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Sample records for proteomic analysis identifies

  1. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  2. Proteomic analysis of the soybean symbiosome identifies new symbiotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Victoria C; Loughlin, Patrick C; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M; Day, David A; Smith, Penelope M C

    2015-05-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  3. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  4. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  5. 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis identifies new potential therapeutic targets for adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Armignacco, Roberta; Ercolino, Tonino; Canu, Letizia; Baroni, Gianna; Nesi, Gabriella; Galli, Andrea; Mannelli, Massimo; Luconi, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive tumor with poor prognosis when metastatic at diagnosis. The tumor biology is still mostly unclear, justifying the limited specificity and efficacy of the anti-cancer drugs currently available. This study reports the first proteomic analysis of ACC by using two-dimensional-differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to evaluate a differential protein expression profile between adrenocortical carcinoma and normal adrenal. Mass spectrometry, associated with 2D-DIGE analysis of carcinomas and normal adrenals, identified 22 proteins in 27 differentially expressed 2D spots, mostly overexpressed in ACC. Gene ontology analysis revealed that most of the proteins concurs towards a metabolic shift, called the Warburg effect, in adrenocortical cancer. The differential expression was validated by Western blot for Aldehyde-dehydrogenase-6-A1,Transferrin, Fascin-1,Lamin A/C,Adenylate-cyclase-associated-protein-1 and Ferredoxin-reductase. Moreover, immunohistochemistry performed on paraffin-embedded ACC and normal adrenal specimens confirmed marked positive staining for all 6 proteins diffusely expressed by neoplastic cells, compared with normal adrenal cortex. In conclusion, our preliminary findings reveal a different proteomic profile in adrenocortical carcinoma compared with normal adrenal cortex characterized by overexpression of mainly metabolic enzymes, thus suggesting the Warburg effect also occurs in ACC. These proteins may represent promising novel ACC biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets if validated in larger cohorts of patients. PMID:25691058

  6. Deep Proteome Analysis Identifies Age-Related Processes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vikram; Ly, Tony; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Lamond, Angus I; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Effective network analysis of protein data requires high-quality proteomic datasets. Here, we report a near doubling in coverage of the C. elegans adult proteome, identifying >11,000 proteins in total with ∼9,400 proteins reproducibly detected in three biological replicates. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identify proteins whose abundances vary with age, revealing a concerted downregulation of proteins involved in specific metabolic pathways and upregulation of cellular stress responses with advancing age. Among these are ∼30 peroxisomal proteins, including the PRX-5/PEX5 import protein. Functional experiments confirm that protein import into the peroxisome is compromised in vivo in old animals. We also studied the behavior of the set of age-variant proteins in chronologically age-matched, long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1-pathway mutants. Unexpectedly, the levels of many of these age-variant proteins did not scale with extended lifespan. This indicates that, despite their youthful appearance and extended lifespans, not all aspects of aging are reset in these long-lived mutants. PMID:27453442

  7. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Camelina sativa Seeds Overexpressing the AGG3 Gene to Identify the Proteomic Basis of Increased Yield and Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Sophie; Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Hicks, Leslie M; Pandey, Sona

    2015-06-01

    Camelina sativa, a close relative of Arabidopsis, is an oilseed plant that is emerging as an important biofuel resource. The genome and transcriptome maps of Camelina have become available recently, but its proteome composition remained unexplored. A labeling LC-based quantitative proteomics approach was applied to decipher the Camelina seed proteome, which led to the identification of 1532 proteins. In addition, the effect of overexpression of the Arabidopsis G-protein γ subunit 3 (AGG3) on the Camelina seed proteome was elucidated to identify the proteomic basis of its increased seed size and improved stress tolerance. The comparative analysis showed a significantly higher expression of proteins involved in primary and secondary metabolism, nucleic acid and protein metabolism, and abscisic acid related responses, corroborating the physiological effects of AGG3 overexpression. More importantly, the proteomic data suggested involvement of the AGG3 protein in the regulation of oxidative stress and heavy metal stress tolerance. These observations were confirmed by the physiological and biochemical characterization of AGG3-overexpressing seeds, which exhibit a higher tolerance to exogenous cadmium in a glutathione-dependent manner. The activity of multiple redox-regulating enzymes is higher in seeds expressing enhanced levels of AGG3. Overall, these data provide critical evidence for the role of redox regulation by the AGG3 protein in mediating important seed-related traits. PMID:25944359

  8. Proteome Analysis. Novel Proteins Identified at the Peribacteroid Membrane from Lotus japonicus Root Nodules1

    PubMed Central

    Wienkoop, Stefanie; Saalbach, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    The peribacteroid membrane (PBM) forms the structural and functional interface between the legume plant and the rhizobia. The model legume Lotus japonicus was chosen to study the proteins present at the PBM by proteome analysis. PBM was purified from root nodules by an aqueous polymer two-phase system. Extracted proteins were subjected to a global trypsin digest. The peptides were separated by nanoscale liquid chromatography and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Searching the nonredundant protein database and the green plant expressed sequence tag database using the tandem mass spectrometry data identified approximately 94 proteins, a number far exceeding the number of proteins reported for the PBM hitherto. In particular, a number of membrane proteins like transporters for sugars and sulfate; endomembrane-associated proteins such as GTP-binding proteins and vesicle receptors; and proteins involved in signaling, for example, receptor kinases, calmodulin, 14-3-3 proteins, and pathogen response-related proteins, including a so-called HIR protein, were detected. Several ATPases and aquaporins were present, indicating a more complex situation than previously thought. In addition, the unexpected presence of a number of proteins known to be located in other compartments was observed. Two characteristic protein complexes obtained from native gel electrophoresis of total PBM proteins were also analyzed. Together, the results identified specific proteins at the PBM involved in important physiological processes and localized proteins known from nodule-specific expressed sequence tag databases to the PBM. PMID:12644660

  9. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105). PMID:26364553

  10. Proteomic analysis from haploid and diploid embryos of Quercus suber L. identifies qualitative and quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Aranzazu; López, Juan Antonio; Pintos, Beatriz; Camafeita, Emilio; Bueno, Ma Angeles

    2009-09-01

    Quercus suber L. is a Mediterranean forest species with ecological, social and economic value. Clonal propagation of Q. suber elite trees has been successfully obtained from in vitro-derived somatic and gametic embryos. These clonal lines play a main role in breeding and genetic studies of Q. suber. To aid in unravelling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach is proposed. The proteomic analysis of Q. suber somatic and gametic in vitro culture-derived embryos, based on DIGE and MALDI-MS, has produced for the first time proteomic data on this species. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins have been identified which display significantly altered levels between gametic and somatic embryos. These proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, most of which had been neither previously associated with embryo development nor identified in the genus Quercus. Some of these proteins are involved in stress and pollen development and others play a role in the metabolism of tannins and phenylpropanoids, which represent two of the major pathways for the synthesis of cork chemical components. Furthermore, the augmented expression levels found for specific proteins are probably related to the homozygous state of a doubled-haploid sample. Proteins involved in synthesis of cork components can be detected at such early stages of development, showing the potential of the method to be useful in searching for biomarkers related to cork quality. PMID:19662628

  11. Identifying novel protein interactions: Proteomic methods, optimisation approaches and data analysis pipelines.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Daniel Gonçalves; Clarke, Thomas; Davies, Clare C; Bailey, Dalan

    2016-02-15

    The technological revolution in high-throughput nucleic acid and protein analysis in the last 15 years has launched the field of 'omics' and led to great advances in our understanding of cell biology. Consequently the study of the cellular proteome and protein dynamics, in particular interactomics, has been a matter of intense investigation, specifically the determination and description of complex protein interaction networks in the cell, not only with other proteins but also with RNA and DNA. The analysis of these interactions, beginning with their identification and ultimately resulting in structural level examination, is one of the cornerstones of modern biological science underpinning basic research and impacting on applied biology, biomedicine and drug discovery. In this review we summarise a selection of emerging and established techniques currently being applied in this field with a particular focus on affinity-based purification systems and their optimisation, including tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging, isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (IPOND) and RNA-protein immunoprecipitation in tandem (RIPiT). The recent application of quantitative proteomics to improve stringency and specificity is also discussed, including the use of metabolic labelling by stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), localization of organelle proteins by isotope tagging (LOPIT) and proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID). Finally, we describe a range of software resources that can be applied to interactomics, both to handle raw data and also to scrutinise its broader biological context. In this section we focus especially on open-access online interactomic databases such as Reactome and IntAct. PMID:26320829

  12. Combined expressional analysis, bioinformatics and targeted proteomics identify new potential therapeutic targets in glioblastoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Stangeland, Biljana; Mughal, Awais A.; Grieg, Zanina; Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Joel, Mrinal; Nygård, Ståle; Meling, Torstein; Murrell, Wayne; Vik Mo, Einar O.; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is both the most common and the most lethal primary brain tumor. It is thought that GBM stem cells (GSCs) are critically important in resistance to therapy. Therefore, there is a strong rationale to target these cells in order to develop new molecular therapies. To identify molecular targets in GSCs, we compared gene expression in GSCs to that in neural stem cells (NSCs) from the adult human brain, using microarrays. Bioinformatic filtering identified 20 genes (PBK/TOPK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7/DLGAP5/HURP, KIF18A, EZH2, HMMR/RHAMM/CD168, NOL4, MPP6, MDM1, RAPGEF4, RHBDD1, FNDC3B, FILIP1L, MCC, ATXN7L4/ATXN7L1, P2RY5/LPAR6 and FAM118A) that were consistently expressed in GSC cultures and consistently not expressed in NSC cultures. The expression of these genes was confirmed in clinical samples (TCGA and REMBRANDT). The first nine genes were highly co-expressed in all GBM subtypes and were part of the same protein-protein interaction network. Furthermore, their combined up-regulation correlated negatively with patient survival in the mesenchymal GBM subtype. Using targeted proteomics and the COGNOSCENTE database we linked these genes to GBM signalling pathways. Nine genes: PBK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7, KIF18A, EZH2 and HMMR should be further explored as targets for treatment of GBM. PMID:26295306

  13. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuk-Kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Lung, Maria Li; Mak, Nai-Ki; Ngok-Shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-10-15

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1 and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. PMID:25857718

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  16. Quantitative proteomics analysis to identify diffuse axonal injury biomarkers in rats using iTRAQ coupled LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Shisheng; Li, Yongguo; Zhao, Minzhu; Liu, Meng; Gao, Jun; Ding, Shijia; Li, Jianbo

    2016-02-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is fairly common during a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is associated with high mortality. Making an early diagnosis, appropriate therapeutic decisions, and an accurate prognostic evaluation of patients with DAI still pose difficulties for clinicians. The detailed mechanisms of axonal injury after head trauma have yet to be clearly defined and no reliable biomarkers are available for early DAI diagnosis. Therefore, this study employed an established DAI animal model in conjunction with an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based protein identification/quantification approach. Alterations in rat cerebral protein expression were quantified using iTRAQ coupled LC-MS/MS, with differentially expressed proteins between the control groups, sham and sham-injured, and the injury groups, animals that died immediately post-injury and those sacrificed at 1h, 6h, 1d, 3d and 7d post-injury, identified. A total of 1858 proteins were identified and quantified and comparative analysis identified ten candidate proteins that warranted further examination. Of the ten candidate DAI biomarkers, four proteins, citrate synthase (CS), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap25), microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) and Rho-associated protein kinase 2 (Rock2), were validated by subsequent Western blot and immunohistochemistry analyses. Our studies not only identified several novel biomarkers that may provide insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of DAI, but also demonstrated the feasibility of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis in cerebral tissue research. PMID:26710722

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Millar, Ewan K. A.; Schwartz, Peter; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression. Method We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20) and healthy control women (n = 20). Results Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p<0.05, fold change >3). Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131), early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014), filaggrin and MMRN2) and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10). Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin) identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns

  18. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  19. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  20. Coronin-1C is a novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma invasive progression identified by proteomics analysis and clinical validation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To better search for potential markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invasion and metastasis, proteomic approach was applied to identify potential metastasis biomarkers associated with HCC. Methods Membrane proteins were extracted from MHCC97L and HCCLM9 cells, with a similar genetic background and remarkably different metastasis potential, and compared by SDS-PAGE and identified by ESI-MS/MS. The results were further validated by western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tumor tissues from HCCLM9- and MHCC97L-nude mice, and clinical specimens. Results Membrane proteins were extracted from MHCC97L and HCCLM9 cell and compared by SDS-PAGE analyses. A total of 14 differentially expressed proteins were identified by ESI-MS/MS. Coronin-1C, a promising candidate, was found to be overexpressed in HCCLM9 cells as compared with MHCC97L cells, and validated by western blot and IHC from both nude mice tumor tissues and clinical specimens. Coronin-1C level showed an abrupt upsurge when pulmonary metastasis occurred. Increasing coronin-1C expression was found in liver cancer tissues of HCCLM9-nude mice with spontaneous pulmonary metastasis. IHC study on human HCC specimens revealed that more patients in the higher coronin-1C group had overt larger tumor and more advanced stage. Conclusions Coronin-1C could be a candidate biomarker to predict HCC invasive behavior. PMID:20181269

  1. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  2. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identified HSC71 as a Novel Serum Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Cai, Yi; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most lethal urologic cancers and about 80% of RCC are of the clear-cell type (ccRCC). However, there are no serum biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis of RCC. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis on serum samples from ccRCC patients and control group by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Overall, 16 proteins were significantly upregulated (ratio > 1.5) and 14 proteins were significantly downregulated (ratio < 0.67) in early-stage ccRCC compared to control group. HSC71 was selected and subsequently validated by Western blot in six independent sets of patients. ELISA subsequently confirmed HSC71 as a potential serum biomarker for distinguishing RCC from benign urologic disease with an operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76~0.96), achieving sensitivity of 87% (95% CI 69%~96%) at a specificity of 80% (95% CI 61~92%) with a threshold of 15 ng/mL. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis led to identification of serum HSC71 as a novel serum biomarker of RCC, particularly useful in early diagnosis of ccRCC. PMID:26425554

  3. Spermatogenesis-associated proteins at different developmental stages of buffalo testicular seminiferous tubules identified by comparative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Lin; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Hong; Chen, Fu-Mei; Zhao, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Huan-Jing; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Huang, Feng-Ling; Lu, Yang-Qing; Zhang, Ming

    2016-07-01

    The testicular seminiferous tubules contain Sertoli cells and different types of spermatogenic cells. They provide the microenvironment for spermatogenesis, but the precise molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis is still not well known. Here, we have employed tandem mass tag coupled to LC-MS/MS with the high-throughput quantitative proteomics technology to explore the protein expression from buffalo testicular seminiferous tubules at three different developmental stages (prepuberty, puberty, and postpuberty). The results show 304 differentially expressed proteins with a ≥2-fold change, and bioinformatics analysis indicates that 27 of these may be associated with spermatogenesis. Expression patterns of seven selected proteins were verified via Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, and further cellular localizations of these proteins by immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence analysis. Taken together, the results provide potential molecular markers of spermatogenesis and provide a rich resource for further studies on male reproduction regulation. PMID:27173832

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Human Nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Nicolas, Armel; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed spectacular progress in the field of mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics, including advances in instrumentation, chromatography, sample preparation methods, and experimental design for multidimensional analyses. It is now possible not only to identify most of the protein components of a cell proteome in a single experiment, but also to describe additional proteome dimensions, such as protein turnover rates, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. Furthermore, by comparing the proteome at different time points, it is possible to create a "time-lapse" view of proteome dynamics. By combining high-throughput quantitative proteomics with detailed subcellular fractionation protocols and data analysis techniques it is also now possible to characterize in detail the proteomes of specific subcellular organelles, providing important insights into cell regulatory mechanisms and physiological responses. In this chapter we present a reliable workflow and protocol for MS-based analysis and quantitation of the proteome of nucleoli isolated from human cells. The protocol presented is based on a SILAC analysis of human MCF10A-Src-ER cells with analysis performed on a Q-Exactive Plus Orbitrap MS instrument (Thermo Fisher Scientific). The subsequent chapter describes how to process the resulting raw MS files from this experiment using MaxQuant software and data analysis procedures to evaluate the nucleolar proteome using customized R scripts. PMID:27576725

  5. Plasma Proteomic Analysis May Identify New Markers for Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Xuwi; Shedden, Kerby; Ao Xiaoping; Davis, Mary

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To study whether radiation induces differential changes in plasma proteomics in patients with and without radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) of Grade {>=}2 (RILT2). Methods and Materials: A total of 57 patients with NSCLC received radiation therapy (RT) were eligible. Twenty patients, 6 with RILT2 with tumor stage matched to 14 without RILT2, were enrolled for this analysis. Platelet-poor plasma was obtained before RT, at 2, 4, 6 weeks during RT, and 1 and 3 months after RT. Plasma proteomes were compared using a multiplexed quantitative proteomics approach involving ExacTag labeling, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and nano-LC electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Variance components models were used to identify the differential protein expression between patients with and without RILT2. Results: More than 100 proteins were identified and quantified. After excluding proteins for which there were not at least 2 subjects with data for at least two time points, 76 proteins remained for this preliminary analysis. C4b-binding protein alpha chain, Complement C3, and Vitronectin had significantly higher expression levels in patients with RILT2 compared with patients without RILT2, based on both the data sets of RT start to 3 months post-RT (p < 0.01) and RT start to the end of RT (p < 0.01). The expression ratios of patients with RILT2 vs. without RILT2 were 1.60, 1.36, 1.46, and 1.66, 1.34, 1.46, for the above three proteins, respectively. Conclusions: This proteomic approach identified new plasma protein markers for future studies on RILT prediction.

  6. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Droplets from Caco-2/TC7 Enterocytes Identifies Novel Modulators of Lipid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Beilstein, Frauke; Bouchoux, Julien; Rousset, Monique; Demignot, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    In enterocytes, the dynamic accumulation and depletion of triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LD) during fat absorption suggests that cytosolic LD-associated TAG contribute to TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL) production. To get insight into the mechanisms controlling the storage/secretion balance of TAG, we used as a tool hepatitis C virus core protein, which localizes onto LDs, and thus may modify their protein coat and decrease TRL secretion. We compared the proteome of LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes expressing or not hepatitis C virus core protein by a differential proteomic approach (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry). We identified 42 proteins, 21 being involved in lipid metabolism. Perilipin-2/ADRP, which is suggested to stabilize long term-stored TAG, was enriched in LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 expressing core protein while perilipin-3/TIP47, which is involved in LD synthesis from newly synthesized TAG, was decreased. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins were strongly decreased, suggesting reduced interactions between LD and endoplasmic reticulum, where TRL assembly occurs. For the first time, we show that 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (DHB2), which catalyzes the conversion of 17-keto to 17 β-hydroxysteroids and which was the most highly enriched protein in core expressing cells, is localized to LD and interferes with TAG secretion, probably through its capacity to inactivate testosterone. Overall, we identified potential new players of lipid droplet dynamics, which may be involved in the balance between lipid storage and secretion, and may be altered in enterocytes in pathological conditions such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes and obesity. PMID:23301014

  8. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum induced alterations in humans from different endemic regions of India to decipher malaria pathogenesis and identify surrogate markers of severity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kumar, Vipin; Bhave, Amruta; Singh, Vaidhvi; Gogtay, Nithya J; Thatte, Urmila M; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    India significantly contributes to the global malaria burden and has the largest population in the world at risk of malaria. This study aims to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of non-severe and severe infections by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to identify markers related to disease severity and to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and host immune responses. In discovery phase of the study, a comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis was performed using gel-based (2D-DIGE) and gel-free (iTRAQ) techniques on two independent mass spectrometry platforms (ESI-Q-TOF and Q-Exactive mass spectrometry), and selected targets were validated by ELISA. Proteins showing altered serum abundance in falciparum malaria patients revealed the modulation of different physiological pathways including chemokine and cytokine signaling, IL-12 signaling and production in macrophages, complement cascades, blood coagulation, and protein ubiquitination pathways. Some muscle related and cytoskeletal proteins such as titin and galectin-3-binding protein were found to be up-regulated in severe malaria patients. Hemoglobin levels and platelet counts were also found to be drastically lower in severe malaria patients. Identified proteins including serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein E and haptoglobin, which exhibited sequential alterations in their serum abundance in different severity levels of malaria, could serve as potential predictive markers for disease severity. To the best of our information, we report here the first comprehensive analysis describing the serum proteomic alterations observed in severe P. falciparum infected patients from different malaria endemic regions of India. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25982387

  9. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Molecular Signatures of Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Rats as a Model of Postmenopausal Status

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Chung; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal women are particularly at increased risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here we aimed to determine the impact of postmenopausal-induced NAFLD (PM-NAFLD) in an ovariectomized rat model. Sixteen six-week-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into two groups (eight per group), for sham-operation (Sham) or bilateral ovariectomy (Ovx). Four months after surgery, indices of liver damage and liver histomorphometry were measured. Both serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotranferease (ALT) levels were significantly higher in the Ovx than Sham group. We performed quantitative LC-MS/MS-based proteomic profiling of livers from rats with PM-NAFLD to provide baseline knowledge of the PM-NAFLD proteome and to investigate proteins involved in PM-NAFLD by ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) to provide corroborative evidence for differential regulation of molecular and cellular functions affecting metabolic processes. Of the 586 identified proteins, the levels of 59 (10.0%) and 48 (8.2%) were significantly higher and lower, respectively, in the Ovx group compared to the Sham group. In conclusion, the changes in regulation of proteins implicated in PM-NAFLD may affect other vital biological processes in the body apart from causing postmenopause-mediated liver dysfunction. Our quantitative proteomics analysis may also suggest potential biomarkers and further clinical applications for PM-NAFLD. PMID:26506382

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N.; Krag, Sharon S.; Cole, Robert N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In order to complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multi-dimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most a 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using CHO genome exclusively which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. 504 of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  11. Proteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N; Krag, Sharon S; Cole, Robert N; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. Five-hundred four of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications, and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  12. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature

    PubMed Central

    Pesciotta, Esther N.; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  13. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  14. Gel-based and gel-free proteomic analysis of Nicotiana tabacum trichomes identifies proteins involved in secondary metabolism and in the (a)biotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, Emmanuel; Simonart, Géraldine; Degand, Hervé; Faber, Anne-Marie; Morsomme, Pierre; Boutry, Marc

    2011-02-01

    Nicotiana tabacum leaves are covered by trichomes involved in the secretion of large amounts of secondary metabolites, some of which play a major role in plant defense. However, little is known about the metabolic pathways that operate in these structures. We undertook a proteomic analysis of N. tabacum trichomes in order to identify their protein complement. Efficient trichome isolation was obtained by abrading frozen leaves. After homogenization, soluble proteins and a microsomal fraction were prepared by centrifugation. Gel-based and gel-free proteomic analyses were then performed. 2-DE analysis of soluble proteins led to the identification of 1373 protein spots, which were digested and analyzed by MS/MS, leading to 680 unique identifications. Both soluble proteins and microsomal fraction were analyzed by LC MALDI-MS/MS after trypsin digestion, leading to 858 identifications, many of which had not been identified after 2-DE, indicating that the two methods complement each other. Many enzymes putatively involved in secondary metabolism were identified, including enzymes involved in the synthesis of terpenoid precursors and in acyl sugar production. Several transporters were also identified, some of which might be involved in secondary metabolite transport. Various (a)biotic stress response proteins were also detected, supporting the role of trichomes in plant defense. PMID:21268273

  15. Proteomics analysis of human oligodendroglioma proteome.

    PubMed

    Khaghani-Razi-Abad, Solmaz; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Pooladi, Mehdi; Entezari, Maliheh; Kazemi, Elham

    2015-09-10

    Proteomics analyses enable the identification and quantitation of proteins. From a purely clinical perspective, the application of proteomics based on innovations, may greatly affect the future management of malignant brain tumors. This optimism is based on four main reasons: diagnosis, prognosis, selection of targeted therapy based on molecular profile of the brain tumor and monitoring therapeutic response, or resistance. We extracted the proteins of tumor and normal brain tissues, and then evaluated the protein purity by Bradford test. In this study, we separated the proteins by two-dimensional (2DG) gel electrophoresis methods. Then spots were analyzed, compared using statistical data and specific software and were identified by pH isoelectric, molecular weights and data banks. The protein profiles were determined using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry approaches. Simple statistical tests were used to establish a putative hierarchy in which the change in protein level was ranked according to a cut-off point with p<0.05. The 2D gel showed a total of 1328 spots among which 157 spots were under-expressed and 276 spots were overexpressed. Most proteins are subjects to post-translational modifications, where amino acid residues may be chemically modified or conjugated by small proteins like ubiquitin. Proteomics is a powerful way to identifying multiple proteins which are altered following a neuropharmacological intervention in a CNS disease. PMID:26002447

  16. Total Proteome Analysis Identifies Migration Defects as a Major Pathogenetic Factor in Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region (IGHV)-unmutated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia*

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Gina L.; Zhuang, Jianguo; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Till, Kathleen J.; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian G.; Oates, Melanie; Park, Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Pettitt, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region defines two clinically distinct forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) known as mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (UM-CLL). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse clinical outcome associated with UM-CLL, total proteomes from nine UM-CLL and nine M-CLL samples were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based mass spectrometry. Based on the expression of 3521 identified proteins, principal component analysis separated CLL samples into two groups corresponding to immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutational status. Computational analysis showed that 43 cell migration/adhesion pathways were significantly enriched by 39 differentially expressed proteins, 35 of which were expressed at significantly lower levels in UM-CLL samples. Furthermore, UM-CLL cells underexpressed proteins associated with cytoskeletal remodeling and overexpressed proteins associated with transcriptional and translational activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that UM-CLL cells are less migratory and more adhesive than M-CLL cells, resulting in their retention in lymph nodes, where they are exposed to proliferative stimuli. In keeping with this hypothesis, analysis of an extended cohort of 120 CLL patients revealed a strong and specific association between UM-CLL and lymphadenopathy. Our study illustrates the potential of total proteome analysis to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer. PMID:25645933

  17. Total proteome analysis identifies migration defects as a major pathogenetic factor in immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV)-unmutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Gina L; Zhuang, Jianguo; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Till, Kathleen J; Jithesh, Puthen V; Lin, Ke; Johnson, Gillian G; Oates, Melanie; Park, Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    The mutational status of the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region defines two clinically distinct forms of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) known as mutated (M-CLL) and unmutated (UM-CLL). To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the adverse clinical outcome associated with UM-CLL, total proteomes from nine UM-CLL and nine M-CLL samples were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based mass spectrometry. Based on the expression of 3521 identified proteins, principal component analysis separated CLL samples into two groups corresponding to immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region mutational status. Computational analysis showed that 43 cell migration/adhesion pathways were significantly enriched by 39 differentially expressed proteins, 35 of which were expressed at significantly lower levels in UM-CLL samples. Furthermore, UM-CLL cells underexpressed proteins associated with cytoskeletal remodeling and overexpressed proteins associated with transcriptional and translational activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that UM-CLL cells are less migratory and more adhesive than M-CLL cells, resulting in their retention in lymph nodes, where they are exposed to proliferative stimuli. In keeping with this hypothesis, analysis of an extended cohort of 120 CLL patients revealed a strong and specific association between UM-CLL and lymphadenopathy. Our study illustrates the potential of total proteome analysis to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms in cancer. PMID:25645933

  18. Directed Shotgun Proteomics Guided by Saturated RNA-seq Identifies a Complete Expressed Prokaryotic Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Omasits, U.; Quebatte, Maxime; Stekhoven, Daniel J.; Fortes, Claudia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Robinson, Mark D.; Dehio, Christoph; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2013-11-01

    Prokaryotes, due to their moderate complexity, are particularly amenable to the comprehensive identification of the protein repertoire expressed under different conditions. We applied a generic strategy to identify a complete expressed prokaryotic proteome, which is based on the analysis of RNA and proteins extracted from matched samples. Saturated transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq provided an endpoint estimate of the protein-coding genes expressed under two conditions which mimic the interaction of Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Directed shotgun proteomics experiments were carried out on four subcellular fractions. By specifically targeting proteins which are short, basic, low abundant, and membrane localized, we could eliminate their initial underrepresentation compared to the estimated endpoint. A total of 1250 proteins were identified with an estimated false discovery rate below 1%. This represents 85% of all distinct annotated proteins and ~90% of the expressed protein-coding genes. Genes that were detected at the transcript but not protein level, were found to be highly enriched in several genomic islands. Furthermore, genes that lacked an ortholog and a functional annotation were not detected at the protein level; these may represent examples of overprediction in genome annotations. A dramatic membrane proteome reorganization was observed, including differential regulation of autotransporters, adhesins, and hemin binding proteins. Particularly noteworthy was the complete membrane proteome coverage, which included expression of all members of the VirB/D4 type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor.

  19. Differential expression of proteins in naïve and IL-2 stimulated primary human NK cells identified by global proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Di; Felder, Mildred; Scarlett, Cameron O.; Patankar, Manish S.; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells efficiently cytolyse tumors and virally infected cells. Despite the important role that interleukin (IL)-2 plays in stimulating the proliferation of NK cells and increasing NK cell activity, little is known about the alterations in the global NK cell proteome following IL-2 activation. To compare the proteomes of naïve and IL-2-activated primary NK cells and identify key cellular pathways involved in IL-2 signaling, we isolated proteins from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells from healthy donors, the proteins were trypsinized and the resulting peptides were analyzed by 2D LC ESI-MS/MS followed by label-free quantification. In total, more than 2000 proteins were identified from naïve and IL-2-activated NK cells where 383 proteins were found to be differentially expressed following IL-2 activation. Functional annotation of IL-2 regulated proteins revealed potential targets for future investigation of IL-2 signaling in human primary NK cells. A pathway analysis was performed and revealed several pathways that were not previously known to be involved in IL-2 response, including ubiquitin proteasome pathway, integrin signaling pathway, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling pathway, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway and Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:23806757

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Oocytes Identifies PRMT7 as a Reprogramming Factor that Replaces SOX2 in the Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bingyuan; Pfeiffer, Martin J; Drexler, Hannes C A; Fuellen, Georg; Boiani, Michele

    2016-08-01

    The reprogramming process that leads to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may benefit from adding oocyte factors to Yamanaka's reprogramming cocktail (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, with or without MYC; OSK(M)). We previously searched for such facilitators of reprogramming (the reprogrammome) by applying label-free LC-MS/MS analysis to mouse oocytes, producing a catalog of 28 candidates that are (i) able to robustly access the cell nucleus and (ii) shared between mature mouse oocytes and pluripotent embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that our 28 reprogrammome candidates would also be (iii) abundant in mature oocytes, (iv) depleted after the oocyte-to-embryo transition, and (v) able to potentiate or replace the OSKM factors. Using LC-MS/MS and isotopic labeling methods, we found that the abundance profiles of the 28 proteins were below those of known oocyte-specific and housekeeping proteins. Of the 28 proteins, only arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) changed substantially during mouse embryogenesis and promoted the conversion of mouse fibroblasts into iPSCs. Specifically, PRMT7 replaced SOX2 in a factor-substitution assay, yielding iPSCs. These findings exemplify how proteomics can be used to prioritize the functional analysis of reprogrammome candidates. The LC-MS/MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003093. PMID:27225728

  1. Proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic studies of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have recently received great attention because this animal is a useful model platform for the in vivo study of various biological problems relevant to human disease. In general, proteomic analysis is performed in order to address a...

  2. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated canine mast cell tumour cells identifies potentially kit signaling-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine mast cell tumour proliferation depends to a large extent on the activity of KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Inhibitors of the KIT tyrosine kinase have recently been introduced and successfully applied as a therapeutic agent for this tumour type. However, little is known on the downstream target genes of this signaling pathway and molecular changes after inhibition. Results Transcriptome analysis of the canine mast cell tumour cell line C2 treated for up to 72 hours with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor masitinib identified significant changes in the expression levels of approximately 3500 genes or 16% of the canine genome. Approximately 40% of these genes had increased mRNA expression levels including genes associated with the pro-proliferative pathways of B- and T-cell receptors, chemokine receptors, steroid hormone receptors and EPO-, RAS and MAP kinase signaling. Proteome analysis of C2 cells treated for 72 hours identified 24 proteins with changed expression levels, most of which being involved in gene transcription, e.g. EIA3, EIA4, TARDBP, protein folding, e.g. HSP90, UCHL3, PDIA3 and protection from oxidative stress, GSTT3, SELENBP1. Conclusions Transcriptome and proteome analysis of neoplastic canine mast cells treated with masitinib confirmed the strong important and complex role of KIT in these cells. Approximately 16% of the total canine genome and thus the majority of the active genes were significantly transcriptionally regulated. Most of these changes were associated with reduced proliferation and metabolism of treated cells. Interestingly, several pro-proliferative pathways were up-regulated, which may represent attempts of masitinib treated cells to activate alternative pro-proliferative pathways. These pathways may contain hypothetical targets for a combination therapy with masitinib to further improve its therapeutic effect. PMID:22747577

  3. S100A8 is identified as a biomarker of HPV18-infected oral squamous cell carcinomas by suppression subtraction hybridization, clinical proteomics analysis, and immunohistochemistry staining.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wan-Yu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Hua, Chun-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Huang, Shiuan-Yi; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to differentiate between the Human papillomaviruses 18 positive (HPV18+) and negative (HPV18-) oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) in oral cancer patients with cancer-associated oral habits (betel quid chewing, cigarette smoking, and alcohol drinking). Both gene and protein expression profiles of HPV18+ and HPV18- OSCC were compared: we then further explored the biological effect of HPV in oral cancer. Suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH), clinical proteomics analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining were carried out in the HPV18+ and HPV18- OSCC groups. HPV typing detection revealed that 11 OSCC tissues from 82 patients were positive for HPV18. The SSH experiment showed that 4 cancer-associated genes were highly transcribed within 11 cDNA libraries of HPV18+ OSCC, including poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase I (PARP1), replication protein A2 (RPA2), S100A8, and S100A2. Clinical proteomics analysis indicated that there was over 10-fold overexpression of Stratifin, F-actin capping protein alpha-1 subunit (CapZ alpha-1), Apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1), Heat-shock protein 27 (HSP27), Arginase-1, p16INK4A, and S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) in HPV18+ OSCC. Interestingly, the results from SSH and protemics analysis showed that S100A8 was overexpressed in HPV18+ OSCC. Moreover, IHC staining demonstrated that S100A8 was up-regulated in HPV18+ OSCC tissues. Our results suggest that S100A8 plays an important role in oral carcinogenesis following HPV18 infection; therefore, S100A8 may be a powerful biomarker of HPV18 as well as a potential therapeutic target for HPV18+ OSCC patients. The study is the first to identify S100A8 as a biomarker in HPV-associated cancer. Furthermore, this is also the first study to discover a biomarker by combining SSH, clinical proteomics, and IHC stain analysis in oral cancer-associated research. PMID:17451265

  4. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  5. Multivariate proteomic profiling identifies novel accessory proteins of coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Antrobus, Robin; Hirst, Jennifer; Bhumbra, Gary S.; Kozik, Patrycja; Jackson, Lauren P.; Sahlender, Daniela A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in mass spectrometry, proteomic characterization of transport vesicles remains challenging. Here, we describe a multivariate proteomics approach to analyzing clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) from HeLa cells. siRNA knockdown of coat components and different fractionation protocols were used to obtain modified coated vesicle-enriched fractions, which were compared by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry. 10 datasets were combined through principal component analysis into a “profiling” cluster analysis. Overall, 136 CCV-associated proteins were predicted, including 36 new proteins. The method identified >93% of established CCV coat proteins and assigned >91% correctly to intracellular or endocytic CCVs. Furthermore, the profiling analysis extends to less well characterized types of coated vesicles, and we identify and characterize the first AP-4 accessory protein, which we have named tepsin. Finally, our data explain how sequestration of TACC3 in cytosolic clathrin cages causes the severe mitotic defects observed in auxilin-depleted cells. The profiling approach can be adapted to address related cell and systems biological questions. PMID:22472443

  6. Data from proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yangdong; Han, Rongwei; Ma, Lu; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Songli; Guo, Tongjun; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-06-01

    Milk fat globules memebrane (MFGM)-enriched proteomes from Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, horse, and human were extracted and identified by an iTRAQ quantification proteomic approach. Proteomes data were analyzed by bioinformatic and multivariate statistical analysis and used to present the characteristic traits of the MFGM proteins among the studied mammals. The data of this study are also related to the research article "Proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis" in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217709

  7. Data in support of quantitative proteomics to identify potential virulence regulators in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Alexandre Keiji; Castilho, Daniele Gonçalves; Chaves, Alison Felipe Alencar; Xander, Patricia; Zelanis, André; Batista, Wagner Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides genus are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis endemic in Latin America. Few virulence factors have been identified in these fungi. This paper describes support data from the quantitative proteomics of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis attenuated and virulent isolates [1]. The protein compositions of two isolates of the Pb18 strain showing distinct infection profiles were quantitatively assessed by stable isotopic dimethyl labeling and proteomic analysis. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with identifier PXD000804. PMID:26501084

  8. Database independent proteomics analysis of the ostrich and human proteome.

    PubMed

    Altelaar, A F Maarten; Navarro, Danny; Boekhorst, Jos; van Breukelen, Bas; Snel, Berend; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-01-10

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis relies heavily on the presence of complete protein databases. Such a strategy is extremely powerful, albeit not adequate in the analysis of unpredicted postgenome events, such as posttranslational modifications, which exponentially increase the search space. Therefore, it is of interest to explore "database-free" approaches. Here, we sampled the ostrich and human proteomes with a method facilitating de novo sequencing, utilizing the protease Lys-N in combination with electron transfer dissociation. By implementing several validation steps, including the combined use of collision-induced dissociation/electron transfer dissociation data and a cross-validation with conventional database search strategies, we identified approximately 2,500 unique de novo peptide sequences from the ostrich sample with over 900 peptides generating full backbone sequence coverage. This dataset allowed the appropriate positioning of ostrich in the evolutionary tree. The described database-free sequencing approach is generically applicable and has great potential in important proteomics applications such as in the analysis of variable parts of endogenous antibodies or proteins modified by a plethora of complex posttranslational modifications. PMID:22198768

  9. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  10. Differential proteomics analysis of synaptic proteins identifies potential cellular targets and protein mediators of synaptic neuroprotection conferred by the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) gene

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, Thomas M.; Paterson, Janet M.; Short, Duncan M.; Meredith, Sara; Robertson, Kevin A.; Sutherland, Calum; Cousin, Michael A.; Dutia, Mayank B.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-somatic synaptic and axonal compartments of neurons are primary pathological targets in many neurodegenerative conditions, ranging from Alzheimer's disease through to motor neuron disease. Axons and synapses are protected from degeneration by the slow Wallerian degeneration (Wlds) gene. Significantly, the molecular mechanisms through which this spontaneous genetic mutation delays degeneration remain controversial and the downstream protein targets of Wlds resident in non-somatic compartments remain unknown. Here we have used differential proteomic analysis to identify proteins whose expression levels were significantly altered in isolated synaptic preparations from the striatum of Wlds mice. 8 of the 16 proteins we identified as having modified expression levels in Wlds synapses are known regulators of mitochondrial stability and degeneration (including VDAC1, Aralar1 and mitofilin). Subsequent analyses demonstrated that other key mitochondrial proteins, not identified in our initial screen, are also modified in Wlds synapses. Of the non-mitochondrial proteins identified, several have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases where synapses and axons are primary pathological targets (including DRP-2 and Rab GDI beta). In addition, we show that downstream protein changes can be identified in pathways corresponding to both Ube4b (including UBE1) and Nmnat1 (including VDAC1 and Aralar1) components of the chimeric Wlds gene, suggesting that full-length Wlds protein is required to elicit maximal changes in synaptic proteins. We conclude that altered mitochondrial responses to degenerative stimuli are likely to play an important role in the neuroprotective Wlds phenotype and that targeting proteins identified in the current study may lead to novel therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases in humans. PMID:17470424

  11. Proteomic Approach to Identify Nuclear Proteins in Wheat Grain.

    PubMed

    Bancel, Emmanuelle; Bonnot, Titouan; Davanture, Marlène; Branlard, Gérard; Zivy, Michel; Martre, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear proteome of the grain of the two cultivated wheat species Triticum aestivum (hexaploid wheat; genomes A, B, and D) and T. monococcum (diploid wheat; genome A) was analyzed in two early stages of development using shotgun-based proteomics. A procedure was optimized to purify nuclei, and an improved protein sample preparation was developed to efficiently remove nonprotein substances (starch and nucleic acids). A total of 797 proteins corresponding to 528 unique proteins were identified, 36% of which were classified in functional groups related to DNA and RNA metabolism. A large number (107 proteins) of unknown functions and hypothetical proteins were also found. Some identified proteins may be multifunctional and may present multiple localizations. On the basis of the MS/MS analysis, 368 proteins were present in the two species, and in two stages of development, some qualitative differences between species and stages of development were also found. All of these data illustrate the dynamic function of the grain nucleus in the early stages of development. PMID:26228564

  12. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  13. Proteomic analysis of engineered cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage. PMID:26445845

  14. Proteome Analysis of Peroxisomes from Etiolated Arabidopsis Seedlings Identifies a Peroxisomal Protease Involved in β-Oxidation and Development1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Sheng; Yang, Pingfang; Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Kaur, Navneet; Switzenberg, Robert; Aung, Kyaw; Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development. Peroxisomes in seeds/dark-grown seedlings and in photosynthetic tissues constitute two major subtypes of plant peroxisomes, which had been postulated to contain distinct primary biochemical properties. Multiple in-depth proteomic analyses had been performed on leaf peroxisomes, yet the major makeup of peroxisomes in seeds or dark-grown seedlings remained unclear. To compare the metabolic pathways of the two dominant plant peroxisomal subtypes and discover new peroxisomal proteins that function specifically during seed germination, we performed proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. The detection of 77 peroxisomal proteins allowed us to perform comparative analysis with the peroxisomal proteome of green leaves, which revealed a large overlap between these two primary peroxisomal variants. Subcellular targeting analysis by fluorescence microscopy validated around 10 new peroxisomal proteins in Arabidopsis. Mutant analysis suggested the role of the cysteine protease RESPONSE TO DROUGHT21A-LIKE1 in β-oxidation, seed germination, and growth. This work provides a much-needed road map of a major type of plant peroxisome and has established a basis for future investigations of peroxisomal proteolytic processes to understand their roles in development and in plant interaction with the environment. PMID:24130194

  15. Combined Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis Identifies Pathways and Markers Associated with the Establishment of Rapeseed Microspore-Derived Embryo Development1[W

    PubMed Central

    Joosen, Ronny; Cordewener, Jan; Supena, Ence Darmo Jaya; Vorst, Oscar; Lammers, Michiel; Maliepaard, Chris; Zeilmaker, Tieme; Miki, Brian; America, Twan; Custers, Jan; Boutilier, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Microspore-derived embryo (MDE) cultures are used as a model system to study plant cell totipotency and as an in vitro system to study embryo development. We characterized and compared the transcriptome and proteome of rapeseed (Brassica napus) MDEs from the few-celled stage to the globular/heart stage using two MDE culture systems: conventional cultures in which MDEs initially develop as unorganized clusters that usually lack a suspensor, and a novel suspensor-bearing embryo culture system in which the embryo proper originates from the distal cell of a suspensor-like structure and undergoes the same ordered cell divisions as the zygotic embryo. Improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing MDEs suggests a new role for the suspensor in driving embryo cell identity and patterning. An MDE culture cDNA array and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein sequencing were used to compile global and specific expression profiles for the two types of MDE cultures. Analysis of the identities of 220 candidate embryo markers, as well as the identities of 32 sequenced embryo up-regulated protein spots, indicate general roles for protein synthesis, glycolysis, and ascorbate metabolism in the establishment of MDE development. A collection of 135 robust markers for the transition to MDE development was identified, a number of which may be coregulated at the gene and protein expression level. Comparison of the expression profiles of preglobular-stage conventional MDEs and suspensor-bearing MDEs identified genes whose differential expression may reflect improved histodifferentiation of suspensor-bearing embryos. This collection of early embryo-expressed genes and proteins serves as a starting point for future marker development and gene function studies aimed at understanding the molecular regulation of cell totipotency and early embryo development in plants. PMID:17384159

  16. Proteomic analysis of serum proteins in triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice: implications for identifying biomarkers for use to screen potential candidate therapeutic drugs for early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xiaojing; Ren, Xiaohu; Huang, Peiwu; Li, Shuiming; Ma, Quan; Ying, Ming; Ni, Jiazuan; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xifei

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting the elderly worldwide. There is an urgent need to identify novel biomarkers of early AD. This study aims to search for potential early protein biomarkers in serum from a triple transgenic (PS1M146V/APPSwe/TauP301L) mouse model. Proteomic analysis via two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was performed on serum samples from wild-type (WT) and triple transgenic mice that were treated with or without coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) (800 mg/kg body weight/day), a powerful endogenous antioxidant displaying therapeutic benefits against AD pathology and cognitive impairment in multiple AD mouse models, for a period of three months beginning at two months of age. A total of 15 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between the WT and AD transgenic mice. The administration of CoQ10 was found to alter the changes in the differentially expressed serum proteins by upregulating 10 proteins and down-regulating 10 proteins. Among the proteins modulated by CoQ10, clusterin and α-2-macroglobulin were validated via ELISA assay. These findings revealed significant changes in serum proteins in the AD mouse model at an early pathological stage and demonstrated that administration of CoQ10 could modulate these changes in serum proteins. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed serum proteins could serve as potential protein biomarkers of early AD and that screening for potential candidate AD therapeutic drugs and monitoring of therapeutic effects could be performed via measurement of the changes in these differentially expressed serum proteins. PMID:24496070

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica. PMID:21176126

  18. A Novel Hydrolase Identified by Genomic-Proteomic Analysis of Phenylurea Herbicide Mineralization by Variovorax sp. Strain SRS16▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bers, Karolien; Leroy, Baptiste; Breugelmans, Philip; Albers, Pieter; Lavigne, Rob; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Aamand, Jens; De Mot, René; Wattiez, Ruddy; Springael, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The soil bacterial isolate Variovorax sp. strain SRS16 mineralizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron. The proposed pathway initiates with hydrolysis of linuron to 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine, followed by conversion of DCA to Krebs cycle intermediates. Differential proteomic analysis showed a linuron-dependent upregulation of several enzymes that fit into this pathway, including an amidase (LibA), a multicomponent chloroaniline dioxygenase, and enzymes associated with a modified chlorocatechol ortho-cleavage pathway. Purified LibA is a monomeric linuron hydrolase of ∼55 kDa with a Km and a Vmax for linuron of 5.8 μM and 0.16 nmol min−1, respectively. This novel member of the amidase signature family is unrelated to phenylurea-hydrolyzing enzymes from Gram-positive bacteria and lacks activity toward other tested phenylurea herbicides. Orthologues of libA are present in all other tested linuron-degrading Variovorax strains with the exception of Variovorax strains WDL1 and PBS-H4, suggesting divergent evolution of the linuron catabolic pathway in different Variovorax strains. The organization of the linuron degradation genes identified in the draft SRS16 genome sequence indicates that gene patchwork assembly is at the origin of the pathway. Transcription analysis suggests that a catabolic intermediate, rather than linuron itself, acts as effector in activation of the pathway. Our study provides the first report on the genetic organization of a bacterial pathway for complete mineralization of a phenylurea herbicide and the first report on a linuron hydrolase in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22003008

  19. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  20. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  1. Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous meningitis is a frequent extrapulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is associated with high mortality rates and severe neurological sequelae. In an earlier study employing DNA microarrays, we had identified genes that were differentially expressed at the transcript level in human brain tissue from cases of tuberculous meningitis. In the current study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach to discover protein biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. Methods To compare brain tissues from confirmed cased of tuberculous meningitis with uninfected brain tissue, we carried out quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of SCX fractionated peptides on Agilent’s accurate mass QTOF mass spectrometer. Results and conclusions Through this approach, we identified both known and novel differentially regulated molecules. Those described previously included signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA) and protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6), which have been shown to be overexpressed at the mRNA level in tuberculous meningitis. The novel overexpressed proteins identified in our study included amphiphysin (AMPH) and neurofascin (NFASC) while ferritin light chain (FTL) was found to be downregulated in TBM. We validated amphiphysin, neurofascin and ferritin light chain using immunohistochemistry which confirmed their differential expression in tuberculous meningitis. Overall, our data provides insights into the host response in tuberculous meningitis at the molecular level in addition to providing candidate diagnostic biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23198679

  2. Proteomics Analysis of Bladder Cancer Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Joanne L.; Khanna, Sanjay; Giles, Peter J.; Brennan, Paul; Brewis, Ian A.; Staffurth, John; Mason, Malcolm D.; Clayton, Aled

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted by various cell types, present in biological fluids that are particularly rich in membrane proteins. Ex vivo analysis of exosomes may provide biomarker discovery platforms and form non-invasive tools for disease diagnosis and monitoring. These vesicles have never before been studied in the context of bladder cancer, a major malignancy of the urological tract. We present the first proteomics analysis of bladder cancer cell exosomes. Using ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion, exosomes were highly purified from cultured HT1376 bladder cancer cells and verified as low in contaminants by Western blotting and flow cytometry of exosome-coated beads. Solubilization in a buffer containing SDS and DTT was essential for achieving proteomics analysis using an LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS approach. We report 353 high quality identifications with 72 proteins not previously identified by other human exosome proteomics studies. Overrepresentation analysis to compare this data set with previous exosome proteomics studies (using the ExoCarta database) revealed that the proteome was consistent with that of various exosomes with particular overlap with exosomes of carcinoma origin. Interrogating the Gene Ontology database highlighted a strong association of this proteome with carcinoma of bladder and other sites. The data also highlighted how homology among human leukocyte antigen haplotypes may confound MASCOT designation of major histocompatability complex Class I nomenclature, requiring data from PCR-based human leukocyte antigen haplotyping to clarify anomalous identifications. Validation of 18 MS protein identifications (including basigin, galectin-3, trophoblast glycoprotein (5T4), and others) was performed by a combination of Western blotting, flotation on linear sucrose gradients, and flow cytometry, confirming their exosomal expression. Some were confirmed positive on urinary exosomes from a bladder cancer patient. In summary, the

  3. Proteomic and Genetic Approaches Identify Syk as an AML Target

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Cynthia K.; Berchuck, Jacob E.; Ross, Kenneth N.; Kakoza, Rose M.; Clauser, Karl; Schinzel, Anna C.; Ross, Linda; Galinsky, Ilene; Davis, Tina N.; Silver, Serena J.; Root, David E.; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Carroll, Martin; Hahn, William C.; Carr, Steven A.; Golub, Todd R.; Kung, Andrew L.; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-based screening can facilitate rapid identification of compounds inducing complex cellular phenotypes. Advancing a compound toward the clinic, however, generally requires identification of precise mechanisms of action. We previously found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors induce acute myeloid leukemia (AML) differentiation via a non-EGFR mechanism. In this report, we integrated proteomic and RNAi-based strategies to identify their off-target anti-AML mechanism. These orthogonal approaches identified Syk as a target in AML. Genetic and pharmacological inactivation of Syk with a drug in clinical trial for other indications promoted differentiation of AML cells and attenuated leukemia growth in vivo. These results demonstrate the power of integrating diverse chemical, proteomic, and genomic screening approaches to identify therapeutic strategies for cancer. PMID:19800574

  4. Proteome analysis for rat saliva.

    PubMed

    Inenaga, Kiyotoshi; Yamada, Naoyuki; Yuji, Reiko; Kawai, Misako; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Ono, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ei-ichiro; Torii, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Proteome analysis is a popular method to discover biomarkers for the prevention and diagnosis of diseases. Since saliva is a non-invasively available body fluid, gathering of saliva causes minimal harm to patients. Therefore, detection of proteins for the prevention and diagnosis from the saliva sample may be the preferred method, especially for children and elderly people. However, the abundance of salivary proteins and contaminant proteins from food and mouth bacteria obscure identification of proteins present in the saliva at low concentrations. To address this problem, we developed a shotgun proteomic method using two-dimensional nano-flow LC tandem mass spectrometry. We report here that our method is able to detect proteins quantitatively even in small sample volumes of saliva. PMID:20224185

  5. DIGE-based proteomic analysis identifies nucleophosmin/B23 and nucleolin C23 as over-expressed proteins in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianda; Lin, Minhui; Liu, Tingbo; Li, Jing; Chen, Buyuan; Chen, Yingyu

    2011-08-01

    Drug resistance is a challenge in treatment of acute leukemia. To investigate novel protein changes involved in resistance, protein expression profiles between leukemia cell line HL-60 and adriamycin-resistant HL-60 (HL-60/ADR) were compared based on a proteomic approach-2D-DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF/MS. 13 protein spots were identified as up-regulated and 3 down-regulated in HL-60/ADR. Nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM B23) and nucleolin C23 (C23) were selected and verified by western blot, which showed an obvious up-regulation in leukemia cells, especially in 3 resistant leukemia cell lines and in relapsed/refractory patients. To a conclusion, B23 and C23 may be involved in drug resistance and be useful in assessing the prognosis of leukemia. PMID:21310483

  6. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-02-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (~34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models.

  7. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Hughes, Lindsey D; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E; Gross, Mitchell E; Plevritis, Sylvia K; McIntosh, Martin W; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Samir; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag

    2012-05-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by lack of tools to accurately assess a patient's response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here, we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study, we use stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGF receptor (EGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information, and a subset consisting of 400 proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and showed that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  8. Quantitative Proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M.; Hughes, Lindsey D.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E.; Gross, Mitchell E.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by a lack of tools to accurately assess a patient’s response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not-responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study we use Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGFR targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information and a subset consisting of [400] proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and demonstrated that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  9. Proteomic analysis of cap-dependent translation identifies LARP1 as a key regulator of 5'TOP mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Tcherkezian, Joseph; Cargnello, Marie; Romeo, Yves; Huttlin, Edward L; Lavoie, Genevieve; Gygi, Steven P; Roux, Philippe P

    2014-02-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell growth and proliferation by promoting mRNA translation and increasing the protein synthetic capacity of the cell. Although mTOR globally promotes translation by regulating the mRNA 5' cap-binding protein eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E), it also preferentially regulates the translation of certain classes of mRNA via unclear mechanisms. To help fill this gap in knowledge, we performed a quantitative proteomic screen to identify proteins that associate with the mRNA 5' cap in an mTOR-dependent manner. Using this approach, we identified many potential regulatory factors, including the putative RNA-binding protein LARP1 (La-related protein 1). Our results indicate that LARP1 associates with actively translating ribosomes via PABP and that LARP1 stimulates the translation of mRNAs containing a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) motif, encoding for components of the translational machinery. We found that LARP1 associates with the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for global protein synthesis as well as cell growth and proliferation. Together, these data reveal important molecular mechanisms involved in TOP mRNA translation and implicate LARP1 as an important regulator of cell growth and proliferation. PMID:24532714

  10. Analysis of the Human Prostate-Specific Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling Identifies TMEM79 and ACOXL as Two Putative, Diagnostic Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Hurley, Gillian; Busch, Christer; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Stadler, Charlotte; Tolf, Anna; Lundberg, Emma; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Jirström, Karin; Bjartell, Anders; Gallagher, William M.; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    To better understand prostate function and disease, it is important to define and explore the molecular constituents that signify the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to define the prostate specific transcriptome and proteome, in comparison to 26 other human tissues. Deep sequencing of mRNA (RNA-seq) and immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling were combined to identify prostate specific gene expression patterns and to explore tissue biomarkers for potential clinical use in prostate cancer diagnostics. We identified 203 genes with elevated expression in the prostate, 22 of which showed more than five-fold higher expression levels compared to all other tissue types. In addition to previously well-known proteins we identified two poorly characterized proteins, TMEM79 and ACOXL, with potential to differentiate between benign and cancerous prostatic glands in tissue biopsies. In conclusion, we have applied a genome-wide analysis to identify the prostate specific proteome using transcriptomics and antibody-based protein profiling to identify genes with elevated expression in the prostate. Our data provides a starting point for further functional studies to explore the molecular repertoire of normal and diseased prostate including potential prostate cancer markers such as TMEM79 and ACOXL. PMID:26237329

  11. Extensive dataset of boar seminal plasma proteome displaying putative reproductive functions of identified proteins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Barranco, Isabel; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-09-01

    A complete proteomic profile of seminal plasma (SP) remains challenging, particularly in porcine. The data reports on the analysis of boar SP-proteins by using a combination of SEC, 1-D SDS PAGE and NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS from 33 pooled SP-samples (11 boars, 3 ejaculates/boar). A complete dataset of the 536 SP-proteins identified and validated with confidence ≥95% (Unused Score >1.3) and a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤1%, is provided. In addition, the relative abundance of 432 of them is also shown. Gene ontology annotation of the complete SP-proteome complemented by an extensive description of the putative reproductive role of SP-proteins, providing a valuable source for a better understanding of SP role in the reproductive success. This data article refers to the article entitled "Characterization of the porcine seminal plasma proteome comparing ejaculate portions" (Perez-Patiño et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27583342

  12. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  13. Proteome analysis in the assessment of ageing.

    PubMed

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Pich, Andreas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-11-01

    Based on demographic trends, the societies in many developed countries are facing an increasing number and proportion of people over the age of 65. The raise in elderly populations along with improved health-care will be concomitant with an increased prevalence of ageing-associated chronic conditions like cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory diseases, arthritis, dementia, and diabetes mellitus. This is expected to pose unprecedented challenges both for individuals and societies and their health care systems. An ultimate goal of ageing research is therefore the understanding of physiological ageing and the achievement of 'healthy' ageing by decreasing age-related pathologies. However, on a molecular level, ageing is a complex multi-mechanistic process whose contributing factors may vary individually, partly overlap with pathological alterations, and are often poorly understood. Proteome analysis potentially allows modelling of these multifactorial processes. This review summarises recent proteomic research on age-related changes identified in animal models and human studies. We combined this information with pathway analysis to identify molecular mechanisms associated with ageing. We identified some molecular pathways that are affected in most or even all organs and others that are organ-specific. However, appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm these findings based in in silico evaluation. PMID:25257180

  14. Proteome analysis identified the PPARγ ligand 15d-PGJ2 as a novel drug inhibiting melanoma progression and interfering with tumor-stroma interaction.

    PubMed

    Paulitschke, Verena; Gruber, Silke; Hofstätter, Elisabeth; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Klepeisz, Philipp; Schicher, Nikolaus; Jonak, Constanze; Petzelbauer, Peter; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gerner, Christopher; Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been originally thought to be restricted to lipid metabolism or glucose homeostasis. Recently, evidence is growing that PPARγ ligands have inhibitory effects on tumor growth. To shed light on the potential therapeutic effects on melanoma we tested a panel of PPAR agonists on their ability to block tumor proliferation in vitro. Whereas ciglitazone, troglitazone and WY14643 showed moderate effects on proliferation, 15d-PGJ2 displayed profound anti-tumor activity on four different melanoma cell lines tested. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2 inhibited proliferation of tumor-associated fibroblasts and tube formation of endothelial cells. 15d-PGJ2 induced the tumor suppressor gene p21, a G(2)/M arrest and inhibited tumor cell migration. Shot gun proteome analysis in addition to 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation of A375 melanoma cells suggested that 15d-PGJ2 might exert its effects via modification and/or downregulation of Hsp-90 (heat shock protein 90) and several chaperones. Applying the recently established CPL/MUW database with a panel of defined classification signatures, we demonstrated a regulation of proteins involved in metastasis, transport or protein synthesis including paxillin, angio-associated migratory cell protein or matrix metalloproteinase-2 as confirmed by zymography. Our data revealed for the first time a profound effect of the single compound 15d-PGJ2 on melanoma cells in addition to the tumor-associated microenvironment suggesting synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:23049949

  15. Proteome Analysis Identified the PPARγ Ligand 15d-PGJ2 as a Novel Drug Inhibiting Melanoma Progression and Interfering with Tumor-Stroma Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Paulitschke, Verena; Gruber, Silke; Hofstätter, Elisabeth; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Klepeisz, Philipp; Schicher, Nikolaus; Jonak, Constanze; Petzelbauer, Peter; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gerner, Christopher; Kunstfeld, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been originally thought to be restricted to lipid metabolism or glucose homeostasis. Recently, evidence is growing that PPARγ ligands have inhibitory effects on tumor growth. To shed light on the potential therapeutic effects on melanoma we tested a panel of PPAR agonists on their ability to block tumor proliferation in vitro. Whereas ciglitazone, troglitazone and WY14643 showed moderate effects on proliferation, 15d-PGJ2 displayed profound anti-tumor activity on four different melanoma cell lines tested. Additionally, 15d-PGJ2 inhibited proliferation of tumor-associated fibroblasts and tube formation of endothelial cells. 15d-PGJ2 induced the tumor suppressor gene p21, a G2/M arrest and inhibited tumor cell migration. Shot gun proteome analysis in addition to 2D-gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation of A375 melanoma cells suggested that 15d-PGJ2 might exert its effects via modification and/or downregulation of Hsp-90 (heat shock protein 90) and several chaperones. Applying the recently established CPL/MUW database with a panel of defined classification signatures, we demonstrated a regulation of proteins involved in metastasis, transport or protein synthesis including paxillin, angio-associated migratory cell protein or matrix metalloproteinase-2 as confirmed by zymography. Our data revealed for the first time a profound effect of the single compound 15d-PGJ2 on melanoma cells in addition to the tumor-associated microenvironment suggesting synergistic therapeutic efficiency. PMID:23049949

  16. Deep transcriptome-sequencing and proteome analysis of the hydrothermal vent annelid Alvinella pompejana identifies the CvP-bias as a robust measure of eukaryotic thermostability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alvinella pompejana is an annelid worm that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean. Living at a depth of approximately 2500 meters, these worms experience extreme environmental conditions, including high temperature and pressure as well as high levels of sulfide and heavy metals. A. pompejana is one of the most thermotolerant metazoans, making this animal a subject of great interest for studies of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Results In order to complement existing EST resources we performed deep sequencing of the A. pompejana transcriptome. We identified several thousand novel protein-coding transcripts, nearly doubling the sequence data for this annelid. We then performed an extensive survey of previously established prokaryotic thermoadaptation measures to search for global signals of thermoadaptation in A. pompejana in comparison with mesophilic eukaryotes. In an orthologous set of 457 proteins, we found that the best indicator of thermoadaptation was the difference in frequency of charged versus polar residues (CvP-bias), which was highest in A. pompejana. CvP-bias robustly distinguished prokaryotic thermophiles from prokaryotic mesophiles, as well as the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum from mesophilic eukaryotes. Experimental values for thermophilic proteins supported higher CvP-bias as a measure of thermal stability when compared to their mesophilic orthologs. Proteome-wide mean CvP-bias also correlated with the body temperatures of homeothermic birds and mammals. Conclusions Our work extends the transcriptome resources for A. pompejana and identifies the CvP-bias as a robust and widely applicable measure of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Reviewer This article was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, L. Aravind and Anthony M. Poole. PMID:23324115

  17. An Integrative Proteomic Approach Identifies Novel Cellular SMYD2 Substrates.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hazem; Duan, Shili; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification with important roles in transcriptional regulation and other biological processes, but the enzyme-substrate relationship between the 68 known human protein methyltransferases and the thousands of reported methylation sites is poorly understood. Here, we propose a bioinformatic approach that integrates structural, biochemical, cellular, and proteomic data to identify novel cellular substrates of the lysine methyltransferase SMYD2. Of the 14 novel putative SMYD2 substrates identified by our approach, six were confirmed in cells by immunoprecipitation: MAPT, CCAR2, EEF2, NCOA3, STUB1, and UTP14A. Treatment with the selective SMYD2 inhibitor BAY-598 abrogated the methylation signal, indicating that methylation of these novel substrates was dependent on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. We believe that our integrative approach can be applied to other protein lysine methyltransferases, and help understand how lysine methylation participates in wider signaling processes. PMID:27163177

  18. HydroCalc Proteome: a tool to identify distinct characteristics of effector proteins.

    PubMed

    da Silva, G J; da Silva, R G T M; Silva, V A; C Caritá, E; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is associated with secretion of effector proteins into intra- and extracellular spaces. These proteins interfere with cellular processes such as inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, induction of apoptosis and autophagy, activation and suppression of kinases, regulation of receptor activity, and modulation of transcription factors. Knowledge regarding the characteristics of these proteins would assist in pathogenicity studies, and help to identify possible and novel targets for antibacterial drugs. Amino acid hydropathy is a property that can affect behavior patterns in effector proteins. The HydroCalc Proteome tool analyzes total hydropathy, average hydropathy, C-terminal hydropathy, C-terminal load, and basic polar amino acids at the C-terminus. These five properties could contribute to the identification of proteins with an effector potential. HydroCalc Proteome is a web tool that provides a simple interface for the analysis of hydropathy properties in proteins. This tool permits the analysis of a single protein or even the complete proteome, which cannot be achieved by using other hydropathy tools. The tool displays the result of five properties related to effector proteins in a single table. The HydroCalc Proteome (www.gmb.bio.br/hydrocalc) is a powerful tool for protein analysis, and can contribute to the study of effector proteins. PMID:27525880

  19. Proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The vitreous humor is a transparent, gelatinous mass whose main constituent is water. It plays an important role in providing metabolic nutrient requirements of the lens, coordinating eye growth and providing support to the retina. It is in close proximity to the retina and reflects many of the changes occurring in this tissue. The biochemical changes occurring in the vitreous could provide a better understanding about the pathophysiological processes that occur in vitreoretinopathy. In this study, we investigated the proteome of normal human vitreous humor using high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Results The vitreous humor was subjected to multiple fractionation techniques followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 1,205 proteins, 682 of which have not been described previously in the vitreous humor. Most proteins were localized to the extracellular space (24%), cytoplasm (20%) or plasma membrane (14%). Classification based on molecular function showed that 27% had catalytic activity, 10% structural activity, 10% binding activity, 4% cell and 4% transporter activity. Categorization for biological processes showed 28% participate in metabolism, 20% in cell communication and 13% in cell growth. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000957. Conclusion This large catalog of vitreous proteins should facilitate biomedical research into pathological conditions of the eye including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment and cataract. PMID:25097467

  20. Derivative component analysis for mass spectral serum proteomic profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As a promising way to transform medicine, mass spectrometry based proteomics technologies have seen a great progress in identifying disease biomarkers for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. However, there is a lack of effective feature selection methods that are able to capture essential data behaviors to achieve clinical level disease diagnosis. Moreover, it faces a challenge from data reproducibility, which means that no two independent studies have been found to produce same proteomic patterns. Such reproducibility issue causes the identified biomarker patterns to lose repeatability and prevents it from real clinical usage. Methods In this work, we propose a novel machine-learning algorithm: derivative component analysis (DCA) for high-dimensional mass spectral proteomic profiles. As an implicit feature selection algorithm, derivative component analysis examines input proteomics data in a multi-resolution approach by seeking its derivatives to capture latent data characteristics and conduct de-noising. We further demonstrate DCA's advantages in disease diagnosis by viewing input proteomics data as a profile biomarker via integrating it with support vector machines to tackle the reproducibility issue, besides comparing it with state-of-the-art peers. Results Our results show that high-dimensional proteomics data are actually linearly separable under proposed derivative component analysis (DCA). As a novel multi-resolution feature selection algorithm, DCA not only overcomes the weakness of the traditional methods in subtle data behavior discovery, but also suggests an effective resolution to overcoming proteomics data's reproducibility problem and provides new techniques and insights in translational bioinformatics and machine learning. The DCA-based profile biomarker diagnosis makes clinical level diagnostic performances reproducible across different proteomic data, which is more robust and systematic than the existing biomarker discovery based

  1. A Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Subcellular Proteome Localization and Changes Induced by DNA Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, François-Michel; Lam, Yun Wah; Lamont, Douglas; Lamond, Angus I.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cell biology is to identify the subcellular distribution of proteins within cells and to characterize how protein localization changes under different cell growth conditions and in response to stress and other external signals. Protein localization is usually determined either by microscopy or by using cell fractionation combined with protein blotting techniques. Both these approaches are intrinsically low throughput and limited to the analysis of known components. Here we use mass spectrometry-based proteomics to provide an unbiased, quantitative, and high throughput approach for measuring the subcellular distribution of the proteome, termed “spatial proteomics.” The spatial proteomics method analyzes a whole cell extract created by recombining differentially labeled subcellular fractions derived from cells in which proteins have been mass-labeled with heavy isotopes. This was used here to measure the relative distribution between cytoplasm, nucleus, and nucleolus of over 2,000 proteins in HCT116 cells. The data show that, at steady state, the proteome is predominantly partitioned into specific subcellular locations with only a minor subset of proteins equally distributed between two or more compartments. Spatial proteomics also facilitates a proteome-wide comparison of changes in protein localization in response to a wide range of physiological and experimental perturbations, shown here by characterizing dynamic changes in protein localization elicited during the cellular response to DNA damage following treatment of HCT116 cells with etoposide. DNA damage was found to cause dissociation of the proteasome from inhibitory proteins and assembly chaperones in the cytoplasm and relocation to associate with proteasome activators in the nucleus. PMID:20026476

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  3. Ultrasensitive proteome analysis using paramagnetic bead technology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher S; Foehr, Sophia; Garfield, David A; Furlong, Eileen E; Steinmetz, Lars M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain a systems-level understanding of a complex biological system, detailed proteome information is essential. Despite great progress in proteomics technologies, thorough interrogation of the proteome from quantity-limited biological samples is hampered by inefficiencies during processing. To address these challenges, here we introduce a novel protocol using paramagnetic beads, termed Single-Pot Solid-Phase-enhanced Sample Preparation (SP3). SP3 provides a rapid and unbiased means of proteomic sample preparation in a single tube that facilitates ultrasensitive analysis by outperforming existing protocols in terms of efficiency, scalability, speed, throughput, and flexibility. To illustrate these benefits, characterization of 1,000 HeLa cells and single Drosophila embryos is used to establish that SP3 provides an enhanced platform for profiling proteomes derived from sub-microgram amounts of material. These data present a first view of developmental stage-specific proteome dynamics in Drosophila at a single-embryo resolution, permitting characterization of inter-individual expression variation. Together, the findings of this work position SP3 as a superior protocol that facilitates exciting new directions in multiple areas of proteomics ranging from developmental biology to clinical applications. PMID:25358341

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Faça, Vitor Marcel; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Greene, Lewis Joel; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) are of great interest in biomedical sciences and disease treatment because of their multipotency and wide range of applications for tissue repair and suppression of the immune system. Proteomic analysis of these unique cells has contributed to the identification of important pathways utilized by MSCs to differentiate into distinct tissues as well as important proteins responsible for their special function in vivo and in vitro. However, comparison of proteomic studies in MSCs still suffers from the heterogeneity of MSC preparations. In addition, as proteomics technology advances, several studies can be revisited in order to increase the depth of analysis and, therefore, elucidate more refined mechanisms involved in MSC functionalities. Here, we present detailed protocols to obtain MSCs, as well as protocols to perform in-depth profiling and quantification of alterations in MSC proteomes. PMID:27236693

  5. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Vitreous Biopsy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Skeie, Jessica M.; Brown, Eric N.; Martinez, Harryl D.; Russell, Stephen R.; Birkholz, Emily S.; Folk, James C.; Boldt, H. Culver; Gehrs, Karen M.; Stone, Edwin M.; Wright, Michael E.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare vitreous biopsy methods using analysis platforms employed in proteomics biomarker discovery. Methods Vitreous biopsies from 10 eyes were collected sequentially using a 23-gauge needle and a 23-gauge vitreous cutter instrument. Paired specimens were evaluated by UV absorbance spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results The total protein concentration obtained with a needle and vitrectomy instrument biopsy averaged 1.10 mg/ml (SEM = 0.35) and 1.13 mg/ml (SEM = 0.25), respectively. In eight eyes with low or medium viscidity, there was a very high correlation (R2 = 0.934) between the biopsy methods. When data from two eyes with high viscidity vitreous were included, the correlation was reduced (R2 = 0.704). The molecular weight protein SDS-PAGE profiles of paired needle and vitreous cutter samples were similar, except for a minority of pairs with single band intensity variance. Using LC-MS/MS, equivalent peptides were identified with similar frequencies (R2 ≥ 0.90) in paired samples. Conclusion Proteins and peptides collected from vitreous needle biopsies are nearly equivalent to those obtained from a vitreous cutter instrument. This study suggests both techniques may be used for most proteomic and biomarker discovery studies of vitreoretinal diseases, although a minority of proteins and peptides may differ in concentration. PMID:23095728

  7. Proteomic analysis of mature Lagenaria siceraria seed.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Neha; Tajmul, Md; Yadav, Savita

    2015-04-01

    Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd) class belongs to Magnoliopsida family curcurbitaceae that is a traditionally used medicinal plant. Fruit of this plant are widely used as a therapeutic vegetable in various diseases, all over the Asia and Africa. Various parts of this plant like fruit, seed, leaf and root are used as alternative medicine. In the present study, primarily, we have focused on proteomic analysis of L. siceraria seed using phenol extraction method for protein isolation. Twenty-four colloidal coomassie blue stained protein spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) after resolving on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Out of 24 identified protein spots, four were grouped as unidentified proteins which clearly suggest that less work has been done in the direction of plant seed proteomics. These proteins have been found to implicate in various functions such as biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins, serine/threonine kinase activity, plant disease resistance and transferase activity against insects by means of insecticidal and larval growth inhibitory, anti-HIV, antihelmintic and antimicrobial properties. By Blast2GO annotation analysis, amongst the identified proteins of L. siceraria, molecular function for majority of proteins has indispensable role in catalytic activity, few in binding activity and antioxidant activity; it is mostly distributed in cell, organelle, membrane and macromolecular complex. Most of them involved in biological process such as metabolic process, cellular process, response to stimulus, single organism process, signalling, biological recognition, cellular component organization or biogenesis and localization. PMID:25672325

  8. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Activation of Hallmark Pathways of Cancer in Patient Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, Stephanie D.; Larson, Signe K.; Avaritt, Nathan L.; Moreland, Linley E.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Cheung, Wang L.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular pathways regulating melanoma initiation and progression are potential targets of therapeutic development for this aggressive cancer. Identification and molecular analysis of these pathways in patients has been primarily restricted to targeted studies on individual proteins. Here, we report the most comprehensive analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human melanoma tissues using quantitative proteomics. From 61 patient samples, we identified 171 proteins varying in abundance among benign nevi, primary melanoma, and metastatic melanoma. Seventy-three percent of these proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry staining of malignant melanoma tissues from the Human Protein Atlas database. Our results reveal that molecular pathways involved with tumor cell proliferation, motility, and apoptosis are mis-regulated in melanoma. These data provide the most comprehensive proteome resource on patient melanoma and reveal insight into the molecular mechanisms driving melanoma progression. PMID:23976835

  9. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Pal, Ranadip

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, understanding the regulatory behavior of cells has been pursued through independent analysis of the transcriptome or the proteome. Based on the central dogma, it was generally assumed that there exist a direct correspondence between mRNA transcripts and generated protein expressions. However, recent studies have shown that the correlation between mRNA and Protein expressions can be low due to various factors such as different half lives and post transcription machinery. Thus, a joint analysis of the transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide useful insights that may not be deciphered from individual analysis of mRNA or protein expressions. This article reviews the existing major approaches for joint analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data. We categorize the different approaches into eight main categories based on the initial algorithm and final analysis goal. We further present analogies with other domains and discuss the existing research problems in this area. PMID:24082820

  10. Large-scale proteomic analysis of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Springer, David L.

    2004-10-01

    Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins is promising in identification of novel candidates as drug targets and/or disease biomarkers. Despite notable technological developments, obstacles related to extraction and solubilization of membrane proteins are frequently encountered. A critical discussion of the different preparative methods of membrane proteins is offered in relation to downstream proteomic applications, mainly gel-based analyses and mass spectrometry. Unknown proteins are often identified by high-throughput profiling of membrane proteins. In search for novel membrane proteins, analysis of protein sequences using computational tools is performed to predict for the presence of transmembrane domains. Here, we also present these bioinformatic tools with the human proteome as a case study. Along with technological innovations, advancements in the areas of sample preparation and computational prediction of membrane proteins will lead to exciting discoveries.

  11. Dog Tear Film Proteome In-Depth Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Winiarczyk, Mateusz; Winiarczyk, Dagmara; Banach, Tomasz; Adaszek, Lukasz; Madany, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Jerzy; Pietras-Ozga, Dorota; Winiarczyk, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    In this study, mass spectrometry was used to explore the canine tear proteome. Tear samples were obtained from six healthy dogs, and one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (1D SDS-PAGE) was used as a first step to separate intact proteins into 17 bands. Each fraction was then trypsin digested and analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS) to characterize the protein components in each fraction. In total, 125 tear proteins were identified, with MCA (Major Canine Allergen), Serum albumin, UPF0557 protein C10orf119 homolog, Collagen alpha-2(I) chain, Tyrosine -protein kinase Fer, Keratine type II cytoskeletal, Beta-crystallin B2, Interleukin-6 and Desmin occuring as the most confident ones with the highest scores. The results showed that the proteomic strategy used in this study was successful in the analysis of the dog tear proteome. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the comprehensive proteome profile of tears from healthy dogs by 1D SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003124. PMID:26701646

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Anoxia Tolerance in the Developing Zebrafish Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Bryce A.; Malone, James P.; Townsend, R. Reid; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    While some species and tissue types are injured by oxygen deprivation, anoxia tolerant organisms display a protective response that has not been fully elucidated and is well-suited to genomic and proteomic analysis. However, such methodologies have focused on transcriptional responses, prolonged anoxia, or have used cultured cells or isolated tissues. In this study of intact zebrafish embryos, a species capable of >24 h survival in anoxia, we have utilized 2D difference in gel electrophoresis to identify changes in the proteomic profile caused by near-lethal anoxic durations as well as acute anoxia (1 h), a timeframe relevant to ischemic events in human disease when response mechanisms are largely limited to post-transcriptional and post-translational processes. We observed a general stabilization of the proteome in anoxia. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, antioxidant defense, transcription, and translation changed over this time period. Among the largest proteomic alterations was that of muscle cofilin 2, implicating the regulation of the cytoskeleton and actin assembly in the adaptation to acute anoxia. These studies in an intact embryo highlight proteomic components of an adaptive response to anoxia in a model organism amenable to genetic analysis to permit further mechanistic insight into the phenomenon of anoxia tolerance. PMID:20403745

  13. Pathway and Network Analysis in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Hasan, Mohammad Al; Chen, Jake Yue

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is inherently a systems science that studies not only measured protein and their expressions in a cell, but also the interplay of proteins, protein complexes, signaling pathways, and network modules. There is a rapid accumulation of Proteomics data in recent years. However, Proteomics data are highly variable, with results being sensitive to data preparation methods, sample condition, instrument types, and analytical method. To address this challenge in Proteomics data analysis, we review common approaches developed to incorporate biological function and network topological information. We categorize existing tools into four categories: tools with basic functional information and little topological features (e.g., GO category analysis), tools with rich functional information and little topological features (e.g., GSEA), tools with basic functional information and rich topological features (e.g., Cytoscape), and tools with rich functional information and rich topological features (e.g., PathwayExpress). We review the general application potential of these tools to Proteomics. In addition, we also review tools that can achieve automated learning of pathway modules and features, and tools that help perform integrated network visual analytics. PMID:24911777

  14. Pathway and network analysis in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaogang; Hasan, Mohammad Al; Chen, Jake Yue

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics is inherently a systems science that studies not only measured protein and their expressions in a cell, but also the interplay of proteins, protein complexes, signaling pathways, and network modules. There is a rapid accumulation of Proteomics data in recent years. However, Proteomics data are highly variable, with results sensitive to data preparation methods, sample condition, instrument types, and analytical methods. To address the challenge in Proteomics data analysis, we review current tools being developed to incorporate biological function and network topological information. We categorize these tools into four types: tools with basic functional information and little topological features (e.g., GO category analysis), tools with rich functional information and little topological features (e.g., GSEA), tools with basic functional information and rich topological features (e.g., Cytoscape), and tools with rich functional information and rich topological features (e.g., PathwayExpress). We first review the potential application of these tools to Proteomics; then we review tools that can achieve automated learning of pathway modules and features, and tools that help perform integrated network visual analytics. PMID:24911777

  15. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  16. Proteomic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid identifies biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Srikanth; Williams, Eric; Ganchev, Philip; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lacomis, David; Urbinelli, Leo; Newhall, Kristyn; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Brown, Robert H.; Bowser, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by degeneration of motor neurons. We tested the hypothesis that proteomic analysis will identify protein biomarkers that provide insight into disease pathogenesis and are diagnostically useful. To identify ALS specific biomarkers, we compared the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from ALS and control subjects using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We identified 30 mass ion peaks with statistically significant (p < 0.01) differences between control and ALS subjects. Initial analysis with a rule-learning algorithm yielded biomarker panels with diagnostic predictive value as subsequently assessed using an independent set of coded test subjects. Three biomarkers were identified that are either decreased (transthyretin, cystatin C) or increased (carboxy-terminal fragment of neuroendocrine protein 7B2) in ALS CSF. We validated the SELDI-TOF-MS results for transthyretin and cystatin C by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry using commercially available antibodies. These findings identify a panel of CSF protein biomarkers for ALS. PMID:16313519

  17. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  18. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of four Bacillus clausii strains: proteomic expression signature distinguishes protein profile of the strains.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Gnoni, Antonio; Abbrescia, Anna; Panelli, Damiano; Maiorano, Stefania; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Papa, Sergio; Gaballo, Antonio

    2011-11-18

    A comparative proteomic approach, using two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, has been developed to compare and elucidate the differences among the cellular proteomes of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T, B. clausii strains during both exponential and stationary phases of growth. Image analysis of the electropherograms reveals a high degree of concordance among the four proteomes, some proteins result, however, differently expressed. The proteins spots exhibiting high different expression level were identified, by mass-spectrometry analysis, as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHA, EC1.2.1.3; ABC0046 isoform) aldehyde dehydrogenase (DHAS, EC 1.2.1.3; ABC0047 isoform) and flagellin-protein of B. clausii KSM-k16. The different expression levels of the two dehydrogenases were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and dehydrogenases enzymatic activity. The different patterns of protein expression can be considered as cell proteome signatures of the different strains. PMID:21810490

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  1. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  2. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  3. Proteomics beyond large-scale protein expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Boersema, Paul J; Kahraman, Abdullah; Picotti, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics is commonly referred to as the application of high-throughput approaches to protein expression analysis. Typical results of proteomics studies are inventories of the protein content of a sample or lists of differentially expressed proteins across multiple conditions. Recently, however, an explosion of novel proteomics workflows has significantly expanded proteomics beyond the analysis of protein expression. Targeted proteomics methods, for example, enable the analysis of the fine dynamics of protein systems, such as a specific pathway or a network of interacting proteins, and the determination of protein complex stoichiometries. Structural proteomics tools allow extraction of restraints for structural modeling and identification of structurally altered proteins on a proteome-wide scale. Other variations of the proteomic workflow can be applied to the large-scale analysis of protein activity, location, degradation and turnover. These exciting developments provide new tools for multi-level 'omics' analysis and for the modeling of biological networks in the context of systems biology studies. PMID:25636126

  4. A panel of tumor markers, calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3 in upper tract urothelial carcinoma identified by proteomic and immunological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is a tumor with sizable metastases and local recurrence. It has a worse prognosis than bladder cancer. This study was designed to investigate the urinary potential tumor markers of UTUC. Methods Between January 2008 and January 2009, urine was sampled from 13 patients with UTUC and 20 healthy adults. The current study identified biomarkers for UTUC using non-fixed volume stepwise weak anion exchange chromatography for fractionation of urine protein prior to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Results Fifty five differential proteins have been determined by comparing with the 2-DE maps of the urine of UTUC patients and those of healthy people. Western blotting analysis and immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and normal tissues from patients with UTUC were carried out to further verify five possible UTUC biomarkers, including zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein, calreticulin, annexin A2, annexin A3 and haptoglobin. The data of western blot and immunohistochemical analysis are consistent with the 2-DE data. Combined the experimental data in the urine and in tumor tissues collected from patients with UTUC, the crucial over-expressed proteins are calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3. Conclusions Calreticulin, annexin A2, and annexin A3 are very likely a panel of biomarkers with potential value for UTUC diagnosis. PMID:24884814

  5. One-hour proteome analysis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Richards, Alicia L; Hebert, Alexander S; Ulbrich, Arne; Bailey, Derek J; Coughlin, Emma E; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in chromatography and mass spectrometry (MS) have made rapid and deep proteomic profiling possible. To maximize the performance of the recently produced Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer, we have developed a protocol that combines improved sample preparation (including optimized cellular lysis by extensive bead beating) and chromatographic conditions (specifically, 30-cm capillary columns packed with 1.7-μm bridged ethylene hybrid material) and the manufacture of a column heater (to accommodate flow rates of 350-375 nl/min) that increases the number of proteins identified across a single liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) separation, thereby reducing the need for extensive sample fractionation. This strategy allowed the identification of up to 4,002 proteins (at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR)) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4741) over 70 min of LC-MS/MS analysis. Quintuplicate analysis of technical replicates reveals 83% overlap at the protein level, thus demonstrating the reproducibility of this procedure. This protocol, which includes cell lysis, overnight tryptic digestion, sample analysis and database searching, takes ∼24 h to complete. Aspects of this protocol, including chromatographic separation and instrument parameters, can be adapted for the optimal analysis of other organisms. PMID:25855955

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Human Mesenteric Lymph

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Peltz, Erik; Campsen, Jeffrey; Kelher, Marguerite; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive animal work has established mesenteric lymph as the mechanistic link between gut ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and distant organ injury. Our trauma and transplant services provide a unique opportunity to assess the relevance of our animal data to human mesenteric lymph under conditions that simulate those used in the laboratory. Mesenteric lymph was collected from eleven patients; with lymphatic injuries, during semi-elective spine reconstruction, or immediately before organ donation. The lymph was tested for its ability to activate human neutrophils in vitro, and was analyzed by label-free proteomic analysis. Human mesenteric lymph primed human PMNs in a pattern similar to that observed in previous rodent, swine, and primate studies. A total of 477 proteins were identified from the 11 subject’s lymph samples with greater than 99% confidence. In addition to classical serum proteins, markers of hemolysis, extracellular matrix components, and general tissue damage were identified. Both tissue injury and shock correlate strongly with production of bioactive lymph. Products of red blood cell hemolysis correlate strongly with human lymph bioactivity and immunoglobulins have a negative correlation with the pro-inflammatory lymph. These human data corroborate the current body of research implicating post shock mesenteric lymph in the development of systemic inflammation and multiple organ failure. Further studies will be required to determine if the proteins identified participate in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure and if they can be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:21192285

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  8. A Foundation for Reliable Spatial Proteomics Data Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Laurent; Breckels, Lisa M.; Burger, Thomas; Nightingale, Daniel J. H.; Groen, Arnoud J.; Campbell, Callum; Nikolovski, Nino; Mulvey, Claire M.; Christoforou, Andy; Ferro, Myriam; Lilley, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative mass-spectrometry-based spatial proteomics involves elaborate, expensive, and time-consuming experimental procedures, and considerable effort is invested in the generation of such data. Multiple research groups have described a variety of approaches for establishing high-quality proteome-wide datasets. However, data analysis is as critical as data production for reliable and insightful biological interpretation, and no consistent and robust solutions have been offered to the community so far. Here, we introduce the requirements for rigorous spatial proteomics data analysis, as well as the statistical machine learning methodologies needed to address them, including supervised and semi-supervised machine learning, clustering, and novelty detection. We present freely available software solutions that implement innovative state-of-the-art analysis pipelines and illustrate the use of these tools through several case studies involving multiple organisms, experimental designs, mass spectrometry platforms, and quantitation techniques. We also propose sound analysis strategies for identifying dynamic changes in subcellular localization by comparing and contrasting data describing different biological conditions. We conclude by discussing future needs and developments in spatial proteomics data analysis. PMID:24846987

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis of single pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Waanders, Leonie F.; Chwalek, Karolina; Monetti, Mara; Kumar, Chanchal; Lammert, Eckhard; Mann, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Technological developments make mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics a central pillar of biochemical research. MS has been very successful in cell culture systems, where sample amounts are not limiting. To extend its capabilities to extremely small, physiologically distinct cell types isolated from tissue, we developed a high sensitivity chromatographic system that measures nanogram protein mixtures for 8 h with very high resolution. This technology is based on splitting gradient effluents into a capture capillary and provides an inherent technical replicate. In a single analysis, this allowed us to characterize kidney glomeruli isolated by laser capture microdissection to a depth of more than 2,400 proteins. From pooled pancreatic islets of Langerhans, another type of “miniorgan,” we obtained an in-depth proteome of 6,873 proteins, many of them involved in diabetes. We quantitatively compared the proteome of single islets, containing 2,000–4,000 cells, treated with high or low glucose levels, and covered most of the characteristic functions of beta cells. Our ultrasensitive analysis recapitulated known hyperglycemic changes but we also find components up-regulated such as the mitochondrial stress regulator Park7. Direct proteomic analysis of functionally distinct cellular structures opens up perspectives in physiology and pathology. PMID:19846766

  10. Proteome Analysis Identifies the Dpr Protein of Streptococcus mutans as an Important Factor in the Presence of Early Streptococcal Colonizers of Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Niki, Mamiko; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yasunaga, Ai; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Oral streptococci are primary colonizers of tooth surfaces and Streptococcus mutans is the principal causative agent of dental caries in humans. A number of proteins are involved in the formation of monospecies biofilms by S. mutans. This study analyzed the protein expression profiles of S. mutans biofilms formed in the presence or absence of S. gordonii, a pioneer colonizer of the tooth surface, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). After identifying S. mutans proteins by Mass spectrometric analysis, their expression in the presence of S. gordonii was analyzed. S. mutans was inoculated with or without S. gordonii DL1. The two species were compartmentalized using 0.2-μl Anopore membranes. The biofilms on polystyrene plates were harvested, and the solubilized proteins were separated by 2-DE. When S. mutans biofilms were formed in the presence of S. gordonii, the peroxide resistance protein Dpr of the former showed 4.3-fold increased expression compared to biofilms that developed in the absence of the pioneer colonizer. In addition, we performed a competition assay using S. mutans antioxidant protein mutants together with S. gordonii and other initial colonizers. Growth of the dpr-knockout S. mutans mutant was significantly inhibited by S. gordonii, as well as by S. sanguinis. Furthermore, a cell viability assay revealed that the viability of the dpr-defective mutant was significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type strain when co-cultured with S. gordonii. Therefore, these results suggest that Dpr might be one of the essential proteins for S. mutans survival on teeth in the presence of early colonizing oral streptococci. PMID:25816242

  11. Proteomics Analysis of Helicoverpa armigera Single Nucleocapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus Identified Two New Occlusion-Derived Virus-Associated Proteins, HA44 and HA100▿

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fei; Wang, Ranran; Fang, Minggang; Jiang, Yue; Xu, Xushi; Wang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xinwen; Arif, Basil M.; Guo, Lin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2007-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the structural proteins of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II NPV. Twenty-three structural proteins of HearNPV ODV were identified, 21 of which have been reported previously as structural proteins or ODV-associated proteins in other baculoviruses. These include polyhedrin, P78/83, P49, ODV-E18, ODV-EC27, ODV-E56, P74, LEF-3, HA66 (AC66), DNA polymerase, GP41, VP39, P33, ODV-E25, helicase, P6.9, ODV/BV-C42, VP80, ODV-EC43, ODV-E66, and PIF-1. Two proteins encoded by HearNPV ORF44 (ha44) and ORF100 (ha100) were discovered as ODV-associated proteins for the first time. ha44 encodes a protein of 378 aa with a predicted mass of 42.8 kDa. ha100 encodes a protein of 510 aa with a predicted mass of 58.1 kDa and is a homologue of the gene for poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (parg). Western blot analysis and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that HA44 is associated with the nucleocapsid and HA100 is associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope of HearNPV ODV. HA44 is conserved in group II NPVs and granuloviruses but does not exist in group I NPVs, while HA100 is conserved only in group II NPVs. PMID:17581982

  12. Multivariate data analysis of proteome data.

    PubMed

    Engkilde, Kåre; Jacobsen, Susanne; Søndergaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    We present the background for multivariate data analysis on proteomics data with a hands-on section on how to transfer data between different software packages. The techniques can also be used for other biological and biochemical problems in which structures have to be found in a large amount of data. Digitalization of the 2D gels, analysis using image processing software, transfer of data, multivariate data analysis, interpretation of the results, and finally we return to biology. PMID:17093312

  13. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis. PMID:27358910

  14. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  15. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O. John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  16. Proteomic analysis of thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Venkateswarlu; Nellaepalli, Sreedhar; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydomonas is a model organism to study photosynthesis. Thylakoid membranes comprise several proteins belonging to photosystems I and II. In this chapter, we show the accurate proteomic measurements in thylakoid membranes. The chlorophyll-containing membrane protein complexes were precipitated using chloroform/methanol solution. These complexes were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the resolved spots were exercised from the gel matrix and digested with trypsin. These peptide fragments were separated by MALDI-TOF, and the isotopic masses were blasted to a MASCOT server to obtain the protein sequence. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). The method discussed here would be a useful method for the separation and identification of thylakoid membrane proteins. PMID:20960129

  17. Proteomics Analysis of the Causative Agent of Typhoid Fever

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Yoon, Hyunjin; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Rue, Joanne; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-02-01

    Typhoid fever is a potentially fatal disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi). S. typhi infection is a complex process that involves numerous bacterially-encoded virulence determinants, and these are thought to confer both stringent human host specificity and a high mortality rate. In the present study we used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics strategy to investigate the proteome of logarithmic, stationary phase, and low pH/low magnesium (MgM) S. typhi cultures. This represents the first large scale comprehensive characterization of the S. typhi proteome. Our analysis identified a total of 2066 S. typhi proteins. In an effort to identify putative S. typhi-specific virulence factors, we then compared our S. typhi results to those obtained in a previously published study of the S. typhimurium proteome under similar conditions (Adkins J.N. et al (2006) Mol Cell Prot). Comparative proteomic analysis of S. typhi (strain Ty2) and S. typhimurium (strains LT2 and 14028) revealed a subset of highly expressed proteins unique to S. typhi that were exclusively detected under conditions that mimic the infective state in macrophage cells. These proteins included CdtB, HlyE, and a conserved protein encoded by t1476. The differential expression of selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Taken together with the current literature, our observations suggest that this subset of proteins may play a role in S. typhi pathogenesis and human host specificity. In addition, we observed products of the biotin (bio) operon displayed a higher abundance in the more virulent strains S. typhi-Ty2 and S. typhimurium-14028 compared to the virulence attenuated S. typhimurium strain LT2, suggesting bio proteins may contribute to Salmonella pathogenesis.

  18. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  19. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  20. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Human Erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Emilie-Fleur; Ducamp, Sarah; Leduc, Marjorie; Salnot, Virginie; Guillonneau, François; Dussiot, Michael; Hale, John; Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; Raimbault, Anna; Douay, Luc; Lacombe, Catherine; Mohandas, Narla; Verdier, Frédérique; Zermati, Yael; Mayeux, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics now enables the absolute quantification of thousands of proteins in individual cell types. We used this technology to analyze the dynamic proteome changes occurring during human erythropoiesis. We quantified the absolute expression of 6,130 proteins during erythroid differentiation from late burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-Es) to orthochromatic erythroblasts. A modest correlation between mRNA and protein expression was observed. We identified several proteins with unexpected expression patterns in erythroid cells, highlighting a breakpoint in the erythroid differentiation process at the basophilic stage. We also quantified the distribution of proteins between reticulocytes and pyrenocytes after enucleation. These analyses identified proteins that are actively sorted either with the reticulocyte or the pyrenocyte. Our study provides the absolute quantification of protein expression during a complex cellular differentiation process in humans, and it establishes a framework for future studies of disordered erythropoiesis. PMID:27452463

  1. Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S

    2014-04-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different -SOH specific probes and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impede product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest that dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  2. Proteomic Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni Miracidium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Rotgans, Bronwyn A.; Strong, April; Liang, Di; Ni, Guoying; Limpanont, Yanin; Ramasoota, Pongrama; McManus, Donald P.; Cummins, Scott F.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive control efforts, schistosomiasis continues to be a major public health problem in developing nations in the tropics and sub-tropics. The miracidium, along with the cercaria, both of which are water-borne and free-living, are the only two stages in the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni which are involved in host invasion. Miracidia penetrate intermediate host snails and develop into sporocysts, which lead to cercariae that can infect humans. Infection of the snail host by the miracidium represents an ideal point at which to interrupt the parasite’s life-cycle. This research focuses on an analysis of the miracidium proteome, including those proteins that are secreted. We have identified a repertoire of proteins in the S. mansoni miracidium at 2 hours post-hatch, including proteases, venom allergen-like proteins, receptors and HSP70, which might play roles in snail-parasite interplay. Proteins involved in energy production and conservation were prevalent, as were proteins predicted to be associated with defence. This study also provides a strong foundation for further understanding the roles that neurohormones play in host-seeking by schistosomes, with the potential for development of novel anthelmintics that interfere with its various life-cycle stages. PMID:26799066

  3. Proteomic analysis of protein palmitoylation in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenying; Jhala, Ulupi S.; Du, Keyong

    2013-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation, by modulating the dynamic interaction between protein and cellular membrane, is involved in a wide range of biological processes, including protein trafficking, sorting, sub-membrane partitioning, protein-protein interaction and cell signaling. To explore the role of protein palmitoylation in adipocytes, we have performed proteomic analysis of palmitoylated proteins in adipose tissue and 3T3-L1 adipocytes and identified more than 800 putative palmitoylated proteins. These include various transporters, enzymes required for lipid and glucose metabolism, regulators of protein trafficking and signaling molecules. Of note, key proteins involved in membrane translocation of the glucose-transporter Glut4 including IRAP, Munc18c, AS160 and Glut4, and signaling proteins in the JAK-STAT pathway including JAK1 and 2, STAT1, 3 and 5A and SHP2 in JAK-STAT, were palmitoylated in cultured adipocytes and primary adipose tissue. Further characterization showed that palmitoylation of Glut4 and IRAP was altered in obesity, and palmitoylation of JAK1 played a regulatory role in JAK1 intracellular localization. Overall, our studies provide evidence to suggest a novel and potentially regulatory role for protein palmitoylation in adipocyte function. PMID:23599907

  4. Proteomic Analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni Miracidium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfang; Zhao, Min; Rotgans, Bronwyn A; Strong, April; Liang, Di; Ni, Guoying; Limpanont, Yanin; Ramasoota, Pongrama; McManus, Donald P; Cummins, Scott F

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive control efforts, schistosomiasis continues to be a major public health problem in developing nations in the tropics and sub-tropics. The miracidium, along with the cercaria, both of which are water-borne and free-living, are the only two stages in the life-cycle of Schistosoma mansoni which are involved in host invasion. Miracidia penetrate intermediate host snails and develop into sporocysts, which lead to cercariae that can infect humans. Infection of the snail host by the miracidium represents an ideal point at which to interrupt the parasite's life-cycle. This research focuses on an analysis of the miracidium proteome, including those proteins that are secreted. We have identified a repertoire of proteins in the S. mansoni miracidium at 2 hours post-hatch, including proteases, venom allergen-like proteins, receptors and HSP70, which might play roles in snail-parasite interplay. Proteins involved in energy production and conservation were prevalent, as were proteins predicted to be associated with defence. This study also provides a strong foundation for further understanding the roles that neurohormones play in host-seeking by schistosomes, with the potential for development of novel anthelmintics that interfere with its various life-cycle stages. PMID:26799066

  5. Integrated Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) and Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identifies Galectin-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Predicting Sorafenib Resistance in Liver Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Shao, Yu-Yun; Ho, Wen-Ching; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Feng, Wen-Chi; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has become the standard therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Therefore, it is important to identify potential biomarkers that could predict the efficacy of sorafenib. To identify target proteins associated with the development of sorafenib resistance, we applied stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze differences in protein expression levels between parental HuH-7 and sorafenib-acquired resistance HuH-7 (HuH-7R) cells in vitro, combined with an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) quantitative analysis of HuH-7 and HuH-7R tumors in vivo. In total, 2,450 quantified proteins were identified in common in SILAC and iTRAQ experiments, with 81 showing increased expression (>2.0-fold) with sorafenib resistance and 75 showing decreased expression (<0.5-fold). In silico analyses of these differentially expressed proteins predicted that 10 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of one of these candidate proteins, galectin-1, decreased cell proliferation and metastasis in HuH-7R cells and restored sensitivity to sorafenib. We verified galectin-1 as a predictive marker of sorafenib resistance and a downstream target of the AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling pathway. In addition, increased galectin-1 expression in HCC patients' serum was associated with poor tumor control and low response rate. We also found that a high serum galectin-1 level was an independent factor associated with poor progression-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, these results suggest that galectin-1 is a possible biomarker for predicting the response of HCC patients to treatment with sorafenib. As such, it may assist in the stratification of HCC and help direct personalized therapy. PMID:25850433

  6. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Membrane Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Che, Fa-Yun; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Burd, Berta; Zhang, Hongshan; Nieves, Edward; Kim, Kami; Fiser, Andras; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that is an important human and animal pathogen. Experimental information on T. gondii membrane proteins is limited, and the majority of gene predictions with predicted transmembrane motifs are of unknown function. A systematic analysis of the membrane proteome of T. gondii is important not only for understanding this parasite's invasion mechanism(s), but also for the discovery of potential drug targets and new preventative and therapeutic strategies. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of the membrane proteome of T. gondii, employing three proteomics strategies: one-dimensional gel liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis (one-dimensional gel electrophoresis LC-MS/MS), biotin labeling in conjunction with one-dimensional gel LC-MS/MS analysis, and a novel strategy that combines three-layer “sandwich” gel electrophoresis with multidimensional protein identification technology. A total of 2241 T. gondii proteins with at least one predicted transmembrane segment were identified and grouped into 841 sequentially nonredundant protein clusters, which account for 21.8% of the predicted transmembrane protein clusters in the T. gondii genome. A large portion (42%) of the identified T. gondii membrane proteins are hypothetical proteins. Furthermore, many of the membrane proteins validated by mass spectrometry are unique to T. gondii or to the Apicomplexa, providing a set of gene predictions ripe for experimental investigation, and potentially suitable targets for the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:20935347

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Tissue to Identify Potential Biomarkers of Responders and Nonresponders to First-Line Chemotherapy of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Urmila; Pokhriyal, Ruchika; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Hariprasad, Roopa; Khan, Mohd Imran; Gupta, Divya; Naru, Jasmine; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Vanamail, Perumal; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Sunesh; Hariprasad, Gururao

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment for advanced ovarian cancer is an initial debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel. Despite initial high response, three-fourths of these women experience disease recurrence with a dismal prognosis. Patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery were enrolled and tissue samples were collected. Post surgery, these patients were started on chemotherapy and followed up till the end of the cycle. Fluorescence-based differential in-gel expression coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used for discovery phase of experiments, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and pathway analysis were performed for expression and functional validation of differentially expressed proteins. While aldehyde reductase, hnRNP, cyclophilin A, heat shock protein-27, and actin are upregulated in responders, prohibitin, enoyl-coA hydratase, peroxiredoxin, and fibrin-β are upregulated in the nonresponders. The expressions of some of these proteins correlated with increased apoptotic activity in responders and decreased apoptotic activity in nonresponders. Therefore, the proteins qualify as potential biomarkers to predict chemotherapy response. PMID:26997873

  8. Proteomic Analysis of the Spatio-temporal Based Molecular Kinetics of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Identifies a Time- and Segment-specific Window for Effective Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Stephanie; Cizkova, Dasa; Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Nataf, Serge; Pays, Laurent; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Maass, Peter; Kobarg, Jan H; Kobeissy, Firas; Mériaux, Céline; Wisztorski, Maxence; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Cigankova, Viera; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a major debilitating health issue with a direct socioeconomic burden on the public and private sectors worldwide. Although several studies have been conducted to identify the molecular progression of injury sequel due from the lesion site, still the exact underlying mechanisms and pathways of injury development have not been fully elucidated. In this work, based on OMICs, 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, cytokines arrays, confocal imaging we established for the first time that molecular and cellular processes occurring after SCI are altered between the lesion proximity, i.e. rostral and caudal segments nearby the lesion (R1-C1) whereas segments distant from R1-C1, i.e. R2-C2 and R3-C3 levels coexpressed factors implicated in neurogenesis. Delay in T regulators recruitment between R1 and C1 favor discrepancies between the two segments. This is also reinforced by presence of neurites outgrowth inhibitors in C1, absent in R1. Moreover, the presence of immunoglobulins (IgGs) in neurons at the lesion site at 3 days, validated by mass spectrometry, may present additional factor that contributes to limited regeneration. Treatment in vivo with anti-CD20 one hour after SCI did not improve locomotor function and decrease IgG expression. These results open the door of a novel view of the SCI treatment by considering the C1 as the therapeutic target. PMID:27250205

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  10. Purification of specific loci for proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, Stephanie D.; Taverna, Sean D.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purification of small, native chromatin sections for proteomic identification of specifically bound proteins and histone posttranslational modifications is a powerful approach for studying mechanisms of chromosome metabolism. We detail a Chromatin Affinity Purification with Mass Spectrometry (ChAP-MS) approach for affinity purification of ~1 kb sections of chromatin for targeted proteomic analysis. This approach utilizes quantitative, high resolution mass spectrometry to categorize proteins and histone posttranslational modifications co-enriching with the given chromatin section as either “specific” to the targeted chromatin or “non-specific” contamination. In this way, the ChAP-MS approach can help define and re-define mechanisms of chromatin-templated activities. PMID:25311124

  11. Integrated Redox Proteomics and Metabolomics of Mitochondria to Identify Mechanisms of Cd Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Roede, James R.; Orr, Michael; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure contributes to human diseases affecting liver, kidney, lung, and other organ systems, but mechanisms underlying the pleotropic nature of these toxicities are poorly understood. Cd accumulates in humans from dietary, environmental (including cigarette smoke), and occupational sources, and has a twenty-year biologic half-life. Our previous mouse and cell studies showed that environmental low-dose Cd exposure altered protein redox states resulting in stimulation of inflammatory signaling and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton system, suggesting that Cd could impact multiple mechanisms of disease. In the current study, we investigated the effects of acute Cd exposure on the redox proteome and metabolome of mouse liver mitochondria to gain insight into associated toxicological mechanisms and functions. We analyzed redox states of liver mitochondrial proteins by redox proteomics using isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) combined mass spectrometry. Redox ICAT identified 2687 cysteine-containing peptides (peptidyl Cys) of which 1667 peptidyl Cys (657 proteins) were detected in both control and Cd-exposed samples. Of these, 46% (1247 peptidyl Cys, 547 proteins) were oxidized by Cd more than 1.5-fold relative to controls. Bioinformatics analysis using MetaCore software showed that Cd affected 86 pathways, including 24 Cys in proteins functioning in branched chain amino acid (BCAA) and 14 Cys in proteins functioning in fatty acid (acylcarnitine/carnitine) metabolism. Consistently, high-resolution metabolomics data showed that Cd treatment altered levels of BCAA and carnitine metabolites. Together, these results show that mitochondrial protein redox and metabolites are targets in Cd-induced hepatotoxicity. The results further indicate that redox proteomics and metabolomics can be used in an integrated systems approach to investigate complex disease mechanisms. PMID:24496640

  12. Integrative Analysis of the Mitochondrial Proteome in Yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Prokisch, Holger; Scharfe, Curt M.; Camp, David G.; Xiao, Wenzhong; David, Lior; Andreoli, Christophe; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Kozany, Christian; Hixson, Kim K.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Zischka, Hans; Ueffing, Marius; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Meitinger, Thomas; Oefner, Peter; Smith, Richard D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2004-06-30

    In this study yeast mitochondria were used as a model system to apply, evaluate, and integrate different genomic approaches to define the proteins of an organelle. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry applied to purified mitochondria identified 546 proteins. By expression analysis and comparison to other proteome studies, we demonstrate that the proteomic approach identifies primarily highly abundant proteins. By expanding our evaluation to other types of genomic approaches, including systematic deletion phenotype screening, expression profiling, subcellular localization studies, protein interaction analyses, and computational predictions, we show that an integration of approaches moves beyond the limitations of any single approach. We report the success of each approach by benchmarking it against a reference set of known mitochondrial proteins, and predict approximately 700 proteins associated with the mitochondrial organelle from the integration of 22 datasets. We show that a combination of complementary approaches like deletion phenotype screening and mass spectrometry can identify over 75% of the known mitochondrial proteome. These findings have implications for choosing optimal genome-wide approaches for the study of other cellular systems, including organelles and pathways in various species. Furthermore, our systematic identification of genes involved in mitochondrial function and biogenesis in yeast expands the candidates genes available for mapping Mendelian and complex mitochondrial disorders in humans.

  13. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily I.; Crew, Katherine D.; Trivedi, Meghna; Awad, Danielle; Maurer, Mathew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Koller, Antonius; Patel, Purvi; Kim Kim, Jenny; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9) and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8). MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2) suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  14. Identifying Predictors of Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Using Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Emily I; Crew, Katherine D; Trivedi, Meghna; Awad, Danielle; Maurer, Mathew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Koller, Antonius; Patel, Purvi; Kim Kim, Jenny; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in early detection and therapy have significantly increased the survival of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, most cancer therapies are known to carry a substantial risk of adverse long-term treatment-related effects. Little is known about patient susceptibility to severe side effects after chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common side effect of taxanes. Recent advances in genome-wide genotyping and sequencing technologies have supported the discoveries of a number of pharmacogenetic markers that predict response to chemotherapy. However, effectively implementing these pharmacogenetic markers in the clinic remains a major challenge. On the other hand, recent advances in proteomic technologies incorporating mass spectrometry (MS) for biomarker discovery show great promise to provide clinically relevant protein biomarkers. In this study, we evaluated the association between protein content in serum exosomes and severity of CIPN. Women with early stage breast cancer receiving adjuvant taxane chemotherapy were assessed with the FACT-Ntx score and serum was collected before and after the taxane treatment. Based on the change in FACT-Ntx score from baseline to 12 month follow-up, we separated patients into two groups: those who had no change (Group 1, N = 9) and those who had a ≥20% worsening (Group 1, N = 8). MS-based proteomics technology was used to identify proteins present in serum exosomes to determine potential biomarkers. Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon analysis was applied and maximum FDR was controlled at 20%. From the serum exosomes derived from this cohort, we identified over 700 proteins known to be in different subcellular locations and have different functions. Statistical analysis revealed a 12-protein signature that resulted in a distinct separation between baseline serum samples of both groups (q<0.2) suggesting that the baseline samples can predict subsequent neurotoxicity. These toxicity

  15. Lung tissue proteomics identifies elevated transglutaminase 2 levels in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ohlmeier, Steffen; Nieminen, Pentti; Gao, Jing; Kanerva, Tinja; Rönty, Mikko; Toljamo, Tuula; Bergmann, Ulrich; Mazur, Witold; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation. Cigarette smoking represents the main risk factor, but the specific mechanisms of COPD are not completely understood. Our aim was to identify COPD-specific proteomic changes involved in disease onset and severity. A comparative proteomic analysis of 51 lung tissues from nonsmokers, smokers, smokers with mild to moderate (stage I-II) COPD, severe to very severe COPD (stage III-IV), and patients with α-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) was performed by cysteine-specific two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry. Selected COPD-specific changes were validated by immunoblotting and further by ELISA in 120 induced sputum and plasma samples from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD (stage I-III). Altogether 82 altered proteins were identified comprising COPD-, AATD-, and IPF-specific, overlapping, and unspecific changes. Cathepsin D (CTSD), dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DPYSL2), transglutaminase 2 (TGM2), and tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 (TPP1) were validated as COPD-specific. TGM2 was not associated with smoking and correlated with COPD severity in lung tissue. TGM2 levels in sputum and plasma were elevated in patients with COPD (stage II-III) and correlated with lung function. In conclusion, new proteins related to COPD onset and severity could be identified with TGM2 being a novel potential diagnostic and therapeutic target for COPD. Further studies in carefully characterized cohorts are required to validate the identified changes. PMID:27084846

  16. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Host Factors Modulated during Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rogée, Sophie; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Bouquet, Jérôme; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Frederici, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute enterically transmitted hepatitis. In industrialized countries, it is a zoonotic disease, with swine being the major reservoir of human HEV contamination. The occurrence and severity of the disease are variable, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In the absence of a robust cell culture system or small-animal models, the HEV life cycle and pathological process remain unclear. To characterize HEV pathogenesis and virulence mechanisms, a quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify cellular factors and pathways modulated during acute infection of swine. Three groups of pigs were inoculated with three different strains of swine HEV to evaluate the possible role of viral determinants in pathogenesis. Liver samples were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach, two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and 61 modulated proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the three HEV strains replicate similarly in swine and that they modulate several cellular pathways, suggesting that HEV impairs several cellular processes, which can account for the various types of disease expression. Several proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, apolipoprotein E, and prohibitin, known to be involved in other viral life cycles, were upregulated in HEV-infected livers. Some differences were observed between the three strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability may induce variations in pathogenesis. This comparative analysis of the liver proteome modulated during infection with three different strains of HEV genotype 3 provides an important basis for further investigations on the factors involved in HEV replication and the mechanism of HEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for acute hepatitis, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic

  17. Proteomics-Driven Analysis of Ovine Whey Colostrum

    PubMed Central

    Scumaci, Domenica; Trimboli, Francesca; Dell’Aquila, Ludovica; Concolino, Antonio; Pappaianni, Giusi; Tammè, Laura; Vignola, Giorgio; Luciani, Alessia; Morelli, Daniela; Cuda, Giovanni; Boari, Andrea; Britti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to shed light in to the complexity of the ovine colostrum proteome, with a specific focus on the low abundance proteins. The ovine colostrum is characterized by a few dominating proteins, as the immunoglobulins, but it also contains less represented protein species, equally important for the correct development of neonates. Ovine colostrum, collected immediately after lambing, was separated by 1D SDS-PAGE. Proteins bands were digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, a total of 343 unique proteins were identified. To our knowledge, this study represents the most comprehensive analysis of ovine colostrum proteome. PMID:25643159

  18. SILAC-based proteome analysis of Starmerella bombicola sophorolipid production.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Katarzyna; Li, Bing; Groeneboer, Sara; Van Bogaert, Inge; Lin, Yao-Chen; Soetaert, Wim; Van de Peer, Yves; Devreese, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Starmerella (Candida) bombicola is the biosurfactant-producing species that caught the greatest deal of attention in the academic and industrial world due to its ability of producing large amounts of sophorolipids. Despite its high economic potential, the biochemistry behind the sophorolipid biosynthesis is still poorly understood. Here we present the first proteomic characterization of S. bombicola for which we created a lys1Δ mutant to allow the use of SILAC for quantitative analysis. To characterize the processes behind the production of these biosurfactants, we compared the proteome of sophorolipid producing (early stationary phase) and nonproducing cells (exponential phase). We report the simultaneous production of all known enzymes involved in sophorolipid biosynthesis including a predicted sophorolipid transporter. In addition, we identified the heme binding protein Dap1 as a possible regulator for Cyp52M1. Our results further indicate that ammonium and phosphate limitation are not the sole limiting factors inducing sophorolipid biosynthesis. PMID:23964782

  19. Proteomics-driven analysis of ovine whey colostrum.

    PubMed

    Scumaci, Domenica; Trimboli, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Ludovica; Concolino, Antonio; Pappaianni, Giusi; Tammè, Laura; Vignola, Giorgio; Luciani, Alessia; Morelli, Daniela; Cuda, Giovanni; Boari, Andrea; Britti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to shed light in to the complexity of the ovine colostrum proteome, with a specific focus on the low abundance proteins. The ovine colostrum is characterized by a few dominating proteins, as the immunoglobulins, but it also contains less represented protein species, equally important for the correct development of neonates. Ovine colostrum, collected immediately after lambing, was separated by 1D SDS-PAGE. Proteins bands were digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, a total of 343 unique proteins were identified. To our knowledge, this study represents the most comprehensive analysis of ovine colostrum proteome. PMID:25643159

  20. Proteomic analysis of the royal jelly and characterization of the functions of its derivation glands in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toshiyuki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Ao-Kondo, Hiroko; Kunieda, Takekazu; Oyama, Masaaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2013-01-01

    To identify candidate royal jelly (RJ) proteins that might affect the physiologic status of honeybee colony members, we used shotgun proteomics to comprehensively identify the RJ proteome as well as proteomes of the hypopharyngeal gland (HpG), postcerebral gland (PcG), and thoracic gland (TG), from which RJ proteins are assumed to be derived. We identified a total of 38 nonredundant RJ proteins, including 22 putative secretory proteins and Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein complex acid labile subunit. Among them, 9 proteins were newly identified from RJ. Comparison of the RJ proteome with the HpG, PcG, and TG proteomes revealed that 17 of the 22 putative secretory RJ proteins were derived from some of these glands, suggesting that the RJ proteome is a cocktail of proteins from these three glands. Furthermore, pathway analysis suggested that the HpG proteome represents the molecular basis of the extremely high protein-synthesizing ability, whereas the PcG proteome suggests that the PcG functions as a reservoir for the volatile compounds and a primer pheromone. Finally, to further characterize the possible total RJ proteome, we identified putative secretory proteins in the proteomes of these three glands. This will be useful for predicting novel RJ protein components in future studies. PMID:23157659

  1. Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2012-04-16

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

  2. Comprehensive Proteomics Analysis of Glycosomes from Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Jamdhade, Mahendra D.; Pawar, Harsh; Chavan, Sandip; Sathe, Gajanan; Umasankar, P.K.; Mahale, Kiran N.; Dixit, Tanwi; Madugundu, Anil K.; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Gowda, Harsha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Leishmania donovani is a kinetoplastid protozoan that causes a severe and fatal disease kala-azar, or visceral leishmaniasis. L. donovani infects human host after the phlebotomine sandfly takes a blood meal and resides within the phagolysosome of infected macrophages. Previous studies on host–parasite interactions have not focused on Leishmania organelles and the role that they play in the survival of this parasite within macrophages. Leishmania possess glycosomes that are unique and specialized subcellular microbody organelles. Glycosomes are known to harbor most peroxisomal enzymes and, in addition, they also possess nine glycolytic enzymes. In the present study, we have carried out proteomic profiling using high resolution mass spectrometry of a sucrose density gradient-enriched glycosomal fraction isolated from L. donovani promastigotes. This study resulted in the identification of 4022 unique peptides, leading to the identification of 1355 unique proteins from a preparation enriched in L. donovani glycosomes. Based on protein annotation, 566 (41.8%) were identified as hypothetical proteins with no known function. A majority of the identified proteins are involved in metabolic processes such as carbohydrate, lipid, and nucleic acid metabolism. Our present proteomic analysis is the most comprehensive study to date to map the proteome of L. donovani glycosomes. PMID:25748437

  3. Proteomic analysis of antigens from Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, María Auxiliadora; Rama-Iñiguez, Sara; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco

    2006-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease caused by the species of the genus Leishmania, flagellated protozoa that multiply inside mammalian macrophages and are transmitted by the bite of the sandfly. The disease is widespread and due to the lack of fully effective treatment and vaccination the search for new drugs and immune targets is needed. Proteomics seems to be a suitable strategy because the annotated sequenced genome of L. major is available. Here, we present a high-resolution proteome for L. infantum promastigotes comprising of around 700 spots. Western blot with rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against L. infantum promastiogote extracts and further analysis by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS allowed the identification of various relevant functional antigenic proteins. Major antigenic proteins were identified as propionil carboxilasa, ATPase beta subunit, transketolase, proteasome subunit, succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase, a probable tubulin alpha chain, the full-size heat shock protein 70, and several proteins of unknown function. In addition, one enzyme from the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway (adrenodoxin reductase) and the structural paraflagellar rod protein 3 (PAR3) were found among non-antigenic proteins. This study corroborates the usefulness of proteomics in identifying new proteins with crucial biological functions in Leishmania parasites. PMID:16791830

  4. Improving reproducibility and sensitivity in identifying human proteins by shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Resing, Katheryn A; Meyer-Arendt, Karen; Mendoza, Alex M; Aveline-Wolf, Lauren D; Jonscher, Karen R; Pierce, Kevin G; Old, William M; Cheung, Hiu T; Russell, Steven; Wattawa, Joy L; Goehle, Geoff R; Knight, Robin D; Ahn, Natalie G

    2004-07-01

    Identifying proteins in cell extracts by shotgun proteomics involves digesting the proteins, sequencing the resulting peptides by data-dependent mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and searching protein databases to identify the proteins from which the peptides are derived. Manual analysis and direct spectral comparison reveal that scores from two commonly used search programs (Sequest and Mascot) validate less than half of potentially identifiable MS/MS spectra (class positive) from shotgun analyses of the human erythroleukemia K562 cell line. Here we demonstrate increased sensitivity and accuracy using a focused search strategy along with a peptide sequence validation script that does not rely exclusively on XCorr or Mowse scores generated by Sequest or Mascot, but uses consensus between the search programs, along with chemical properties and scores describing the nature of the fragmentation spectrum (ion score and RSP). The approach yielded 4.2% false positive and 8% false negative frequencies in peptide assignments. The protein profile is then assembled from peptide assignments using a novel peptide-centric protein nomenclature that more accurately reports protein variants that contain identical peptide sequences. An Isoform Resolver algorithm ensures that the protein count is not inflated by variants in the protein database, eliminating approximately 25% of redundant proteins. Analysis of soluble proteins from a human K562 cells identified 5130 unique proteins, with approximately 100 false positive protein assignments. PMID:15228325

  5. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Sebastian; Dengjel, Jörn; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is driven by the oncogenic fusion kinase Bcr-Abl, which organizes its own signaling network with various proteins. These proteins, their interactions, and their role in relevant signaling pathways can be analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches in various models systems, e.g., in cell culture models. In this chapter, we describe in detail immunoprecipitations and quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of components of the Bcr-Abl signaling pathway in the human CML cell line K562. PMID:27581145

  6. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  7. Analysis of Mass Spectrometry Data for Nucleolar Proteomics Experiments.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Armel; Bensaddek, Dalila; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in experiment design, sample preparation, separation and instruments, mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics is becoming increasingly more popular. This has the potential to usher a new revolution in biology, in which the protein complement of cell populations can be described not only with increasing coverage, but also in all of its dimensions with unprecedented precision. Indeed, while earlier proteomics studies aimed solely at identifying as many as possible of the proteins present in the sample, newer, so-called Next Generation Proteomics studies add to this the aim of determining and quantifying the protein variants present in the sample, their mutual associations within complexes, their posttranslational modifications, their variation across the cell-cycle or in response to stimuli or perturbations, and their subcellular distribution. This has the potential to make MS proteomics much more useful for researchers, but will also mean that researchers with no background in MS will increasingly be confronted with the less-than trivial challenges of preparing samples for MS analysis, then processing and interpreting the results. In Chapter 20 , we described a workflow for isolating the protein contents of a specific SILAC-labeled organelle sample (the nucleolus) and processing it into peptides suitable for bottom-up MS analysis. Here, we complete this workflow by describing how to use the freely available MaxQuant software to convert the spectra stored in the Raw files into peptide- and protein-level information. We also briefly describe how to visualize the data using the free R scripting language. PMID:27576726

  8. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/). PMID:25913743

  9. A Comparative Quantitative Proteomic Study Identifies New Proteins Relevant for Sulfur Oxidation in the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Sylvester, Marc; Kröninger, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we compared the proteome response of Allochromatium vinosum when growing photoautotrophically in the presence of sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur with the proteome response when the organism was growing photoheterotrophically on malate. Applying tandem mass tag analysis as well as two-dimensional (2D) PAGE, we detected 1,955 of the 3,302 predicted proteins by identification of at least two peptides (59.2%) and quantified 1,848 of the identified proteins. Altered relative protein amounts (≥1.5-fold) were observed for 385 proteins, corresponding to 20.8% of the quantified A. vinosum proteome. A significant number of the proteins exhibiting strongly enhanced relative protein levels in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds are well documented essential players during oxidative sulfur metabolism, e.g., the dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB. Changes in protein levels generally matched those observed for the respective relative mRNA levels in a previous study and allowed identification of new genes/proteins participating in oxidative sulfur metabolism. One gene cluster (hyd; Alvin_2036-Alvin_2040) and one hypothetical protein (Alvin_2107) exhibiting strong responses on both the transcriptome and proteome levels were chosen for gene inactivation and phenotypic analyses of the respective mutant strains, which verified the importance of the so-called Isp hydrogenase supercomplex for efficient oxidation of sulfide and a crucial role of Alvin_2107 for the oxidation of sulfur stored in sulfur globules to sulfite. In addition, we analyzed the sulfur globule proteome and identified a new sulfur globule protein (SgpD; Alvin_2515). PMID:24487535

  10. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  11. Proteomic analysis of seminal fluid from men exhibiting oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Seminal plasma serves as a natural reservoir of antioxidants. It helps to remove excessive formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and consequently, reduce oxidative stress. Proteomic profiling of seminal plasma proteins is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in infertile men. Methods This prospective study consisted of 52 subjects: 32 infertile men and 20 healthy donors. Once semen and oxidative stress parameters were assessed (ROS, antioxidant concentration and DNA damage), the subjects were categorized into ROS positive (ROS+) or ROS negative (ROS-). Seminal plasma from each group was pooled and subjected to proteomics analysis. In-solution digestion and protein identification with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), followed by bioinformatics analyses was used to identify and characterize potential biomarker proteins. Results A total of 14 proteins were identified in this analysis with 7 of these common and unique proteins were identified in both the ROS+ and ROS- groups through MASCOT and SEQUEST analyses, respectively. Prolactin-induced protein was found to be more abundantly present in men with increased levels of ROS. Gene ontology annotations showed extracellular distribution of proteins with a major role in antioxidative activity and regulatory processes. Conclusions We have identified proteins that help protect against oxidative stress and are uniquely present in the seminal plasma of the ROS- men. Men exhibiting high levels of ROS in their seminal ejaculate are likely to exhibit proteins that are either downregulated or oxidatively modified, and these could potentially contribute to male infertility. PMID:24004880

  12. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  13. Proteome Analysis of the Plasma Membrane of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Shalini; Kosalai, K.; Namane, Abdelkader; Pym, Alex S.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is likely to contain proteins that could serve as novel drug targets, diagnostic probes or even components of a vaccine against tuberculosis. With this in mind, we have undertaken proteome analysis of the membrane of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Isolated membrane vesicles were extracted with either a detergent (Triton X114) or an alkaline buffer (carbonate) following two of the protocols recommended for membrane protein enrichment. Proteins were resolved by 2D-GE using immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips, and identified by peptide mass mapping utilizing the M. tuberculosis genome database. The two extraction procedures yielded patterns with minimal overlap. Only two proteins, both HSPs, showed a common presence. MALDI–MS analysis of 61 spots led to the identification of 32 proteins, 17 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome database. We classified 19 of the identified proteins as ‘membrane-associated’; 14 of these were further classified as ‘membrane-bound’, three of which were lipoproteins. The remaining proteins included four heat-shock proteins and several enzymes involved in energy or lipid metabolism. Extraction with Triton X114 was found to be more effective than carbonate for detecting ‘putative’ M. tuberculosis membrane proteins. The protocol was also found to be suitable for comparing BCG and M. tuberculosis membranes, identifying ESAT-6 as being expressed selectively in M. tuberculosis. While this study demonstrates for the first time some of the membrane proteins of M. tuberculosis, it also underscores the problems associated with proteomic analysis of a complex membrane such as that of a mycobacterium. PMID:18629250

  14. Breast tumor metastasis: analysis via proteomic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Goodison, Steve; Urquidi, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The ability to predict the metastatic behavior of a patient’s cancer, as well as to detect and eradicate such recurrences, remain major clinical challenges in oncology. While many potential molecular biomarkers have been identified and tested previously, none have greatly improved the accuracy of specimen evaluation over routine histopathological criteria and, to date, they predict individual outcomes poorly. The ongoing development of high-throughput proteomic profiling technologies is opening new avenues for the investigation of cancer and, through application in tissue-based studies and animal models, will facilitate the identification of molecular signatures that are associated with breast tumor cell phenotype. The appropriate use of these approaches has the potential to provide efficient biomarkers, and to improve our knowledge of tumor biology. This, in turn, will enable the development of targeted therapeutics aimed at ameliorating the lethal dissemination of breast cancer. In this review, we focus on the accumulating proteomic signatures of breast tumor progression, particularly those that correlate with the occurrence of distant metastases, and discuss some of the expected future developments in the field. PMID:18532913

  15. Proteomics and the Analysis of Proteomic Data: 2013 Overview of Current Protein-Profiling Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Can; Stone, Kathryn; Gulcicek, Erol; Williams, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a major tool in the study of proteomes. The analysis of proteolytic peptides and their fragment ions by this technique enables the identification and quantitation of the precursor proteins in a mixture. However, deducing chemical structures and then protein sequences from mass-to-charge ratios is a challenging computational task. Software tools incorporating powerful algorithms and statistical methods improved our ability to process the large quantities of proteomics data. Repositories of spectral data make both data analysis and experimental design more efficient. New approaches in quantitative and statistical proteomics make possible a greater coverage of the proteome, the identification of more post-translational modifications and a greater sensitivity in the quantitation of targeted proteins. PMID:23504934

  16. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  17. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium in the mosquito: progress and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    WASS, M. N.; STANWAY, R.; BLAGBOROUGH, A. M.; LAL, K.; PRIETO, J. H.; RAINE, D.; STERNBERG, M. J. E.; TALMAN, A. M.; TOMLEY, F.; YATES, J.; SINDEN, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we discuss proteomic analyses of whole cell preparations of the mosquito stages of malaria parasite development (i.e. gametocytes, microgamete, ookinete, oocyst and sporozoite) of Plasmodium berghei. We also include critiques of the proteomes of two cell fractions from the purified ookinete, namely the micronemes and cell surface. Whereas we summarise key biological interpretations of the data, we also try to identify key methodological constraints we have met, only some of which we were able to resolve. Recognising the need to translate the potential of current genome sequencing into functional understanding, we report our efforts to develop more powerful combinations of methods for the in silico prediction of protein function and location. We have applied this analysis to the proteome of the male gamete, a cell whose very simple structural organisation facilitated interpretation of data. Some of the in silico predictions made have now been supported by ongoing protein tagging and genetic knockout studies. We hope this discussion may assist future studies. PMID:22336136

  18. Analyses of the Xylem Sap Proteomes Identified Candidate Fusarium virguliforme Proteinacious Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the ascomycete fungus, Fusarium virguliforme, exhibits root necrosis and leaf scorch or foliar SDS. The pathogen has never been identified from the above ground diseased foliar tissues. Foliar SDS is believed to be caused by host selective toxins, including FvTox1, secreted by the fungus. This study investigated if the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants contains secreted F. virguliforme-proteins, some of which could cause foliar SDS development. Results Xylem sap samples were collected from five biological replications of F. virguliforme-infected and uninfected soybean plants under controlled conditions. We identified five F. virguliforme proteins from the xylem sap of the F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants by conducting LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These five proteins were also present in the excreted proteome of the pathogen in culture filtrates. One of these proteins showed high sequence identity to cerato-platanin, a phytotoxin produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata f. sp. platani to cause canker stain disease in the plane tree. Of over 500 soybean proteins identified in this study, 112 were present in at least 80% of the sap samples collected from F. virguliforme-infected and -uninfected control plants. We have identified four soybean defense proteins from the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000873. Conclusion This study confirms that a few F. virguliforme proteins travel through the xylem, some of which could be involved in foliar SDS development. We have identified five candidate proteinaceous toxins, one of which showed high similarity to a previously characterized phytotoxin. We have also shown the presence of four soybean defense proteins in the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants. This study laid the foundation for studying the molecular basis of foliar SDS development in soybean and

  19. Evaluation of sample extraction methods for proteomics analysis of green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-05-01

    Many protein extraction methods have been developed for plant proteome analysis but information is limited on the optimal protein extraction method from algae species. This study evaluated four protein extraction methods, i.e. direct lysis buffer method, TCA-acetone method, phenol method, and phenol/TCA-acetone method, using green algae Chlorella vulgaris for proteome analysis. The data presented showed that phenol/TCA-acetone method was superior to the other three tested methods with regards to shotgun proteomics. Proteins identified using shotgun proteomics were validated using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) technique. Additionally, SWATH provides protein quantitation information from different methods and protein abundance using different protein extraction methods was evaluated. These results highlight the importance of green algae protein extraction method for subsequent MS analysis and identification. PMID:26935773

  20. The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteomic libraries to identify RNA-modifying proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Jane E; Grayhack, Elizabeth J; Phizicky, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    Biochemical assay of proteomic libraries derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome provides a powerful new tool for the assignment of activities to proteins. Particular advantages of this approach include the speed with which a protein can be identified and the generality for any biological activity for which an assay can be developed. We discuss the utility of this approach for the identification of RNA-modifying enzymes using a yeast proteomic library derived from a genomic set of strains expressing GST-ORF fusion proteins. This technique is also broadly applicable to other classes of RNA-protein interactions, including RNA binding and RNA degradation, and can be used with any of the proteomic libraries that are available. PMID:18982304

  1. Using R and Bioconductor for proteomics data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Laurent; Christoforou, Andy

    2014-01-01

    This review presents how R, the popular statistical environment and programming language, can be used in the frame of proteomics data analysis. A short introduction to R is given, with special emphasis on some of the features that make R and its add-on packages premium software for sound and reproducible data analysis. The reader is also advised on how to find relevant R software for proteomics. Several use cases are then presented, illustrating data input/output, quality control, quantitative proteomics and data analysis. Detailed code and additional links to extensive documentation are available in the freely available companion package RforProteomics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23692960

  2. Comparative plasma proteome analysis of lymphoma-bearing SJL mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vadiraja B; Choi, Man Ho; Wishnok, John S; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    In SJL mice, growth of RcsX lymphoma cells induces an inflammatory response by stimulating V(beta)16+ T cells. During inflammation, various serum protein levels can increase (e.g., acute phase reactants) or decrease (e.g., albumin), and most of these altered proteins are thus potential biomarkers. Although blood plasma is a valuable and promising sample for biomarker discovery for diseases or for novel drug targets, its proteome is complex. To address this, we have focused on a comprehensive comparison of the plasma proteomes from normal and RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mice using the 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS method after removing albumin and immunoglobulins. This analysis resulted in the identification of a total of 1079 nonredundant mouse plasma proteins; more than 480 in normal and 790 in RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mouse plasma. Of these, only 191 proteins were found in common. The molecular weights ranged from 2 to 876 kDa, covering the pI values between 4.22 and 12.09, and included proteins with predicted transmembrane domains. By comparing the plasma proteomic profile of normal and RcsX-tumor-bearing SJL mice, we found significant changes in the levels of many proteins in RcsX-tumor-bearing mouse plasma. Most of the up-regulated proteins were identified as acute-phase proteins (APPs). Also, several unique proteins i.e., haptoglobin, proteosome subunits, fetuin-B, 14-3-3 zeta, MAGE-B4 antigen, etc, were found only in the tumor-bearing mouse plasma; either secreted, shed by membrane vesicles, or externalized due to cell death. These results affirm the effectiveness of this approach for protein identification from small samples, and for comparative proteomics in potential animal models of human disorders. PMID:16212437

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. PMID:24530623

  4. N-terminome analysis of the human mitochondrial proteome.

    PubMed

    Vaca Jacome, Alvaro Sebastian; Rabilloud, Thierry; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Rompais, Magali; Ayoub, Daniel; Lane, Lydie; Bairoch, Amos; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Carapito, Christine

    2015-07-01

    The high throughput characterization of protein N-termini is becoming an emerging challenge in the proteomics and proteogenomics fields. The present study describes the free N-terminome analysis of human mitochondria-enriched samples using trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) labelling approaches. Owing to the extent of protein import and cleavage for mitochondrial proteins, determining the new N-termini generated after translocation/processing events for mitochondrial proteins is crucial to understand the transformation of precursors to mature proteins. The doublet N-terminal oriented proteomics (dN-TOP) strategy based on a double light/heavy TMPP labelling has been optimized in order to improve and automate the workflow for efficient, fast and reliable high throughput N-terminome analysis. A total of 2714 proteins were identified and 897 N-terminal peptides were characterized (424 N-α-acetylated and 473 TMPP-labelled peptides). These results allowed the precise identification of the N-terminus of 693 unique proteins corresponding to 26% of all identified proteins. Overall, 120 already annotated processing cleavage sites were confirmed while 302 new cleavage sites were characterized. The accumulation of experimental evidence of mature N-termini should allow increasing the knowledge of processing mechanisms and consequently also enhance cleavage sites prediction algorithms. Complete datasets have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifiers PXD001521, PXD001522 and PXD001523 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001521, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD0001522 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001523, respectively). PMID:25944712

  5. Functional Module Search in Protein Networks based on Semantic Similarity Improves the Analysis of Proteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Boyanova, Desislava; Nilla, Santosh; Klau, Gunnar W.; Dandekar, Thomas; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The continuously evolving field of proteomics produces increasing amounts of data while improving the quality of protein identifications. Albeit quantitative measurements are becoming more popular, many proteomic studies are still based on non-quantitative methods for protein identification. These studies result in potentially large sets of identified proteins, where the biological interpretation of proteins can be challenging. Systems biology develops innovative network-based methods, which allow an integrated analysis of these data. Here we present a novel approach, which combines prior knowledge of protein-protein interactions (PPI) with proteomics data using functional similarity measurements of interacting proteins. This integrated network analysis exactly identifies network modules with a maximal consistent functional similarity reflecting biological processes of the investigated cells. We validated our approach on small (H9N2 virus-infected gastric cells) and large (blood constituents) proteomic data sets. Using this novel algorithm, we identified characteristic functional modules in virus-infected cells, comprising key signaling proteins (e.g. the stress-related kinase RAF1) and demonstrate that this method allows a module-based functional characterization of cell types. Analysis of a large proteome data set of blood constituents resulted in clear separation of blood cells according to their developmental origin. A detailed investigation of the T-cell proteome further illustrates how the algorithm partitions large networks into functional subnetworks each representing specific cellular functions. These results demonstrate that the integrated network approach not only allows a detailed analysis of proteome networks but also yields a functional decomposition of complex proteomic data sets and thereby provides deeper insights into the underlying cellular processes of the investigated system. PMID:24807868

  6. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin-Zhang; Zeng, Wei-Qun; Xiang, Yi; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Min; Li, Hong; She, Sha; Yang, Min; Xia, Kun; Peng, Shi-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common disease in the southern provinces of China with a poor prognosis. To better understand the pathogenesis of NPC and identify proteins involved in NPC carcinogenesis, we applied iTRAQ coupled with two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to compare the proteome profiles of NPC tissues and the adjacent non-tumor tissues. We identified 54 proteins with differential expression in NPC and the adjacent non-tumor tissues. The differentially expressed proteins were further determined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, the up-regulation of HSPB1, NPM1 and NCL were determined by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray. Functionally, we found that siRNA mediated knockdown of NPM1 inhibited the migration and invasion of human NPC CNE1 cell line. In summary, this is the first study on proteome analysis of NPC tissues using an iTRAQ method, and we identified many new differentially expressed proteins which are potential targets for the diagnosis and therapy of NPC. PMID:25648846

  7. Proteomic analysis of the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is used for the microbiological production of the antioxidant carotenoid astaxanthin. In this study, we established an optimal protocol for protein extraction and performed the first proteomic analysis of the strain ATCC 24230. Protein profiles before and during the induction of carotenogenesis were determined by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. Results Among the approximately 600 observed protein spots, 131 non-redundant proteins were identified. Proteomic analyses allowed us to identify 50 differentially expressed proteins that fall into several classes with distinct expression patterns. These analyses demonstrated that enzymes related to acetyl-CoA synthesis were more abundant prior to carotenogenesis. Later, redox- and stress-related proteins were up-regulated during the induction of carotenogenesis. For the carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes mevalonate kinase and phytoene/squalene synthase, we observed higher abundance during induction and/or accumulation of carotenoids. In addition, classical antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and the cytosolic superoxide dismutases, were not identified. Conclusions Our results provide an overview of potentially important carotenogenesis-related proteins, among which are proteins involved in carbohydrate and lipid biosynthetic pathways as well as several redox- and stress-related proteins. In addition, these results might indicate that X. dendrorhous accumulates astaxanthin under aerobic conditions to scavenge the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during metabolism. PMID:21669001

  8. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Winck, Flavia V.; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis. PMID:26538482

  9. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Winck, Flavia V; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis. PMID:26538482

  10. Representative proteomes: a stable, scalable and unbiased proteome set for sequence analysis and functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuming; Natale, Darren A; Finn, Robert D; Huang, Hongzhan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Cathy H; Mazumder, Raja

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating growth in the number of protein sequences taxes both the computational and manual resources needed to analyze them. One approach to dealing with this problem is to minimize the number of proteins subjected to such analysis in a way that minimizes loss of information. To this end we have developed a set of Representative Proteomes (RPs), each selected from a Representative Proteome Group (RPG) containing similar proteomes calculated based on co-membership in UniRef50 clusters. A Representative Proteome is the proteome that can best represent all the proteomes in its group in terms of the majority of the sequence space and information. RPs at 75%, 55%, 35% and 15% co-membership threshold (CMT) are provided to allow users to decrease or increase the granularity of the sequence space based on their requirements. We find that a CMT of 55% (RP55) most closely follows standard taxonomic classifications. Further analysis of this set reveals that sequence space is reduced by more than 80% relative to UniProtKB, while retaining both sequence diversity (over 95% of InterPro domains) and annotation information (93% of experimentally characterized proteins). All sets can be browsed and are available for sequence similarity searches and download at http://www.proteininformationresource.org/rps, while the set of 637 RPs determined using a 55% CMT are also available for text searches. Potential applications include sequence similarity searches, protein classification and targeted protein annotation and characterization. PMID:21556138

  11. Identification and proteomic analysis of osteoblast-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Min; Ke, Ronghu; Cai, Tianyi; Yang, Junyi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-11-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles with the function of intercellular communication, and they are released by various cell types. To reveal the knowledge about the exosomes from osteoblast, and explore the potential functions of osteogenesis, we isolated microvesicles from supernatants of mouse Mc3t3 by ultracentrifugation, characterized exosomes by electron microscopy and immunoblotting and presented the protein profile by proteomic analysis. The result demonstrated that microvesicles were between 30 and 100 nm in diameter, round shape with cup-like concavity and expressed exosomal marker tumor susceptibility gene (TSG) 101 and flotillin (Flot) 1. We identified a total number of 1069 proteins among which 786 proteins overlap with ExoCarta database. Gene Oncology analysis indicated that exosomes mostly derived from plasma membrane and mainly involved in protein localization and intracellular signaling. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed pathways are mostly involved in exosome biogenesis, formation, uptake and osteogenesis. Among the pathways, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 pathways played an important role in osteogenesis. Our study identified osteoblast-derived exosomes, unveiled the content of them, presented potential osteogenesis-related proteins and pathways and provided a rich proteomics data resource that will be valuable for further studies of the functions of individual proteins in bone diseases. PMID:26420226

  12. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  13. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  14. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  15. Pneumococcal Neuraminidase Substrates Identified through Comparative Proteomics Enabled by Chemoselective Labeling.

    PubMed

    McCombs, Janet E; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-04-20

    Neuraminidases (sialidases) are enzymes that hydrolytically remove sialic acid from sialylated proteins and lipids. Neuraminidases are encoded by a range of human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoa. Many pathogen neuraminidases are virulence factors, indicating that desialylation of host glycoconjugates can be a critical step in infection. Specifically, desialylation of host cell surface glycoproteins can enable these molecules to function as pathogen receptors or can alter signaling through the plasma membrane. Despite these critical effects, no unbiased approaches exist to identify glycoprotein substrates of neuraminidases. Here, we combine previously reported glycoproteomics methods with quantitative proteomics analysis to identify glycoproteins whose sialylation changes in response to neuraminidase treatment. The two glycoproteomics methods-periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (PAL) and galactose oxidase and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation (GAL)-rely on chemoselective labeling of sialylated and nonsialylated glycoproteins, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of the combined approaches by identifying substrates of two pneumococcal neuraminidases in a human cell line that models the blood-brain barrier. The methods deliver complementary lists of neuraminidase substrates, with GAL identifying a larger number of substrates than PAL (77 versus 17). Putative neuraminidase substrates were confirmed by other methods, establishing the validity of the approach. Among the identified substrates were host glycoproteins known to function in bacteria adherence and infection. Functional assays suggest that multiple desialylated cell surface glycoproteins may act together as pneumococcus receptors. Overall, this method will provide a powerful approach to identify glycoproteins that are desialylated by both purified neuraminidases and intact pathogens. PMID:26954852

  16. Label-free Quantitative Urinary Proteomics Identifies the Arginase Pathway as a New Player in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25205225

  17. In silico proteome analysis to facilitate proteomics experiments using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cagney, Gerard; Amiri, Shiva; Premawaradena, Thanuja; Lindo, Micheal; Emili, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Proteomics experiments typically involve protein or peptide separation steps coupled to the identification of many hundreds to thousands of peptides by mass spectrometry. Development of methodology and instrumentation in this field is proceeding rapidly, and effective software is needed to link the different stages of proteomic analysis. We have developed an application, proteogest, written in Perl that generates descriptive and statistical analyses of the biophysical properties of multiple (e.g. thousands) protein sequences submitted by the user, for instance protein sequences inferred from the complete genome sequence of a model organism. The application also carries out in silico proteolytic digestion of the submitted proteomes, or subsets thereof, and the distribution of biophysical properties of the resulting peptides is presented. proteogest is customizable, the user being able to select many options, for instance the cleavage pattern of the digestion treatment or the presence of modifications to specific amino acid residues. We show how proteogest can be used to compare the proteomes and digested proteome products of model organisms, to examine the added complexity generated by modification of residues, and to facilitate the design of proteomics experiments for optimal representation of component proteins. PMID:12946274

  18. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  19. Towards identifying Brassica proteins involved in mediating resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans: a proteomics-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hotte, Naomi; Rahman, Muhammad H; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat N V

    2008-09-01

    To better understand the pathogen-stress response of Brassica species against the ubiquitous hemi-biotroph fungus Leptosphaeria maculans, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis between blackleg-susceptible Brassica napus and blackleg-resistant Brassica carinata following pathogen inoculation. We examined temporal changes (6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h) in protein profiles of both species subjected to pathogen-challenge using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 64 proteins were found to be significantly affected by the pathogen in the two species, out of which 51 protein spots were identified using tandem mass spectrometry. The proteins identified included antioxidant enzymes, photosynthetic and metabolic enzymes, and those involved in protein processing and signaling. Specifically, we observed that in the tolerant B. carinata, enzymes involved in the detoxification of free radicals increased in response to the pathogen whereas no such increase was observed in the susceptible B. napus. The expression of genes encoding four selected proteins was validated using quantitative real-time PCR and an additional one by Western blotting. Our findings are discussed with respect to tolerance or susceptibility of these species to the pathogen. PMID:18668695

  20. f-divergence cutoff index to simultaneously identify differential expression in the integrated transcriptome and proteome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaojun; Hemberg, Martin; Cansizoglu, Ertugrul; Belin, Stephane; Kosik, Kenneth; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith

    2016-01-01

    The ability to integrate ‘omics’ (i.e. transcriptomics and proteomics) is becoming increasingly important to the understanding of regulatory mechanisms. There are currently no tools available to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) across different ‘omics’ data types or multi-dimensional data including time courses. We present fCI (f-divergence Cut-out Index), a model capable of simultaneously identifying DEGs from continuous and discrete transcriptomic, proteomic and integrated proteogenomic data. We show that fCI can be used across multiple diverse sets of data and can unambiguously find genes that show functional modulation, developmental changes or misregulation. Applying fCI to several proteogenomics datasets, we identified a number of important genes that showed distinctive regulation patterns. The package fCI is available at R Bioconductor and http://software.steenlab.org/fCI/. PMID:26980280

  1. f-divergence cutoff index to simultaneously identify differential expression in the integrated transcriptome and proteome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaojun; Hemberg, Martin; Cansizoglu, Ertugrul; Belin, Stephane; Kosik, Kenneth; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith

    2016-06-01

    The ability to integrate 'omics' (i.e. transcriptomics and proteomics) is becoming increasingly important to the understanding of regulatory mechanisms. There are currently no tools available to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) across different 'omics' data types or multi-dimensional data including time courses. We present fCI (f-divergence Cut-out Index), a model capable of simultaneously identifying DEGs from continuous and discrete transcriptomic, proteomic and integrated proteogenomic data. We show that fCI can be used across multiple diverse sets of data and can unambiguously find genes that show functional modulation, developmental changes or misregulation. Applying fCI to several proteogenomics datasets, we identified a number of important genes that showed distinctive regulation patterns. The package fCI is available at R Bioconductor and http://software.steenlab.org/fCI/. PMID:26980280

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cold-responsive proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Karlie A; Mariani, Michael; Haynes, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Rice is susceptible to cold stress and with a future of climatic instability we will be unable to produce enough rice to satisfy increasing demand. A thorough understanding of the molecular responses to thermal stress is imperative for engineering cultivars, which have greater resistance to low temperature stress. In this study we investigated the proteomic response of rice seedlings to 48, 72 and 96 h of cold stress at 12-14°C. The use of both label-free and iTRAQ approaches in the analysis of global protein expression enabled us to assess the complementarity of the two techniques for use in plant proteomics. The approaches yielded a similar biological response to cold stress despite a disparity in proteins identified. The label-free approach identified 236 cold-responsive proteins compared to 85 in iTRAQ results, with only 24 proteins in common. Functional analysis revealed differential expression of proteins involved in transport, photosynthesis, generation of precursor metabolites and energy; and, more specifically, histones and vitamin B biosynthetic proteins were observed to be affected by cold stress. PMID:21433000

  3. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  4. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva.

    PubMed

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Turse, Joshua E; Scoles, Glen A; Purvine, Samuel O; Nicora, Carrie D; Clauss, Therese R W; Ueti, Massaro W; Brown, Wendy C; Brayton, Kelly A

    2014-11-01

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified. PMID:25110293

  5. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed's potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30 °C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0-90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue. PMID:26172265

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Neutrophil Priming by PAF.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Elaine N; Neves, Anne C D; Santos, Karina C; Uribe, Carlos E; Souza, Paulo E N; Correa, José R; Castro, Mariana S; Fontes, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are the main cells of the innate immunity inflammatory response. Several factors can activate or stimulate neutrophils, including platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator. Some authors consider the activation induced by PAF priming because it triggers limited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and it amplifies the response of the cell to a subsequent activator. The stimulation is reversible, which is critical for modulating the inflammatory response. Exacerbated inflammatory responses lead to serious diseases, such as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), among others. Characterizing the stimulation of neutrophils during the possible reversion or prevention of an exaggerated inflammatory response is critical for the development of control strategies. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to identify 36 proteins that differ in abundance between quiescent neutrophils and PAFstimulated neutrophils. The identified proteins were associated with increased DNA repair processes, calcium flux, protein transcription, cytoskeleton alterations that facilitate migration and degranulation, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins that modulate the inflammatory response. Some of the identified proteins have not been previously reported in neutrophils. PMID:26631175

  7. Brown recluse spider venom: proteomic analysis and proposal of a putative mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Lucilene D; Dias, Nathalia B; Roberto, José; Pinto, A S; Palma, Mario S

    2009-01-01

    Loxosceles intermedia spider venom was subjected to proteomic analysis through a MudPIT shot-gun approach to identify the protein composition. Were identified 39 proteins which seem to responsible by the lesion of different types of tissues, to some physiopathological actions and by the prevention of structural damage to the toxin structures. PMID:19689420

  8. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometr...

  9. Characterization of a SILAC method for proteomic analysis of primary rat microglia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E.; Stevens, Stanley M.; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Microglia play important and dynamic roles in mediating a variety of physiological and pathological processes during the development, normal function and degeneration of the central nervous system. Application of SILAC-based proteomic analysis would greatly facilitate the identification of cellular pathways regulating the multifaceted phenotypes of microglia. We and others have successfully SILAC-labeled immortalized murine microglial cell lines in previous studies. In this study, we report the development and evaluation of a SILAC-labeled primary rat microglia model. Although the isotope labeling scheme for primary microglia is drastically different from that of immortalized cell lines, our de novo and uninterrupted primary culture labeling protocol (DUP-SILAC) resulted in sufficient incorporation of SILAC labels for mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling. In addition, label incorporation did not alter their morphology and response to endotoxin stimulation. Proteomic analysis of the endotoxin-stimulated SILAC-labeled primary microglia identified expected as well as potentially novel activation markers and pro-inflammatory pathways that could be quantified in a more physiologically relevant cellular model system compared to immortalized cell lines. The establishment of primary microglia SILAC model will further expand our capacity for global scale proteomic profiling of pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. Proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002759. PMID:26936193

  10. Redox proteomic analysis of the gastrocnemius muscle from adult and old mice.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2015-09-01

    The data provides information in support of the research article, "Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging", Journal of Proteome Research, 2014, 13 (11), 2008-21 [1]. Raw data is available from ProteomeXchange [2] with identifier PDX001054. The proteome of gastrocnemius muscle from adult and old mice was analyzed by global label-free proteomics and the relative quantification of specific reduced and reversibly oxidized Cysteine (Cys) residues was performed using Skyline [3]. Briefly, reduced Cysteine (Cys) containing peptides was alkylated using N-ethylmalemide (d0-NEM). Samples were desalted and reversibly oxidized Cys residues were reduced using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) and the newly formed reduced Cys residues were labeled with heavy NEM( d5-NEM). Label-free analysis of the global proteome of adult (n=5) and old (n=4) gastrocnemius muscles was performed using Peaks7™ mass spectrometry data analysis software [4]. Relative quantification of Cys containing peptides that were identified as reduced (d(0) NEM labeled) and reversibly oxidized d(5)-NEM labeled was performed using the intensity of their precursor ions in Skyline. Results indicate that muscles from old mice show reduced redox flexibility particularly in proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. PMID:26217813

  11. Proteomic analysis of mare follicular fluid during late follicle development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Follicular fluid accumulates into the antrum of follicle from the early stage of follicle development. Studies on its components may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying follicular development and oocyte quality. With this objective, we performed a proteomic analysis of mare follicular fluid. First, we hypothesized that proteins in follicular fluid may differ from those in the serum, and also may change during follicle development. Second, we used four different approaches of Immunodepletion and one enrichment method, in order to overcome the masking effect of high-abundance proteins present in the follicular fluid, and to identify those present in lower abundance. Finally, we compared our results with previous studies performed in mono-ovulant (human) and poly-ovulant (porcine and canine) species in an attempt to identify common and/or species-specific proteins. Methods Follicular fluid samples were collected from ovaries at three different stages of follicle development (early dominant, late dominant and preovulatory). Blood samples were also collected at each time. The proteomic analysis was carried out on crude, depleted and enriched follicular fluid by 2D-PAGE, 1D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. Results Total of 459 protein spots were visualized by 2D-PAGE of crude mare follicular fluid, with no difference among the three physiological stages. Thirty proteins were observed as differentially expressed between serum and follicular fluid. Enrichment method was found to be the most powerful method for detection and identification of low-abundance proteins from follicular fluid. Actually, we were able to identify 18 proteins in the crude follicular fluid, and as many as 113 in the enriched follicular fluid. Inhibins and a few other proteins involved in reproduction could only be identified after enrichment of follicular fluid, demonstrating the power of the method used. The comparison of proteins found in mare follicular fluid

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Vitreous Humor in Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Michael; Dacheva, Ivanka; Nobl, Matthias; Siwy, Justyna; Schanstra, Joost P.; Mullen, William; Koch, Frank H. J.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Kretz, Florian T. A.; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Koss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the protein profile of human vitreous of untreated patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods Sixty-eight vitreous humor (VH) samples (44 from patients with treatment naïve RVO, 24 controls with idiopathic floaters) were analyzed in this clinical-experimental study using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometer and tandem mass spectrometry. To define potential candidate protein markers of RVO, proteomic analysis was performed on RVO patients (n = 30) and compared with controls (n = 16). To determine validity of potential biomarker candidates in RVO, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was performed by using proteome data of independent RVO (n = 14) and control samples (n = 8). Results Ninety-four different proteins (736 tryptic peptides) could be identified. Sixteen proteins were found to be significant when comparing RVO and control samples (P = 1.43E-05 to 4.48E-02). Five proteins (Clusterin, Complement C3, Ig lambda-like polypeptide 5 (IGLL5), Opticin and Vitronectin), remained significant after using correction for multiple testing. These five proteins were also detected significant when comparing subgroups of RVO (central RVO, hemi-central RVO, branch RVO) to controls. Using independent samples ROC-Area under the curve was determined proving the validity of the results: Clusterin 0.884, Complement C3 0.955, IGLL5 1.000, Opticin 0.741, Vitronectin 0.786. In addition, validation through ELISA measurements was performed. Conclusion The results of the study reveal that the proteomic composition of VH differed significantly between the patients with RVO and the controls. The proteins identified may serve as potential biomarkers for pathogenesis induced by RVO. PMID:27362861

  13. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  14. Proteomic analysis of murine testes lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyi; Wei, Suning; Li, Linghai; Su, Xueying; Du, Congkuo; Li, Fengjuan; Geng, Bin; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Guoheng

    2015-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells contain abundant cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) as a cholesteryl-ester store for releasing cholesterols as the precursor substrate for testosterone biosynthesis. Here, we identified the protein composition of testicular LDs purified from adult mice by using mass spectrometry and immunodetection. Among 337 proteins identified, 144 were previously detected in LD proteomes; 44 were confirmed by microscopy. Testicular LDs contained multiple Rab GTPases, chaperones, and proteins involved in glucuronidation, ubiquination and transport, many known to modulate LD formation and LD-related cellular functions. In particular, testicular LDs contained many members of both the perilipin family and classical lipase/esterase superfamily assembled predominately in adipocyte LDs. Thus, testicular LDs might be regulated similar to adipocyte LDs. Remarkably, testicular LDs contained a large number of classical enzymes for biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and hormonal steroids, so steroidogenic reactions might occur on testicular LDs or the steroidogenic enzymes and products could be transferred through testicular LDs. These characteristics differ from the LDs in most other types of cells, so testicular LDs could be an active organelle functionally involved in steroidogenesis. PMID:26159641

  15. Micro-proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-02-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro-proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin-associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro-proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat-shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat-shock, including variable induction of heat-shock proteins. The micro-proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  16. Micro‐proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level

    PubMed Central

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro‐proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin‐associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro‐proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat‐shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat‐shock, including variable induction of heat‐shock proteins. The micro‐proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  17. Global analysis of a 'simple' proteome : methanoccus jannaschii.

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C. S.; Reich, C.; Tollaksen, S.; Babnigg, G.; Lim, H.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J., III; Olsen, G.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; The Scripps Inst.

    2002-12-25

    The completed genome of Methanococcus jannaschii, including the main chromosome and two extra-chromosomal elements, predicts a proteome comprised of 1783 proteins. How many of those proteins are expressed at any given time and the relative abundance of the expressed proteins, however, cannot be predicted solely from the genome sequence. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with peptide mass spectrometry is being used to identify the proteins expressed by M. jannaschii cells grown under different conditions as part of an effort to correlate protein expression with regulatory mechanisms. Here we describe the identification of 170 of the most abundant proteins found in total lysates of M. jannaschii grown under optimal fermentation conditions. To optimize the number of proteins detected, two different protein specific stains (Coomassie Blue R250 or silver nitrate) and two different first dimension separation methods (isoelectric focusing or nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) were used. Thirty-two percent of the proteins identified are annotated as hypothetical (21% conserved hypothetical and 11% hypothetical), 21% are enzymes involved in energy metabolism, 12% are proteins required for protein synthesis, and the remainder include proteins necessary for intermediary metabolism, cell division, and cell structure. Evidence of post-translational modification of numerous M. jannaschii proteins has been found, as well as indications of incomplete dissociation of protein-protein complexes. These results demonstrate the complexity of proteome analysis even when dealing with a relatively simple genome.

  18. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  19. Systematic VCP-UBXD Adaptor Network Proteomics Identifies a Role for UBXN10 in Regulating Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Malavika; Sergeev, Mikhail; Garnaas, Maija; Lydeard, John R.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Goessling, Wolfram; Shah, Jagesh V.; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase VCP (also known as p97 or CDC48) uses ATP hydrolysis to “segregate” ubiquitinated proteins from their binding partners. VCP acts via UBX-domain containing adaptors that provide target specificity, but targets and functions of UBXD proteins remain poorly understood. Through systematic proteomic analysis of UBXD proteins in human cells, we reveal a network of over 195 interacting proteins, implicating VCP in diverse cellular pathways. We have explored one such complex between an unstudied adaptor UBXN10 and the intraflagellar transport B (IFT-B) complex, which regulates anterograde transport into cilia. UBXN10 localizes to cilia in a VCP-dependent manner and both VCP and UBXN10 are required for ciliogenesis. Pharmacological inhibition of VCP destabilized the IFT-B complex and increased trafficking rates. Depletion of UBXN10 in zebrafish embryos causes defects in left-right asymmetry, which depends on functional cilia. This study provides a resource for exploring the landscape of UBXD proteins in biology and identifies an unexpected requirement for VCP-UBXN10 in ciliogenesis. PMID:26389662

  20. Proteomic analysis of naturally-sourced biological scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiyao; Uygun, Basak E; Geerts, Sharon; Ozer, Sinan; Scalf, Mark; Gilpin, Sarah E; Ott, Harald C; Yarmush, Martin L; Smith, Lloyd M; Welham, Nathan V; Frey, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge to the clinical implementation of decellularized scaffold-based tissue engineering lies in understanding the process of removing cells and immunogenic material from a donor tissue/organ while maintaining the biochemical and biophysical properties of the scaffold that will promote growth of newly seeded cells. Current criteria for evaluating whole organ decellularization are primarily based on nucleic acids, as they are easy to quantify and have been directly correlated to adverse host responses. However, numerous proteins cause immunogenic responses and thus should be measured directly to further understand and quantify the efficacy of decellularization. In addition, there has been increasing appreciation for the role of the various protein components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in directing cell growth and regulating organ function. We performed in-depth proteomic analysis on four types of biological scaffolds and identified a large number of both remnant cellular and ECM proteins. Measurements of individual protein abundances during the decellularization process revealed significant removal of numerous cellular proteins, but preservation of most structural matrix proteins. The observation that decellularized scaffolds still contain many cellular proteins, although at decreased abundance, indicates that elimination of DNA does not assure adequate removal of all cellular material. Thus, proteomic analysis provides crucial characterization of the decellularization process to create biological scaffolds for future tissue/organ replacement therapies. PMID:26476196

  1. Proteomic analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Qian, Dandan; Tian, Lihong; Qu, Leqing

    2015-01-01

    The defects in storage proteins secretion in the endosperm of transgenic rice seeds often leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which produces floury and shrunken seeds, but the mechanism of this response remains unclear. We used an iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis of ER-stressed rice seeds due to the endosperm-specific suppression of OsSar1 to identify changes in the protein levels in response to ER stress. ER stress changed the expression of 405 proteins in rice seed by >2.0- fold compared with the wild-type control. Of these proteins, 140 were upregulated and 265 were downregulated. The upregulated proteins were mainly involved in protein modification, transport and degradation, and the downregulated proteins were mainly involved in metabolism and stress/defense responses. A KOBAS analysis revealed that protein-processing in the ER and degradation-related proteasome were the predominant upregulated pathways in the rice endosperm in response to ER stress. Trans-Golgi protein transport was also involved in the ER stress response. Combined with bioinformatic and molecular biology analyses, our proteomic data will facilitate our understanding of the systemic responses to ER stress in rice seeds. PMID:26395408

  2. Proteomic analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in rice seeds

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Dandan; Tian, Lihong; Qu, Leqing

    2015-01-01

    The defects in storage proteins secretion in the endosperm of transgenic rice seeds often leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which produces floury and shrunken seeds, but the mechanism of this response remains unclear. We used an iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis of ER-stressed rice seeds due to the endosperm-specific suppression of OsSar1 to identify changes in the protein levels in response to ER stress. ER stress changed the expression of 405 proteins in rice seed by >2.0- fold compared with the wild-type control. Of these proteins, 140 were upregulated and 265 were downregulated. The upregulated proteins were mainly involved in protein modification, transport and degradation, and the downregulated proteins were mainly involved in metabolism and stress/defense responses. A KOBAS analysis revealed that protein-processing in the ER and degradation-related proteasome were the predominant upregulated pathways in the rice endosperm in response to ER stress. Trans-Golgi protein transport was also involved in the ER stress response. Combined with bioinformatic and molecular biology analyses, our proteomic data will facilitate our understanding of the systemic responses to ER stress in rice seeds. PMID:26395408

  3. Proteome analysis of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 facilitated by the biomodule analysis tool BMSorter.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rueichi R; Yi, Eugene C; Chiu, Yulun; Lee, Hookeun; Kao, Yu-Chieh P; Wu, Timothy H; Aebersold, Ruedi; Goodlett, David R; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2006-06-01

    To better understand the extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium species NRC-1, we analyzed its soluble proteome by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 888 unique proteins were identified with a ProteinProphet probability (P) between 0.9 and 1.0. To evaluate the biochemical activities of the organism, the proteomic data were subjected to a biological network analysis using our BMSorter software. This allowed us to examine the proteins expressed in different biomodules and study the interactions between pertinent biomodules. Interestingly an integrated analysis of the enzymes in the amino acid metabolism and citrate cycle networks suggested that up to eight amino acids may be converted to oxaloacetate, fumarate, or oxoglutarate in the citrate cycle for energy production. In addition, glutamate and aspartate may be interconverted from other amino acids or synthesized from citrate cycle intermediates to meet the high demand for the acidic amino acids that are required to build the highly acidic proteome of the organism. Thus this study demonstrated that proteome analysis can provide useful information and help systems analyses of organisms. PMID:16497792

  4. Analysis of soybean seed proteins using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different proteomics technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, different classes of soybean seed proteins are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists in obtaining a greater understanding of the...

  5. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  6. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  7. [Challenge to the Development of Molecular Targeted Therapy against a Novel Target Candidate Identified by Antibody Proteomics Technology].

    PubMed

    Nagano, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Disease proteomics that systemically analyzes and identifies differentially expressed proteins between healthy and diseased samples is a potentially useful approach for obtaining target proteins for drug development. To date, however, very few target proteins have been identified from this field. A key issue that remains to be resolved is how to correctly identify target proteins from a number of potential candidates. To circumvent this problem, we have developed "antibody proteomics technology" in which a single chain Fv phage antibody library is utilized for proteome analysis. Here, we describe the application of this technology by primarily focusing on Eph receptor A10 (EphA10), a novel breast cancer-related protein that is a promising target for antibody drugs. To establish an effective and safe targeted cancer therapy, it is important that the target is specifically expressed in cancer tissues. Therefore, we attempted to analyze the EphA10 expression profiles. Tissue microarray analysis showed that EphA10 was expressed in all subtypes of breast cancer containing triple negative breast cancer cases. On the other hand, EphA10 was only expressed in testis tissue among 36 kinds of normal tissues. Thus, EphA10 could be a highly cancer-specific protein, making it a promising target for female breast cancer patients. Finally, we examined the anti-tumor effect by anti-EphA10 antibody, aiming for the development of a novel EphA10 targeting therapy. Administration of the antibody showed that tumor volumes were significantly inhibited. Our results suggest that targeting EphA10 in breast cancer cases might be a promising new form of therapy. PMID:26831784

  8. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: a meta-analysis of response patterns.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2015-02-01

    Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action. We suggest that the results of any differential proteomics experiment performed with zebrafish should be interpreted keeping in mind the list of the most frequent responders that we have identified. Similar reservations should apply to any other species where proteome responses are analyzed by global proteomics methods. Careful consideration of the reliability and significance of observed changes is necessary in order not to over

  9. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  10. A Proteomic Analysis of Maize Chloroplast Biogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Lonosky, Patricia M.; Zhang, Xiaosi; Honavar, Vasant G.; Dobbs, Drena L.; Fu, Aigen; Rodermel, Steve R.

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics studies to explore global patterns of protein expression in plant and green algal systems have proliferated within the past few years. Although most of these studies have involved mapping of the proteomes of various organs, tissues, cells, or organelles, comparative proteomics experiments have also led to the identification of proteins that change in abundance in various developmental or physiological contexts. Despite the growing use of proteomics in plant studies, questions of reproducibility have not generally been addressed, nor have quantitative methods been widely used, for example, to identify protein expression classes. In this report, we use the de-etiolation (“greening”) of maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts as a model system to explore these questions, and we outline a reproducible protocol to identify changes in the plastid proteome that occur during the greening process using techniques of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We also evaluate hierarchical and nonhierarchical statistical methods to analyze the patterns of expression of 526 “high-quality,” unique spots on the two-dimensional gels. We conclude that Adaptive Resonance Theory 2—a nonhierarchical, neural clustering technique that has not been previously applied to gene expression data—is a powerful technique for discriminating protein expression classes during greening. Our experiments provide a foundation for the use of proteomics in the design of experiments to address fundamental questions in plant physiology and molecular biology. PMID:14966246

  11. Nanobiocatalysis for protein digestion in proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-02-01

    The process of protein digestion is a critical step for successful protein identification in the bottom-up proteomic analysis. To substitute the present practice of in-solution protein digestion, which is long, tedious, and difficult to automate, a lot of efforts have been dedicated for the development of a rapid, recyclable and automated digestion system. Recent advances of nanobiocatalytic approaches have improved the performance of protein digestion by using various nanomaterials such as nanoporous materials, magnetic nanoparticles, and polymer nanofibers. Especially, the unprecedented success of trypsin stabilization in the form of trypsin-coated nanofibers, showing no activity decrease under repeated uses for one year and retaining good resistance to proteolysis, has demonstrated its great potential to be employed in the development of automated, high-throughput, and on-line digestion systems. This review discusses recent developments of nanobiocatalytic approaches for the improved performance of protein digestion in speed, detection sensitivity, recyclability, and trypsin stability. In addition, we also introduce the protein digestions under unconventional energy inputs for protein denaturation and the development of microfluidic enzyme reactors that can benefit from recent successes of these nanobiocatalytic approaches.

  12. A Comprehensive Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Hydra Head Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hendrik O.; Höger, Stefanie K.; Looso, Mario; Lengfeld, Tobias; Kuhn, Anne; Warnken, Uwe; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Schnölzer, Martina; Krüger, Marcus; Özbek, Suat; Simakov, Oleg; Holstein, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The cnidarian freshwater polyp Hydra sp. exhibits an unparalleled regeneration capacity in the animal kingdom. Using an integrative transcriptomic and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture proteomic/phosphoproteomic approach, we studied stem cell-based regeneration in Hydra polyps. As major contributors to head regeneration, we identified diverse signaling pathways adopted for the regeneration response as well as enriched novel genes. Our global analysis reveals two distinct molecular cascades: an early injury response and a subsequent, signaling driven patterning of the regenerating tissue. A key factor of the initial injury response is a general stabilization of proteins and a net upregulation of transcripts, which is followed by a subsequent activation cascade of signaling molecules including Wnts and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-related factors. We observed moderate overlap between the factors contributing to proteomic and transcriptomic responses suggesting a decoupled regulation between the transcriptional and translational levels. Our data also indicate that interstitial stem cells and their derivatives (e.g., neurons) have no major role in Hydra head regeneration. Remarkably, we found an enrichment of evolutionarily more recent genes in the early regeneration response, whereas conserved genes are more enriched in the late phase. In addition, genes specific to the early injury response were enriched in transposon insertions. Genetic dynamicity and taxon-specific factors might therefore play a hitherto underestimated role in Hydra regeneration. PMID:25841488

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Proton Beam Irradiated Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Elas, Martyna; Sowa, Urszula; Swakon, Jan; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Olko, Pawel; Romanowska-Dixon, Bozena; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy) of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times) change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i) DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH), (ii) cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70), (iii) cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP), and (iv) cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B). A substantial decrease (2.3 x) was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma. PMID:24392146

  14. A Comprehensive Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Hydra Head Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Hendrik O; Höger, Stefanie K; Looso, Mario; Lengfeld, Tobias; Kuhn, Anne; Warnken, Uwe; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Schnölzer, Martina; Krüger, Marcus; Özbek, Suat; Simakov, Oleg; Holstein, Thomas W

    2015-08-01

    The cnidarian freshwater polyp Hydra sp. exhibits an unparalleled regeneration capacity in the animal kingdom. Using an integrative transcriptomic and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture proteomic/phosphoproteomic approach, we studied stem cell-based regeneration in Hydra polyps. As major contributors to head regeneration, we identified diverse signaling pathways adopted for the regeneration response as well as enriched novel genes. Our global analysis reveals two distinct molecular cascades: an early injury response and a subsequent, signaling driven patterning of the regenerating tissue. A key factor of the initial injury response is a general stabilization of proteins and a net upregulation of transcripts, which is followed by a subsequent activation cascade of signaling molecules including Wnts and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-related factors. We observed moderate overlap between the factors contributing to proteomic and transcriptomic responses suggesting a decoupled regulation between the transcriptional and translational levels. Our data also indicate that interstitial stem cells and their derivatives (e.g., neurons) have no major role in Hydra head regeneration. Remarkably, we found an enrichment of evolutionarily more recent genes in the early regeneration response, whereas conserved genes are more enriched in the late phase. In addition, genes specific to the early injury response were enriched in transposon insertions. Genetic dynamicity and taxon-specific factors might therefore play a hitherto underestimated role in Hydra regeneration. PMID:25841488

  15. Proteomic Analysis Provides Insights on Venom Processing in Conus textile

    PubMed Central

    Tayo, Lemmuel L.; Lu, Bingwen; Cruz, Lourdes J.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Conus species of marine snails deliver a potent collection of toxins from the venom duct via a long proboscis attached to a harpoon tooth. Conotoxins are known to possess powerful neurological effects and some have been developed for therapeutic uses. Using mass-spectrometry based proteomics, qualitative and quantitative differences in conotoxin components were found in the proximal, central and distal sections of the C. textile venom duct suggesting specialization of duct sections for biosynthesis of particular conotoxins. Reversed phase HPLC followed by Orbitrap mass spectrometry and data analysis using SEQUEST and ProLuCID identified 31 conotoxin sequences and 25 post-translational modification (PTM) variants with King-Kong 2 peptide being the most abundant. Several previously unreported variants of known conopeptides and were found and this is the first time that HyVal is reported for a disulfide rich Conus peptide. Differential expression along the venom duct, production of PTM variants, alternative proteolytic cleavage sites, and venom processing enroute to the proboscis all appear to contribute to enriching the combinatorial pool of conopeptides and producing the appropriate formulation for a particular hunting situation. The complimentary tools of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and molecular biology can greatly accelerate the discovery of Conus peptides and provide insights on envenomation and other biological strategies of cone snails. PMID:20334424

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of floral color variegation in peach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wu, Xinxin; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Zhihong

    2015-09-01

    Variegation in flower is a special trait in ornamental peach (Prunus persica L.). To investigate the mechanism of color variegation, we used a combination of two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to explore the proteomic profiles between variegated flower (VF) and red flower (RF) buds of the peach cultivar 'Sahong Tao'. More than 500 highly reproducible protein spots (P < 0.05) were detected and 72 protein spots showed a greater than two-fold difference in their values. We identified 70 proteins that may play roles in petal coloration. The mRNA levels of the corresponding genes were detected using quantitative RT-PCR. The results show that most of the proteins are involved in energy and metabolism, which provide energy and substrates. We found that LDOX, WD40, ACC, and PPO II are related to the pigment biosynthetic pathway. The activity of PPO enzyme was further validated and showed the higher with significant differences in RF compared with the VF ones. Moreover, the four UCH proteins are involved in protein fate and may be important in post-translational modifications in peach flowers. Our study is the first comparative proteomic analysis of floral variegation and will contribute to further investigations into the molecular mechanism of flower petal coloration in ornamental peach. PMID:26192118

  17. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  18. Identification of Novel Amelogenin-Binding Proteins by Proteomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takao; Sanui, Terukazu; Toyoda, Kyosuke; Tanaka, Urara; Taketomi, Takaharu; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2013-01-01

    Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD) is well recognized in periodontology. It is used in periodontal surgery to regenerate cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. However, the precise molecular mechanisms underlying periodontal regeneration are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the proteins bound to amelogenin, which are suggested to play a pivotal role in promoting periodontal tissue regeneration. To identify new molecules that interact with amelogenin and are involved in osteoblast activation, we employed coupling affinity chromatography with proteomic analysis in fractionated SaOS-2 osteoblastic cell lysate. In SaOS-2 cells, many of the amelogenin-interacting proteins in the cytoplasm were mainly cytoskeletal proteins and several chaperone molecules of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family. On the other hand, the proteomic profiles of amelogenin-interacting proteins in the membrane fraction of the cell extracts were quite different from those of the cytosolic-fraction. They were mainly endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated proteins, with lesser quantities of mitochondrial proteins and nucleoprotein. Among the identified amelogenin-interacting proteins, we validated the biological interaction of amelogenin with glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78/Bip), which was identified in both cytosolic and membrane-enriched fractions. Confocal co-localization experiment strongly suggested that Grp78/Bip could be an amelogenin receptor candidate. Further biological evaluations were examined by Grp78/Bip knockdown analysis with and without amelogenin. Within the limits of the present study, the interaction of amelogenin with Grp78/Bip contributed to cell proliferation, rather than correlate with the osteogenic differentiation in SaOS-2 cells. Although the biological significance of other interactions are not yet explored, these findings suggest that the differential effects of amelogenin-derived osteoblast activation could be of potential clinical

  19. Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster proteome dynamics during embryonic development by a combination of label-free proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Bertrand; Korona, Dagmara; Groen, Arnoud; Vowinckel, Jakob; Gatto, Laurent; Deery, Michael J; Ralser, Markus; Russell, Steven; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2016-08-01

    During embryogenesis, organisms undergo considerable cellular remodelling requiring the combined action of thousands of proteins. In case of the well-studied model Drosophila melanogaster, transcriptomic studies, most notably from the modENCODE project, have described in detail changes in gene expression at the mRNA level across development. Although such data are clearly very useful to understand how the genome is regulated during embryogenesis, it is important to understand how changes in gene expression are reflected at the level of the proteome. In this study, we describe a combination of two quantitative label-free approaches, SWATH and data-dependent acquisition, to monitor changes in protein expression across a timecourse of D. melanogaster embryonic development. We demonstrate that both approaches provide robust and reproducible methods for the analysis of proteome changes. In a preliminary analysis of Drosophila embryogenesis, we identified several pathways, including the heat-shock response, nuclear protein import and energy production that are regulated during embryo development. In some cases changes in protein expression mirrored transcript levels across development, whereas other proteins showed signatures of post-transcriptional regulation. Taken together, our pilot study provides a solid platform for a more detailed exploration of the embryonic proteome. PMID:27029218

  20. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris—Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J.; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications. PMID:26986963

  1. Annotation of the zebrafish genome through an integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Provost, Elayne; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Manda, Srikanth S; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Wang, Chieh-Huei; Datta, Keshava K; Woo, Sunghee; Dwivedi, Sutopa B; Renuse, Santosh; Getnet, Derese; Huang, Tai-Chung; Kim, Min-Sik; Pinto, Sneha M; Mitchell, Christopher J; Madugundu, Anil K; Kumar, Praveen; Sharma, Jyoti; Advani, Jayshree; Dey, Gourav; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Syed, Nazia; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Goel, Renu; Prasad, T S Keshava; Bafna, Vineet; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Gowda, Harsha; Wang, Charles; Leach, Steven D; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-11-01

    Accurate annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary tasks upon the completion of whole genome sequencing of any organism. In this study, we used an integrated transcriptomic and proteomic strategy to validate and improve the existing zebrafish genome annotation. We undertook high-resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomic profiling of 10 adult organs, whole adult fish body, and two developmental stages of zebrafish (SAT line), in addition to transcriptomic profiling of six organs. More than 7,000 proteins were identified from proteomic analyses, and ∼ 69,000 high-confidence transcripts were assembled from the RNA sequencing data. Approximately 15% of the transcripts mapped to intergenic regions, the majority of which are likely long non-coding RNAs. These high-quality transcriptomic and proteomic data were used to manually reannotate the zebrafish genome. We report the identification of 157 novel protein-coding genes. In addition, our data led to modification of existing gene structures including novel exons, changes in exon coordinates, changes in frame of translation, translation in annotated UTRs, and joining of genes. Finally, we discovered four instances of genome assembly errors that were supported by both proteomic and transcriptomic data. Our study shows how an integrative analysis of the transcriptome and the proteome can extend our understanding of even well-annotated genomes. PMID:25060758

  2. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications. PMID:26986963

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of human lung telocytes with fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonghua; Cretoiu, Dragos; Yan, Guoquan; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) were recently described as interstitial cells with very long prolongations named telopodes (Tps; http://www.telocytes.com). Establishing the TC proteome is a priority to show that TCs are a distinct type of cells. Therefore, we examined the molecular aspects of lung TCs by comparison with fibroblasts (FBs). Proteins extracted from primary cultures of these cells were analysed by automated 2-dimensional nano-electrospray ionization liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D Nano-ESI LC-MS/MS). Differentially expressed proteins were screened by two-sample t-test (P < 0.05) and fold change (>2), based on the bioinformatics analysis. We identified hundreds of proteins up- or down-regulated, respectively, in TCs as compared with FBs. TC proteins with known identities are localized in the cytoskeleton (87%) and plasma membrane (13%), while FB up-regulated proteins are in the cytoskeleton (75%) and destined to extracellular matrix (25%). These identified proteins were classified into different categories based on their molecular functions and biological processes. While the proteins identified in TCs are mainly involved in catalytic activity (43%) and as structural molecular activity (25%), the proteins in FBs are involved in catalytic activity (24%) and in structural molecular activity, particularly synthesis of collagen and other extracellular matrix components (25%). Anyway, our data show that TCs are completely different from FBs. In conclusion, we report here the first extensive identification of proteins from TCs using a quantitative proteomics approach. Protein expression profile shows many up-regulated proteins e.g. myosin-14, periplakin, suggesting that TCs might play specific roles in mechanical sensing and mechanochemical conversion task, tissue homoeostasis and remodelling/renewal. Furthermore, up-regulated proteins matching those found in extracellular vesicles emphasize TCs roles in intercellular signalling and stem cell niche

  4. Shotgun proteomics analysis on maize chloroplast thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Wu, Ya-Dan; Shen, Zhi-Ying; Shen, Zhuo; Li, Hua-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Xiu-Feng; Guo, Chang-Hong; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2011-01-01

    In this study we initiated a proteomic investigation of the maize thylakoid membrane by using a shotgun proteomic approach based on LC-MS(E). A total of 34 maize thylakoid membrane proteins were identified, the majority of which are primarily involved in photosynthesis, including the light-reaction and carbon assimilation. It is noteworthy that all of the core subunits of the Photosystem II were identified in our search. Proteins involved in other processes, such as iron storage, were also detected in our study. The quantity of each identified protein was also determined. Of interest, we discovered that the amount of the three ATP synthase subunits were not equivalent, suggesting that these proteins perform other functions in addition to ATP synthesis. To our knowledge this is the first extensive proteomic investigation of the maize thylakoid membrane, and will likely enable further study of maize photosynthesis and chloroplast development. PMID:21196305

  5. Breast Cancer Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  6. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  7. Exome-based proteogenomics of HEK-293 human cell line: Coding genomic variants identified at the level of shotgun proteome.

    PubMed

    Lobas, Anna A; Karpov, Dmitry S; Kopylov, Arthur T; Solovyeva, Elizaveta M; Ivanov, Mark V; Ilina, Irina Y; Lazarev, Vassily N; Kuznetsova, Ksenia G; Ilgisonis, Ekaterina V; Zgoda, Victor G; Gorshkov, Mikhail V; Moshkovskii, Sergei A

    2016-07-01

    Genomic and proteomic data were integrated into the proteogenomic workflow to identify coding genomic variants of Human Embryonic Kidney 293 (HEK-293) cell line at the proteome level. Shotgun proteome data published by Geiger et al. (2012), Chick et al. (2015), and obtained in this work for HEK-293 were searched against the customized genomic database generated using exome data published by Lin et al. (2014). Overall, 112 unique variants were identified at the proteome level out of ∼1200 coding variants annotated in the exome. Seven identified variants were shared between all the three considered proteomic datasets, and 27 variants were found in any two datasets. Some of the found variants belonged to widely known genomic polymorphisms originated from the germline, while the others were more likely resulting from somatic mutations. At least, eight of the proteins bearing amino acid variants were annotated as cancer-related ones, including p53 tumor suppressor. In all the considered shotgun datasets, the variant peptides were at the ratio of 1:2.5 less likely being identified than the wild-type ones compared with the corresponding theoretical peptides. This can be explained by the presence of the so-called "passenger" mutations in the genes, which were never expressed in HEK-293 cells. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002613 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002613). PMID:27233776

  8. ProteomeScout: a repository and analysis resource for post-translational modifications and proteins.

    PubMed

    Matlock, Matthew K; Holehouse, Alex S; Naegle, Kristen M

    2015-01-01

    ProteomeScout (https://proteomescout.wustl.edu) is a resource for the study of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) consisting of a database of PTMs, a repository for experimental data, an analysis suite for PTM experiments, and a tool for visualizing the relationships between complex protein annotations. The PTM database is a compendium of public PTM data, coupled with user-uploaded experimental data. ProteomeScout provides analysis tools for experimental datasets, including summary views and subset selection, which can identify relationships within subsets of data by testing for statistically significant enrichment of protein annotations. Protein annotations are incorporated in the ProteomeScout database from external resources and include terms such as Gene Ontology annotations, domains, secondary structure and non-synonymous polymorphisms. These annotations are available in the database download, in the analysis tools and in the protein viewer. The protein viewer allows for the simultaneous visualization of annotations in an interactive web graphic, which can be exported in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format. Finally, quantitative data measurements associated with public experiments are also easily viewable within protein records, allowing researchers to see how PTMs change across different contexts. ProteomeScout should prove useful for protein researchers and should benefit the proteomics community by providing a stable repository for PTM experiments. PMID:25414335

  9. ProteomeScout: a repository and analysis resource for post-translational modifications and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matthew K.; Holehouse, Alex S.; Naegle, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    ProteomeScout (https://proteomescout.wustl.edu) is a resource for the study of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) consisting of a database of PTMs, a repository for experimental data, an analysis suite for PTM experiments, and a tool for visualizing the relationships between complex protein annotations. The PTM database is a compendium of public PTM data, coupled with user-uploaded experimental data. ProteomeScout provides analysis tools for experimental datasets, including summary views and subset selection, which can identify relationships within subsets of data by testing for statistically significant enrichment of protein annotations. Protein annotations are incorporated in the ProteomeScout database from external resources and include terms such as Gene Ontology annotations, domains, secondary structure and non-synonymous polymorphisms. These annotations are available in the database download, in the analysis tools and in the protein viewer. The protein viewer allows for the simultaneous visualization of annotations in an interactive web graphic, which can be exported in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format. Finally, quantitative data measurements associated with public experiments are also easily viewable within protein records, allowing researchers to see how PTMs change across different contexts. ProteomeScout should prove useful for protein researchers and should benefit the proteomics community by providing a stable repository for PTM experiments. PMID:25414335

  10. Integration of monolithic frit into the particulate capillary (IMFPC) column in shotgun proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangjun; Dong, Jing; Ye, Mingliang; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2009-10-12

    Capillary column plays an important role in nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry for dealing with the high dynamic range and complexity of protein samples in shotgun proteome analysis. In this study, the integrated monolithic frit into the particulate capillary (IMFPC) column was prepared. By comparing the prepared IMFPC column with conventionally fritless capillary column, smaller size of packing materials could be easily packed into the capillary to achieve higher average peak capacity and proteome coverage. As the monolithic emitter was integrated onto this type of column, the void volume between packing particles and electrospray emitter was eliminated and the electrospray quality was improved. The prepared IMFPC column was applied to proteome analysis of mouse liver extracts, and it was observed that the number of identified proteins and peptides increased 14.9 and 12.9% as well as the peak capacity increased 11.6% by using IMFPC column over conventionally fritless capillary column. PMID:19786199

  11. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    SciTech Connect

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-09-12

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function.

  12. Prefractionation methods for individual adult fruit fly hemolymph proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi; Avilov, Vitaly; Shippy, Scott A

    2016-03-15

    The analysis of blood provides in depth chemical information of physiological states of organisms. Hemolymph (blood) is the fluid in the open circulatory system of Drosophila melanogaster that is the medium for molecules regulating a wide variety of physiological activities and signaling between tissues. Adult Drosophila is typically less than 3mm in length and, as a consequence, the available volume of hemolymph is usually less than 50nL from individual flies. Proteomic analysis of volume-limited hemolymph is a great challenge for both sample handling and subsequent mass spectrometry characterization of this chemically diverse biological fluid with a wide dynamic range of proteins in concentrations. Less abundant proteins, in particular, could be easily lost during sample preparation or missed by current mass spectrometry methods. This article describes simple and customized RPLC column and IEX columns to prefractionate volume-limited hemolymph without excessive dilution. Step-gradient elution methods were developed and optimized to enhance the identification of novel proteins from an individual fruit fly hemolymph sample. Fractions from each step gradient was analyzed by an Agilent nano-RPLC chip column and then characterized by high mass resolution and high mass accuracy orbitrap mass spectrometry. As a result, both RPLC (11 proteins) and IEX fractionation approaches (9 proteins) identified more proteins than an unfractionated control approach with higher protein scores, emPAI values and coverage. Furthermore, a significant number of novel proteins were revealed by both RPLC and IEX fractionation methods, which were missed by unfractionated controls. The demonstration of this method establishes a means to deepen proteomic analysis to this commonly used, important biological model system. PMID:26901848

  13. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Overlapping Functions of Clustered Protocadherins*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, Chengyi; Meng, Shuxia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    The three tandem-arrayed protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters, namely Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ, play important roles in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system. To gain insight into the molecular action of PCDHs, we performed a systematic proteomics analysis of PCDH-γ-associated protein complexes. We identified a list of 154 non-redundant proteins in the PCDH-γ complexes. This list includes nearly 30 members of clustered Pcdh-α, -β, and -γ families as core components of the complexes and additionally over 120 putative PCDH-associated proteins. We validated a selected subset of PCDH-γ-associated proteins using specific antibodies. Analysis of the identities of PCDH-associated proteins showed that the majority of them overlap with the proteomic profile of postsynaptic density preparations. Further analysis of membrane protein complexes revealed that several validated PCDH-γ-associated proteins exhibit reduced levels in Pcdh-γ-deficient brain tissues. Therefore, PCDH-γs are required for the integrity of the complexes. However, the size of the overall complexes and the abundance of many other proteins remained unchanged, raising a possibility that PCDH-αs and PCDH-βs might compensate for PCDH-γ function in complex formation. As a test of this idea, RNA interference knockdown of both PCDH-αs and PCDH-γs showed that PCDHs have redundant functions in regulating neuronal survival in the chicken spinal cord. Taken together, our data provide evidence that clustered PCDHs coexist in large protein complexes and have overlapping functions during vertebrate neural development. PMID:19843561

  14. Transgenic, Fluorescent Leishmania mexicana Allow Direct Analysis of the Proteome of Intracellular Amastigotes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Paape, Daniel; Lippuner, Christoph; Schmid, Monika; Ackermann, Renate; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E.; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Brinkmann, Volker; Arndt, Benjamin; Pleissner, Klaus Peter; Jungblut, Peter R.; Aebischer, Toni

    2008-01-01

    Investigating the proteome of intracellular pathogens is often hampered by inadequate methodologies to purify the pathogen free of host cell material. This has also precluded direct proteome analysis of the intracellular, amastigote form of Leishmania spp., protozoan parasites that cause a spectrum of diseases that affect some 12 million patients worldwide. Here a method is presented that combines classic, isopycnic density centrifugation with fluorescent particle sorting for purification by exploiting transgenic, fluorescent parasites to allow direct proteome analysis of the purified organisms. By this approach the proteome of intracellular Leishmania mexicana amastigotes was compared with that of extracellular promastigotes that are transmitted by insect vectors. In total, 509 different proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and database search. This number corresponds to ∼6% of gene products predicted from the reference genome of Leishmania major. Intracellular amastigotes synthesized significantly more proteins with basic pI and showed a greater abundance of enzymes of fatty acid catabolism, which may reflect their living in acidic habitats and metabolic adaptation to nutrient availability, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses of the genes corresponding to the protein data sets produced clear evidence for skewed codon usage and translational bias in these organisms. Moreover analysis of the subset of genes whose products were more abundant in amastigotes revealed characteristic sequence motifs in 3′-untranslated regions that have been linked to translational control elements. This suggests that proteome data sets may be used to identify regulatory elements in mRNAs. Last but not least, at 6% coverage the proteome identified all vaccine antigens tested to date. Thus, the present data set provides a valuable resource for selection of candidate vaccine antigens. PMID:18474515

  15. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  16. Proteomic analysis of soybean cyst nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines, SCN) is the most destructive pathogen of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) worldwide causing an estimated $2 billion in losses annually. Proteomic technologies are powerful tools to examine protein expression profiles as well as modification of proteins. W...

  17. Proteomic analysis of the asthmatic airway.

    PubMed

    Wiktorowicz, John E; Jamaluddin, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic investigations in general utilize varied technologies for sample preparation, separations, quantification, protein identification, and biological rationalization. Their applications range from pure discovery and mechanistic studies to biomarker discovery/verification/validation. In each specific case, the analytical strategy to be implemented is tailored to the type of sample that serves as the target of the investigations. Proteomic investigations take into consideration sample complexity, the cellular heterogeneity (particularly from tissues), the potential dynamic range of the protein and peptide abundance within the sample, the likelihood of posttranslational modifications (PTM), and other important factors that might influence the final output of the study. We describe the sample types typically used for proteomic investigations into the biology of asthma and review the most recent related publications with special attention to those that deal with the unique airway samples such as bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF), epithelial lining fluid and cells (ELF), induced sputum (IS), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Finally, we describe the newest proteomics approaches to sample preparation of the unique airway samples, BALF and IS. PMID:24162912

  18. RegStatGel: proteomic software for identifying differentially expressed proteins based on 2D gel images

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Image analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is a key step in proteomic workflow for identifying proteins that change under different experimental conditions. Since there are usually large amount of proteins and variations shown in the gel images, the use of software for analysis of 2D gel images is inevitable. We developed open-source software with graphical user interface for differential analysis of 2D gel images. The user-friendly software, RegStatGel, contains fully automated as well as interactive procedures. It was developed and has been tested under Matlab 7.01. Availability The database is available for free at http://www.mediafire.com/FengLi/2DGelsoftware PMID:21904427

  19. Evaluation of Proteomic Search Engines for the Analysis of Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  20. Evaluation of proteomic search engines for the analysis of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-10-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  1. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, Tamami; Yashiro, Masakazu; Kakehashi, Anna; Inagaki, Azusa; Kinoshita, Haruhito; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Kasashima, Hiroaki; Masuda, Go; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Ohira, Masaichi; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for cancer progression, metastasis, and recurrence. To date, the specific markers of CSCs remain undiscovered. The aim of this study was to identify novel biomarkers of gastric CSCs for clinical diagnosis using proteomics technology. CSC-like SP cells, OCUM-12/SP cells, OCUM-2MD3/SP cells, and their parent OCUM-12 cells and OCUM-2MD3 cells were used in this study. Protein lysates from each cell line were analyzed using QSTAR Elite Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry, coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation technology. Candidate proteins detected by proteomics technology were validated by immunohistochemical analysis of 300 gastric cancers. Based on the results of LC-MS/MS, eight proteins, including RBBP6, GLG1, VPS13A, DCTPP1, HSPA9, HSPA4, ALDOA, and KRT18, were up-regulated in both OCUM-12/SP cells and OCUM-2MD3/SP cells when compared to their corresponding parent cells. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression level of RBBP6, HSPA4, DCTPP1, HSPA9, VPS13A, ALDOA, GLG1, and CK18 was high in OCUM-12/SP and OCUM-2MD3/SP, in compared with the control of parent OCUM-12 and OCUM-2MD3. These proteins were significantly associated with advanced invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, or advanced clinical stage. RBBP6, DCTPP1, HSPA4, and ALDOA expression in particular were significantly associated with a poor prognosis in the 300 gastric cancer patients. RBBP6 was determined to be an independent prognostic factor. The motility-stimulating ability of OCUM-12/SP cells and OCUM-2MD3/SP cells was inhibited by RBBP6 siRNA. These findings might suggest that the eight proteins, RBBP6, GLG1, VPS13A, DCTPP1, HSPA9, HSPA4, ALDOA, and KRT18, utilizing comparative proteomics analysis, were perceived to be potential CSC markers of gastric cancer. Of the eight candidate proteins, RBBP6 was suggested to be a promising prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target for gastric cancer

  2. Analysis of high accuracy, quantitative proteomics data in the MaxQB database.

    PubMed

    Schaab, Christoph; Geiger, Tamar; Stoehr, Gabriele; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    MS-based proteomics generates rapidly increasing amounts of precise and quantitative information. Analysis of individual proteomic experiments has made great strides, but the crucial ability to compare and store information across different proteome measurements still presents many challenges. For example, it has been difficult to avoid contamination of databases with low quality peptide identifications, to control for the inflation in false positive identifications when combining data sets, and to integrate quantitative data. Although, for example, the contamination with low quality identifications has been addressed by joint analysis of deposited raw data in some public repositories, we reasoned that there should be a role for a database specifically designed for high resolution and quantitative data. Here we describe a novel database termed MaxQB that stores and displays collections of large proteomics projects and allows joint analysis and comparison. We demonstrate the analysis tools of MaxQB using proteome data of 11 different human cell lines and 28 mouse tissues. The database-wide false discovery rate is controlled by adjusting the project specific cutoff scores for the combined data sets. The 11 cell line proteomes together identify proteins expressed from more than half of all human genes. For each protein of interest, expression levels estimated by label-free quantification can be visualized across the cell lines. Similarly, the expression rank order and estimated amount of each protein within each proteome are plotted. We used MaxQB to calculate the signal reproducibility of the detected peptides for the same proteins across different proteomes. Spearman rank correlation between peptide intensity and detection probability of identified proteins was greater than 0.8 for 64% of the proteome, whereas a minority of proteins have negative correlation. This information can be used to pinpoint false protein identifications, independently of peptide database

  3. A Novel Proteomics Approach to Identify SUMOylated Proteins and Their Modification Sites in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Galisson, Frederic; Mahrouche, Louiza; Courcelles, Mathieu; Bonneil, Eric; Meloche, Sylvain; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Thibault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small group of proteins that are reversibly attached to protein substrates to modify their functions. The large scale identification of protein SUMOylation and their modification sites in mammalian cells represents a significant challenge because of the relatively small number of in vivo substrates and the dynamic nature of this modification. We report here a novel proteomics approach to selectively enrich and identify SUMO conjugates from human cells. We stably expressed different SUMO paralogs in HEK293 cells, each containing a His6 tag and a strategically located tryptic cleavage site at the C terminus to facilitate the recovery and identification of SUMOylated peptides by affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry. Tryptic peptides with short SUMO remnants offer significant advantages in large scale SUMOylome experiments including the generation of paralog-specific fragment ions following CID and ETD activation, and the identification of modified peptides using conventional database search engines such as Mascot. We identified 205 unique protein substrates together with 17 precise SUMOylation sites present in 12 SUMO protein conjugates including three new sites (Lys-380, Lys-400, and Lys-497) on the protein promyelocytic leukemia. Label-free quantitative proteomics analyses on purified nuclear extracts from untreated and arsenic trioxide-treated cells revealed that all identified SUMOylated sites of promyelocytic leukemia were differentially SUMOylated upon stimulation. PMID:21098080

  4. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott M.; Moore, Kaitlyn E.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E.; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5′ splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates. PMID:25795785

  5. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in Bacillus thuringiensis 4.0718

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Jie; He, Hao; Wang, Ting; Ding, Xuezhi; Zuo, Mingxing; Quan, Meifang; Sun, Yunjun; Yu, Ziquan; Hu, Shengbiao; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used biopesticide that produced various insecticidal active substances during its life cycle. Separation and purification of numerous insecticide active substances have been difficult because of the relatively short half-life of such substances. On the other hand, substances can be synthetized at different times during development, so samples at different stages have to be studied, further complicating the analysis. A dual genomic and proteomic approach would enhance our ability to identify such substances, and particularily using mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. The comparative analysis for genomic and proteomic data have showed that not all of the products deduced from the annotated genome could be identified among the proteomic data. For instance, genome annotation results showed that 39 coding sequences in the whole genome were related to insect pathogenicity, including five cry genes. However, Cry2Ab, Cry1Ia, Cytotoxin K, Bacteriocin, Exoenzyme C3 and Alveolysin could not be detected in the proteomic data obtained. The sporulation-related proteins were also compared analysis, results showed that the great majority sporulation-related proteins can be detected by mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed Spo0A~P, SigF, SigE(+), SigK(+) and SigG(+), all known to play an important role in the process of spore formation regulatory network, also were displayed in the proteomic data. Through the comparison of the two data sets, it was possible to infer that some genes were silenced or were expressed at very low levels. For instance, found that cry2Ab seems to lack a functional promoter while cry1Ia may not be expressed due to the presence of transposons. With this comparative study a relatively complete database can be constructed and used to transform hereditary material, thereby prompting the high expression of toxic proteins. A theoretical basis is provided for constructing highly virulent engineered bacteria and for

  6. Proteomic analysis of pollination-induced corolla senescence in petunia

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shuangyi; Willard, Belinda; Chapin, Laura J.; Kinter, Michael T.; Francis, David M.; Stead, Anthony D.; Jones, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Senescence represents the last phase of petal development during which macromolecules and organelles are degraded and nutrients are recycled to developing tissues. To understand better the post-transcriptional changes regulating petal senescence, a proteomic approach was used to profile protein changes during the senescence of Petunia×hybrida ‘Mitchell Diploid’ corollas. Total soluble proteins were extracted from unpollinated petunia corollas at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h after flower opening and at 24, 48, and 72 h after pollination. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in non-senescing (unpollinated) and senescing (pollinated) corollas, and image analysis was used to determine which proteins were up- or down-regulated by the experimentally determined cut-off of 2.1-fold for P <0.05. One hundred and thirty-three differentially expressed protein spots were selected for sequencing. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to determine the identity of these proteins. Searching translated EST databases and the NCBI non-redundant protein database, it was possible to assign a putative identification to greater than 90% of these proteins. Many of the senescence up-regulated proteins were putatively involved in defence and stress responses or macromolecule catabolism. Some proteins, not previously characterized during flower senescence, were identified, including an orthologue of the tomato abscisic acid stress ripening protein 4 (ASR4). Gene expression patterns did not always correlate with protein expression, confirming that both proteomic and genomic approaches will be required to obtain a detailed understanding of the regulation of petal senescence. PMID:20110265

  7. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Urine from Gamma-Irradiated Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, Stephanie D; Burdine, Marie S; Orr, Lisa; Moreland, Linley; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    The molecular effects of total body gamma-irradiation exposure are of critical importance as large populations of people could be exposed either by terrorists, nuclear blast, or medical therapy. In this study, we aimed to identify changes in the urine proteome using a non-human primate model system, Rhesus macaque, in order to characterize effects of acute radiation syndrome following whole body irradiation (Co-60) at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy with a twelve day observation period. The urine proteome is potentially a valuable and non-invasive diagnostic for radiation exposure. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 2346 proteins in the urine proteome. We show proteins involved in disease, cell adhesion, and metabolic pathway were significantly changed upon exposure to differing levels and durations of radiation exposure. Cell damage increased at a faster rate at 7.4 Gy compared with 6.7 Gy exposures. We report sets of proteins that are putative biomarkers of time- and dose-dependent radiation exposure. The proteomic study presented here is a comprehensive analysis of the urine proteome following radiation exposure. PMID:26962295

  8. Targets for cystic fibrosis therapy: proteomic analysis and correction of mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Collawn, James F; Fu, Lianwu; Bebok, Zsuzsa

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic analysis has proved to be an important tool for understanding the complex nature of genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis (CF), by defining the cellular protein environment (proteome) associated with wild-type and mutant proteins. Proteomic screens identified the proteome of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and provided fundamental information to studies designed for understanding the crucial components of physiological CFTR function. Simultaneously, high-throughput screens for small-molecular correctors of CFTR mutants provided promising candidates for therapy. The majority of CF cases are caused by nucleotide deletions (ΔF508 CFTR; >75%), resulting in CFTR misfolding, or insertion of premature termination codons (~10%), leading to unstable mRNA and reduced levels of truncated dysfunctional CFTR. In this article, we review recent results of proteomic screens, developments in identifying correctors for the most frequent CFTR mutants, and comment on how integration of the knowledge gained from these studies may aid in finding a cure for CF and a number of other genetic disorders. PMID:20653506

  9. Sense and nonsense of pathway analysis software in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thorsten; Schrötter, Andreas; Loosse, Christina; Helling, Stefan; Stephan, Christian; Ahrens, Maike; Uszkoreit, Julian; Eisenacher, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E; Marcus, Katrin

    2011-12-01

    New developments in proteomics enable scientists to examine hundreds to thousands of proteins in parallel. Quantitative proteomics allows the comparison of different proteomes of cells, tissues, or body fluids with each other. Analyzing and especially organizing these data sets is often a Herculean task. Pathway Analysis software tools aim to take over this task based on present knowledge. Companies promise that their algorithms help to understand the significance of scientist's data, but the benefit remains questionable, and a fundamental systematic evaluation of the potential of such tools has not been performed until now. Here, we tested the commercial Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool as well as the freely available software STRING using a well-defined study design in regard to the applicability and value of their results for proteome studies. It was our goal to cover a wide range of scientific issues by simulating different established pathways including mitochondrial apoptosis, tau phosphorylation, and Insulin-, App-, and Wnt-signaling. Next to a general assessment and comparison of the pathway analysis tools, we provide recommendations for users as well as for software developers to improve the added value of a pathway study implementation in proteomic pipelines. PMID:21978018

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of ductal and lobular invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, N C S; Gomig, T H B; Milioli, H H; Cordeiro, F; Costa, G G; Urban, C A; Lima, R S; Cavalli, I J; Ribeiro, E M S F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the first among women. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) are the two major histological subtypes, and the clinical and molecular differences between them justify the search for new markers to distinguish them. As proteomic analysis allows for a powerful and analytical approach to identify potential biomarkers, we performed a comparative analysis of IDC and ILC samples by using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Twenty-three spots were identified corresponding to 10 proteins differentially expressed between the two subtypes. ACTB, ACTG, TPM3, TBA1A, TBA1B, VIME, TPIS, PDIA3, PDIA6, and VTDB were upregulated in ductal carcinoma compared to in lobular carcinoma samples. Overall, these 10 proteins have a key role in oncogenesis. Their specific functions and relevance in cancer initiation and progression are further discussed in this study. The identified peptides represent promising biomarkers for the differentiation of ductal and lobular breast cancer subtypes, and for future interventions based on tailored therapy. PMID:27173185

  11. Comparative proteomics analysis of oral cancer cell lines: identification of cancer associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A limiting factor in performing proteomics analysis on cancerous cells is the difficulty in obtaining sufficient amounts of starting material. Cell lines can be used as a simplified model system for studying changes that accompany tumorigenesis. This study used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to compare the whole cell proteome of oral cancer cell lines vs normal cells in an attempt to identify cancer associated proteins. Results Three primary cell cultures of normal cells with a limited lifespan without hTERT immortalization have been successfully established. 2DE was used to compare the whole cell proteome of these cells with that of three oral cancer cell lines. Twenty four protein spots were found to have changed in abundance. MALDI TOF/TOF was then used to determine the identity of these proteins. Identified proteins were classified into seven functional categories – structural proteins, enzymes, regulatory proteins, chaperones and others. IPA core analysis predicted that 18 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in hyperplasia, metastasis, invasion, growth and tumorigenesis. The mRNA expressions of two proteins – 14-3-3 protein sigma and Stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 – were found to correlate with the corresponding proteins’ abundance. Conclusions The outcome of this analysis demonstrated that a comparative study of whole cell proteome of cancer versus normal cell lines can be used to identify cancer associated proteins. PMID:24422745

  12. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Groslambert, Marine; Glass, Mandy; Orr, Anne; Hay, Ronald T.; Everett, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO) family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection. PMID:26200910

  13. Optimized protein extraction methods for proteomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Lakshman, Sukla; Garrett, Wesley M; Dhar, Arun K

    2008-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani (Teleomorph: Thanatephorus cucumeris, T. praticola) is a basidiomycetous fungus and a major cause of root diseases of economically important plants. Various isolates of this fungus are also beneficially associated with orchids, may serve as biocontrol agents or remain as saprophytes with roles in decaying and recycling of soil organic matter. R. solani displays several hyphal anastomosis groups (AG) with distinct host and pathogenic specializations. Even though there are reports on the physiological and histological basis of Rhizoctonia-host interactions, very little is known about the molecular biology and control of gene expression early during infection by this pathogen. Proteamic technologies are powerful tools for examining alterations in protein profiles. To aid studies on its biology and host pathogen interactions, a two-dimensional (2-D) gel-based global proteomic study has been initiated. To develop an optimized protein extraction protocol for R. solani, we compared two previously reported protein extraction protocols for 2-D gel analysis of R. solani (AG-4) isolate Rs23. Both TCA-acetone precipitation and phosphate solubilization before TCA-acetone precipitation worked well for R. solani protein extraction, although selective enrichment of some proteins was noted with either method. About 450 spots could be detected with the densitiometric tracing of Coomassie blue-stained 2-D PAGE gels covering pH 4-7 and 6.5-205 kDa. Selected protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometric analysis with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Eleven protein spots were positively identified based on peptide mass fingerprinting match with fungal proteins in public databases with the Mascot search engine. These results testify to the suitability of the two optimized protein extraction protocols for 2-D proteomic studies of R. solani. PMID:19202841

  14. Proteomic analysis of an unculturable bacterial endosymbiont (Blochmannia) reveals high abundance of chaperonins and biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongliang; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Wernegreen, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Many insect groups have coevolved with bacterial endosymbionts that live within specialized host cells. As a salient example, ants in the tribe Camponotini rely on Blochmannia, an intracellular bacterial mutualist that synthesizes amino acids and recycles nitrogen for the host. We performed a shotgun, label-free, LC/MS/MS quantitative proteomic analysis to investigate the proteome of Blochmannia associated with Camponotus chromaiodes. We identified more than 330 Blochmannia proteins, or 54% coverage of the predicted proteome, as well as 244 Camponotus proteins. Using the average intensity of the top 3 “best flier” peptides along with spiking of a surrogate standard at a known concentration, we estimated the concentration (fmol/μg) of those proteins with confident identification. The estimated dynamic range of Blochmannia protein abundance spanned three orders of magnitude and covered diverse functional categories, with particularly high representation of metabolism, information transfer, and chaperones. GroEL, the most abundant protein, totaled 6% of Blochmannia protein abundance. Biosynthesis of essential amino acids, fatty acids, and nucleotides, and sulfate assimilation had disproportionately high coverage in the proteome, further supporting a nutritional role of the symbiosis. This first quantitative proteomic analysis of an ant endosymbiont illustrates a promising approach to study the functional basis of intimate symbioses. PMID:23205679

  15. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-01

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species. PMID:23464874

  16. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  17. GProX, a user-friendly platform for bioinformatics analysis and visualization of quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Vanselow, Jens T; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2011-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to identify and quantify thousands of proteins in a single proteomics experiment. As a result of these developments, the analysis of data has become the bottleneck of proteomics experiment. To provide the proteomics community with a user-friendly platform for comprehensive analysis, inspection and visualization of quantitative proteomics data we developed the Graphical Proteomics Data Explorer (GProX)(1). The program requires no special bioinformatics training, as all functions of GProX are accessible within its graphical user-friendly interface which will be intuitive to most users. Basic features facilitate the uncomplicated management and organization of large data sets and complex experimental setups as well as the inspection and graphical plotting of quantitative data. These are complemented by readily available high-level analysis options such as database querying, clustering based on abundance ratios, feature enrichment tests for e.g. GO terms and pathway analysis tools. A number of plotting options for visualization of quantitative proteomics data is available and most analysis functions in GProX create customizable high quality graphical displays in both vector and bitmap formats. The generic import requirements allow data originating from essentially all mass spectrometry platforms, quantitation strategies and software to be analyzed in the program. GProX represents a powerful approach to proteomics data analysis providing proteomics experimenters with a toolbox for bioinformatics analysis of quantitative proteomics data. The program is released as open-source and can be freely downloaded from the project webpage at http://gprox.sourceforge.net. PMID:21602510

  18. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF HUMAN BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID AFTER SUBSGEMENTAL EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew W.; Will Thompson, J.; Que, Loretta G.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Arthur Moseley, M.; Marshall, Harvey E.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of airway fluid, as sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), provides a minimally invasive route to interrogate lung biology in health and disease. Here, we used immunodepletion, coupled with gel- and label-free LC-MS/MS, for quantitation of the BAL fluid (BALF) proteome in samples recovered from human subjects following bronchoscopic instillation of saline, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or house dust mite antigen into three distinct lung subsegments. Among more than 200 unique proteins quantified across nine samples, neutrophil granule-derived and acute phase proteins were most highly enriched in the LPS-exposed lobes. Of these, peptidoglycan response protein 1 was validated and confirmed as a novel marker of neutrophilic inflammation. Compared to a prior transcriptomic analysis of airway cells in this same cohort, the BALF proteome revealed a novel set of response factors. Independent of exposure, the enrichment of tracheal-expressed proteins in right lower lung lobes suggests a potential for constitutive intralobar variability in the BALF proteome; sampling of multiple lung subsegments also appears to aid in the identification of protein signatures that differentiate individuals at baseline. Collectively, this proof-of-concept study validates a robust workflow for BALF proteomics and demonstrates the complementary nature of proteomic and genomic techniques for investigating airway (patho)physiology. PMID:23550723

  19. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Bertrand; Lee, Jinoo; Valkova, Nelly; Dhirapong, Amy; Lin, Pei-Yin; Fiehn, Oliver; Kültz, Dietmar; Weiss, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values < 2.0 E-05) in glycolysis, propanoate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, urea cycle and arginine/proline metabolism, as well as in the non-metabolic p53 and FAS pathways. In a pilot study using random urine samples from both ccRCC and control patients, we performed metabolic profiling and found that only sorbitol, a component of an alternative glycolysis pathway, is significantly elevated at 5.4-fold in RCC patients as compared to controls. Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids

  20. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  1. Comprehensive data analysis of human ureter proteome

    PubMed Central

    Magdeldin, Sameh; Hirao, Yoshitoshi; El Guoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R.; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive human ureter proteome dataset was generated from OFFGel fractionated ureter samples. Our result showed that among 2217 non-redundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease-associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, Cytoscape GO annotation was examined on the final ureter dataset to better understand proteins molecular function, biological processes, and cellular component. The ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. PMID:26937461

  2. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Unbounded Cellular Compartments: Synaptic Clefts.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ken H; Stawski, Philipp S; Draycott, Austin S; Udeshi, Namrata D; Lehrman, Emily K; Wilton, Daniel K; Svinkina, Tanya; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Stevens, Beth; Carr, Steven A; Ting, Alice Y

    2016-08-25

    Cellular compartments that cannot be biochemically isolated are challenging to characterize. Here we demonstrate the proteomic characterization of the synaptic clefts that exist at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Normal brain function relies on the careful balance of these opposing neural connections, and understanding how this balance is achieved relies on knowledge of their protein compositions. Using a spatially restricted enzymatic tagging strategy, we mapped the proteomes of two of the most common excitatory and inhibitory synaptic clefts in living neurons. These proteomes reveal dozens of synaptic candidates and assign numerous known synaptic proteins to a specific cleft type. The molecular differentiation of each cleft allowed us to identify Mdga2 as a potential specificity factor influencing Neuroligin-2's recruitment of presynaptic neurotransmitters at inhibitory synapses. PMID:27565350

  4. Interaction analysis through proteomic phage display.

    PubMed

    Sundell, Gustav N; Ivarsson, Ylva

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  5. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs), or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance. PMID:25295249

  6. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken uterine fluid during eggshell biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2014-12-01

    Chicken eggshell is the protective barrier of the egg. It is a biomineral composed of 95% calcium carbonate on calcitic form and 3.5% organic matrix proteins. Mineralization process occurs in uterus into the uterine fluid. This acellular fluid contains ions and organic matrix proteins precursors which are interacting with the mineral phase and control crystal growth, eggshell structure and mechanical properties. We performed a proteomic approach and identified 308 uterine fluid proteins. Gene Ontology terms enrichments were determined to investigate their potential functions. Mass spectrometry analyses were also combined to label free quantitative analysis to determine the relative abundance of 96 proteins at initiation, rapid growth phase and termination of shell calcification. Sixty four showed differential abundance according to the mineralization stage. Their potential functions have been annotated. The complete proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses are reported in Marie et al., J. Proteomics (2015) [1]. PMID:26217689

  7. Proteomic Analysis of the Uterosacral Ligament in Postmenopausal Women with and without Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-Jing; Zhu, Lan; Lang, Jing-He; Wang, Zhao; Liang, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health problem in adult women that involves many factors. No proteomic analysis has been conducted exclusively in POP patients. This study aimed to identify the differential expression of proteins that may be involved in POP by proteomic analysis. Methods: Samples of the uterosacral ligament (USL) were collected from five POP patients and five non-POP patients matched according to age, parity, and menopausal status and analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to verify the mRNA expression of proteins that showed differential expression in the proteomic analyses. Results: Proteins differentially expressed between POP and non-POP patients were detected. Eight proteins that were down-regulated in the POP group were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. These proteins included electron transfer flavoprotein, apolipoprotein A-I, actin, transgelin, cofilin-1, cyclophilin A, myosin, and galectin-1, and their expression was verified by qRT-PCR. Conclusion: Using comparative proteomics, we identified eight differentially expressed proteins (including four cytoskeleton proteins and three proteins related to apoptosis) in the USL that may be involved in apoptosis associated with the tissue effects in POP pathophysiology. PMID:26612295

  8. Proteomic analysis of blastema formation in regenerating axolotl limbs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Following amputation, urodele salamander limbs reprogram somatic cells to form a blastema that self-organizes into the missing limb parts to restore the structure and function of the limb. To help understand the molecular basis of blastema formation, we used quantitative label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based methods to analyze changes in the proteome that occurred 1, 4 and 7 days post amputation (dpa) through the mid-tibia/fibula of axolotl hind limbs. Results We identified 309 unique proteins with significant fold change relative to controls (0 dpa), representing 10 biological process categories: (1) signaling, (2) Ca2+ binding and translocation, (3) transcription, (4) translation, (5) cytoskeleton, (6) extracellular matrix (ECM), (7) metabolism, (8) cell protection, (9) degradation, and (10) cell cycle. In all, 43 proteins exhibited exceptionally high fold changes. Of these, the ecotropic viral integrative factor 5 (EVI5), a cell cycle-related oncoprotein that prevents cells from entering the mitotic phase of the cell cycle prematurely, was of special interest because its fold change was exceptionally high throughout blastema formation. Conclusion Our data were consistent with previous studies indicating the importance of inositol triphosphate and Ca2+ signaling in initiating the ECM and cytoskeletal remodeling characteristic of histolysis and cell dedifferentiation. In addition, the data suggested that blastema formation requires several mechanisms to avoid apoptosis, including reduced metabolism, differential regulation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins, and initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). Since there is virtually no mitosis during blastema formation, we propose that high levels of EVI5 function to arrest dedifferentiated cells somewhere in the G1/S/G2 phases of the cell cycle until they have accumulated under the wound epidermis and enter mitosis in response to neural and

  9. A proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts isolated from sweet orange fruits [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yunliu; Pan, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuduan; Zhu, Andan; Cao, Hongbo; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2011-11-01

    Here, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts purified from sweet orange using Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation is reported. A GeLC-MS/MS shotgun approach was used to identify the proteins of pooled chromoplast samples. A total of 493 proteins were identified from purified chromoplasts, of which 418 are putative plastid proteins based on in silico sequence homology and functional analyses. Based on the predicted functions of these identified plastid proteins, a large proportion (∼60%) of the chromoplast proteome of sweet orange is constituted by proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid/protein synthesis, and secondary metabolism. Of note, HDS (hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase), PAP (plastid-lipid-associated protein), and psHSPs (plastid small heat shock proteins) involved in the synthesis or storage of carotenoid and stress response are among the most abundant proteins identified. A comparison of chromoplast proteomes between sweet orange and tomato suggested a high level of conservation in a broad range of metabolic pathways. However, the citrus chromoplast was characterized by more extensive carotenoid synthesis, extensive amino acid synthesis without nitrogen assimilation, and evidence for lipid metabolism concerning jasmonic acid synthesis. In conclusion, this study provides an insight into the major metabolic pathways as well as some unique characteristics of the sweet orange chromoplasts at the whole proteome level. PMID:21841170

  10. Differential proteome analysis of replicative senescence in rat embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Silvia; Cramer, Rainer; Quinn, Christopher C; Bruce, Jim; Zvelebil, Marketa; Corless, Steven; Bond, Jacquelyn; Yang, Alice; Hockfield, Susan; Burlingame, Alma L; Waterfield, Michael D; Jat, Parmjit S

    2002-04-01

    Normal somatic cells undergo a finite number of divisions and then cease dividing whereas cancer cells are able to proliferate indefinitely. To identify the underlying mechanisms that limit the mitotic potential, a two-dimensional differential proteome analysis of replicative senescence in serially passaged rat embryo fibroblasts was undertaken. Triplicate independent two-dimensional gels containing over 1200 spots each were run, curated, and analyzed. This revealed 49 spots whose expression was altered more than 2-fold. Of these, 42 spots yielded positive protein identification by mass spectrometry comprising a variety of cytoskeletal, heat shock, and metabolic proteins, as well as proteins involved in trafficking, differentiation, and protein synthesis, turnover, and modification. These included gelsolin, a candidate tumor suppressor for breast cancer, and alpha-glucosidase II, a member of the family of glucosidases that includes klotho; a defect in klotho expression in mice results in a syndrome that resembles human aging. Changes in expression of TUC-1, -2, -4, and -4 beta, members of the TUC family critical for neuronal differentiation, were also identified. Some of the identified changes were also shown to occur in two other models of senescence, premature senescence of REF52 cells and replicative senescence of mouse embryo fibroblasts. The majority of these candidate proteins were unrecognized previously in replicative senescence. They are now implicated in a new role. PMID:12096110

  11. Comprehensive maternal serum proteomics identifies the cytoskeletal proteins as non-invasive biomarkers in prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhu; Gu, Hui; Li, Jun; Yang, Ze-Yu; Sun, Xiao; Zhang, Li; Shan, Liping; Wu, Lina; Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Yili; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Henan; Cao, Songying; Huang, Tianchu; Miao, Jianing; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common group of major birth defects. Presently there are no clinically used biomarkers for prenatally detecting CHDs. Here, we performed a comprehensive maternal serum proteomics assessment, combined with immunoassays, for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers for prenatal diagnosis of CHDs. A total of 370 women were included in this study. An isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic approach was used first to compare protein profiles in pooled serum collected from women who had CHD-possessing or normal fetuses, and 47 proteins displayed significant differential expressions. Targeted verifications were performed on 11 proteins using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS), and the resultant candidate biomarkers were then further validated using ELISA analysis. Finally, we identified a biomarker panel composed of 4 cytoskeletal proteins capable of differentiating CHD-pregnancies from normal ones [with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.938, P < 0.0001]. The discovery of cytoskeletal protein changes in maternal serum not only could help us in prenatal diagnosis of CHDs, but also may shed new light on CHD embryogenesis studies. PMID:26750556

  12. Proteomic analysis of peach fruit moth larvae treated with phosphine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Li, Baishu; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2012-01-01

    Phosphine has been used worldwide for the control of stored-product insects for many years. However, the molecular mechanism of its toxicity is not clearly understood. In the current study, larvae of the peach fruit moth were fumigated with phosphine. Proteomic analysis was then performed to identify the regulated proteins. Our results confirmed the phosphine toxicity on the peach fruit moth. The median lethal time LT50 was 38.5 h at 330 ppm at 25 degrees C. During fumigation, the respiration of the peach fruit moth was extremely inhibited. Of the 26 regulated proteins, 16 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after a 24 h treatment. The proteins were classified as related to metabolism (25 %), anti-oxidation (6 %), signal transduction (38 %), or defense (19 %). The rest (13 %) were unclassified. Phosphine regulation of ATP and glutathione contents, as well as of ATP synthase and glutathione S-transferase 2 activities were confirmed by enzyme activity analysis. These results demonstrate that complex transcriptional regulations underlie phosphine fumigation. New theories on the mechanism of phosphine toxicity may also be established based on these results. PMID:22201993

  13. Integrated Translatomics with Proteomics to Identify Novel Iron–Transporting Proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; He, Ke; Du, Gaofei; Wu, Xiaohui; Yu, Guangchuang; Pan, Yunlong; Zhang, Gong; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (S.pneumoniae) is a major human pathogen causing morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efficiently acquiring iron from the environment is critical for S. pneumoniae to sustain growth and cause infection. There are only three known iron-uptake systems in Streptococcal species responsible for iron acquisition from the host, including ABC transporters PiaABC, PiuABC, and PitABC. Besides, no other iron-transporting system has been suggested. In this work, we employed our newly established translating mRNA analysis integrated with proteomics to evaluate the possible existence of novel iron transporters in the bacterium. We simultaneously deleted the iron-binding protein genes of the three iron-uptake systems to construct a piaA/piuA/pitA triple mutant (Tri-Mut) of S. pneumoniae D39, in which genes and proteins related to iron transport should be regulated in response to the deletion. With ribosome associated mRNA sequencing-based translatomics focusing on translating mRNA and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics based on the covalent labeling of peptides with tags of varying mass, we indeed observed a large number of genes and proteins representing various coordinated biological pathways with significantly altered expression levels in the Tri-Mut mutant. Highlighted in this observation is the identification of several new potential iron-uptake ABC transporters participating in iron metabolism of Streptococcus. In particular, putative protein SPD_1609 in operon 804 was verified to be a novel iron-binding protein with similar function to PitA in S. pneumoniae. These data derived from the integrative translatomics and proteomics analyses provided rich information and insightful clues for further investigations on iron-transporting mechanism in bacteria and the interplay between Streptococcal iron availability and the biological metabolic pathways. PMID:26870030

  14. The Effect of Using an Inappropriate Protein Database for Proteomic Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Giselle M.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A recent study by Bromenshenk et al., published in PLoS One (2010), used proteomic analysis to identify peptides purportedly of Iridovirus and Nosema origin; however the validity of this finding is controversial. We show here through re-analysis of a subset of this data that many of the spectra identified by Bromenshenk et al. as deriving from Iridovirus and Nosema proteins are actually products from Apis mellifera honey bee proteins. We find no reliable evidence that proteins from Iridovirus and Nosema are present in the samples that were re-analyzed. This article is also intended as a learning exercise for illustrating some of the potential pitfalls of analysis of mass spectrometry proteomic data and to encourage authors to observe MS/MS data reporting guidelines that would facilitate recognition of analysis problems during the review process. PMID:21695130

  15. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Wormwood, Kelly L; Russell, Stefanie; Ryan, Jeanne P; Darie, Costel C; Woods, Alisa G

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is increasing, with current estimates at 1/68-1/50 individuals diagnosed with an ASD. Diagnosis is based on behavioral assessments. Early diagnosis and intervention is known to greatly improve functional outcomes in people with ASD. Diagnosis, treatment monitoring and prognosis of ASD symptoms could be facilitated with biomarkers to complement behavioral assessments. Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics may help reveal biomarkers for ASD. In this pilot study, we have analyzed the salivary proteome in individuals with ASD compared to neurotypical control subjects, using MS-based proteomics. Our goal is to optimize methods for salivary proteomic biomarker discovery and to identify initial putative biomarkers in people with ASDs. The salivary proteome is virtually unstudied in ASD, and saliva could provide an easily accessible biomaterial for analysis. Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins, including elevated prolactin-inducible protein, lactotransferrin, Ig kappa chain C region, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, neutrophil elastase, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs and point toward the need for larger studies in behaviorally-characterized individuals. PMID:25626423

  16. Plasma proteomic analysis of active and torpid greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis)

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Alexander M.; Braun, Beate C.; Krause, Eberhard; Voigt, Christian C.; Greenwood, Alex D.; Czirják, Gábor Á.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation is a physiological adaptation to overcome extreme environmental conditions. It is characterized by prolonged periods of torpor interrupted by temporary arousals during winter. During torpor, body functions are suppressed and restored rapidly to almost pre-hibernation levels during arousal. Although molecular studies have been performed on hibernating rodents and bears, it is unclear how generalizable the results are among hibernating species with different physiology such as bats. As targeted blood proteomic analysis are lacking in small hibernators, we investigated the general plasma proteomic profile of European Myotis myotis and hibernation associated changes between torpid and active individuals by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Results revealed an alternation of proteins involved in transport, fuel switching, innate immunity and blood coagulation between the two physiological states. The results suggest that metabolic changes during hibernation are associated with plasma proteomic changes. Further characterization of the proteomic plasma profile identified transport proteins, coagulation proteins and complement factors and detected a high abundance of alpha-fetoprotein. We were able to establish for the first time a basic myotid bat plasma proteomic profile and further demonstrated a modulated protein expression during torpor in Myotis myotis, indicating both novel physiological pathways in bats in general, and during hibernation in particular. PMID:26586174

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Cytoskeleton Proteins in Fish.

    PubMed

    Gotesman, Michael; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe laboratory protocols for rearing fish and a simple and efficient method of extracting and identifying pathogen and host proteins that may be involved in entry and replication of commercially important fish viruses. We have used the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and goldfish (Cyprinus auratus) as a model system for studies of proteins involved in viral entry and replication. The chapter describes detailed protocols for maintenance of carp, cell culture, antibody purification of proteins, and use of electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry analysis to screen and identify cytoskeleton and other proteins that may be involved in viral infection and propagation in fish. PMID:26498797

  18. Zygocotyle lunata: proteomic analysis of the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Sotillo, Javier; Valero, M Luz; Sánchez del Pino, Manuel M; Fried, Bernard; Esteban, J Guillermo; Marcilla, Antonio; Toledo, Rafael

    2011-06-01

    The somatic extract of Zygocotyle lunata (Trematoda: Paramphistomidae) adults collected from experimentally infected mice was investigated using a proteomic approach to separate and identify tryptic peptides from the somatic extract of Z. lunata adult worms. A shot-gun liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry procedure was used. We used the MASCOT search engine (Matrix-Science) and ProteinPilot software v2.0 (Applied Biosystems) for the database search. A total of 36 proteins were accurately identified from the worms. The largest protein family consisted of metabolic enzymes. Structural, motor and receptor binding proteins and proteins related to oxygen transport were identified in the somatic extract of Z. lunata. This is the first study that attempts to identify the proteome of Z. lunata. However, more work is needed to improve our knowledge of trematodiasis in general and more specifically to have a better understanding about host-parasite relationships in infections with paramphistomes. PMID:21334327

  19. Extraction of Wheat Endosperm Proteins for Proteome Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total protein extracts of wheat endosperm are widely used for the analysis of the highly abundant gliadins and glutenins. In this review, the most popular total endosperm extraction methods are compared for their effectiveness in proteome coverage. A drawback of total endosperm extracts is that the ...

  20. Proteomic Analysis on Acetate Metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Man; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Son, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Young-Mi; Yang, Seung-Ok; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Hur, Sung-Ho; Yum, Jong Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Mass production of glucosamine (GlcN) using microbial cells is a worthy approach to increase added values and keep safety problems in GlcN production process. Prior to set up a microbial cellular platform, this study was to assess acetate metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4 (BL-4) which has produced a polyglucosamine PGB-2. The LC-MS analysis was conducted after protein separation on the 1D-PAGE to accomplish the purpose of this study. 280 proteins were totally identified and 188 proteins were separated as acetate-related proteins in BL-4. Acetate was converted to acetyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA synthetase up-regulated in the acetate medium. The glyoxylate bypass in the acetate medium was up-regulated with over-expression of isocitrate lyases and 2D-PAGE confirmed this differential expression. Using 1H-NMR analysis, the product of isocitrate lyases, succinate, increased about 15 times in the acetate medium. During acetate metabolism proteins involved in the lipid metabolism and hexosamine biosynthesis were over-expressed in the acetate medium, while proteins involved in TCA cycle, pentose phosphate cycle and purine metabolism were down-regulated. Taken together, the results from the proteomic analysis can be applied to improve GlcN production and to develop metabolic engineering in BL-4. PMID:22211106

  1. Community and Proteomic Analysis of Methanogenic Consortia Degrading Terephthalate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng-Yau; Chuang, Hui-Ping; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Hung-Jen; Chen, Shu-Hui; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of terephthalate (TA) through microbial syntrophy under moderately thermophilic (46 to 50°C) methanogenic conditions was characterized by using a metagenomic approach (A. Lykidis et al., ISME J. 5:122–130, 2011). To further study the activities of key microorganisms responsible for the TA degradation, community analysis and shotgun proteomics were used. The results of hierarchical oligonucleotide primer extension analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes indicated that Pelotomaculum, Methanosaeta, and Methanolinea were predominant in the TA-degrading biofilms. Metaproteomic analysis identified a total of 482 proteins and revealed a distinctive distribution pattern of microbial functions expressed in situ. The results confirmed that TA was degraded by Pelotomaculum spp. via the proposed decarboxylation and benzoyl-coenzyme A-dependent pathway. The intermediate by-products, including acetate, H2/CO2, and butyrate, were produced to support the growth of methanogens, as well as other microbial populations that could further degrade butyrate. Proteins related to energy production and conservation, and signal transduction mechanisms (that is, chemotaxis, PAS/GGDEF regulators, and stress proteins) were highly expressed, and these mechanisms were important for growth in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems. PMID:23064332

  2. Methods for Pseudopodia Purification and Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Feng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2007-08-21

    Directional cell migration (chemotaxis) plays a central role in a wide spectrum of physiological and pathological processes, including embryo development, wounding healing, immunity, and cancer metastasis (1, 2). The process of chemotaxis is characterized by the sustained migration of cells in the direction of an increasing concentration of chemoattractant and/or ECM protein. Upon sensing the chemoattractant cells response with localized amplification of signals on the side facing the gradient (3-7). The spatial signal propagation facilitates reorganization of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton leading to extension of a dominant pseudopodium (PD) only in the direction of chemoattractant (7-10). While it is clear that localized signaling is critical for pseudopodium formation and chemotaxis, the molecular mechanisms that mediate this response remain poorly defined. To investigate mechanisms of pseudopodia formation, we recently described a novel approach to separate the PD and cell body (CB) compartments for large scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using chambers equipped with microporous filters (Fig. 1) (3, 7, 11). This in vitro system recapitulates physiological events associates with pseudopodial protrusion through small openings in the ECM and the vessel wall during immune cell intravasation and cancer cell metastasis (12, 13). The model system has been used to reveal important signaling pathways and novel proteins that mediate cell migration. This model, combined with the state-of-the-art proteomics and phosphoproteomics technology, will provide an effective approach to systematically analyze the proteins that differentially localized or phosphorylated in the front and the back of polarized migrating cells. In the following sections, we will describe in detail the protocols used to purify the PD and CB compartments for large-scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using mass spectrometry.

  3. Integrated quantitative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of lung tumor and control tissue: a lung cancer showcase

    PubMed Central

    Huwer, Hanno; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Wesse, Tanja; Franke, Andre; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics analysis of paired cancer and control tissue can be applied to investigate pathological processes in tumors. Advancements in data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry allow for highly reproducible quantitative analysis of complex proteomic patterns. Optimized sample preparation workflows enable integrative multi-omics studies from the same tissue specimens. We performed ion mobility enhanced, data-independent acquisition MS to characterize the proteome of 21 lung tumor tissues including adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as compared to control lung tissues of the same patient each. Transcriptomic data were generated for the same specimens. The quantitative proteomic patterns and mRNA abundances were subsequently analyzed using systems biology approaches. We report a significantly (p = 0.0001) larger repertoire of proteins in cancer tissues. 12 proteins were higher in all tumor tissues as compared to matching control tissues. Three proteins, CAV1, CAV2, and RAGE, were vice versa higher in all controls. We also identified characteristic SCC and adenocarcinoma protein patterns. Principal Component Analysis provided evidence that not only cancer from control tissue but also tissue from adenocarcinoma and SCC can be differentiated. Transcriptomic levels of key proteins measured from the same matched tissue samples correlated with the observed protein patterns. The applied study set-up with paired lung tissue specimens of which different omics are measured, is generally suited for an integrated multi-omics analysis. PMID:26930711

  4. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report. PMID:22008648

  5. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetonebutanol- ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results: We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report.

  6. The Revolution and Evolution of Shotgun Proteomics for Large-Scale Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved at an exponential rate over the last 100 years. Innovations in the development of mass spectrometers have created powerful instruments capable of analyzing a wide range of targets, from rare atoms and molecules to very large molecules such as a proteins, protein complexes and DNA. These performance gains have been driven by sustaining innovations, punctuated by the occasional disruptive innovation. The use of mass spectrometry for proteome analysis was driven by disruptive innovations that created a capability for large-scale analysis of proteins and modifications. PMID:23294060

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Cell Walls of Two Developmental Stages of Alfalfa Stems

    PubMed Central

    Verdonk, Julian C.; Hatfield, Ronald D.; Sullivan, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Cell walls are important for the growth and development of all plants. They are also valuable resources for feed and fiber, and more recently as a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. Cell wall proteins comprise only a fraction of the cell wall, but play important roles in establishing the walls and in the chemical interactions (e.g., crosslinking) of cell wall components. This crosslinking provides structure, but restricts digestibility of cell wall complex carbohydrates, limiting available energy in animal and bioenergy production systems. Manipulation of cell wall proteins could be a strategy to improve digestibility. An analysis of the cell wall proteome of apical alfalfa stems (less mature, more digestible) and basal alfalfa stems (more mature, less digestible) was conducted using a recently developed low-salt/density gradient method for the isolation of cell walls. Walls were subsequently subjected to a modified extraction utilizing EGTA to remove pectins, followed by a LiCl extraction to isolate more tightly bound proteins. Recovered proteins were identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 272 proteins in the alfalfa stem cell wall proteome, 153 of which had not previously been identified in cell wall proteomic analyses. Nearly 70% of the identified proteins were predicted to be secreted, as would be expected for most cell wall proteins, an improvement over previously published studies using traditional cell wall isolation methods. A comparison of our and several other cell wall proteomic studies indicates little overlap in identified proteins among them, which may be largely due to differences in the tissues used as well as differences in experimental approach. PMID:23248635

  8. Proteome analysis of Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) ova.

    PubMed

    Keyvanshokooh, Saeed; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2008-12-01

    The Persian sturgeon ova are a key material both for inevitable artificial propagation and for caviar production. In this study, the proteome profile of Persian sturgeon ova was analyzed using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF in order to determine its protein composition. Out of 192 spots analyzed with MALDI-TOF/TOF, 107 spots corresponding to 73 different proteins were identified. The identified proteins were classified into 11 groups with regard to their main known function involving cell structure (24.65%), translation and transcription (12.32%), metabolism and energy production (12.32%), protein synthesis (9.60%), membrane protein receptors or cell signaling (8.21%), cell defense (5.47%), transport (5.47%), cell division (8.21%), vitellogenin (2.73%), unclassified (6.84%) and unknown function (4.10%). The results of this study provide a valuable resource for molecular analysis of normal and abnormal conditions affecting female reproduction. Moreover, it may help to better understand factors affecting caviar quality during refrigerated storage. PMID:18054827

  9. Proteomic analysis of strawberry leaves infected with Colletotrichum fragariae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Xin, Ya; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Yu, Hong; Liu, Hui; Xiao, Wenfei; Wang, Shuzhen; Zheng, Guizhen; Liu, Hongbo; Jin, Liang; Ma, Huasheng; Ruan, Songlin

    2012-07-16

    Understanding the defense mechanisms used by anthracnose-resistant strawberries against Colletotrichum infection is important for breeding purposes. To characterize cell responses to Colletotrichum infection, proteomes from strawberry seedling leaves that had or had not been infected with Colletotrichum fragariae were characterized at different time points post infection by 2-DE and by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS and database-searching protein identification. Mass spectrometry identified 49 differentially expressed proteins with significant intensity differences (>1.5-fold, p<0.05) in mock- and C. fragariae-infected leaves at least at one time point. Notably, 2-DE analysis revealed that C. fragariae infection increased the expression of well-known and novel pathogen-responsive proteins whose expression patterns tended to correlate with physiological changes in the leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the transcriptional profiles of infected and uninfected strawberry leaves, and western blotting confirmed the induction of β-1,3-glucanase and a low-molecular-weight heat shock protein in response to C. fragariae infection. During the late phase of infection, proteins involved in the Calvin cycle and glycolysis pathway had suppressed expression. The abundance changes, putative functions, and participation in physiological reactions for the identified proteins produce a pathogen-responsive protein network in C. fragariae-infected strawberry leaves. Together, these findings increase our knowledge of pathogen resistance mechanisms, especially those found in non-model plant species. PMID:22634039

  10. Functional Complexity of the Axonal Growth Cone: A Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Bernal, Adriana; Sanford, Staci D.; Sosa, Lucas J.; Simon, Glenn C.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Pfenninger, Karl H.

    2012-01-01

    The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions. PMID:22384089

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Chikungunya Virus Infected Microgial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abere, Bizunesh; Wikan, Nitwara; Ubol, Sukathida; Auewarakul, Prasert; Paemanee, Atchara; Kittisenachai, Suthathip; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Smith, Duncan R.

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a recently re-emerged public health problem in many countries bordering the Indian Ocean and elsewhere. Chikungunya fever is a relatively self limiting febrile disease, but the consequences of chikungunya fever can include a long lasting, debilitating arthralgia, and occasional neurological involvement has been reported. Macrophages have been implicated as an important cell target of CHIKV with regards to both their role as an immune mediator, as well evidence pointing to long term viral persistence in these cells. Microglial cells are the resident brain macrophages, and so this study sought to define the proteomic changes in a human microglial cell line (CHME-5) in response to CHIKV infection. GeLC-MS/MS analysis of CHIKV infected and mock infected cells identified some 1455 individual proteins, of which 90 proteins, belonging to diverse cellular pathways, were significantly down regulated at a significance level of p<0.01. Analysis of the protein profile in response to infection did not support a global inhibition of either normal or IRES-mediated translation, but was consistent with the targeting of specific cellular pathways including those regulating innate antiviral mechanisms. PMID:22514668

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebellum in Common Marmoset Exposed to Methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yueting; Yamamoto, Megumi; Figeys, Daniel; Ning, Zhibin; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-07-01

    The cerebellum is known as the major target regions of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity, but the mechanisms are still not fully understood. We studied the effects of MeHg exposure in the cerebellum of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) using a shotgun proteomic approach with liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of 1000 common proteins were identified in all samples, and 102 proteins were significantly differentially expressed in the cerebellum of common marmoset with orally dosed MeHg (1.5 mg MeHg/kg body weight for 2 weeks) compared with those of the control group. Functional enrichment analysis and pathway predictions showed that the differentially expressed proteins were involved in carbohydrate derivative metabolic process, ion transport including synaptic transmission, cell development, and calcium signaling pathway. Cellular component enrichment analysis showed that they were mainly distributed in plasma membrane, excitatory synapse, and synaptic membrane. These results indicate that synaptic transmission and calcium signaling pathways are the core functions affected by MeHg. We found a total of 21 novel proteins affected by MeHg in synaptic transmission and calcium signaling pathways. DLG4: (PSD95) and MIR-19A/MIR-19B were found to be potential key targets leading to the multiple effects of MeHg neurotoxicity. These results show the global effects of MeHg on cellular functions and pathways leading to neurological deficits in common marmoset. PMID:25809596

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analyses of Avirulent, Virulent, and Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identify Strain-specific Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Kumari, Sangeeta; Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Kalam, Haroon; Arora, Divya; Jain, Neharika; Kumaar, Lakshmi Krishna; Samal, Areejit; Rao, Kanury V. S.; Kumar, Dhiraj; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an adaptable intracellular pathogen, existing in both dormant as well as active disease-causing states. Here, we report systematic proteomic analyses of four strains, H37Ra, H37Rv, and clinical isolates BND and JAL, to determine the differences in protein expression patterns that contribute to their virulence and drug resistance. Resolution of lysates of the four strains by liquid chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry analysis, identified a total of 2161 protein groups covering ∼54% of the predicted M. tuberculosis proteome. Label-free quantification analysis of the data revealed 257 differentially expressed protein groups. The differentially expressed protein groups could be classified into seven K-means cluster bins, which broadly delineated strain-specific variations. Analysis of the data for possible mechanisms responsible for drug resistance phenotype of JAL suggested that it could be due to a combination of overexpression of proteins implicated in drug resistance and the other factors. Expression pattern analyses of transcription factors and their downstream targets demonstrated substantial differential modulation in JAL, suggesting a complex regulatory mechanism. Results showed distinct variations in the protein expression patterns of Esx and mce1 operon proteins in JAL and BND strains, respectively. Abrogating higher levels of ESAT6, an important Esx protein known to be critical for virulence, in the JAL strain diminished its virulence, although it had marginal impact on the other strains. Taken together, this study reveals that strain-specific variations in protein expression patterns have a meaningful impact on the biology of the pathogen. PMID:27151218

  14. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  15. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YAN; LIU, XIAO-HUI; WU, JIAN-JUN; REN, HUI-MING; WANG, JIAN; DING, ZHENG-TONG; JIANG, YU-PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study used comparative proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients in order to identify proteins that may act as diagnostic biomarkers and indicators of the pathogenesis of ALS. This analysis was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology, coupled with 2-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery software was utilized for bioinformatic analysis of the data. Following this, western blotting was performed in order to examine the expression of 3 candidate proteins in ALS patients compared with healthy individuals [as a normal control (NC) group] or patients with other neurological disease (OND); these proteins were insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-2), glutamate receptor 4 (GRIA4) and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1 (LRG1). Clinical data, including gender, age, disease duration and ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) score, were also collected in the ALS patients. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed between the clinical data and the results of western blot analysis. A total of 248 distinct proteins were identified in the ALS and NC groups, amongst which a significant difference could be identified in 35 proteins; of these, 21 proteins were downregulated and 14 were upregulated. These differentially-expressed proteins were thus revealed to be associated with ALS. The western blot analysis confirmed a proportion of the data attained in the iTRAQ analysis, revealing the differential protein expression of IGF-2 and GRIA4 between the ALS and NC groups. IGF-2 was significantly downregulated in ALS patients (P=0.017) and GRIA4 was significantly upregulated (P=0.016). These results were subsequently validated in the 35-patient ALS and OND groups (P=0.002), but no significant difference was identified in LRG1 expression between these groups. GRIA4 protein expression was higher

  16. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human spliceosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaolan; Licklider, Lawrence J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Reed, Robin

    2002-09-01

    The precise excision of introns from pre-messenger RNA is performed by the spliceosome, a macromolecular machine containing five small nuclear RNAs and numerous proteins. Much has been learned about the protein components of the spliceosome from analysis of individual purified small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and salt-stable spliceosome `core' particles. However, the complete set of proteins that constitutes intact functional spliceosomes has yet to be identified. Here we use maltose-binding protein affinity chromatography to isolate spliceosomes in highly purified and functional form. Using nanoscale microcapillary liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we identify ~145 distinct spliceosomal proteins, making the spliceosome the most complex cellular machine so far characterized. Our spliceosomes comprise all previously known splicing factors and 58 newly identified components. The spliceosome contains at least 30 proteins with known or putative roles in gene expression steps other than splicing. This complexity may be required not only for splicing multi-intronic metazoan pre-messenger RNAs, but also for mediating the extensive coupling between splicing and other steps in gene expression.

  17. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Giegé, Philippe; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete set of nuclear genes that encode proteins targeted to mitochondria in plants is currently undefined and thus the full range of mitochondrial functions in plants is unknown. Analysis of two-dimensional gel separations of Arabidopsis cell culture mitochondrial protein revealed approximately 100 abundant proteins and 250 low-abundance proteins. Comparison of subfractions of mitochondrial protein on two-dimensional gels provided information on the soluble, membrane, or integral membrane locations of this protein set. A total of 170 protein spots were excised, trypsin-digested, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry spectra obtained. Using this dataset, 91 of the proteins were identified by searching translated Arabidopsis genomic databases. Of this set, 81 have defined functions based on sequence comparison. These functions include respiratory electron transport, tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein import, processing, and assembly, transcription, membrane transport, and antioxidant defense. A total of 10 spectra were matched to Arabidopsis putative open reading frames for which no specific function has been determined. A total of 64 spectra did not match to an identified open reading frame. Analysis of full-length putative protein sequences using bioinformatic tools to predict subcellular targeting (TargetP, Psort, and MitoProt) revealed significant variation in predictions, and also a lack of mitochondrial targeting prediction for several characterized mitochondrial proteins. PMID:11743115

  18. Global Liver Proteomics of Rats Exposed for 5 Days to Phenobarbital Identifies Changes Associated with Cancer and with CYP Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dail, Mary B.; Shack, L. Allen; Chambers, Janice E.; Burgess, Shane C.

    2008-01-01

    A global proteomics approach was applied to model the hepatic response elicited by the toxicologically well-characterized xenobiotic phenobarbital (PB), a prototypical inducer of hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and a well-known nongenotoxic liver carcinogen in rats. Differential detergent fractionation two-dimensional liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and systems biology modeling were used to identify alterations in toxicologically relevant hepatic molecular functions and biological processes in the livers of rats following a 5-day exposure to PB at 80 mg/kg/day or a vehicle control. Of the 3342 proteins identified, expression of 121 (3.6% of the total proteins) was significantly increased and 127 (3.8%) significantly decreased in the PB group compared to controls. The greatest increase was seen for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B2 (167-fold). All proteins with statistically significant differences from control were then analyzed using both Gene Ontology (GO) and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA, 5.0 IPA-Tox) for cellular location, function, network connectivity, and possible disease processes, especially as they relate to CYP-mediated metabolism and nongenotoxic carcinogenesis mechanisms. The GO results suggested that PB's mechanism of nongenotoxic carcinogenesis involves both increased xenobiotic metabolism, especially induction of the 2B subfamily of CYP enzymes, and increased cell cycle activity. Apoptosis, however, also increased, perhaps, as an attempt to counter the rising cancer threat. Of the IPA-mapped proteins, 41 have functions which are procarcinogenic and 14 anticarcinogenic according to the hypothesized nongenotoxic mechanism of imbalance between apoptosis and cellular proliferation. Twenty-two additional IPA nodes can be classified as procarcinogenic by the competing theory of increased metabolism resulting in the formation of reactive oxygen species. Since the systems biology modeling corresponded well to PB

  19. Quantitative analysis of plasma membrane proteome using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenqiang

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) controls cell's exchange of both material and information with the outside environment, and PM-associated proteins play key roles in cellular regulation. Numerous cell surface receptors allow cells to perceive and respond to various signals from neighbor cells, pathogens, or the environment; large numbers of transporter and channel proteins control material uptake or release. Quantitative proteomic analysis of PM-associated proteins can identify key proteins involved in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Here, we describe a protocol for quantitative proteomic analysis of PM proteins using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. The protocol has been successfully employed to identify new components of the brassinosteroid signaling pathway, and should also be applicable to the studies of other plant signal transduction pathways and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22576086

  20. Image analysis tools and emerging algorithms for expression proteomics

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Lisacek, Frederique; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Dunn, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Since their origins in academic endeavours in the 1970s, computational analysis tools have matured into a number of established commercial packages that underpin research in expression proteomics. In this paper we describe the image analysis pipeline for the established 2-D Gel Electrophoresis (2-DE) technique of protein separation, and by first covering signal analysis for Mass Spectrometry (MS), we also explain the current image analysis workflow for the emerging high-throughput ‘shotgun’ proteomics platform of Liquid Chromatography coupled to MS (LC/MS). The bioinformatics challenges for both methods are illustrated and compared, whilst existing commercial and academic packages and their workflows are described from both a user’s and a technical perspective. Attention is given to the importance of sound statistical treatment of the resultant quantifications in the search for differential expression. Despite wide availability of proteomics software, a number of challenges have yet to be overcome regarding algorithm accuracy, objectivity and automation, generally due to deterministic spot-centric approaches that discard information early in the pipeline, propagating errors. We review recent advances in signal and image analysis algorithms in 2-DE, MS, LC/MS and Imaging MS. Particular attention is given to wavelet techniques, automated image-based alignment and differential analysis in 2-DE, Bayesian peak mixture models and functional mixed modelling in MS, and group-wise consensus alignment methods for LC/MS. PMID:21046614

  1. Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

  2. Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes”

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S.

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for LC-MS/MS analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments, or with identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different –SOH specific probes, and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impedes product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  3. [FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN BRYOZOAN COLONY: A PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Kutyumov, V A; Maltseva, A L; Kotenko, N; Ostrovsky, A N

    2016-01-01

    Bryozoans are typical modular organisms. They consist of repetitive structural units, the zooids. Bryozoan colonies grow by zooidal budding, with the distribution pattern of the budding loci underlying the diversity of colony forms. Budding is usually restricted to the zooids at the periphery of the colony, which form a "growing edge" or local terminal growth zones. Non-budding parts of the colony can be functionally subdivided, too. In many species colonies consists of regular, often repetitive zones of feeding and non-feeding modules, associated with a periodical degeneration and regeneration of the polypide, retractile tentacle crown with a gut and the accompanying musculature. So, there is functional differentiation in bryozoan colonies but its mechanisms are unknown. Presumably, budding and/or polypide recycling in different colony parts are induced or inhibited by certain determinants of functional specialization. An effective tool of their identification is the comparison of proteomes of functionally different zones. Here we report the results of proteomic analysis of three bryozoan species from the White Sea, which have a different colony form: Flustrellidra hispida, Terminoflustra membranaceotruncata and Securiflustra securifrons. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we compared proteomes of the growing edge and the zones consisting of feeding and non-feeding zooids in these species. We estimated the overall proteome variability, revealed proteins whose relative abundance gradually changed along the proximal-distal colony axis and suggested that they might be involved in the functional differentiation of the colony. PMID:27220253

  4. Proteomic analysis through larval development of Solea senegalensis flatfish.

    PubMed

    Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Alhama, José; López-Barea, Juan

    2015-12-01

    The post-embryonic development of the Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis, a flatfish of growing interest in fisheries and aquaculture, is associated with drastic morpho-physiological changes during metamorphosis. Although in the last two decades knowledge on sole culture has notably increased, especially in Southern Europe, its progress was restricted due to lack of methods to control reproduction, improve larval quality and increase juvenile disease resistance. A limited knowledge of the physiological, molecular and genetic mechanisms involved is at the base of such limitation. A proteomic study was carried out to explore the molecular events that occur during S. senegalensis ontogenesis. Protein expression changes were monitored in larvae from 5 to 21 dph by combining 2DE and protein identification with de novo MS/MS sequencing. An average of 6177 ± 282 spots was resolved in 2DE gels. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the 705 selected spots grouped them in eight patterns. Thirty-four proteins were identified and assigned biological functions including structure, metabolism highlighting energy metabolism, transport, protein folding, stress response, chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. These changes provide a sequential description of the molecular events associated with the biochemical and biological transformations that occur during sole larval development. PMID:26365915

  5. Shotgun MS proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Gharib, Sina A; Schnapp, Lynn M; Goodlett, David R

    2014-10-01

    We provide a review of proteomic techniques used to characterize the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome of normal healthy subjects. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is the most common technique for sampling the components of the alveolar space. The proteomic techniques used to study normal BALF include protein separation by 2DE, whereby proteins were identified by comparison to a reference gel as well as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS, also known as shotgun proteomics. We summarize recent progress using shotgun MS technologies to define the normal BALF proteome. Surprisingly, we find that despite advances in shotgun proteomic technologies over the course of the last 10 years, which have resulted in greater numbers of proteins being identified, the functional landscape of normal BALF proteome was similarly described by all methods examined. PMID:24616423

  6. Shotgun MS proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V.; Gharib, Sina A.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Goodlett, David R.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a review of proteomic techniques used to characterize the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) proteome of normal healthy subjects. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is the most common technique for sampling the components of the alveolar space. The proteomic techniques used to study normal BALF include protein separation by 2D gel electrophoresis whereby proteins were identified by comparison to a reference gel as well as high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry technique, also known as shotgun proteomics. We summarize recent progress using shotgun MS technologies to define the normal BALF proteome. Surprisingly, we find that despite advances in shotgun proteomic technologies over the course of the last ten years, which have resulted in greater numbers of proteins being identified, the functional landscape of normal BALF proteome was similarly described by all methods examined. PMID:24616423

  7. Proteomic analysis of papaya fruit ripening using 2DE-DIGE.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Silvia Beserra; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Oliveira do Nascimento, João Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Papayas have a very short green life as a result of their rapid pulp softening as well as their susceptibility to physical injury and mold growth. The ripening-related changes take place very quickly, and there is a continued interest in the reduction of postharvest losses. Proteins have a central role in biological processes, and differential proteomics enables the discrimination of proteins affected during papaya ripening. A comparative analysis of the proteomes of climacteric and pre-climacteric papayas was performed using 2DE-DIGE. Third seven proteins corresponding to spots with significant differences in abundance during ripening were submitted to MS analysis, and 27 proteins were identified and classified into six main categories related to the metabolic changes occurring during ripening. Proteins from the cell wall (alpha-galactosidase and invertase), ethylene biosynthesis (methionine synthase), climacteric respiratory burst, stress response, synthesis of carotenoid precursors (hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase, GcpE), and chromoplast differentiation (fibrillin) were identified. There was some correspondence between the identified proteins and the data from previous transcript profiling of papaya fruit, but new, accumulated proteins were identified, which reinforces the importance of differential proteomics as a tool to investigate ripening and provides potentially useful information for maintaining fruit quality and minimizing postharvest losses. PMID:22134357

  8. Subfractionation, characterization and in-depth proteomic analysis of glomerular membrane vesicles in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Zenka, Roman M.; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Madden, Benjamin J.; Mahoney, Doug W.; Oberg, Ann L.; Huang, Bing Q.; Nesbitt, Lisa L.; Bakeberg, Jason L.; Bergen, H. Robert; Ward, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary exosome-like vesicles (ELVs) are a heterogenous mixture (diameter 40–200nm) containing vesicles shed from all segments of the nephron including glomerular podocytes. Contamination with Tamm Horsfall protein (THP) oligomers has hampered their isolation and proteomic analysis. Here we improved ELV isolation protocols employing density centrifugation to remove THP and albumin, and isolated a glomerular membranous vesicle (GMV) enriched subfraction from 7 individuals identifying 1830 proteins and in 3 patients with glomerular disease identifying 5657 unique proteins. The GMV fraction was composed of podocin/podocalyxin positive irregularly shaped membranous vesicles and podocin/podocalyxin negative classical exosomes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified integrin, actin cytoskeleton and RhoGDI signaling in the top three canonical represented signaling pathways and 19 other proteins associated with inherited glomerular diseases. The GMVs are of podocyte origin and the density gradient technique allowed isolation in a reproducible manner. We show many nephrotic syndrome proteins, proteases and complement proteins involved in glomerular disease are in GMVs and some were shed in the disease state (nephrin, TRPC6 and INF2 and PLA2R). We calculated sample sizes required to identify new glomerular disease biomarkers, expand the ELV proteome and provide a reference proteome in a database that may prove useful in the search for biomarkers of glomerular disease. PMID:24196483

  9. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Ma, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Cong; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity can induce a serial of physiological and pathological changes in human body, such as cardiovascular functional disorder, bone loss, muscular atrophy and impaired immune system function, etc. In this research, we focus on the influence of microgravity to vertebrate embryo development. As a powerful model for studying vertebrate development, zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf (hour past fertilization) and 24 hpf were placed into a NASA developed bioreac-tor (RCCS) to simulate microgravity for 64 and 48 hours, respectively. The same number of control embryos from the same parents were placed in a tissue culture dish at the same temper-ature of 28° C. Each experiment was repeated 3 times and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Image analysis of silver stained 2-D gels revealed that 64 from total 292 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations that were significantly (P<0.05) and reproducibly different between simulate-microgravity treatment and the stationary control samples. 4 protein spots with significant expression alteration (P<0.01) were excised from 2-D gels and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra primarily. Of these proteins, 3 down-regulated proteins were identified as bectin 2, centrosomal protein of 135kDa and tropomyosin 4, while the up-regulated protein was identified as creatine kinase muscle B. Other protein spots showed significant expression alteration will be identified successively and the corresponding genes expression will also be measured by Q-PCR method at different development stages. The data presented in this study illustrate that zebrafish embryo can be significantly induced by microgravity on the expression of proteins involved in bone and muscle formation. Key Words: Danio rerio; Simulated-microgravity; Proteomics

  10. Proteome Analysis of Ground State Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Taleahmad, Sara; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Parker, Lindsay M.; Hassani, Seyedeh-Nafiseh; Mollamohammadi, Sepideh; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Haynes, Paul A.; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation potential of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can be manipulated via serum and medium conditions for direct cellular development or to maintain a naïve ground state. The self-renewal state of ESCs can thus be induced by adding inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (Gsk3), known as 2 inhibitors (2i) treatment. We have used a shotgun proteomics approach to investigate differences in protein expressions between 2i- and serum-grown mESCs. The results indicated that 164 proteins were significantly upregulated and 107 proteins downregulated in 2i-grown cells compared to serum. Protein pathways in 2i-grown cells with the highest enrichment were associated with glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Protein pathways related to organ development were downregulated in 2i-grown cells. In serum-grown ESCs, protein pathways involved in integrin and focal adhesion, and signaling proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton regulation were enriched. We observed a number of nuclear proteins which were mostly involved in self-renewal maintenance and were expressed at higher levels in 2i compared to serum - Dnmt1, Map2k1, Parp1, Xpo4, Eif3g, Smarca4/Brg1 and Smarcc1/Baf155. Collectively, the results provided an insight into the key protein pathways used by ESCs in the ground state or metastable conditions through 2i or serum culture medium, respectively. PMID:26671762

  11. Proteomic analysis of acetylation in thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Woo; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Yong-Jik; Kim, Jung-Ae; Choi, Ji Young; Kang, Sunghyun; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2013-08-01

    Recent analysis of prokaryotic N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteins highlights the posttranslational regulation of a broad spectrum of cellular proteins. However, the exact role of acetylation remains unclear due to a lack of acetylated proteome data in prokaryotes. Here, we present the N(ε)-lysine-acetylated proteome of gram-positive thermophilic Geobacillus kaustophilus. Affinity enrichment using acetyl-lysine-specific antibodies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 253 acetylated peptides representing 114 proteins. These acetylated proteins include not only common orthologs from mesophilic Bacillus counterparts, but also unique G. kaustophilus proteins, indicating that lysine acetylation is pronounced in thermophilic bacteria. These data complement current knowledge of the bacterial acetylproteome and provide an expanded platform for better understanding of the function of acetylation in cellular metabolism. PMID:23696451

  12. Analysis of proteome dynamics in mice by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and in vivo isotopic labeling have enabled proteome-wide analyses of protein turnover in complex organisms. Here, we describe a protocol for analyzing protein turnover rates in mouse tissues by comprehensive (15)N labeling. The procedure involves the complete isotopic labeling of blue green algae (Spirulina platensis) with (15)N and utilizing it as a source of dietary nitrogen for mice. We outline a detailed protocol for in-house production of (15)N-labeled algae, labeling of mice, and analysis of isotope incorporation kinetics by mass spectrometry. The methodology can be adapted to analyze proteome dynamics in most murine tissues and may be particularly useful in the analysis of proteostatic disruptions in mouse models of disease. PMID:24791984

  13. Isolation and proteomic analysis of the SYP61 compartment reveal its role in exocytic trafficking in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Drakakaki, Georgia; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Pan, Songqin; Miao, Yansong; Wang, Junqi; Keinath, Nana F; Weatherly, Brent; Jiang, Liwen; Schumacher, Karin; Hicks, Glenn; Raikhel, Natasha

    2012-02-01

    The endomembrane system is a complex and dynamic intracellular trafficking network. It is very challenging to track individual vesicles and their cargos in real time; however, affinity purification allows vesicles to be isolated in their natural state so that their constituent proteins can be identified. Pioneering this approach in plants, we isolated the SYP61 trans-Golgi network compartment and carried out a comprehensive proteomic analysis of its contents with only minimal interference from other organelles. The proteome of SYP61 revealed the association of proteins of unknown function that have previously not been ascribed to this compartment. We identified a complete SYP61 SNARE complex, including regulatory proteins and validated the proteome data by showing that several of these proteins associated with SYP61 in planta. We further identified the SYP121-complex and cellulose synthases, suggesting that SYP61 plays a role in the exocytic trafficking and the transport of cell wall components to the plasma membrane. The presence of proteins of unknown function in the SYP61 proteome including ECHIDNA offers the opportunity to identify novel trafficking components and cargos. The affinity purification of plant vesicles in their natural state provides a basis for further analysis and dissection of complex endomembrane networks. The approach is widely applicable and can afford the study of several vesicle populations in plants, which can be compared with the SYP61 vesicle proteome. PMID:21826108

  14. Isolation and proteomic analysis of the SYP61 compartment reveal its role in exocytic trafficking in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Drakakaki, Georgia; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Pan, Songqin; Miao, Yansong; Wang, Junqi; Keinath, Nana F; Weatherly, Brent; Jiang, Liwen; Schumacher, Karin; Hicks, Glenn; Raikhel, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    The endomembrane system is a complex and dynamic intracellular trafficking network. It is very challenging to track individual vesicles and their cargos in real time; however, affinity purification allows vesicles to be isolated in their natural state so that their constituent proteins can be identified. Pioneering this approach in plants, we isolated the SYP61 trans-Golgi network compartment and carried out a comprehensive proteomic analysis of its contents with only minimal interference from other organelles. The proteome of SYP61 revealed the association of proteins of unknown function that have previously not been ascribed to this compartment. We identified a complete SYP61 SNARE complex, including regulatory proteins and validated the proteome data by showing that several of these proteins associated with SYP61 in planta. We further identified the SYP121-complex and cellulose synthases, suggesting that SYP61 plays a role in the exocytic trafficking and the transport of cell wall components to the plasma membrane. The presence of proteins of unknown function in the SYP61 proteome including ECHIDNA offers the opportunity to identify novel trafficking components and cargos. The affinity purification of plant vesicles in their natural state provides a basis for further analysis and dissection of complex endomembrane networks. The approach is widely applicable and can afford the study of several vesicle populations in plants, which can be compared with the SYP61 vesicle proteome. PMID:21826108

  15. Identifying Changes in the Synaptic Proteome of Cirrhotic Alcoholic Superior Frontal Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, N; Mayfield, R.D; Harris, R.A; Dodd, P.R

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic complications are a common side-effect of alcoholism. Without the detoxification capabilities of the liver, alcohol misuse induces changes in gene and protein expression throughout the body. A global proteomics approach was used to identify these protein changes in the brain. We utilised human autopsy tissue from the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) of six cirrhotic alcoholics, six alcoholics without comorbid disease, and six non-alcoholic non-cirrhotic controls. Synaptic proteins were isolated and used in two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. Many expression differences were confined to one or other alcoholic sub-group. Cirrhotic alcoholics showed 99 differences in protein expression levels from controls, of which half also differed from non-comorbid alcoholics. This may reflect differences in disease severity between the sub-groups of alcoholics, or differences in patterns of harmful drinking. Alternatively, the protein profiles may result from differences between cirrhotic and non-comorbid alcoholics in subjects’ responses to alcohol misuse. Ten proteins were identified in at least two spots on the 2D gel; they were involved in basal energy metabolism, synaptic vesicle recycling, and chaperoning. These post-translationally modified isoforms were differentially regulated in cirrhotic alcoholics, indicating a level of epigenetic control not previously observed in this disorder. PMID:21886576

  16. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vivelo, Christina A.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by mass spectrometry using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD+ analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  17. Proteomics approaches to identify mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivelo, Christina A; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription, and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by MS using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD(+) analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  18. Quantitative proteomics identify DAB2 as a cardiac developmental regulator that inhibits WNT/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hofsteen, Peter; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Chapman, Daniel Patrick; Moon, Randall T.; Murry, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac lineage determination and differentiation, we quantified the proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and cardiomyocytes during a time course of directed differentiation by label-free quantitative proteomics. This approach correctly identified known stage-specific markers of cardiomyocyte differentiation, including SRY-box2 (SOX2), GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), and myosin heavy chain 6 (MYH6). This led us to determine whether our proteomic screen could reveal previously unidentified mediators of heart development. We identified Disabled 2 (DAB2) as one of the most dynamically expressed proteins in hESCs, CPCs, and cardiomyocytes. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) mutagenesis in zebrafish to assess whether DAB2 plays a functional role during cardiomyocyte differentiation. We found that deletion of Dab2 in zebrafish embryos led to a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte number and increased endogenous WNT/β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, the Dab2-deficient defects in cardiomyocyte number could be suppressed by overexpression of dickkopf 1 (DKK1), an inhibitor of WNT/β-catenin signaling. Thus, inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling by DAB2 is essential for establishing the correct number of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart. Our work demonstrates that quantifying the proteome of human stem cells can identify previously unknown developmental regulators. PMID:26755607

  19. Quantitative proteomics identify DAB2 as a cardiac developmental regulator that inhibits WNT/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hofsteen, Peter; Robitaille, Aaron M; Chapman, Daniel Patrick; Moon, Randall T; Murry, Charles E

    2016-01-26

    To reveal the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac lineage determination and differentiation, we quantified the proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and cardiomyocytes during a time course of directed differentiation by label-free quantitative proteomics. This approach correctly identified known stage-specific markers of cardiomyocyte differentiation, including SRY-box2 (SOX2), GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), and myosin heavy chain 6 (MYH6). This led us to determine whether our proteomic screen could reveal previously unidentified mediators of heart development. We identified Disabled 2 (DAB2) as one of the most dynamically expressed proteins in hESCs, CPCs, and cardiomyocytes. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) mutagenesis in zebrafish to assess whether DAB2 plays a functional role during cardiomyocyte differentiation. We found that deletion of Dab2 in zebrafish embryos led to a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte number and increased endogenous WNT/β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, the Dab2-deficient defects in cardiomyocyte number could be suppressed by overexpression of dickkopf 1 (DKK1), an inhibitor of WNT/β-catenin signaling. Thus, inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling by DAB2 is essential for establishing the correct number of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart. Our work demonstrates that quantifying the proteome of human stem cells can identify previously unknown developmental regulators. PMID:26755607

  20. Current perspectives in proteomic analysis of abiotic stress in Grapevines

    PubMed Central

    George, Iniga S.; Haynes, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Grapes are an important crop plant which forms the basis of a globally important industry. Grape and wine production is particularly vulnerable to environmental and climatic fluctuations, which makes it essential for us to develop a greater understanding of the molecular level responses of grape plants to various abiotic stresses. The completion of the initial grape genome sequence in 2007 has led to a significant increase in research on grapes using proteomics approaches. In this article, we discuss some of the current research on abiotic stress in grapevines, in the context of abiotic stress research in other plant species. We also highlight some of the current limitations in grapevine proteomics and identify areas with promising scope for potential future research. PMID:25538720

  1. Decreased levels of CXC-chemokines in serum of benzene-exposed workers identified by array-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Roel; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Luoping; Gunn, Laura; McCarthy, Diane; Woodbury, Ronald L.; McGuire, Marielena; Podust, Vladimir N.; Li, Guilan; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Mu, Ruidong; Yin, Songnian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Smith, Martyn T.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is an important industrial chemical and environmental contaminant that causes leukemia. To obtain mechanistic insight into benzene's mechanism of action, we examined the impact of benzene on the human serum proteome in a study of exposed healthy shoe-factory workers and unexposed controls. Two sequential studies were performed, each using sera from 10 workers exposed to benzene (overall mean benzene air level >30 ppm) and 10 controls. Serum samples were subjected to anion-exchange fractionation and bound to three types of ProteinChip arrays (Ciphergen Biosystems, Fremont, CA) [hydrophobic (H50), metal affinity (IMAC3-Cu), and cation exchange (WCX2)]. Protein-expression patterns were detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI)-TOF MS. Three proteins (4.1, 7.7, and 9.3 kDa) were consistently down-regulated in exposed compared with control subjects in both studies. All proteins were highly inversely correlated with individual estimates of benzene exposure (r > 0.75). The 7.7- and 9.3-kDa proteins were subsequently identified as platelet factor (PF)4 and connective tissue activating peptide (CTAP)-III. Initial proteomic results for PF4 and CTAP-III were subsequently confirmed in a single experiment using a ProteinChip-array-based immunoassay(Ciphergen Biosystems). The altered expression of the platelet-derived CXC-chemokines (40% and 63% for PF4 and CTAP-III, respectively) could not be explained by changes in absolute platelet counts. Thus, SELDI-TOF analysis of a limited number of exposed and unexposed subjects revealed that lowered expression of PF4 and CTAP-III proteins is a potential biomarker of benzene's early biologic effects and may play a role in the immunosuppressive effects of benzene. PMID:16286641

  2. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  3. Dataset for the quantitative proteomics analysis of the primary hepatocellular carcinoma with single and multiple lesions.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohua; Huang, Yao; Wang, Sen; Chi, Minhui; Zeng, Yongyi; Chen, Lihong; Li, Ling; Zeng, Jinhua; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Jingfeng; Liu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumor, which is causing the second leading cancer-related death worldwide. The tumor tissues and the adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from HCC patients with single and multiple lesions were quantified using iTRAQ. A total of 5513 proteins (FDR of 1%) were identified which correspond to roughly 27% of the total liver proteome. And 107 and 330 proteins were dysregulated in HCC tissue with multiple lesions (MC group) and HCC tissue with a single lesion (SC group), compared with their noncancerous tissue (MN and SN group) respectively. Bioinformatics analysis (GO, KEGG and IPA) allowed these data to be organized into distinct categories. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Xing et al., J. Proteomics (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.08.007[1]) have been deposited to the iProX with identifier IPX00037601. PMID:26543886

  4. Dataset for the quantitative proteomics analysis of the primary hepatocellular carcinoma with single and multiple lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiaohua; Huang, Yao; Wang, Sen; Chi, Minhui; Zeng, Yongyi; Chen, Lihong; Li, Ling; Zeng, Jinhua; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Jingfeng; Liu, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumor, which is causing the second leading cancer-related death worldwide. The tumor tissues and the adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from HCC patients with single and multiple lesions were quantified using iTRAQ. A total of 5513 proteins (FDR of 1%) were identified which correspond to roughly 27% of the total liver proteome. And 107 and 330 proteins were dysregulated in HCC tissue with multiple lesions (MC group) and HCC tissue with a single lesion (SC group), compared with their noncancerous tissue (MN and SN group) respectively. Bioinformatics analysis (GO, KEGG and IPA) allowed these data to be organized into distinct categories. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Xing et al., J. Proteomics (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2015.08.007[1]) have been deposited to the iProX with identifier IPX00037601. PMID:26543886

  5. Proteomic analysis of ‘Zaosu’ pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its red skin bud mutation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding for strong red skin color is an important objective of the pear breeding program. There are few reports of proteome research in green skin pear and its red skin bud mutation. The manuscript at hand is one of the first studies dealing with 2D-PAGE-based analysis of pear fruits and leaves, establishing a suitable sample preparation and testing different 2D-PAGE protocols. Therefore, it may grant a basis for further studies on the pear proteome being the studies main goal. A proteomic analysis was conducted on leaves and fruits of ‘Zaosu’ pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and its red skin bud mutation in order to reveal their genetic differences in the protein level. Results In the present study, the optimized two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis system of pear leaf and fruit was set up, and applied to analyze the leaves and fruit protein. The interesting peptide fragments were determined using 4800 Plus MALDI TOF/TOFTM Analyzer mass spectrometer, and the sequence obtained was blasted in NCBInr to identify the differentially-expressed protein. In the 1.5-fold differently-expressed proteins between ‘Zaosu’ pear and its mutant, 10 out of 35 proteins in fruit and 12 out of 24 ones in leaves were identified successfully. Among the 22 identified proteins, 7 protein spots were related to photosynthesis and energy metabolism; 4 were associated with environmental stress; 4 with disease defense; 2 with amino acid metabolism; 2 with cytoskeleton; 1 with antioxidant function; 1 with calcium metabolism; and 1 with unknown function. Moreover, related physiological index, such as chlorophyll content, Rubisco content and polyphone oxidase activity, were different between ‘Zaosu’ pear and its mutant. Conclusion A 2-D gel electrophoresis system of pear leaves and fruits was established, which was suitable for the analysis of proteome comparison. To the best of our knowledge, we have performed the first analysis of the proteomic changes in leaves

  6. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases. PMID:26694367

  7. Global proteomic analysis of two tick-borne emerging zoonotic agents: Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Mingqun ..; Kikuchi, Takane; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-02-17

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis are obligatory intracellular {alpha}-proteobacteria that infect human leukocytes and cause potentially fatal emerging zoonoses. In the present study, we determined global protein expression profiles of these bacteria cultured in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Mass spectrometric (MS) analyses identified a total of 1,212 A. phagocytophilum and 1,021 E. chaffeensis proteins, representing 89.3 and 92.3% of the predicted bacterial proteomes, respectively. Nearly all bacterial proteins ({approx}99%) with known functions were expressed, whereas only approximately 80% of hypothetical proteins were detected in infected human cells. Quantitative MS/MS analyses indicated that highly expressed proteins in both bacteria included chaperones, enzymes involved in biosynthesis and metabolism, and outer membrane proteins, such as A. phagocytophilum P44 and E. chaffeensis P28/OMP-1. Among 113 A. phagocytophilum p44 paralogous genes, 110 of them were expressed and 88 of them were encoded by pseudogenes. In addition, bacterial infection of HL-60 cells up-regulated the expression of human proteins involved mostly in cytoskeleton components, vesicular trafficking, cell signaling, and energy metabolism, but down regulated some pattern recognition receptors involved in innate immunity. Our proteomics data represent a comprehensive analysis of A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis proteomes, and provide a quantitative view of human host protein expression profiles regulated by bacterial infection. The availability of these proteomic data will provide new insights into biology and pathogenesis of these obligatory intracellular pathogens.

  8. Proteome Analysis of Cytoplasmatic and Plastidic β-Carotene Lipid Droplets in Dunaliella bardawil1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidi, Lital; Levin, Yishai; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The halotolerant green alga Dunaliella bardawil is unique in that it accumulates under stress two types of lipid droplets: cytoplasmatic lipid droplets (CLD) and β-carotene-rich (βC) plastoglobuli. Recently, we isolated and analyzed the lipid and pigment compositions of these lipid droplets. Here, we describe their proteome analysis. A contamination filter and an enrichment filter were utilized to define core proteins. A proteome database of Dunaliella salina/D. bardawil was constructed to aid the identification of lipid droplet proteins. A total of 124 and 42 core proteins were identified in βC-plastoglobuli and CLD, respectively, with only eight common proteins. Dunaliella spp. CLD resemble cytoplasmic droplets from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and contain major lipid droplet-associated protein and enzymes involved in lipid and sterol metabolism. The βC-plastoglobuli proteome resembles the C. reinhardtii eyespot and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastoglobule proteomes and contains carotene-globule-associated protein, plastid-lipid-associated protein-fibrillins, SOUL heme-binding proteins, phytyl ester synthases, β-carotene biosynthesis enzymes, and proteins involved in membrane remodeling/lipid droplet biogenesis: VESICLE-INDUCING PLASTID PROTEIN1, synaptotagmin, and the eyespot assembly proteins EYE3 and SOUL3. Based on these and previous results, we propose models for the biogenesis of βC-plastoglobuli and the biosynthesis of β-carotene within βC-plastoglobuli and hypothesize that βC-plastoglobuli evolved from eyespot lipid droplets. PMID:25404729

  9. Proteomics analysis of human tears from aqueous-deficient and evaporative dry eye patients

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Natarajan; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high global prevalence of dry eye syndrome (DES), the fundamental processes underlying this pathology remain largely unexplored. Therefore, this study endeavoured to investigate in-depth the tear proteome of DES patients employing the mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic strategies. Eighty patients were recruited and subdivided into three major DES subgroups, which are the aqueous-deficient (DRYaq), evaporative (DRYlip) and a combination of the two (DRYaqlip), as well as healthy subjects (CTRL). Discovery proteomics strategy was employed to identify large number of significantly differentially expressed tear proteins in DRYlip vs. CTRL, DRYaq vs. CTRL and DRYaqlip vs. CTRL with 22, 58 and 67 proteins, respectively. Biological functional analysis demonstrated for the first time that various metabolic processes were highly expressed in DRYaq and DRYaqlip, which might modulate various other known processes, especially the inflammatory and immune processes. Targeted proteomics strategy verified that 13 major proteins were differentially expressed in specific DES subgroups, comprising of PRR4, ZG16B, SCGB2A1, DMBT1, PROL1, LACRT, ALDH3A1, ENO1, TF, S100A8, S100A9, PEBP1 and ORM1. In conclusion, this study had explored in-depth the pathology of DES by unravelling various new fundamental processes and the major proteins responsible for the maintenance of tear film stability. PMID:27436115

  10. Proteome stability analysis of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colon mucosal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona; Gaihede, Michael; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2016-03-01

    Large repositories of well characterized RNAlater preserved samples and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples have been generated worldwide. However, the impact on the proteome of the preservation methods remain poorly described. Therefore, we analyzed the impact on the proteome of preserving samples in RNAlater, and by formalin-fixation, paraffin-embedding on human soft tissue, using directly frozen samples as a control ("Comparing the proteome of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue samples" [1]). We here report the data from the analysis. The comparative analysis was performed on 24 colon mucosa biopsies, extracted from the sigmoideum of two gastroenterologically healthy participants for the purpose of this study. A set of biopsies were additionally stored for 30 min at room temperature prior to formalin-fixation. The samples were analyzed by high throughput gel free quantitative proteomics. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002029. PMID:26937473

  11. Proteome stability analysis of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colon mucosal biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Kastaniegaard, Kenneth; Padurariu, Simona; Gaihede, Michael; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Large repositories of well characterized RNAlater preserved samples and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples have been generated worldwide. However, the impact on the proteome of the preservation methods remain poorly described. Therefore, we analyzed the impact on the proteome of preserving samples in RNAlater, and by formalin-fixation, paraffin-embedding on human soft tissue, using directly frozen samples as a control (“Comparing the proteome of snap frozen, RNAlater preserved, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue samples” [1]). We here report the data from the analysis. The comparative analysis was performed on 24 colon mucosa biopsies, extracted from the sigmoideum of two gastroenterologically healthy participants for the purpose of this study. A set of biopsies were additionally stored for 30 min at room temperature prior to formalin-fixation. The samples were analyzed by high throughput gel free quantitative proteomics. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002029. PMID:26937473

  12. Proteomic analysis of human aqueous humor using multidimensional protein identification technology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Matthew R.; Price, Marianne O.; Price, Francis W.; Pardo, Jennifer C.; Grandin, Juan C.; You, Jinsam; Wang, Mu

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous humor (AH) supports avascular tissues in the anterior segment of the eye, maintains intraocular pressure, and potentially influences the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Nevertheless, the AH proteome is still poorly defined despite several previous efforts, which were hindered by interfering high abundance proteins, inadequate animal models, and limited proteomic technologies. To facilitate future investigations into AH function, the AH proteome was extensively characterized using an advanced proteomic approach. Samples from patients undergoing cataract surgery were pooled and depleted of interfering abundant proteins and thereby divided into two fractions: albumin-bound and albumin-depleted. Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was utilized for each fraction; this incorporates strong cation exchange chromatography to reduce sample complexity before reversed-phase liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Twelve proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-bound fraction and 50 proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-depleted fraction. Gene ontological analyses were performed to determine which cellular components and functions were enriched. Many proteins were previously identified in the AH and for several their potential role in the AH has been investigated; however, the majority of identified proteins were novel and only speculative roles can be suggested. The AH was abundant in anti-oxidant and immunoregulatory proteins as well as anti-angiogenic proteins, which may be involved in maintaining the avascular tissues. This is the first known report to extensively characterize and describe the human AH proteome and lays the foundation for future work regarding its function in homeostatic and pathologic states. PMID:20019884

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Lyme Disease: Global Protein Comparison of Three Strains of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Yang, Xiaohua; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dunn, John J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-04-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. It has been studied extensively to help understand its pathogenicity of infection and how it can persist in different mammalian hosts. We report the proteomic analysis of the archetype B. burgdorferi B31 strain and two other strains (ND40, and JD-1) having different Borrelia pathotypes using strong cation exchange fractionation of proteolytic peptides followed by high-resolution, reversed phase capillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Protein identification was facilitated by the availability of the complete B31 genome sequence. A total of 665 Borrelia proteins were identified representing ~38 % coverage of the theoretical B31 proteome. A significant overlap was observed between the identified proteins in direct comparisons between any two strains (>72%), but distinct differences were observed among identified hypothetical and outer membrane proteins of the three strains. Such a concurrent proteomic overview of three Borrelia strains based upon only the B31 genome sequence is shown to provide significant insights into the presence or absence of specific proteins and a broad overall comparison among strains.

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Arabidopsis Nucleolus Suggests Novel Nucleolar FunctionsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Pendle, Alison F.; Clark, Gillian P.; Boon, Reinier; Lewandowska, Dominika; Lam, Yun Wah; Andersen, Jens; Mann, Matthias; Lamond, Angus I.; Brown, John W. S.; Shaw, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic nucleolus is involved in ribosome biogenesis and a wide range of other RNA metabolism and cellular functions. An important step in the functional analysis of the nucleolus is to determine the complement of proteins of this nuclear compartment. Here, we describe the first proteomic analysis of plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) nucleoli, in which we have identified 217 proteins. This allows a direct comparison of the proteomes of an important nuclear structure between two widely divergent species: human and Arabidopsis. The comparison identified many common proteins, plant-specific proteins, proteins of unknown function found in both proteomes, and proteins that were nucleolar in plants but nonnucleolar in human. Seventy-two proteins were expressed as GFP fusions and 87% showed nucleolar or nucleolar-associated localization. In a striking and unexpected finding, we have identified six components of the postsplicing exon-junction complex (EJC) involved in mRNA export and nonsense-mediated decay (NMD)/mRNA surveillance. This association was confirmed by GFP-fusion protein localization. These results raise the possibility that in plants, nucleoli may have additional functions in mRNA export or surveillance. PMID:15496452

  15. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach to identify potential biomarkers from the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma secretome

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Harsha, HC; Renuse, Santosh; Pawar, Harsh; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Kim, Min-Sik; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya Keshava; Mahmood, Riaz; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Meltzer, Stephen J; Kumar, Rekha V; Rustgi, Anil K

    2010-01-01

    The identification of secreted proteins that are differentially expressed between non-neoplastic and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells can provide potential biomarkers of ESCC. We used a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach to compare the secretome of ESCC cells with that of non-neoplastic esophageal squamous epithelial cells. Proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) of in-gel trypsindigested peptides was carried out on a high-accuracy qTOF mass spectrometer. In total, we identified 441 proteins in the combined secretomes, including 120 proteins with ≥ 2-fold upregulation in the ESCC secretome vs. that of non-neoplastic esophageal squamous epithelial cells. In this study, several potential protein biomarkers previously known to be increased in ESCC including matrix metalloproteinase 1, transferrin receptor and transforming growth factor beta-induced 68 kDa were identified as overexpressed in the ESCC-derived secretome. In addition, we identified several novel proteins that have not been previously reported to be associated with ESCC. Among the novel candidate proteins identified, protein disulfide isomerase family a member 3 (PDIA3), GDP dissociation inhibitor 2 (GDI2) and lectin galactoside binding soluble 3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) were further validated by immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemical labeling using tissue microarrays. This tissue microarray analysis showed overexpression of protein disulfide isomerase family a member 3, GDP dissociation inhibitor 2 and lectin galactoside binding soluble 3 binding protein in 93, 93 and 87% of 137 ESCC cases, respectively. Hence, we conclude that these potential biomarkers are excellent candidates for further evaluation to test their role and efficacy in the early detection of ESCC. PMID:20686364

  16. Proteomics analysis of Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex stage.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Christian; García, María Pía; Stoore, Caroll; Ramírez, Juan Pablo; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Hellman, Ulf; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Galanti, Norbel; Landerer, Eduardo; Paredes, Rodolfo

    2016-03-15

    Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex proteins were separated using two-dimensional electrophoresis and then identified using mass spectrometry; we identified 61 proteins, 28 which are newly described of which 4 could be involved in hydatid cyst fertility molecular mechanisms. PMID:26872926

  17. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miho; Takahashi, Sachiko; Kondo, Takanori; Dohra, Hideo; Ito, Yumihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Marina; Kamiya, Shiori; Kato, Masaya; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Motohashi, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of 'Micro-Tom' fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared 'Micro-Tom' results with those from two other varieties, 'Black' and 'White Beauty'. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of 'Micro-Tom', and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared 'Micro-Tom' fruits with 'Black' and 'White Beauty' using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein) and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1) in the 'Black' and 'White Beauty' varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin) in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between 'Micro-Tom' and 'Black'/'White Beauty'. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast. PMID:26371478

  18. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takanori; Dohra, Hideo; Ito, Yumihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Marina; Kamiya, Shiori; Kato, Masaya; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Motohashi, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of ‘Micro-Tom’ fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared ‘Micro-Tom’ results with those from two other varieties, ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of ‘Micro-Tom’, and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared ‘Micro-Tom’ fruits with ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein) and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1) in the ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin) in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between ‘Micro-Tom’ and ‘Black’/‘White Beauty’. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast. PMID:26371478

  19. Integrated Proteomics Identified Up-Regulated Focal Adhesion-Mediated Proteins in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Daniela C.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Aragão, Annelize Z.; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Flores, Isadora L.; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Silva, Alan R. S.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules. PMID:24858105

  20. Proteomic analysis of renal calculi indicates an important role for inflammatory processes in calcium stone formation.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael L; Cummins, Timothy D; Wilkey, Daniel W; Salyer, Sarah A; Powell, David W; Klein, Jon B; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2008-10-01

    Even though renal stones/calculi occur in approximately 10% of individuals, they are an enormous economic burden to the entire US health system. While the relative metabolic composition of renal calculi is generally known, there is no clear understanding of the genetics of renal stone formation, nor are there clear prognostic indicators of renal stone formation. The application of proteomics to the analysis of renal calculi axiomatically holds that insight into renal stone pathobiology can be gained by a more comprehensive understanding of renal calculus protein composition. We analyzed isolated renal stone matrix proteins with mass spectrometric and immunohistochemical methods identifying 158 proteins with high confidence, including 28 common proteins. The abundant proteins included those identified previously in stones and proteins identified here for the first time, such as myeloid lineage-specific, integral membrane and lipid regulatory proteins. Pathway analyses of all proteins identified suggested that a significant fraction of the most abundant matrix proteins participate in inflammatory processes. These proteomic results support the hypothesis that stone formation induces a cellular inflammatory response and the protein components of this response contribute to the abundant stone matrix proteome. PMID:18701630

  1. Breast Cancer Proteomics – Differences in Protein Expression between Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Tumors Identified by Tandem Mass Tag Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Karn, Thomas; Hanker, Lars; Schwarz, Josef; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Kuhn, Karsten; Böhm, Gitte; Selzer, Stefan; Erhard, Neukum; Engels, Knut; Holtrich, Uwe; Kaufmann, Manfred; Rody, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteomic analysis has become an effective tool in breast cancer research. In this study, we applied the new gel-free tandem mass tag (TMT) reference method for the first time in breast cancer. Materials and Methods Proteomic analysis was used to compare 10 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and 10 ER-negative samples. The results of the proteomic approach were validated by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis. Results 17 proteins with significant differences in expression were identified. 13 proteins were overexpressed in ER-negative tumors and 4 were overexpressed in ER-positive samples. All these proteins were characterized by relatively high cellular abundance. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the gel-free TMT approach allows the quantification of differences in protein expression levels. Further improvement of the sensitivity by subfractionation of the tissue should allow also the identification of low-abundance proteins and might lead to the use of this method in breast cancer research. PMID:22619634

  2. Proteomic Analysis of MG132-Treated Germinating Pollen Reveals Expression Signatures Associated with Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Crinelli, Rita; Marconi, Valerio; Campomenosi, Paola; Marsoni, Milena; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition. PMID:25265451

  3. Different sample preparation and detection methods for normal and lung cancer urinary proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Sinchaikul, Supachok; Tantipaiboonwong, Payungsak; Sriyam, Supawadee; Tzao, Ching; Phutrakul, Suree; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2010-01-01

    The urinary proteome is known to be a valuable field of study related to human physiological functions because many components in urine provide an alternative to blood plasma as a potential source of disease biomarkers useful in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic application. Due to the variability and complexity of urine, sample preparation is very important for decreasing the dynamic range of components and isolating specific urinary proteins prior to analysis. We discuss many useful sample preparation methods in this chapter, including those of lung cancer urine samples. In addition, protein detection methods are also crucial in visualizing protein profiles and for quantification of protein content in urine samples from both normal donor and lung cancer patients. This chapter also provides alternative choices of urine sample preparation and detection methods for selective use in urinary proteome analysis and for identifying urinary protein markers in lung cancer and other diseases. PMID:20407942

  4. Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Abaitua, Fernando; Krause, Eberhard; Tate, Edward W.; O’Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions. PMID:26256475

  5. Proteomic analysis of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa: dealing with the issues of a non-conventional yeast.

    PubMed

    Addis, Maria Filippa; Tanca, Alessandro; Landolfo, Sara; Abbondio, Marcello; Cutzu, Raffaela; Biosa, Grazia; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Uzzau, Sergio; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2016-08-01

    Red yeasts ascribed to the species Rhodotorula mucilaginosa are gaining increasing attention, due to their numerous biotechnological applications, spanning carotenoid production, liquid bioremediation, heavy metal biotransformation and antifungal and plant growth-promoting actions, but also for their role as opportunistic pathogens. Nevertheless, their characterization at the 'omic' level is still scarce. Here, we applied different proteomic workflows to R. mucilaginosa with the aim of assessing their potential in generating information on proteins and functions of biotechnological interest, with a particular focus on the carotenogenic pathway. After optimization of protein extraction, we tested several gel-based (including 2D-DIGE) and gel-free sample preparation techniques, followed by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Contextually, we evaluated different bioinformatic strategies for protein identification and interpretation of the biological significance of the dataset. When 2D-DIGE analysis was applied, not all spots returned a unambiguous identification and no carotenogenic enzymes were identified, even upon the application of different database search strategies. Then, the application of shotgun proteomic workflows with varying levels of sensitivity provided a picture of the information depth that can be reached with different analytical resources, and resulted in a plethora of information on R. mucilaginosa metabolism. However, also in these cases no proteins related to the carotenogenic pathway were identified, thus indicating that further improvements in sequence databases and functional annotations are strictly needed for increasing the outcome of proteomic analysis of this and other non-conventional yeasts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26987668

  6. A DIGE proteomic analysis for high-intensity exercise-trained rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Wataru; Fujimoto, Eri; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Tabata, Izumi

    2010-09-01

    Exercise training induces various adaptations in skeletal muscles. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we conducted 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis, which has not yet been used for elucidating adaptations of skeletal muscle after high-intensity exercise training (HIT). For 5 days, rats performed HIT, which consisted of 14 20-s swimming exercise bouts carrying a weight (14% of the body weight), and 10-s pause between bouts. The 2D-DIGE analysis was conducted on epitrochlearis muscles excised 18 h after the final training exercise. Proteomic profiling revealed that out of 800 detected and matched spots, 13 proteins exhibited changed expression by HIT compared with sedentary rats. All proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. Furthermore, using western immunoblot analyses, significantly changed expressions of NDUFS1 and parvalbumin (PV) were validated in relation to HIT. In conclusion, the proteomic 2D-DIGE analysis following HIT-identified expressions of NDUFS1 and PV, previously unknown to have functions related to exercise-training adaptations. PMID:20634418

  7. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K.; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G.; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K.; S. B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K.; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G.; Gandhi, Mayuri N.; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity. PMID:27090372

  8. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; S B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G; Gandhi, Mayuri N; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-01-01

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity. PMID:27090372

  9. Proteome analysis of Pueraria mirifica tubers collected in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Jungsukcharoen, Jutarmas; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2016-06-01

    Pueraria mirifica-derived tuberous powder has been long-term consumed in Thailand as female hormone-replacement traditional remedies. The protein profiles of tubers collected in different seasons were evaluated. Phenol extraction, 2D-PAGE, and mass spectrometry were employed for tuberous proteome analysis. Out of the 322 proteins detected, over 59% were functionally classified as being involved in metabolism. The rest proteins were involved in defense, protein synthesis, cell structure, transportation, stress, storage, and also unidentified function. The proteins were found to be differentially expressed with respect to harvest season. Importantly, chalcone isomerase, isoflavone synthase, cytochrome p450, UDP-glycosyltransferase, and isoflavone reductase, which are all involved in the biosynthesis pathway of bioactive isoflavonoids, were most abundantly expressed in the summer-collected tubers. This is the first report on the proteomic patterns in P. mirifica tubers in relevant with seasonal variation. The study enlights the understanding of variance isoflavonoid production in P. mirifica tubers. PMID:26940377

  10. Nanopatterned structures for biomolecular analysis toward genomic and proteomic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Fu; Gu, Jian; Wei, Qihuo; Liu, Yingjie; Gupta, Ravi; Nishio, Takeyoshi; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    We report our fabrication of nanoscale devices using electron beam and nanoimprint lithography (NIL). We focus our study in the emerging fields of NIL, nanophotonics and nanobiotechnology and give a few examples as to how these nanodevices may be applied toward genomic and proteomic applications for molecular analysis. The examples include reverse NIL-fabricated nanofluidic channels for DNA stretching, nanoscale molecular traps constructed from dielectric constrictions for DNA or protein focusing by dielectrophoresis, multi-layer nanoburger and nanoburger multiplets for optimized surface-plasma enhanced Raman scattering for protein detection, and biomolecular motor-based nanosystems. The development of advanced nanopatterning techniques promises reliable and high-throughput manufacturing of nanodevices which could impact significantly on the areas of genomics, proteomics, drug discovery and molecular clinical diagnostics.

  11. A proteomic analysis of the Pichia pastoris secretome in methanol-induced cultures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Jr; Damasceno, Leonardo M; Anderson, Kyle A; Zhang, Sheng; Old, Lloyd J; Batt, Carl A

    2011-04-01

    The secreted proteome of Pichia pastoris X-33 was investigated in methanol-induced cultures with a goal to enhance the secretion and purification of recombinant proteins. In a fed-batch fermentation at 30 °C, more host proteins were found in greater concentrations compared to cultures grown at 25 °C. Protein samples collected directly from the culture media at 25 °C, as well as separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel, were subjected to ESI-MS/MS analysis. A total of 75 proteins were identified in the media from different conditions including pre- and post-methanol induction and in a strain overexpressing a recombinant schistosomiasis vaccine, Sm14-C62V. The identified proteins include native secreted proteins and some intracellular proteins, most of which have low isoelectric points (pI < 6). 2D gel analyses further revealed important characteristics, such as abundance, degradation, and glycosylation of these identified proteins in this proteome. Cell wall-associated proteins involved in cell wall biogenesis, structure, and modification comprised the majority of the secreted proteins which have been identified. Intracellular proteins such as alcohol oxidase and superoxide dismutase were also found in the proteome, suggesting some degree of cell lysis. However, both protocols show that their concentrations are significantly lower than the native secreted proteins. This study identifies proteins secreted or released into the culture media in the methanol-induced fermentation cultures of P. pastoris X-33 and suggests potential biotechnology applications based on the discovery of this proteome. PMID:21305280

  12. Network-based proteomic analysis for postmenopausal osteoporosis in Caucasian females.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zeng, Yong; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhu, Jia-Qiang; He, Hao; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Deng, Fei-Yan; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is one of the crucial physiological events during the life of a woman. Transition of menopause status is accompanied by increased risks of various health problems such as osteoporosis. Peripheral blood monocytes can differentiate into osteoclasts and produce cytokines important for osteoclast activity. With quantitative proteomics LC-nano-ESI-MS(E) (where MS(E) is elevated-energy MS), we performed protein expression profiling of peripheral blood monocytes in 42 postmenopausal women with discordant bone mineral density (BMD) levels. Traditional comparative analysis showed proteins encoded by four genes (LOC654188, PPIA, TAGLN2, YWHAB) and three genes (LMNB1, ANXA2P2, ANXA2) were significantly down- and upregulated, respectively, in extremely low- versus high-BMD subjects. To study functionally orchestrating groups of detected proteins in the form of networks, we performed weighted gene coexpression network analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis showed that the module including the annexin gene family was most significantly correlated with low BMD, and the lipid-binding related GO terms were enriched in this identified module. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that two significantly enriched gene sets may be involved in postmenopausal BMD variation by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines activities. To gain more insights into the proteomics data generated, we performed integrative analyses of the datasets available to us at the genome (DNA level), transcriptome (RNA level), and proteome levels jointly. PMID:26435169

  13. Proteomic analysis of human osteoprogenitor response to disordered nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Kantawong, Fahsai; Burchmore, Richard; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microgroove-initiated contact guidance can induce bone formation in osteoprogenitor cells (OPGs) and produce changes in the cell proteome. For proteomic analysis, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) can be used as a powerful diagnostic method to provide comparable data between the proteomic profiles of cells cultured in different conditions. This study focuses on the response of OPGs to a novel nanoscale pit topography with osteoinductive properties compared with planar controls. Disordered near-square nanopits with 120 nm diameter and 100 nm depth with an average 300 nm centre-to-centre spacing (300 nm spaced pits in square pattern, but with ±50 nm disorder) were fabricated on 1×1 cm2 polycaprolactone sheets. Human OPGs were seeded onto the test materials. DIGE analysis revealed changes in the expression of a number of distinct proteins, including upregulation of actin isoforms, beta-galectin1, vimentin and procollagen-proline, 2-oxoglutarate 4-dioxygenase and prolyl 4-hydroxylase. Downregulation of enolase, caldesmon, zyxin, GRASP55, Hsp70 (BiP/GRP78), RNH1, cathepsin D and Hsp27 was also observed. The differences in cell morphology and mineralization are also reported using histochemical techniques. PMID:19068473

  14. Autoantibody Profiling of Glioma Serum Samples to Identify Biomarkers Using Human Proteome Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Parvez; Gupta, Shabarni; Choudhary, Saket; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Atak, Apurva; Richharia, Annie; KP, Manubhai; Zhu, Heng; Epari, Sridhar; Noronha, Santosh B.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneity and poor prognosis associated with gliomas, makes biomarker identification imperative. Here, we report autoantibody signatures across various grades of glioma serum samples and sub-categories of glioblastoma multiforme using Human Proteome chips containing ~17000 full-length human proteins. The deduced sets of classifier proteins helped to distinguish Grade II, III and IV samples from the healthy subjects with 88, 89 and 94% sensitivity and 87, 100 and 73% specificity, respectively. Proteins namely, SNX1, EYA1, PQBP1 and IGHG1 showed dysregulation across various grades. Sub-classes of GBM, based on its proximity to the sub-ventricular zone, have been reported to have different prognostic outcomes. To this end, we identified dysregulation of NEDD9, a protein involved in cell migration, with probable prognostic potential. Another subcategory of patients where the IDH1 gene is mutated, are known to have better prognosis as compared to patients carrying the wild type gene. On a comparison of these two cohorts, we found STUB1 and YWHAH proteins dysregulated in Grade II glioma patients. In addition to common pathways associated with tumourigenesis, we found enrichment of immunoregulatory and cytoskeletal remodelling pathways, emphasizing the need to explore biochemical alterations arising due to autoimmune responses in glioma. PMID:26370624

  15. Metabolomics-assisted proteomics identifies succinylation and SIRT5 as important regulators of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Liu, Xiaojing; Ryu, Dongryeol; Nelson, Ornella D; Stupinski, John A; Li, Zhi; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Weiss, Robert S; Locasale, Jason W; Auwerx, Johan; Lin, Hening

    2016-04-19

    Cellular metabolites, such as acyl-CoA, can modify proteins, leading to protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs). One such PTM is lysine succinylation, which is regulated by sirtuin 5 (SIRT5). Although numerous proteins are modified by lysine succinylation, the physiological significance of lysine succinylation and SIRT5 remains elusive. Here, by profiling acyl-CoA molecules in various mouse tissues, we have discovered that different tissues have different acyl-CoA profiles and that succinyl-CoA is the most abundant acyl-CoA molecule in the heart. This interesting observation has prompted us to examine protein lysine succinylation in different mouse tissues in the presence and absence of SIRT5. Protein lysine succinylation predominantly accumulates in the heart whenSirt5is deleted. Using proteomic studies, we have identified many cardiac proteins regulated by SIRT5. Our data suggest that ECHA, a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is a major enzyme that is regulated by SIRT5 and affects heart function.Sirt5knockout (KO) mice have lower ECHA activity, increased long-chain acyl-CoAs, and decreased ATP in the heart under fasting conditions.Sirt5KO mice develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as evident from the increased heart weight relative to body weight, as well as reduced shortening and ejection fractions. These findings establish that regulating heart metabolism and function is a major physiological function of lysine succinylation and SIRT5. PMID:27051063

  16. Modular composition and dynamics of native GABAB receptors identified by high-resolution proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Jochen; Pérez-Garci, Enrique; Schneider, Andy; Kollewe, Astrid; Gauthier-Kemper, Anne; Fritzius, Thorsten; Raveh, Adi; Dinamarca, Margarita C; Hanuschkin, Alexander; Bildl, Wolfgang; Klingauf, Jürgen; Gassmann, Martin; Schulte, Uwe; Bettler, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    GABAB receptors, the most abundant inhibitory G protein-coupled receptors in the mammalian brain, display pronounced diversity in functional properties, cellular signaling and subcellular distribution. We used high-resolution functional proteomics to identify the building blocks of these receptors in the rodent brain. Our analyses revealed that native GABAB receptors are macromolecular complexes with defined architecture, but marked diversity in subunit composition: the receptor core is assembled from GABAB1a/b, GABAB2, four KCTD proteins and a distinct set of G-protein subunits, whereas the receptor's periphery is mostly formed by transmembrane proteins of different classes. In particular, the periphery-forming constituents include signaling effectors, such as Cav2 and HCN channels, and the proteins AJAP1 and amyloid-β A4, both of which tightly associate with the sushi domains of GABAB1a. Our results unravel the molecular diversity of GABAB receptors and their postnatal assembly dynamics and provide a roadmap for studying the cellular signaling of this inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor. PMID:26691831

  17. Quantitative proteome analyses identify PrfA-responsive proteins and phosphoproteins in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sandeep Kumar; Moussan Désirée Aké, Francine; Wu, Zongfu; Milohanic, Eliane; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Cossart, Pascale; Deutscher, Josef; Monnet, Véronique; Archambaud, Cristel; Henry, Céline

    2014-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism of signal transduction in bacteria. Here, we analyzed the proteome and phosphoproteome of a wild-type strain of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes that was grown in either chemically defined medium or rich medium containing glucose. We then compared these results with those obtained from an isogenic prfA* mutant that produced a constitutively active form of PrfA, the main transcriptional activator of virulence genes. In the prfA* mutant grown in rich medium, we identified 256 peptides that were phosphorylated on serine (S), threonine (T), or tyrosine (Y) residues, with a S/T/Y ratio of 155:75:12. Strikingly, we detected five novel phosphosites on the virulence protein ActA. This protein was known to be phosphorylated by a cellular kinase in the infected host, but phosphorylation by a listerial kinase had not previously been reported. Unexpectedly, SILAC experiments with the prfA* mutant grown in chemically defined medium revealed that, in addition to previously described PrfA-regulated proteins, several other proteins were significantly overproduced, among them were several proteins involved in purine biosynthesis. This work provides new information for our understanding of the correlation among protein phosphorylation, virulence mechanisms, and carbon metabolism. PMID:25383790

  18. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; Walsworth, Vicki L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.; Chromy, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  19. Proteomic analysis of the anti-inflammatory action of minocycline

    PubMed Central

    Dunston, Christopher R; Griffiths, Helen R; Lambert, Peter A; Staddon, Susan; Vernallis, Ann B

    2011-01-01

    Minocycline possesses anti-inflammatory properties independently of its antibiotic activity although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines and pro-inflammatory protein expression are reduced by minocycline in cultured macrophages. Here, we tested a range of clinically important tetracycline compounds (oxytetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline and tigecycline) and showed that they all inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production. We made the novel finding that tigecycline inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production to a greater extent than the other tetracycline compounds tested. To identify potential targets for minocycline, we assessed alterations in the macrophage proteome induced by LPS in the presence or absence of a minocycline pre-treatment using 2-DE and nanoLC-MS. We found a number of proteins, mainly involved in cellular metabolism (ATP synthase β-subunit and aldose reductase) or stress response (heat shock proteins), which were altered in expression in response to LPS, some of which were restored, at least in part, by minocycline. This is the first study to document proteomic changes induced by minocycline. The observation that minocycline inhibits some, but not all, of the LPS-induced proteomic changes shows that minocycline specifically affects some signalling pathways and does not completely inhibit macrophage activation. PMID:21182193

  20. Whole Proteome Analysis of Mouse Lymph Nodes in Cutaneous Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weidong; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance; Popov, Serguei G.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize a soluble proteome of popliteal lymph nodes during lymphadenitis induced by intradermal injection of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores in mice using tandem LC-MS/MS and reverse-phase protein microarray with antibodies specific to epitopes of phosphorylated proteins. More than 380 proteins were detected in the normal intra-nodal lymph, while the infectious process resulted in the profound changes in the protein abundances and appearance of 297 unique proteins. These proteins belong to an array of processes reflecting response to wounding, inflammation and perturbations of hemostasis, innate immune response, coagulation and fibrinolysis, regulation of body fluid levels and vascular disturbance among others. Comparison of lymph and serum revealed 83 common proteins. Also, using 71 antibodies specific to total and phosphorylated forms of proteins we carried initial characterization of circulating lymph phosphoproteome which brought additional information regarding signaling pathways operating in the lymphatics. The results demonstrate that the proteome of intra-nodal lymph serves as a sensitive sentinel of the processes occurring within the lymph nodes during infection. The acute innate response of the lymph nodes to anthrax is accompanied by cellular damage and inflammation with a large number of up- and down-regulated proteins many of which are distinct from those detected in serum. MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001342. PMID:25329596

  1. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  2. Statistical analysis of variation in the human plasma proteome.

    PubMed

    Corzett, Todd H; Fodor, Imola K; Choi, Megan W; Walsworth, Vicki L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L; Chromy, Brett A

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where one human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery. PMID:20130815

  3. Advancing Clinical Proteomics via Analysis Based on Biological Complexes: A Tale of Five Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Wong, Limsoon

    2016-09-01

    Despite advances in proteomic technologies, idiosyncratic data issues, for example, incomplete coverage and inconsistency, resulting in large data holes, persist. Moreover, because of naïve reliance on statistical testing and its accompanying p values, differential protein signatures identified from such proteomics data have little diagnostic power. Thus, deploying conventional analytics on proteomics data is insufficient for identifying novel drug targets or precise yet sensitive biomarkers. Complex-based analysis is a new analytical approach that has potential to resolve these issues but requires formalization. We categorize complex-based analysis into five method classes or paradigms and propose an even-handed yet comprehensive evaluation rubric based on both simulated and real data. The first four paradigms are well represented in the literature. The fifth and newest paradigm, the network-paired (NP) paradigm, represented by a method called Extremely Small SubNET (ESSNET), dominates in precision-recall and reproducibility, maintains strong performance in small sample sizes, and sensitively detects low-abundance complexes. In contrast, the commonly used over-representation analysis (ORA) and direct-group (DG) test paradigms maintain good overall precision but have severe reproducibility issues. The other two paradigms considered here are the hit-rate and rank-based network analysis paradigms; both of these have good precision-recall and reproducibility, but they do not consider low-abundance complexes. Therefore, given its strong performance, NP/ESSNET may prove to be a useful approach for improving the analytical resolution of proteomics data. Additionally, given its stability, it may also be a powerful new approach toward functional enrichment tests, much like its ORA and DG counterparts. PMID:27454466

  4. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  5. Comparative proteomic analyses of two reovirus T3D subtypes and comparison to T1L identifies multiple novel proteins in key cellular pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Berard, Alicia R; Severini, Alberto; Coombs, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Viruses induce changes in the host to facilitate replication and evade the immune response. These changes are reflected by the host's proteome, including differences in protein abundance. Focusing on up and down regulated proteins after a virus infects the cell will lead to a characterization of the host response to infection, and may give insight into how viruses modulate proteins to evade host defense responses. We previously used SILAC to examine host proteomic changes in protein abundance in HEK293 cells infected with reovirus type 1, strain Lang (T1L). For the present study, we extended this analysis by determining cell protein alterations induced by two different reovirus subtypes, a less pathogenic type 3 Dearing (T3D(F)) isolate, and a more pathogenic isolate named T3D(C) that is presently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer oncolytic agent. This comparison of host proteome regulation showed that T3D(C) had a more marked effect on DNA replication proteins, recombination and repair, as well as immunological, apoptotic, and survival cell functions. We also identified several proteins not previously identified in any virus infection; branched chain amino-acid transaminase 2 (BCAT), paternally expressed 10 (PEG10), target of myb1 (TOM1), histone cluster 2 H4b (HIST2H4B) and tubulin beta 4B (TUBB4B). PMID:25900405

  6. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K; Schouten, Philip C; Rueda, Oscar M; Bosma, Astrid J; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J C; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O'Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J F; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A; Barbet, Aurélie S; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O'Connor, Darran P; Vis, Daniël J; Benes, Cyril H; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J; Simon, Iris M; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C; Gallagher, William M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  7. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M.; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K.; Schouten, Philip C.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Bosma, Astrid J.; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J.C.; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O’Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J.F.; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A.; Barbet, Aurélie S.; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O’Connor, Darran P.; Vis, Daniël J.; Benes, Cyril H.; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J.; Simon, Iris M.; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C.; Gallagher, William M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  8. Insights from the molecular characterization of mercury stress proteins identified by proteomics in E.coli nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Seshapani, Panthangi; Rayalu, Daddam Jayasimha; Kumar, Vadde Kiran; Sekhar, Kathera Chandra; Kumari, Jasti Pramoda

    2013-01-01

    Differently expressed proteins in probiotic Escherichia coli nissle 1917 under mercury stress identified by using a proteomic approach. We applied to separate proteins by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS using PMF, by mascot database search using the NCBI database. we identified six proteins after exposure to mercury stress with respect to different functional classes. It is useful to understand the molecular insights into mercury stress in probiotic E. coli. Next we describe a structure generated by homology modelling and functional domain identification; it is interesting to study the impact of stress on protein structures. MS characterization and computational methods together provide the opportunity to examine the impact of stress arising from mercury. The role of these proteins in metal tolerance and structure relation is discussed. To the best of our knowledge, proteomics of E. coli nissle 1917 overview of mercury stress has been reported for the first time. PMID:23847405

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Tardigrades: Towards a Better Understanding of Molecular Mechanisms by Anhydrobiotic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schokraie, Elham; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Warnken, Uwe; Mali, Brahim; Frohme, Marcus; Förster, Frank; Dandekar, Thomas; Hengherr, Steffen; Schill, Ralph O.; Schnölzer, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Background Tardigrades are small, multicellular invertebrates which are able to survive times of unfavourable environmental conditions using their well-known capability to undergo cryptobiosis at any stage of their life cycle. Milnesium tardigradum has become a powerful model system for the analysis of cryptobiosis. While some genetic information is already available for Milnesium tardigradum the proteome is still to be discovered. Principal Findings Here we present to the best of our knowledge the first comprehensive study of Milnesium tardigradum on the protein level. To establish a proteome reference map we developed optimized protocols for protein extraction from tardigrades in the active state and for separation of proteins by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Since only limited sequence information of M. tardigradum on the genome and gene expression level is available to date in public databases we initiated in parallel a tardigrade EST sequencing project to allow for protein identification by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. 271 out of 606 analyzed protein spots could be identified by searching against the publicly available NCBInr database as well as our newly established tardigrade protein database corresponding to 144 unique proteins. Another 150 spots could be identified in the tardigrade clustered EST database corresponding to 36 unique contigs and ESTs. Proteins with annotated function were further categorized in more detail by their molecular function, biological process and cellular component. For the proteins of unknown function more information could be obtained by performing a protein domain annotation analysis. Our results include proteins like protein member of different heat shock protein families and LEA group 3, which might play important roles in surviving extreme conditions. Conclusions The proteome reference map of Milnesium tardigradum provides the basis for further studies in order to identify and

  10. Comparative analysis of predicted plastid-targeted proteomes of sequenced higher plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Scott; Harper, Artemus; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Dhingra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Plastids are actively involved in numerous plant processes critical to growth, development and adaptation. They play a primary role in photosynthesis, pigment and monoterpene synthesis, gravity sensing, starch and fatty acid synthesis, as well as oil, and protein storage. We applied two complementary methods to analyze the recently published apple genome (Malus × domestica) to identify putative plastid-targeted proteins, the first using TargetP and the second using a custom workflow utilizing a set of predictive programs. Apple shares roughly 40% of its 10,492 putative plastid-targeted proteins with that of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastid-targeted proteome as identified by the Chloroplast 2010 project and ∼57% of its entire proteome with Arabidopsis. This suggests that the plastid-targeted proteomes between apple and Arabidopsis are different, and interestingly alludes to the presence of differential targeting of homologs between the two species. Co-expression analysis of 2,224 genes encoding putative plastid-targeted apple proteins suggests that they play a role in plant developmental and intermediary metabolism. Further, an inter-specific comparison of Arabidopsis, Prunus persica (Peach), Malus × domestica (Apple), Populus trichocarpa (Black cottonwood), Fragaria vesca (Woodland Strawberry), Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato) and Vitis vinifera (Grapevine) also identified a large number of novel species-specific plastid-targeted proteins. This analysis also revealed the presence of alternatively targeted homologs across species. Two separate analyses revealed that a small subset of proteins, one representing 289 protein clusters and the other 737 unique protein sequences, are conserved between seven plastid-targeted angiosperm proteomes. Majority of the novel proteins were annotated to play roles in stress response, transport, catabolic processes, and cellular component organization. Our results suggest that the current state of knowledge regarding

  11. Protein functional analysis data in support of comparative proteomics of the pathogenic black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis under different temperature conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Tafer, Hakim; Arcalis, Elsa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In the current study a comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the response of the human pathogen black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis toward temperature treatment. Protein functional analysis – based on cellular process GO terms – was performed on the 32 temperature-responsive identified proteins. The bioinformatics analyses and data presented here provided novel insights into the cellular pathways at the base of the fungus temperature tolerance. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in “Proteome of tolerance fine-tuning in the human pathogen black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis” by Tesei et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26958594

  12. Protein functional analysis data in support of comparative proteomics of the pathogenic black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis under different temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Tesei, Donatella; Marzban, Gorji; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Tafer, Hakim; Arcalis, Elsa; Sterflinger, Katja

    2015-12-01

    In the current study a comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the response of the human pathogen black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis toward temperature treatment. Protein functional analysis - based on cellular process GO terms - was performed on the 32 temperature-responsive identified proteins. The bioinformatics analyses and data presented here provided novel insights into the cellular pathways at the base of the fungus temperature tolerance. A detailed analysis and interpretation of the data can be found in "Proteome of tolerance fine-tuning in the human pathogen black yeast Exophiala dermatitidis" by Tesei et al. (2015) [1]. PMID:26958594

  13. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rüetschi, Ulla; Stenson, Martin; Hasselblom, Sverker; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Hansson, Ulrika; Fagman, Henrik; Andersson, Per-Ola

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS) quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i) early relapsed or refractory and (ii) long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy. PMID:26060582

  14. CSF Proteomics Identifies Specific and Shared Pathways for Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Avsar, Timucin; Durası, İlknur Melis; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Tütüncü, Melih; Demirci, Nuri Onat; Saip, Sabahattin; Sezerman, O. Uğur; Siva, Aksel; Tahir Turanlı, Eda

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated, neuro-inflammatory, demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with a heterogeneous clinical presentation and course. There is a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity in MS, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain unknown. We aimed to investigate further the etiopathogenesis related molecular pathways in subclinical types of MS using proteomic and bioinformatics approaches in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing remitting MS and progressive MS (n=179). Comparison of disease groups with controls revealed a total of 151 proteins that are differentially expressed in clinically different MS subtypes. KEGG analysis using PANOGA tool revealed the disease related pathways including aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption (p=8.02x10-5) which is important in the immune cell migration, renin-angiotensin (p=6.88x10-5) system that induces Th17 dependent immunity, notch signaling (p=1.83x10-10) pathway indicating the activated remyelination and vitamin digestion and absorption pathways (p=1.73x10-5). An emerging theme from our studies is that whilst all MS clinical forms share common biological pathways, there are also clinical subtypes specific and pathophysiology related pathways which may have further therapeutic implications. PMID:25942430

  15. Serum Proteome Profiling Identifies Novel and Powerful Markers of Cystic Fibrosis Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Marion; Menendez Menendez, Katrin; Zachoval, Reinhart; Naehrlich, Lutz; Schulz, Richard; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cystic Fibrosis associated liver disease (CFLD) develops in approximately 30% of CF patients. However, routine sensitive diagnostic tools for CFLD are lacking. Within this study, we aimed to identify new experimental biomarkers for the detection of CFLD. Methods 45 CF patients were included in the study and received transient elastography. Differential regulation of 220 different serum proteins was assessed in a subgroup of patients with and without CFLD. Most interesting candidate proteins were further quantified and validated by ELISA in the whole patient cohort. To assess a potential relation of biomarker expression to the degree of hepatic fibrosis, serum biomarkers were further determined in 18 HCV patients where liver histology was available. Results 43 serum proteins differed at least 2-fold in patients with CFLD compared to those without liver disease as identified in proteome profiling. In ELISA quantifications, TIMP-4 and Endoglin were significantly up-regulated in patients with CFLD as diagnosed by clinical guidelines or increased liver stiffness. Pentraxin-3 was significantly decreased in patients with CFLD. Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin showed highest values in HCV patients with liver cirrhosis compared to those with fibrosis but without cirrhosis. At a cut-off value of 6.3 kPa, transient elastography compassed a very high diagnostic accuracy and specificity for the detection of CFLD. Among the biomarkers, TIMP-4 and Endoglin exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for CFLD. Diagnostic sensitivities and negative predictive values were increased when elastography and TIMP-4 and Endoglin were combined for the detection of CFLD. Conclusions Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin are increased in CFLD and their expression correlates with hepatic staging. Determination of TIMP-4 and Endoglin together with transient elastography can increase the sensitivity for the non-invasive diagnosis of CFLD. PMID:23516586

  16. A regularized Hotelling’s T2 test for pathway analysis in proteomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin S.; Paul, Debashis; Prentice, Ross L.; Wang, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies have identified proteins related to specific phenotypes. In addition to marginal association analysis for individual proteins, analyzing pathways (functionally related sets of proteins) may yield additional valuable insights. Identifying pathways that differ between phenotypes can be conceptualized as a multivariate hypothesis testing problem: whether the mean vector μ of a p-dimensional random vector X is μ0. Proteins within the same biological pathway may correlate with one another in a complicated way, and type I error rates can be inflated if such correlations are incorrectly assumed to be absent. The inflation tends to be more pronounced when the sample size is very small or there is a large amount of missingness in the data, as is frequently the case in proteomic discovery studies. To tackle these challenges, we propose a regularized Hotelling’s T2 (RHT) statistic together with a non-parametric testing procedure, which effectively controls the type I error rate and maintains good power in the presence of complex correlation structures and missing data patterns. We investigate asymptotic properties of the RHT statistic under pertinent assumptions and compare the test performance with four existing methods through simulation examples. We apply the RHT test to a hormone therapy proteomics data set, and identify several interesting biological pathways for which blood serum concentrations changed following hormone therapy initiation. PMID:23997374

  17. Proteomic analysis for early neurodegenerative biomarker detection in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Vincenzetti, Silvia; Nasuti, Cinzia; Fedeli, Donatella; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Pucciarelli, Stefania; Gabbianelli, Rosita

    2016-02-01

    The exposure to xenobiotics in the early stages of life represents the most important component in the etiology of many neurodegenerative disorders. Proteomic analysis of plasma and brain samples from early life treated animal model was performed in order to identify early biomarkers of neurodegeneration. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified four proteins in the plasma of adolescent rats that deviated from the control group. Low expression levels of transthyretin and plasma transferrin, and the absence of long-chain fatty acid transport 1 were measured. On the other hand, the same proteomic approach was done on striatum of an adult rat model of neurodegeneration. Mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase and voltage-dependent anion channel were under expressed, while mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, myelin basic protein and ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 were absent in striatum of animal model compared to control group. Data show that early biomarkers for the diagnosis of neurodegeneration can be obtained by proteomic analysis, starting from adolescent age and the results highlight the time frame for the onset of neurodegeneration due to early exposure to xenobiotics. PMID:26631339

  18. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism. PMID:26700148

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Tumor Xenografts Treated with the Ectopic ATP Synthase Inhibitor Citreoviridin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Hu, Chia-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2013-01-01

    ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy. PMID:23990911

  20. Proteomic analysis of post translational modifications in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-16

    Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria and the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Recently, cyanobacteria have attracted great interest due to their crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles and their ability to produce clean and renewable biofuels. To survive in various environmental conditions, cyanobacteria have developed a complex signal transduction network to sense environmental signals and implement adaptive changes. The post-translational modifications (PTMs) systems play important regulatory roles in the signaling networks of cyanobacteria. The systematic investigation of PTMs could contribute to the comprehensive description of protein species and to elucidate potential biological roles of each protein species in cyanobacteria. Although the proteomic studies of PTMs carried out in cyanobacteria were limited, these data have provided clues to elucidate their sophisticated sensing mechanisms that contribute to their evolutionary and ecological success. This review aims to summarize the current status of PTM studies and recent publications regarding PTM proteomics in cyanobacteria, and discuss the novel developments and applications for the analysis of PTMs in cyanobacteria. Challenges, opportunities and future perspectives in the proteomics studies of PTMs in cyanobacteria are also discussed. PMID:26254007

  1. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  2. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  3. Proteome analysis of roots of wheat seedlings under aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong Won; Roy, Swapan Kumar; Kamal, Abu Hena Mostofa; Cho, Kun; Cho, Seong-Woo; Park, Chul-Soo; Choi, Jong-Soon; Komatsu, Setsuko; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2014-02-01

    The root apex is considered the first sites of aluminum (Al) toxicity and the reduction in root biomass leads to poor uptake of water and nutrients. Aluminum is considered the most limiting factor for plant productivity in acidic soils. Aluminum is a light metal that makes up 7 % of the earth's scab dissolving ionic forms. The inhibition of root growth is recognized as the primary effect of Al toxicity. Seeds of wheat cv. Keumkang were germinated on petridish for 5 days and then transferred hydroponic apparatus which was treated without or with 100 and 150 μM AlCl3 for 5 days. The length of roots, shoots and fresh weight of wheat seedlings were decreased under aluminum stress. The concentration of K(+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) were decreased, whereas Al(3+) and P2O5 (-) concentration was increased under aluminum stress. Using confocal microscopy, the fluorescence intensity of aluminum increased with morin staining. A proteome analysis was performed to identify proteins, which are responsible to aluminum stress in wheat roots. Proteins were extracted from roots and separated by 2-DE. A total of 47 protein spots were changed under Al stress. Nineteen proteins were significantly increased such as sadenosylmethionine, oxalate oxidase, malate dehydrogenase, cysteine synthase, ascorbate peroxidase and/or, 28 protein spots were significantly decreased such as heat shock protein 70, O-methytransferase 4, enolase, and amylogenin. Our results highlight the importance and identification of stress and defense responsive proteins with morphological and physiological state under Al stress. PMID:24357239

  4. Phyloproteomics: What Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals about Serum Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Asab, Mones; Chaouchi, Mohamed; Amri, Hakima

    2008-01-01

    Phyloproteomics is a novel analytical tool that solves the issue of comparability between proteomic analyses, utilizes a total spectrum-parsing algorithm, and produces biologically meaningful classification of specimens. Phyloproteomics employs two algorithms: a new parsing algorithm (UNIPAL) and a phylogenetic algorithm (MIX). By outgroup comparison, the parsing algorithm identifies novel or vanished MS peaks and peaks signifying up or down regulated proteins and scores them as derived or ancestral. The phylogenetic algorithm uses the latter scores to produce a biologically meaningful classification of the specimens. PMID:16944935

  5. Thematic Review Series: Proteomics. An integrated omics analysis of eicosanoid biology1s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Buczynski, Matthew W.; Dumlao, Darren S.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Eicosanoids have been implicated in a vast number of devastating inflammatory conditions, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, pain, and cancer. Currently, over a hundred different eicosanoids have been identified, with many having potent bioactive signaling capacity. These lipid metabolites are synthesized de novo by at least 50 unique enzymes, many of which have been cloned and characterized. Due to the extensive characterization of eicosanoid biosynthetic pathways, this field provides a unique framework for integrating genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics toward the investigation of disease pathology. To facilitate a concerted systems biology approach, this review outlines the proteins implicated in eicosanoid biosynthesis and signaling in human, mouse, and rat. Applications of the extensive genomic and lipidomic research to date illustrate the questions in eicosanoid signaling that could be uniquely addressed by a thorough analysis of the entire eicosanoid proteome. PMID:19244215

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Schistosoma mansoni Egg Secretions

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Califf, Lindsay L.; Xu, Tao; Hernandez, Hector J.; Stadecker, Miguel J.; Yates, John R.; Williams, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a largely neglected, global health problem. The morbid pathology of the disease stems from the host's inflammatory response to parasite eggs trapped in host tissues. Long term host/parasite survival is dependent upon the successful modulation of the acute pathological response, which is induced by egg antigens. In this study, using Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology, we identified the Schistosoma mansoni egg secretome consisting of 188 proteins. Notably we identified proteins involved in redox balance, molecular chaperoning and protein folding, development and signaling, scavenging and metabolic pathways, immune response modulation, and 32 novel, previously uncharacterized schistosome proteins. We localized a subset of previously-characterized schistosome proteins identified in egg secretions in this study, to the surface of live S. mansoni eggs using the circumoval precipitin reaction. The identification of proteins actively secreted by live schistosome eggs provides important new information for understanding immune modulation and the pathology of schistosomiasis. PMID:17644200

  7. Proteomic analysis of a podocyte vesicle-enriched fraction from human normal and pathological urine samples.

    PubMed

    Lescuyer, Pierre; Pernin, Agnès; Hainard, Alexandre; Bigeire, Caty; Burgess, Jennifer A; Zimmermann-Ivol, Catherine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Schifferli, Jürg A; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Moll, Solange

    2008-07-01

    Podocytes (glomerular visceral epithelial cells) release vesicles into urine. Podocyte vesicle-enriched fractions from normal and pathological human urine samples were prepared for proteomic analysis. An immunoadsorption method was applied and enrichment of podocyte vesicles was assessed. We identified 76 unique proteins. One protein, serum paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON-1), was newly identified in normal human urine sample. We confirmed this result and showed PON-1 expression in normal human kidney. These results demonstrated the potential for using the urine samples enriched in podocyte vesicles as a starting material in studies aimed at discovery of biomarkers for diseases. PMID:21136901

  8. Quantitative proteomics analysis of adsorbed plasma proteins classifies nanoparticles with different surface properties and size

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Burnum, Kristin E.; Luna, Maria L.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Kim, Jong Seo; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Thrall, Brian D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pounds, Joel G.; Liu, Tao

    2011-12-01

    In biofluids (e.g., blood plasma) nanoparticles are readily embedded in layers of proteins that can affect their biological activity and biocompatibility. Herein, we report a study on the interactions between human plasma proteins and nanoparticles with a controlled systematic variation of properties using stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based quantitative proteomics. Novel protocol has been developed to simplify the isolation of nanoparticle bound proteins and improve the reproducibility. Plasma proteins associated with polystyrene nanoparticles with three different surface chemistries and two sizes as well as for four different exposure times (for a total of 24 different samples) were identified and quantified by LC-MS analysis. Quantitative comparison of relative protein abundances were achieved by spiking an 18 O-labeled 'universal reference' into each individually processed unlabeled sample as an internal standard, enabling simultaneous application of both label-free and isotopic labeling quantitation across the sample set. Clustering analysis of the quantitative proteomics data resulted in distinctive pattern that classifies the nanoparticles based on their surface properties and size. In addition, data on the temporal study indicated that the stable protein 'corona' that was isolated for the quantitative analysis appeared to be formed in less than 5 minutes. The comprehensive results obtained herein using quantitative proteomics have potential implications towards predicting nanoparticle biocompatibility.

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians. PMID:26131905

  10. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics as a tool to identify biological matrices in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Van Steendam, Katleen; De Ceuleneer, Marlies; Dhaenens, Maarten; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    In forensic casework analysis, identification of the biological matrix and the species of a forensic trace, preferably without loss of DNA, is of major importance. The biological matrices that can be encountered in a forensic context are blood (human or non-human), saliva, semen, vaginal fluid, and to a lesser extent nasal secretions, feces, and urine. All these matrices were applied on swabs and digested with trypsin in order to obtain peptides. These peptides were injected on a mass spectrometer (ESI Q-TOF) resulting in the detection of several biomarkers that were used to build a decision tree for matrix identification. Saliva and blood were characterized by the presence of alpha-amylase 1 and hemoglobin, respectively. In vaginal fluid, cornulin, cornifin, and/or involucrin were found as biomarkers while semenogelin, prostate-specific antigen, and/or acid phosphatase were characteristic proteins for semen. Uromodulin or AMBP protein imply the presence of urine, while plunc protein is present in nasal secretions. Feces could be determined by the presence of immunoglobulins without hemoglobin. The biomarkers for the most frequently encountered biological matrices (saliva, blood, vaginal fluid, and semen) were validated in blind experiments and on real forensic samples. Additionally, by means of this proteomic approach, species identification was possible. This approach has the advantage that the analysis is performed on the first "washing" step of the chelex DNA extraction, a solution which is normally discarded, and that one single test is sufficient to determine the identity and the species of the biological matrix, while the conventional methods require cascade testing. This technique can be considered as a useful additional tool for biological matrix identification in forensic science and holds the promise of further automation. PMID:22843116

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  12. Isolation and Proteomics Analysis of Barley Centromeric Chromatin Using PICh.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zixian; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-06-01

    Identification of proteins that are directly or indirectly associated with a specific DNA sequence is often an important goal in molecular biology research. Proteomics of isolated chromatin fragments (PICh) is a technique used to isolate chromatin that contains homologous DNA sequence to a specific nucleic acid probe. All proteins directly and indirectly associated with the DNA sequences that hybridize to the probe are then identified by proteomics.1 We used the PICh technique to isolate chromatin associated with the centromeres of barley (Hordeum vulgare) by using a 2'-deoxy-2'fluoro-ribonucleotides (2'-F RNA) probe that is homologous to the AGGGAG satellite DNA specific to barley centromeres. Proteins associated with the barley centromeric chromatin were then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Both alpha-cenH3 and beta-cenH3, the two centromeric histone H3 variants associated with barley centromeres, were positively identified. Interestingly, several different H2A and H2B variants were recovered in the PIChed chromatin. The limitations and future potential of PICh in plant chromatin research are discussed. PMID:27142171

  13. Proteomic analysis of the flooding tolerance mechanism in mutant soybean.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Nanjo, Yohei; Nishimura, Minoru

    2013-02-21

    Flooding stress of soybean is a serious problem because it reduces growth; however, flooding-tolerant cultivars have not been identified. To analyze the flooding tolerance mechanism of soybean, the flooding-tolerant mutant was isolated and analyzed using a proteomic technique. Flooding-tolerance tests were repeated five times using gamma-ray irradiated soybeans, whose root growth (M6 stage) was not suppressed even under flooding stress. Two-day-old wild-type and mutant plants were subjected to flooding stress for 2days, and proteins were identified using a gel-based proteomic technique. In wild-type under flooding stress, levels of proteins related to development, protein synthesis/degradation, secondary metabolism, and the cell wall changed; however, these proteins did not markedly differ in the mutant. In contrast, an increased number of fermentation-related proteins were identified in the mutant under flooding stress. The root tips of mutant plants were not affected by flooding stress, even though the wild-type plants had damaged root. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the mutant increased at an early stage of flooding stress compared with that of the wild-type. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the fermentation system in the early stages of flooding may be an important factor for the acquisition of flooding tolerance in soybean. PMID:23313221

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cysteine Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee-Young; Chay, Kee-Oh; Kwon, Joseph; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Park, Young-Kyu; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes damage to cellular proteins, lipids, membranes and DNA, and plays a key role in the development of cancer. Reactive oxygen species disrupt redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating aberrant activation of signaling pathways that lead to tumorigenesis. We used shotgun proteomics to identify proteins containing oxidation-sensitive cysteines in tissue specimens from colorectal cancer patients. We then compared the patterns of cysteine oxidation in the membrane fractions between the tumor and non-tumor tissues. Using nano-UPLC-MSE proteomics, we identified 31 proteins containing 37 oxidation-sensitive cysteines. These proteins were observed with IAM-binding cysteines in non-tumoral region more than tumoral region of CRC patients. Then using the Ingenuity pathway program, we evaluated the cellular canonical networks connecting those proteins. Within the networks, proteins with multiple connections were related with organ morphology, cellular metabolism, and various disorders. We have thus identified networks of proteins whose redox status is altered by oxidative stress, perhaps leading to changes in cellular functionality that promotes tumorigenesis. PMID:23677378

  15. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C.; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vlot, A. Corina; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR. To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR. To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  16. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Carella, Philip; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Wilson, Daniel C; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M; Vlot, A Corina; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-06-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  17. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  18. Dysbindin as a novel biomarker for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma identified by proteomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Lv, Xiaohui; Fang, Cheng; Lv, Xing; Wang, Fengsong; Wang, Dongmei; Zhao, Jun; Ma, Yueyun; Xue, Yu; Bai, Quan; Yao, Xuebiao; Chen, Yong

    2016-10-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is known to have a poor prognosis partly because of lack of effective biomarkers. In the test set, we investigated dysbindin (DTNBP1) as a potential biomarker for PDAC by comparing preoperative and postoperative serum mass spectrometry (MS) proteomic profilings. Of the included 50 PDAC patients, 42 (positivity of 84.0%) detected a lower MS peak in postoperative serums than preoperative ones which was then identified as dysbindin. In the verification set, receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used to assess diagnostic efficiency. 550 participants were included in the verification set [250 with PDAC, 80 with benign biliary obstruction (BBO), 70 with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 150 healthy donors (HD)]. Dysbindin was increased in PDAC patient sera than in all controls. ROC curves revealed the optimum diagnostic cutoff for dysbindin was 699.16 pg/ml [area under curve (AUC) 0.849 (95% CI 0.812-0.885), sensitivity 81.9% and specificity 84.7%]. Raised concentration of dysbindin in sera could differentiate PDAC from BBO, CP and HD. Moreover, dysbindin maintained its diagnostic accuracy for PDAC patients who were CA19-9 negative [AUC 0.875 (95% CI 0.804-0.945), sensitivity 83.0%, specificity 89.0%] and for patients with benign biliary obstruction [AUC 0.849 (95% CI 0.803-0.894), sensitivity 82.3%, specificity 84.0%].Our discovery of dysbindin may complement measurement of CA19-9 in the diagnosis of PDAC and help to discriminate PDAC from other pancreatic diseases or begin biliary obstruction. PMID:27281120

  19. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  20. Proteome analysis of microtubule-associated proteins and their interacting partners from mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Frank; Riaz, Tahira; DeBonis, Salvatore; Koehler, Christian J; Kroening, Mario; Panse, Isabel; Strozynski, Margarita; Donaldson, Ian M; Thiede, Bernd

    2011-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for a variety of cellular processes. MTs are finely regulated by distinct classes of MT-associated proteins (MAPs), which themselves bind to and are regulated by a large number of additional proteins. We have carried out proteome analyses of tubulin-rich and tubulin-depleted MAPs and their interacting partners isolated from bovine brain. In total, 573 proteins were identified giving us unprecedented access to brain-specific MT-associated proteins from mammalian brain. Most of the standard MAPs were identified and at least 500 proteins have been reported as being associated with MTs. We identified protein complexes with a large number of subunits such as brain-specific motor/adaptor/cargo complexes for kinesins, dynein, and dynactin, and proteins of an RNA-transporting granule. About 25% of the identified proteins were also found in the synaptic vesicle proteome. Analysis of the MS/MS data revealed many posttranslational modifications, amino acid changes, and alternative splice variants, particularly in tau, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Bioinformatic analysis of known protein-protein interactions of the identified proteins indicated that the number of MAPs and their associated proteins is larger than previously anticipated and that our database will be a useful resource to identify novel binding partners. PMID:20567863

  1. A Proteomics Analysis of Human Cytomegalovirus Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Streblow, Daniel N.; Varnum, Susan M.; Smith, Richard D.; Nelson, Jay

    2006-01-01

    While the sequence of the AD169 HCMV genome has been known for several years, the viral and cellular proteins that compose the infectious HCMV virion and entry-competent, non-replicating viral particles such as Dense Bodies (DBs) and Non-Infectious Enveloped Particles (NIEPs) are unknown. To approach this problem we have utilized a gel-free 2-D capillary liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to identify and determine the relative abundance of viral and cellular proteins in purified HCMV AD169 particles. !is study has identified and quantitated the proteins that compose both HCMV virions and DBs. While a number of previously identified proteins were detected by this method the number of viral proteins that compose the HCMV virion was doubled in this study suggesting that over a third of the viral open reading frames are part of an infectious virion. !is chapter will discuss the implications of our findings in relation to what was previously known about HCMV and MCMV virion composition.

  2. Computational Proteomics Analysis System (CPAS): an extensible, open-source analytic system for evaluating and publishing proteomic data and high throughput biological experiments.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Adam; Bellew, Matthew; Eng, Jimmy; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; Holzman, Ted; Hussey, Peter; Igra, Mark; Maclean, Brendan; Lin, Chen Wei; Detter, Andrea; Fang, Ruihua; Faca, Vitor; Gafken, Phil; Zhang, Heidi; Whiteaker, Jeffrey; Whitaker, Jeffrey; States, David; Hanash, Sam; Paulovich, Amanda; McIntosh, Martin W

    2006-01-01

    The open-source Computational Proteomics Analysis System (CPAS) contains an entire data analysis and management pipeline for Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics, including experiment annotation, protein database searching and sequence management, and mining LC-MS/MS peptide and protein identifications. CPAS architecture and features, such as a general experiment annotation component, installation software, and data security management, make it useful for collaborative projects across geographical locations and for proteomics laboratories without substantial computational support. PMID:16396501

  3. In-depth Proteomic Analysis of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer to Discover Molecular Targets and Candidate Biomarkers*

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Takefumi; Hassanein, Mohamed; Amann, Joseph M.; Liu, Qinfeng; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Rahman, S. M. Jamshedur; Kaufman, Jacob M.; Zhang, Xueqiong; Hoeksema, Megan D.; Harris, Bradford K.; Li, Ming; Shyr, Yu; Gonzalez, Adriana L.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Massion, Pierre P.; Carbone, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in proteomic analysis of human samples are driving critical aspects of biomarker discovery and the identification of molecular pathways involved in disease etiology. Toward that end, in this report we are the first to use a standardized shotgun proteomic analysis method for in-depth tissue protein profiling of the two major subtypes of nonsmall cell lung cancer and normal lung tissues. We identified 3621 proteins from the analysis of pooled human samples of squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and control specimens. In addition to proteins previously shown to be implicated in lung cancer, we have identified new pathways and multiple new differentially expressed proteins of potential interest as therapeutic targets or diagnostic biomarkers, including some that were not identified by transcriptome profiling. Up-regulation of these proteins was confirmed by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. A subset of these proteins was found to be detectable and differentially present in the peripheral blood of cases and matched controls. Label-free shotgun proteomic analysis allows definition of lung tumor proteomes, identification of biomarker candidates, and potential targets for therapy. PMID:22761400

  4. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Barley Cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) with Contrasting Grain Protein Content

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baojian; Luan, Haiye; Lin, Shen; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Rugen

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein contents (GPCs) of barley seeds are significantly different between feed and malting barley cultivars. However, there is still no insight into the proteomic analysis of seed proteins between feed and malting barley cultivars. Also, the genetic control of barley GPC is still unclear. GPCs were measured between mature grains of Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. A proteome profiling of differentially expressed protein was established by using a combination of 2-DE and tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 502 reproducible protein spots in barley seed proteome were detected with a pH range of 4–7 and 6–11, among these 41 protein spots (8.17%) were detected differentially expressed between Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. Thirty-four protein spots corresponding to 23 different proteins were identified, which were grouped into eight categories, including stress, protein degradation and post-translational modification, development, cell, signaling, glycolysis, starch metabolism, and other functions. Among the identified proteins, enolase (spot 274) and small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (spot 271) are exclusively expressed in barley Yangsimai 3, which may be involved in regulating seed protein expression. In addition, malting quality is characterized by an accumulation of serpin protein, Alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CMb and Alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1. Most noticeably, globulin, an important storage protein in barley seed, undergoes post-translational processing in both cultivars, and also displays different expression patterns. PMID:27200019

  5. Reference map and comparative proteomic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae displaying high resistance against spectinomycin.

    PubMed

    Nabu, Sunanta; Lawung, Ratana; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-03-01

    A proteome reference map of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was successfully established using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis in conjunction with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. This map was further applied to compare protein expression profiles of high-level spectinomycin-resistant (clinical isolate) and -susceptible (reference strain) N. gonorrhoeae following treatment with subminimal inhibitory concentrations (subMICs) of spectinomycin. Approximately 200 protein spots were visualized by Coomassie brilliant blue G-250 staining and 66 spots representing 58 unique proteins were subsequently identified. Most of the identified proteins were analysed as cytoplasmic proteins and belonged to the class of energy metabolism. Comparative proteomic analysis of whole protein expression of susceptible and resistant gonococci showed up to 96% similarity while eight proteins were found to be differentially expressed in the resistant strain. In the presence of subMICs of spectinomycin, it was found that 50S ribosomal protein L7/L12, an essential component for ribosomal translocation, was upregulated in both strains, ranging from 1.5- to 3.5-fold, suggesting compensatory mechanisms of N. gonorrhoeae in response to antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis. Moreover, the differential expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and the cell envelope was noticeably detected, indicating significant cellular responses and adaptation against antibiotic stress. Such knowledge provides valuable data, not only fundamental proteomic data, but also knowledge of the mode of action of antibiotic and secondary target proteins implicated in adaptation and compensatory mechanisms. PMID:24567501

  6. Analysis of the periplasmic proteome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a metabolically versatile opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Perdomo, Ariel Basulto; Tiburzi, Federica; Mancone, Carmine; Alonzi, Tonino; Ascenzi, Paolo; Piacentini, Mauro; Visca, Paolo; Fimia, Gian Maria

    2009-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a main cause of infection in hospitalized, burned, immunocompromised, and cystic fibrosis patients. Many processes essential for P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, e.g., nutrient uptake, antibiotic resistance, and virulence, take place in the cell envelope and depend on components residing in the periplasmic space. Recent high-throughput studies focused on P. aeruginosa membrane compartments. However, the composition and dynamics of its periplasm remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a detailed description of the periplasmic proteome of the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Three extraction methods were compared at proteome level in order to achieve the most reliable and comprehensive periplasmic protein map. A total of 495 spots representing 395 different proteins were identified. Most of the high intensity spots corresponded to periplasmic proteins, while cytoplasmic contaminants were mainly detected among faint spots. The majority of the identified periplasmic proteins is involved in transport, cell-envelope integrity, and protein folding control. Notably, more than 30% still has an unpredicted function. This work provides the first overview of the P. aeruginosa periplasm and offers the basis for future studies on periplasmic proteome changes occurring during P. aeruginosa adaptation to different environments and/or antibiotic treatments. PMID:19333994

  7. Proteomic Analysis Identifies an NADPH Oxidase 1 (Nox1)-Mediated Role for Actin-Related Protein 2/3 Complex Subunit 2 (ARPC2) in Promoting Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al Ghouleh, Imad; Rodríguez, Andrés; Pagano, Patrick J.; Csányi, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    A variety of vascular pathologies, including hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis, are characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy and migration. NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) plays a pivotal role in these phenotypes via distinct downstream signaling. However, the mediators differentiating these distinct phenotypes and their precise role in vascular disease are still not clear. The present study was designed to identify novel targets of VSMC Nox1 signaling using 2D Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry (2D-DIGE/MS). VSMC treatment with scrambled (Scrmb) or Nox1 siRNA and incubation with the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 50 μM, 3 h) followed by 2D-DIGE/MS on cell lysates identified 10 target proteins. Among these proteins, actin-related protein 2/3 complex subunit 2 (ARPC2) with no previous link to Nox isozymes, H2O2, or other reactive oxygen species (ROS), was identified and postulated to play an intermediary role in VSMC migration. Western blot confirmed that Nox1 mediates H2O2-induced ARPC2 expression in VSMC. Treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) resulted in reduced ARPC2 expression in H2O2-treated VSMC. Additionally, wound-healing “scratch” assay confirmed that H2O2 stimulates VSMC migration via Nox1. Importantly, gene silencing of ARPC2 suppressed H2O2-stimulated VSMC migration. These results demonstrate for the first time that Nox1-mediated VSMC migration involves ARPC2 as a downstream signaling target. PMID:24152438

  8. Transcriptome and proteome of Conus planorbis identify the nicotinic receptors as primary target for the defensive venom.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ai-Hua; Vetter, Irina; Himaya, Siddhihalu W A; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Most venomous predators have evolved complex venom primarily to immobilize their prey and secondarily to defend against predators. In a new paradigm, carnivorous marine gastropods of the genus Conus were shown to rapidly and reversibly switch between two types of venoms in response to predatory or defensive stimulus, suggesting that the defensive use of venom may have a more important role in venom evolution and specialization than previously thought. To further investigate this phenomenon, the defensive repertoire of a vermivorous species, Conus planorbis, was deciphered using second-generation sequencing coupled to high-throughput proteomics. The venom gland transcriptome of C. planorbis revealed 182 unique conotoxin precursors from 25 gene superfamilies, with superfamily T dominating in terms of read and paralog numbers. Analysis of the defense-evoked venom revealed that this vermivorous species uses a similarly complex arsenal to deter aggressors as more recently evolved fish- and mollusk-hunting species, with MS/MS validating 23 conotoxin sequences from six superfamilies. Pharmacological characterization of the defensive venom on human receptors identified the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as a primary target. This work provides the first insights into the composition and biological activity of specifically evolved defensive venoms in vermivorous cone snails. PMID:26506909

  9. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome.

    PubMed

    Doellinger, Joerg; Schaade, Lars; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus' zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV) and monkeypox virus (MPXV), the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV) is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing. PMID:26556597

  10. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Doellinger, Joerg; Schaade, Lars; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus’ zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV) and monkeypox virus (MPXV), the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV) is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing. PMID:26556597

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Subjected to Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto; Hurtado, Gerardo; Martínez-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Espinoza, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to sudden temperature changes during its life cycle. Adaptation to these variations is crucial for parasite survival, reproduction, and transmission. Some of these conditions may change the pattern of genetic expression of proteins involved in homeostasis in the course of stress treatment. In the present study, the proteome of T. cruzi epimastigotes subjected to heat shock and epimastigotes grow normally was compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. Twenty-four spots differing in abundance were identified. Of the twenty-four changed spots, nineteen showed a greater intensity and five a lower intensity relative to the control. Several functional categories of the identified proteins were determined: metabolism, cell defense, hypothetical proteins, protein fate, protein synthesis, cellular transport, and cell cycle. Proteins involved in the interaction with the cellular environment were also identified, and the implications of these changes are discussed. PMID:22287837

  12. Extraction of intracellular protein from Glaciozyma antarctica for proteomics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizura, S. Nor; Farahayu, K.; Faizal, A. B. Mohd; Asmahani, A. A. S.; Amir, R.; Nazalan, N.; Diba, A. B. Farah; Muhammad, M. Nor; Munir, A. M. Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Two preparation methods of crude extracts of psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica were compared in order to obtain a good recovery of intracellular proteins. Extraction with mechanical procedures using sonication was found to be more effective for obtaining good yield compare to alkaline treatment method. The procedure is simple, rapid, and produce better yield. A total of 52 proteins were identified by combining both extraction methods. Most of the proteins identified in this study involves in the metabolic process including glycolysis pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruyate decarboxylation and also urea cyle. Several chaperons were identified including probable cpr1-cyclophilin (peptidylprolyl isomerase), macrolide-binding protein fkbp12 and heat shock proteins which were postulate to accelerate proper protein folding. Characteristic of the fundamental cellular processes inferred from the expressed-proteome highlight the evolutionary and functional complexity existing in this domain of life.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis of drug-induced changes in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Minerva A; Silva, Jeffrey C; Geromanos, Scott J; Townsend, Craig A

    2006-01-01

    A new approach for qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis using capillary liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to study the protein expression response in mycobacteria following isoniazid treatment is discussed. In keeping with known effects on the fatty acid synthase II pathway, proteins encoded by the kas operon (AcpM, KasA, KasB, Accd6) were significantly overexpressed, as were those involved in iron metabolism and cell division suggesting a complex interplay of metabolic events leading to cell death. PMID:16396495

  14. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mice corneal tissues reveals angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minqian; Tao, Yimin; Feng, Yifan; Liu, Xing; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced in Balb/c mice by alkali burns in the central area of the cornea with a diameter of 2.5mm. After fourteen days, the cornea from one eye was collected for histological staining for CNV examination, while the cornea from the other eye of the same mouse was harvested for proteomic analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach was applied to analyze five normal corneal tissues (normal group mice n=5) and five corresponding neovascularized corneal tissues (model group mice n=5). A total of 2124 proteins were identified, and 1682 proteins were quantified from these corneal tissues. Among these quantified proteins, 290 proteins were significantly changed between normal and alkali burned corneal tissues. Of these significantly changed proteins, 35 were reported or predicted as angiogenesis-related proteins. Then, these 35 proteins were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software, resulting in 26 proteins enriched and connected to each other in the protein-protein interaction network, such as Lcn-2, αB-crystallin and Serpinf1 (PEDF). These three significantly changed proteins were selected for further Western blotting validation. Consistent with the quantitative proteomic results, Western blotting showed that Lcn-2 and αB-crystallin were significantly up-regulated in CNV model, while PEDF was down-regulated. This study provided increased understanding of angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal vascular development, which will be useful in the ophthalmic clinic of specifically target angiogenesis. PMID:27049463

  15. Proteome analysis of biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of neuromyelitis optica patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shumei; Guo, Xuxiao; Qin, Zhaoyu; Wang, Banqin; Li, Xiaohong; Qin, Yanjiang; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying neuromyelitis optica (NMO), we developed a proteomics platform for biomarker discovery in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with NMO. Methods Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to compare the CSF proteome of NMO patients with that of controls. A subsequent ELISA and western blot analysis were performed to verify the results of the proteomic analysis. Pathway Studio 5.0 software was used to determine possible functional interactions among these differentially expressed proteins. Results Using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF MS, we identified 11 differentially expressed proteins and two isoforms of these same proteins. The expression of four proteins was enhanced, whereas the expression of seven proteins was reduced in the NMO group in comparison to the control group. These differences in protein expression were confirmed by performing ELISA and western blot analyses (p<0.01). Protein network analyses revealed biologic interactions and cross-talks among these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusions Because of their unique expression profile in NMO CSFs, these proteins are candidate biomarkers for NMO. Thus, our findings may have important implications for both the diagnosis of NMO and the further understanding of its pathogenesis. PMID:19710940

  16. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  17. Proteome analysis of the triton-insoluble erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Harper, Sandra; Pesciotta, Esther N; Speicher, Kaye D; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Speicher, David W

    2015-10-14

    Erythrocyte shape and membrane integrity is imparted by the membrane skeleton, which can be isolated as a Triton X-100 insoluble structure that retains the biconcave shape of intact erythrocytes, indicating isolation of essentially intact membrane skeletons. These erythrocyte "Triton Skeletons" have been studied morphologically and biochemically, but unbiased proteome analysis of this substructure of the membrane has not been reported. In this study, different extraction buffers and in-depth proteome analyses were used to more fully define the protein composition of this functionally critical macromolecular complex. As expected, the major, well-characterized membrane skeleton proteins and their associated membrane anchors were recovered in good yield. But surprisingly, a substantial number of additional proteins that are not considered in erythrocyte membrane skeleton models were recovered in high yields, including myosin-9, lipid raft proteins (stomatin, flotillin1 and 2), multiple chaperone proteins (HSPs, protein disulfide isomerase and calnexin), and several other proteins. These results show that the membrane skeleton is substantially more complex than previous biochemical studies indicated, and it apparently has localized regions with unique protein compositions and functions. This comprehensive catalog of the membrane skeleton should lead to new insights into erythrocyte membrane biology and pathogenic mutations that perturb membrane stability. Biological significance Current models of erythrocyte membranes describe fairly simple homogenous structures that are incomplete. Proteome analysis of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton shows that it is quite complex and includes a substantial number of proteins whose roles and locations in the membrane are not well defined. Further elucidation of interactions involving these proteins and definition of microdomains in the membrane that contain these proteins should yield novel insights into how the membrane skeleton

  18. Plasma proteome profiling of a mouse model of breast cancer identifies a set of up-regulated proteins in common with human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Faca, Vitor M; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Kasarda, A Erik; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Newcomb, Lisa; Krasnoselsky, Alexei; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Gina; Fitzgibbon, Matthew; McIntosh, Martin W; Kemp, Christopher J; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-04-01

    We have applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach, combining isotopic labeling extensive intact protein separation and mass spectrometry, for high confidence identification of protein changes in plasmas from a mouse model of breast cancer. We hypothesized that a wide spectrum of proteins may be up-regulated in plasma with tumor development and that comparisons with proteins expressed in human breast cancer cell lines may identify a subset of up-regulated proteins in common with proteins expressed in breast cancer cell lines that may represent candidate biomarkers for breast cancer. Plasma from PyMT transgenic tumor-bearing mice and matched controls were obtained at two time points during tumor growth. A total of 133 proteins were found to be increased by 1.5-fold or greater at one or both time points. A comparison of this set of proteins with published findings from proteomic analysis of human breast cancer cell lines yielded 49 proteins with increased levels in mouse plasma that were identified in breast cancer cell lines. Pathway analysis comparing the subset of up-regulated proteins known to be expressed in breast cancer cell lines with other up-regulated proteins indicated a cancer related function for the former and a host-response function for the latter. We conclude that integration of proteomic findings from mouse models of breast cancer and from human breast cancer cell lines may help identify a subset of proteins released by breast cancer cells into the circulation and that occur at increased levels in breast cancer. PMID:18311905

  19. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable. PMID:27418427

  20. Proteomics identifies Bacillus cereus EntD as a pivotal protein for the production of numerous virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Hélène; Alpha-Bazin, Béatrice; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Armengaud, Jean; Duport, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive pathogen that causes a wide variety of diseases in humans. It secretes into the extracellular milieu proteins that may contribute directly or indirectly to its virulence. EntD is a novel exoprotein identified by proteogenomics of B. cereus ATCC 14579. We constructed a ΔentD mutant and analyzed the impact of entD disruption on the cellular proteome and exoproteome isolated from early, late, and stationary-phase cultures. We identified 308 and 79 proteins regulated by EntD in the cellular proteome and the exoproteome, respectively. The contribution of these proteins to important virulence-associated functions, including central metabolism, cell structure, antioxidative ability, cell motility, and toxin production, are presented. The proteomic data were correlated with the growth defect, cell morphology change, reduced motility, and reduced cytotoxicity of the ΔentD mutant strain. We conclude that EntD is an important player in B. cereus virulence. The function of EntD and the putative EntD-dependent regulatory network are discussed. To our knowledge, this study is the first characterization of an Ent family protein in a species of the B. cereus group. PMID:26500610

  1. Proteome Analysis of the Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Barreiro, Carlos; García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by “blue silver” colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin

  2. Proteomic profiling of human plasma identifies apolipoprotein E as being associated with smoking and a marker for squamous metaplasia of the lung.

    PubMed

    Rice, Shawn J; Liu, Xin; Miller, Bruce; Joshi, Monika; Zhu, Junjia; Caruso, Carla; Gilbert, Chris; Toth, Jennifer; Reed, Michael; Rassaei, Negar; Das, Arun; Barochia, Amit; El-Bayoumy, Karam; Belani, Chandra P

    2015-09-01

    Biomarkers to identify subjects at high-risk for developing lung cancer will revolutionize the disease outlook. Most biomarker studies have focused on patients already diagnosed with lung cancer and in most cases the disease is often advanced and incurable. The objective of this study was to use proteomics to identify a plasma biomarker for early detection of lung lesions that may subsequently be the harbinger for cancer. Plasma samples were obtained from subjects without lung cancer grouped as never, current, or ex-smokers. An iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis was performed on these pooled plasma samples. We identified 31 proteins differentially abundant in current smokers or ex-smokers relative to never smokers. Western blot and ELISA analyses confirmed the iTRAQ results that demonstrated an increase of apolipoprotein E (APOE) in current smokers as compared to both never and ex-smokers. There was a strong and significant correlation of the plasma APOE levels with development of premalignant squamous metaplasia. Additionally, we also showed that higher tissue levels of APOE are seen with squamous metaplasia, supporting a direct relationship. Our analysis reveals that elevated plasma APOE is associated with smoking, and APOE is a novel predictive protein biomarker for early morphological changes of squamous metaplasia in the lung. PMID:26058877

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of compartmentalised Ras signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are membrane bound signalling hubs that operate from both the cell surface and endomembrane compartments. However, the extent to which intracellular pools of Ras can contribute to cell signalling is debated. To address this, we have performed a global screen of compartmentalised Ras signalling. We find that whilst ER/Golgi- and endosomal-Ras only generate weak outputs, Ras localised to the mitochondria or Golgi significantly and distinctly influence both the abundance and phosphorylation of a wide range of proteins analysed. Our data reveal that ~80% of phosphosites exhibiting large (≥1.5-fold) changes compared to control can be modulated by organellar Ras signalling. The majority of compartmentalised Ras-specific responses are predicted to influence gene expression, RNA splicing and cell proliferation. Our analysis reinforces the concept that compartmentalisation influences Ras signalling and provides detailed insight into the widespread modulation of responses downstream of endomembranous Ras signalling. PMID:26620772

  4. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle. PMID:27165017

  5. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S.; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle. PMID:27165017

  6. In silico Proteome-wide Amino aCid and Elemental Composition (PACE) Analysis of Expression Proteomics Data Provides A Fingerprint of Dominant Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Good, David M.; Mamdoh, Anwer; Budamgunta, Harshavardhan; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteome-wide Amino aCid and Elemental composition (PACE) analysis is a novel and informative way of interrogating the proteome. The PACE approach consists of in silico decomposition of proteins detected and quantified in a proteomics experiment into 20 amino acids and five elements (C, H, N, O and S), with protein abundances converted to relative abundances of amino acids and elements. The method is robust and very sensitive; it provides statistically reliable differentiation between very similar proteomes. In addition, PACE provides novel insights into proteome-wide metabolic processes, occurring, e.g., during cell starvation. For instance, both Escherichia coli and Synechocystis down-regulate sulfur-rich proteins upon sulfur deprivation, but E. coli preferentially down-regulates cysteine-rich proteins while Synechocystis mainly down-regulates methionine-rich proteins. Due to its relative simplicity, flexibility, generality and wide applicability, PACE analysis has the potential of becoming a standard analytical tool in proteomics. PMID:23917074

  7. Label-free proteomics identifies Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease resulting from mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Recent breakthroughs in preclinical research have highlighted several potential novel therapies for SMA, increasing the need for robust and sensitive clinical trial platforms for evaluating their effectiveness in human patient cohorts. Given that most clinical trials for SMA are likely to involve young children, there is a need for validated molecular biomarkers to assist with monitoring disease progression and establishing the effectiveness of therapies being tested. Proteomics technologies have recently been highlighted as a potentially powerful tool for such biomarker discovery. Methods We utilized label-free proteomics to identify individual proteins in pathologically-affected skeletal muscle from SMA mice that report directly on disease status. Quantitative fluorescent western blotting was then used to assess whether protein biomarkers were robustly changed in muscle, skin and blood from another mouse model of SMA, as well as in a small cohort of human SMA patient muscle biopsies. Results By comparing the protein composition of skeletal muscle in SMA mice at a pre-symptomatic time-point with the muscle proteome at a late-symptomatic time-point we identified increased expression of both Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as robust indicators of disease progression in SMA mice. We report that these protein biomarkers were consistently modified in different mouse models of SMA, as well as across multiple skeletal muscles, and were also measurable in skin biopsies. Furthermore, Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin were measurable in muscle biopsy samples from human SMA patients. Conclusions We conclude that label-free proteomics technology provides a powerful platform for biomarker identification in SMA, revealing Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers capable of reporting on disease progression in

  8. Large-Scale Proteomic Analysis of the Human Spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Rappsilber, Juri; Ryder, Ursula; Lamond, Angus I.; Mann, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    In a previous proteomic study of the human spliceosome, we identified 42 spliceosome-associated factors, including 19 novel ones. Using enhanced mass spectrometric tools and improved databases, we now report identification of 311 proteins that copurify with splicing complexes assembled on two separate pre-mRNAs. All known essential human splicing factors were found, and 96 novel proteins were identified, of which 55 contain domains directly linking them to functions in splicing/RNA processing. We also detected 20 proteins related to transcription, which indicates a direct connection between this process and splicing. This investigation provides the most detailed inventory of human spliceosome-associated factors to date, and the data indicate a number of interesting links coordinating splicing with other steps in the gene expression pathway. PMID:12176931

  9. Application of Differential Proteomic Analysis to Authenticate Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwei; Lai, Xintian; Li, Bifang; Wu, Cong; Wang, Shifeng; Chen, Xuejian; Huang, Jingmin; Yang, Guowu

    2016-03-01

    Ophiocordyceps sinensis (Berk.) Sacc. is one of the most well-known fungi in traditional Chinese medicine and is attracting attention because of its nutritious and medicinal properties. The present study aimed to produce a proteomic map to identify common O. sinensis proteins. The caterpillar body and stroma of O. sinensis collected from five locations and four fungal specimens of similar appearance were examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Five proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF--TOF/MS, and the 2-DE identification pattern was provided. OCS_04585 and β-lactamase domain-containing protein, the two abundant and characteristic proteins, were separated and purified using liquid-phase isoelectric focusing. The products were high-quality materials that can be used for future protein-function studies and immunoassay development. PMID:26660081

  10. Cytoplasmic- and extracellular-proteome analysis of Diplodia seriata: a phytopathogenic fungus involved in grapevine decline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The phytopathogenic fungus Diplodia seriata, whose genome remains unsequenced, produces severe infections in fruit trees (fruit blight) and grapevines. In this crop is recognized as one of the most prominent pathogens involved in grapevine trunk disease (or grapevine decline). This pathology can result in the death of adult plants and therefore it produces severe economical losses all around the world. To date no genes or proteins have been characterized in D. seriata that are involved in the pathogenicity process. In an effort to help identify potential gene products associated with pathogenicity and to gain a better understanding of the biology of D. seriata, we initiated a proteome-level study of the fungal mycelia and secretome. Results Intracellular and secreted proteins from D. seriata collected from liquid cultures were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. About 550 cytoplasmic proteins were reproducibly present in 3 independent extractions, being 53 identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry. The secretome analysis showed 75 secreted proteins reproducibly present in 3 biological replicates, being 16 identified. Several of the proteins had been previously identified as virulence factors in other fungal strains, although their contribution to pathogenicity in D. seriata remained to be analyzed. When D. seriata was grown in a medium supplemented with carboxymethylcellulose, 3 proteins were up-regulated and 30 down-regulated. Within the up-regulated proteins, two were identified as alcohol dehydrogenase and mitochondrial peroxyrredoxin-1, suggesting that they could play a significant role in the pathogenicity process. As for the 30 down-regulated proteins, 9 were identified being several of them involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Conclusions This study is the first report on proteomics on D. seriata. The proteomic data obtained will be important to understand the pathogenicity process. In fact, several of

  11. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  12. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  13. The advantage of laser-capture microdissection over whole tissue analysis in proteomic profiling studies.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Tommaso; Braakman, Rene B H; Stingl, Christoph; van Duijn, Martijn M; Smid, Marcel; Foekens, John A; Luider, Theo M; Martens, John W M; Umar, Arzu

    2016-05-01

    Laser-capture microdissection (LCM) offers a reliable cell population enrichment tool and has been successfully coupled to MS analysis. Despite this, most proteomic studies employ whole tissue lysate (WTL) analysis in the discovery of disease biomarkers and in profiling analyses. Furthermore, the influence of tissue heterogeneity in WTL analysis, nor its impact in biomarker discovery studies have been completely elucidated. In order to address this, we compared previously obtained high resolution MS data from a cohort of 38 breast cancer tissues, of which both LCM enriched tumor epithelial cells and WTL samples were analyzed. Label-free quantification (LFQ) analysis through MaxQuant software showed a significantly higher number of identified and quantified proteins in LCM enriched samples (3404) compared to WTLs (2837). Furthermore, WTL samples displayed a higher amount of missing data compared to LCM both at peptide and protein levels (p-value < 0.001). 2D analysis on co-expressed proteins revealed discrepant expression of immune system and lipid metabolisms related proteins between LCM and WTL samples. We hereby show that LCM better dissected the biology of breast tumor epithelial cells, possibly due to lower interference from surrounding tissues and highly abundant proteins. All data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002381 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002381). PMID:27030549

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  16. Systems proteomics of cardiac chromatin identifies nucleolin as a regulator of growth and cellular plasticity in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Monte, Emma; Mouillesseaux, Kevin; Chen, Haodong; Kimball, Todd; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Chen, Jau-Nian; Vondriska, Thomas M; Franklin, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Myocyte hypertrophy antecedent to heart failure involves changes in global gene expression, although the preceding mechanisms to coordinate DNA accessibility on a genomic scale are unknown. Chromatin-associated proteins alter chromatin structure by changing their association with DNA, thereby altering the gene expression profile. Little is known about the global changes in chromatin subproteomes that accompany heart failure, and the mechanisms by which these proteins alter chromatin structure. The present study tests the fundamental hypothesis that cardiac growth and plasticity in the setting of disease recapitulates conserved developmental chromatin remodeling events. We used quantitative proteomics to identify chromatin-associated proteins extracted via detergent and to quantify changes in their abundance during disease. Our study identified 321 proteins in this subproteome, demonstrating it to have modest conservation (37%) with that revealed using strong acid. Of these proteins, 176 exhibited altered expression during cardiac hypertrophy and failure; we conducted extensive functional characterization of one of these proteins, Nucleolin. Morpholino-based knockdown of nucleolin nearly abolished protein expression but surprisingly had little impact on gross morphological development. However, hearts of fish lacking Nucleolin displayed severe developmental impairment, abnormal chamber patterning and functional deficits, ostensibly due to defects in cardiac looping and myocyte differentiation. The mechanisms underlying these defects involve perturbed bone morphogenetic protein 4 expression, decreased rRNA transcription, and a shift to more heterochromatic chromatin. This study reports the quantitative analysis of a new chromatin subproteome in the normal and diseased mouse heart. Validation studies in the complementary model system of zebrafish examine the role of Nucleolin to orchestrate genomic reprogramming events shared between development and disease. PMID

  17. Overview of software options for processing, analysis and interpretation of mass spectrometric proteomic data.

    PubMed

    Haga, Steve W; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the interests in proteomics have been intensively increased, and the proteomic methods have been widely applied to many problems in cell biology. If the age of 1990s is considered to be a decade of genomics, we can claim that the following years of the new century is a decade of proteomics. The rapid evolution of proteomics has continued through these years, with a series of innovations in separation techniques and the core technologies of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MS. Both technologies are fueled by automation and high throughput computation for profiling of proteins from biological systems. As Patterson ever mentioned, 'data analysis is the Achilles heel of proteomics and our ability to generate data now outstrips our ability to analyze it'. The development of automatic and high throughput technologies for rapid identification of proteins is essential for large-scale proteome projects and automatic protein identification and characterization is essential for high throughput proteomics. This review provides a snap shot of the tools and applications that are available for mass spectrometric high throughput biocomputation. The review starts with a brief introduction of proteomics and MS. Computational tools that can be employed at various stages of analysis are presented, including that for data processing, identification, quantification, and the understanding of the biological functions of individual proteins and their dynamic interactions. The challenges of computation software development and its future trends in MS-based proteomics have also been speculated. PMID:25303385

  18. Comprehensive proteome analysis of an Apc mouse model uncovers proteins associated with intestinal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth E; Faca, Vitor; Song, Kenneth; Sarracino, David A; Richard, Larissa Georgeon; Krastins, Bryan; Forrester, Sara; Porter, Andrew; Kunin, Alexandra; Mahmood, Umar; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2009-03-01

    Tumor-derived proteins may occur in the circulation as a result of secretion, shedding from the cell surface, or cell turnover. We have applied an in-depth comprehensive proteomic strategy to plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice to identify proteins associated with tumor development. We used quantitative tandem mass spectrometry of fractionated mouse plasma to identify differentially expressed proteins in plasma from intestinal tumor-bearing Apc mutant mice relative to matched controls. Up-regulated proteins were assessed for the expression of corresponding genes in tumor tissue. A subset of proteins implicated in colorectal cancer were selected for further analysis at the tissue level using antibody microarrays, Western blotting, tumor immunohistochemistry, and novel fluorescent imaging. We identified 51 proteins that were elevated in plasma with concordant up-regulation at the RNA level in tumor tissue. The list included multiple proteins involved in colon cancer pathogenesis: cathepsin B and cathepsin D, cullin 1, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran. Of these, Parkinson disease 7, muscle pyruvate kinase, and Ran were also found to be up-regulated in human colon adenoma samples. We have identified proteins with direct relevance to colorectal carcinogenesis that are present both in plasma and in tumor tissue in intestinal tumor-bearing mice. Our results show that integrated analysis of the plasma proteome and tumor transcriptome of genetically engineered mouse models is a powerful approach for the identification of tumor-related plasma proteins. PMID:19240248

  19. Proteomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Fu, Yang; Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria provide an interesting research material for defining cell-envelope proteins without experimental cell disruption. OMVs are also promising immunogenic platforms and may play important roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis. We used in-solution trypsin digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 90 proteins present in OMVs of Vibrio cholerae when grown under conditions that activate the TCP pilus virulence regulatory protein (ToxT) virulence regulon. The ToxT expression profile and potential contribution to virulence of these proteins were assessed using ToxT and in vivo RNA-seq, Tn-seq, and cholera stool proteomic and other genome-wide data sets. Thirteen OMV-associated proteins appear to be essential for cell growth, and therefore may represent antibacterial drug targets. Another 12 nonessential OMV proteins, including DegP protease, were required for intestinal colonization in rabbits. Comparative proteomics of a degP mutant revealed the importance of DegP in the incorporation of nine proteins into OMVs, including ones involved in biofilm matrix formation and various substrates of the type II secretion system. Taken together, these results suggest that DegP plays an important role in determining the content of OMVs and also affects phenotypes such as intestinal colonization, proper function of the type II secretion system, and formation of biofilm matrix. PMID:24706774

  20. Proteome analysis of early-stage soybean seedlings under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Akiko; Sakata, Katsumi; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2009-04-01

    Proteomic analyses of soybean seedlings responding to flooding were conducted to identify proteins involved in such response. Soybean was germinated for 48 h and then subjected to flooding stress for 6-48 h. Proteomic analysis of hypocotyl and root was used in a time-dependent manner, and altered proteins were identified using soybean protein data file constructed for this research. Under flooding stress, 35 proteins were up-regulated, whereas 16 proteins were down-regulated at a 24-h time point. Changes in energy generation was recognized because several glycolytic enzymes were up-regulated. General stress response was also shown to occur as various reactive oxygen species scavengers were up-regulated. Other identified proteins with diverse functional categories suggest that flooding stress includes not only hypoxic stress, but also other stresses such as weak light, disease, and water stresses. In addition, proteins with unknown functions were shown to be positioned as hubs which activate other proteins in system response networks by protein-protein interaction analysis, suggesting that this type of interaction analysis is useful for screening of important factors in plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:19714819

  1. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum parasites from patients with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Gwladys I; Sabbagh, Audrey; Argy, Nicolas; Salnot, Virginie; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Agbota, Gino; Ladipo, Yélé; Alao, Jules M; Sagbo, Gratien; Guillonneau, François; Deloron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible of severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM). During its intra-erythrocytic maturation, parasite-derived proteins are expressed, exported and presented at the infected erythrocyte membrane. To identify new CM-specific parasite membrane proteins, we conducted a mass spectrometry-based proteomic study and compared the protein expression profiles between 9 CM and 10 uncomplicated malaria (UM) samples. Among the 1097 Plasmodium proteins identified, we focused on the 499 membrane-associated and hypothetical proteins for comparative analysis. Filter-based feature selection methods combined with supervised data analysis identified a subset of 29 proteins distinguishing CM and UM samples with high classification accuracy. A hierarchical clustering analysis of these 29 proteins based on the similarity of their expression profiles revealed two clusters of 15 and 14 proteins, respectively under- and over-expressed in CM. Among the over-expressed proteins, the MESA protein is expressed at the erythrocyte membrane, involved in proteins trafficking and in the export of variant surface antigens (VSAs), but without antigenic function. Antigen 332 protein is exported at the erythrocyte, also involved in protein trafficking and in VSAs export, and exposed to the immune system. Our proteomics data demonstrate an association of selected proteins in the pathophysiology of CM. PMID:27245217

  2. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum parasites from patients with cerebral and uncomplicated malaria

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Gwladys I.; Sabbagh, Audrey; Argy, Nicolas; Salnot, Virginie; Ezinmegnon, Sem; Agbota, Gino; Ladipo, Yélé; Alao, Jules M.; Sagbo, Gratien; Guillonneau, François; Deloron, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible of severe malaria, including cerebral malaria (CM). During its intra-erythrocytic maturation, parasite-derived proteins are expressed, exported and presented at the infected erythrocyte membrane. To identify new CM-specific parasite membrane proteins, we conducted a mass spectrometry-based proteomic study and compared the protein expression profiles between 9 CM and 10 uncomplicated malaria (UM) samples. Among the 1097 Plasmodium proteins identified, we focused on the 499 membrane-associated and hypothetical proteins for comparative analysis. Filter-based feature selection methods combined with supervised data analysis identified a subset of 29 proteins distinguishing CM and UM samples with high classification accuracy. A hierarchical clustering analysis of these 29 proteins based on the similarity of their expression profiles revealed two clusters of 15 and 14 proteins, respectively under- and over-expressed in CM. Among the over-expressed proteins, the MESA protein is expressed at the erythrocyte membrane, involved in proteins trafficking and in the export of variant surface antigens (VSAs), but without antigenic function. Antigen 332 protein is exported at the erythrocyte, also involved in protein trafficking and in VSAs export, and exposed to the immune system. Our proteomics data demonstrate an association of selected proteins in the pathophysiology of CM. PMID:27245217

  3. Integrative subcellular proteomic analysis allows accurate prediction of human disease-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Yiyun; Bajaj, Amol Onkar; Eblimit, Aiden; Xu, Mingchu; Soens, Zachry T; Wang, Feng; Ge, Zhongqi; Jung, Sung Yun; He, Feng; Li, Yumei; Wensel, Theodore G; Qin, Jun; Chen, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Proteomic profiling on subcellular fractions provides invaluable information regarding both protein abundance and subcellular localization. When