where geoscientists can play a lead role in the Radical Middle is in the overlap between energy, the environment, and the economy. Globally, fossil fuels still represent 85% of the aggregate energy mix. As existing conventional oil and natural-gas reservoir production continues to slowly decline, unconventional reservoirs, led today by shale and other more expensive resources, will represent a growing part of the oil and gas production mix. Many of these unconventional reservoirs require hydraulic fracturing. The positive economic impact of hydraulic fracturing and associated natural gas and oil production on the United States economy is well documented and undeniable. Yet there are environmental concerns about fracking, and some states and nations have imposed moratoria. This energy-environment-economy space is ideal for leadership from the geosciences. Another such overlap space is the potential for geoscience leadership in relations with China, whose economy and global presence continue to expand. Although China is building major hydropower and natural-gas power plants, as well as nuclear reactors, coal is still king—with the associated environmental impacts. Carbon sequestration—onshore in brine and to enhance oil recovery, as well as offshore—could prove viable. It is vital that educated and objective geoscientists from industry, government, and academia leave their corners and work together in the Radical Middle to educate the public and develop and deliver balanced, economically sensible energy and environmental strategies.

  20. Radical Smiles Rearrangement: An Update.

    PubMed

    Allart-Simon, Ingrid; Gérard, Stéphane; Sapi, Janos

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades the Smiles rearrangement and its variants have become essential synthetic tools in modern synthetic organic chemistry. In this mini-review we summarized some very recent results of the radical version of these rearrangements. The selected examples illustrate the synthetic power of this approach, especially if it is incorporated into a domino process, for the preparation of polyfunctionalized complex molecules. PMID:27399654

  1. Recombinant Subgroup B Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Efficiently Replicates in Primary Human Cells and Is Virulent in Cotton Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Ken; Nguyen, D. Tien; Ludlow, Martin; Rennick, Linda J.; Yüksel, Selma; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Rima, Bert K.; de Swart, Rik L.

    2014-01-01

    -adapted viruses with diminished virulence in animal models of disease. To address this, we determined the genome sequence of an unpassaged human respiratory syncytial virus from a sample obtained directly from an infected infant, assembled a molecular clone, and recovered a wild-type recombinant virus. Addition of a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein allowed this wild-type virus to be tracked in primary human cells and living animals in the absence of significant cytopathic effects. Imaging of fluorescent cells proved to be a highly valuable tool for monitoring the spread of virus and may help improve assays for evaluating novel intervention strategies. PMID:25540371

  2. Promoter-dependent and -independent activation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 gene expression by prostaglandin E2 in primary rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Casinghino, S.; Mittanck, D. W.; Ji, C. H.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) action is mediated by high affinity cell surface IGF receptors and modulated by a family of secreted IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). IGFBP-5, the most conserved of six IGFBPs characterized to date, uniquely potentiates the anabolic actions of IGF-I for skeletal cells. In osteoblasts, IGFBP-5 production is stimulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a local factor that mediates certain effects induced by parathyroid hormone, cytokines such as interleukin-1 and transforming growth factor-beta, and mechanical strain. In this study, we show that transcriptional and post-transcriptional events initiated by PGE2 collaborate to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in primary fetal rat osteoblast cultures. PGE2 treatment stimulated up to a 7-fold rise in steady-state levels of IGFBP-5 mRNA throughout 32 h of incubation. Analysis of nascent IGFBP-5 mRNA suggested that PGE2 had only a modest stimulatory effect on IGFBP-5 gene transcription, and transient transfection studies with IGFBP-5 promoter-reporter genes confirmed that PGE2 enhanced promoter activity by approximately 2-fold. Similar stimulatory effects were seen with forskolin. A DNA fragment with only 51 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequence retained hormonal responsiveness, which may be mediated by a binding site for transcription factor AP-2 located at positions -44 to -36 in the proximal IGFBP-5 promoter. Incubation of osteoblasts with the mRNA transcriptional inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGFBP-5 mRNA stability by 2-fold, increasing the t1/2 from 9 to 18 h. The effects of PGE2 on steady-state IGFBP-5 transcripts were abrogated by preincubating cells with cycloheximide, indicating that the effects of PGE2 on both gene transcription and mRNA stability required ongoing protein synthesis. Therefore, both promoter-dependent and -independent pathways converge to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in response to PGE2 in osteoblasts.

  3. Persistent Electrical Activity in Primary Nociceptors after Spinal Cord Injury Is Maintained by Scaffolded Adenylyl Cyclase and Protein Kinase A and Is Associated with Altered Adenylyl Cyclase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Li, Yong; Wu, Zizhen; Yang, Qing; Herrera, Juan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intracellular signaling mechanisms that persistently excite neurons in pain pathways. Persistent spontaneous activity (SA) generated in the cell bodies of primary nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been found to make major contributions to chronic pain in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) (Bedi et al., 2010; Yang et al., 2014). The occurrence of SCI-induced SA in a large fraction of DRG neurons and the persistence of this SA long after dissociation of the neurons provide an opportunity to define intrinsic cell signaling mechanisms that chronically drive SA in pain pathways. The present study demonstrates that SCI-induced SA requires continuing activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), as well as a scaffolded complex containing AC5/6, A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), and PKA. SCI caused a small but significant increase in the expression of AKAP150 but not other AKAPs. DRG membranes isolated from SCI animals revealed a novel alteration in the regulation of AC. AC activity stimulated by Ca2+-calmodulin increased, while the inhibition of AC activity by Gαi showed an unexpected and dramatic decrease after SCI. Localized enhancement of the activity of AC within scaffolded complexes containing PKA is likely to contribute to chronic pathophysiological consequences of SCI, including pain, that are promoted by persistent hyperactivity in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic neuropathic pain is a major clinical problem with poorly understood mechanisms and inadequate treatments. Recent findings indicate that chronic pain in a rat SCI model depends upon hyperactivity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Although cAMP signaling is involved in many forms of neural plasticity, including hypersensitivity of nociceptors in the presence of inflammatory mediators, our finding that continuing cAMP-PKA signaling is required for persistent SA months after SCI and long after isolation of

  4. Residues 231 to 280 of the Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Protein 2 Are Not Essential for Primary B-Lymphocyte Growth Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Shizuko; Yalamanchili, Ramana; Kieff, Elliott

    1998-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear protein 2 (EBNA-2) is a transcriptional transactivator of cellular and viral gene expression and is essential for the transformation of resting human B lymphocytes into long-term lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Previous molecular genetic analyses identified three domains that are critical for transformation and showed that the rest of EBNA-2 is not critical. We now find that codons 231 to 280 that were part of one of the critical domains (J. I. Cohen, F. Wang, and E. Kieff, J. Virol. 65:2545–2554, 1991) can be deleted with only a small effect on the ability of EBNA-2 to transactivate gene expression. In transient transfection assays, EBNA-2 deleted for codons 231 to 280 accumulated to higher levels and was similar to wild-type EBNA-2 in activation of the BamC promoter and in association with RBPJk, a cellular transcription factor that is important for EBNA-2 interaction with promoter regulatory elements. However, EBNA-2 d231–280 activated the viral latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) promoter with only 60% of wild-type efficiency. Recombinant EBVs specifically deleted for EBNA-2 codons 231 to 280 were efficient in initiating the transformation of resting primary human B lymphocytes into LCLs. However, these LCLs grew less well than wild-type EBV-transformed LCLs, and 4- to 10-fold more cells were required for outgrowth following limit dilution. EBNA-2 d231–280 accumulated to unusually high levels in the recombinant transformed LCLs, and this was associated with somewhat higher EBNA-1 and lower LMP1 expression, consistent with the near-wild-type activation of the BamC EBNA promoter and the abnormally low activation of the LMP1 promoter in transient transfection assays. Thus, EBNA-2 d231–280 modestly perturbed the regulation of viral gene expression and resulted in less LMP1, while having surprisingly subtle effects on LCL outgrowth. Deletion of EBNA-2 codons 292 to 310, which are closer to the site that specifies interaction

  5. Micro-RNA-30a regulates ischemia-induced cell death by targeting heat shock protein HSPA5 in primary cultured cortical neurons and mouse brain after stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Nan; Liang, Jia; Li, Jiefei; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2015-11-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) have emerged as key gene regulators in many diseases, including stroke. We recently reported that miR-30a protects N2A cells against ischemic injury, in part through enhancing beclin 1-mediated autophagy. The present study explores further the involvement of miR-30a in ischemia-induced apoptosis and its possible mechanisms in primary cortical neurons and stroked mouse brain. We demonstrate that miR-30a level is significantly decreased in cortical neurons after 1-hr oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/24-hr reoxygenation. Overexpression of miR-30a aggravated the OGD-induced neuronal cell death, whereas inhibition of miR-30a attenuated necrosis and apoptosis as determined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-di-phenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide, lactate dehydrogenase, TUNEL, and cleaved caspase-3. The amount of HSPA5 protein, which is predicted to be a putative target of miR-30a by TargetScan, could be reduced by pre-miR-30a, whereas it was increased by anti-miR-30a. Furthermore, the luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-30a directly binds to the predicted 3'-UTR target sites of the hspa5 gene. The cell injury regulated by miR-30a in OGD-treated cells could be aggravated by HSPA5 siRNA. We also observed an interaction of HSPA5 and caspase-12 by coimmunoprecipitation and speculate that HSPA5 might be involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. In vivo, reduced miR-30a increased the HSPA5 level and attenuated ischemic brain infarction in focal ischemia-stroked mice. Downregulation of miR-30a could prevent neural ischemic injury through upregulating HSPA5 protein expression, and decreased ER stress-induced apoptosis might be one of the mechanisms underlying HSPA5-mediated neuroprotection. PMID:26301516

  6. A radical way to burn

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, S.

    1996-08-01

    By manipulating chamber geometries as well as engine cycle pressures and timing, engineers are exploiting a long-obscure technology known as activated radical combustion. Piston-driven internal combustion engines generally come in two varieties: compression-ignited diesels and spark-ignited gasoline power plants. There, is however, a third way to initiate burning of the fuel-air mixture. The technique--variously called radical ignition (RI), activated radical (AR) combustion, Toyota-Soken combustion, and active thermo-atmosphere combustion--is not exactly new, but only recently have engineers begun to exploit the process in practical power plants. These new units include a lightweight two-stroke racing-motorcycle engine, truck diesels with reduced soot output, and lean-burn spark-ignited car engines. This long-obscure combustion process is based on a range of specialized chemical kinetic and physical acoustic techniques developed over decades. Engineers manipulate fundamental combustion parameter such as chamber geometries, valving and porting configurations, and engine cycle pressures and timing to foster the formation of certain highly reactive chemical species that lower the fuel-air mixture`s flash point so that even modest compression make sit self-ignite. These chemical initiators are then retained into the next cycle to start combustion, allowing the engineer to run stably with no spark.

  7. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  8. Quantitative methods for studying the role of free radicals in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakus, Judit; Kriska, Tamas; Maximova, Tatjana K.; Nemeth, Andras; Korecz, Laszlo; Gal, Dezso

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of the primary sensitization steps in Photodynamic Therapy could be of essential importance concerning the efficiency of the treatment. Besides the well known mechanisms there is a possibility that the interaction between the excited triplet state sensitizer and the doublet state free radicals generated by the cells adds a significant contribution to the overall photodynamic effect. To support this hypothesis the quantification and identification of free radicals would be required. For this purpose chemiluminescence studies and spin trapping seemed to be the most suitable methods due to the extremely short lifetime of free radicals in biological systems. We present data on the kinetics of accumulation of free radicals: (1) by measuring luminol- dependent chemiluminescence of stimulated macrophages both in the absence and in the presence of a free radical inhibitor 3,5 di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl propionic acid; (2) by following the production of primary, secondary and tertiary radical adducts using DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) as spin trapping agent in chemical model systems. The measured data are used to determine the effect of the excited sensitizers on the kinetics of accumulation of free radicals under biological conditions. These results would serve to design new and more effective sensitizers used for therapy based on the triplet-doublet mechanism of action.

  9. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Mehlorn, R.J.; Mendez, A.T.; Higashi, R.; Fan, T.

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  10. Robot assisted radical prostatectomy: the new standard?

    PubMed

    Laviana, A A; Williams, S B; King, E D; Chuang, R J; Hu, J C

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, the robotic assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) has grown increasingly popular and quickly equated itself as the most commonly used modality to treat locally-confined prostate cancer. Despite increased utilization, there is limited comparative research demonstrating superiority for RARP over the conventional radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP). Furthermore, though perioperative and short-term oncologic outcomes are equivalent if not superior for the robotic approach, the optimal utilization of robotic technology remains to be determined with cost serving as a primary driver. In this review, we performed a literature search to identify comparative effectiveness research as it pertains to RARP versus RRP. We performed a PubMed literature search for a review of articles published between 2000 and 2014 using the following keywords to identify pertinent research: "robot or robotic prostatectomy", "open or retropubic prostatectomy", "cost", "resource utilization". Long-term data comparing RARP and RRP remains limited, though short-term positive surgical margins, biochemical recurrence-free survival, and need for adjuvant therapy appear at least equivocal, if not in favor of RARP versus RRP. Functional outcomes including return of continence and potency favor RARP while cost still favors RRP. Nonetheless, the generalization of results remains difficult with surgeon volume playing a large role in improving efficiency and quality. For the foreseeable future, an increasing number of prostatectomies will continue to be performed robotically. Though RARP appears to offer improved functional outcomes with good short-term oncologic outcomes, there is a need for longer-term studies to assess the true value of RARP. Outcomes aside, rigorous, prospective randomized-controlled trials must also be performed on the cost-effectiveness of RARP to determine its overall utility in an era of health care delivery reform. PMID:25424387

  11. Heart-type Fatty acid-binding protein in Acute Myocardial infarction Evaluation (FAME): Background and design of a diagnostic study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bruins Slot, Madeleine HE; van der Heijden, Geert JMG; Rutten, Frans H; van der Spoel, Onno P; Mast, E Gijs; Bredero, Ad C; Doevendans, Pieter A; Glatz, Jan FC; Hoes, Arno W

    2008-01-01

    Background Currently used biomarkers for cardiac ischemia are elevated in blood plasma after a delay of several hours and therefore unable to detect acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a very early stage. General practitioners (GPs), however, are often confronted with patients suspected of ACS within hours after onset of complaints. This ongoing study aims to evaluate the added diagnostic value beyond clinical assessment for a rapid bedside test for heart-type fatty-acid binding protein (H-FABP), a biomarker that is detectable as soon as one hour after onset of ischemia. Methods Participating GPs perform a blinded H-FABP rapid bedside test (Cardiodetect®) in patients with symptoms suggestive of ACS such as chest pain or discomfort at rest. All patients, whether referred to hospital or not, undergo electrocardiography (ECG) and venapunction for a plasma troponin test within 12–36 hours after onset of complaints. A final diagnosis will be established by an expert panel consisting of two cardiologists and one general practitioner (blinded to the H-FABP test result), using all available patient information, also including signs and symptoms. The added diagnostic value of the H-FABP test beyond history taking and physical examination will be determined with receiver operating characteristic curves derived from multivariate regression analysis. Conclusion Reasons for presenting the design of our study include the prevention of publication bias and unacknowledged alterations in the study aim, design or data-analysis. To our knowledge this study is the first to assess the diagnostic value of H-FABP outside a hospital-setting. Several previous hospital-based studies showed the potential value of H-FABP in diagnosing ACS. Up to now however it is unclear whether these results are equally promising when the test is used in primary care. The first results are expected in the end of 2008. PMID:18412949

  12. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3) channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone, but not morphine, at supraspinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Fujita, Masahide; Ono, Hiroko; Hongo, Yoshie; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Koichi; Morioka, Yasuhide; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kato, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oxycodone and morphine are μ-opioid receptor agonists prescribed to control moderate-to-severe pain. Previous studies suggested that these opioids exhibit different analgesic profiles. We hypothesized that distinct mechanisms mediate the differential effects of these two opioids and investigated the role of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3 also known as GIRK) channels in their antinociceptive effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Opioid-induced antinociceptive effects were assessed in mice, using the tail-flick test, by i.c.v. and intrathecal (i.t.) administration of morphine and oxycodone, alone and following inhibition of KIR3.1 channels with tertiapin-Q (30 pmol per mouse, i.c.v. and i.t.) and KIR3.1-specific siRNA. The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone and morphine were also examined after tertiapin-Q administration in the mouse femur bone cancer and neuropathic pain models. KEY RESULTS The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, after both i.c.v. and i.t. administrations, were markedly attenuated by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of i.c.v. morphine were unaffected, whereas those induced by i.t. morphine were attenuated, by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In the two chronic pain models, the antinociceptive effects of s.c. oxycodone, but not morphine, were inhibited by supraspinal administration of tertiapin-Q. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that KIR3.1 channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not those of morphine, at supraspinal sites and suggest that supraspinal KIR3.1 channels are responsible for the unique analgesic profile of oxycodone. PMID:24117458

  13. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold-conjugated bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes cartilage regeneration from primary chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo without accelerated endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Zhang, Huina; Hollister, Scott J

    2012-08-01

    As articular cartilage is avascular, and mature chondrocytes do not proliferate, cartilage lesions have a limited capacity for regeneration after severe damage. The treatment of such damage has been challenging due to the limited availability of autologous healthy cartilage and lengthy and expensive cell isolation and expansion procedures. Hence, the use of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a potent regulator of chondrogenic expression, has received considerable attention in cartilage and osteochondral tissue engineering. However, the exact role of BMP-2 in cartilage repair has been postulated to promote both cartilage formation and subsequent cartilage degradation through hypertrophy and endochondral ossification. Furthermore, it is likely that the manner in which BMP-2 is presented to chondrocytes will influence the physiologic pathway (repair vs. degeneration). This study investigates the relative influence of BMP-2 on cartilage matrix and potential subsequent bone matrix production using primary chondrocytes seeded on designed 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with chemically conjugated BMP-2. The results show that chemically conjugated BMP-2 PCL scaffolds can promote significantly greater cartilage regeneration from seeded chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo compared with untreated scaffolds. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the conjugated BMP-2 does not particularly accelerate endochondral ossification even in a readily permissible and highly vascular in vivo environment compared with untreated PCL scaffolds. This study not only reveals the potential use of the BMP-2 conjugation delivery method for enhanced cartilage tissue formation but also gives new insights for the effects of conjugated BMP-2 on cartilage regeneration and osteochondral ossification. PMID:22615065

  14. Point-of-care C reactive protein for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infection in NHS primary care: a qualitative study of barriers and facilitators to adoption

    PubMed Central

    Huddy, Jeremy R; Ni, Melody Z; Barlow, James; Hanna, George B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Point-of-care (POC) C reactive protein (CRP) is incorporated in National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for the diagnosis of pneumonia, reduces antibiotic prescribing and is cost effective. Aim To determine the barriers and facilitators to adoption of POC CRP testing in National Health Service (NHS) primary care for the diagnosis of lower respiratory tract infection. Design The study followed a qualitative methodology based on grounded theory. The study was undertaken in 2 stages. Stage 1 consisted of semistructured interviews with 8 clinicians from Europe and the UK who use the test in routine practice, and focused on their subjective experience in the challenges of implementing POC CRP testing. Stage 2 was a multidisciplinary-facilitated workshop with NHS stakeholders to discuss barriers to adoption, impact of adoption and potential adoption scenarios. Emergent theme analysis was undertaken. Participants Participants included general practitioners (including those with commissioning experience), biochemists, pharmacists, clinical laboratory scientists and industry representatives from the UK and abroad. Results Barriers to the implementation of POC CRP exist, but successful adoption has been demonstrated abroad. Analysis highlighted 7 themes: reimbursement and incentivisation, quality control and training, laboratory services, practitioner attitudes and experiences, effects on clinic flow and workload, use in pharmacy and gaps in evidence. Conclusions Successful adoption models from the UK and abroad demonstrate a distinctive pattern and involve collaboration with central laboratory services. Incorporating antimicrobial stewardship into quality improvement frameworks may incentivise adoption. Further research is needed to develop scaling-up strategies to address the resourcing, clinical governance and economic impact of widespread NHS implementation. PMID:26940107

  15. CCL20/macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha production by primary uterine epithelial cells in response to treatment with lipopolysaccharide or Pam3Cys.

    PubMed

    Crane-Godreau, Mardi A; Wira, Charles R

    2005-01-01

    Having previously shown that CCL20/macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) are released by polarized primary rat uterine epithelial cells (UEC) in response to Escherichia coli but not to Lactobacillus rhamnosus, we sought to determine if epithelial cells are responsive to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and Pam(3)Cys, a bacterial lipoprotein analog. Epithelial cells were grown to confluence on Nunc cell culture inserts prior to apical treatment with PAMPs. In response to LPS, LTA, and Pam(3)Cys (EMC Microcollection GmbH, Tubingen, Germany), CCL20 levels increased (4- to 10-fold) while PAMPs caused increased TNF-alpha (1- to 4-fold) in the medium collected after 24 h of incubation. Both apical and basolateral secretion of CCL20 and TNF-alpha increased in response to PAMPs, but treatments had no effect on cell viability and integrity, as measured by transepithelial resistance. Time course studies of CCL20 and TNF-alpha release in response to Pam(3)Cys and LPS indicated that CCL20 release peaked between 2 and 4 h after treatment, whereas TNF-alpha release was gradual over the length of the incubation. Freeze-thaw and cell lysis experiments, along with actinomycin D studies, suggested that CCL20 and TNF-alpha are synthesized in response to PAMP stimulation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that E. coli and selected PAMPs have direct effects on the production of CCL20 and TNF-alpha without affecting cell integrity. Since CCL20 is known to be both chemotactic and antimicrobial, the increase in apical and basolateral release by UEC in response to PAMPs suggests a new mechanism of innate immune protection in the female reproductive tract. PMID:15618187

  16. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages. PMID:26776055

  17. Primary defect of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Failure in glycosylation of erythrocyte lactosaminoglycan proteins caused by lowered N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M N; Dell, A; Scartezzini, P

    1987-05-25

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with positive acidified serum test (HEMPAS) is a genetic disease caused by membrane abnormality. Previously we have found that Band 3 and Band 4.5 are not glycosylated by lactosaminoglycans in HEMPAS erythrocytes, whereas normally these proteins have lactosaminoglycans (Fukuda, M. N., Papayannopoulou, T., Gordon-Smith, E. C., Rochant, H., and Testa, U. (1984) Br. J. Haematol. 56, 55-68). In order to find out where glycosylation of lactosaminoglycans stops, we have analyzed the carbohydrate structures of HEMPAS Band 3. By fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, methylation analysis, and hydrazinolysis followed by exoglycosidase treatments, the following structure was elucidated: (formula; see text) N-Linked glycopeptides synthesized in vitro by reticulocyte microsomes from HEMPAS were shown to be predominantly the above short oligosaccharide, whereas those from normal reticulocytes contain large molecular weight carbohydrates. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, which transfers N-acetylglucosamine to the C-2 position of the Man alpha 1----6Man beta 1----arm of the biantennary core structure, was therefore examined by using Man alpha 1----6(GlcNAc beta 1----2Man alpha 1----3)Man beta 1----4GlcNAc beta 1----4GlcNAcol as an acceptor. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II activity was demonstrated in the lymphocyte microsome fraction from normal individuals. However, this enzyme activity was found to be decreased in those from HEMPAS patients. These results suggest that the primary defect of HEMPAS lies in the lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II. PMID:2953718

  18. Spin-trapping studies of hepatic free radicals formed following the acute administration of ethanol to rats: In vivo detection of 1-hydroxyethyl radicals with PBN

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, L.A.; Kotake, Y.; McCay, P.B.; Janzen, E.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The generation of free radicals in rat liver following the acute oral administration of ethanol was studied with the spin-trapping method, using a deuterated derivative of phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN-d14) as the spin-trapping agent. After administration of ethanol and PBN-d14 to rats, organic extracts of the liver were prepared and subjected to ESR spectroscopy. In the case of ethanol-treated rats, the ESR spectra indicated that mixtures of radicals had been trapped, while spectra from control rats were essentially negative. The predominant spin adduct detected after ethanol treatment is proposed to be from a carbon-centered, primary alkyl radical, based on gamma-hydrogen hyperfine splitting patterns observed with PBN-d14. Oxygen-centered radicals also contributed to the ESR spectra. Liver extracts also contained low concentrations of the 1-hydroxyethyl radical spin adduct, which was indicated by weak spectral lines corresponding to those of the 1-13C-ethanol adduct. These data confirm previous suggestions that ethanol is metabolized to a free radical metabolite in rat liver. In addition, some information on types of lipid radicals generated during alcohol intoxication has been obtained.

  19. Kinetics of hydroperoxy radical reactions with acetone/HO2 adduct and with acetonylperoxy radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieman, F. J.; VanDerGeest, K.; Newenhouse, E.; Watkins, K.; Noell, A. C.; Hui, A.; Sander, S. P.; Okumura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions of hydroperoxy radical, HO2, with acetone and with acetonylperoxy radical, CH3C(O)CH2OO, may play an important role in the oxidation chemistry of the troposphere. Using a temperature-controlled slow-flow tube cell and laser flash photolysis of Cl2 to produce HO2 and CH3C(O)CH2OO from methanol and acetone, respectively, we studied the chemical kinetics involved over the temperature range of 215 to 298 K at 100 Torr. Rates of chemical reactions were determined by monitoring the HO2 concentration as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. (See Fig.1.) The primary reactions are rapid (<100 μsec) reactions to form the adducts HO2-CH3OH and HO2-CH3C(O)CH3 followed by HO2 reactions with itself, the adducts (chaperone mechanisms), and acetonylperoxy radical. The equilibrium constants for adduct formation were determined in previous work.1,2 In this work, rate coefficients were determined for the acetone chaperone mechanism over the entire temperature range. (E.g., see Fig. 2.) The rate coefficients and energies obtained are very similar to those found for the methanol case.1 Rate coefficients for the CH3C(O)CH2OO/HO2 reaction were also determined over a smaller temperature range, extending the measured value beyond room temperature, and yielding an activation energy. 1. Christensen et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 6948-6959. 2. Grieman et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2011, 115, 10527-10538. Fig.1. HO2 decay for HO2/Acetone chemistry at T = 298 K. Fig.2. Determining rate coefficient (k") for HO2/acetone chaperone effect at T = 222.5 K.

  20. Electron attachment and positive ion chemistry of monohydrogenated fluorocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Justin P.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2015-08-01

    Rate coefficients and product branching fractions for electron attachment and for reaction with Ar+ are measured over the temperature range 300-585 K for three monohydrogenated fluorocarbon (HFC) radicals (CF3CHF, CHF2CF2, and CF3CHFCF2), as well as their five closed-shell precursors (1-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4I, 2-HC2F4Br, 1-HC3F6I, 2-HC3F6Br). Attachment to the HFC radicals is always fairly inefficient (between 0.1% and 10% of the Vogt-Wannier capture rate), but generally faster than attachment to analogous perfluorinated carbon radicals. The primary products in all cases are HF-loss to yield CnFm-1- anions, with only a minor branching to F- product. In all cases the temperature dependences are weak. Attachment to the precursor halocarbons is near the capture rate with a slight negative temperature dependence in all cases except for 2-HC2F4Br, which is ˜10% efficient at 300 K and becomes more efficient, approaching the capture rate at higher temperatures. All attachment kinetics are successfully reproduced using a kinetic modeling approach. Reaction of the HFC radicals with Ar+ proceeds at or near the calculated collisional rate coefficient in all cases, yielding a wide variety of product ions.

  1. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  2. Low-temperature EPR and quantum chemical study of lactone radical cations and their transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, S.; Janovský, I.; Knolle, W.; Mehnert, R.; Turin, D. A.

    2005-07-01

    Radical cations of a number of lactones ( β-butyro-, γ-butyro-, γ-valero-, δ-hexano-, δ-valero- and ɛ-capro-) were radiolytically generated in CF 3CCl 3 matrix and investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The primary radical cation of the 4-membered ring β-butyrolactone is unstable even at 77 K and undergoes spontaneous ring opening and fragmentation, leading to the deprotonated neutral (CH 2CHCH 2) rad radical. The stability of the primary carbonyl-centred radical cations of the 5-, 6- and 7-membered lactone rings towards intramolecular H-shift from the C1 in α-position to carbonyl oxygen depends primarily on the ring size, which determines the activation energy of the transformation and distance L(H-O) of the carbonyl oxygen to the nearest H-atom on the ring. The larger the ring, the smaller the L(H-O) and also activation energy of the H-shift, making the transformation of the primary radical cation more feasible. The quantum chemical calculations facilitated the interpretation of the EPR spectra of the secondary radical cations.

  3. Free radical-operated proteotoxic stress in macrophages primed with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Dili; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E.; Gimenez, Maria S.; Deter ding, Leesa J.; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mason, Ronald P.; Ashby, Michael T.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2013-01-01

    The free-radical-operated mechanism of death of activated macrophages at sites of inflammation is unclear, but it is important to define it in order to find targets to prevent further tissue dysfunction. A well-defined model of macrophage activation at sites of inflammation is the treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with the resulting production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS and other free radicals can be trapped with the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), a cell-permeable probe with antioxidant properties, which thus interferes with free-radical-operated oxidation processes. Here we have used immuno-spin trapping to investigate the role of free-radical-operated protein oxidation in LPS-induced cytotoxicity in macrophages. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS resulted in increased ROS production, oxidation of proteins, cell morphological changes and cytotoxicity. DMPO was found to trap protein radicals to form protein–DMPO nitrone adducts, to reduce protein carbonyls, and to block LPS-induced cell death. N-Acetylcysteine (a source of reduced glutathione), diphenyleneiodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase), and 2,2′-dipyridyl (a chelator of Fe2+) prevented LPS-induced oxidative stress and cell death and reduced DMPO–nitrone adduct formation, suggesting a critical role of ROS, metals, and protein-radical formation in LPS-induced cell cytotoxicity. We also determined the subcellular localization of protein–DMPO nitrone adducts and identified some candidate proteins for DMPO attachment by LC-MS/MS. The LC-MS/MS data are consistent with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, one of the most abundant, sensitive, and ubiquitous proteins in the cell, becoming labeled with DMPO when the cell is primed with LPS. This information will help find strategies to treat inflammation-associated tissue dysfunction by focusing on preventing free radical-operated proteotoxic stress and death of macrophages. PMID

  4. Isomerization and decomposition reactions in the pyrolysis of branched hydrocarbons: 4-methyl-1-pentyl radical.

    PubMed

    McGivern, W Sean; Awan, Iftikhar A; Tsang, Wing; Manion, Jeffrey A

    2008-07-31

    The kinetics of the decomposition of 4-methyl-1-pentyl radicals have been studied from 927-1068 K at pressures of 1.78-2.44 bar using a single pulse shock tube with product analysis. The reactant radicals were formed from the thermal C-I bond fission of 1-iodo-4-methylpentane, and a radical inhibitor was used to prevent interference from bimolecular reactions. 4-Methyl-1-pentyl radicals undergo competing decomposition and isomerization reactions via beta-bond scission and 1, x-hydrogen migrations (x = 4, 5), respectively, to form short-chain radicals and alkenes. Major alkene products, in decreasing order of concentration, were propene, ethene, isobutene, and 1-pentene. The observed products are used to validate a RRKM/master equation (ME) chemical kinetics model of the pyrolysis. The presence of the branched methyl moiety has a significant impact on the observed reaction rates relative to analogous reaction rates in straight-chain radical systems. Systems that result in the formation of substituted radical or alkene products are found to be faster than reactions that form primary radical and alkene species. Pressure-dependent reaction rate constants from the RRKM/ME analysis are provided for all four H-transfer isomers at 500-1900 K and 0.1-1000 bar pressure for all of the decomposition and isomerization reactions in this system. PMID:18613654

  5. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  6. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    radical species derived from amino acids, peptides and proteins described in the literature are made.

  7. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  8. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    PubMed

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. PMID

  9. Photoinduced free radicals from chlorpromazine and related phenothiazines: relationship to phenothiazine-induced photosensitization.

    PubMed Central

    Chignell, C F; Motten, A G; Buettner, G R

    1985-01-01

    Chlorpromazine and several other related phenothiazines are known to cause both phototoxic and photoallergic reactions in the skin and eyes of patients receiving these drugs. While the detailed mechanisms of photosensitization are not known, it is obvious that the first step must be the absorption of light by the drug, its metabolites, or photoproducts, or possibly an induced endogenous chemical. In this review, the free-radical photochemistry of phenothiazines is described, and the evidence for the involvement of photoinduced free radicals in photo