Science.gov

Sample records for proteus mirabilis pseudomonas

  1. Proteus mirabilis: The Enemy Within.

    PubMed

    Dzutsev, Amiran; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-04-21

    The organism needs to tailor the intestinal inflammatory response to pathogenic bacteria and to pathobionts that are only occasionally pathogenic. In this issue of Immunity, Seo et al. (2015) show that the pathobiont Proteus mirabilis induces NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent interleukin-1? (IL-1?) release from CCR2(+) Ly6C(high) inflammatory monocytes. PMID:25902478

  2. Bacteriophage typing of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Proteus morganii.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W C; Jeffries, C D

    1974-01-01

    A bacteriphage typing scheme for differentiating Proteus isolated from clinical specimens was developed. Twenty-one distinct patterns of lysis were seen when 15 bacteriophages isolated on 8 Proteus mirabilis, 1 P. vulgaris, and 1 P. morganii were used to type 162 of 189 (85.7%) P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates. Seven phages isolated on 3 P. morganii were used to type 13 of 19 (68.4%) P. morganii isolates. Overall, 84.1% of the 208 isolates were lysed by at least 1 phage at routine test dilution (RTD) or 1,000 x RTD. Fifty isolates, retyped several weeks after the initial testing, showed no changes in lytic patterns. The phages retained their titers after storage at 4 C for several months. A computer analysis of the data showed that there was no relationship between the source of the isolate and bacteriophage type. This bacteriophage typing system may provide epidemiological information on strains involved in human infections. PMID:4589141

  3. Anti-biofilm activity of biogenic selenium nanoparticles and selenium dioxide against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Forootanfar, Hamid; Golkari, Yaser; Mohammadi-Khorsand, Tayebe; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-biofilm activity of biologically synthesized selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) against the biofilm produced by clinically isolated bacterial strains compared to that of selenium dioxide. Thirty strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were isolated from various specimens of the patients hospitalized in different hospitals (Kerman, Iran). Quantification of the biofilm using microtiter plate assay method introduced 30% of S. aureus, 13% of P. aeruginosa and 17% of P. mirabilis isolates as severely adherent strains. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the purified Se NPs (produced by Bacillus sp. MSh-1) showed individual and spherical nano-structure in the size range of 80-220nm. Obtained results of the biofilm formation revealed that selenium nanoparticles inhibited the biofilm of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and P. mirabilis by 42%, 34.3%, and 53.4%, respectively, compared to that of the non-treated samples. Effect of temperature and pH on the biofilm formation in the presence of Se NPs and SeO2 was also evaluated. PMID:25175509

  4. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  5. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  6. Collective motion in Proteus mirabilis swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoran, Xu

    Proteus mirabilisis a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. It is widely distributed in soil and water, and it is well known for exhibiting swarming motility on nutrient agar surfaces. In our study, we focused on the collective motility of P. mirabilis and uncovered a range of interesting phenomena. Here we will present our efforts to understand these phenomena through experiments and simulation. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail:xhrphx@gmail.com.

  7. Proteus morgani is less frequently associated with urinary tract infections than Proteus mirabilis--an explanation.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1983-08-01

    The metabolic activities of faecal and urinary strains of Proteus morgani and P. mirabilis were compared. Regardless of origin, the generation time of P. morgani strains in urine was approximately twice as long as that of the P. mirabilis strains. Urease synthesis was constitutive in P. morgani strains but required induction with urea in the P. mirabilis strains. In the presence of urea, the P. mirabilis strains liberated ammonia more rapidly and produced alkaline conditions more quickly than P. morgani strains, although they synthesized much less urease. These characteristics may place P. morgani strains at a disadvantage in comparison with P. mirabilis strains in their ability to cause urinary tract infections. PMID:6348289

  8. Diversity of TEM Mutants in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, R.; De Champs, C.; Sirot, D.; Chanal, C.; Labia, R.; Sirot, J.

    1999-01-01

    In a survey of resistance to amoxicillin among clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis, 10 TEM-type β-lactamases were characterized: (i) the well-known penicillinases TEM-1 and TEM-2, the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) TEM-3 and TEM-24, and the inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) TEM-44 and (ii) five novel enzymes, a penicillinase TEM-57 similar to TEM-1, an ESBL TEM-66 similar to TEM-3, and three IRTs, TEM-65, TEM-73, and TEM-74. The penicillinase TEM-57 and the ESBL TEM-66 differed from TEM-1 and TEM-3, respectively, by the amino acid substitution Gly-92→Asp (nucleotide mutation G-477→A). This substitution could have accounted for the decrease in pIs (5.2 for TEM-57 and 6.0 for TEM-66) but did not necessarily affect the intrinsic activities of these enzymes. The IRT TEM-65 was an IRT-1-like IRT (Cys-244) related to TEM-2 (Lys-39). The two other IRTs, TEM-73 and TEM-74, were related to IRT-1 (Cys-244) and IRT-2 (Ser-244), respectively, and harbored the amino acid substitutions Leu-21→Phe and Thr-265→Met. In this study, the ESBLs TEM-66, TEM-24, and TEM-3 were encoded by large (170- to 180-kb) conjugative plasmids that exhibited similar patterns after digestion and hybridization with the TEM and AAC(6′)I probes. The three IRTs TEM-65, TEM-73, and TEM-74 were encoded by plasmids that ranged in size from 42 to 70 kb but for which no transfer was obtained. The characterization of five new plasmid-mediated TEM-type β-lactamases and the first report of TEM-24 in P. mirabilis are evidence of the wide diversity of β-lactamases produced in this species and of its possible role as a β-lactamase-encoding plasmid reservoir. PMID:10543745

  9. Draft Genome Assemblies of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The pleomorphic swarming bacilli of the genus Proteus are common human gut commensal organisms but also the causative agents of recurrent urinary tract infections and bacteremia. We sequenced and assembled the 3.99-Mbp genome of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 (accession no. JOVJ00000000) and the 3.97-Mbp genome of Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132 (accession no. JPIX00000000), both of which are commonly used reference strains. PMID:25342681

  10. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis. PMID:12135833

  11. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae which provides a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericat. This s...

  12. Swarming and pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R

    1995-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is best known for its pattern of swarming differentiation on agar plates, as well as for its association with the development of renal stones in patients with urinary tract infection. Urease and flagella appear to contribute most significantly to virulence, with fimbriae playing a more subtle role, whereas hemolysin does not appear to contribute significantly to pathogenesis. PMID:7551643

  13. Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 as a new representative of the O13 Proteus serogroup.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata; Siwińska, Małgorzata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The unique feature of some Proteus O-polysaccharides is occurrence of an amide of galacturonic acid with N(ε)-[(S/R)-1-Carboxyethyl]-L-lysine, GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys). The results of the serological studies presented here, with reference to known O-antigens structures suggest that GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys) or 2S,8R-AlaLys contribute to cross-reactions of O13 Proteus antisera, and Proteeae LPSs. It was also revealed that the Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 strain can be classified into the O13 serogroup, represented so far by two strains: Proteus mirabilis 26/57 and Proteus vulgaris 8344. The O13 LPS is a serologically important antigen with a fragment common to LPSs of different species in the Proteeae tribe. PMID:26645323

  14. Acidic environments induce differentiation of Proteus mirabilis into swarmer morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Masatoshi; Obara, Hisato; Watanabe, Yusaku; Ono, Hisaya K; Sasaki, Jun; Goryo, Masanobu; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-07-01

    Although swarmer morphotypes of Proteus mirabilis have long been considered to result from surfaced-induced differentiation, the present findings show that, in broth medium containing urea, acidic conditions transform some swimmer cells into elongated swarmer cells. This study has also demonstrates that P. mirabilis cells grown in acidic broth medium containing urea enhance virulence factors such as flagella production and cytotoxicity to human bladder carcinoma cell line T24, though no significant difference in urease activity under different pH conditions was found. Since there is little published data on the behavior of P. mirabilis at various hydrogen-ion concentrations, the present study may clarify aspects of cellular differentiation of P. mirabilis in patients at risk of struvite formation due to infection with urease-producing bacteria, as well as in some animals with acidic or alkaline urine. PMID:21707738

  15. Some biological features of Proteus bacilli. 1. Comparison of Proteus mirabilis strains provided from various sources.

    PubMed

    Kotelko, K; Rozalski, A; Deka, M; Kaca, W; Sidorczyk, Z; Gromska, W; Zych, K

    1983-01-01

    Some properties which may contribute to the pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis were compared in urinary isolates and in strains provided from soil and from culture collection. Clinical isolates revealed the higher expression of all the features examined in this report: swarming growth, haemagglutination, adherence to human uroepithelial cells, urease activity and haemolytic activity. Noteworthy is the higher mean value of adherence to the uroepithelial cells in clinical strains. Three P. mirabilis urinary isolates were detected which produce an as yet unreported filterable haemolysin. However, the loss of this ability within a few months seems to suggest the temporary presence of a plasmid rapidly eliminated by the Proteus strains. PMID:6202101

  16. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  17. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  18. Merging mythology and morphology: the multifaceted lifestyle of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, named for the Greek god who changed shape to avoid capture, has fascinated microbiologists for more than a century with its unique swarming differentiation, Dienes line formation and potent urease activity. Transcriptome profiling during both host infection and swarming motility, coupled with the availability of the complete genome sequence for P. mirabilis, has revealed the occurrence of interbacterial competition and killing through a type VI secretion system, and the reciprocal regulation of adhesion and motility, as well as the intimate connections between metabolism, swarming and virulence. This Review addresses some of the unique and recently described aspects of P. mirabilis biology and pathogenesis, and emphasizes the potential role of this bacterium in single- species and polymicrobial urinary tract infections. PMID:23042564

  19. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  20. Merging mythology and morphology: the multifaceted lifestyle of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis, named for the Greek god who changed shape to avoid capture, has fascinated microbiologists for more than a century with its unique swarming differentiation, Dienes line formation and potent urease activity. Transcriptome profiling during both host infection and swarming motility, coupled with the availability of the complete genome sequence for P. mirabilis, has revealed the occurrence of interbacterial competition and killing through a type VI secretion system, and the reciprocal regulation of adhesion and motility, as well as the intimate connections between metabolism, swarming and virulence. This Review addresses some of the unique and recently described aspects of P. mirabilis biology and pathogenesis, and emphasizes the potential role of this bacterium in single-species and polymicrobial urinary tract infections. PMID:23042564

  1. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. PMID:27091004

  2. Morphological Diversity of the Colony Produced by Bacteria Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Akio; Shimada, Yuji; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Matsushita, Mitsugu; Matsuyama, Tohey

    1996-08-01

    Morphological changes of colonies have been investigatedfor a bacterial strain of Proteus mirabilis, which is a famous speciesfor producing concentric-ring-like colonies. It was found that colony patterns can be classified into three types,i.e., cyclic spreading, diffusion-limited growth (DLA-like)and three-dimensional growth (inside the agar medium) patterns. Cyclic spreading patterns can further be classifiedinto three subgroups, i.e., concentric-ring, homogeneous and spatiotemporal patterns. These subgroups were classified by examining the development of colony structure after colonies spread all over petri-dishes. Comparison of the results with thoseof another bacterial species Bacillus subtilis is also discussed.

  3. Nickel availability and urease expression in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Rando, D; Steglitz, U; Mörsdorf, G; Kaltwasser, H

    1990-01-01

    Cells of Proteus mirabilis, previously grown in nutrient broth (NB), exhibited an increase in urease activity during subsequent incubation in mineral medium even when protein biosynthesis was inhibited. During growth in NB, degradation of amino acids obviously led to the formation of nickel-complexing metabolites, and nickel ions were therefore unavailable for maximal expression of enzymatically active urease; this inhibition of urease biosynthesis was overcome by the addition of nickel to the growth medium, and also by added glucose. Experiments concerning the incorporation of radioactive nickel into urease finally indicated that the observed increase in urease activity was caused by posttranslational insertion of nickel into performed apo-urease. PMID:2256779

  4. Ureolytic Biomineralization Reduces Proteus mirabilis Biofilm Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobao; Lu, Nanxi; Brady, Hannah R; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-01

    Ureolytic biomineralization induced by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis, is responsible for the formation of urinary tract calculi and the encrustation of indwelling urinary catheters. Such microbial biofilms are challenging to eradicate and contribute to the persistence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, but the mechanisms responsible for this recalcitrance remain obscure. In this study, we characterized the susceptibility of wild-type (ure+) and urease-negative (ure-) P. mirabilis biofilms to killing by ciprofloxacin. Ure+ biofilms produced fine biomineral precipitates that were homogeneously distributed within the biofilm biomass in artificial urine, while ure- biofilms did not produce biomineral deposits under identical growth conditions. Following exposure to ciprofloxacin, ure+ biofilms showed greater survival (less killing) than ure- biofilms, indicating that biomineralization protected biofilm-resident cells against the antimicrobial. To evaluate the mechanism responsible for this recalcitrance, we observed and quantified the transport of Cy5-conjugated ciprofloxacin into the biofilm by video confocal microscopy. These observations revealed that the reduced susceptibility of ure+ biofilms resulted from hindered delivery of ciprofloxacin into biomineralized regions of the biofilm. Further, biomineralization enhanced retention of viable cells on the surface following antimicrobial exposure. These findings together show that ureolytic biomineralization induced by P. mirabilis metabolism strongly regulates antimicrobial susceptibility by reducing internal solute transport and increasing biofilm stability. PMID:26953206

  5. Virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Island, M D; Massad, G

    1994-11-01

    The urinary tract is among the most common sites of bacterial infection and E. coli is by far the most common infecting agent. In patients with urinary catheters in place or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, Proteus mirabilis is also a frequent isolate. To study virulence of these bacterial species, we have isolated the genes that encode putative virulence factors, constructed specific mutations within these genes, introduced the mutation back into the wild type strain by allelic exchange, and analyzed these mutants for virulence in appropriate in vitro and in vivo models. Specific virulence markers have been identified for strains that cause urinary tract infection. For E. coli, these include P fimbriae, S fimbriae, hemolysin, aerobactin, serum resistance, and a small group of O-serotypes. Redundant virulence factors must be present in these organisms as mutation of the most clearly identified epidemiological marker, P fimbriae, does not result in attenuation of a virulent strain. For P. mirabilis, urease appears to contribute most significantly to virulence. Fimbriae play a significant but more subtle role in colonization. Hemolysin, although potently cytotoxic to renal cells in vitro, does not appear to contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infection. We can conclude that the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection and acute pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis are multifactorial, as mutation of single genes rarely causes significant attenuation of virulence. PMID:7869662

  6. New Aspects of RpoE in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen causing recurrent or persistent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The underlying mechanisms for P. mirabilis to establish UTIs are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that loss of the sigma factor E (RpoE), mediating extracytoplasmic stress responses, decreased fimbria expression, survival in macrophages, cell invasion, and colonization in mice but increased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression of urothelial cells and swarming motility. This is the first study to demonstrate that RpoE modulated expression of MR/P fimbriae by regulating mrpI, a gene encoding a recombinase controlling the orientation of MR/P fimbria promoter. By real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the IL-8 mRNA amount of urothelial cells was induced significantly by lipopolysaccharides extracted from rpoE mutant but not from the wild type. These RpoE-associated virulence factors should be coordinately expressed to enhance the fitness of P. mirabilis in the host, including the avoidance of immune attacks. Accordingly, rpoE mutant-infected mice displayed more immune cell infiltration in bladders and kidneys during early stages of infection, and the rpoE mutant had a dramatically impaired ability of colonization. Moreover, it is noteworthy that urea (the major component in urine) and polymyxin B (a cationic antimicrobial peptide) can induce expression of rpoE by the reporter assay, suggesting that RpoE might be activated in the urinary tract. Altogether, our results indicate that RpoE is important in sensing environmental cues of the urinary tract and subsequently triggering the expression of virulence factors, which are associated with the fitness of P. mirabilis, to build up a UTI. PMID:25547796

  7. [Study on whorl swarming growth phenomenon of Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    He, Xianyuan; Liao, Sixiang; Liu, Junkang; Li, Kun; Liu, Yanxia; Yu, Lurong

    2015-02-01

    The present paper is aimed to explore the origins of Proteus mirabilis (PM) whorl swarming growth phenomenon. The whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM was observed by changed bacterial culture inoculation time, humidity, vaccination practices, cultured flat placement, magnetic field, pH and other factors. Bacterial ring spiral direction of rotation is counterclockwise and the volatile growth process of PM was whorl swarming growth phenomenon. Spiro fluctuation phenomenon was of high frequency in the sealing tanks by cultured anytime inoculation, wherever inoculation technique applied or not, the presence or absence of the magnetic field, and wherever the dish position was. The experimental results showed that the whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM requires specific pH environment, in which the facts may be relative to its genetic characteristics and the Earths rotation. PMID:25997280

  8. Replication of the R Factor Rts1 in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Terawaki, Yoshiro; Rownd, R.

    1972-01-01

    The replication of the R factor Rts1 in Proteus mirabilis was examined by using the technique of CsCl density-gradient centrifugation. The proportion of Rts1 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) relative to the host chromosomal DNA (% R-DNA) was 7% in both exponential and stationary growth phases in Penassay Broth and supplemented M9 minimal medium at 30 C. The chromosomal DNA content per cell varied over a threefold range in the different growth media. In agreement with previous genetic observations, the replication of Rts1 was found to be temperature-sensitive and Rts1 DNA was diluted from the cells during exponential growth at 42 C. 14N-15N medium transfer experiments have shown that individual copies of Rts1 are selected at random for replication during the duplication of the multicopy episome pool. PMID:4550810

  9. Characterization and spectral properties of Proteus mirabilis PR catalase.

    PubMed

    Jouve, H M; Gaillard, J; Pelmont, J

    1984-10-01

    Purified catalase from a peroxide-resistant mutant (PR) of Proteus mirabilis displayed great similarities with the bovine liver catalase on the basis of its amino acid composition, content in prosthetic groups, and spectroscopic data. The bacterial enzyme was found to have 2.6 +/- 0.2 mol of protoheme IX per tetramer, with an equivalent amount of titrable iron atoms. The optical absorption of P. mirabilis PR catalase in the presence of various anionic species (cyanide, azide, formate) was examined. The dissociation constant of the formate-enzyme complex was determined as 60 +/- 2 mM at pH 7.5. Inhibition and spectral shifts induced by some thiol compounds were very similar to those reported with mammalian catalase. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra (at 9 GHz and 6 K) of bacterial catalase and its various complexes were reported. Two major different rhombic high-spin ferric signals could be seen in the g = 6 region, using either the pure enzyme or the cell crude extract. The balance between the two rhombic forms was reversibly altered by pH. Various changes in rhombicity were also observed after binding with anionic ligands. The EPR spectrum (at 40 K) of nitrosyl ferrous catalase was very similar to reported data with horse liver catalase. PMID:6095975

  10. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Fonseca, Alicia; Liu, Wenqi; Fields, Andrew T; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Spindola, Aline F; Tarone, Aaron M; Crippen, Tawni L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wood, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae that provide a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericata; this strain swarmed significantly and produced a strong odor that attracts blow flies. To identify the putative interkingdom signals for the bacterium and flies, we reasoned that as swarming is used by this bacterium to cover the food resource and requires bacterial signaling, the same bacterial signals used for swarming may be used to communicate with blow flies. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified six novel genes for swarming (ureR, fis, hybG, zapB, fadE and PROSTU_03490), then, confirming our hypothesis, we discovered that fly attractants, lactic acid, phenol, NaOH, KOH and ammonia, restore swarming for cells with the swarming mutations. Hence, compounds produced by the bacterium that attract flies also are utilized for swarming. In addition, bacteria with the swarming mutation rfaL attracted fewer blow flies and reduced the number of eggs laid by the flies. Therefore, we have identified several interkingdom signals between P. mirabilis and blow flies. PMID:22237540

  11. Proteus mirabilis viability after lithotripsy of struvite calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakharan, Sabitha; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Spore, Scott S.; Sabanegh, Edmund; Glickman, Randolph D.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Urinary calculi composed of struvite harbor urease-producing bacteria within the stone. The photothermal mechanism of holmium:YAG lithotripsy is uniquely different than other lithotripsy devices. We postulated that bacterial viability of struvite calculi would be less for calculi fragmented with holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices. Human calculi of known struvite composition (greater than 90% magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate) were incubated with Proteus mirabilis. Calculi were fragmented with no lithotripsy (controls), or shock wave, intracorporeal ultrasonic, electrohydraulic, pneumatic, holmium:YAG or pulsed dye laser lithotripsy. After lithotripsy, stone fragments were sonicated and specimens were serially plated for 48 hours at 38 C. Bacterial counts and the rate of bacterial sterilization were compared. Median bacterial counts (colony forming units per ml) were 8 X 106 in controls and 3 X 106 in shock wave, 3 X 107 in ultrasonic, 4 X 105 in electrohydraulic, 8 X 106 in pneumatic, 5 X 104 in holmium:YAG and 1 X 106 in pulsed dye laser lithotripsy, p less than 0.001. The rate of bacterial sterilization was 50% for holmium:YAG lithotripsy treated stones versus 0% for each of the other cohorts, p less than 0.01. P. mirabilis viability is less after holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices.

  12. Effect of Curcumin Against Proteus mirabilis During Crystallization of Struvite from Artificial Urine.

    PubMed

    Prywer, Jolanta; Torzewska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity of curcumin against Proteus mirabilis and the struvite crystallization in relation to urinary stones formation. In order to evaluate an activity of curcumin we performed an in vitro experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis to mimic the real urinary tract infection, which usually leads to urinary stone formation. The results demonstrate that curcumin exhibits the effect against Proteus mirabilis inhibiting the activity of urease-an enzyme produced by these microorganisms. Addition of curcumin increases the induction time and decreases the efficiency of growth of struvite compared with the absence of curcumin. Interestingly, the addition of curcumin does not affect the crystal morphology and habit. In conclusion, curcumin has demonstrated its significant potential to be further investigated for its use in the case of struvite crystallization induced for the growth by Proteus mirabilis in relation to urinary stone formation. PMID:21808656

  13. Unique developmental characteristics of the swarm and short cells of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O; Hoffman, P S

    1984-06-01

    Swarming cells of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris could be distinguished from their short-cell counterparts by virtue of their synthesis (or lack of synthesis) of certain enzymes and outer membrane proteins. Urease synthesis was constitutive in swarm cells and uninducible in short cells. In contrast, phenylalanine deaminase was inducible in both short and swarm cells, demonstrating that transcriptional and translational processes were functional. During swarm cell development, the amount of one outer membrane protein (45 kilodaltons) fell and the amounts of two others (50 and 28.3 kilodaltons) rose significantly, the level of cytochrome b decreased, and the synthesis of cytochromes a and d were repressed. Respiratory activities of swarm cells were greatly diminished, suggesting that energy for swarming came from fermentation rather than from respiration. Widespread changes in the pattern of enzyme activities, in cytochrome composition, and in the composition and type of outer membrane proteins suggest that they are due to transcriptional regulation. PMID:6427187

  14. Modulation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm development on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, David J; Morgan, Sheridan D

    2006-05-01

    The crystalline biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis can seriously complicate the care of patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. The generation of alkaline urine by the bacterial urease causes calcium and magnesium phosphates to precipitate from urine and accumulate in the catheter biofilm, blocking the flow of urine from the bladder. The pH at which these salts crystallize from a urine sample, the nucleation pH (pH(n)), can be elevated by diluting the urine and by increasing its citrate content. The aim of this study was to examine whether manipulation of pH(n) in these ways modulated the rate at which crystalline biofilm developed. Experiments in laboratory models of the catheterized bladder infected with P. mirabilis showed that when the bladder was supplied with a concentrated urine (pH(n) 6.7) at a low fluid output (720 ml per 24 h), catheters blocked at 19-31 h. Diluting this urine 1:4 increased the pH(n) to 7.5 and models supplied with this urine at 2880 ml per 24 h took 110-137 h to block. When models were supplied with urine containing citrate at 1.5 mg ml(-1) or above (pH(n) 8.3-9.1), the catheters drained freely for the full 7 day experimental period. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the catheter biofilms that developed in urine with high pH(n) values were devoid of crystalline formations. These observations should encourage a clinical trial to examine the effect of increasing a patient's fluid intake with citrate-containing drinks on the encrustation and blockage of catheters. PMID:16585633

  15. Proteus mirabilis urease: transcriptional regulation by UreR.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Foxall, P A; Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea, initiating the formation of urinary stones. The enzyme is critical for kidney colonization and the development of acute pyelonephritis. Urease is induced by urea and is not controlled by the nitrogen regulatory system (ntr) or catabolite repression. Purified whole-cell RNA from induced and uninduced cultures of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli harboring cloned urease sequences was probed with a 4.2-kb BglI fragment from within the urease operon. Autoradiographs of slot blots demonstrated 4.2- and 5.8-fold increases, respectively, in urease-specific RNA upon induction with urea. Structural and accessory genes necessary for urease activity, ureD, A, B, C, E, and F, were previously cloned and sequenced (B. D. Jones and H. L. T. Mobley, J. Bacteriol. 171:6414-6422, 1989). A 1.2-kb EcoRV-BamHI restriction fragment upstream of these sequences confers inducibility upon the operon in trans. Nucleotide sequencing of this fragment revealed a single open reading frame of 882 nucleotides, designated ureR, which is transcribed in the direction opposite that of the urease structural and accessory genes and encodes a 293-amino-acid polypeptide predicted to be 33,415 Da in size. Autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides obtained by in vitro transcription-translation of the PCR fragments carrying only ureR yielded a single band with an apparent molecular size of 32 kDa. Fragments carrying an in-frame deletion within ureR synthesized a truncated product. The predicted UreR amino acid sequence contains a potential helix-turn-helix motif and an associated AraC family signature and is similar to that predicted for a number of DNA-binding proteins, including E. coli proteins that regulate acid phosphatase synthesis (AppY), porin synthesis (EnvY), and rhamnose utilization (RhaR). These data suggest that UreR governs the inducibility of P. mirabilis urease. PMID:7678244

  16. Theory of periodic swarming of bacteria: Application to Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, A.; Matsushita, M.; Vicsek, T.

    2001-03-01

    The periodic swarming of bacteria is one of the simplest examples for pattern formation produced by the self-organized collective behavior of a large number of organisms. In the spectacular colonies of Proteus mirabilis (the most common species exhibiting this type of growth), a series of concentric rings are developed as the bacteria multiply and swarm following a scenario that periodically repeats itself. We have developed a theoretical description for this process in order to obtain a deeper insight into some of the typical processes governing the phenomena in systems of many interacting living units. Our approach is based on simple assumptions directly related to the latest experimental observations on colony formation under various conditions. The corresponding one-dimensional model consists of two coupled differential equations investigated here both by numerical integrations and by analyzing the various expressions obtained from these equations using a few natural assumptions about the parameters of the model. We determine the phase diagram corresponding to systems exhibiting periodic swarming, and discuss in detail how the various stages of the colony development can be interpreted in our framework. We point out that all of our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the complete set of available observations. Thus the present study represents one of the few examples where self-organized biological pattern formation is understood within a relatively simple theoretical approach, leading to results and predictions fully compatible with experiments.

  17. Radial and Spiral Stream Formation in Proteus mirabilis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuan; Budrene, Elena O.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis, which is a pathogen that forms biofilms in vivo, can swarm over hard surfaces and form a variety of spatial patterns in colonies. Colony formation involves two distinct cell types: swarmer cells that dominate near the surface and the leading edge, and swimmer cells that prefer a less viscous medium, but the mechanisms underlying pattern formation are not understood. New experimental investigations reported here show that swimmer cells in the center of the colony stream inward toward the inoculation site and in the process form many complex patterns, including radial and spiral streams, in addition to previously-reported concentric rings. These new observations suggest that swimmers are motile and that indirect interactions between them are essential in the pattern formation. To explain these observations we develop a hybrid model comprising cell-based and continuum components that incorporates a chemotactic response of swimmers to a chemical they produce. The model predicts that formation of radial streams can be explained as the modulation of the local attractant concentration by the cells, and that the chirality of the spiral streams results from a swimming bias of the cells near the surface of the substrate. The spatial patterns generated from the model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:22219724

  18. Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Isolated From Newly Weaned Infant Rhesus Monkeys and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenhai; He, Zhanlong; Huang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteus mirabilis is an important uropathogen that causes complicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and induces diarrhea in infants. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate P. mirabilis infection in newly weaned infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with diarrhea. Materials and Methods: Stool samples were collected from 74 rhesus monkeys and 12 ferrets with diarrhea. Proteus mirabilis was isolated from the samples through Polymerase Chain Reaction. The isolated P. mirabilis was subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Results: Seven (7/74, 9.5%) and four (4/12, 30%) P. mirabilis strains were detected in the stool samples collected from the monkeys and ferrets, respectively. Sequence analyses showed that the isolated P. mirabilis was closely related to P. mirabilis strain HI4320, which was isolated from the urine of a patient with a long-term indwelling urinary catheter. In addition, the isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Conclusions: Rhesus monkeys and ferrets are susceptible to P. mirabilis, making them useful as animal models for future studies on the mechanism of P. mirabilis-induced UTI and its corresponding treatment. PMID:26301055

  19. The expression of nonagglutinating fimbriae and its role in Proteus mirabilis adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Harrison, B A; Latta, R K; Lee, K K; Altman, E

    1997-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common causative agent of human urinary tract infections, especially in catheterized patients and in those patients with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. In addition to the production of hemolysin and urease, fimbriae-mediated adherence to uroepithelial cells and kidney epithelium may be essential for virulence of P. mirabilis. A single P. mirabilis strain is capable of expressing several morphologically distinct fimbrial species, which can each be favoured by specific in vitro growth conditions. The fimbrial species reported to date include mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae, ambient temperature fimbriae, P. mirabilis fimbriae, and nonagglutinating fimbriae (NAF). Here, using intact bacteria or purified NAF as immunogens, we have generated the first reported NAF-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Bacteria expressing NAF as their only fimbrial species adhered strongly to a number of cell lines in vitro, including uroepithelial cell lines. Binding of P. mirabilis was markedly reduced following preincubation with NAF-specific mAbs and Fab fragments. The presence of NAF with highly conserved N-terminal sequences on all P. mirabilis strains so far examined, combined with the ability of both anti-NAF mAbs and purified NAF molecules to inhibit P. mirabilis adherence in vitro, suggests that NAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. mirabilis. PMID:9304781

  20. Inhibition of virulence factor expression and swarming differentiation in Proteus mirabilis by p-nitrophenylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Liaw, S J; Lai, H C; Ho, S W; Luh, K T; Wang, W B

    2000-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of upper urinary tract infections that can involve invasion of host urothelial cells. The ability to invade urothelial cells is coupled closely to swarming, a form of multicellular behaviour in which vegetative bacteria differentiate into hyperflagellate, filamentous swarming cells capable of co-ordinated and rapid population migration. Co-ordinate expression of virulence factors including urease, protease, haemolysin and flagellin during swarm-cell differentiation in P. mirabilis has been reported. To investigate the effects of p-nitrophenylglycerol (PNPG), a potent anti-swarming agent, on the various swarming-associated traits of P. mirabilis and to elucidate the relationships among them, P. mirabilis growth rate, swarming/swimming activity, cell invasion ability and the ability to express various virulence factors were monitored in the presence or absence of PNPG. It was found that PNPG could inhibit the growth rate, swarming differentiation and swarming/swimming activities of P. mirabilis. The expression of virulence factors such as protease, urease, haemolysin and flagellin in P. mirabilis was also inhibited by PNPG. The ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells was reduced dramatically in the presence of PNPG. These results suggest that PNPG has the potential to be developed as an agent active against the effects of P. mirabilis infection. PMID:10933258

  1. Involvement of polyphosphate kinase in virulence and stress tolerance of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Qiao; Pan, Jia-Yun; Deng, Cong; Yu, Jing-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Man; Huang, Sheng-He; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), a gram-negative enteric bacterium, frequently causes urinary tract infections. Many virulence factors of uropathogenic P. mirabilis have been identified, including urease, flagella, hemolysin and fimbriae. However, the functions of polyphosphate kinase (PPK), which are related to the pathogenicity of many bacteria, remain entirely unknown in P. mirabilis. In this study, a ppk gene encoding the PPK insertional mutant in P. mirabilis strain HI4320 was constructed, and its biological functions were examined. The results of survival studies demonstrated that the ppk mutant was deficient in resistance to oxidative, hyperosmotic and heat stress. The swarming and biofilm formation abilities of P. mirabilis were also attenuated after the ppk interruption. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that ppk was required for P. mirabilis to invade the bladder. The negative phenotypes of the ppk mutant could be restored by ppk gene complementation. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteomes of the wild-type strain and the ppk mutant. Compared with the wild-type strain, seven proteins including TonB-dependent receptor, universal stress protein G, major mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbrial protein (MR/P fimbriae), heat shock protein, flagellar capping protein, putative membrane protein and multidrug efflux protein were down-regulated, and four proteins including exported peptidase, repressor protein for FtsI, FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and phosphotransferase were up-regulated in the ppk mutant. As a whole, these results indicate that PPK is an important regulator and plays a crucial role in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:26233310

  2. Eugenol alters the integrity of cell membrane and acts against the nosocomial pathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Pandima; Sakthivel, R; Nisha, S Arif; Suganthy, N; Pandian, S Karutha

    2013-03-01

    Eugenol, a member of the phenylpropanoids class of chemical compounds, is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. The antibacterial activity of eugenol and its mechanism of bactericidal action against Proteus mirabilis were evaluated. Treatment with eugenol at their minimum inhibitory concentration [0.125 % (v/v)] and minimum bactericidal concentration [0.25 % (v/v)] reduced the viability and resulted in complete inhibition of P. mirabilis. A strong bactericidal effect on P. mirabilis was also evident, as eugenol inactivated the bacterial population within 30 min exposure. Chemo-attractant property and the observance of highest antibacterial activity at alkaline pH suggest that eugenol can work more effectively when given in vivo. Eugenol inhibits the virulence factors produced by P. mirabilis as observed by swimming motility, swarming behavior and urease activity. It interacts with cellular membrane of P. mirabilis and makes it highly permeable, forming nonspecific pores on plasma membrane, which in turn directs the release of 260 nm absorbing materials and uptake of more crystal violet from the medium into the cells. SDS-polyacrylamide gel, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis further proves the disruptive action of eugenol on the plasma membrane of P. mirabilis. The findings reveal that eugenol shows an excellent bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis by altering the integrity of cell membrane. PMID:23444040

  3. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the murine urinary tract: virulence and nitrogen assimilation gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Melanie M; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2011-07-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  4. Identification of emergent bla CMY-2 -carrying Proteus mirabilis lineages by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, M; Rogers, T R; Crowley, B

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of 24 Proteus mirabilis isolates revealed the clonal expansion of two cefoxitin-resistant strains among patients with community-onset infection. These strains harboured bla CMY-2 within a chromosomally located integrative and conjugative element and exhibited multidrug resistance phenotypes. A predominant strain, identified in 18 patients, also harboured the PGI-1 genomic island and associated resistance genes, accounting for its broader antibiotic resistance profile. The identification of these novel multidrug-resistant strains among community-onset infections suggests that they are endemic to this region and represent emergent P. mirabilis lineages of clinical significance. PMID:26865983

  5. Identification of emergent blaCMY-2-carrying Proteus mirabilis lineages by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mac Aogáin, M.; Rogers, T.R.; Crowley, B.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of 24 Proteus mirabilis isolates revealed the clonal expansion of two cefoxitin-resistant strains among patients with community-onset infection. These strains harboured blaCMY-2 within a chromosomally located integrative and conjugative element and exhibited multidrug resistance phenotypes. A predominant strain, identified in 18 patients, also harboured the PGI-1 genomic island and associated resistance genes, accounting for its broader antibiotic resistance profile. The identification of these novel multidrug-resistant strains among community-onset infections suggests that they are endemic to this region and represent emergent P. mirabilis lineages of clinical significance. PMID:26865983

  6. Loss of FliL Alters Proteus mirabilis Surface Sensing and Temperature-Dependent Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic motile bacterium well known for its flagellum-dependent swarming motility over surfaces. In liquid, P. mirabilis cells are 1.5- to 2.0-μm swimmer cells with 4 to 6 flagella. When P. mirabilis encounters a solid surface, where flagellar rotation is limited, swimmer cells differentiate into elongated (10- to 80-μm), highly flagellated swarmer cells. In order for P. mirabilis to swarm, it first needs to detect a surface. The ubiquitous but functionally enigmatic flagellar basal body protein FliL is involved in P. mirabilis surface sensing. Previous studies have suggested that FliL is essential for swarming through its involvement in viscosity-dependent monitoring of flagellar rotation. In this study, we constructed and characterized ΔfliL mutants of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly and unlike other fliL mutants, both P. mirabilis and E. coli ΔfliL cells swarm (Swr+). Further analysis revealed that P. mirabilis ΔfliL cells also exhibit an alteration in their ability to sense a surface: e.g., ΔfliL P. mirabilis cells swarm precociously over surfaces with low viscosity that normally impede wild-type swarming. Precocious swarming is due to an increase in the number of elongated swarmer cells in the population. Loss of fliL also results in an inhibition of swarming at <30°C. E. coli ΔfliL cells also exhibit temperature-sensitive swarming. These results suggest an involvement of FliL in the energetics and function of the flagellar motor. PMID:25331431

  7. First description of DHA-1 ampCbeta-lactamase in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Bidet, P; Verdet, C; Gautier, V; Bingen, E; Arlet, G

    2005-07-01

    This report describes the first occurrence of the DHA-1 ampCbeta-lactamase gene in Proteus mirabilis. The organism was isolated from the vaginal flora of a pregnant woman in a French hospital. The DHA-1 beta-lactamase gene was identified on the basis of phenotypic characteristics, PCR amplification and sequencing. Antagonism between cefoxitin and the other cephalosporins suggested inducible production of the DHA-1 enzyme. PMID:15966982

  8. Proteus mirabilis urease. Partial purification and inhibition by boric acid and boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, J M; Hausinger, R P

    1988-03-15

    Urease was purified 800-fold and partially characterized from Proteus mirabilis, the predominant microorganism associated with urinary stones. Boric acid is a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor of urease. The pH-dependence of inhibition exhibited pKa values of 6.25 and 9.3, where the latter value is probably due to the inherent pKa of boric acid. Three boronic acids also were shown to inhibit urease competitively. PMID:3291857

  9. Histochemical and biochemical urease localization in the periplasm and outer membrane of two Proteus mirabilis strains.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Cheng, K J; Gould, W D; Nickel, J C; Costerton, J W

    1986-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacillus, is often implicated in the formation of infectious kidney stones. As ureolytic activity of this organism is thought to play a major role in its pathogenesis, we adapted our recently described urease localization technique to visualize urease activity in vivo. Urease activity was ultrastructurally localized in two clinically isolated P. mirabilis strains by precipitating the enzymatic reaction product (ammonia) with sodium tetraphenylboron. Subsequent silver staining of the cells revealed urease activity to be predominantly associated with the periplasm and outer membranes of each strain. Biochemical measurements of urease activity in P. mirabilis cell fractions correlated well with histochemical observations in that the majority of urease activity was associated with the periplasm. Membrane-bound urease activity of these strains was associated mainly with the peptidoglycan in the detergent-insoluble (outer membrane) fraction. PMID:3539291

  10. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104) product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains. PMID:24756091

  11. Development of an intranasal vaccine to prevent urinary tract infection by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Lane, M Chelsea; Warren, John W; Mobley, Harry L T

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis commonly infects the complicated urinary tract and is associated with urolithiasis. Stone formation is caused by bacterial urease, which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, causing local pH to rise, and leads to the subsequent precipitation of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) and calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals. To prevent these infections, we vaccinated CBA mice with formalin-killed bacteria or purified mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, a surface antigen expressed by P. mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection, via four routes of immunization: subcutaneous, intranasal, transurethral, and oral. We assessed the efficacy of vaccination using the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Subcutaneous or intranasal immunization with formalin-killed bacteria and intranasal or transurethral immunization with purified MR/P fimbriae significantly protected CBA mice from ascending urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.05). To investigate the potential of MrpH, the MR/P fimbrial tip adhesin, as a vaccine, the mature MrpH peptide (residues 23 to 275, excluding the signal peptide), and the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of MrpH (residues 23 to 157) were overexpressed as C-terminal fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP) and purified on amylose resins. Intranasal immunization of CBA mice with MBP-MrpH (residues 23 to 157) conferred effective protection against urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.002). PMID:14688082

  12. Comparison of phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Elie K; Hajj, Zahi G; Hamadeh, Shadi; Shaib, Houssam A; Farran, Mohamad T; Araj, George; Faroon, Obaid; Barbour, Kamil E; Jirjis, Faris; Azhar, Esam; Kumosani, Taha; Harakeh, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the phenotypic and virulence genes characteristics in human and chicken isolates of Proteus mirabilis. The bacterial examination of 50 livers of individual broilers, marketed by four major outlets, revealed a high recovery of P. mirabilis (66%), and a low recovery frequency of Salmonella spp. (4%), Serratia odorifera (2%), Citrobacter brakii (2%), and Providencia stuartii (2%). The phenotypic biochemical characterization of the recovered 33 chicken isolates of P. mirabilis were compared to 30 human isolates (23 urinary and six respiratory isolates). The comparison revealed significant differences in the presence of gelatinase enzyme (100% presence in chicken isolates versus 91.3 and 83.3% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P<0.05). The H2S production occurred in 100% of chicken isolates versus 95.6 and 66.7% presence in human urinary and respiratory isolates, respectively, P<0.05). The other 17 biochemical characteristics did not differ significantly among the three groups of isolates (P>0.05). Two virulence genes, the mrpA and FliL, were having a typical 100% presence in randomly selected isolates of P. mirabilis recovered from chicken livers (N = 10) versus isolates recovered from urinary (N = 5) and respiratory specimens of humans (N = 5) (P>0.05). The average percentage similarity of mrpA gene nucleotide sequence of poultry isolates to human urinary and respiratory isolates was 93.2 and 97.5-%, respectively. The high similarity in phenotypic characteristics, associated with typical frequency of presence of two virulence genes, and high similarity in sequences of mrpA gene among poultry versus human P. mirabilis isolates justifies future investigations targeting the evaluation of adaptable pathogenicity of avian Proteus mirabilis isolates to mammalian hosts. PMID:23182140

  13. Molecular detection of HpmA and HlyA hemolysin of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Silvia Emanoele; Ludovico, Marilucia Santos; Martins, Fernando Henrique; da Rocha, Sérgio Paulo Dejato; Elias, Waldir Pereira; Pelayo, Jacinta Sanchez

    2013-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the bacterial infections frequently documented in humans. Proteus mirabilis is associated with UTI mainly in individuals with urinary tract abnormality or related with vesicular catheterism and it can be difficult to treat because of the formation of stones in the bladder and kidneys. These stones are formed due to the presence of urease synthesized by the bacteria. Another important factor is that P. mirabilis produces hemolysin HpmA, used by the bacteria to damage the kidney tissues. Proteus spp. samples can also express HlyA hemolysin, similar to that found in Escherichia coli. A total of 211 uropathogenic P. mirabilis isolates were analyzed to detect the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes by the techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot and hlyA by PCR. The hpmA and hpmB genes were expressed by the RT-PCR technique and two P. mirabilis isolates were sequenced for the hpmA and hpmB genes. The presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes was confirmed by PCR in 205 (97.15 %) of the 211 isolates. The dot blot confirmed the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes in the isolates that did not amplify in the PCR. None of the isolates studied presented the hlyA gene. The hpmA and hpmB genes that were sequenced presented 98 % identity with the same genes of the HI4320 P. mirabilis sample. This study showed that the PCR technique has good sensitivity for detecting the hpmA and hpmB genes of P. mirabilis. PMID:23884594

  14. Cranberry impairs selected behaviors essential for virulence in Proteus mirabilis HI4320.

    PubMed

    McCall, Jennifer; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Asadishad, Bahareh; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an etiological agent of complicated urinary tract infections. North American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) have long been considered to have protective properties against urinary tract infections. This work reports the effects of cranberry powder (CP) on the motility of P. mirabilis HI4320 and its expression of flaA, flhD, and ureD. Our results show that swimming and swarming motilities and swarmer-cell differentiation were inhibited by CP. Additionally, transcription of the flagellin gene flaA and of flhD, the first gene of the flagellar master operon flhDC, decreased during exposure of P. mirabilis to various concentrations of CP. Moreover, using ureD-gfp, a fusion of the urease accessory gene ureD with gfp, we show that CP inhibits urease expression. Because we demonstrate that CP does not inhibit the growth of P. mirabilis, the observed effects are not attributable to toxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that CP hinders motility of P. mirabilis and reduces the expression of important virulence factors. PMID:23750959

  15. Allicin from garlic inhibits the biofilm formation and urease activity of Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Omid, Mahsa; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Amani, Mojtaba; Shokri Al-Hashem, Seyyedeh Khadijeh; Amir Mozafari, Nour; Peeri Doghaheh, Hadi

    2015-05-01

    Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis. This study determined the inhibitory effects of allicin on urease, hemolysin and biofilm of P. mirabilis ATCC 12453 and its antimicrobial activity against 20 clinical isolates of P. mirabilis. Allicin did not inhibit hemolysin, whereas it did inhibit relative urease activity in both pre-lysed (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 4.15 μg) and intact cells (IC50 = 21 μg) in a concentration-dependent manner. Allicin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (2-32 μg mL(-1)) showed no significant effects on the growth of the bacteria (P > 0.05), but it reduced biofilm development in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.001). A higher concentration of allicin was needed to inhibit the established biofilms. Using the microdilution technique, the MIC90 and MBC90 values of allicin against P. mirabilis isolates were determined to be 128 and 512 μg mL(-1), respectively. The results suggest that allicin could have clinical applications in controlling P. mirabilis infections. PMID:25837813

  16. A novel autotransporter of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis is both a cytotoxin and an agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Alamuri, Praveen; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-05-01

    One of the six predicted Proteus mirabilis autotransporters (ATs), ORF c2341, is predicted to contain a serine protease motif and was earlier identified as an immunogenic outer membrane protein in P. mirabilis. The 3.2 kb gene encodes a 117 kDa protein with a 58-amino-acid-long signal peptide, a 75-kDa-long N-terminal passenger domain and a 30-kDa-long C-terminal translocator. Affinity-purified 110 kDa AT exhibited chymotrypsin-like activity and hydrolysed N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNa and N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu-pNa with a K(M) of 22 muM and 31 muM, respectively, under optimal pH of 8.5-9.0 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Activity was inhibited by subtilase-specific inhibitors leupeptin and chymostatin. Both the cell-associated and purified form elicited cytopathic effects on cultured kidney and bladder epithelial cells. Substrate hydrolysis as well as cytotoxicity was associated with the passenger domain and was compromised upon mutation of any of the catalytic residues (Ser366, His147 and Asp533). At alkaline pH and optimal cell density, the AT also promoted autoaggregation of P. mirabilis and this function was independent of its protease activity. Cytotoxicity, autoaggregation and virulence were significantly reduced in an isogenic pta mutant of P. mirabilis. Proteus toxic agglutinin (Pta) represents a novel autotransported cytotoxin with no bacterial homologues that works optimally in the alkalinized urinary tract, a characteristic of urease-mediated urea hydrolysis during P. mirabilis infection. PMID:18430084

  17. Detection of KPC-2 in a Clinical Isolate of Proteus mirabilis and First Reported Description of Carbapenemase Resistance Caused by a KPC Beta-Lactamase in P. mirabilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Proteus mirabilis recovered from bacterial cultures was shown to be resistant to imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem by disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Amplification of whole cell and/or plasmid DNA recovered from the isolate using primers specific for the blaKPC carbapenemase g...

  18. Characterization of 17 chaperone-usher fimbriae encoded by Proteus mirabilis reveals strong conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Lisa; Schaffer, Jessica N.; Zouzias, Christos D.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes complicated urinary tract infections, particularly in patients with indwelling catheters. Sequencing of clinical isolate P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed the presence of 17 predicted chaperone-usher fimbrial operons. We classified these fimbriae into three groups by their genetic relationship to other chaperone-usher fimbriae. Sixteen of these fimbriae are encoded by all seven currently sequenced P. mirabilis genomes. The predicted protein sequence of the major structural subunit for 14 of these fimbriae was highly conserved (≥95 % identity), whereas three other structural subunits (Fim3A, UcaA and Fim6A) were variable. Further examination of 58 clinical isolates showed that 14 of the 17 predicted major structural subunit genes of the fimbriae were present in most strains (>85 %). Transcription of the predicted major structural subunit genes for all 17 fimbriae was measured under different culture conditions designed to mimic conditions in the urinary tract. The majority of the fimbrial genes were induced during stationary phase, static culture or colony growth when compared to exponential-phase aerated culture. Major structural subunit proteins for six of these fimbriae were detected using MS of proteins sheared from the surface of broth-cultured P. mirabilis, demonstrating that this organism may produce multiple fimbriae within a single culture. The high degree of conservation of P. mirabilis fimbriae stands in contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, which exhibit greater variability in their fimbrial repertoires. These findings suggest there may be evolutionary pressure for P. mirabilis to maintain a large fimbrial arsenal. PMID:24809384

  19. Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide on the subunit vaccine of Proteus mirabilis in birds.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guolin; Zhong, Shixun; Yang, Shifa; Zuo, Xuemei; Liang, Manfei; Sun, Jing; Liu, Jingjing; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2013-05-01

    Three adjuvants, namely, Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), white mineral oil (WO) and propolis (PP), were added to the outer membrane protein (OMP) of Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) and their effects were compared. Three hundred 1-day-old chicks were randomly divided into five groups (I-V), with 60 chicks per group, and injected subcutaneously with WO-OMP vaccine (I), PP-OMP vaccine (II), TPPPS-OMP vaccine (III), OMP-only vaccine (IV) and physiological saline (V) at 3, 7 and 12 days old. On days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 after the first vaccination, the antibody titers, interleukin-2 levels (IL-2) and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in the peripheral blood as well as the secreting-type IgA levels (SIgA) in the duodenum were measured. On day 7 after the third vaccination, the chicks were challenged with P. mirabilis strain Q1 and the protective effects of each group were observed. The highest protective rate was observed in group III. Moreover, the antibody titers as well as IL-2, SIgA and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in this group significantly increased and were significantly higher than those in the other groups at most time points. The results indicate that TPPPS could significantly enhance the effects of the subunit vaccine of P. mirabilis; induced stronger humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity as compared with WO and PP; and should be developed as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:23403027

  20. Evidence against the involvement of chemotaxis in swarming of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, F D; Anderson, D M; Hoffman, P S; Schwarzhoff, R H; Leonard, S

    1976-01-01

    Nonswarming and nonchemotactic mutants of Proteus mirabilis were isolated after mutagenesis with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or ultraviolet light. These mutants were used in experiments to determine if chemotaxis is involved in the swarming of P. mirabilis. Nonchemotactic mutants failed to form chemotactic bands in a semisolid casein hydrolysate medium, yet they swarmed on the same medium containing 1.5% agar. Nonswarming mutants were attracted towards individual amino acids and components of tryptose. In cross-feeding experiments, no evidence was obtained to indicate the production of a diffusable chemical repellent. In studies with the wild-type P. mirabilis, no clear-cut negative chemotaxis was seen even though three different assays were used and numerous chemicals were tested. Additional evidence against the involvement of chemotaxis in swarming comes from finding that dialysis does not interfere with swarming; swarm cells will swarm immediately when transferred to fresh media, and swarm cells will swarm on an agar-water medium supplemented with a surfactant. These data indicate that chemotaxis is not involved in the swarming of P. mirabilis. PMID:776927

  1. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  2. Anti-biofilm effects of honey against wound pathogens Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    Majtan, Juraj; Bohova, Jana; Horniackova, Miroslava; Klaudiny, Jaroslav; Majtan, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm growth and its persistence within wounds have recently been suggested as contributing factors to impaired healing. The goal of this study was to investigate the anti-biofilm effects of several honey samples of different botanical origin, including manuka honey against Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacter cloacae wound isolates. Quantification of biofilm formation was carried out using a microtiter plate assay. All honeys at a sub-inhibitory concentration of 10% (w/v) significantly reduced the biofilm development of both isolates. Similarly, at a concentration of 50% (w/v), each of the honeys caused significant partial detachment of Pr. mirabilis biofilm after 24 h. On the other hand, no honey was able to significantly detach Ent. cloacae biofilm. In addition, treatment of Ent. cloacae and Pr. mirabilis biofilms with all honeys resulted in a significant decrease in colony-forming units per well values in a range of 0.35-1.16 and 1.2-7.5 log units, respectively. Of the tested honeys, manuka honey possessed the most potent anti-biofilm properties. Furthermore, methylglyoxal, an antibacterial compound of manuka honey, was shown to be responsible for killing biofilm-embedded wound bacteria. These findings suggest that manuka honey could be used as a potential therapy for the treatment of wounds containing Pr. mirabilis or Ent. cloacae. PMID:23494861

  3. Inhibition of swarming and virulence factor expression in Proteus mirabilis by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Won-Bo; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chiou, Robin Y-Y; Lin, Shwu-Bin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2006-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a phytoalexin compound with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The effect of resveratrol on swarming and virulence factor expression of Proteus mirabilis, an important pathogen infecting the urinary tract, was determined on swarming agar plates with and without the compound. Bacteria harvested at different times were assayed for cell length and the production of flagella, haemolysin and urease. Resveratrol inhibited P. mirabilis swarming and virulence factor expression in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol significantly inhibited swarming at 15 microg ml(-1), and completely inhibited swarming at 60 microg ml(-1). Inhibition of swarming and virulence factor expression was mediated through RsbA, a His-containing phosphotransmitter of the bacterial two-component signalling system possibly involved in quorum sensing. Complementation of an rsbA-defective mutant with the rsbA gene restored its responsiveness to resveratrol. The compound also inhibited the ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells. These findings suggest that resveratrol has potential to be developed as an antimicrobial agent against P. mirabilis infection. PMID:17005777

  4. Polymer surface properties and their effect on the adhesion of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Downer, A; Morris, N; Feast, W J; Stickler, D

    2003-01-01

    A problem encountered in patients undergoing long-term catheterization of the urinary tract is that of encrustation and blockage of the catheter by crystalline bacterial biofilms. This is principally caused by the action of the urease-producing pathogen Proteus mirabilis. A major aim of this work is to develop materials resistant to encrustation. Here, the effects of polymer surface properties on the adhesion of P. mirabilis are examined. Spin-coated polymer films were characterized through contact angle measurements to give the Lifschitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor terms of the surface free energy, gamma(s)LW, gamma(s)+ and gamma(s)- respectively. A parallel-plate flow cell was used to assess adhesion to these polymer films of P. mirabilis suspended in an aqueous phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, ionic strength 0.26 mol/kg. P. mirabilis was found to adhere significantly less (p < 0.02) to films of agarose, poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) and cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) than to more hydrophobic materials. These polymer films were found to be strongly electron donating, i.e. possessing large gamma(s)-. Films examined using scanning electron microscopy mostly showed no evidence of roughness down to a scale of 1-10 microm. The better performance is thought to be due to a repulsive interaction with the bacterial surface caused by acid/base-type interactions. PMID:12885198

  5. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb. PMID:25896692

  6. Two novel Salmonella genomic island 1 variants in Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Wang, Hong-Ning; Yang, Li-Qin; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Four different Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) variants, including two novel variants, were characterized in one Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen sequence type ST1917 isolate and three Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China. One novel variant was derived from SGI1-B with the backbone gene S021 disrupted by a 12.72-kb IS26 composite transposon containing the dfrA17-aadA5 cassettes and macrolide inactivation gene cluster mphA-mrx-mphR. The other one was an integron-free SGI1 and contained a 183-bp truncated S025 next to IS6100 and S044. PMID:25918148

  7. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  8. Molecular Characteristics of Salmonella Genomic Island 1 in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Poultry Farms in China

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Qing-Qing; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Dong-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Six out of the 64 studied Proteus mirabilis isolates from 11 poultry farms in China contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). PCR mapping showed that the complete nucleotide sequences of SGI1s ranged from 33.2 to 42.5 kb. Three novel variants, SGI1-W, SGI1-X, and SGI1-Y, have been characterized. Resistance genes lnuF, dfrA25, and qnrB2 were identified in SGI1 for the first time. PMID:25267683

  9. Sequence of the Proteus mirabilis urease accessory gene ureG.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1993-07-15

    We report the sequence of ureG, an accessory gene that is a part of the ure gene cluster of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and required for full enzymatic activity of urease. The 615-bp open reading frame predicts a M(r) 22,374 polypeptide, which contains a consensus amino acid (aa) sequence for ATP-binding. The polypeptide shares sequence homology with UreG of Escherichia coli (93% of identical aa), Klebsiella aerogenes (59%) and Helicobacter pylori (59%). PMID:8335248

  10. Evaluation of the Usefulness of a Novel Injectable Cephalosporin, E1040, and Ceftazidime for Management of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis by Using the Rat Urolithiasis Model

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Masaru; Munakata, Kei-Ichi; Takeuchi, Hideo; Yoshida, Osamu

    1992-01-01

    A novel injectable cephalosporin, E1040, significantly eradicated Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the urine, in contrast to ceftazidime, in rats with complicated P. aeruginosa urinary tract infections associated with urinary stones, suggesting that E1040 is a prospective therapeutic agent in the management of refractory Pseudomonas urinary tract infections. PMID:1510458

  11. Unique ability of the Proteus mirabilis capsule to enhance mineral growth in infectious urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Dumanski, A J; Hedelin, H; Edin-Liljegren, A; Beauchemin, D; McLean, R J

    1994-07-01

    Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) calculi are a common complication of Proteus mirabilis urinary tract infections. Although urease is a major virulence factor in calculus formation, the polysaccharide capsule (CPS) of this organism also enhances struvite crystallization and growth in vitro (L. Clapham, R. J. C. McLean, J. C. Nickel, J. Downey, and J. W. Costerton, J. Crystal Growth 104:475-484, 1990). We obtained purified CPS, of known structure and varying anionic character, from P. mirabilis ATCC 49565 and several other organisms. Artificial urine was added to CPS, and the pH was elevated from 5.8 to 8.5 by the addition of urease or titration with 0.25 M NH4OH to induce struvite crystallization. Crystallization was measured by particle counting (Coulter counter), and the morphology (crystal habit) was examined by phase-contrast microscopy. In the presence of partially anionic P. mirabilis CPS, struvite formation occurred at a lower pH than in the absence of CPS or in the presence of other neutral, partially anionic, or anionic CPS. At pH 7.5 to 8.0, significantly more struvite crystals formed in the presence of P. mirabilis CPS than under other experimental conditions. With the exception of one polymer (curdlan) which did not bind Mg2+, enhancement of struvite formation by CPS polymers was inversely proportional to their Mg2+ binding ability. We speculate that the structure and partial anionic nature of P. mirabilis CPS enable it to enhance struvite formation by weakly concentrating Mg2+ ions during struvite crystal formation. This illustrates a new virulence aspect of bacterial CPS during infection. PMID:8005688

  12. Cytotoxicity of the HpmA hemolysin and urease of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris against cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R; Swihart, K G; Welch, R A

    1991-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated bacteriuria, can cause acute pyelonephritis. In ascending infections, bacteria colonize the bladder and ascend the ureters to the proximal tubules of the kidney. We postulate that Proteus species uses the HpmA hemolysin and urease to elicit tissue damage that allows entry of these bacteria into the kidney. To study this interaction, strains of Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris and their isogenic hemolysin-negative (hpmA) or isogenic urease-negative (ureC) constructs were overlaid onto cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) isolated from kidneys obtained by immediate autopsy. Cytotoxicity was measured by release of soluble lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Two strains of P. mirabilis inoculated at 10(6) CFU caused a release of 80% of total LDH after 6 h, whereas pyelonephritogenic hemolytic Escherichia coli CFT073 released only 25% at 6 h (P less than 0.012). Ten P. mirabilis isolates and five P. vulgaris isolates were all hemolytic and cytotoxic and produced urease which was induced by urea. The HpmA hemolysin is apparently responsible for the majority of cytotoxicity in vitro since the hemolysin-negative (hpmA) mutants of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris were significantly less cytotoxic than wild-type strains. P. mirabilis WPM111 (hemolysin negative) was used to test the effect of urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis on HRPTEC viability. In the presence of 50 mM urea, WPM111 caused the release of 42% of LDH versus 1% at 6 h in the absence of substrate (P = 0.003). We conclude that the HpmA hemolysin of Proteus species acts as a potent cytotoxin against HRPTEC. In addition, urease apparently contributes to this process when substrate urea is available. PMID:2037363

  13. Tuberculous Otitis with Proteus mirabilis Co-Infection: An Unsuspected Presentation Encountered in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Moumita; Jadhav, Savita Vivek; Vyawahare, Chanda; Misra, Rabindranath

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a contagious bacterial disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily involves the lungs.Though Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is the commonest clinical presentation, there is a need for alertness towards uncommon presentations which involve other organs. Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is one such rare presentation seen in paediatric practice. It is characterized by painless otorrhoea which fails to respond to the routine antibacterial treatment. TOM usually occurs secondary to PTB. Here is a case of tuberculous otitis media with Proteus mirabilis co-infection, with no evidence of PTB. In the sample of ear discharge obtained from the patient, acid fast bacilli were demonstrated on direct microscopy after Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Culture done on Lowenstein-Jensen medium demonstrated slow-growing Mycobacterium. Bacteriological culture and identification helped in isolating Proteus mirabilis. PCR, followed by Line- Probe Assay for early identification and susceptibility testing to primary drugs, was done. Further, patient tested negative for the Mantoux test. Patient was enrolled in National Tuberculosis programme- RNTCP. This case emphasizes on one of the less common presentations of a common disease. A high clinical suspicion and laboratory confirmation are required for appropriate patient management. PMID:24995225

  14. Hemagglutinin, urease, and hemolysin production by Proteus mirabilis from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R

    1990-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, can lead to serious complications including pyelonephritis. Adherence factors, urease, and hemolysin may be virulence determinants. These factors were compared for bacteria cultured from 16 patients with acute pyelonephritis and 35 with catheter-associated bacteriuria and for 20 fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates were more likely (P less than .05) to express the mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) hemagglutinin in the absence of mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutinin than were catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates produced urease activity of 63 +/- 27 (mean +/- SD) mumol of NH3/min/mg of protein, not significantly different from catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Hybridization of Southern blots of P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA with two urease gene probes demonstrated that urease gene sequences were conserved in all isolates. Geometric mean of reciprocal hemolytic titers for pyelonephritis isolates was 27.9; for urinary catheter isolates, 18.0; and for fecal isolates, 55.7 (not significantly different, P greater than .1). Although in vivo expression of urease and hemolysin may not be reliable indexes of virulence, MR/P hemagglutination in the absence of MR/K hemagglutination may be necessary for development of pyelonephritis. PMID:2179424

  15. Sublethal ciprofloxacin treatment leads to resistance via antioxidant systems in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Aiassa, Virginia; Barnes, Ana I; Smania, Andrea M; Albesa, Inés

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates new aspects of the possible role of antioxidant defenses in the mechanisms of resistance to ciprofloxacin in Proteus mirabilis. Four ciprofloxacin-resistant variants (CRVs), selected in vitro by repeated cultures in a sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) concentration of ciprofloxacin, attained different levels of antibiotic resistance and high Ferric reducing antioxidant power, with 10(-6) frequencies. However, no mutations occurred in positions 83 or 87 of gyrA, 464 or 466 of gyrB, or 78, 80 or 84 of parC, suggesting that resistance took place without these typical mutations in DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV. Assays with ciprofloxacin and the pump inhibitor carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone showed that in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms, the influx/efflux mechanism also contributed to the increase in the resistance to ciprofloxacin in one CRV. Moreover, lipid oxidation to malondialdehyde and protein oxidation to carbonyls and advanced oxidation protein products were higher in sensitive than in the resistant strains, as a new factor involved in the mechanisms of resistance in P. mirabilis. The oxidative stress cross-resistance to telluride in CRVs enhanced the role of the antioxidants in the ciprofloxacin resistance of P. mirabilis, which was reinforced during the assays of reduction of susceptibility to ciprofloxacin by glutathione and ascorbic acid. PMID:22092852

  16. Cell cycle parameters of Proteus mirabilis: interdependence of the biosynthetic cell cycle and the interdivision cycle.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, J; Sarnow, E; Milde, K

    1985-11-01

    We investigated the time periods of DNA replication, lateral cell wall extension, and septum formation within the cell cycle of Proteus mirabilis. Cells were cultivated under three different conditions, yielding interdivision times of approximately 55, 57, and 160 min, respectively. Synchrony was achieved by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The time periods were estimated by division inhibition studies with cephalexin, mecillinam, and nalidixic acid. In addition, DNA replication was measured by thymidine incorporation, and murein biosynthesis was measured by incorporation of N-acetylglucosamine into sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble murein sacculi. At interdivision times of 55 to 57 min murein biosynthesis for reproduction of a unit cell lasted longer than the interdivision time itself, whereas DNA replication finished within 40 min. Surprisingly, inhibition of DNA replication by nalidixic acid did not inhibit the subsequent cell division but rather the one after that. Because P. mirabilis fails to express several reactions of the recA-dependent SOS functions known from Escherichia coli, the drug allowed us to determine which DNA replication period actually governed which cell division. Taken together, the results indicate that at an interdivision time of 55 to 57 min, the biosynthetic cell cycle of P. mirabilis lasts approximately 120 min. To achieve the observed interdivision time, it is necessary that two subsequent biosynthetic cell cycles be tightly interlocked. The implications of these findings for the regulation of the cell cycle are discussed. PMID:3902797

  17. Role of swarming in the formation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilms on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian V; Mahenthiralingam, E; Sabbuba, N A; Stickler, D J

    2005-09-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is frequently complicated by infection with Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter, forming surface biofilm communities, and their urease activity generates alkaline conditions under which crystals of magnesium ammonium phosphate and calcium phosphate are formed and become trapped in the biofilm. As the biofilm develops it obstructs the flow of urine through the catheter, causing either incontinence due to leakage of urine around the catheter or retention of urine in the bladder. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the surface-associated swarming motility of P. mirabilis in the initiation and development of these crystalline catheter biofilms. A set of stable transposon mutants with a range of swimming and swarming abilities were tested for their ability to colonize silicone surfaces in a parallel-plate flow cell. A laboratory model of the catheterized bladder was then used to examine their ability to form crystalline, catheter-blocking biofilms. The results showed that neither swarming nor swimming motility was required for the attachment of P. mirabilis to silicone. Mutants deficient in swarming and swimming were also capable of forming crystalline biofilms and blocking catheters more rapidly than the wild-type strain. PMID:16091430

  18. Modified insulator semiconductor electrode with functionalized nanoparticles for Proteus mirabilis bacteria biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Braham, Yosra; Barhoumi, Houcine; Maaref, Abderrazak; Bakhrouf, Amina; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    The development of enzymatic sensors for biological purposes such as biomedicine, pharmacy, food industry, and environmental toxicity requires the purification step of the enzyme. To prevent the loss of the enzyme activity, a new strategy is held in order to immobilize the bacteria. It will constitute the biological sensing element leading to a high operational stability and multiple adaptations to various conditions such as temperature, pH and ionic strength changes. In this work we describe the development of a urea biosensor by immobilizing Proteus mirabilis bacteria onto an insulator-semiconductor electrode on functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), using cationic, Poly (allylamine hydrochloride) then anionic, Poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolytes, BSA (serum bovin albumin), and glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The response of P. mirabilis to urea addition is evaluated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Before the immobilization step, the activity of urease produced from the P. mirabilis bacteria was attempted using the ion ammonium selective electrodes (ISEs). Adhesion of the bacteria cells on IS electrodes have been studied using contact angle measurements. After immobilization of the bacteria, on the (Si/SiO2/Si3N4) and (Si/SiO2) substrates, the relationship between the evolution of the flat band potential ∆VFB and the urea concentration is found to be linear for values ranging from 10(-2)M to 10(-5)M. PMID:24094152

  19. A Sensor To Detect the Early Stages in the Development of Crystalline Proteus mirabilis Biofilm on Indwelling Bladder Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Stickler, D. J.; Jones, S. M.; Adusei, G. O.; Waters, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    A simple sensor has been developed to detect the early stages of urinary catheter encrustation and avoid the clinical crises induced by catheter blockage. In laboratory models of colonization by Proteus mirabilis, the sensor signaled encrustation at an average time of 43 h before catheters were blocked with crystalline biofilm. PMID:16597888

  20. Ability of Proteus mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells is coupled to motility and swarming differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Coleman, N; Jones, P L; Hughes, C

    1992-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes serious kidney infections which can involve invasion of host urothelial cells. We present data showing that the ability to invade host urothelial cells is closely coupled to swarming, a form of cyclical multicellular behavior in which vegetative bacteria differentiate into hyperflagellated, filamentous swarm cells capable of coordinated and rapid population migration. Entry into the human urothelial cell line EJ/28 by P. mirabilis U6450 isolated at different stages throughout the swarming cycle was measured by the antibiotic protection assay method and confirmed by electron microscopy. Differentiated filaments entered urothelial cells within 30 min and were 15-fold more invasive (ca. 0.18% entry in 2 h) than an equivalent dry weight of vegetative cells isolated before differentiation, which attained only ca. 0.012% entry in the 2-h assay. The invasive ability of P. mirabilis was modulated in parallel with flagellin levels throughout two cycles of swarming. Septation and division of intracellular swarm cells produced between 50 and 300 vegetative bacteria per human cell, compared with 4 to 12 intracellular bacteria after incubation with vegetative cells. Transposon (Tn5) mutants of P. mirabilis with specific defects in motility and multicellular behavior were compared with the wild-type for the ability to invade. Mutants which lacked flagella (nonmotile nonswarming) were entirely noninvasive, and those which were motile but defective in swarm cell formation (motile nonswarming) were 25-fold less invasive than wild-type vegetative cells. Mutants with defects in the coordination of multicellular migration and the temporal control of consolidation (cyclical reversion of swarm cells to vegetative cells) were reduced ca. 3- to 12-fold in the ability to enter urothelial cells. In contrast, a nonhemolytic transposon mutant which swarmed normally retained over 80% of wild-type invasive ability. Swarm cells and early consolidation cells were at least 10-fold more cytolytic than vegetative cells as a result of their high-level production of hemolysin. Images PMID:1398984

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis, a Master of both Adherence and Motility▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melanie M.; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A.; Seshasayee, Aswin S.; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrosmith, Claire; Atkin, Becky; Chillingworth, Tracey; Hauser, Heidi; Jagels, Kay; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; Whithead, Sally; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Rather, Philip N.; Parkhill, Julian; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2008-01-01

    The gram-negative enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a frequent cause of urinary tract infections in individuals with long-term indwelling catheters or with complicated urinary tracts (e.g., due to spinal cord injury or anatomic abnormality). P. mirabilis bacteriuria may lead to acute pyelonephritis, fever, and bacteremia. Most notoriously, this pathogen uses urease to catalyze the formation of kidney and bladder stones or to encrust or obstruct indwelling urinary catheters. Here we report the complete genome sequence of P. mirabilis HI4320, a representative strain cultured in our laboratory from the urine of a nursing home patient with a long-term (≥30 days) indwelling urinary catheter. The genome is 4.063 Mb long and has a G+C content of 38.88%. There is a single plasmid consisting of 36,289 nucleotides. Annotation of the genome identified 3,685 coding sequences and seven rRNA loci. Analysis of the sequence confirmed the presence of previously identified virulence determinants, as well as a contiguous 54-kb flagellar regulon and 17 types of fimbriae. Genes encoding a potential type III secretion system were identified on a low-G+C-content genomic island containing 24 intact genes that appear to encode all components necessary to assemble a type III secretion system needle complex. In addition, the P. mirabilis HI4320 genome possesses four tandem copies of the zapE metalloprotease gene, genes encoding six putative autotransporters, an extension of the atf fimbrial operon to six genes, including an mrpJ homolog, and genes encoding at least five iron uptake mechanisms, two potential type IV secretion systems, and 16 two-component regulators. PMID:18375554

  2. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Involved in Stress Tolerance and Virulence in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cheng; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a bacterial RNA chaperone involved in the riboregulation of diverse genes via small noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that Hfq is critical for the uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis to effectively colonize the bladder and kidneys in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and to establish burned wound infection of the rats. In this regard, we found the hfq mutant induced higher IL-8 and MIF levels of uroepithelial cells and displayed reduced intra-macrophage survival. The loss of hfq affected bacterial abilities to handle H2O2 and osmotic pressures and to grow at 50°C. Relative to wild-type, the hfq mutant had reduced motility, fewer flagella and less hemolysin expression and was less prone to form biofilm and to adhere to and invade uroepithelial cells. The MR/P fimbrial operon was almost switched to the off phase in the hfq mutant. In addition, we found the hfq mutant exhibited an altered outer membrane profile and had higher RpoE expression, which indicates the hfq mutant may encounter increased envelope stress. With the notion of envelope disturbance in the hfq mutant, we found increased membrane permeability and antibiotic susceptibilities in the hfq mutant. Finally, we showed that Hfq positively regulated the RpoS level and tolerance to H2O2 in the stationary phase seemed largely mediated through the Hfq-dependent RpoS expression. Together, our data indicate that Hfq plays a critical role in P. mirabilis to establish UTIs by modulating stress responses, surface structures and virulence factors. This study suggests Hfq may serve as a scaffold molecule for development of novel anti-P. mirabilis drugs and P. mirabilis hfq mutant is a vaccine candidate for preventing UTIs. PMID:24454905

  3. Purification of two DD-carboxypeptidases/transpeptidases with different penicillin sensitivities from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Schilf, W; Martin, H H

    1980-04-01

    Two membrane-bound enzymes of Proteus mirabilis with the dual functions of peptidoglycan DD-carboxypeptidase and transpeptidase (named DD-carboxypeptidase/transpeptidase H and L) were isolated and purified by selective solubilization with the nonionic detergent Genapol X-100, affinity chromatography on matrix-bound ampicillin, and preparative isoelectric focusing in the presence of detergent. Purified enzymes H and L were, respectively, penicillin-binding proteins 4 and 5 among seven major penicillin-binding proteins present in P. mirabilis. The enzymes differed in the following properties. Enzyme H had an Mr of 49,000; isoelectric point at pH 8.2; high sensitivity to benzylpenicillin and permanent inactivation because of high stability of the enzyme-antibiotic complex EI* (half-life 300 min); fragmentation of benzylpenicillin with formation of phenylacetylglycine during the slow decay of EI*; it functioned as an endopeptidase on peptide-crosslinked side chains of peptidoglycan. Enzyme L had an Mr of 43 000; isoelectric point at pH 5.9; low sensitivity to benzylpenicillin and low stability of EI* (half-life 7.2 min) with rapid recovery of enzyme activity; no function as an endopeptidase. The properties of enzyme L were identical with those of the single active DD-carboxypeptidase found previously in the spheroplast L-form of P. mirabilis grown in the presence of benzylpenicillin. We conclude that the partial penicillin resistance of P. mirabilis, with growth as L-form and synthesis of peptide-crosslinked peptidoglycan, depends on the continuing fuction of enzyme L as a DD-carboxypeptidase and transpeptidase in the presence of the antibiotic. PMID:7379792

  4. Complete genome sequence of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis, a master of both adherence and motility.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Melanie M; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A; Seshasayee, Aswin S; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrosmith, Claire; Atkin, Becky; Chillingworth, Tracey; Hauser, Heidi; Jagels, Kay; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; Whithead, Sally; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rather, Philip N; Parkhill, Julian; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-06-01

    The gram-negative enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a frequent cause of urinary tract infections in individuals with long-term indwelling catheters or with complicated urinary tracts (e.g., due to spinal cord injury or anatomic abnormality). P. mirabilis bacteriuria may lead to acute pyelonephritis, fever, and bacteremia. Most notoriously, this pathogen uses urease to catalyze the formation of kidney and bladder stones or to encrust or obstruct indwelling urinary catheters. Here we report the complete genome sequence of P. mirabilis HI4320, a representative strain cultured in our laboratory from the urine of a nursing home patient with a long-term (> or =30 days) indwelling urinary catheter. The genome is 4.063 Mb long and has a G+C content of 38.88%. There is a single plasmid consisting of 36,289 nucleotides. Annotation of the genome identified 3,685 coding sequences and seven rRNA loci. Analysis of the sequence confirmed the presence of previously identified virulence determinants, as well as a contiguous 54-kb flagellar regulon and 17 types of fimbriae. Genes encoding a potential type III secretion system were identified on a low-G+C-content genomic island containing 24 intact genes that appear to encode all components necessary to assemble a type III secretion system needle complex. In addition, the P. mirabilis HI4320 genome possesses four tandem copies of the zapE metalloprotease gene, genes encoding six putative autotransporters, an extension of the atf fimbrial operon to six genes, including an mrpJ homolog, and genes encoding at least five iron uptake mechanisms, two potential type IV secretion systems, and 16 two-component regulators. PMID:18375554

  5. Elucidating the Genetic Basis of Crystalline Biofilm Formation in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Holling, N.; Lednor, D.; Tsang, S.; Bissell, A.; Campbell, L.; Nzakizwanayo, J.; Dedi, C.; Hawthorne, J. A.; Hanlon, G.; Ogilvie, L. A.; Salvage, J. P.; Patel, B. A.; Barnes, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms. PMID:24470471

  6. Elucidating the genetic basis of crystalline biofilm formation in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Holling, N; Lednor, D; Tsang, S; Bissell, A; Campbell, L; Nzakizwanayo, J; Dedi, C; Hawthorne, J A; Hanlon, G; Ogilvie, L A; Salvage, J P; Patel, B A; Barnes, L M; Jones, B V

    2014-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms. PMID:24470471

  7. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sandra A.; Fader, Mandy J.; Keevil, C. William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk of artefacts due to sample manipulation. A full understanding of the stages and components involved in crystalline encrustation formation will aid in the development of new protocols to manage and ultimately prevent catheter blockage. PMID:26516766

  8. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sandra A; Fader, Mandy J; Keevil, C William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk of artefacts due to sample manipulation. A full understanding of the stages and components involved in crystalline encrustation formation will aid in the development of new protocols to manage and ultimately prevent catheter blockage. PMID:26516766

  9. Visualization of Proteus mirabilis within the matrix of urease-induced bladder stones during experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Hui; Lockatell, C Virginia; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-01-01

    The virulence of a urease-negative mutant of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and its wild-type parent strain was assessed by using a CBA mouse model of catheterized urinary tract infection. Overall, catheterized mice were significantly more susceptible than uncatheterized mice to infection by wild-type P. mirabilis. At a high inoculum, the urease-negative mutant successfully colonized bladders of catheterized mice but did not cause urolithiasis and was still severely attenuated in its ability to ascend to kidneys. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the presence of P. mirabilis within the urease-induced stone matrix. Alizarin red S staining was used to detect calcium-containing deposits in bladder and kidney tissues of P. mirabilis-infected mice. PMID:11748205

  10. First Report of an OXA-48-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Strain from Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the blaOXA-48-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene blaOXA-48, extended spectrum β-lactamase gene blaCTX-M-14, and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3′)-VIb. PMID:25896692

  11. Crystal structure of Proteus mirabilis PR catalase with and without bound NADPH.

    PubMed

    Gouet, P; Jouve, H M; Dideberg, O

    1995-06-23

    A catalase from a peroxide resistant mutant of Proteus mirabilis binds NADPH tightly. Interestingly, this enzyme can be stripped of NADPH without loss of the catalatic activity. It is the only known non-mammalian catalase able to bind NADPH. The structure without cofactor was solved by molecular replacement using the structure of beef liver catalase as a model. The structure was refined to an R-factor of 19.3% in the range 8 to 2.2 A resolution. According to the sequence, a methionine sulphone was positioned in the haem active site. This oxidized form of methionine is particular to Proteus mirabilis catalase and likely to produce some steric hindrance in the active site. Two important water molecules are positioned in the haem distal site. These two water molecules are not located in the structure of beef liver catalase, but are supposed to account for the catalytic mechanism. The liganded form was obtained by soaking crystals of the unliganded form into an NADPH solution. The structure was refined to an R-factor of 15.9% in the range of 8 to 3.1 A resolution using the unliganded structure as a model. The NADPH was clearly located in the electron density map with the same conformation as in beef liver catalase. The NADPH binding induces slight structural changes. However, the imidazole ring of a histidine residue (His284) rotates about 50 degrees to accommodate the cofactor. The electron transfer from NADPH to the haem molecule was examined and several pathways are proposed. PMID:7791219

  12. Interferences in the Optimization of the MTT Assay for Viability Estimation of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Grela, Ewa; Ząbek, Adam; Grabowiecka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Background: The chromogenic assay based on MTT bioreduction was adapted to Proteus mirabilis viability estimations. We primarily intended to use the assay for the evaluation of novel antimicrobial compounds, including structures with possible permeabilizing activity. Therefore, the influence of basic permeabilizing agents like Triton X-100 and EDTA upon the MTT assay was studied. Methods: 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used as a substrate for the whole-cell dehydrogenase activity estimations. The amount of formazan product was evaluated in the end-point reactions terminated with acidic isopropanol or in the continuous reactions run in the presence of low detergent concentrations. Results: The generally established procedure of the end product dissolution with acidic isopropanol caused absorbance instability which strongly affected the results accuracy. The disadvantage was especially pronounced when the assay was conducted in Mueller-Hinton Broth. PBS with 0.01% Triton X-100 used as the reaction medium allowed to omit the formazan dissolution step and follow the microbial MTT reduction in a continuous mode. It was observed that in Proteus mirabilis with a compromised outer membrane the assay score was artificially increased above the untreated control. Conclusion: The dependence of the assay results on the cell integrity might be a major drawback of the MTT assay application for the evaluation of novel antimicrobials against Gram-negative microorganisms. On the other hand, the MTT reduction could be conveniently used to assay the permeabilization degree in biotechnological protocols. PMID:26605010

  13. Properties of a catalase from a peroxide-resistant mutant of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jouve, H M; Lasauniere, C; Pelmont, J

    1983-11-01

    A catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) from Proteus mirabilis PR, a mutant with strong resistance to hydrogen peroxide, was purified to homogeneity and compared with catalase from wild-type P. mirabilis. In crude extracts from the mutant, catalase was present as two different entities called A and B, that could be resolved by ion-exchange chromatography. The B form was transformed into A. The pure catalase preparation contained the A form only. This catalase was not found to be different from the wild-type enzyme, considering its molecular weight, subunit composition, isoelectric pH, and reactivity to specific antibodies. Partial proteolytic cleavage of the two bacterial enzymes with four different proteases proceeded at the same rate and produced identical patterns. However, pure catalase from the mutant had a specific activity against H2O2 of 2.7 X 10(7) M-1 X s-1, and its purity index (A406/A280) was 1.12. These values were higher than previously determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the mutant catalase was more stable to heat. The results suggest that the purified catalase (A form) differs from the wild-type enzyme and appears to be a more efficient catalase against H2O2. Both enzymes were found to be much more resistant than beef liver catalase to the classically used catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. PMID:6365291

  14. Proteus mirabilis urease: genetic organization, regulation, and expression of structural genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1988-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of serious urinary tract infection, produces urease, an important virulence factor for this species. The enzyme hydrolyzes urea to CO2 and NH3, which initiates struvite or apatite stone formation. Genes encoding urease were localized on a P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA gene bank clone in Escherichia coli by deletion analysis, subcloning, Bal31 nuclease digestion, transposon Tn5 mutagenesis, and in vitro transcription-translation. A region of DNA between 4.0 and 5.4 kilobases (kb) in length was necessary for urease activity and was located within an 18.5-kb EcoRI fragment. The operon was induced by urea and encoded a multimeric, cytoplasmic enzyme comprising subunit polypeptides of 8,000, 10,000, and 73,000 daltons that were encoded by a single polycistronic mRNA and transcribed in that order. Seventeen urease-negative transposon insertions were isolated that synthesized either none of the structural subunit polypeptides, the 8,000-dalton polypeptide alone, or both the 8,000- and 10,000-dalton subunit polypeptides. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 212,000 by Superose-6 chromatography. Homologous sequences encoding the urease of Providencia stuartii synthesized subunit polypeptides of similar sizes and showed a similar genetic arrangement. However, restriction maps of the operons from the two species were distinct, indicating significant divergence. PMID:2841283

  15. Multiple proteins encoded within the urease gene complex of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Walz, S E; Wray, S K; Hull, S I; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Chromosomal DNA fragments from a uropathogenic isolate of Proteus mirabilis were inserted into the cosmid vector pHC79 to construct a genomic library in Escherichia coli HB101. A urease-positive recombinant cosmid, designated pSKW1, was recovered. Sequential recombinant manipulation of pSKW1 yielded a 10.2-kilobase plasmid, designated pSKW4, which encoded three urease isozymes with electrophoretic mobilities identical to those of the donor P. mirabilis strain. Plasmid pSKW4 gene sequences encode seven proteins designated 68K (apparent molecular weight, of 68,000), 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 18.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K within the limits of the urease gene complex. Insertion mutations in genes encoding the 68K, 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K proteins resulted in complete or partial (22.5K) loss of urease activity. There was no reduction in urease activity when the gene encoding the 18.5K protein was inactivated. PMID:2830226

  16. Proteus mirabilis urease: nucleotide sequence determination and comparison with jack bean urease.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1989-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, produces a potent urease that hydrolyzes urea to NH3 and CO2, initiating kidney stone formation. Urease genes, which were localized to a 7.6-kilobase-pair region of DNA, were sequenced by using the dideoxy method. Six open reading frames were found within a region of 4,952 base pairs which were predicted to encode polypeptides of 31.0 (ureD), 11.0 (ureA), 12.2 (ureB), 61.0 (ureC), 17.9 (ureE), and 23.0 (ureF) kilodaltons (kDa). Each open reading frame was preceded by a ribosome-binding site, with the exception of ureE. Putative promoterlike sequences were identified upstream of ureD, ureA, and ureF. Possible termination sites were found downstream of ureD, ureC, and ureF. Structural subunits of the enzyme were encoded by ureA, ureB, and ureC and were translated from a single transcript in the order of 11.0, 12.2, and 61.0 kDa. When the deduced amino acid sequences of the P. mirabilis urease subunits were compared with the amino acid sequence of the jack bean urease, significant amino acid similarity was observed (58% exact matches; 73% exact plus conservative replacements). The 11.0-kDa polypeptide aligned with the N-terminal residues of the plant enzyme, the 12.2-kDa polypeptide lined up with internal residues, and the 61.0-kDa polypeptide matched with the C-terminal residues, suggesting an evolutionary relationship of the urease genes of jack bean and P. mirabilis. PMID:2687233

  17. Pyrophosphate inhibition of Proteus mirabilis-induced struvite crystallization in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Downey, J; Clapham, L; Wilson, J W; Nickel, J C

    1991-08-30

    Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) crystals, the major mineral component of infectious urinary calculi, were produced in vitro by growth of a clinical isolate of Proteus mirabilis in artificial urine. P. mirabilis growth and urease-induced struvite production were monitored by phase contrast light microscopy and measurements of urease activity, pH, ammonia concentrations, turbidity, and culture viability. In the absence of pyrophosphate, struvite crystals appeared within 3-5 h due to the urease-induced elevation of pH and initially assumed a planar or 'X-shaped' crystal habit (morphology) characteristic of rapid growth. When pyrophosphate was present, initial precipitation and crystal appearance were significantly impaired and precipitates were largely amorphous. When crystals did appear (usually after 7 or 8 h) they were misshapen or octahedral in shape indicative of very slow growth. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) identified all crystals as struvite. Trace contaminates of carbonate-apatite (Ca10(PO4)6CO3) or newberyite (MgHPO4.H2O) were produced only in the absence of pyrophosphate. P. mirabilis viability and culture pH elevation were unaffected by the addition of pyrophosphate, whereas urease activity and ammonia concentrations were marginally reduced. Struvite could also be produced chemically by titration of the artificial urine with NH4OH. If pyrophosphate was present during titration, the same inhibitory effect on crystal growth occurred, so it is unlikely that urease inhibition is important. Lowering of pyrophosphate concentration from 13-0.45 mumol/l did not reduce its inhibitory activity so it is unlikely to act by chelating free Mg2+. We propose that pyrophosphate inhibits struvite growth principally through direct interference with the chemical mechanisms involved in crystal nucleation and growth, because of its effectiveness at very low concentrations. PMID:1663844

  18. Proteus mirabilis urease: nucleotide sequence determination and comparison with jack bean urease.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1989-12-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, produces a potent urease that hydrolyzes urea to NH3 and CO2, initiating kidney stone formation. Urease genes, which were localized to a 7.6-kilobase-pair region of DNA, were sequenced by using the dideoxy method. Six open reading frames were found within a region of 4,952 base pairs which were predicted to encode polypeptides of 31.0 (ureD), 11.0 (ureA), 12.2 (ureB), 61.0 (ureC), 17.9 (ureE), and 23.0 (ureF) kilodaltons (kDa). Each open reading frame was preceded by a ribosome-binding site, with the exception of ureE. Putative promoterlike sequences were identified upstream of ureD, ureA, and ureF. Possible termination sites were found downstream of ureD, ureC, and ureF. Structural subunits of the enzyme were encoded by ureA, ureB, and ureC and were translated from a single transcript in the order of 11.0, 12.2, and 61.0 kDa. When the deduced amino acid sequences of the P. mirabilis urease subunits were compared with the amino acid sequence of the jack bean urease, significant amino acid similarity was observed (58% exact matches; 73% exact plus conservative replacements). The 11.0-kDa polypeptide aligned with the N-terminal residues of the plant enzyme, the 12.2-kDa polypeptide lined up with internal residues, and the 61.0-kDa polypeptide matched with the C-terminal residues, suggesting an evolutionary relationship of the urease genes of jack bean and P. mirabilis. PMID:2687233

  19. Proteus mirabilis biofilm protection against struvite crystal dissolution and its implications in struvite urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Lawrence, J R; Korber, D R; Caldwell, D E

    1991-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation, struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) crystal formation and dissolution in an artificial urine mixture were monitored using computer-enhanced microscopy (CEM) and a 1 x 3 mm. glass flow cell. Image analysis showed that P. mirabilis biofilm formation did not occur to any extent at macroenvironment flow rates greater than two mL/h (equivalent to a microenvironment flow rate of less than 5 microns./sec). Essentially, cells attached to glass surfaces, grew slowly and divided. Daughter cells were generally released directly into the medium where they could then presumably colonize other regions. Microcolonies formed by the adhesion of aggregates of cells from the medium, and over time grew into biofilms. Struvite crystallization due to urease activity and pH elevation above neutrality, was preceded by the deposition of organic matter on the glass surface, followed by the appearance of a number of tiny (one to two microns.) crystals. Crystals forming within a biofilm at low dilution rates took on a characteristic twinned or "X-shaped" appearance (crystal habit) indicative of a rapid growth rate. Those forming outside the biofilm took on a more tabular appearance reflecting their slower growth. When the macroenvironment flow rate of artificial urine (initial pH 5.8) in the glass flow cell was increased from two mL/h to four mL/h, struvite crystals not associated with biofilms dissolved within five to 10 min. Crystals entrapped within the P. mirabilis biofilm withstood flow rates up to 200 mL/h presumably due to the maintenance of an alkaline Mg-saturated microenvironment within the biofilm. These observations may suggest a mechanism by which struvite calculi can grow in spite of neutral or acidic urine pH and resist mild acidification therapy. PMID:1895441

  20. Interaction of Proteus mirabilis urease apoenzyme and accessory proteins identified with yeast two-hybrid technology.

    PubMed

    Heimer, S R; Mobley, H L

    2001-02-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacterium associated with complicated urinary tract infections, produces a metalloenzyme urease which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. The apourease is comprised of three structural subunits, UreA, UreB, and UreC, assembled as a homotrimer of individual UreABC heterotrimers (UreABC)(3). To become catalytically active, apourease acquires divalent nickel ions through a poorly understood process involving four accessory proteins, UreD, UreE, UreF, and UreG. While homologues of UreD, UreF, and UreG have been copurified with apourease, it remains unclear specifically how these polypeptides associate with the apourease or each other. To identify interactions among P. mirabilis accessory proteins, in vitro immunoprecipitation and in vivo yeast two-hybrid assays were employed. A complex containing accessory protein UreD and structural protein UreC was isolated by immunoprecipitation and characterized with immunoblots. This association occurs independently of coaccessory proteins UreE, UreF, and UreG and structural protein UreA. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, UreD was found to directly interact in vivo with coaccessory protein UreF. Unique homomultimeric interactions of UreD and UreF were also detected in vivo. To substantiate the study of urease proteins with a yeast two-hybrid assay, previously described UreE dimers and homomultimeric UreA interactions among apourease trimers were confirmed in vivo. Similarly, a known structural interaction involving UreA and UreC was also verified. This report suggests that in vivo, P. mirabilis UreD may be important for recruitment of UreF to the apourease and that crucial homomultimeric associations occur among these accessory proteins. PMID:11157956

  1. Bacteriophage Can Prevent Encrustation and Blockage of Urinary Catheters by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Hanin, Aurélie; Alves, Diana R; McCutcheon, Benjamin; Dedi, Cinzia; Salvage, Jonathan; Knox, Karen; Stewart, Bruce; Metcalfe, Anthony; Clark, Jason; Gilmore, Brendan F; Gahan, Cormac G M; Jenkins, A Toby A; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms dense crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that occlude urine flow, leading to serious clinical complications in long-term catheterized patients, but there are presently no truly effective approaches to control catheter blockage by this organism. This study evaluated the potential for bacteriophage therapy to control P. mirabilis infection and prevent catheter blockage. Representative in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, simulating a complete closed drainage system as used in clinical practice, were employed to evaluate the performance of phage therapy in preventing blockage. Models mimicking either an established infection or early colonization of the catheterized urinary tract were treated with a single dose of a 3-phage cocktail, and the impact on time taken for catheters to block, as well as levels of crystalline biofilm formation, was measured. In models of established infection, phage treatment significantly increased time taken for catheters to block (∼3-fold) compared to untreated controls. However, in models simulating early-stage infection, phage treatment eradicated P. mirabilis and prevented blockage entirely. Analysis of catheters from models of established infection 10 h after phage application demonstrated that phage significantly reduced crystalline biofilm formation but did not significantly reduce the level of planktonic cells in the residual bladder urine. Taken together, these results show that bacteriophage constitute a promising strategy for the prevention of catheter blockage but that methods to deliver phage in sufficient numbers and within a key therapeutic window (early infection) will also be important to the successful application of phage to this problem. PMID:26711744

  2. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the Murine Urinary Tract: Virulence and Nitrogen Assimilation Gene Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melanie M.; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  3. Studies of antibiotic resistance of rough and smooth Proteus mirabilis strains and influence of polymyxin E on their lipopolysaccharide composition.

    PubMed

    Kaca, W; Ujazda, E

    1996-01-01

    The influence of type of bacterial culture media on antibiotic resistance of Proteus mirabilis R and S forms, was tested. P. mirabilis S1959 (S form), R45 and R110 strains (Re and Ra mutant, respectively) cultivated in media supplemented with 10% heat inactivated bovine serum were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, nalidixic acid and nitroxoline. Proteus strains cultivated in media without serum were sensitive to these antibacterial agents. The presence of serum did not change the polymyxin E (colistin) resistance of there Proteus strains tested. The effects of the presence of colistin (1000 U/ml) in culture media on Proteus lipopolysaccharide composition was studied. The content of uronic acids and phosphate residues in lipopolysaccharides isolated from bacteria cultivated in the presence of colistin (LPS-col), were lower than in control LPSs. The contents of 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose decreases in S1959 LPS-col, increases in R110 LPS-col and remains unchanged in R45 LPS-col. These results indicate that the presence of colistin in cultivation media exerts an influence on the contents of charged components of LPSs isolated from polymyxin E-resistant Proteus R and S strains. PMID:8997693

  4. Overexpression of an Outer Membrane Protein Associated with Decreased Susceptibility to Carbapenems in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Lin; Wang, Min-Cheng; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liu, Ming-Che; Hu, Rouh-Mei; Wu, Yue-Jin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis isolates commonly have decreased susceptibility to imipenem. Previously, we found P. mirabilis hfq mutant was more resistant to imipenem and an outer membrane protein (OMP) could be involved. Therefore, we investigated the role of this OMP in carbapenem susceptibility. By SDS-PAGE we found this OMP (named ImpR) was increased in hfq mutant and LC-MS/MS revealed it to be the homologue of Salmonella YbfM, which is a porin for chitobiose and subject to MicM (a small RNA) regulation. We demonstrated that ImpR overexpression resulted in increased carbapenem MICs in the laboratory strain and clinical isolates. Chitobiose induced expression of chb (a chitobiose utilization operon). Real-time RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE were performed to elucidate the relationship of hfq, impR, chb and MicM in P. mirabilis. We found MicM RNA was decreased in hfq mutant and chbBC-intergenic region (chbBC-IGR) overexpression strain (chbIGRov), while impR mRNA was increased in hfq mutant, micM mutant and chbIGRov strain. In addition, mutation of hfq or micM and overexpression of chbBC-IGR increased ImpR protein level. Accordingly, chitobiose made wild-type have higher levels of ImpR protein and are more resistant to carbapenems. Hfq- and MicM-complemented strains restored wild-type MICs. Mutation of both impR and hfq eliminated the increase in carbapenem MICs observed in hfq mutant and ImpR-complementation of hfq/impR double mutant resulted in MICs as hfq mutant, indicating that the ImpR-dependent decreased carbapenem susceptibility of hfq mutant. These indicate MicM was antisense to impR mRNA and was negatively-regulated by chbBC-IGR. Together, overexpression of ImpR contributed to the decreased carbapenem susceptibility in P. mirabilis. PMID:25756370

  5. Regulation of the Min Cell Division Inhibition Complex by the Rcs Phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Howery, Kristen E.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Şimşek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key regulator of swarming in Proteus mirabilis is the Rcs phosphorelay, which represses flhDC, encoding the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2. Mutants in rcsB, the response regulator in the Rcs phosphorelay, hyperswarm on solid agar and differentiate into swarmer cells in liquid, demonstrating that this system also influences the expression of genes central to differentiation. To gain a further understanding of RcsB-regulated genes involved in swarmer cell differentiation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to examine the RcsB regulon. Among the 133 genes identified, minC and minD, encoding cell division inhibitors, were identified as RcsB-activated genes. A third gene, minE, was shown to be part of an operon with minCD. To examine minCDE regulation, the min promoter was identified by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′-RACE), and both transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR were used to confirm that the minCDE operon was RcsB activated. Purified RcsB was capable of directly binding the minC promoter region. To determine the role of RcsB-mediated activation of minCDE in swarmer cell differentiation, a polar minC mutation was constructed. This mutant formed minicells during growth in liquid, produced shortened swarmer cells during differentiation, and exhibited decreased swarming motility. IMPORTANCE This work describes the regulation and role of the MinCDE cell division system in P. mirabilis swarming and swarmer cell elongation. Prior to this study, the mechanisms that inhibit cell division and allow swarmer cell elongation were unknown. In addition, this work outlines for the first time the RcsB regulon in P. mirabilis. Taken together, the data presented in this study begin to address how P. mirabilis elongates upon contact with a solid surface. PMID:25986901

  6. Morphological changes in Proteus mirabilis O18 biofilm under the influence of a urease inhibitor and a homoserine lactone derivative.

    PubMed

    Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Arabski, Michał; Wąsik, Sławomir; Jabłońska-Wawrzycka, Agnieszka; Rogala, Patrycja; Kaca, Wiesław

    2014-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium that frequently causes kidney infections, typically established by ascending colonization of the urinary tract. The present study is focused on ureolytic activity and urease inhibition in biofilms generated by P. mirabilis O18 cells. Confocal microscopy revealed morphological alterations in biofilms treated with urea and a urease inhibitor (acetohydroxamic acid, AHA), as some swarmer cells were found to protrude from the biofilm. The presence of a quorum-sensing molecule (N-butanoyl homoserine lactone, BHL) increased biofilm thickness and its ureolytic activity. Laser interferometric determination of diffusion showed that urea easily diffuses through P. mirabilis biofilm, while AHA is blocked. This may suggest that the use of urease inhibitors in CAUTIs may by less effective than in other urease-associated infections. Spectroscopic studies revealed differences between biofilm and planktonic cells indicating that polysaccharides and nucleic acids are involved in extracellular matrix and biofilm formation. PMID:24481535

  7. Chromosomally Encoded AmpC-Type β-Lactamase in a Clinical Isolate of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bret, L.; Chanal-Claris, C.; Sirot, D.; Chaibi, E. B.; Labia, R.; Sirot, J.

    1998-01-01

    A clinical strain of Proteus mirabilis (CF09) isolated from urine specimens of a patient displayed resistance to amoxicillin (MIC >4,096 μg/ml), ticarcillin (4,096 μg/ml), cefoxitin (64 μg/ml), cefotaxime (256 μg/ml), and ceftazidime (128 μg/ml) and required an elevated MIC of aztreonam (4 μg/ml). Clavulanic acid did not act synergistically with cephalosporins. Two β-lactamases with apparent pIs of 5.6 and 9.0 were identified by isoelectric focusing on a gel. Substrate and inhibition profiles were characteristic of an AmpC-type β-lactamase with a pI of 9.0. Amplification by PCR with primers for ampC genes (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter freundii) of a 756-bp DNA fragment from strain CF09 was obtained only with C. freundii-specific primers. Hybridization results showed that the ampC gene is only chromosomally located while the TEM gene is plasmid located. After cloning of the gene, analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence (1,146 bp) showed that this ampC gene is close to blaCMY-2, from which it differs by three point mutations leading to amino acid substitutions Glu → Gly at position 22, Trp → Arg at position 201, and Ser → Asn at position 343. AmpC β-lactamases derived from that of C. freundii (LAT-1, LAT-2, BIL-1, and CMY-2) have been found in Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, and Enterobacter aerogenes and have been reported to be plasmid borne. This is the first example of a chromosomally encoded AmpC-type β-lactamase observed in P. mirabilis. We suggest that it be designated CMY-3. PMID:9593136

  8. Identification of virulence determinants in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis using signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Himpsl, Stephanie D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Hebel, J Richard; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-09-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis causes urinary tract infections (UTIs) in individuals with long-term indwelling catheters or those with functional or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. Known virulence factors include urease, haemolysin, fimbriae, flagella, DsbA, a phosphate transporter and genes involved in cell-wall synthesis and metabolism, many of which have been identified using the technique of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM). To identify additional virulence determinants and to increase the theoretical coverage of the genome, this study generated and assessed 1880 P. mirabilis strain HI4320 mutants using this method. Mutants with disruptions in genes vital for colonization of the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI were identified after performing primary and secondary in vivo screens in approximately 315 CBA mice, primary and secondary in vitro screens in both Luria broth and minimal A medium to eliminate mutants with minor growth deficiencies, and co-challenge competition experiments in approximately 500 CBA mice. After completion of in vivo screening, a total of 217 transposon mutants were attenuated in the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI. Following in vitro screening, this number was reduced to 196 transposon mutants with a probable role in virulence. Co-challenge competition experiments confirmed significant attenuation for 37 of the 93 transposon mutants tested, being outcompeted by wild-type HI4320. Following sequence analysis of the 37 mutants, transposon insertions were identified in genes including the peptidyl-prolyl isomerases surA and ppiA, glycosyltransferase cpsF, biopolymer transport protein exbD, transcriptional regulator nhaR, one putative fimbrial protein, flagellar M-ring protein fliF and hook protein flgE, and multiple metabolic genes. PMID:18719175

  9. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific observations that followed the invention of the microscope. A bacterium can swim through a fluid environment or coordinate motion with a group of bacteria and swarm across a surface. The flagellar motor, which propels the bacterium, is fueled by proton motive force. In contrast to the physiology that governs swimming motility, much less is known about the energy sources required for multicellular swarming on surfaces. In this study, we used Proteus mirabilis as a model organism to study vigorous swarming behavior and genetic and biochemical approaches to define energy pathways and central metabolism that contribute to multicellular motility. We found that swarming bacteria use a complete aerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle but do not respire oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, suggesting that multicellular cooperation during swarming reduces the amount of energy required by individual bacteria to achieve rapid motility. PMID:23111869

  10. First Isolation of carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis from an uncomplicated cystitis patient with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oana, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Michiko; Nagata, Mika; Washino, Kei-Ichi; Akahane, Takayuki; Takamatsu, Yu-Uki; Tsutsui, Chie; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    An uncomplicated cystitis caused by CO2-dependent Proteus mirabilis was observed in a 64-year-old Japanese female patient with Sjögren's syndrome in the Aomori Kyoritsu Hospital, Aomori, Japan. The initial P. mirabilis isolate came from a midstream urine specimen containing large numbers of Gram-negative, rod-shaped organisms that failed to grow on both Drigalski agar and sheep blood agar incubated in ambient air. The organism did grow when the urine was cultured overnight on blood agar under anaerobic conditions. Hence, we believed that the organism was an anaerobe. Further investigation revealed that the isolate grew on sheep blood agar along with swarming when the atmospheric CO2 concentrations were increased to 5%. Initially, we failed to characterize or identify the P. mirabilis isolate or determine its antimicrobial susceptibilities using the MicroScan WalkAway-40 System because the isolate did not grow in the system. However, the isolate was subsequently identified as P. mirabilis based on its morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties by using the commercially available kit systems, Quick ID-GN and ID-Test EB-20. This identification of the isolate was confirmed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of the organism. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical isolation of capnophilic P. mirabilis. PMID:23698488

  11. Dynamical Properties of Transient Spatio-Temporal Patterns in Bacterial Colony of Proteus mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Itoh, Hiroto; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Kurosu, Sayuri; Ikeda, Takemasa; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2002-02-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns emerged inside a colony of bacterial species Proteus mirabilis on the surface of nutrient-rich semisolid agar medium have been investigated. We observed various patterns composed of the following basic types: propagating stripe, propagating stripe with fixed dislocation, expanding and shrinking target, and rotating spiral. The remarkable point is that the pattern changes immediately when we alter the position for observation, but it returns to the original if we restore the observing position within a few minutes. We further investigated mesoscopic and microscopic properties of the spatio-temporal patterns. It turned out that whenever the spatio-temporal patterns are observed in a colony, the areas are composed of two superimposed monolayers of elongated bacterial cells. In each area they are aligned almost parallel with each other like a two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal, and move collectively and independently of another layer. It has been found that the observed spatio-temporal patterns are explained as the moiré effect.

  12. Production of a High Efficiency Microbial Flocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 Using Compound Organic Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Jiao

    2010-11-01

    The production of a high efficiency microbial flocculant (MBF) by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 using compound organic wastewater was investigated. To cut down the cost of the MBF production, several nutritive organic wastewaters were selected to replace glucose and peptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source in the optimized medium of strain TJ-1, respectively. The compound wastewater of the milk candy and the soybean milk was found to be good carbon source and nitrogen source for this strain to produce MBF. The cost-effective culture medium consists of (per liter): 800 mL wastewater of milk candy, 200 mL wastewater of soybean milk, 0.3 g MgSO4ṡ7 H2O, 5 g K2HPO4, 2 g and KH2PO4, pH 7.0. The economic cost for the MBF production can be cut down over a half by using the developed culture medium. Furthermore, the utilization of the two wastewaters in the preparation of culture medium of strain TJ-1 can not only save their big treatment cost, but also realize their resource reuse.

  13. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Wang, Xuejiang; Yang, Aming; Xu, Bin; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier

    2009-04-15

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery. PMID:18718709

  14. Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, S. M.; Stickler, D. J.; Mobley, H. L. T.; Shirtliff, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options. PMID:18202436

  15. Urease activity related to the growth and differentiation of swarmer cells of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Murray, R G

    1987-04-01

    Urease activity was measured using whole cells of both long (swarming) and short (nonswarming) populations of Proteus mirabilis from casein hydrolysate agar (CHA) and broth (CHB) cultures, and from brain heart infusion broth (BHIB) cultures. Urease is a constitutive enzyme for both long and short cells, but its activity was tremendously increased when urea was incorporated into the media. Urease production was also affected by culture age and media used. Before exponential phase, urease activity was very low, and it increased to its highest point after about 4 h in BHIB and 8 h in both CHA and CHB cultures at 37 degrees C. Long cells had higher urease activity than did short cells when grown on CHA, and was also expressed by two different strains cultured in BHIB. Strain PM23, in BHIB, was able to form long cells (swarming cells) to a maximum proportion after about 4 h, but strain IM47 could not differentiate in any of the liquid media. The former had more urease when swarming differentiation was initiated. PM23 grew relatively faster than IM47 when the former began to differentiate, but this fast growth could not be observed when nutrient broth or minimal medium was used. These observations suggest that long or swarming cells are "faster growing" rather than "nongrowing bacteria". PMID:3297270

  16. Use of Green Fluorescent Protein To Assess Urease Gene Expression by Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis during Experimental Ascending Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Thompson, Richard B.; Lockatell, Virginia; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of complicated urinary tract infection, expresses urease when exposed to urea. While it is recognized that the positive transcriptional activator UreR induces gene expression, the levels of expression of the enzyme during experimental infection are not known. To investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis urease, the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to construct reporter fusions. Translational fusions of urease accessory gene ureD, which is preceded by a urea-inducible promoter, were made with gfp (modified to express S65T/V68L/S72A [B. P. Cormack et al. Gene 173:33–38, 1996]). Constructs were confirmed by sequencing of the fusion junctions. UreD-GFP fusion protein was induced by urea in both Escherichia coli DH5α and P. mirabilis HI4320. By using Western blotting with antiserum raised against GFP, expression level was shown to correlate with urea concentration (tested from 0 to 500 mM), with highest induction at 200 to 500 mM urea. Fluorescent E. coli and P. mirabilis bacteria were observed by fluorescence microscopy following urea induction, and the fluorescence intensity of GFP in cell lysates was measured by spectrophotofluorimetry. P. mirabilis HI4320 carrying the UreD-GFP fusion plasmid was transurethrally inoculated into the bladders of CBA mice. One week postchallenge, fluorescent bacteria were detected in thin sections of both bladder and kidney samples; the fluorescence intensity of bacteria in bladder tissue was higher than that in the kidney. Kidneys were primarily infected with single-cell-form fluorescent bacteria, while aggregated bacterial clusters were observed in the bladder. Elongated swarmer cells were only rarely observed. These observations demonstrate that urease is expressed in vivo and that using GFP as a reporter protein is a viable approach to investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis virulence genes in experimental urinary tract infection. PMID:9423875

  17. Use of green fluorescent protein to assess urease gene expression by uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis during experimental ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Thompson, R B; Lockatell, V; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1998-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of complicated urinary tract infection, expresses urease when exposed to urea. While it is recognized that the positive transcriptional activator UreR induces gene expression, the levels of expression of the enzyme during experimental infection are not known. To investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis urease, the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to construct reporter fusions. Translational fusions of urease accessory gene ureD, which is preceded by a urea-inducible promoter, were made with gfp (modified to express S65T/V68L/S72A [B. P. Cormack et al. Gene 173:33-38, 1996]). Constructs were confirmed by sequencing of the fusion junctions. UreD-GFP fusion protein was induced by urea in both Escherichia coli DH5alpha and P. mirabilis HI4320. By using Western blotting with antiserum raised against GFP, expression level was shown to correlate with urea concentration (tested from 0 to 500 mM), with highest induction at 200 to 500 mM urea. Fluorescent E. coli and P. mirabilis bacteria were observed by fluorescence microscopy following urea induction, and the fluorescence intensity of GFP in cell lysates was measured by spectrophotofluorimetry. P. mirabilis HI4320 carrying the UreD-GFP fusion plasmid was transurethrally inoculated into the bladders of CBA mice. One week postchallenge, fluorescent bacteria were detected in thin sections of both bladder and kidney samples; the fluorescence intensity of bacteria in bladder tissue was higher than that in the kidney. Kidneys were primarily infected with single-cell-form fluorescent bacteria, while aggregated bacterial clusters were observed in the bladder. Elongated swarmer cells were only rarely observed. These observations demonstrate that urease is expressed in vivo and that using GFP as a reporter protein is a viable approach to investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis virulence genes in experimental urinary tract infection. PMID:9423875

  18. Proteus mirabilis urease: operon fusion and linker insertion analysis of ure gene organization, regulation, and function.

    PubMed

    Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1995-10-01

    Urease is an inducible virulence factor of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Although eight contiguous genes necessary for urease activity have been cloned and sequenced, the transcriptional organization and regulation of specific genes within the Proteus gene cluster has not been investigated in detail. The first gene, ureR, is located 400 bp upstream and is oriented in the direction opposite the other seven genes, ureDABCEFG. The structural subunits of urease are encoded by ureABC. Previously, UreR was shown to contain a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif 30 residues upstream of a consensus sequence which is a signature for the AraC family of positive regulators; this polypeptide is homologous to other DNA-binding regulatory proteins. Nested deletions of ureR linked to either ureD-lacZ or ureA-lacZ operon fusions demonstrated that an intact ureR is required for urea-induced synthesis of LacZ from either ureA or ureD and identified a urea-regulated promoter in the ureR-ureD intergenic region. However, lacZ operon fusions to fragments encompassing putative promoter regions upstream of ureA and ureF demonstrated that no urea-regulated promoters occur upstream of these open reading frames; regions upstream of ureR, ureE, and ureG were not tested. These data suggest that UreR acts as a positive regulator in the presence of urea, activating transcription of urease structural and accessory genes via sequences upstream of ureD. To address the role of the nonstructural regulatory and accessory genes, we constructed deletion, cassette, and linker insertion mutations throughout the ure gene cluster and determined the effect of these mutations on production and regulation of urease activity in Escherichia coli. Mutations were obtained, with locations determine by DNA sequencing, in all genes except ureA and ureE. In each case, the mutation resulted in a urease-negative phenotype. PMID:7559355

  19. Modulation of pulmonary defense mechanisms by acute exposures to nitrogen dioxide. [Staphylococcus aureus; Proteus mirabilis; Pasteurella pneumotropica

    SciTech Connect

    Jakab, G.J.

    1987-02-01

    The effect of acute exposures to NO/sub 2/ on the antibacterial defenses of the murine lung was assessed following inhalation challenges with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Pasteurella pneumotropica. With S. aureus pulmonary antibacterial defenses were suppressed at NO/sub 2/ levels of 4.0 ppm and greater. Exposure to 10.0 ppm enhanced the intrapulmonary killing of P. mirabilis which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell populations lavaged from the lungs; at 20.0 ppm bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis was impaired. Pulmonary antibacterial defenses against P. pneumotropica were impaired at 10.0 ppm which correlated with a decrease in the retrieved phagocytic lung cell population. Reversing the order of treatment (ie., NO/sub 2/ exposure prior to bacterial challenge) raised the threshold concentration for NO/sub 2/-induced impairment of intrapulmonary bacterial killing. With S. aureus the effect was not observed at 5.0 ppm but at 10.0 ppm and with P. mirabilis not at 20.0 ppm but at 30.0 ppm intrapulmonary killing was enhanced. Exposures up to 20.0 ppm of NO/sub 2/ did not effect the physical translocation mechanisms of the lung as quantitated by declines in pulmonary radiotracer activity following aerogenic challenge with /sup 32/P-labeled staphylococci.

  20. Increased Incidence of Urolithiasis and Bacteremia During Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii Coinfection Due to Synergistic Induction of Urease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Smith, Sara N.; Yep, Alejandra; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CaUTIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections worldwide and are frequently polymicrobial. The urease-positive species Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii are two of the leading causes of CaUTIs and commonly co-colonize catheters. These species can also cause urolithiasis and bacteremia. However, the impact of coinfection on these complications has never been addressed experimentally. Methods. A mouse model of ascending UTI was utilized to determine the impact of coinfection on colonization, urolithiasis, and bacteremia. Mice were infected with P. mirabilis or a urease mutant, P. stuartii, or a combination of these organisms. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess growth dynamics and impact of co-culture on urease activity. Results. Coinfection resulted in a bacterial load similar to monospecies infection but with increased incidence of urolithiasis and bacteremia. These complications were urease-dependent as they were not observed during coinfection with a P. mirabilis urease mutant. Furthermore, total urease activity was increased during co-culture. Conclusions. We conclude that P. mirabilis and P. stuartii coinfection promotes urolithiasis and bacteremia in a urease-dependent manner, at least in part through synergistic induction of urease activity. These data provide a possible explanation for the high incidence of bacteremia resulting from polymicrobial CaUTI. PMID:24280366

  1. Inhibition of crystallization caused by Proteus mirabilis during the development of infectious urolithiasis by various phenolic substances.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Rozalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Infectious urolithiasis is a consequence of persistent urinary tract infections caused by urease producing bacteria e.g. Proteus mirabilis. These stones are composed of struvite and carbonate apatite. Their rapid growth and high recurrence indicate that so far appropriate methods of treatment have not been found. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds was investigated in vitro against formation of struvite/apatite crystals. The impact of these substances with different chemical structures on crystallization caused by clinical isolates of P. mirabilis was tested spectrophotometrically using a microdilution method. Among the 11 tested compounds resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, peralgonidin, vanillic and coffee acids at the concentrations 250-1000 μg/ml inhibited P. mirabilis urease activity and crystallization. However, only vanillic acid had such an effect on all tested strains of P. mirabilis. Therefore, using an in vitro model, bacterial growth, crystallization, urease activity and pH were examined for 24h in synthetic urine with vanillic acid. Effect of vanillic acid was compared with that of other known struvite/apatite crystallization inhibitors (acetohydroxamic acid, pyrophosphate) and it was shown that vanillic acid strongly inhibited bacterial growth and the formation of crystals. It can be assumed that this compound, after further studies, can be used in the treatment or prophylaxis of infectious urolithiasis. PMID:24239192

  2. Pulmonary Pneumatocele in a Pneumonia Patient Infected with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Bae, Jong Wook; Baek, Hyun Jin; Lee, Doo Hyuk; Lee, Sang Won; Choi, Gyu Ho; Han, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Se Weon; Kim, Hyunbeom; Hong, Goohyeon

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary pneumatoceles are air-filled thin-walled spaces within the lung and are rare in adult cases of pneumonia. We report the case of a 74-year-old male who was admitted with a cough and sputum production. He had been treated with oral dexamethasone since a brain tumorectomy 6 months prior. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed a large pneumatocele in the right middle lobe and peripheral pneumonic consolidation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; cultures identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Proteus mirabilis. A 4-week course of intravenous ertapenem was administered, and the pneumatocele with pneumonia resolved on follow-up chest CT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pulmonary pneumatocele caused by ESBL-producing P. mirabilis associated with pneumonia. PMID:26508927

  3. Pulmonary Pneumatocele in a Pneumonia Patient Infected with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Bae, Jong Wook; Baek, Hyun Jin; Lee, Doo Hyuk; Lee, Sang Won; Choi, Gyu Ho; Han, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Se Weon; Kim, Hyunbeom

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary pneumatoceles are air-filled thin-walled spaces within the lung and are rare in adult cases of pneumonia. We report the case of a 74-year-old male who was admitted with a cough and sputum production. He had been treated with oral dexamethasone since a brain tumorectomy 6 months prior. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed a large pneumatocele in the right middle lobe and peripheral pneumonic consolidation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; cultures identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Proteus mirabilis. A 4-week course of intravenous ertapenem was administered, and the pneumatocele with pneumonia resolved on follow-up chest CT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pulmonary pneumatocele caused by ESBL-producing P. mirabilis associated with pneumonia. PMID:26508927

  4. Sequential unfolding of the hemolysin two-partner secretion domain from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Megan R; Woods, Christopher N; Adamczak, Kyle J; Glasgow, Evan M; Novak, Walter R P; Grilley, Daniel P; Weaver, Todd M

    2015-11-01

    Protein secretion is a major contributor to Gram-negative bacterial virulence. Type Vb or two-partner secretion (TPS) pathways utilize a membrane bound β-barrel B component (TpsB) to translocate large and predominantly virulent exoproteins (TpsA) through a nucleotide independent mechanism. We focused our studies on a truncated TpsA member termed hemolysin A (HpmA265), a structurally and functionally characterized TPS domain from Proteus mirabilis. Contrary to the expectation that the TPS domain of HpmA265 would denature in a single cooperative transition, we found that the unfolding follows a sequential model with three distinct transitions linking four states. The solvent inaccessible core of HpmA265 can be divided into two different regions. The C-proximal region contains nonpolar residues and forms a prototypical hydrophobic core as found in globular proteins. The N-proximal region of the solvent inaccessible core, however, contains polar residues. To understand the contributions of the hydrophobic and polar interiors to overall TPS domain stability, we conducted unfolding studies on HpmA265 and site-specific mutants of HpmA265. By correlating the effect of individual site-specific mutations with the sequential unfolding results we were able to divide the HpmA265 TPS domain into polar core, nonpolar core, and C-terminal subdomains. Moreover, the unfolding studies provide quantitative evidence that the folding free energy for the polar core subdomain is more favorable than for the nonpolar core and C-terminal subdomains. This study implicates the hydrogen bonds shared among these conserved internal residues as a primary means for stabilizing the N-proximal polar core subdomain. PMID:26350294

  5. Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Harboring a Conjugative NDM-1 Plasmid and a Novel Salmonella Genomic Island 1 Variant, SGI1-Z.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shangshang; Qi, Hui; Zhang, Qijing; Zhao, Di; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Tian, Hao; Xu, Lijuan; Xu, Hui; Zhou, Mengmeng; Feng, Xianju; Liu, Hong-Min

    2015-10-01

    Acquisition of blaNDM-1 in bacterial species, such as Proteus mirabilis that is intrinsically resistant to tetracycline, tigecycline and colistin, will make clinical treatment extremely difficult. Here, we characterized an NDM-1-producing clinical isolate of P. mirabilis (PM58) that displayed an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype, susceptible only to aztreonam. Molecular analysis revealed that PM58 harbored both a conjugative NDM-1 plasmid and a novel Salmonella genomic island 1 variant on chromosome. PMID:26195511

  6. Outbreak caused by Proteus mirabilis isolates producing weakly expressed TEM-derived extended-spectrum β-lactamase in spinal cord injury patients with recurrent bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cremet, Lise; Bemer, Pascale; Rome, Joanna; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Navas, Dominique; Bourigault, Celine; Guillouzouic, Aurelie; Caroff, Nathalie; Lepelletier, Didier; Asseray, Nathalie; Perrouin-Verbe, Brigitte; Corvec, Stephane

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) molecular characterization of Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from urine of spinal cord injury patients. A incorrectly detected TEM-24-producing clone and a new weakly expressed TEM-derived ESBL were discovered. In such patients, ESBL detection in daily practice should be improved by systematic use of a synergy test in strains of P. mirabilis resistant to penicillins. PMID:21888562

  7. Cross-reactivity between the rheumatoid arthritis-associated motif EQKRAA and structurally related sequences found in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, H; Wilson, C; Alvarez, A; Abuknesha, R; Bansal, S; Ebringer, A

    1999-06-01

    Cross-reactivity or molecular mimicry may be one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antiserum against the RA susceptibility sequence EQKRAA was shown to bind to a similar peptide ESRRAL present in the hemolysin of the gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and an anti-ESRRAL serum reacted with EQKRAA. There was no reactivity with either anti-EQKRAA or anti-ESRRAL to a peptide containing the EDERAA sequence which is present in HLA-DRB1*0402, an allele not associated with RA. Furthermore, the EQKRAA and ESRRAL antisera bound to a mouse fibroblast transfectant cell line (Dap.3) expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 but not to DRB1*0402. However, peptide sequences structurally related to the RA susceptibility motif LEIEKDFTTYGEE (P. mirabilis urease), VEIRAEGNRFTY (collagen type II) and DELSPETSPYVKE (collagen type XI) did not bind significantly to cell lines expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 or HLA-DRB1*0402 compared to the control peptide YASGASGASGAS. It is suggested here that molecular mimicry between HLA alleles associated with RA and P. mirabilis may be relevant in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. PMID:10338479

  8. Co-ordinate expression of virulence genes during swarm-cell differentiation and population migration of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Allison, C; Lai, H C; Hughes, C

    1992-06-01

    The uropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis exhibits a form of multicellular behaviour termed swarming, which involves cyclical differentiation of typical vegetative cells into filamentous, multinucleate, hyperflagellate swarm cells capable of rapid and co-ordinated population migration across surfaces. We observed that differentiation into swarm cells was accompanied by substantial increases in the activities of intracellular urease and extracellular haemolysin and metalloprotease, which are believed to be central to the pathogenicity of P. mirabilis. In addition, the ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells in vitro was primarily a characteristic of differentiated swarm cells, not vegetative cells. These virulence factor activities fell back as the cells underwent cyclical reversion to the vegetative form (consolidation), in parallel with the diagnostic modulation of flagellin levels on the cell surface. Control cellular alkaline phosphatase activities did not increase during differentiation or consolidation. Non-flagellated, nonmotile transposon insertion mutants were unable to invade urothelial cells and they generated only low-level activities of haemolysin, urease and protease (0-10% of wild type). Motile mutants unable to differentiate into swarm cells were comparably reduced in their haemolytic, ureolytic and invasive phenotypes and generated threefold less protease activity. Mutants that were able to form swarm cells but exhibited various aberrant patterns of swarming migration produced wild-type activities of haemolysin, urease and protease, but their ability to enter urothelial cells was three- to 10-fold lower.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1495387

  9. Evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopy for analysis of Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ on urinary catheters

    PubMed Central

    Holling, Nina; Dedi, Cinzia; Jones, Caroline E; Hawthorne, Joseph A; Hanlon, Geoffrey W; Salvage, Jonathan P; Patel, Bhavik A; Barnes, Lara M; Jones, Brian V

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and frequently leads to blockage of catheters due to crystalline biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has proven to be a valuable tool in the study of these unusual biofilms, but entails laborious sample preparation that can introduce artefacts, undermining the investigation of biofilm development. In contrast, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) permits imaging of unprocessed, fully hydrated samples, which may provide much insight into the development of P. mirabilis biofilms. Here, we evaluate the utility of ESEM for the study of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ, on urinary catheters. In doing so, we compare this to commonly used conventional SEM approaches for sample preparation and imaging. Overall, ESEM provided excellent resolution of biofilms formed on urinary catheters and revealed structures not observed in standard SEM imaging or previously described in other studies of these biofilms. In addition, we show that energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) may be employed in conjunction with ESEM to provide information regarding the elemental composition of crystalline structures and demonstrate the potential for ESEM in combination with EDS to constitute a useful tool in exploring the mechanisms underpinning crystalline biofilm formation. PMID:24786314

  10. Case-Control Study of the Risk Factors for Acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus Species during Tigecycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Eun; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  11. Case-control study of the risk factors for acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus species during tigecycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  12. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals for receptor binding. PMID:26538254

  13. In vivo phase variation of MR/P fimbrial gene expression in Proteus mirabilis infecting the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Blomfield, I; Mobley, H L

    1997-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, associated with complicated urinary tract infection, expresses mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae. Expression of these surface structures, which mediate haemagglutination and have a demonstrated role in virulence, undergoes phase variation. By DNA sequence analysis, a 252 bp invertible element was found in the intergenic region between mrpl, the putative site-specific recombinase gene, and mrpA, the primary structural subunit gene. The invertible segment is flanked by identical 21 bp inverted repeats and the presumptive half-sites for recombinase binding show homology to those recognized by FimB and FimE encoded by the Escherichia coli fim (Type 1 fimbriae) gene cluster. When amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from static broth cultures expressing MR/P fimbriae, the switch region was found in both ON and OFF positions. When PCR was used to amplify agar cultures which do not express the fimbriae, the switch region was OFF only. A canonical sigma 70 promoter inside the invertible element drives the transcription of mrpA when in the ON position; in the OFF position it is directed away from mrpA but does not appear to drive expression of mrpI. The mrpI gene was able to confer inversion of the mrp switch region in trans from both ON to OFF and OFF to ON. To examine the position of the switch in vivo, urine, bladder, and kidneys from mice transurethrally infected with P. mirabilis were used to prepare template DNA for PCR amplification. In the absence of urolithiasis (urease-mediated stone formation), the switch was found 100% in the ON position, a condition never observed following in vitro culture. We conclude that MR/P phase variation is regulated at the transcriptional level by the action of MrpI on an invertible element and that there is strong selective pressure for the expression of MR/P fimbriae in vivo. PMID:9076737

  14. A total internal reflection ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy study of interactions between Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Sęk, S; Dworecki, K; Kaca, W

    2015-07-01

    Specific antigen-antibody interactions play a central role in the human immune system. The objective of this paper is to detect immune complexes using label-free detection techniques, that is, total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based topography and recognition imaging. Interactions of purified rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies with bacterial endotoxins (Proteus mirabilis S1959 O3 lipopolysaccharides) were studied. Lipopolysaccharide was adsorbed on gold surface for TIRE. In the AFM imaging experiments, LPS was attachment to the PEG linker (AFM tip modification). The mica surface was covered by IgG. In TIRE, the optical parameters Ψ and Δ change when a complex is formed. It was found that even highly structured molecules, such as IgG antibodies (anti-O3 LPS rabbit serum), preserve their specific affinity to their antigens (LPS O3). LPS P. mirabilis O3 response of rabbit serum anti-O3 was also tested by topography and recognition imaging. Both TIRE and AFM techniques were recruited to check for possible detection of antigen-antibody recognition event. The presented data allow for determination of interactions between a variety of biomolecules. In future research, this technique has considerable potential for studying a wide range of antigen-antibody interactions and its use may be extended to other biomacromolecular systems. PMID:25854960

  15. Differential Association of F′ Plasmid and R Plasmid Deoxyribonucleic Acid with a Rapidly Sedimenting Fraction of a Proteus mirabilis Lysate

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Lorne; Rownd, Robert H.

    1977-01-01

    We have examined the association of an F′ plasmid and an R plasmid in Proteus mirabilis with a rapidly sedimenting material that is generated by sodium dodecyl sulfate lysis and low speed centrifugation. Virtually all of the chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and the F′ plasmid DNA are associated with the rapidly sedimenting material after gentle lysis and centrifugation. A portion of R plasmid NR1 DNA (usually 5 to 25%) is not bound to the rapidly sedimenting material and is recovered in the supernatant fraction. This difference in binding is not related to the size of the plasmid DNA, since F′ plasmids and R plasmids of different molecular weights showed the same behavior. R plasmid DNA labeled by a brief pulse of [3H]thymine is recovered in the supernatant fraction to a lower extent than the total R plasmid DNA. It would appear that R plasmid replication takes place in association with the rapidly sedimenting material. With prolongation of the [3H]thymine pulse, the [3H]thymine-labeled R plasmid DNA is recovered in the supernatant fraction with the same probability as the total R plasmid DNA. This finding indicates that a change in R plasmid attachment to the rapidly sedimenting material occurs some time after its replication. The differences observed in the replication of F′ plasmids and R plasmids in P. mirabilis may be related to their different modes of association with the rapidly sedimenting material. PMID:324981

  16. Bacterial swarming: a biochemical time-resolved FTIR-ATR study of Proteus mirabilis swarm-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gué, M; Dupont, V; Dufour, A; Sire, O

    2001-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was applied to the study of the differentiation process undergone by Proteus mirabilis. This bacterium exhibits a remarkable dimorphism, allowing the cells to migrate on a solid substratum in a concerted manner yielding characteristic ring patterns. We performed an in situ noninvasive analysis of biochemical events occurring as vegetative cells differentiate into elongated, multinucleate, nonseptate, and hyperflagellated swarm cells. The major findings arising from this study are (i) the real-time monitoring of flagellar filament assembly, (ii) the evidence for de novo synthesis of qualitatively different lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and/or exopolysaccharides (EPS) constituting the slime into which bacteria swarm, and (iii) the alteration in the membrane fatty acid composition with a concomitant 10 degrees C decrease in the gel/liquid crystal phase transition resulting in an elevated membrane fluidity in swarm cells at the growth temperature. The time course of events shows that the EPS-LPS syntheses are synchronous with membrane fatty acid alterations and occur about 1 h before massive flagellar filament assembly is detected. This study not only provided a time sketch of biochemical events involved in the differentiation process but also led to the identification of the major spectral markers of both vegetative and swarm cells. This identification will allow to resolve the time-space structure of P. mirabilis colonies by using infrared microscopy. PMID:11570895

  17. Various intensity of Proteus mirabilis-induced crystallization resulting from the changes in the mineral composition of urine.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Różalski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Infectious urolithiasis is a result of recurrent and chronic urinary tract infections caused by urease-positive bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis. The main role in the development of this kind of stones is played by bacterial factors such as urease and extracellular polysaccharides, but urinary tract environment also contributes to this process. We used an in vitro model to establish how the changes in the basic minerals concentrations affect the intensity of crystallization which occurs in urine. In each experiment crystallization was induced by an addition of P. mirabilis to artificial urine with a precisely defined chemical composition. Crystallization intensity was determined using the spectrophotometric microdilution method and the chemical composition of formed crystals was established by atomic absorption spectroscopy and colorimetric methods. Increasing the concentration of all crystals forming ions such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and phosphate strongly intensified the process of crystallization, whereas reducing the amount of these components below the proper physiological concentration did not affect its intensity. The inhibitory influence of citrate on calcium and magnesium phosphate crystallization and competitive actions of calcium and oxalate ions on struvite crystals formation were not confirmed. In the case of infectious stones the chemical composition of urine plays an important role, which creates a necessity to support the treatment by developing a model of proper diet. PMID:25654361

  18. Arginine promotes Proteus mirabilis motility and fitness by contributing to conservation of the proton gradient and proton motive force

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Hodges, Steven A; Smith, Sara N; Alteri, Christopher J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-01-01

    Swarming contributes to Proteus mirabilis pathogenicity by facilitating access to the catheterized urinary tract. We previously demonstrated that 0.1–20 mmol/L arginine promotes swarming on normally nonpermissive media and that putrescine biosynthesis is required for arginine-induced swarming. We also previously determined that arginine-induced swarming is pH dependent, indicating that the external proton concentration is critical for arginine-dependent effects on swarming. In this study, we utilized survival at pH 5 and motility as surrogates for measuring changes in the proton gradient (ΔpH) and proton motive force (μH+) in response to arginine. We determined that arginine primarily contributes to ΔpH (and therefore μH+) through the action of arginine decarboxylase (speA), independent of the role of this enzyme in putrescine biosynthesis. In addition to being required for motility, speA also contributed to fitness during infection. In conclusion, consumption of intracellular protons via arginine decarboxylase is one mechanism used by P. mirabilis to conserve ΔpH and μH+ for motility. PMID:25100003

  19. Influence of chondroitin sulfate, heparin sulfate, and citrate on Proteus mirabilis-induced struvite crystallization in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Downey, J; Clapham, L; Nickel, J C

    1990-11-01

    Struvite crystals were produced by Proteus mirabilis growth in artificial urine, in the presence of a number of naturally occurring crystallization inhibitors. The use of phase contrast light microscopy enabled the effects of added chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, heparin sulfate, or sodium citrate, on struvite crystal growth rates to be rapidly monitored as changes in crystal habit. Struvite crystals formed as a consequence of the urease activity of P. mirabilis under all chemical conditions. In the absence of inhibitor, early crystal development was marked by large quantities of amorphous precipitate, followed immediately by the appearance of rapidly growing X-shaped or planar crystals. Addition of the glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, or heparin sulfate to the artificial urine mixture had no effect on the rate of crystal growth or appearance. When sodium citrate was present in elevated concentrations, crystal appearance was generally slowed, and the crystals assumed an octahedral, slow growing appearance. None of the added compounds had any influence on bacterial viability, pH, or urease activity. It is therefore likely that the inhibitory activity displayed by sodium citrate might be related to its ability to complex magnesium or to interfere with the crystal structure during struvite formation. From these experiments it would appear that citrate may be a factor in the natural resistance of whole urine to struvite crystallization. PMID:2122009

  20. H-NS Is a Repressor of the Proteus mirabilis Urease Transcriptional Activator Gene ureR

    PubMed Central

    Coker, Christopher; Bakare, Olubunmi O.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of Proteus mirabilis urease is governed by UreR, an AraC-like positive transcriptional activator. A poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence, consisting of A6TA2CA2TGGTA5GA6TGA5, is located 16 bp upstream of the ς70-like ureR promoter P2. Since poly(A) tracts of DNA serve as binding sites for the gene repressor histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS), we measured β-galactosidase activity of wild-type Escherichia coli MC4100 (H-NS+) and its isogenic derivative ATM121 (hns::Tn10) (H-NS−) harboring a ureR-lacZ operon fusion plasmid (pLC9801). β-Galactosidase activity in the H-NS− host strain was constitutive and sevenfold greater (P < 0.0001) than that in the H-NS+ host. A recombinant plasmid containing cloned P. mirabilis hns was able to complement and restore repression of the ureR promoter in the H-NS− host when provided in trans. Deletion of the poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence from pLC9801 resulted in an increase in β-galactosidase activity in the H-NS+ host to nearly the same levels as that observed for wild-type pLC9801 harbored by the H-NS− host. Urease activity in strains harboring the recombinant plasmid pMID1010 (encoding the entire urease gene cluster of P. mirabilis) was equivalent in both the H-NS− background and the H-NS+ background in the presence of urea but was eightfold greater (P = 0.0001) in the H-NS− background in the absence of urea. We conclude that H-NS represses ureR expression in the absence of urea induction. PMID:10762273

  1. H-NS is a repressor of the Proteus mirabilis urease transcriptional activator gene ureR.

    PubMed

    Coker, C; Bakare, O O; Mobley, H L

    2000-05-01

    Expression of Proteus mirabilis urease is governed by UreR, an AraC-like positive transcriptional activator. A poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence, consisting of A(6)TA(2)CA(2)TGGTA(5)GA(6)TGA(5), is located 16 bp upstream of the sigma(70)-like ureR promoter P2. Since poly(A) tracts of DNA serve as binding sites for the gene repressor histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS), we measured beta-galactosidase activity of wild-type Escherichia coli MC4100 (H-NS(+)) and its isogenic derivative ATM121 (hns::Tn10) (H-NS(-)) harboring a ureR-lacZ operon fusion plasmid (pLC9801). beta-Galactosidase activity in the H-NS(-) host strain was constitutive and sevenfold greater (P < 0.0001) than that in the H-NS(+) host. A recombinant plasmid containing cloned P. mirabilis hns was able to complement and restore repression of the ureR promoter in the H-NS(-) host when provided in trans. Deletion of the poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence from pLC9801 resulted in an increase in beta-galactosidase activity in the H-NS(+) host to nearly the same levels as that observed for wild-type pLC9801 harbored by the H-NS(-) host. Urease activity in strains harboring the recombinant plasmid pMID1010 (encoding the entire urease gene cluster of P. mirabilis) was equivalent in both the H-NS(-) background and the H-NS(+) background in the presence of urea but was eightfold greater (P = 0.0001) in the H-NS(-) background in the absence of urea. We conclude that H-NS represses ureR expression in the absence of urea induction. PMID:10762273

  2. Proteus mirabilis urease: use of a ureA-lacZ fusion demonstrates that induction is highly specific for urea.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Mobley, H L

    1991-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, is the most frequent cause of infection-induced bladder and kidney stones. Urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis initiates stone formation in urine and can be inhibited by acetohydroxamic acid and other structural analogs of urea. Since P. mirabilis urease is inducible with urea, there has been some concern that urease inhibitors actually induce urease during an active infection, thus compounding the problem of elevated enzyme activity. Quantitating induction by compounds that simultaneously inhibit urease activity has been difficult. Therefore, to study these problems, we constructed a fusion of ureA (a urease subunit gene) and lacZ (the beta-galactosidase gene) within plasmid pMID1010, which encodes an inducible urease of P. mirabilis expressed in E. coli JM103 (Lac-). The fusion protein, predicted to be 117 kDa, was induced by urea and detected on Western blots (immunoblots) with anti-beta-galactosidase antiserum. Peak beta-galactosidase activity of 9.9 mumol of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein, quantitated spectrophotometrically, was induced at 200 mM urea. The uninduced rate was 0.2 mumol of ONPG hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein. Induction was specific for urea, as no structural analog of urea (including acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, thiourea, hippuric acid, flurofamide, or hydroxylamine) induced fusion protein activity. These data suggest that induction by inactivation of UreR, the urease repressor protein that governs regulation of the urease operon, is specific for urea and does not respond to closely related structural analogs. PMID:1894350

  3. Contribution of Proteus mirabilis urease to persistence, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Lockatell, C V; Zulty, J C; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1993-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a significant cause of bacteriuria and acute pyelonephritis in humans, produces urease. This high-molecular-weight, multimeric, cytoplasmic enzyme hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. To assess the role of urease in colonization, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in an animal model of ascending urinary tract infection, we compared a uropathogenic strain of P. mirabilis with its isogenic urease-negative mutant, containing an insertion mutation within ureC, the gene encoding the large subunit of the enzyme. Mice challenged transurethrally with the parent strain developed significant bacteriuria and urinary stones. The urease-negative mutant had a 50% infective dose of 2.7 x 10(9) CFU, a value more than 1,000-fold greater than that of the parent strain (2.2 x 10(6) CFU). The urease-positive parent strain reached significantly higher concentrations and persisted significantly longer in the bladder and kidney than did the mutant. Indeed, in the kidney, the parent strain increased in concentration while the mutant concentration fell so that, by 1 week, the parent strain concentration was 10(6) times that of the mutant. Similarly, the urease-positive parent produced significantly more severe renal pathology than the mutant. The initial abnormalities were in and around the pelvis and consisted of acute inflammation and epithelial necrosis. By 1 week, pyelitis was more severe, crystals were seen in the pelvis, and acute pyelonephritis, with acute interstitial inflammation, tubular epithelial cell necrosis, and in some cases abscesses, had developed. By 2 weeks, more animals had renal abscesses and radial bands of fibrosis. We conclude that the urease of P. mirabilis is a critical virulence determinant for colonization, urolithiasis, and severe acute pyelonephritis. PMID:8514376

  4. Proteus mirabilis urease: use of a ureA-lacZ fusion demonstrates that induction is highly specific for urea.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Mobley, H L

    1991-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, is the most frequent cause of infection-induced bladder and kidney stones. Urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis initiates stone formation in urine and can be inhibited by acetohydroxamic acid and other structural analogs of urea. Since P. mirabilis urease is inducible with urea, there has been some concern that urease inhibitors actually induce urease during an active infection, thus compounding the problem of elevated enzyme activity. Quantitating induction by compounds that simultaneously inhibit urease activity has been difficult. Therefore, to study these problems, we constructed a fusion of ureA (a urease subunit gene) and lacZ (the beta-galactosidase gene) within plasmid pMID1010, which encodes an inducible urease of P. mirabilis expressed in E. coli JM103 (Lac-). The fusion protein, predicted to be 117 kDa, was induced by urea and detected on Western blots (immunoblots) with anti-beta-galactosidase antiserum. Peak beta-galactosidase activity of 9.9 mumol of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein, quantitated spectrophotometrically, was induced at 200 mM urea. The uninduced rate was 0.2 mumol of ONPG hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein. Induction was specific for urea, as no structural analog of urea (including acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, thiourea, hippuric acid, flurofamide, or hydroxylamine) induced fusion protein activity. These data suggest that induction by inactivation of UreR, the urease repressor protein that governs regulation of the urease operon, is specific for urea and does not respond to closely related structural analogs. Images PMID:1894350

  5. Characterization of SXT/R391 Integrative and Conjugative Elements in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Food-Producing Animals in China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Wang, Hong-Ning; Liu, Bi-Hui; Yang, Li-Qin; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) were detected in 8 out of 125 Proteus mirabilis isolates from food-producing animals in China. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that seven ICEs were identical to ICEPmiJpn1, carrying the cephalosporinase gene blaCMY-2. Another one, designated ICEPmiChn1, carried five resistance genes. All eight ICEs could be transferred to Escherichia coli via conjugation. The results highlight the idea that animal farms are important reservoir of the SXT/R391 ICE-containing P. mirabilis. PMID:26824957

  6. High Prevalence of SXT/R391-Related Integrative and Conjugative Elements Carrying blaCMY-2 in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Gulls in the South of France.

    PubMed

    Aberkane, Salim; Compain, Fabrice; Decré, Dominique; Dupont, Chloé; Laurens, Chrislène; Vittecoq, Marion; Pantel, Alix; Solassol, Jérôme; Carrière, Christian; Renaud, François; Brieu, Nathalie; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Bouzinbi, Nicolas; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structures involved in the dissemination of blaCMY-2 carried by Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from different gull species in the South of France were characterized and compared to clinical isolates. blaCMY-2 was identified in P. mirabilis isolates from 27/93 yellow-legged gulls and from 37/65 slender-billed gulls. It was carried by a conjugative SXT/R391-like integrative and conjugative element (ICE) in all avian strains and in 3/7 human strains. Two clinical isolates had the same genetic background as six avian isolates. PMID:26643344

  7. Laser interferometric and cultivation methods for measurement of colistin/ampicilin and saponin interactions with smooth and rough of Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides and cells.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Micha?; Wasik, S?awomir; Dworecki, Kazimierz; Kaca, Wies?aw

    2009-05-01

    Laser interferometry is commonly used in permeability studies of soluble substances. In this study a modification that allowed testing partially insoluble mixtures is presented. The modification relies on the measurement of diffusion from 1% agarose gel. As a model for this study, two Proteus mirabilis strains were used that differ in polysaccharide content: smooth P. mirabilis S1959 strain and its Re-type mutant, strain R45. By laser interferometry and precipitation it is shown that R45 lipopolysaccharide is more effective in binding colistin. It has been shown with the laser interferometric method that saponins, which are detergent-like substances of plant origin, partially enhance the interaction of colistin with the S and Re types of P. mirabilis. These results were confirmed with whole cell Proteus studies. The saponin partially inhibited the growth of the S and Re P. mirabilis strains at doses of 31-500 microg/ml. A sub-inhibitory dose--15 microg/ml of saponins alone do not reduced the numbers of P. mirabilis S1959 and R45 cells. However, the presence of colistin or amipicillin and 15 microg/ml of saponins reduced the amount of P. mirabilis S1959 and R45 cells. The saponins enhanced sensitivities of S and R P. mirabilis cells towards colistin and amipicillin. One may proposed that saponins binds to lipid A part of LPS may resulted on an increase in bacterial cell wall outer-membrane permeabilities and by that facilitated antibiotics penetration into the bacterial cells. In conclusion, the laser interferometric method is a useful tool for studies of lipopolysaccharide-antibiotic interactions even if the tested substances are not fully soluble in water. PMID:19318050

  8. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin. PMID:9119470

  9. Evolution and Spread of a Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Clone with Chromosomal AmpC-Type Cephalosporinases in Europe▿

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrea, M. M.; Literacka, E.; Zioga, A.; Giani, T.; Baraniak, A.; Fiett, J.; Sadowy, E.; Tassios, P. T.; Rossolini, G. M.; Gniadkowski, M.; Miriagou, V.

    2011-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis isolates obtained in 1999 to 2008 from three European countries were analyzed; all carried chromosomal AmpC-type cephalosporinase blaCMY genes from a Citrobacter freundii origin (blaCMY-2-like genes). Isolates from Poland harbored several blaCMY genes (blaCMY-4, blaCMY-12, blaCMY-14, blaCMY-15, and blaCMY-38 and the new gene blaCMY-45), while isolates from Italy and Greece harbored blaCMY-16 only. Earlier isolates with blaCMY-4 or blaCMY-12, recovered in France from Greek and Algerian patients, were also studied. All isolates showed striking similarities. Their blaCMY genes resided within ISEcp1 transposition modules, named Tn6093, characterized by a 110-bp distance between ISEcp1 and blaCMY, and identical fragments of both C. freundii DNA and a ColE1-type plasmid backbone. Moreover, these modules were inserted into the same chromosomal site, within the pepQ gene. Since ColE1 plasmids carrying ISEcp1 with similar C. freundii DNA fragments (Tn6114) had been identified earlier, it is likely that a similar molecule had mediated at some stage this DNA transfer between C. freundii and P. mirabilis. In addition, isolates with blaCMY-12, blaCMY-15, and blaCMY-38 genes harbored a second blaCMY copy within a shorter ISEcp1 module (Tn6113), always inserted downstream of the ppiD gene. Sequence analysis of all mobile blaCMY-2-like genes indicated that those integrated in the P. mirabilis chromosome form a distinct cluster that may have evolved by the stepwise accumulation of mutations. All of these observations, coupled to strain typing data, suggest that the blaCMY genes studied here may have originated from a single ISEcp1-mediated mobilization-transfer-integration process, followed by the spread and evolution of a P. mirabilis clone over time and a large geographic area. PMID:21402851

  10. Differential regulation of the Proteus mirabilis urease gene cluster by UreR and H-NS.

    PubMed

    Poore, Carrie A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2003-12-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, relies on several virulence factors to colonize the urinary tract. Among these, urease contributes to the development of urinary stones resulting from the increase in local pH due to urease-mediated hydrolysis of urea to NH(3) and CO(2). UreR, an AraC-like transcriptional activator, activates transcription of the genes encoding the urease subunits and accessory proteins (ureDABCEFG) in the presence of urea. UreR also initiates transcription of its own gene in a urea-inducible manner by binding to the intergenic region between ureR and ureD. The intergenic region contains poly(A) tracts that appear to be the target of H-NS. It has been shown that Escherichia coli and P. mirabilis H-NS acts to repress transcription of ureR in an E. coli model system. It was hypothesized that H-NS represses urease gene expression in the absence of UreR and urea by binding to the intergenic region. To demonstrate this the P. mirabilis hns gene was cloned and the 15.6 kDa H-NS was overexpressed and purified as a myc-His tail fusion. Using a gel shift assay, purified H-NS-myc-His bound preferentially to a 609 bp DNA fragment containing the entire ureR-ureD intergenic region. H-NS and UreR were able to displace each other from the ureR-ureD intergenic region. Circular permutation analysis revealed that the intergenic region is bent. Moreover, H-NS recognizes this curvature, binds the DNA fragment and induces further bending of the DNA as shown by a circular ligation assay. The effects of H-NS, urea and temperature (25 vs 37 degrees C) on urease expression were shown in E. coli containing an hns knockout and P. mirabilis where expression was increased at 37 degrees C. Increased transcription from p(ureR) was seen in the E. coli hns knockout when temperature was increased from 25 to 37 degrees C. These findings suggest H-NS and UreR differentially regulate urease in a negative and positive manner, respectively. PMID:14663072

  11. Characterization of CMY-type beta-lactamases in clinical strains of Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in four hospitals in the Paris area.

    PubMed

    Decré, Dominique; Verdet, Charlotte; Raskine, Laurent; Blanchard, Hervé; Burghoffer, Béatrice; Philippon, Alain; Sanson-Le-Pors, Marie José; Petit, Jean Claude; Arlet, Guillaume

    2002-11-01

    We isolated five clinical strains (three Proteus mirabilis and two Klebsiella pneumoniae) with beta-lactam resistance phenotypes consistent with production of an AmpC-type beta-lactamase. The predicted amino acid sequences of the enzymes were typical of class C beta-lactamases. The enzymes were identified as CMY-2, CMY-4 and a new CMY-variant beta-lactamase, CMY-12. The AmpC beta-lactamases from the two K. pneumoniae isolates were found to be encoded on self-transferable plasmids. The genes encoding the AmpC-type beta-lactamase produced by the three P. mirabilis isolates were chromosomal. Four of the five clinical isolates were from patients transferred from Greece, Algeria and Egypt; one of the K. pneumoniae strains was recovered from a French patient. PFGE analysis and rep-PCR fingerprinting showed that the two P. mirabilis isolates from Greek patients were closely related. PMID:12407124

  12. Effects of the pH and the urine infected by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis on chromic catgut, polyglycolic acid and polyglactin 910: study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hering, F L; Rosenberg, D; Chade, J

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the effects of the pH and the urine infected by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis on chromic catgut, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and polyglactin 910 (P910), we divided the experiment into three steps. In the first step, the behavior of suture material immersed in sterile urine, urine infected by E. coli and urine infected by P. mirabilis and in culture environment infected by P. mirabilis was studied. The physical features were observed continuously up to the 6th day. In the second step, every element of the urea-splitting reaction was isolatedly studied , without the presence of bacterial agents. And in the last step, that reaction was mimetized in sterile environments and in environments with acid and alkaline pH. While the chromic catgut was kept integral in all the environments, the PGA and the P910 dissolved in urine infected by Proteus, which was caused by the ammonia resulting from the urea-splitting reaction. This dissolution was also observed in sterile environment (mimetization of the urea-splitting reaction by urease, with no Proteus). The destruction of the sutures was not influenced by the pH variance. PMID:2552634

  13. Intranasal immunization with fusion protein MrpH·FimH and MPL adjuvant confers protection against urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oloomi, Mana; Jafari, Anis; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Proteus mirabilis are among the most common infections in the world. Currently there are no vaccines available to confer protection against UTI in humans. In this study, the immune responses and protection of FimH of UPEC with MrpH antigen of P. mirabilis in different vaccine formulations with and without MPL adjuvant were assessed. Mice intranasally immunized with the novel fusion protein MrpH·FimH induced a significant increase in IgG and IgA in serum, nasal wash, vaginal wash, and urine samples. Mice immunized with fusion MrpH·FimH also showed a significant boost in cellular immunity. Addition of MPL as the adjuvant enhanced FimH and MrpH specific humoral and cellular responses in both systemic and mucosal samples. Vaccination with MrpH·FimH alone or in combination with MPL showed the highest efficiency in clearing bladder and kidney infections in mice challenged with UPEC and P. mirabilis. These findings may indicate that the protection observed correlates with the systemic, mucosal and cellular immune responses induced by vaccination with these preparations. Our data suggest MrpH·FimH fusion protein with or without MPL as adjuvant could be potential vaccine candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis. These data altogether are promising and these formulations are good candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis. PMID:25562574

  14. Cooccurrence of Multiple AmpC β-Lactamases in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Chérif, Thouraya; Saidani, Mabrouka; Decré, Dominique; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Arlet, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Over a period of 40 months, plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases were detected in Tunis, Tunisia, in 78 isolates (0.59%) of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis. In 67 isolates, only one ampC gene was detected, i.e., blaCMY-2-type (n = 33), blaACC (n = 23), blaDHA (n = 6) or blaEBC (n = 5). Multiple ampC genes were detected in 11 isolates, with the following distribution: blaMOX-2, blaFOX-3, and blaCMY-4/16 (n = 6), blaFOX-3 and blaMOX-2 (n = 3), and blaCMY-4 and blaMOX-2 (n = 2). A great variety of plasmids carrying these genes was found, independently of the species and the bla gene. If the genetic context of blaCMY-2-type is variable, that of blaMOX-2, reported in part previously, is unique and that of blaFOX-3 is unique and new. PMID:26459902

  15. Cold adapted features of Vibrio salmonicida catalase: characterisation and comparison to the mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Moe, Elin; Jouve, Hélène Marie; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-10-01

    The gene encoding catalase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio salmonicida LFI1238 was identified, cloned and expressed in the catalase-deficient Escherichia coli UM2. Recombinant catalase from V. salmonicida (VSC) was purified to apparent homogeneity as a tetramer with a molecular mass of 235 kDa. VSC contained 67% heme b and 25% protoporphyrin IX. VSC was able to bind NADPH, react with cyanide and form compounds I and II as other monofunctional small subunit heme catalases. Amino acid sequence alignment of VSC and catalase from the mesophilic Proteus mirabilis (PMC) revealed 71% identity. As for cold adapted enzymes in general, VSC possessed a lower temperature optimum and higher catalytic efficiency (k (cat)/K (m)) compared to PMC. VSC have higher affinity for hydrogen peroxide (apparent K (m)) at all temperatures. For VSC the turnover rate (k (cat)) is slightly lower while the catalytic efficiency is slightly higher compared to PMC over the temperature range measured, except at 4 degrees C. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency of VSC and PMC is almost temperature independent, except at 4 degrees C where PMC has a twofold lower efficiency compared to VSC. This may indicate that VSC has evolved to maintain a high efficiency at low temperatures. PMID:16609813

  16. [Structural and immunologic studies of Proteus mirabilis 033 O-specific polysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Cedzyński, M; Rózalski, A; Kotełko, K; Kaca, W; Vinogradov, E V; Knirel, Y A; Kochetkov, N K

    1993-01-01

    O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of P. mirabilis 033 lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was found to contain N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-L-fucosamine in a ratio 1:1:1. On the basis of the data obtained from 13C-NMR and methylation analysis, the following structure of repeating unit was established: [formula: see text] Selective removal of the D-GlcA significantly decreased reactivity of 033 O-specific polysaccharide with homologous antiserum. This component was plays an immunodominant role. Cross reactivity between anti-033 serum and disaccharide alfa-L-FucNAc-beta-D-GlcNAc containing P. vulgaris 023 and S. arizonae 059 O-specific polysaccharides was also observed. PMID:8231453

  17. Identification of UreR binding sites in the Enterobacteriaceae plasmid-encoded and Proteus mirabilis urease gene operons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, V J; Collins, C M

    1999-03-01

    The closely related Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacterlaceae plasmid-encoded urease genes are positively regulated by the AraC-like transcriptional activator UreR. In the presence of the effector molecule urea, UreR promotes transcription of ureD, the initial gene in the urease operon, and increases transcription of the divergently transcribed ureR. Here, we identify UreR-specific binding sites in the ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. Recombinant UreR (rUreR) was expressed and purified, and gel shift and DNase I protection assays were performed with this protein. These analyses indicated that there are two distinct rUreR binding sites in both the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. A consensus binding site of TA/GT/CA/TT/GC/TTA/TT/AATTG was predicted from the DNase I protection assays. Although rUreR bound to the specific DNA binding site in both the presence and the absence of urea, the dissociation rate constant k-1 of the rUreR-DNA complex interaction was measurably different when urea was present. In the absence of urea, the dissociation of the protein-DNA complexes, for both ureRp and ureDp, was complete at the earliest time point, and it was not possible to determine a rate. In the presence of urea, dissociation was measurable with a k-1 for the rUreR-ureRp interaction of 1.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-2) s-1 and a k-1 for the rUreR-ureDp interaction of 2.6 +/- 0.1 x 10(-3) s-1. This corresponds to a half-life of the ureRp-rUreR interaction of 58 s, and a half-life of the ureDp-rUreR interaction of 4 min 26 s. A model describing a potential role for urea in the activation of these promoters is proposed. PMID:10200962

  18. Determination of a novel integron-located variant (blaOXA -320 ) of Class D β-lactamase in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Aysegul Copur; Duzgun, Azer Ozad; Saral, Aysegul; Sandalli, Cemal

    2014-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) is one of Gram-negative pathogens encountered in clinical specimens. A clinical isolate (TRP41) of P. mirabilis was isolated from a Turkish patient in Turkey. The isolate was identified using the API 32GN system and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and it was found resistant to ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. This isolate was harboring a Class 1 integron gene cassette and its DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel blaOXA variant exhibiting one amino acid substitution (Asn266Ile) from blaOXA-1 . This new variant of OXA was located on Class 1 integron together with aadA1 gene encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. According to sequence records, the new variant was named as blaOXA-320 . Cassette array and size of integron were found as blaOXA-320 -aadA1 and 2086 bp, respectively. The blaOXA-320 gene is not transferable according to conjugation experiment. In this study, we report the first identification of blaOXA-320 -aadA1 gene cassette, a novel variant of Class D β-lactamase, in P. mirabilis from Turkey. PMID:24027220

  19. Construction of a urease-negative mutant of Proteus mirabilis: analysis of virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Lockatell, C V; Johnson, D E; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1990-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a urease-producing uropathogen, causes serious urinary tract infections in humans. To specifically evaluate the contribution of urease to virulence, a mutation was introduced into P. mirabilis HI4320 by homologous recombination. Virulence was assessed in the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Twenty mice each were challenged transurethrally with P. mirabilis HI4320 and its urease-negative derivative (1 x 10(9) to 2 x 10(9) CFU). At 48 h animals were sacrificed and the mean log10 CFU per milliliter of urine (parent, 6.23; mutant, 4.19; P = 0.0014) or per gram of bladder (parent, 6.29; mutant, 4.28; P = 0.0002), left kidney (parent, 4.11; mutant, 1.02; P = 0.00009), and right kidney (parent, 4.11; mutant, 2.43; P = 0.036) were all shown to be significantly different. These data demonstrate a role for urease as a critical virulence determinant for uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:2180821

  20. Bloodstream infections caused by multi-drug resistant Proteus mirabilis: Epidemiology, risk factors and impact of multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Korytny, Alexander; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Fransisc; Borer, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Background The prevalence of antimicrobial co-resistance among ESBL-producing Enterobactereaceae is extremely high in Israel. Multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strains (MDR-PM), resistant to almost all antibiotic classes have been described. The aim was to determine the risk factors for bloodstream infections caused by MDR-PM and clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective case-control study. Adult patients with PM bacteremia during 7 years were identified retrospectively and their files reviewed for demographics, underlying diseases, Charlson Comorbidity Index, treatment and outcome. Results One hundred and eighty patients with PM-bloodstream infection (BSI) were included; 90 cases with MDR-PM and 90 controls with sensitive PM (S-PM). Compared to controls, cases more frequently were from nursing homes, had recurrent hospital admissions in the past year and received antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months, were bedridden and suffered from peripheral vascular disease and peptic ulcer disease (p < 0.001). Two-thirds of the MDR-PM isolates were ESBL-producers vs 4.4% of S-PM isolates (p < 0.001, OR = 47.6, 95% CI = 15.9-142.6). In-hospital crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was 37.7% vs 23.3% in those with S-PM BSI (p = 0.0359, OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.81). Conclusions PM bacteremia in elderly and functionally-dependent patients is likely to be caused by nearly pan-resistant PM strains in the institution; 51.8% of the patients received inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. The crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was significantly higher than that of patients with S-PM BSI. PMID:26763474

  1. Formation of a tyrosyl radical intermediate in Proteus mirabilis catalase by directed mutagenesis and consequences for nucleotide reactivity.

    PubMed

    Andreoletti, P; Gambarelli, S; Sainz, G; Stojanoff, V; White, C; Desfonds, G; Gagnon, J; Gaillard, J; Jouve, H M

    2001-11-13

    Proteus mirabilis catalase (PMC) belongs to the family of NADPH binding catalases. The function of NADPH in these enzymes is still a matter of debate. This study presents the effects of two independent phenylalanine mutations (F194 and F215), located between NADPH and heme in the PMC structure. The phenylalanines were replaced with tyrosines which we predicted could carry radicals in a NADPH-heme electron transfer. The X-ray crystal structures of the two mutants indicated that neither the binding site of NADPH nor the immediate environment of the residues was affected by the mutations. Measurements using H2O2 as a substrate confirmed that the variants were as active as the native enzyme. With equivalent amounts of peroxoacetic acid, wild-type PMC, F215Y PMC, and beef liver catalase (BLC) formed a stable compound I, while the F194Y PMC variant produced a compound I which was rapidly transformed into compound II and a tyrosyl radical. EPR studies showed that this radical, generated by the oxidation of Y194, was not related to the previously observed radical in BLC, located on Y369. In the presence of excess NADPH, compound I was reduced to a resting enzyme (k(obs) = 1.7 min(-1)) in a two-electron process. This was independent of the enzyme's origin and did not require any thus far identified tyrosyl radicals. Conversely, the presence of a tyrosyl radical in F194Y PMC greatly enhanced the oxidation of reduced beta-nicotinamide mononucleotide under a steady-state H2O2 flow with observable compound II. This process could involve a one-electron reduction of compound I via Y194. PMID:11695923

  2. Persistence of antibiotic-resistant and -sensitive Proteus mirabilis strains in the digestive tract of the housefly (Musca domestica) and green bottle flies (Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2014-10-01

    Synanthropic flies have been implicated in the rapid dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resistance determinants in the biosphere. These flies stably harbor a considerable number of bacteria that exhibit resistance to various antibiotics, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the digestive tract of houseflies and green bottle flies, using Proteus mirabilis as a model microorganism. One resistant strain carried the blaTEM and aphA1 genes, and another carried a plasmid containing qnrD gene. Quantitative PCR and 454 pyrosequencing were used to monitor the relative abundance of the Proteus strains, as well as potential changes in the overall structure of the whole bacterial community incurred by the artificial induction of Proteus cultures. Both antibiotic-resistant and -sensitive P. mirabilis strains persisted in the fly digestive tract for at least 3 days, and there was no significant difference in the relative abundance of resistant and sensitive strains despite the lower growth rate of resistant strains when cultured in vitro. Therefore, conditions in the fly digestive tract may allow resistant strains to survive the competition with sensitive strains in the absence of antibiotic selective pressure. The composition of the fly-associated bacterial community changed over time, but the contribution of the artificially introduced P. mirabilis strains to these changes was not clear. In order to explain these changes, it will be necessary to obtain more information about bacterial interspecies antagonism in the fly digestive tract. PMID:24903814

  3. Immunochemical characterization of the O antigens of two Proteus strains, O8-related antigen of Proteus mirabilis 12 B-r and O2-related antigen of Proteus genomospecies 5/6 12 B-k, infecting a hospitalized patient in Poland.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Shashkov, Alexander S; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-01

    A hospitalized 73-year-old woman was infected with a Proteus mirabilis strain, 12 B-r, isolated from the place of injection of a blood catheter. Another strain, 12 B-k, recognized as Proteus genomospecies 5 or 6, was isolated from the patient's faeces, which was an example of a nosocomial infection rather than an auto-infection. Serological investigation using ELISA and Western blotting showed that strain 12 B-k from faeces belonged to the Proteus O2 serogroup. Strain 12 B-r from the wound displayed cross-reactions with several Proteus O serogroups due to common epitopes on the core or O-specific parts of the lipopolysaccharide. Studies of the isolated 12 B-r O-specific polysaccharide by NMR spectroscopy revealed its close structural similarity to that of Proteus O8. The only difference in 12 B-r was the presence of an additional GlcNAc-linked phosphoethanolamine residue, which creates a putative epitope responsible for the cross-reactivity with Pt. mirabilis O16. The new O-antigen form could appear as a result of adaptation of the bacterium to a changing environment. On the basis of the data obtained, we suggest division of the O8 serogroup into two subgroups: O8a for strains of various Proteus species that have been previously classified into the O8 serogroup, and O8a,b for Pt. mirabilis 12 B-r, where 'a' is a common epitope and 'b' is a phosphoethanolamine-associated epitope. These findings further confirm serological and structural heterogeneity of O antigens of Proteus strains isolated lately from patients in Poland. PMID:26959528

  4. Proteus mirabilis genes that contribute to pathogenesis of urinary tract infection: identification of 25 signature-tagged mutants attenuated at least 100-fold.

    PubMed

    Burall, Laurel S; Harro, Janette M; Li, Xin; Lockatell, C Virginia; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Hebel, J Richard; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2004-05-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTI) in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities or with long-term catheterization, forms bladder and kidney stones as a consequence of urease-mediated urea hydrolysis. Known virulence factors, besides urease, are hemolysin, fimbriae, metalloproteases, and flagella. In this study we utilized the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI to evaluate the colonization of mutants of P. mirabilis HI4320 that were generated by signature-tagged mutagenesis. By performing primary screening of 2088 P. mirabilis transposon mutants, we identified 502 mutants that ranged from slightly attenuated to unrecoverable. Secondary screening of these mutants revealed that 114 transposon mutants were reproducibly attenuated. Cochallenge of 84 of these single mutants with the parent strain in the mouse model resulted in identification of 37 consistently out-competed P. mirabilis transposon mutants, 25 of which were out-competed >100-fold for colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by the parent strain. We determined the sequence flanking the site of transposon insertion in 29 attenuated mutants and identified genes affecting motility, iron acquisition, transcriptional regulation, phosphate transport, urease activity, cell surface structure, and key metabolic pathways as requirements for P. mirabilis infection of the urinary tract. Two mutations localized to a approximately 42-kb plasmid present in the parent strain, suggesting that the plasmid is important for colonization. Isolation of disrupted genes encoding proteins with homologies to known bacterial virulence factors, especially the urease accessory protein UreF and the disulfide formation protein DsbA, showed that the CBA mouse model and mutant pools are a reliable source of attenuated mutants with mutations in virulence genes. PMID:15102805

  5. Current status of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis in Okinawa prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Rika; Shingaki, Aoi; Miyazato, Hiroko; Higa, Rikako; Nagamoto, Chota; Hamamoto, Kouta; Ueda, Shuhei; Hachiman, Teruyuki; Touma, Yuki; Miyagi, Kazufumi; Kawahara, Ryuji; Toyosato, Takehiko; Hirai, Itaru

    2016-05-01

    Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) are distributed worldwide. In this study, 114 ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were isolated by analyzing 1672 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae collected from an Okinawa prefectural hospital in Japan between June 2013 and July 2014. The overall prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was 6.8%; the prevalence of different bacterial species among the ESBL-producing isolates was as follows: 11.5% Escherichia coli (90 of 783 isolates), 6.2% Klebsiella pneumoniae (19 of 307 isolates), and 11.1% Proteus mirabilis (5 of 45 isolates). The ESBL types blaCTX-M-1, -3, -15, -2, -14, -27, and mutants of blaSHV-1 were detected. Among them, blaCTX-M-15 (33.3%), blaCTX-M-14 (27.8%) and blaCTX-M-27 (33.3%) were dominant in the E. coli isolates, whereas a blaSHV mutant which possessed four mutations (Tyr7Phe, Leu35Gln, Gly238Ser and Glu240Lys) in the amino acid sequence of SHV-1 dominated in the K. pneumoniae isolates (11 of 19, 57.9%). The pandemic E. coli ST131 clone was found to constitute 3.3% of the overall examined isolates and 62.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that the genetic combination of blaCTX-M, and blaSHV and antibiotics-resistant profile were different from that in other regions such as other areas of Japan, Asia, Europe, and North America, especially in the ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates and in the E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 isolates possessing blaCTX-M-15 (40.7% of the E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 isolates). Taken together, our results indicate that the ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Okinawa, Japan, might be of a unique nature. PMID:26898665

  6. Comparative in vitro studies on disodium EDTA effect with and without Proteus mirabilis on the crystallization of carbonate apatite and struvite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Olszynski, Marcin; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Effect of disodium EDTA (salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) on the crystallization of struvite and carbonate apatite was studied. To evaluate such an effect we performed an experiment of struvite and carbonate apatite growth from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis to mimic the real urinary tract infection, which usually leads to urinary stone formation. The results demonstrate that disodium EDTA exhibits the effect against P. mirabilis retarding the activity of urease - an enzyme produced by these microorganisms. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that, with and without P. mirabilis, the addition of disodium EDTA increases the induction time and decreases the growth efficiency compared to the baseline (without disodium EDTA). These results are discussed from the standpoint of speciation of complexes formed in the solution of artificial urine in the presence of disodium EDTA. The size of struvite crystals was found to decrease in the presence of disodium EDTA. However, struvite crystals are larger in the presence of bacteria while the crystal morphology and habit remain unchanged.

  7. UreR, the transcriptional activator of the Proteus mirabilis urease gene cluster, is required for urease activity and virulence in experimental urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dattelbaum, Jonathan D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2003-02-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of complicated urinary tract infection, produces urease, an essential virulence factor for this species. UreR, a member of the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators, positively activates expression of the ure gene cluster in the presence of urea. To specifically evaluate the contribution of UreR to urease activity and virulence in the urinary tract, a ureR mutation was introduced into P. mirabilis HI4320 by homologous recombination. The isogenic ureR::aphA mutant, deficient in UreR production, lacked measurable urease activity. Expression was not detected in the UreR-deficient strain by Western blotting with monoclonal antibodies raised against UreD. Urease activity and UreD expression were restored by complementation of the mutant strain with ureR expressed from a low-copy-number plasmid. Virulence was assessed by transurethral cochallenge of CBA mice with wild-type and mutant strains. The isogenic ureR::aphA mutant of HI4320 was outcompeted in the urine (P = 0.004), bladder (P = 0.016), and kidneys (P < or = 0.001) 7 days after inoculation. Thus, UreR is required for basal urease activity in the absence of urea, for induction of urease by urea, and for virulence of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:12540589

  8. Irrigation with N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-422) in a citrate buffer maintains urinary catheter patency in vitro and prevents encrustation by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Rani, Suriani Abdul; Celeri, Chris; Najafi, Ron; Bley, Keith; Debabov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Long-term use of indwelling urinary catheters can lead to urinary tract infections and loss of catheter patency due to encrustation and blockage. Encrustation of urinary catheters is due to formation of crystalline biofilms by urease-producing microorganisms such as Proteus mirabilis. An in vitro catheter biofilm model (CBM) was used to evaluate current methods for maintaining urinary catheter patency. We compared antimicrobial-coated urinary Foley catheters, with both available catheter irrigation solutions and investigational solutions containing NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine; a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial). Inoculation of the CBM reactor with 10(8) colony-forming units of P. mirabilis resulted in crystalline biofilm formation in catheters by 48 h and blockage of catheters within 5 days. Silver hydrogel or nitrofurazone-coated catheters did not extend the duration of catheter patency. Catheters irrigated daily with commercially available solutions such as 0.25 % acetic acid and isotonic saline blocked at the same rate as untreated catheters. Daily irrigations of catheters with 0.2 % NVC-422 in 10 mM acetate-buffered saline pH 4 or Renacidin maintained catheter patency throughout 10-day studies, but P. mirabilis colonization of the CBM remained. In contrast, 0.2 % NVC-422 in citrate buffer (6.6 % citric acid at pH 3.8) resulted in an irrigation solution that not only maintained catheter patency for 10 days but also completely eradicated the P. mirabilis biofilm within one treatment day. These data suggest that an irrigation solution containing the rapidly bactericidal antimicrobial NVC-422 in combination with citric acid to permeabilize crystalline biofilm may significantly enhance catheter patency versus other approved irrigation solutions and antimicrobial-coated catheters. PMID:26282899

  9. In silico design of fusion protein of FimH from uropathogenic Escherichia coli and MrpH from Proteus mirabilis against urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Proteus mirabilis are the most important pathogens causing UTIs. The FimH from type 1 pili of UPEC and the MrpH from P. mirabilis play critical roles in the UTI process and have presented as ideal vaccine candidates against UTIs. There is no effective vaccine against UTI and the development of an ideal UTI vaccine is required. Materials and Methods: In this study, we planned to design a novel fusion protein of FimH from UPEC and MrpH from P. mirabilis. For this purpose, we modeled fusion protein forms computationally using the Iterative Threading Assembly Refinement (I-TASSER) server and evaluated their interactions with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). The best fusion protein was constructed using overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (OE-PCR) and the biological activity of fusion was evaluated by the induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the HT-29 cell line. Results: Our study indicated that based on the Protein Structure Analysis (ProSA)-web and the docking results, MrpH.FimH showed better results than did FimH.MrpH, and it was selected for construction. The results of bioassay on the HT-29 showed that FimH and MrpH.FimH induced significantly higher IL-8 responses than untreated cells or MrpH alone in the cell line tested. Conclusions: In the present study, we designed and constructed the novel fusion protein MrpH.FimH from UPEC and P. mirabilis based on in silico methods. Our bioassay results indicate that the MrpH.FimH fusion protein is active and capable of inducing immune responses. PMID:26605246

  10. Proteus mirabilis isolates of different origins do not show correlation with virulence attributes and can colonize the urinary tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Vanessa; Schlapp, Geraldine; Zunino, Pablo

    2006-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis has been described as an aetiological agent in a wide range of infections, playing an important role in urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this study, a collection of P. mirabilis isolates obtained from clinical and non-clinical sources was analysed in order to determine a possible correlation between origin, virulence factors and in vivo infectivity. Isolates were characterized in vitro, assessing several virulence properties that had been previously associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. Swarming motility, urease production, growth in urine, outer-membrane protein patterns, ability to grow in the presence of different iron sources, haemolysin and haemagglutinin production, and the presence and expression of diverse fimbrial genes, were analysed. In order to evaluate the infectivity of the different isolates, the experimental ascending UTI model in mice was used. Additionally, the Dienes test and the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR assay were performed to assess the genetic diversity of the isolates. The results of the present study did not show any correlation between distribution of the diverse potential urovirulence factors and isolate source. No significant correlation was observed between infectivity and the origin of the isolates, since they all similarly colonized the urinary tract of the challenged mice. Finally, all isolates showed unique ERIC-PCR patterns, indicating that the isolates were genetically diverse. The results obtained in this study suggest that the source of P. mirabilis strains cannot be correlated with pathogenic attributes, and that the distribution of virulence factors between isolates of different origins may correspond to the opportunistic nature of the organism. PMID:16804188

  11. Proteus mirabilis flagella and MR/P fimbriae: isolation, purification, N-terminal analysis, and serum antibody response following experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Johnson, D E; Robbins, D; Mobley, H L

    1991-10-01

    Urinary tract infection with Proteus mirabilis may lead to serious complications, including cystitis, acute pyelonephritis, fever, bacteremia, and death. In addition to the production of hemolysin and the enzyme urease, fimbriae and flagellum-mediated motility have been postulated as virulence factors for this species. We purified mannose-resistant/proteuslike (MR/P) fimbriae and flagella from strains CFT322 and HU2450, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed highly concentrated preparations of fimbriae and flagella. Fimbrial and flagellar structural subunits were estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be 18.5 and 41 kDa, respectively. N-terminal sequencing revealed that 10 of the first 20 amino acids of the major MR/P subunit matched the sequence of the P. mirabilis uroepithelial cell adhesin N terminus and 11 of 20 amino acids matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the Escherichia coli P fimbriae structural subunit, PapA. In addition, 90 and 80% homologies were found between the first 20 amino acids of P. mirabilis flagellin and those of Salmonella typhimurium phase-1 flagellin and the E. coli hag gene product, respectively. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified antigens showed a strong reaction between the MR/P fimbriae or flagella and sera of CBA mice challenged transurethrally with P. mirabilis. A possible role for MR/P fimbriae in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection is supported by (i) a strong immune response to the antigen in experimentally infected animals, (ii) amino acid sequence similarity to other enteric surface structure, and (iii) our previously reported observation that MR/P fimbriae are expressed preferentially as the sole fimbrial type in human pyelonephritis isolates. PMID:1680106

  12. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  13. Chromosomal blaCTX-M-₁₅ associated with ISEcp1 in Proteus mirabilis and Morganella morganii isolated at the Military Hospital of Tunis, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Mahrouki, Sihem; Belhadj, Omrane; Chihi, Hela; Mohamed, Ben Moussa; Celenza, Giuseppe; Amicosante, Gianfranco; Perilli, Mariagrazia

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the genetic environment of bla(CTX-M) genes and associated resistance genes in seven Proteus mirabilis and six Morganella morganii extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive isolates. The isolates were recovered from hospitalized patients with respiratory or urinary tract infections at the Military Hospital of Tunis, Tunisia. Twenty-one of the 200 strains exhibited non-susceptibility to third generation cephalosporins and, among these strains, the double-disk synergy test confirmed the ESBL phenotype in 13 isolates. These ESBL producers were co-resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline and oflaxacin but remained susceptible to ertapenem (MIC<0.25 mg l(-1)). The presence and nature of bla(CTX-M-15), bla(CTX-M-8), bla(TEM-24), bla(TEM-1) and bla(TEM-2) genes was determined by PCR and sequencing. Chromosomal localization of the bla(CTX-M-15) gene was confirmed in all strains, with the exception of M. morganii isolate M-17991, by Southern-blot analysis performed either on chromosomal or plasmid DNA. M. morganii M-12012 and M. morganii M-6019 showed the same PFGE pattern, whereas the remaining CTX-M-15-producing isolates were unrelated. The presence of ISEcp1 was ascertained in CTX-M-15-producing isolates. A class 1 integron with different gene cassettes (dfrA1, orfC and aadB) was found in five P. mirabilis and six M. morganii isolates. PMID:22683657

  14. Modulation of effects of lipopolysaccharide on macrophages by a major outer membrane protein of Proteus mirabilis as measured in a chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, G; Heck, D; Bartlett, R R; Nixdorff, K

    1992-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a major protein isolated from purified cell walls of Proteus mirabilis (39-kDa protein) is a strong modulator of the specific immune responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from this bacterium. When the protein is mixed with LPS before immunization of mice, the responses of antibody-producing cells specific for LPS are greatly enhanced and converted predominantly to the immunoglobulin G isotype. In the present study, the immunomodulating effects of the 39-kDa protein were tested at the level of interaction of LPS with macrophages. Activation of macrophages was determined by measuring the production of oxygen radicals in a chemiluminescence assay with lucigenin as the amplifier. LPS from P. mirabilis induced strong oxidative metabolism in both peritoneal and bone marrow-derived murine macrophages. These responses were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by mixing LPS with increasing amounts of the protein. In contrast, bovine serum albumin and methylated bovine serum albumin enhanced the response of macrophages dramatically when complexed with LPS. The inhibiting activity of the 39-kDa protein was also observed with LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. PMID:1541521

  15. Initiation of Swarming Motility by Proteus mirabilis Occurs in Response to Specific Cues Present in Urine and Requires Excess l-Glutamine

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Hodges, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a leading cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CaUTI), differentiates into swarm cells that migrate across catheter surfaces and medium solidified with 1.5% agar. While many genes and nutrient requirements involved in the swarming process have been identified, few studies have addressed the signals that promote initiation of swarming following initial contact with a surface. In this study, we show that P. mirabilis CaUTI isolates initiate swarming in response to specific nutrients and environmental cues. Thirty-three compounds, including amino acids, polyamines, fatty acids, and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, were tested for the ability to promote swarming when added to normally nonpermissive media. l-Arginine, l-glutamine, dl-histidine, malate, and dl-ornithine promoted swarming on several types of media without enhancing swimming motility or growth rate. Testing of isogenic mutants revealed that swarming in response to the cues required putrescine biosynthesis and pathways involved in amino acid metabolism. Furthermore, excess glutamine was found to be a strict requirement for swarming on normal swarm agar in addition to being a swarming cue under normally nonpermissive conditions. We thus conclude that initiation of swarming occurs in response to specific cues and that manipulating concentrations of key nutrient cues can signal whether or not a particular environment is permissive for swarming. PMID:23316040

  16. Occurrence and Detection of AmpC Beta-Lactamases among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis Isolates at a Veterans Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Coudron, Philip E.; Moland, Ellen S.; Thomson, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    AmpC beta-lactamases are cephalosporinases that confer resistance to a wide variety of β-lactam drugs and that may thereby create serious therapeutic problems. Although reported with increasing frequency, the true rate of occurrence of AmpC beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis remains unknown. We tested a total of 1,286 consecutive, nonrepeat isolates of these three species and found that, overall, 45 (3.5%) yielded a cefoxitin zone diameter less than 18 mm (screen positive) and that 16 (1.2%) demonstrated AmpC bands by isoelectric focusing. Based on the species, of 683 E. coli, 371 K. pneumoniae, and 232 P. mirabilis isolates tested, 13 (1.9%), 28 (7.6%), and 4 (1.7%), respectively, demonstrated decreased zone diameters and 11 (1.6%), 4 (1.1%), and 1 (0.4%), respectively, demonstrated AmpC bands. Cefoxitin resistance was transferred for all but 8 (E. coli) of the 16 AmpC producers. We also describe a three-dimensional extract test, which was used to detect phenotypically isolates that harbor AmpC beta-lactamase. Of the 45 cefoxitin-resistant isolates, the three-dimensional extract test accurately identified all 16 AmpC producers and 28 of 29 (97%) isolates as non-AmpC producers. Interestingly, most (86%) isolates in the latter group were K. pneumoniae isolates. These data confirm that, at our institution, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. mirabilis harbor plasmid-mediated AmpC enzymes. PMID:10790101

  17. Carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tang, Hung-Jen; Huang, Chi-Chang; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to delineate the role of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam in treating bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Proteus mirabilis. We performed a multicenter and retrospective study of the patients with ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia. The outcomes of the patients treated by piperacillin/tazobactam or a carbapenem for at least 48 hours and the MICs of the prescribed drugs for these isolates were analyzed. Forty-seven patients with available clinical data were included. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 29.8%. All available isolates (n = 44) were susceptible to ertapenem, meropenem, and doripenem, and 95.6% were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam; however, only 11.4% of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem. Among the 3 patients infected with isolates exhibiting non-susceptibility to imipenem (MIC ≥2 mg/L) who were treated with imipenem, none died within 28 days. The 30-day (14.3% versus 23.1%, P = 0.65) or in-hospital (19.1% versus 30.8%, P = 0.68) mortality rate of 21 patients treated by a carbapenem was lower than that of 13 treated by piperacillin/tazobactam. However, among those treated by piperacillin/tazobactam, the mortality rate of those infected by the isolates with lower piperacillin/tazobactam MICs (≤0.5/4 mg/L) was lower than that of the isolates with MICs of ≥1/4 mg/L (0%, 0/7 versus 60%, 3/5; P = 0.045). ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia is associated with significant mortality, and carbapenem therapy could be regarded as the drugs of choice. The role of piperacillin/tazobactam, especially for the infections due to the isolates with an MIC ≤0.5/4 mg/L, warrants more clinical studies. PMID:25139843

  18. Chromosomally Encoded blaCMY-2 Located on a Novel SXT/R391-Related Integrating Conjugative Element in a Proteus mirabilis Clinical Isolate ▿

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Sohei; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tomoo; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2010-01-01

    Integrating conjugative elements (ICEs) are mobile genetic elements that can transfer from the chromosome of a host to the chromosome of a new host through the process of excision, conjugation, and integration. Although SXT/R391-related ICEs, originally demonstrated in Vibrio cholerae O139 isolates, have become prevalent among V. cholerae isolates in Asia, the prevalence of the ICEs among Gram-negative bacteria other than Vibrio spp. remains unknown. In addition, SXT/R391-related ICEs carrying genes conferring resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins have never been described. Here we carried out a genetic analysis of a cefoxitin-resistant Proteus mirabilis clinical isolate, TUM4660, which revealed the presence of a novel SXT/R391-related ICE, ICEPmiJpn1. ICEPmiJpn1 had a core genetic structure showing high similarity to that of R391 and carried xis and int genes completely identical to those of R391, while an IS10-mediated composite transposon carrying blaCMY-2 was integrated into the ICE. A nucleotide sequence identical to the 3′ part of ISEcp1 was located upstream of the blaCMY-2 gene, and other genes observed around blaCMY-2 in earlier studies were also present. Furthermore, the nucleotide sequences of hot spot 2 and hot spot 4 in ICEPmiJpn1 showed high similarity to that of hot spot 2 in SXTMO10 and with a part of the nucleotide sequence found in P. mirabilis ATCC 29906, respectively. ICEPmiJpn1 was successfully transferred to Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Citrobacter koseri in conjugation experiments. These observations suggest that ICEs may contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes among clinically relevant Enterobacteriaceae, which warrants careful observation of the prevalence of ICEs, including SXT/R391-related ICEs. PMID:20566768

  19. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  20. Characterisation of CMY-4, an AmpC-type plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in a Tunisian clinical isolate of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Verdet, C; Arlet, G; Ben Redjeb, S; Ben Hassen, A; Lagrange, P H; Philippon, A

    1998-12-15

    A strain of Proteus mirabilis resistant to beta-lactams, including cefoxitin, was isolated from the urine of a woman from Tunisia. Its antibiotic susceptibility pattern and that of the Escherichia coli transconjugant suggested the presence of an AmpC-type beta-lactamase. Two bands of beta-lactamase activity (pI 5.4 and 9.2) were detected by isoelectric focusing. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the AmpC-type enzyme was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence was 98-99% identical to CMY-3 and to those of the plasmid-mediated AmpC-type beta-lactamases originated from Citrobacter freundii and 97% identical to the chromosome-encoded beta-lactamase of a Tunisian clinical isolate of C. freundii. This enzyme differs from CMY-2 by one substitution (Arg for Trp at position 221) and from CMY-3 by two substitutions (Glu for Gly at position 42 and Ser for Asn at position 363) and we propose the denomination CMY-4. PMID:9868767

  1. Chromosome-Encoded AmpC and CTX-M Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Clinical Isolates of Proteus mirabilis from Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wonkeun; Kim, Juwon; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Seo, Young Hee; Shin, Jong Hee; Jang, Sook Jin; Uh, Young; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2011-01-01

    Among 222 Proteus mirabilis clinical isolates collected from 17 hospitals in Korea in 2008, 28 (12.6%) and 8 (3.6%) isolates exhibited extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC phenotypes, respectively. The most common type of ESBL gene identified by PCR and sequencing experiments was blaCTX-M-14a (n = 12). The blaCTX-M-90 (n = 4), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 3), blaCTX-M-12 (n = 3), blaCTX-M-2 (n = 2), blaCTX-M-14b (n = 1), blaTEM-52 (n = 5), and blaSHV-12 (n = 1) genes were also detected. Eight isolates carried an AmpC β-lactamase gene, such as blaCMY-2 (n = 6) or blaDHA-1 (n = 2). All bla genes encoding CTX-M-1- and CTX-M-9-type enzymes and all blaCMY-2 genes were preceded by ISEcp1-like elements. The blaCTX-M-2 gene found in two isolates was located on a complex class 1 integron. The blaDHA-1 gene was preceded by a transcriptional regulator gene and was followed by phage shock protein genes. The blaCTX-M genes were located on the chromosome in 21 isolates. A plasmid location for the blaCTX-M gene was found in only four isolates: the blaCTX-M-14a gene was located on ∼150-kbp IncA/C plasmids in three isolates and on a ∼50-kbp IncN plasmid in one isolate. The blaTEM-52 gene was located on ∼50-kbp IncN plasmids in all five isolates. The AmpC β-lactamase genes were located on the chromosome in seven of eight isolates; one isolate carried the blaCMY-2 gene on a ∼150-kbp IncA/C plasmid. Our results show that a chromosomal location of CTX-M ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genes in P. mirabilis is no longer an unusual phenomenon in hospital environments. PMID:21282448

  2. Single-step purification of Proteus mirabilis urease accessory protein UreE, a protein with a naturally occurring histidine tail, by nickel chelate affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Sriwanthana, B; Island, M D; Maneval, D; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, is essential for the virulence of this species in the urinary tract. Escherichia coli containing cloned structural genes ureA, ureB, and ureC and accessory genes ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG displays urease activity when cultured in M9 minimal medium. To study the involvement of one of these accessory genes in the synthesis of active urease, deletion mutations were constructed. Cultures of a ureE deletion mutant did not produce an active urease in minimal medium. Urease activity, however, was partially restored by the addition of 5 microM NiCl2 to the medium. The predicted amino acid sequence of UreE, which concludes with seven histidine residues among the last eight C-terminal residues (His-His-His-His-Asp-His-His-His), suggested that UreE may act as a Ni2+ chelator for the urease operon. To exploit this potential metal-binding motif, we attempted to purify UreE from cytoplasmic extracts of E. coli containing cloned urease genes. Soluble protein was loaded onto a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column, a metal chelate resin with high affinity for polyhistidine tails, and bound protein was eluted with a 0 to 0.5 M imidazole gradient. A single polypeptide of 20-kDa apparent molecular size, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-10 to 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was eluted between 0.25 and 0.4 M imidazole. The N-terminal 10 amino acids of the eluted polypeptide exactly matched the deduced amino acid sequence of P. mirabilis UreE. The molecular size of the native protein was estimated on a Superdex 75 column to be 36 kDa, suggesting that the protein is a dimer. These data suggest that UreE is a Ni(2)+-binding protein that is necessary for synthesis of a catalytically active urease at low Ni(2+) concentrations. Images PMID:7961442

  3. In vitro activity of flomoxef and comparators against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwen; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Zhipeng; Xu, Yingchun; Cao, Bin; Kong, Haishen; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Sun, Ziyong; Hu, Bijie; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Liao, Kang; Shen, Dingxia; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Juan; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the in vitro activity of flomoxef against clinical extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 401 ESBL-producing isolates, including 196 Escherichia coli, 124 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 81 Proteus mirabilis, were collected consecutively from 21 hospitals in China in 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution methods. Phenotypic identification of ESBL production was detected as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). ESBL genes were detected by PCR and sequencing. Flomoxef, doripenem, meropenem, ertapenem, cefmetazole and piperacillin/tazobactam exhibited good activity against ESBL-producing isolates, with susceptibility rates >90%. Tigecycline showed good activity against E. coli and K. pneumoniae (100% and 97.6%, respectively). Cefotaxime and cefepime showed very low activities against ESBL-producing isolates, with susceptibility rates of 0-0.8% and 1.0-13.6%, respectively. blaCTX-M were the major ESBL genes, with occurrence in 99.5% of E. coli, 91.1% of K. pneumoniae and 97.5% of P. mirabilis. blaCTX-M-14 was the predominant ESBL gene, detected in 46.9% (188/401) of the isolates, followed by blaCTX-M-15 (21.4%), blaCTX-M-55 (17.2%), blaCTX-M-65 (12.7%) and blaCTX-M-3 (6.7%). Flomoxef exhibited excellent activity against the different CTX-M-type ESBL-producing isolates, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.064-0.125μg/mL and 0.25-0.5μg/mL, respectively. Against the isolates solely producing CTX-M-14, -15, -55, -3 or -65, flomoxef showed susceptibility rates of 98.6%, 98.0%, 98.1%, 100.0% and 97.4%, respectively. In conclusion, flomoxef showed good activity against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and may be a choice to treat infections caused by these isolates in China. PMID:25600890

  4. Single-step purification of Proteus mirabilis urease accessory protein UreE, a protein with a naturally occurring histidine tail, by nickel chelate affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Island, M D; Maneval, D; Mobley, H L

    1994-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, is essential for the virulence of this species in the urinary tract. Escherichia coli containing cloned structural genes ureA, ureB, and ureC and accessory genes ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG displays urease activity when cultured in M9 minimal medium. To study the involvement of one of these accessory genes in the synthesis of active urease, deletion mutations were constructed. Cultures of a ureE deletion mutant did not produce an active urease in minimal medium. Urease activity, however, was partially restored by the addition of 5 microM NiCl2 to the medium. The predicted amino acid sequence of UreE, which concludes with seven histidine residues among the last eight C-terminal residues (His-His-His-His-Asp-His-His-His), suggested that UreE may act as a Ni2+ chelator for the urease operon. To exploit this potential metal-binding motif, we attempted to purify UreE from cytoplasmic extracts of E. coli containing cloned urease genes. Soluble protein was loaded onto a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column, a metal chelate resin with high affinity for polyhistidine tails, and bound protein was eluted with a 0 to 0.5 M imidazole gradient. A single polypeptide of 20-kDa apparent molecular size, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-10 to 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was eluted between 0.25 and 0.4 M imidazole. The N-terminal 10 amino acids of the eluted polypeptide exactly matched the deduced amino acid sequence of P. mirabilis UreE. The molecular size of the native protein was estimated on a Superdex 75 column to be 36 kDa, suggesting that the protein is a dimer. These data suggest that UreE is a Ni(2)+-binding protein that is necessary for synthesis of a catalytically active urease at low Ni(2+) concentrations. PMID:7961442

  5. Evaluation of the effect of MPL and delivery route on immunogenicity and protectivity of different formulations of FimH and MrpH from uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis in a UTI mouse model.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis are an important cause of morbidity and with the high rate of relapse and spread of multi-drug resistant pathogens, pose a significant public health challenge worldwide. Lack of an efficacious commercial vaccine targeting both uropathogens makes development of a combined vaccine highly desirable. In this study the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of different formulations of FimH of UPEC, MrpH of P. mirabilis and their fusion protein (MrpH.FimH) subcutaneously administered with and without Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) adjuvant were evaluated. Our data showed that the subcutaneously administered proteins induced both serum and mucosal IgG, which MPL significantly improved developing a mixed Th1 and Th2 immune response. However, the preparations induced a higher systemic and mucosal IgG and IL-2 levels by this route compared to the intranasal. Immunization of mice with MrpH.FimH fusion with MPL or a mixture of FimH, MrpH and MPL conferred the highest protection of the bladder and kidneys when challenged with UPEC and P. mirabilis in a UTI mouse model. Therefore considering these results MrpH.FimH fusion with MPL administered subcutaneously or intranasally could be a promising vaccine candidate for elimination of UTIs caused by UPEC and P. mirabilis. PMID:26033493

  6. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  7. Novel Plasmid-Mediated 16S rRNA Methylase, RmtC, Found in a Proteus mirabilis Isolate Demonstrating Extraordinary High-Level Resistance against Various Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamane, Kunikazu; Shibayama, Keigo; Kurokawa, Hiroshi; Shibata, Naohiro; Suzuki, Satowa; Doi, Yohei; Kimura, Kouji; Ike, Yasuyoshi; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2006-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis ARS68, which demonstrated a very high level of resistance to various aminoglycosides, was isolated in 2003 from an inpatient in Japan. The aminoglycoside resistance of this strain could not be transferred to recipient strains Escherichia coli CSH-2 and E. coli HB101 by a general conjugation experiment, but E. coli DH5α was successfully transformed by electroporation with the plasmid of the parent strain, ARS68, and acquired an unusually high degree of resistance against aminoglycosides. Cloning and sequencing analyses revealed that the presence of a novel 16S rRNA methylase gene, designated rmtC, was responsible for resistance in strain ARS68 and its transformant. The G+C content of rmtC was 41.1%, and the deduced amino acid sequences of the newly identified 16S rRNA methylase, RmtC, shared a relatively low level of identity (≤29%) to other plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methylases, RmtA, RmtB, and ArmA, which have also been identified in pathogenic gram-negative bacilli. Also, RmtC shared a low level of identity (≤28%) with the other 16S rRNA methylases found in aminoglycoside-producing actinomycetes. The purified histidine-tagged RmtC clearly showed methyltransferase activity against E. coli 16S rRNA in vitro. rmtC was located downstream of an ISEcp1-like element containing tnpA. Several plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methylases have been identified in pathogenic gram-negative bacilli belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, and some of them are dispersing worldwide. The acceleration of aminoglycoside resistance among gram-negative bacilli by producing plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methylases, such as RmtC, RmtB, and RmtA, may indeed become an actual clinical hazard in the near future. PMID:16377684

  8. Crystal structure of the dithiol oxidase DsbA enzyme from proteus mirabilis bound non-covalently to an active site peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A; Fairlie, David P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-07-11

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  9. Proteus mirabilis urease: histidine 320 of UreC is essential for urea hydrolysis and nickel ion binding within the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Mobley, H L

    1993-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease, a nickel-containing enzyme, has been established as a critical virulence determinant in urinary tract infection. An amino acid sequence (residues 308 to 327: TVDEHLDMLMVCHHLDPSIP) within the large urease subunit, UreC, is highly conserved for every urease examined thus far and has been suggested to reside within the enzyme active site. Histidine residues have been postulated to play a role in catalysis by coordinating Ni2+ ions. To test this hypothesis, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to change amino acid His-320 to Leu-320 within UreC. The base change (CAT for His-320 to CTT for Leu-320) was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The recombinant and mutant proteins were expressed at similar levels in Escherichia coli as detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) of denaturing and nondenaturing gels. Specific activities of the enzymes were quantitated after partial purification. Strains expressing the mutant enzyme showed no detectable activity, whereas strains expressing the recombinant enzyme hydrolyzed urea at 149 mumol of NH3 per min per mg of protein. In addition, the mutant enzyme was able to incorporate only about one-half (58%) of the amount of 63Ni2+ incorporated by the active recombinant enzyme. While the mutation of His-320 to Leu-320 within UreC does not affect expression or assembly of urease polypeptide subunits UreA, UreB, and UreC His-320 of UreC is required for urea hydrolysis and proper incorporation of Ni2+ into apoenzyme. PMID:8500894

  10. Identification of protease and rpoN-associated genes of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis by negative selection in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1999-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a motile gram-negative bacterium, is a principal cause of urinary tract infections in patients with functional or anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract or those with urinary catheters in place. Thus far, virulence factors including urease, flagella, haemolysin, various fimbriae, IgA protease and a deaminase have been characterized based on the phenotypic traits conferred by these proteins. In this study, an attempt was made to identify new virulence genes of P. mirabilis that may not have identifiable phenotypes using the recently described technique of signature-tagged mutagenesis. A pool of chromosomal transposon mutants was made through conjugation and kanamycin/tetracycline selection; random insertion was confirmed by Southern blotting of chromosomal DNA isolated from 16 mutants using the aphA gene as a probe. From the total pool, 2.3% (9/397) auxotrophic mutants and 3.5% (14/397) swarming mutants were identified by screening on minimal salts agar and Luria agar plates, respectively. Thirty per cent of the mutants, found to have either no tag or an unamplifiable tag, were removed from the input pool. Then 10(7) c.f.u. from a 96-mutant pool (approximately 10(5) c.f.u. of each mutant) were used as an input pool to transurethrally inoculate seven CBA mice. After 2 d infection, bacteria were recovered from the bladders and kidneys and yielded about 10(5) c.f.u. as an output pool. Dot blot analysis showed that two of the 96 mutants, designated B2 and B5, could not be hybridized by signature tags amplified from the bladder output pool. Interrupted genes from these two mutants were cloned and sequenced. The interrupted gene in B2 predicts a polypeptide of 37.3 kDa that shares amino acid similarity with a putative protease or collagenase precursor. The gene in B5 predicts a polypeptide of 32.6 kDa that is very similar to that encoded by ORF284 of the rpoN operon controlling expression of nitrogen-regulated genes from several bacterial species. The virulence of the two mutants was tested further by co-challenging CBA mice with each mutant and the parental strain. After 1 week of infection, the B2 and B5 mutants were recovered in numbers 100-fold and 1000-fold less than the parental strain, respectively. Using an in vitro assay, it was shown that the B2 mutant had significantly less (P = 0.0001) extracellular protease activity than the wild-type strain. These findings demonstrate that signature-tagged mutagenesis is a viable approach to identify bacterial genes associated with the ability to infect the urinary tract. PMID:10206698

  11. Production of phenylpyruvic acid from L-phenylalanine using an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis: comparison of enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng

    2015-10-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is an important organic acid that has a wide range of applications. In this study, the membrane-bound L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) gene from Proteus mirabilis KCTC 2566 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and then the L-AAD was purified. After that, we used the purified enzyme and the recombinant E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst to produce PPA via a one-step biotransformation from L-phenylalanine. L-AAD was solubilized from the membrane and purified 52-fold with an overall yield of 13 %, which corresponded to a specific activity of 0.94 ± 0.01 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1). Then, the biotransformation conditions for the pure enzyme and the whole-cell biocatalyst were optimized. The maximal production was 2.6 ± 0.1 g·L(-1) (specific activity of 1.02 ± 0.02 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 86.7 ± 5 % mass conversion rate, and 1.04 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) and 3.3 ± 0.2 g L(-1) (specific activity of 0.013 ± 0.003 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 82.5 ± 4 % mass conversion rate, and 0.55 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) for the pure enzyme and whole-cell biocatalyst, respectively. Comparative studies of the enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation were performed in terms of specific activity, production, conversion, productivity, stability, need of external cofactors, and recycling. We have developed two eco-friendly and efficient approaches for PPA production. The strategy described herein may aid the biotransformational synthesis of other α-keto acids from their corresponding amino acids. PMID:26109004

  12. 10′(Z),13′(E)-Heptadecadienylhydroquinone Inhibits Swarming and Virulence Factors and Increases Polymyxin B Susceptibility in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Won-Bo; Yuan, Yu-Han; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that 10′(Z), 13′(E)-heptadecadienylhydroquinone (HQ17-2), isolated from the lacquer tree, could decrease swarming motility and hemolysin activity but increase polymyxin B (PB) susceptibilityof Proteus mirabilis which is intrinsically highly-resistant to PB. The increased PB susceptibility induced by HQ17-2 was also observed in clinical isolates and biofilm-grown cells. HQ17-2 could inhibit swarming in the wild-type and rppA mutant but not in the rcsB mutant, indicating that HQ17-2 inhibits swarming through the RcsB-dependent pathway, a two-component signaling pathway negatively regulating swarming and virulence factor expression. The inhibition of hemolysin activity by HQ17-2 is also mediated through the RcsB-dependent pathway, because HQ17-2 could not inhibit hemolysin activity in the rcsB mutant. Moreover, the finding that HQ17-2 inhibits the expression of flhDC gene in the wild-type and rcsB-complemented strain but not in the rcsB mutant supports the notion. By contrast, HQ17-2 could increase PB susceptibility in the wild-type and rcsB mutant but not in the rppA mutant, indicating that HQ17-2 increases PB susceptibility through the RppA-dependent pathway, a signaling pathway positively regulating PB resistance. In addition, HQ17-2 could inhibit the promoter activities of rppA and pmrI, a gene positively regulated by RppA and involved in PB resistance, in the wild-type but not in the rppA mutant. The inhibition of rppA and pmrI expression caused lipopolysaccharide purified from HQ17-2-treated cells to have higher affinity for PB. Altogether, this study uncovers new biological effects of HQ17-2 and provides evidence for the potential of HQ17-2 in clinical applications. PMID:23029100

  13. Identification of the domains of UreR, an AraC-like transcriptional regulator of the urease gene cluster in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Poore, C A; Coker, C; Dattelbaum, J D; Mobley, H L

    2001-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to CO(2) and NH(3), resulting in urinary stone formation in individuals with complicated urinary tract infections. UreR, a member of the AraC family, activates transcription of the genes encoding urease enzyme subunits and accessory proteins, ureDABCEFG, as well as its own transcription in the presence of urea. Based on sequence homology with AraC, we hypothesized that UreR contains both a dimerization domain and a DNA-binding domain. A translational fusion of the leucine zipper dimerization domain (amino acids 302 to 350) of C/EBP and the C-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 164 to 293) activated transcription from the ureD promoter (p(ureD)) and bound to a 60-bp fragment containing p(ureD), as analyzed by gel shift. These results were consistent with the DNA-binding specificity residing in the C-terminal half of UreR and dimerization being required for activity. To localize the dimerization domain of UreR, a translational fusion of the DNA-binding domain of the LexA repressor (amino acids 1 to 87) and the N-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 1 to 182) was constructed and found to repress transcription from p(sulA)-lacZ (sulA is repressed by LexA) and bind to the sulA operator site, as analyzed by gel shift. Since LexA binds this site only as a dimer, the UreR(1-182)-LexA(1-87) fusion also must dimerize to bind p(sulA). Indeed, purified UreR-Myc-His eluted from a gel filtration column as a dimer. Therefore, we conclude that the dimerization domain of UreR is located within the N-terminal half of UreR. UreR contains three leucines that mimic the leucines that contribute to dimerization of AraC. Mutagenesis of Leu147, Leu148, or L158 alone did not significantly affect UreR function. In contrast, mutagenesis of both Leu147 and Leu148 or all three Leu residues resulted in a 85 or 94% decrease, respectively, in UreR function in the presence of urea (P < 0.001). On the contrary, His102 and His175 mutations of UreR resulted in constitutive induction in the absence of urea. We conclude that a dimerization domain resides in the N-terminal half of the polypeptide, that Leu residues may contribute to this function, and that sequences within the C-terminal half of UreR are responsible for DNA binding to the urease promoter regions. Selected His residues also contribute significantly to UreR function. PMID:11443087

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, Representative of a Multidrug-Resistant Clone Spreading in Europe and Expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-Type β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Ciacci, Nagaia; Gniadkowski, Marek; Miriagou, Vivi; Torricelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, representative of a multidrug-resistant clone expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-type β-lactamase and circulating in Europe since 2003, was sequenced by a MiSeq platform using a paired-end approach. The genome was assembled in 100 scaffolds with a total length of 4,197,318 bp. Analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, phenicols, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides, of one plasmid replicon, and of a type I-E clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system. PMID:26868393

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, Representative of a Multidrug-Resistant Clone Spreading in Europe and Expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-Type β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Ciacci, Nagaia; Gniadkowski, Marek; Miriagou, Vivi; Torricelli, Francesca; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, representative of a multidrug-resistant clone expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-type β-lactamase and circulating in Europe since 2003, was sequenced by a MiSeq platform using a paired-end approach. The genome was assembled in 100 scaffolds with a total length of 4,197,318 bp. Analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, phenicols, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides, of one plasmid replicon, and of a type I-E clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system. PMID:26868393

  16. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  17. Prevalence of β-Lactamases among 1,072 Clinical Strains of Proteus mirabilis: a 2-Year Survey in a French Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chanal, C.; Bonnet, R.; De Champs, C.; Sirot, D.; Labia, R.; Sirot, J.

    2000-01-01

    β-Lactam resistance was studied in 1,072 consecutive P. mirabilis clinical strains isolated at the Clermont-Ferrand teaching hospital between April 1996 and March 1998. The frequency of amoxicillin resistance was 48.5%. Among the 520 amoxicillin-resistant isolates, three resistance phenotypes were detected: penicillinase (407 strains [78.3%]), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (74 strains [14.2%]), and inhibitor resistance (39 strains [7.5%]). The penicillinase phenotype isolates were divided into three groups according to the level of resistance to β-lactams, which was shown to be related to the strength of the promoter. The characterization of the different β-lactamases showed that amoxicillin resistance in P. mirabilis was almost always (97%) associated with TEM or TEM-derived β-lactamases, most of which evolved via TEM-2. PMID:10858357

  18. The spot indole test for identification of swarming Proteus.

    PubMed

    Bale, M J; McLaws, S M; Matsen, J M

    1985-01-01

    The authors evaluated the use of the spot indole test for rapid speciation of swarming Proteus from the primary isolation plate. One hundred seventy-two consecutive isolates of swarming Proteus were studied, 163 Proteus mirabilis and nine Proteus vulgaris. One hundred fifty-six isolates (95.7%) of Proteus mirabilis gave a negative spot indole. Seven (4.3%) gave a positive spot indole test, but all seven isolates were from cultures in which other indole-producing organisms also were present. If only isolates representing single gram-negative strains in the specimens were tested, the predictive value was greater than 99%. Eight of the nine (88.9%) Proteus vulgaris isolates gave a positive spot indole test; one (11.1%) gave a negative result. This isolate also failed to produce indole by conventional methods but was ornithine decarboxylase negative, and additional biochemical testing was consistent with the Proteus vulgaris identification. All Proteus vulgaris isolates were resistant to ampicillin, and 94.2% of the Proteus mirabilis tested were ampicillin susceptible. The spot indole test is a rapid, accurate, simple, and cost-effective means of speciating swarming Proteus strains isolated as the only gram-negative bacilli in a specimen. The spot indole test should be used in conjunction with an ampicillin susceptibility test result or other confirmatory test information if other gram-negative bacilli are present in the culture. PMID:3966445

  19. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  20. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  1. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-01-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  2. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-03-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  3. [Proteus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benichou, J J; Labrune, B; Formanek, A; Denoix, C; Oger, P

    1990-01-01

    Two new cases of Proteus syndrome are reported. This congenital syndrome, first described in 1983, comprises gigantism of extremities, body hemihypertrophy, pigmented nevi and multiple tumors (subcutaneous, lipomas, hamartomas). This syndrome belongs to the same group as Recklinghausen disease, Maffucci or Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes. The prognosis is not well known but mostly depends on functional and psychologic consequences of important deformations. PMID:2206106

  4. Proteus endocarditis in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rohan; Sekar, Baskar; Payne, Mark N

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening condition with adverse consequences and increased mortality, despite improvements in treatment options. Diagnosed patients usually require a prolonged course of antibiotics, with up to 40-50% requiring surgery during initial hospital admission. We report a case of a 42-year-old intravenous drug user who presented feeling generally unwell, with lethargy, rigours, confusion and a painful swollen right leg. He was subsequently diagnosed with Proteus mirabilis endocarditis (fulfilling modified Duke criteria for possible IE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). He was successfully treated with single antibiotic therapy without needing surgical intervention or requiring anticoagulation for his DVT. Proteus endocarditis is extremely uncommon, with a limited number of case reports available in the literature. This case illustrates how blood cultures are invaluable in the diagnosis of IE, especially that due to unusual microorganisms. Our case also highlights how single antibiotic therapy can be effective in treating Proteus endocarditis. PMID:26611486

  5. PROTEUS MIRABILIS VIABILITY AFTER LITHOTRIPSY OF STRUVITE CALCULI. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Properties of a deep Proteus R mutant isolated from clinical material.

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Rózalski, A; Bartodziejska, B; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, J; Mayer, H; Kotełko, K

    1991-06-01

    Some biological features of a deep P. mirabilis 17301 R mutant isolated from the urine of a patient with chronic UTI were studied and compared with similar features of P. mirabilis S forms and five induced Proteus R mutants of different chemotypes. There were no differences in lethal toxicity and adhesion to human uroepithelial cells. Of all the R mutants tested, two of them, 17301 and R4, exhibited strong cell-bound hemolytic activity. The P. mirabilis R 17301 was characterized as the most invasive (tested in L929 mouse fibroblasts) compared to the other Proteus S and R forms. The structure of PS from a clinical R mutant investigated and the results of serological studies prove that this mutant belongs to the Rc chemotype. PMID:2054167

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis, Proteus, anti-CCP antibodies and Karl Popper.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling joint disease affecting over 20 million people worldwide. The cause of RA is most probably linked to the triad of microbial trigger, genetic association and autoimmunity and can be explained using the philosophical method of Karl Popper or Popperian sequences. Ten "Popper sequences" have been identified which point to the urinary microbe Proteus mirabilis as the cause of RA: Popper sequence 1 establishes that HLA-DR4 lymphocytes injected into a rabbit evoke specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria. Popper sequence 2 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria are present in RA patients from 14 different countries. Popper sequence 3 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria in RA patients are disease specific since no such antibodies are found in other conditions. Popper sequence 4 establishes that when RA patients have high titres of antibodies to Proteus such bacteria are found in urinary cultures. Popper sequence 5 establishes that only Proteus bacteria and no other microbes evoke significantly elevated antibodies in RA patients. Popper sequence 6 establishes that the "shared epitope" EQR(K)RAA shows "molecular mimicry" with the sequence ESRRAL found in Proteus haemolysin. Popper sequence 7 establishes that Proteus urease contains a sequence IRRET which has "molecular mimicry" with LRREI found in collagen XI of hyaline cartilage. Popper sequence 8 establishes that sera obtained from RA patients have cytopathic properties against sheep red cells coated with the cross-reacting EQR(K)RAA and LRREI self-antigen peptides. Popper sequence 9 establishes that Proteus sequences in haemolysin and urease as well as the self antigens, HLA-DR1/4 and collagen XI, each contain an arginine doublet, thereby providing a substrate for peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) to give rise to citrulline, which is the main antigenic component of CCP, antibodies to which are found in early cases of RA. Popper sequence 10 establishes that antibodies to Proteus come not only from sequences crossreacting to self antigens but also from non-crossreacting sequences, thereby indicating that active RA patients have been exposed to infection by Proteus. The ten Popper sequences establish that RA is most probably caused by Proteus upper urinary tract infections, which can possibly be treated with anti-Proteus therapy. PMID:19895906

  8. Proteus at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  9. Isolation, identification & characterization of Proteus penneri - a missed rare pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Janak

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Indole negative Proteus species are invariably incorrectly identified as P. mirabilis, missing isolates of Proteus penneri. P. penneri is an invasive pathogen capable of causing major infectious diseases still seldom reported in individual cases. We report here the isolation, differentiation, characterization and typing of P. penneri from patients with different clinical infections. Methods: Urine, pus and body fluids collected from patients in intensive care units, wards and out patients departments of a tertiary health care institute from north India were cultured. A total of 61 indole negative Proteus isolates were subjected to extended biochemical tests to differentiate and identify P. penneri from P. mirabilis including failure to produce ornithine decarboxylase (by 0% strains of P. penneri and 100% strains of P. mirabilis) besides P. penneri being uniformly salicin negative, non-utilizer of citrate but ferments sucrose and maltose. Antibiograms and Dienes phenomenon were performed to characterize and type P. penneri isolates besides screening for β-lactamase production. Results: Eight isolates of P. penneri were identified; four from urine, three from abdominal drain-fluid and one from diabetic foot ulcer. P. penneri was isolated as the sole pathogen in all patients having underlying disease; post-operatively. Swarming was not seen in the first strain on primary isolation and was poor in strain-4. All eight isolates were biochemically homologous but multi-drug resistant (MDR) with resistance to 6-8 drugs (up to 12). β-lactamase production was seen in three of five isolates while Dienes phenomenon found four distinct types and discriminated strains differing in resistance even with a single drug. Interpretation & Conclusions: A few additional biochemical tests identified P. penneri isolates; it infected patients with underlying disease and strains were MDR and heterogenous. PMID:22561620

  10. Anti-Proteus activity of some South African medicinal plants: their potential for the prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E; van Vuuren, S F

    2014-02-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional African medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. Thirty-four extracts from 13 South African plant species with a history of ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation were investigated for their ability to control two microbial triggers for RA (Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris). Twenty-nine of the extracts (85.3 %) inhibited the growth of P. mirabilis and 23 of them tested (67.7 %) inhibited the growth of P. vulgaris. Methanol and water extracts of Carpobrotus edulis, Lippia javanica, Pelargonium viridflorum, Ptaeroxylon obliquum, Syzygium cordatum leaf and bark, Terminalia pruinoides, Terminalia sericea, Warburgia salutaris bark and an aqueous extract of W. salutaris leaf were effective Proteus inhibitors, with MIC values <2,000 μg/ml. The most potent extracts were examined by Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy for the presence of resveratrol. Only extracts from T. pruinoides and T. sericea contained resveratrol, indicating that it was not responsible for the anti-Proteus properties reported here. All extracts with Proteus inhibitory activity were also either non-toxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The low toxicity of these extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against Proteus spp. indicate their potential for blocking the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23877712

  11. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: General Properties

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Para-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) was shown to be an effective agent to abolish the swarming of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris on predried solid culture media. The level required to abolish swarming varied with the strain of Proteus, the components of the medium, and also with the conditions of incubation. Generally 0.1 to 0.2 mM PNPG effectively abolished swarming for at least 24 h with aerobic incubation. Levels of PNPG that abolished swarming showed no effect upon the growth of the cells, little or no effect upon the motility characteristics of the organisms, and no effect upon the cellular morphology. PNPG was found to be freely water soluble, stable to autoclaving, and to retain biological activity for at least one month in prepared culture media stored under refrigeration. PMID:4577177

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease triggered by Proteus urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2006-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and disabling polyarthritic disease, which affects mainly women in middle and old age. Extensive evidence based on the results of various microbial, immunological and molecular studies from different parts of the world, shows that a strong link exists between Proteus mirabilis microbes and RA. We propose that sub-clinical Proteus urinary tract infections are the main triggering factors and that the presence of molecular mimicry and cross-reactivity between these bacteria and RA-targeted tissue antigens assists in the perpetuation of the disease process through production of cytopathic auto-antibodies. Patients with RA especially during the early stages of the disease could benefit from Proteus anti-bacterial measures involving the use of antibiotics, vegetarian diets and high intake of water and fruit juices such as cranberry juice in addition to the currently employed treatments. PMID:16603443

  13. Deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Proteus and Providence organisms.

    PubMed

    FALKOW, S; RYMAN, I R; WASHINGTON, O

    1962-06-01

    Falkow, Stanley (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington D.C.), I. R. Ryman, and O. Washington. Deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Proteus and Providence organisms. J. Bacteriol. 83:1318-1321. 1962.-Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) from various species of Proteus and of Providence bacteria have been examined for their guanine + cytosine (GC) content. P. vulgaris, P. mirabilis, and P. rettgeri possess essentially identical mean GC contents of 39%, and Providence DNA has a GC content of 41.5%. In marked contrast, P. morganii DNA was found to contain 50% GC. The base composition of P. morganii is only slightly lower than those observed for representatives of the Escherichia, Shigella, and Salmonella groups. Aerobacter and Serratia differ significantly from the other members of the family by their relatively high GC content. Since a minimal requirement for genetic compatibility among different species appears to be similarity of their DNA base composition, it is suggested that P. morganii is distinct genetically from the other species of Proteus as well as Providence strains. The determination of the DNA base composition of microorganisms is important for its predictive information. This information should prove of considerable value in investigating genetic and taxonomic relationships among bacteria. PMID:13891463

  14. Proteus penneri isolated from the pus of a patient with epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wang, X; Bian, Z; Li, S; Zheng, H; Zhao, B; Chen, J

    1992-02-01

    P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris are the two wellknown species in the genus Proteus. P. myxofaciens and P. penneri are recent additions to the genus. We isolated P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess. The characteristics of the organism, including morphology, staining, physiology and biochemistry, were studied. Clinical microbiological laboratories should suspect P. penneri in the case of as Proteus strain that is negative for indole, salicin and esculin, but otherwise resembles P. vulgaris. Proteus penneri, formerly known as Proteus vulgaris indole-negative or as Proteus vulgaris biogroup 1, was named by Hickman et al in 1932. Little information about human infection by this organism is available. In 1982, Hickman and co-workers studied 20 strain of P. penneri which were isolated from clinical specimens (urine, stool, etc.) in the USA. However, its clinical significance, until recently, was unknown. We isolated a strain of P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess on June 10 and 15, 1989. This paper concerns the problems encountered in identifying this organism and its clinical significance. PMID:1402074

  15. [Prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus spp. strains in clinical specimens and their susceptibility to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Reśliński, Adrian; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Mikucka, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Proteus sp. are opportunistic microorganisms which cause urinary tract and wounds infections, bacteriaemia and sepsis. The aim of this study was analysis of prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. strains in clinical specimens and evaluation of their susceptibility to selected antibiotics. The study was carried out of 1499 Proteus sp. strains were isolated in 2000-2003 from patients of departments and dispensaries of the University Hospital CM in Bydgoszcz UMK in Torun. The strains were identified on the basis of appearance of bacterial colonies on bloody and McConkey's agars, movement ability, indole and urease production and in questionable cases biochemical profile in ID GN or ID E (bio-Mérieux) tests was also included. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disk diffusion method. Isolated strains were regarded as multidrug-resistant when they were resistant to three kinds of antibiotics at least. Received Proteus sp. the most frequently belonged to P. mirabilis species (92.3%). Most of these bacteria were isolated from urine from patients of Rehabilitation Clinic. All of multidrug-resistant strains were resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins, 98.9% to co-trimoxazole, 77.7% to quinolones, 63.8% to tetracyclines, 38.5% to aminoglycosides, 19.3% to monobactams and 3.4% to carbapenems. Almost 25% multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. produced ESBL. PMID:16134389

  16. Proteus: Mythology to modern times

    PubMed Central

    Sellaturay, Senthy V.; Nair, Raj; Dickinson, Ian K.; Sriprasad, Seshadri

    2012-01-01

    Aims: It is common knowledge that proteus bacteria are associated with urinary tract infections and urinary stones. Far more interesting however, is the derivation of the word proteus. This study examines the origin of the word proteus, its mythological, historical and literary connections and evolution to present-day usage. Materials and Methods: A detailed search for primary and secondary sources was undertaken using the library and internet. Results: Greek mythology describes Proteus as an early sea-god, noted for being versatile and capable of assuming many different forms. In the 8th century BC, the ancient Greek poet, Homer, famous for his epic poems the Iliad and Odyssey, describes Proteus as a prophetic old sea-god, and herdsman of the seals of Poseidon, God of the Sea. Shakespeare re-introduced Proteus into English literature, in the 15th century AD, in the comedy The Two Gentleman of Verona, as one of his main characters who is inconstant with his affections. The ‘elephant man’ was afflicted by a severely disfiguring disease, described as ‘Proteus syndrome’. It is particularly difficult to distinguish from neurofibromatosis, due to its various forms in different individuals. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word ‘protean’ as to mean changeable, variable, and existing in multiple forms. Proteus bacteria directly derive their name from the Sea God, due to their rapid swarming growth and motility on agar plates. They demonstrate versatility by secreting enzymes, which allow them to evade the host's defense systems. Conclusions: Thus proteus, true to its name, has had a myriad of connotations over the centuries. PMID:23450503

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the Pseudomonas putida protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Frazee, R W; Livingston, D M; LaPorte, D C; Lipscomb, J D

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode the alpha and beta subunits of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (3,4-PCD [EC 1.13.11.3]) were cloned from a Pseudomonas putida (formerly P. aeruginosa) (ATCC 23975) genomic library prepared in lambda phage. Plaques were screened by hybridization with degenerate oligonucleotides designed using known amino acid sequences. A 1.5-kb SmaI fragment from a 15-kb primary clone was subcloned, sequenced, and shown to contain two successive open reading frames, designated pcaH and pcaG, corresponding to the beta and alpha subunits, respectively, of 3,4-PCD. The amino acid sequences deduced from pcaHG matched the chemically determined sequence of 3,4-PCD in all except three positions. Cloning of pcaHG into broad-host-range expression vector pKMY319 allowed high levels of expression in P. putida strains, as well as in Proteus mirabilis after specific induction of the plasmid-encoded nahG promoter with salicylate. The recombinant enzyme was purified and crystallized from P. mirabilis, which lacks an endogenous 3,4-PCD. The physical, spectroscopic, and kinetic properties of the recombinant enzyme were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type enzyme. Moreover, the same transient enzyme intermediates were formed during the catalytic cycle. These studies establish the methodology which will allow mechanistic investigations to be pursued through site-directed mutagenesis of P. putida 3,4-PCD, the only aromatic ring-cleaving dioxygenase for which the three-dimensional structure is known. Images PMID:8407791

  18. Genetic and biochemical diversity of ureases of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella species isolated from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial urease, particularly from Proteus mirabilis, has been implicated as a contributing factor in the formation of urinary and kidney stones, obstruction of urinary catheters, and pyelonephritis. Weekly urine specimens (n = 1,135) from 32 patients, residing at two chronic-care facilities, with urinary catheters in place for greater than or equal to 30 days yielded 5,088 phenotypically and serotypically diverse bacterial isolates at greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. A total of 86% of specimens contained at least one urease-positive species, and 46% of 3,939 gram-negative bacilli were urease positive. For investigation of genetic relatedness of urease determinants, whole-cell DNA from 50 urease-positive isolates each of Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Morganella morganii were hybridized with a urease gene probe derived from within the urease operon of Providencia stuartii BE2467. The percentage of strains hybridizing with the gene probe was 98 for Providencia stuartii, 100 for Providencia rettgeri, 70 for P. mirabilis, 2 for M. morganii, and 0 for P. vulgaris. Electrophoretic mobilities of ureases from representative isolates revealed nine different patterns among the five species. The urease gene probe hybridized with fragments of HindIII-digested chromosomal DNA from all isolates except M. morganii. Fragment sizes differed between species. Molecular sizes of the enzymes, determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, were found to be 280 kilodaltons (kDa) (P. mirabilis), 323 to 337 kDa (Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris), 620 kDa (providencia rettgeri), and greater than 700 kDa (M. morganii, Providencia rettgeri). Kms ranged from 0.7 mM urea for M. morganii to 60 mM urea for a P. mirabilis isolate. In general, P. mirabilis ureases demonstrated lower affinities for substrate but hydrolyzed urea at rates 6- to 25-fold faster than did enzymes from other species, which may explain the frequent association of this species with stone formation. PMID:3623698

  19. Role of RppA in the Regulation of Polymyxin B Susceptibility, Swarming, and Virulence Factor Expression in Proteus mirabilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Won-Bo; Chen, I-Chun; Jiang, Sin-Sien; Chen, Hui-Ru; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Hsu, Wei-Bin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a human pathogen that frequently causes urinary tract infections, is intrinsically highly resistant to cationic antimicrobial peptides, such as polymyxin B (PB). To explore the mechanisms underlying P. mirabilis resistance to PB, a mutant which displayed increased (>160-fold) sensitivity to PB was identified by transposon mutagenesis. This mutant was found to have Tn5 inserted into a novel gene, rppA. Sequence analysis indicated that rppA may encode a response regulator of the two-component system and is located upstream of the rppB gene, which may encode a membrane sensor kinase. An rppA knockout mutant of P. mirabilis had an altered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) profile. The LPS purified from the rppA knockout mutant could bind more PB than the LPS purified from the wild type. These properties of the rppA knockout mutant may contribute to its PB-sensitive phenotype. The rppA knockout mutant exhibited greater swarming motility and cytotoxic activity and expressed higher levels of flagellin and hemolysin than the wild type, suggesting that RppA negatively regulates swarming, hemolysin expression, and cytotoxic activity in P. mirabilis. PB could modulate LPS synthesis and modification, swarming, hemolysin expression, and cytotoxic activity in P. mirabilis through an RppA-dependent pathway, suggesting that PB could serve as a signal to regulate RppA activity. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of rppA was up-regulated by a low concentration of PB and down-regulated by a high concentration of Mg2+. Together, these data highlight the essential role of RppA in regulating PB susceptibility and virulence functions in P. mirabilis. PMID:18316383

  20. Anti-Adhesion Activity of A2-type Proanthocyanidins (a Cranberry Major Component) on Uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nicolosi, Daria; Tempera, Gianna; Genovese, Carlo; Furneri, Pio M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are relatively common in women and may be classified as uncomplicated or complicated, depending upon the urinary tract anatomy and physiology. Acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) occurs when urinary pathogens from the bowel or vagina colonize the periurethral mucosa and reach the bladder. The vast majority of episodes in healthy women involving the same bacterial strain that caused the initial infection are thought to be reinfections. About 90% of AUC are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), but Proteus mirabilis also plays an important role. Several studies support the importance of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins in preventing adhesion of P-fimbriated UPEC to uroepithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro anti-adhesion activity of A2-linked proanthocyanidins from cranberry on a UPEC and Proteus mirabilis strains and their possible influence on urease activity of the latter. A significant reduction of UPEC adhesion (up to 75%) on the HT1376 cell line was observed vs. control. For the strains of P. mirabilis there was also a reduction of adhesion (up to 75%) compared to controls, as well as a reduction in motility and urease activity. These results suggest that A2-type cranberry proanthocyanidins could aid in maintaining urinary tract health. PMID:27025740

  1. Anti-Adhesion Activity of A2-type Proanthocyanidins (a Cranberry Major Component) on Uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis Strains.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Daria; Tempera, Gianna; Genovese, Carlo; Furneri, Pio M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are relatively common in women and may be classified as uncomplicated or complicated, depending upon the urinary tract anatomy and physiology. Acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) occurs when urinary pathogens from the bowel or vagina colonize the periurethral mucosa and reach the bladder. The vast majority of episodes in healthy women involving the same bacterial strain that caused the initial infection are thought to be reinfections. About 90% of AUC are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), but Proteus mirabilis also plays an important role. Several studies support the importance of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins in preventing adhesion of P-fimbriated UPEC to uroepithelial cells. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro anti-adhesion activity of A2-linked proanthocyanidins from cranberry on a UPEC and Proteus mirabilis strains and their possible influence on urease activity of the latter. A significant reduction of UPEC adhesion (up to 75%) on the HT1376 cell line was observed vs. control. For the strains of P. mirabilis there was also a reduction of adhesion (up to 75%) compared to controls, as well as a reduction in motility and urease activity. These results suggest that A2-type cranberry proanthocyanidins could aid in maintaining urinary tract health. PMID:27025740

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Proteus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... TN, Tosi LL, Mullikin JC, Biesecker LG. A mosaic activating mutation in AKT1 associated with the Proteus syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2011 Aug 18;365(7):611-9. Epub 2011 Jul ... Reviewed : June 2012 Published : May 31, 2016 The ...

  3. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings.

  4. Dentomaxillofacial imaging in Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Korbmacher, H; Tietke, M; Rother, U; Kahl-Nieke, B

    2005-07-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare condition that involves atypical growth of the bones, skin and head and a variety of other symptoms. Only a few authors have reported on the craniofacial manifestations so far. The authors present a case of a 7-year-old girl with Proteus syndrome in which the facial skeleton showed unilateral overgrowth. The analysis of the radiological evaluation revealed a bialveolar prognathism, a skeletal class III, a dolicocephalic growth pattern and a left convex face scoliosis. On the left side, the lesser wing of the sphenoid was elevated and the ethmoidal cell complex was hypertrophic. The left ramus and body of the mandible were enlarged. The asymmetric dental development with a precocious dental age on the affected side was the most striking feature on the panoramic view. Early diagnosis and therapy depend on clinical evaluation and imaging. Therefore, further evaluations on the craniofacial features of patients with Proteus syndrome are necessary in order to establish a list of characteristic symptoms. PMID:15961602

  5. Proteus - Geology, shape, and catastrophic destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1992-01-01

    Least-squares fits to the two available limb profiles of Proteus yield a sphericity close to unity; the visual irregularity is due to a degree of surface roughness comparable to that of Hyperion and the smaller icy satellites. A network of streaks that can be interpreted as tectonic troughs cuts the surface of Proteus, and is organized concentrically around either one of the two nearly-coincident Proteus-Neptune of Pharos axes of symmetry. If the streaks are tectonic, they may be due to tidal stresses generated by a past change in Proteus' equilibrium orientation. The streaks may also be disruptive-stress fractures.

  6. The potential of selected Australian medicinal plants with anti-Proteus activity for the treatment and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cock, I. E.; Winnett, V.; Sirdaarta, J.; Matthews, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A wide variety of herbal medicines are used in indigenous Australian traditional medicinal systems to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. The current study was undertaken to test the ability of a panel of Australian plants with a history of the ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation for the ability to block the microbial trigger of RA. Materials and Methods: One hundred and six extracts from 40 plant species were investigated for the ability to inhibit the growth of the bacterial trigger of RA (Proteus mirabilis). The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The most potent inhibitor of P. mirabilis growth was further analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to high accuracy time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results: Sixty-five of the 106 extracts tested (61.3%) inhibited the growth of P. The Aleurites moluccanus, Datura leichardtii, Eucalyptus major, Leptospermum bracteata, L. juniperium, Macadamia integriflora nut, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Petalostigma pubescens, P. triloculorae, P. augustifolium, Scaevola spinescens, Syzygiumaustrale, and Tasmannia lanceolata extracts were determined to be the most effective inhibitors of P. mirabilis growth, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values generally significantly below 1000 μg/ml. T. lanceolata fruit extracts were the most effective P. mirabilis growth inhibitors, with a MIC values of 11 and 126 μg/ml for the methanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Subsequent analysis of the T. lanceolata fruit extracts by RP-HPLC coupled to high-resolution TOF mass spectroscopy failed to detect resveratrol in either T. lanceolata fruit extract. However, the resveratrol glycoside piceid and 2 combretastatin stilbenes (A-1 and A-4) were detected in both T. lanceolata fruit extracts. With the exception of the Eucalyptus and Syzygium extracts, all extracts exhibiting Proteus inhibitory activity were also shown to be nontoxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. Conclusions: The low toxicity of these extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against Proteus spp. indicate their potential in blocking the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26109767

  7. Proteus virulence: involvement of the pore forming alpha-hemolysin (a short review).

    PubMed

    Tóth, V; Emódy, L

    2000-01-01

    The genus Proteus belongs to the tribe of Proteae in the family of Enterobacteriaceae, and consists of five species: P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. morganii, P. penneri and P. myxofaciens. They are distinguished from the rest of Enterobacteriaceae by their ability to deaminate phenylalanine and tryptophane. They hydrolyze urea and gelatin and fail to ferment lactose, mannose, dulcitol and malonate; and do not form lysine and arginine decarboxylase or beta-galactosidase [1]. Colonies produce distinct "burned chocolate" odor and frequently show the characteristics of swarming motility on solid media. P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. morganii are widely recognized human pathogens. They have been isolated from urinary tract infections, wounds, ear, and nosocomial bacteremic infections, often in immuncompromised patients [2-6]. P. myxofaciens has no clinical interest to this time. P. penneri as species nova was nominated by the recommendation of Hickman and co-workers [7]. Formerly it was recognized as P. vulgaris biogroup 1 or indole negative P. vulgaris [8, 9]. Although it has been less commonly isolated from clinical samples than the other three human pathogenic Proteus species, it has nevertheless been connected with infections of the urinary tract, wounds and has been isolated from the feces of both healthy and diarrheic individuals [10-12]. Potential virulence factors responsible for virulence of Proteae are: IgA protease, urease, type3 fimbriae associated with MR/K haemagglutinins of at least two antigenic types, endotoxin, swarming motility and HlyA and/or HpmA type hemolysins [for review see ref. 13]. In the followings we give a survey of accumulated concepts about the position and characteristics of HlyA type alpha-hemolysins both in general and with emphasis on virulence functions in the tribe of Proteae. PMID:11056765

  8. Pseudomonas putida Strain FStm2 Isolated from Shark Skin: A Potential Source of Bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asmat; Hamid, Rahimi; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Usup, Gires

    2013-09-01

    Bacteriocin-producing Pseudomonas putida strain FStm2 isolated from shark showed broad range of antibacterial activity against all pathogens tested except Bacillus subtilis ATCC11774, MRSA N32064, Proteus mirabilis ATCC12453, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC14506, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC51312, Salmonella mutan ATCC25175, and Aeromonas hydrophila Wbf314. Of the three growth media tested in this study, TSB was observed to support the bacteriocin activity the most. While the highest bacteriocin activity was observed for media supplemented with 1 % NaCl, there was an observed reduction in bacteriocin activity with increasing salt concentration. Although the least bacteriocin activity was observed for marine broth, addition of increasing amounts of tryptone, glucose, or yeast extract increased bacteriocin activity. This was, however, contrary to the effect observed when MgSO4 and MnSO4 were added as supplements. In the presence of α-amylase, lipase, DNase, and RNase, a positive effect on bacteriocin production was observed. Proteinase K strongly inhibited bacteriocin production. Furthermore, the bacteriocins produced were heat stable within the temperature range of 30-70 °C. Bacteriocin activity also was not affected within a wide pH range of 3-9. Exposure to detergents did not inhibit the activity of the bacteriocin at the concentrations tested. Instead, a positive effect on the relative activity of produced bacteriocin was observed as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), EDTA, and Tween 20 at 1 % concentration all improved bacteriocin activity when the cell-free supernatant was tested against Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880. The bacteriocin was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration on a Superdex-200 column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the partially purified bacteriocin revealed an apparent molecular weight of ~32 kDa. PMID:26782985

  9. Proteus and coliform meningoencephalitis in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Shortland-Webb, W. R.

    1968-01-01

    The characteristic necropsy and histological appearances are described of nine cases of Proteus meningoencephalitis in neonates. One case which was not due to Proteus has been included because of the close similarity of the gross appearances of the brain. Umbilical sepsis in half the cases indicated that this is a common portal of entry of these organisms. That epidemiological factors may be of importance in the aetiology was suggested by the distribution of cases. Images PMID:5697343

  10. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Bui, Trong T.; Cavicchi, Richard H.; Conley, Julianne M.; Molls, Frank B.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. The emphasis in the development of Proteus is not algorithm development or research on numerical methods, but rather the development of the code itself. The objective is to develop codes that are user-oriented, easily-modified, and well-documented. Well-proven, state-of-the-art solution algorithms are being used. Code readability, documentation (both internal and external), and validation are being emphasized. This paper is a status report on the Proteus development effort. The analysis and solution procedure are described briefly, and the various features in the code are summarized. The results from some of the validation cases that have been run are presented for both the two- and three-dimensional codes.

  11. Proteus syndrome: evaluation of the immunological profile.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Cutrupi, Maricia; Baronio, Manuela; Moratto, Daniele; Pizzino, M R; Mankad, Kshitij; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Plebani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disease characterized by malformations and overgrowth of different tissues. Prognosis of affected patients may be complicated by premature death, mostly due to pulmonary embolism and respiratory failure. To date, immunological data in Proteus syndrome are scarse.We report on the novel immunologic findings of a 15 years old girl affected with PS. Detailed T and B cell evaluation revealed maturational alterations for both subsets and functional hyperactivation for the latter. Such findings have not been reported previously in PS and may be the spy of more complex immune abnormalities in this syndrome. PMID:26758562

  12. Using optoelectronic sensors in the system PROTEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Piszczek, M.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of optoelectronic devices for human protection in rescue activity. The system consists of an ground robots with predicted sensor. The multisensor construction of the system ensures significant improvement of security of using on-situ like chemical or explosive sensors. The article show a various scenario of use for individual sensor in system PROTEUS.

  13. Kribbella mirabilis sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere soil of a herbaceous plant, Mirabilis jalapa L.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Song, Jiaojiao; Huang, Yaojian; Song, Siyang; Wu, Yingying; Deng, Xianming

    2015-09-01

    Strain XMU 706(T), isolated from the rhizosphere soil of a herbaceous plant, Mirabilis jalapa L., collected from Xiamen City, China, was characterized using a polyphasic approach to clarify its taxonomic position. Strain XMU 706(T) shared the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Kribbella antibiotica YIM 31530(T) (97.2%), and formed a distinct branch in the subclade of the genus Kribbella in the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic tree. The genetic distances of gyrase subunit B gene (gyrB) sequence between strain XMU 706(T) and other species of the genus Kribbella ranged from 0.045 to 0.116, greater than the threshold value of 0.014 for species delineation of this genus. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments gave a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 34.82 ± 6.31% between strain XMU 706(T) and K. antibiotica YIM 31530(T). The chemotaxonomic properties further supported the assignment of strain XMU 706(T) to the genus Kribbella. ll-Diaminopimelic acid was the diagnostic amino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan and cell hydrolysates contained ribose and glucose. The major menaquinone was MK-9(H4). The polar lipids comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine and other unidentified phospholipids and lipids. The major fatty acids of the strain were anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0, and the G+C content of the genomic DNA was 67.3 mol%. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, phenotypic and genotypic characterization, strain XMU 706(T) represents a novel species of the genus Kribbella, for which the name Kribbella mirabilis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XMU 706(T) ( = KCTC 29676(T) = MCCC 1K00429(T)). PMID:26297172

  14. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  15. HST BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Dan; Storrs, Alex D.; Wells, Eddie N.; Hershey, John L.; Rohde, James R.; Seidelmann, P. Kenneth; Currie, Douglas G.

    2006-12-01

    BVI photometry of Triton and Proteus was derived from HST images taken in 1997. The VEGAMAG photometric technique was used. Triton was found to be brighter by a few percent than observations of the 1970's and 1980's, as expected due to the increasingly greater exposure of the bright south polar region. The leading side was also found to be brighter than the trailing side by 0.09 mag in all filters—50% larger than reported by Franz [Franz, O.G., 1981. Icarus 45, 602-606]. Contrary to our previous results [Pascu, D., et al., 1998. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 30, 1101], we found no episodic reddening. Our previous conclusions were based on an inaccurate early version of the Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) correction. The present result limits the start of the reddening event reported by Hicks and Buratti [Hicks, M.D., Buratti, B.J., 2004. Icarus 171, 210-218]. Our ( B- V) result of 0.70±0.01 supports the global blueing described by Buratti et al. [Buratti, B.J., Goguen, J.D., Gibson, J., Mosher, J., 1994. Icarus 110, 303-314]. Our observations of July 1997 agree with the Voyager results and are among the bluest colors seen. We found Proteus somewhat brighter than earlier studies, but in good agreement with the recent value given by Karkoschka [Karkoschka, E., 2003. Icarus 162, 400-407]. A leading/trailing brightness asymmetry was detected for Proteus, with the leading side 0.1 mag brighter. The unique differences in action of the endogenic and exogenic processes on Triton and Proteus provides an opportunity to separate the endogenic and exogenic effects on Triton.

  16. GENES ASSOCIATED WITH OPENING AND SENESCENCE OF MIRABILIS JALAPA FLOWERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modest ethylene climacteric accompanies flower senescence in Mirabilis jalapa L., and exogenous ethylene accelerates the process. However, inhibitors of ethylene action and synthesis have little effect on the life-span of these ephemeral flowers. Treatment with '-amanitin, an inhibitor of DNA-de...

  17. A first assessment of genetic variation in Welwitschia mirabilis Hook.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, K M; Lester, E

    2003-01-01

    Welwitschia mirabilis is a monotypic member of the family Welwitchiaceae which, along with Ephedra and Gnetum species, comprises the gymnospermous order Gnetales. While the monophyly of this order is now widely accepted, the relationship of the Gnetales to other seed plants is still contentious. Despite the unique phylogenetic position of W. mirabilis and its extraordinary physiological and anatomical adaptations, little is known about the plant's phylogeny or its current distribution in isolated locations throughout the Namib Desert. As a preliminary step in the design of an more extensive phylogeographic study, we analyzed 37 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) loci from 59 plants distributed among five sites separated by distances of 6-440 km. Cluster analysis and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant levels of variation within and between populations and little evidence of inbreeding. Genetic differences between populations reflect the geographic distances separating them. Three of the populations formed discernable genetic clusters, suggesting that little gene flow occurs between populations separated by > or = 18 km. In contrast, gene flow is occurring between two populations separated by only 6 km, supporting previous observations that pollen dispersal is primarily local and that seeds are not readily wind-born over the large distances separating most W. mirabilis populations. As a working hypothesis, we propose that W. mirabilis had a continuous distribution across its current range as much as 105 million years ago, and that as a consequence of subsequent drying trends and physical disturbance, populations became progressively isolated, accounting for their current distribution. PMID:12816961

  18. Characterization of Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Natalia, Agnes; Kristiani, Lidya; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2014-10-01

    Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles (Mag-MPs). The immobilization yield and activity retention were 84.15% and 7.87%, respectively. A homology model of lipase K80 was constructed using P. mirabilis lipase as the template. Many lysine residues were located on the protein surface, remote from active sites. The biochemical characteristics of immobilized lipase K80 were compared with the soluble free form of lipase K80. The optimum temperature of K80-Mag-MPs was 60°C, which was 20°C higher than that of the soluble form. K80-Mag-MPs also tended to be more stable than the soluble form at elevated temperatures and a broad range of pH. K80-Mag-MP maintained its stable form at up to 40°C and in a pH range of 5.0- 10.0, whereas soluble K80 maintained its activity up to 35°C and pH 6.0-10.0. K80-Mag-MPs had broader substrate specificity compared with that of soluble K80. K80-Mag-MPs showed about 80% residual relative activity after five recovery trials. These results indicate the potential benefit of K80-Mag-MPs as a biocatalyst in various industries. PMID:25001555

  19. Development of an "early warning" sensor for encrustation of urinary catheters following Proteus infection.

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Waters, Mark G J; Basil, Leo; Stickler, David J; Williams, David W

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation in long-term urinary catheterized patients can lead to encrustation and blockage of urinary catheters with serious clinical complication. Catheter encrustation stems from infection with urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease generates ammonia from urea, and the elevated pH of the urine results in crystallization of calcium and magnesium phosphates, which block the flow of urine. The aim of this research is to develop an "early warning" silicone sensor for catheter encrustation following bacterial infection of an in vitro bladder model system. The in vitro bladder model was infected with a range of urease positive and negative bacterial strains. Developed sensors enabled catheter blockage to be predicted ~17-24 h in advance of its occurrence. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria and only when catheter blockage followed. In summary, sensors were developed that could predict urinary catheter blockage in in vitro infection models. Translation of these sensors to a clinical environment will allow the timely and appropriate management of catheter blockage in long-term catheterized patients. PMID:21954120

  20. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. PMID:22533980

  1. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  2. Antiadhesive activity of the biosurfactant pseudofactin II secreted by the Arctic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudofactin II is a recently identified biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5, the strain obtained from freshwater from the Arctic Archipelago of Svalbard. Pseudofactin II is a novel compound identified as cyclic lipopeptide with a palmitic acid connected to the terminal amino group of eighth amino acid in peptide moiety. The C-terminal carboxylic group of the last amino acid forms a lactone with the hydroxyl of Thr3. Adhesion is the first stage of biofilm formation and the best moment for the action of antiadhesive and anti-biofilm compounds. Adsorption of biosurfactants to a surface e.g. glass, polystyrene, silicone modifies its hydrophobicity, interfering with the microbial adhesion and desorption processes. In this study the role and applications of pseudofactin II as a antiadhesive compound has been investigated from medicinal and therapeutic perspectives. Results Pseudofactin II lowered the adhesion to three types of surfaces (glass, polystyrene and silicone) of bacterial strains of five species: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis and two Candida albicans strains. Pretreatment of a polystyrene surface with 0.5 mg/ml pseudofactin II inhibited bacterial adhesion by 36-90% and that of C. albicans by 92-99%. The same concentration of pseudofactin II dislodged 26-70% of preexisting biofilms grown on previously untreated surfaces. Pseudofactin II also caused a marked inhibition of the initial adhesion of E. faecalis, E. coli, E. hirae and C. albicans strains to silicone urethral catheters. The highest concentration tested (0.5 mg/ml) caused a total growth inhibition of S. epidermidis, partial (18-37%) inhibition of other bacteria and 8-9% inhibition of C. albicans growth. Conclusion Pseudofactin II showed antiadhesive activity against several pathogenic microorganisms which are potential biofilm formers on catheters, implants and internal prostheses. Up to 99% prevention could be achieved by 0.5 mg/ml pseudofactin II. In addition, pseudofactin II dispersed preformed biofilms. Pseudofactin II can be used as a disinfectant or surface coating agent against microbial colonization of different surfaces, e.g. implants or urethral catheters. PMID:22360895

  3. The Proteus Cabinet, or "We Are Here but Not Here"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nield, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, there were three stage illusions in which a magician could cause a person to disappear. In one of these, the Proteus Cabinet, participants would enter a box, and simply vanish. As the designers of the Proteus Cabinet said of them, they were "Here, but not Here." My essay explores this concept in relation to…

  4. The Proteus Cabinet, or "We Are Here but Not Here"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nield, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, there were three stage illusions in which a magician could cause a person to disappear. In one of these, the Proteus Cabinet, participants would enter a box, and simply vanish. As the designers of the Proteus Cabinet said of them, they were "Here, but not Here." My essay explores this concept in relation to

  5. Proteus in flight over mountains near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  6. Proteus aircraft over Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  7. Proteus aircraft low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  8. Radiologic findings in the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azouz, E M; Costa, T; Fitch, N

    1987-01-01

    The radiological findings in two patients with the Proteus syndrome are described. Features in our two cases not previously mentioned or stressed include vertebral dysplasia and enlargement (megaspondylodysplasia), bilateral genu valgum, recurrent after surgery and intraabdominal and mesenteric lipomatosis. Emergency laparotomy was performed on the first patient who had a twisted necrotic portion of mesenteric fat. Macrodactyly, skeletal muscle atrophy and subcutaneous fat accumulation in the abdominal wall were present in both. In addition the second patient was mentally retarded and had frontal bony prominence of skull. Computed tomography was used for the specific diagnosis of the lipomatous tissues in both patients. PMID:3684361

  9. Mirabilis jalapa mottle virus: a new carlavirus infecting four o'clocks.

    PubMed

    Hatlestad, Gregory J; Elam, Lee; Gonzalez, Antonio; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-11-01

    Analysis of a next-generation sequence dataset from Mirabilis jalapa resulted in the discovery of a novel virus in the genus Carlavirus (family Betaflexiviridae), mirabilis jalapa mottle virus (MjMV). The complete genome of MjMV was determined to consist of 8315 nucleotides (nt), with the six open reading frames indicative of carlaviruses. MjMV is most similar to kalanchoe latent virus (60% identity) and lily symptomless virus (59% identity). The virus can be transmitted mechanically to Mirabilis, but thus far MjMV has only been shown to infect Mirabilis jalapa, causing a slight leaf mottling and leaf wrinkling phenotype. PMID:21915718

  10. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the first part of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the Proteus computer code. A review is given of previous studies on the implementation of multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. Also presented is a detailed stability analysis of upwind and central-difference based numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Results are given of a convergence study of the Proteus code on computational grids of different sizes. The results presented here form the foundation for the implementation of multigrid methods in the Proteus code.

  11. Catharanthus mosaic virus: A potyvirus from a gymnosperm, Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Shu Hui; Li, Hua; Admiraal, Ryan; Jones, Michael G K; Wylie, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    A virus from a symptomatic plant of the gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. growing as an ornamental plant in a domestic garden in Western Australia was inoculated to a plant of Nicotiana benthamiana where it established a systemic infection. The complete genome sequence of 9636 nucleotides was determined using high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. The genome sequence shared greatest identity (83% nucleotides and 91% amino acids) with available partial sequences of catharanthus mosaic virus, indicating that the new isolate belonged to that taxon. Analysis of the phylogeny of the complete virus sequence placed it in a monotypic group in the genus Potyvirus. This is the first record of a virus from W. mirabilis, the first complete genome sequence of catharanthus mosaic virus determined, and the first record from Australia. This finding illustrates the risk to natural and managed systems posed by the international trade in live plants and propagules, which enables viruses to establish in new regions and infect new hosts. PMID:25804761

  12. Morphogenesis of the branching reef coral Madracis mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kaandorp, Jaap A; Sloot, Peter M A; Merks, Roeland M H; Bak, Rolf P M; Vermeij, Mark J A; Maier, Cornelia

    2005-01-22

    Understanding external deciding factors in growth and morphology of reef corals is essential to elucidate the role of corals in marine ecosystems, and to explain their susceptibility to pollution and global climate change. Here, we extend on a previously presented model for simulating the growth and form of a branching coral and we compare the simulated morphologies to three-dimensional (3D) images of the coral species Madracis mirabilis. Simulation experiments and isotope analyses of M. mirabilis skeletons indicate that external gradients of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) determine the morphogenesis of branching, phototrophic corals. In the simulations we use a first principle model of accretive growth based on local interactions between the polyps. The only species-specific information in the model is the average size of a polyp. From flow tank and simulation studies it is known that a relatively large stagnant and diffusion dominated region develops within a branching colony. We have used this information by assuming in our model that growth is entirely driven by a diffusion-limited process, where DIC supply represents the limiting factor. With such model constraints it is possible to generate morphologies that are virtually indistinguishable from the 3D images of the actual colonies. PMID:15695202

  13. Rare occurrence of Proteus vulgaris in faeces: a reason for its rare association with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Leslie, D L

    1986-03-01

    The faecal carriage rates of different species of Proteeae were assessed in studies with 220 faecal isolates from 219 individuals of whom approximately one-third were well and the remainder had gastro-enteritis. As a result of the development of new media that allowed replacement of the phenylalanine deaminase test with the tryptophan deaminase test and made it possible to combine tests for indole and urease production and for hydrogen sulphide and ornithine decarboxylase formation in two single-tube tests, all strains were speciated with speed, economy and accuracy. Most (96%) isolates were either Proteus mirabilis (62%) or Morganella morgani (34%). The significance of these findings in relation to urinary tract infection is discussed. P. vulgaris was found in only one (0.45%) faecal specimen and this rarity of carriage in faeces is believed to be the main reason for its rare association with urinary tract infections. The frequent association of M. morgani, in the absence of other enteropathogenic bacteria, with severe gastroenteritis was noted with interest. PMID:3512839

  14. Characterization of Two Novel Type I Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins from the Storage Roots of the Andean Crop Mirabilis expansa1

    PubMed Central

    Vivanco, Jorge M.; Savary, Brett J.; Flores, Hector E.

    1999-01-01

    Two novel type I ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were found in the storage roots of Mirabilis expansa, an underutilized Andean root crop. The two RIPs, named ME1 and ME2, were purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange perfusion chromatography, and C4 reverse-phase chromatography. The two proteins were found to be similar in size (27 and 27.5 kD) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their isoelectric points were determined to be greater than pH 10.0. Amino acid N-terminal sequencing revealed that both ME1 and ME2 had conserved residues characteristic of RIPs. Amino acid composition and western-blot analysis further suggested a structural similarity between ME1 and ME2. ME2 showed high similarity to the Mirabilis jalapa antiviral protein, a type I RIP. Depurination of yeast 26S rRNA by ME1 and ME2 demonstrated their ribosome-inactivating activity. Because these two proteins were isolated from roots, their antimicrobial activity was tested against root-rot microorganisms, among others. ME1 and ME2 were active against several fungi, including Pythium irregulare, Fusarium oxysporum solani, Alternaria solani, Trichoderma reesei, and Trichoderma harzianum, and an additive antifungal effect of ME1 and ME2 was observed. Antibacterial activity of both ME1 and ME2 was observed against Pseudomonas syringae, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Agrobacterium radiobacter, and others. PMID:10198104

  15. The Location GNSS Modules for the Components of Proteus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostowski, K.; Darakchiev, R.; Foks-Ryznar, A.; Sitek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Proteus system - the Integrated Mobile System for Counterterrorism and Rescue Operations is a complex innovative project. To assure the best possible localization of mobile components of the system, many different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) modules were taken into account. In order to chose the best solution many types of tests were done. Full results and conclusions are presented in this paper. The idea of measurements was to test modules in GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) with EGNOS system specification according to certain algorithms. The tests had to answer the question: what type of GNSS modules should be used on different components with respect to specific usage of Proteus system. The second goal of tests was to check the solution quality of integrated GNSS/INS (Inertial Navigation System) and its possible usage in some Proteus system components.

  16. Subcutaneous infection by Ochroconis mirabilis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dongmei; Lu, Guixia; Mei, Huan; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Samerpitak, Kittipan; Deng, Shuwen; Shen, Yongnian; Liu, Weida

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the taxonomy of Ochroconis (Ascomycota, Pezizomycotina, Venturiales, Sympoventuriaceae) has been revised with the recognition of an additional genus, Verruconis. Ochroconis comprises mesophilic saprobes that occasionally infect vertebrates which mostly are cold-blooded, while Verruconis contains thermophilic species which is a neurotrope in humans and birds. On the basis of molecular data it is noted that only a single Ochroconis species regularly infects immunocompetent human hosts. Here we report a subcutaneous infection due to Ochroconis mirabilis in a 50-year-old immunocompetent female patient. In vitro antifungal susceptibility tests revealed that terbinafine was the most effective drug. The patient was successfully cured with oral administration of terbinafine 250 mg daily in combination with 3 times of topical ALA-photodynamic therapy for 9 months. PMID:27182484

  17. Proteus - An experimenter's view. [of spacecraft carrying exchangable Explorer scientific experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The scientific experiments package to be carried by the Proteus system takes the form of an Instrument Load carried into orbit by a Space Shuttle, and there mated to a Proteus spacecraft with the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System. The Proteus system extends to ground support equipment, development tools, and communications, as well as the orbiting satellites. It is expected that Proteus will be able to triple the number of Explorer missions while staying within the current budgetary allocation for such missions. The Proteus spacecraft encompasses a system interface assembly plug, a data handling module, remote interface units, and a power distribution module.

  18. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  19. Wave Features of the Neptune's Satellites: Triton, Proteus, Nereid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2014-07-01

    Fastly orbiting Triton shows Mars-like tectonic dichotomy and very fine granulation 18 km across. Observed Proteus' granules are due to wave modulation. Nereid's fr.is close to that of Earth, thus their relatively sized granules are quite similar.

  20. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: Application to Blood Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Comparative plate counts were made of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes growing on blood agar supplemented with individual chemicals to abolish the swarming of Proteus. B-phenylethanol, sodium azide, and p-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) were used as anti-swarm agents. Each anti-swarm agent effectively abolished swarming for 24 h, but azide failed to control swarming for longer periods of incubation. In addition, azide displayed growth inhibition towards the staphylococci and streptococci resulting in no hemolysis and reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci. Phenylethanol showed reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci and unreliable hemolytic reactions. At 0.1 to 0.3 mM, PNPG proved to be a superior anti-swarm agent in that it showed no growth inhibition and allowed normal hemolysis, but abolished swarming for extended periods of time. When laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae were screened on a blood agar medium containing 0.1 mm PNPG, they displayed similar growth and hemolytic characteristics to the identical medium without PNPG. PMID:4715553

  1. Structural studies on the fucosamine-containing O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O19.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, E V; Kaca, W; Knirel, Y A; Rózalski, A; Kochetkov, N K

    1989-03-01

    The polysaccharide chain of Proteus vulgaris O19 lipopolysaccharide contains D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-L-fucosamine in the ratio 1:1:1:1. The structure of the polysaccharide was established by full acid hydrolysis and methylation analysis, as well as by non-destructive methods, i.e. the computer-assisted evaluation of the 13C-NMR spectrum and computer-assisted evaluation of the specific optical rotation by Klyne's rule. The polysaccharide is regular and built up of tetrasaccharide repeating units of the following structure: ----3)-alpha-L-FucNAcp-(1----3)-beta-D-GlcNAcp-(1----3)-alph a-D-Galp- (1----4)-alpha-D-GalNAcp-(1---- The O19-antiserum cross-reacts with lipopolysaccharide from P. vulgaris O42, the structure of which is still unknown. No cross-reactions were observed with O-polysaccharides Pseudomonas aeruginosa O7 and Salmonella arizonae O59 in spite of some structural similarities. PMID:2651127

  2. 21 CFR 522.1044 - Gentamicin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... early mortality caused by Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are... in the treatment of urinary tract infections (cystitis) caused by Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli... old for treatment of porcine colibacillosis caused by strains of E. coli sensitive to gentamicin....

  3. 21 CFR 522.1044 - Gentamicin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... early mortality caused by Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are... in the treatment of urinary tract infections (cystitis) caused by Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli... old for treatment of porcine colibacillosis caused by strains of E. coli sensitive to gentamicin....

  4. 21 CFR 522.1044 - Gentamicin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... early mortality caused by Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are... in the treatment of urinary tract infections (cystitis) caused by Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli... old for treatment of porcine colibacillosis caused by strains of E. coli sensitive to gentamicin....

  5. 21 CFR 522.1044 - Gentamicin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... early mortality caused by Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are... in the treatment of urinary tract infections (cystitis) caused by Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli... old for treatment of porcine colibacillosis caused by strains of E. coli sensitive to gentamicin....

  6. 21 CFR 522.1044 - Gentamicin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... early mortality caused by Escherichia coli. Salmonella typhimurium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are... in the treatment of urinary tract infections (cystitis) caused by Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli... old for treatment of porcine colibacillosis caused by strains of E. coli sensitive to gentamicin....

  7. Genome sequencing and annotation of Proteus sp. SAS71

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-01-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Proteus sp. strain SAS71, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 3,037,704 bp with a G + C content of 39.3% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDIU00000000. PMID:26697338

  8. [Competence of Cd Phytoremediation in Cd-OCDF Co-contaminated Soil Using Mirabilis jalapa L].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-li; Zou, Wei; Zhou, Qi-xing

    2015-08-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants tends to be severe. Pot experiment was conducted to investigate the phytoremediation of cadmium (Cd) in Cd-OCDF Co-contaminated Soil by Mirabilis jalapa L., using OCDF and Cd as the model pollutants of persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals, to study. the growth responses of plant and OCDF effects on phytoremediation of Cd. The results showed that during three months of planting the height and dry biomass of Mirabilis jalapa L. decreased slightly when the Cd concentration was not higher than 200 mg x kg(-1), and the plant exhibited high tolerance to Cd and OCDF. Compared with the Cd single pollution, OCDF had no significant effect on the height and root biomass of Mirabilis jalapa L. When the concentration of Cd was 200 mg x kg(-1) and the concentration of OCDF was 500 microg x kg(-1), the shoot biomass was reduced by 22.19%. In other treatments, OCDF showed no significant inhibition to the shoot biomass of Mirabilis jalapa L., but increased the shoot biomass in some treatments. Compared with single Cd pollution, when the concentration of Cd was 200 mg x kg(-1) and the concentration of OCDF was 100 microg x kg(-1), the Cd accumulation of root was reduced by 34.44%. When the concentration of Cd was 400 mg x kg(-1) and the concentration of OCDF was 100 microg x kg(-1), the Cd accumulation in root and leaf was reduced by 7.93% and 18.09%, respectively. In other treatments, OCDF promoted the extraction and accumulation of Cd by root, stem and leaf of Mirabilis jalapa L. from soil to some degree. So using Mirabilis jalapa L. to remediate Cd from high Cd concentration and OCDF cocontaminated soil is feasible. PMID:26592039

  9. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  10. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  11. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae... A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS are exempted from the......

  13. Genes associated with opening and senescence of the ephemeral flowers of Mirabilis jalapa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A modest ethylene climacteric accompanies flower senescence in Mirabilis jalapa L., and exogenous ethylene accelerates the process. However, inhibitors of ethylene action and synthesis have little effect on the life-span of these ephemeral flowers. Treatment with a-amanitin, an inhibitor of DNA-depe...

  14. The Proteus aircraft and NASA Dryden's T-34 in flight over Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  15. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Caroline Mohr; Brenner, Frances W.; Miller, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    This review presents the current taxonomy of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella, along with the current methods for the identification of each species within the three genera, incorporating both conventional biochemical and commercial methods. While all of these organisms are ubiquitous in the environment, individual case reports and nosocomial outbreak reports that demonstrate their ability to cause major infectious disease problems are presented. Lastly, anticipated antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are reviewed. Many of these organisms are easily controlled, but the advent of newer and more powerful antimicrobial agents has led to some problems of which laboratorians need to be aware. PMID:11023955

  16. Mechanics and control of the cytoskeleton in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M

    1989-01-01

    Many models of the cytoskeletal motility of Amoeba proteus can be formulated in terms of the theory of reactive interpenetrating flow (Dembo and Harlow, 1986). We have devised numerical methodology for testing such models against the phenomenon of steady axisymmetric fountain flow. The simplest workable scheme revealed by such tests (the minimal model) is the main preoccupation of this study. All parameters of the minimal model are determined from available data. Using these parameters the model quantitatively accounts for the self assembly of the cytoskeleton of A. proteus: for the formation and detailed morphology of the endoplasmic channel, the ectoplasmic tube, the uropod, the plasma gel sheet, and the hyaline cap. The model accounts for the kinematics of the cytoskeleton: the detailed velocity field of the forward flow of the endoplasm, the contraction of the ectoplasmic tube, and the inversion of the flow in the fountain zone. The model also gives a satisfactory account of measurements of pressure gradients, measurements of heat dissipation, and measurements of the output of useful work by amoeba. Finally, the model suggests a very promising (but still hypothetical) continuum formulation of the free boundary problem of amoeboid motion. by balancing normal forces on the plasma membrane as closely as possible, the minimal model is able to predict the turgor pressure and surface tension of A. proteus. Several dynamical factors are crucial to the success of the minimal model and are likely to be general features of cytoskeletal mechanics and control in amoeboid cells. These are: a constitutive law for the viscosity of the contractile network that includes an automatic process of gelation as the network density gets large; a very vigorous cycle of network polymerization and depolymerization (in the case of A. proteus, the time constant for this reaction is approximately 12 s); control of network contractility by a diffusible factor (probably calcium ion); and control of the adhesive interaction between the cytoskeleton and the inner surface of the plasma membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 7 PMID:2765645

  17. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  18. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the Proteus computer code. The first section presents a review of the relevant literature on the implementation of the multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. The next two sections present detailed stability analysis of numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, based on conventional von Neumann analysis and the bi-grid analysis, respectively. The next section presents details of the computational method used in the Proteus computer code. Finally, the multigrid implementation and applications to several two-dimensional and three-dimensional test problems are presented. The results of the present study show that the multigrid method always leads to a reduction in the number of iterations (or time steps) required for convergence. However, there is an overhead associated with the use of multigrid acceleration. The overhead is higher in 2-D problems than in 3-D problems, thus overall multigrid savings in CPU time are in general better in the latter. Savings of about 40-50 percent are typical in 3-D problems, but they are about 20-30 percent in large 2-D problems. The present multigrid method is applicable to steady-state problems and is therefore ineffective in problems with inherently unstable solutions.

  19. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  2. PROTEUS. Fortran Program to Solve 2-D Continuum Equations for Chemically Reacting Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Meeks, E.; Evans, G.H.; Winters, W.S.; Moen, C.D.; Ting, A.; Grcar, J.F.; Vitello, P.A.; Stewart, R.; Bukowski, J.D.; Graves, D.B.; Berry, L.; Tolliver, J.S.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1997-02-01

    PROTEUS is a FORTRAN program that solves 2-d continuum equations for chemically reacting plasma flow including electron, ion, and neutral transport, plasma generation, and plasma-surface kinetics, for modeling inductively coupled plasma reactors. PROTEUS consists of three primary modules: a charged species transport module, a neutral species transport module, and an electromagnetic field solver module. these modules are referred to as INDUCT, CURRENT, and ORMAX, respectively. The modules are all written in FORTRAN and have been designed for and tested on UNIX workstations. PROTEUS also includes interfaces to CHEMKIN III and SURFACE CHEMKIN III for general descriptions of plasma and surface kinetics.

  3. Specific Microbial Communities Associate with the Rhizosphere of Welwitschia mirabilis, a Living Fossil

    PubMed Central

    De Maayer, Pieter; Oberholster, Tanzelle; Henschel, Joh; Louw, Michele K.; Cowan, Don

    2016-01-01

    Welwitschia mirabilis is an ancient and rare plant distributed along the western coast of Namibia and Angola. Several aspects of Welwitschia biology and ecology have been investigated, but very little is known about the microbial communities associated with this plant. This study reports on the bacterial and fungal communities inhabiting the rhizosphere of W. mirabilis and the surrounding bulk soil. Rhizosphere communities were dominated by sequences of Alphaproteobacteria and Euromycetes, while Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and fungi of the class Dothideomycetes jointly dominated bulk soil communities. Although microbial communities within the rhizosphere and soil samples were highly variable, very few “species” (OTUs defined at a 97% identity cut-off) were shared between these two environments. There was a small ‘core’ rhizosphere bacterial community (formed by Nitratireductor, Steroidobacter, Pseudonocardia and three Phylobacteriaceae) that together with Rhizophagus, an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, and other putative plant growth-promoting microbes may interact synergistically to promote Welwitschia growth. PMID:27064484

  4. Specific Microbial Communities Associate with the Rhizosphere of Welwitschia mirabilis, a Living Fossil.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Angel; De Maayer, Pieter; Oberholster, Tanzelle; Henschel, Joh; Louw, Michele K; Cowan, Don

    2016-01-01

    Welwitschia mirabilis is an ancient and rare plant distributed along the western coast of Namibia and Angola. Several aspects of Welwitschia biology and ecology have been investigated, but very little is known about the microbial communities associated with this plant. This study reports on the bacterial and fungal communities inhabiting the rhizosphere of W. mirabilis and the surrounding bulk soil. Rhizosphere communities were dominated by sequences of Alphaproteobacteria and Euromycetes, while Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and fungi of the class Dothideomycetes jointly dominated bulk soil communities. Although microbial communities within the rhizosphere and soil samples were highly variable, very few "species" (OTUs defined at a 97% identity cut-off) were shared between these two environments. There was a small 'core' rhizosphere bacterial community (formed by Nitratireductor, Steroidobacter, Pseudonocardia and three Phylobacteriaceae) that together with Rhizophagus, an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, and other putative plant growth-promoting microbes may interact synergistically to promote Welwitschia growth. PMID:27064484

  5. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hot Tub Rash ( Pseudomonas Folliculitis) Information for adults A ... the skin and small pus-filled lesions. Overview Hot tub rash ( Pseudomonas folliculitis) is an infection of ...

  6. Functional characterization of blue-light-induced responses and PHOTOTROPIN 1 gene in Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Ishishita, Kazuhiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Hirose, Yuki; Higa, Takeshi; Doi, Michio; Wada, Masamitsu; Matsushita, Tomonao; Gotoh, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The blue light (BL) receptor phototropin (phot) is specifically found in green plants; it regulates various BL-induced responses such as phototropism, chloroplast movement, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two phototropins-phot1 and phot2-respond to blue light in overlapping but distinct ways. These BL-receptor-mediated responses enhance the photosynthetic activity of plants under weak light and minimize photodamage under strong light conditions. Welwitschia mirabilis Hook.f. found in the Namib Desert, and it has adapted to severe environmental stresses such as limiting water and strong sunlight. Although the plant has physiologically and ecologically unique features, it is unknown whether phototropin is functional in this plant. In this study, we assessed the functioning of phot-mediated BL responses in W. mirabilis. BL-dependent phototropism and stomatal opening was observed but light-dependent chloroplast movement was not detected. We performed a functional analysis of the PHOT1 gene of W. mirabilis, WmPHOT1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We generated transgenic A. thaliana lines expressing WmPHOT1 in a phot1 phot2 double mutant background. Several Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal growth, although phot1 phot2 double mutant plants showed stunted growth. Furthermore, Wmphot1 transgenic plants showed normal phot1-mediated responses including phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf flattening, but lacked the chloroplast avoidance response that is specifically mediated by phot2. Thus, our findings indicate that W. mirabilis possesses typical phot-mediated BL responses that were at least partially mediated by functional phototropin 1, an ortholog of Atphot1. PMID:26858202

  7. Optical response of a disordered bicontinuous macroporous structure in the longhorn beetle Sphingnotus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Dong, B Q; Zhan, T R; Liu, X H; Jiang, L P; Liu, F; Hu, X H; Zi, J

    2011-07-01

    We studied the structural and optical properties of scales in the longhorn beetle Sphingnotus mirabilis. Structural characterizations revealed that the scale interior possesses a disordered bicontinuous macroporous structure, resembling a phase-separated structure obtained by spinodal decomposition. Its optical response was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Our results show that this structure has interesting optical properties due to the existence of only short-range order and the lack of well-defined local structures. PMID:21867221

  8. Using stable isotopes to understand survival strategies of the living fossil, Welwitschia mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Henschel, J.; Macko, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Namib Desert along the southwestern coast of Africa is hyper-arid in terms of rainfall (<25 mm/yr), but experiences coastal fog deposition up to 100 days each year. The Namib is also home to the biologically anomalous, very long-lived and evolutionarily ancient gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis. Due to its perennial broad green leaves that apparently demand around 1 L of water per day, some have suggested that this living fossil survives on fog deposition. We have investigated this hypothesis using stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δ2H) and found that W. mirabilis shows no evidence of fog uptake. Rather, its stem water looks much like that of large trees that tap into an alluvial aquifer, and nothing like the stem water of shrubs that are endemic to the fog zone and have been shown elsewhere to take up and translocate fog water. We also investigated some biogeochemical aspects of W. mirabilis through δ13C, δ15N and δ34S analysis of stem organic matter. These data revealed a large amount of variability in δ13C and δ15N among plants growing in close proximity to one another, indicating the possibility of micro-environmental control on the C and N cycles. The δ34S data provided a necessary additional constraint on the water isotope investigation.

  9. Benchmark Evaluation of the HTR-PROTEUS Absorber Rod Worths (Core 4)

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-06-01

    PROTEUS was a zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. The critical assembly was constructed from a large graphite annulus surrounding a central cylindrical cavity. Various experimental programs were investigated in PROTEUS; during the years 1992 through 1996, it was configured as a pebble-bed reactor and designated HTR-PROTEUS. Various critical configurations were assembled with each accompanied by an assortment of reactor physics experiments including differential and integral absorber rod measurements, kinetics, reaction rate distributions, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects [1]. Four benchmark reports were previously prepared and included in the March 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [2] evaluating eleven critical configurations. A summary of that effort was previously provided [3] and an analysis of absorber rod worth measurements for Cores 9 and 10 have been performed prior to this analysis and included in PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-004 [4]. In the current benchmark effort, absorber rod worths measured for Core Configuration 4, which was the only core with a randomly-packed pebble loading, have been evaluated for inclusion as a revision to the HTR-PROTEUS benchmark report PROTEUS-GCR-EXP-002.

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  11. Computational protein design: the Proteus software and selected applications.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Gaillard, Thomas; Mignon, David; Schmidt am Busch, Marcel; Lopes, Anne; Amara, Najette; Polydorides, Savvas; Sedano, Audrey; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios

    2013-10-30

    We describe an automated procedure for protein design, implemented in a flexible software package, called Proteus. System setup and calculation of an energy matrix are done with the XPLOR modeling program and its sophisticated command language, supporting several force fields and solvent models. A second program provides algorithms to search sequence space. It allows a decomposition of the system into groups, which can be combined in different ways in the energy function, for both positive and negative design. The whole procedure can be controlled by editing 2-4 scripts. Two applications consider the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme and its successful redesign to bind both O-methyl-tyrosine and D-tyrosine. For the latter, we present Monte Carlo simulations where the D-tyrosine concentration is gradually increased, displacing L-tyrosine from the binding pocket and yielding the binding free energy difference, in good agreement with experiment. Complete redesign of the Crk SH3 domain is presented. The top 10000 sequences are all assigned to the correct fold by the SUPERFAMILY library of Hidden Markov Models. Finally, we report the acid/base behavior of the SNase protein. Sidechain protonation is treated as a form of mutation; it is then straightforward to perform constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations, which yield good agreement with experiment. Overall, the software can be used for a wide range of application, producing not only native-like sequences but also thermodynamic properties with errors that appear comparable to other current software packages. PMID:24037756

  12. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  13. Ammonium assimilation in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae.

    PubMed

    Mrsdorf, G; Kaltwasser, H

    1989-01-01

    No active uptake of ammonium was detected in Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus pasteurii, and Sporosarcina ureae, which indicates that these bacteria depend on the passive diffusion of ammonia across the cell membrane. In P. vulgaris the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS-GOGAT) pathway and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were present, and these enzymes exhibited high affinities for ammonium. In B. pasteurii and S. ureae, however, no GS activity was detected, and GOGAT activity was only present in S. ureae. GDH enzymes were present in these two organisms, but showed only low affinity for ammonium, with apparent Km-values of 55.2 mM in B. pasteurii and 36.7 mM in S. ureae, respectively. These observations explain why P. vulgaris is able to grow at neutral pH and low ammonium concentration (2 mM), while B. pasteurii and S. ureae require high ammonium concentration (40 mM) and alkaline pH for growth. PMID:2570557

  14. Proteus: a reconfigurable computational network for computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralick, Robert M.; Somani, Arun K.; Wittenbrink, Craig M.; Johnson, Robert; Cooper, Kenneth; Shapiro, Linda G.; Phillips, Ihsin T.; Hwang, Jenq N.; Cheung, William; Yao, Yung H.; Chen, Chung-Ho; Yang, Larry; Daugherty, Brian; Lorbeski, Bob; Loving, Kent; Miller, Tom; Parkins, Larye; Soos, Steven L.

    1992-04-01

    The Proteus architecture is a highly parallel MIMD, multiple instruction, multiple-data machine, optimized for large granularity tasks such as machine vision and image processing The system can achieve 20 Giga-flops (80 Giga-flops peak). It accepts data via multiple serial links at a rate of up to 640 megabytes/second. The system employs a hierarchical reconfigurable interconnection network with the highest level being a circuit switched Enhanced Hypercube serial interconnection network for internal data transfers. The system is designed to use 256 to 1,024 RISC processors. The processors use one megabyte external Read/Write Allocating Caches for reduced multiprocessor contention. The system detects, locates, and replaces faulty subsystems using redundant hardware to facilitate fault tolerance. The parallelism is directly controllable through an advanced software system for partitioning, scheduling, and development. System software includes a translator for the INSIGHT language, a parallel debugger, low and high level simulators, and a message passing system for all control needs. Image processing application software includes a variety of point operators neighborhood, operators, convolution, and the mathematical morphology operations of binary and gray scale dilation, erosion, opening, and closing.

  15. Hot tub (Pseudomonas) folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J F; Stege, G C

    1990-02-01

    Folliculitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare, adverse effect of the therapeutic or recreational use of hot tubs, whirlpools, and occasionally swimming pools. The condition is characterized by painful, papulopustular skin lesions often accompanied by low-grade fever, malaise, and other systemic symptoms. Prompt recognition and treatment may shorten the duration of the disease and, more importantly, prevent further cases by identifying the source of exposure. PMID:2307901

  16. Evaluation of Proteus as a Tool for the Rapid Development of Models of Hydrologic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Farthing, M. W.; Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of modern hydrologic systems can be complex and involve a variety of operators with varying character. The goal is to implement approximations of such models that are both efficient for the developer and computationally efficient, which is a set of naturally competing objectives. Proteus is a Python-based toolbox that supports prototyping of model formulations as well as a wide variety of modern numerical methods and parallel computing. We used Proteus to develop numerical approximations for three models: Richards' equation, a brine flow model derived using the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT), and a multiphase TCAT-based tumor growth model. For Richards' equation, we investigated discontinuous Galerkin solutions with higher order time integration based on the backward difference formulas. The TCAT brine flow model was implemented using Proteus and a variety of numerical methods were compared to hand coded solutions. Finally, an existing tumor growth model was implemented in Proteus to introduce more advanced numerics and allow the code to be run in parallel. From these three example models, Proteus was found to be an attractive open-source option for rapidly developing high quality code for solving existing and evolving computational science models.

  17. Macrodactyly with skin hypertrophy: a minimal form of the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Fiss, Roberto Coswig; Happle, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The Proteus syndrome was described 1983 . It has asymmetric gigantism of the limbs, verrucous epidermal naevi, cerebriform enlargement of the plantar region, vascular malformations and neoplasms, as lipomas. It received this denomination after Proteus from the Greek mythology, who had the ability to change his form . A 15 year-old boy, reported a congenital hypertrophy with syndactily of the second and third right fingers . The second case is a 35 year-old man, who reported that since birth the second right toe was bigger than the other toes, skin hypertrophy was also observed. These cases document a localized form if the Proteus syndrome, which may widen the spectrum of its variability. PMID:21738976

  18. Scaled Composites' Proteus and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are seen h

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  19. Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the PROTEUS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Schmocker, U.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive program of reactor physics experiments in GCFR fuel pin lattices has been completed recently at the PROTEUS critical facility located at EIR laboratory in Switzerland. The PROTEUS reactor consists of a central test zone surrounded by a uranium buffer and thermal driver region. The test lattices included a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fuel region with internal and axial blankets of UO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and thorium metal. Detailed analysis of the thorium-bearing lattices has been performed at EIR and at ORNL in order to validate nuclear data and methods used for reactor physics analysis of advanced GCFR designs.

  20. Non-operative management of a splenic laceration in a patient with the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ceelen, W; De Waele, J; Kunnen, M; de Hemptinne, B

    1997-01-01

    An adult patient with the Proteus syndrome sustained a grade III splenic laceration after falling off a horse. Clinical features of this rare disorder include subcutaneous and visceral hamartomatous tumours. The patient also suffered from chronic intravascular coagulation associated with extensive haemangiomatosis (Kasabach-Merritt syndrome). Considering the visceral anomalies and abnormal coagulation, a non-operative approach was preferred despite considerable transfusion requirement, and the patient successfully underwent embolisation of the splenic artery. This is the first reported case of splenic injury in a patient with Proteus syndrome. Images p111-a Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9132186

  1. Functional gene losses occur with minimal size reduction in the plastid genome of the parasitic liverwort Aneura mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Wickett, Norman J; Zhang, Yan; Hansen, S Kellon; Roper, Jessie M; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Plock, Sheila A; Wolf, Paul G; DePamphilis, Claude W; Boore, Jeffrey L; Goffinet, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    Aneura mirabilis is a parasitic liverwort that exploits an existing mycorrhizal association between a basidiomycete and a host tree. This unusual liverwort is the only known parasitic seedless land plant with a completely nonphotosynthetic life history. The complete plastid genome of A. mirabilis was sequenced to examine the effect of its nonphotosynthetic life history on plastid genome content. Using a partial genomic fosmid library approach, the genome was sequenced and shown to be 108,007 bp with a structure typical of green plant plastids. Comparisons were made with the plastid genome of Marchantia polymorpha, the only other liverwort plastid sequence available. All ndh genes are either absent or pseudogenes. Five of 15 psb genes are pseudogenes, as are 2 of 6 psa genes and 2 of 6 pet genes. Pseudogenes of cysA, cysT, ccsA, and ycf3 were also detected. The remaining complement of genes present in M. polymorpha is present in the plastid of A. mirabilis with intact open reading frames. All pseudogenes and gene losses co-occur with losses detected in the plastid of the parasitic angiosperm Epifagus virginiana, though the latter has functional gene losses not found in A. mirabilis. The plastid genome sequence of A. mirabilis represents only the second liverwort, and first mycoheterotroph, to have its plastid genome sequenced. We observed a pattern of genome evolution congruent with functional gene losses in parasitic angiosperms but suggest that its plastid genome represents a genome in the early stages of decay following the relaxation of selection pressures. PMID:18056074

  2. Structure of the O-polysaccharide and serological studies of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus penneri 60 classified into a new Proteus serogroup O70.

    PubMed

    Zych, Krystyna; Perepelov, Andrei; Baranowska, Agata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt

    2005-03-01

    An alkali-treated lipopolysaccharide of Proteus penneri strain 60 was studied by chemical analyses and 1H, 13C and 31P NMR spectroscopy, and the following structure of the linear pentasaccharide-phosphate repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: 6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->3)-alpha-L-FucpNAc-(1-->3)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->3)-beta-D-Quip4NAc-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Glcp-1-P-(O--> Rabbit polyclonal O-antiserum against P. penneri 60 reacted with both core and O-polysaccharide moieties of the homologous LPS. Based on the unique O-polysaccharide structure and serological data, we propose to classify P. penneri 60 into a new, separate Proteus serogroup O70. A weak cross-reactivity of P. penneri 60 O-antiserum with the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O8, O15 and O19 was observed and discussed in view of the chemical structures of the O-polysaccharides. PMID:15708308

  3. [Urease activity of bacteria in urine].

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Takeuchi, H; Tomoyoshi, T; Tatewaki, K

    1989-02-01

    Urea splitting bacteria are related to the formation of struvite or apatite. We investigated the urease activity of bacteria by two methods; the direct measurement of urease activity of viable bacteria and sonicated bacteria from amounts of ammonia by the indophenol method, and the measurement of urease activity by alkalization of infected urine. Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had moderate activity of urease, and Morganella morganii and Staphylococcus epidermidis had the most powerful activity. P. mirabilis caused the strongest alkalization in infected urine. PMID:2500012

  4. The complete plastid genome sequence of Welwitschia mirabilis: an unusually compact plastome with accelerated divergence rates

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Welwitschia mirabilis is the only extant member of the family Welwitschiaceae, one of three lineages of gnetophytes, an enigmatic group of gymnosperms variously allied with flowering plants or conifers. Limited sequence data and rapid divergence rates have precluded consensus on the evolutionary placement of gnetophytes based on molecular characters. Here we report on the first complete gnetophyte chloroplast genome sequence, from Welwitschia mirabilis, as well as analyses on divergence rates of protein-coding genes, comparisons of gene content and order, and phylogenetic implications. Results The chloroplast genome of Welwitschia mirabilis [GenBank: EU342371] is comprised of 119,726 base pairs and exhibits large and small single copy regions and two copies of the large inverted repeat (IR). Only 101 unique gene species are encoded. The Welwitschia plastome is the most compact photosynthetic land plant plastome sequenced to date; 66% of the sequence codes for product. The genome also exhibits a slightly expanded IR, a minimum of 9 inversions that modify gene order, and 19 genes that are lost or present as pseudogenes. Phylogenetic analyses, including one representative of each extant seed plant lineage and based on 57 concatenated protein-coding sequences, place Welwitschia at the base of all seed plants (distance, maximum parsimony) or as the sister to Pinus (the only conifer representative) in a monophyletic gymnosperm clade (maximum likelihood, bayesian). Relative rate tests on these gene sequences show the Welwitschia sequences to be evolving at faster rates than other seed plants. For these genes individually, a comparison of average pairwise distances indicates that relative divergence in Welwitschia ranges from amounts about equal to other seed plants to amounts almost three times greater than the average for non-gnetophyte seed plants. Conclusion Although the basic organization of the Welwitschia plastome is typical, its compactness, gene content and high nucleotide divergence rates are atypical. The current lack of additional conifer plastome sequences precludes any discrimination between the gnetifer and gnepine hypotheses of seed plant relationships. However, both phylogenetic analyses and shared genome features identified here are consistent with either of the hypotheses that link gnetophytes with conifers, but are inconsistent with the anthophyte hypothesis. PMID:18452621

  5. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  7. Endometrioid Paraovarian Borderline Cystic Tumor in an Infant with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Liliana; Tello, Mariela; Maza, Ivan; Oscanoa, Monica; Dueñas, Milagros; Castro, Haydee; Latorre, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and paraovarian neoplasms are uncommon in children, mainly originating from germ cell tumors and, least frequently, epithelial tumors. There is an association between genital tract tumors and Proteus syndrome, a rare, sporadic, and progressive entity, characterized by a postnatal overgrowth in several tissues caused by a mosaic mutation in the AKT1 gene. We describe a 20-month-old asymptomatic infant with Proteus syndrome who developed an endometrioid paraovarian borderline cystic tumor. This is the youngest patient so far reported in the literature with this rare syndrome and an adnexal tumor of borderline malignancy. A total of nine patients have been described with female tract tumors and associated Proteus syndrome, which includes bilateral ovarian cystadenomas and other benign masses. A paraovarian neoplasm is extremely rare in children and could be considered a criterion for Proteus syndrome. Standardized staging and treatment of these tumors are not well established; however, most authors conclude that these neoplasms must be treated as their ovarian counterparts. PMID:26558123

  8. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. Mathemimetics II. Demonstratio Mirabilis of FLT by infinitely ascending cubical crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trell, Erik

    2012-09-01

    Emulating Nature by observation and ground-up application of its patterns, structures and processes is a classical scientific practice which under the designation of Biomimetics has now been brought to the Nanotechnology scale where even highly complex systems can be realized by continuous or cyclically reiterated assembly of the respective self-similar eigen-elements, modules and algorithms right from their infinitesimal origin. This is actually quite akin to the genuine mathematical art and can find valuable renewed use as here exemplified by the tentatively original Demonstratio Mirabilis of FLT (Fermat's Last Theorem, or, in that case, Triumph) by infinitely ascending sheet-wise cubical crystal growth leading to the binomial `magic triangle' of his close fellow Blaise Pascal.

  12. Proteus - A Free and Open Source Sensor Observation Service (SOS) Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, J.; Satapathy, G.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's 'electronic skin' is becoming ever more sophisticated with a growing number of sensors measuring everything from seawater salinity levels to atmospheric pressure. To further the scientific application of this data collection effort, it is important to make the data easily available to anyone who wants to use it. Making Earth Science data readily available will allow the data to be used in new and potentially groundbreaking ways. The US National Science and Technology Council made this clear in its most recent National Strategy for Civil Earth Observations report, when it remarked that Earth observations 'are often found to be useful for additional purposes not foreseen during the development of the observation system'. On the road to this goal the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is defining uniform data formats and service interfaces to facilitate the discovery and access of sensor data. This is being done through the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) stack of standards, which include the Sensor Observation Service (SOS), Sensor Model Language (SensorML), Observations & Measurements (O&M) and Catalog Service for the Web (CSW). End-users do not have to use these standards directly, but can use smart tools that leverage and implement them. We have developed such a tool named Proteus. Proteus is an open-source sensor data discovery client. The goal of Proteus is to be a general-purpose client that can be used by anyone for discovering and accessing sensor data via OGC-based services. Proteus is a desktop client and supports a straightforward workflow for finding sensor data. The workflow takes the user through the process of selecting appropriate services, bounding boxes, observed properties, time periods and other search facets. NASA World Wind is used to display the matching sensor offerings on a map. Data from any sensor offering can be previewed in a time series. The user can download data from a single sensor offering, or download data in bulk from all matching sensor offerings. Proteus leverages NASA World Wind's WMS capabilities and allow overlaying sensor offerings on top of any map. Specific search criteria (i.e. user discoveries) can be saved and later restored. Proteus is supports two user types: 1) the researcher/scientist interested in discovering and downloading specific sensor data as input to research processes, and 2) the data manager responsible for maintaining sensor data services (e.g. SOSs) and wants to ensure proper data and metadata delivery, verify sensor data, and receive sensor data alerts. Proteus has a Web-based companion product named the Community Hub that is used to generate sensor data alerts. Alerts can be received via an RSS feed, viewed in a Web browser or displayed directly in Proteus via a Web-based API. To advance the vision of making Earth Science data easily discoverable and accessible to end-users, professional or laymen, Proteus is available as open-source on GitHub (https://github.com/intelligentautomation/proteus).

  13. Proteomic analysis of cardiac response to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal goby fish Gillichthys mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Tomanek, Lars; Dowd, W Wesley; Somero, George N

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac function is thought to play a central role in determining thermal optima and tolerance limits in teleost fishes. Investigating proteomic responses to temperature in cardiac tissues may provide insights into mechanisms supporting the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Here, we utilized a global proteomic analysis to investigate changes in cardiac protein abundance in response to temperature acclimation (transfer from 13°C to 9, 19 and 26°C) in a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. Proteomic data revealed 122 differentially expressed proteins across acclimation groups, 37 of which were identified using tandem mass-spectrometry. These 37 proteins are involved in energy metabolism, mitochondrial regulation, iron homeostasis, cytoprotection against hypoxia, and cytoskeletal organization. Compared with the 9 and 26°C groups, proteins involved in energy metabolism increased in 19°C-acclimated fish, indicating an overall increase in the capacity for ATP production. Creatine kinase abundance increased in 9°C-acclimated fish, suggesting an important role for the phosphocreatine energy shuttle in cold-acclimated hearts. Both 9 and 26°C fish also increased abundance of hexosaminidase, a protein directly involved in post-hypoxia stress cytoprotection of cardiac tissues. Cytoskeletal restructuring appears to occur in all acclimation groups; however, the most prominent effect was detected in 26°C-acclimated fish, which exhibited significantly increased actin levels. Overall, proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue suggests that the capacity to adjust ATP-generating processes is crucial to the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Furthermore, G. mirabilis may optimize cellular functions at temperatures near 19°C, which lies within the species' preferred temperature range. PMID:25954043

  14. Biology of Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antoni; Bosch, Rafael; García-Valdés, Elena; Palleroni, Norberto J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a nonfluorescent denitrifying bacterium widely distributed in the environment, and it has also been isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from humans. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the taxonomy of this diverse taxonomical group, demonstrating the clonality of its populations. The species has received much attention because of its particular metabolic properties: it has been proposed as a model organism for denitrification studies; many strains have natural transformation properties, making it relevant for study of the transfer of genes in the environment; several strains are able to fix dinitrogen; and others participate in the degradation of pollutants or interact with toxic metals. This review considers the history of the discovery, nomenclatural changes, and early studies, together with the relevant biological and ecological properties, of P. stutzeri. PMID:16760312

  15. Studies on the formation of crystalline bacterial biofilms on urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Morris, N; Moreno, M C; Sabbuba, N

    1998-09-01

    A model of the catheterised bladder was used to test the ability of urease-producing urinary tract pathogens to encrust urethral catheters. Encrustation was assessed by determining the amounts of calcium and magnesium deposited on the catheters and visualised by scanning electron microscopy. Urease-positive Morganella morganii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa failed to raise the urinary pH and form crystalline biofilms. In contrast, strains of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Providencia rettgeri generated alkaline urine (pH 8.3-8.6) and extensive catheter encrustation within 24 h. PMID:9832268

  16. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    PubMed

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm. PMID:24010505

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Selecting the right antibiotic usually requires that a ... to help educate people about Pseudomonas infections, and antibiotic resistance, and to encourage prevention activities and healthy behaviors ...

  18. Effects of Aridity and Fog Deposition on C3/CAM Photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Henschel, J.; Macko, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental controls on photosynthesis and N-cycling in Welwitschia mirabilis are evaluated through δ13C and δ15N analyses of leaf material from 26 individuals in the southermost population of this long-lived gymnosperm, which is endemic to the Namib Desert. The coastal Namib Desert in southwestern Africa is hyperarid in terms of rainfall, but receives up to 100 days of fog each year. This climate regime leads to interesting water relations in the Namib flora and fauna. Among many enigmatic characteristics, photosynthesis in W. mirabilis has puzzled researchers since the 1970's. Although it is predominantly a C3 plant, δ13C ranges from -17.5 to -23.5‰ in natural habitats, and can be as enriched as -14.4‰ under artificial growing conditions. Recently the CAM pathway has been confirmed, but the driver for CAM utilization has not been identified. In this study we incorporate new δ13C compositions for plants in the middle of the 100 km aridity gradient which spans the natural distribution of W. mirabilis. Initial results show an enriched δ13C signal (-20‰) in the more exposed individuals compared with those in a sandy drainage depression (-22‰). In addition, the documented correlation between rainfall and δ15N found in Kalahari C3 plants (Swap et al. 2004) is used to interpret the δ15N values in this W. mirabilis population. Initial results indicate that the fog deposition may significantly affect the nutrition of these unusual plants from the Namib Desert.

  19. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center d

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport in New Mexico. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  20. Chlorella mirabilis as a Potential Species for Biomass Production in Low-Temperature Environment

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, S. P.; Kvíderová, J.; Tříska, J.; Elster, J.

    2013-01-01

    Successful adaptation/acclimatization to low temperatures in micro-algae is usually connected with production of specific biotechnologically important compounds. In this study, we evaluated the growth characteristics in a micro-scale mass cultivation of the Antarctic soil green alga Chlorella mirabilis under different nitrogen and carbon sources followed by analyses of fatty acid contents. The micro-scale mass cultivation was performed in stable (in-door) and variable (out-door) conditions during winter and/or early spring in the Czech Republic. In the in-door cultivation, the treatments for nitrogen and carbon sources determination included pure Z medium (control, Z), Z medium + 5% glycerol (ZG), Z medium + 5% glycerol + 50 μM KNO3 (ZGN), Z medium + 5% glycerol + 200 μM NH4Cl (ZGA), Z medium + 5% glycerol + 1 mM Na2CO3 (ZNC), Z medium + 5% glycerol + 1 mM Na2CO3 + 200 μM NH4Cl (ZGCA) and Z medium + 5% glycerol + 1 mM Na2CO3 + 50 μM KNO3 (ZGCN) and were performed at 15°C with an irradiance of 75 μmol m−2 s−1. During the out-door experiments, the night-day temperature ranged from −6.6 to 17.5°C (daily average 3.1 ± 5.3°C) and irradiance ranged from 0 to 2,300 μmol m−2 s−1 (daily average 1,500 ± 1,090 μmol m−2 s−1). Only the Z, ZG, ZGN, and ZGC treatments were used in the out-door cultivation. In the in-door mass cultivation, all nitrogen and carbon sources additions increased the growth rate with the exception of ZGA. When individual sources were considered, only the effect of 5% glycerol addition was significant. On the other hand, the growth rate decreased in the ZG and ZGN treatments in the out-door experiment, probably due to carbon limitation. Fatty acid composition showed increased production of linoleic acid in the glycerol treatments. The studied strain of C. mirabilis is proposed to be a promising source of linoleic acid in low-temperature-mass cultivation biotechnology. This strain is a perspective model organism for biotechnology in low-temperature conditions. PMID:23630521

  1. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1114 Section 180.1114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS...

  2. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Tehachapi Mountains in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unique shape of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft is clearly visible in this photo of the plane in flight above the rocky slopes of the Tehachapi Mountains near Mojave, California, where the Proteus was designed and built. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds,empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  3. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  4. Empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion associated with proteus species infection: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Yauba, M S; Ahmed, H; Imoudu, I A; Yusuf, M O; Makarfi, H U

    2015-01-01

    Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species. PMID:25893125

  5. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  6. Population-specific behavioral electrosensitivity of the European blind cave salamander, Proteus anguinus.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, P; Bulog, B

    1997-04-01

    In nine salamanders from different Slovenian populations of the urodele Proteus anguinus, including three specimens of its 'black' variety, P anguinus parkelj, thresholds of an overt avoidance response to electrical field stimuli were estimated as a function of frequency (continuous sine-waves in water). Thresholds down to 0.3V/cm (ca 100 nA/cm2) and up to 2 mV/cm (670 nA/cm2), at 'best frequencies' of around 30 Hz were found. Sensitivity covered a total frequency range of below 1 Hz, excluding DC, up to 1-2 kHz with up to 40 dB higher thresholds. Thresholds and tuning curves are compared with those of a Proteus population raised in captivity for more than 35 years. The biological significance and the apparently still ongoing evolution of the electrical sense in urodeles, ie in the genus Proteus, are interpreted in terms of comparative sensory physiology and ethological ecology as a result of more recent evolutionary diversification during and since glaciation in the Pleistocene. PMID:9326735

  7. Crystallization of urine mineral components may depend on the chemical nature of Proteus endotoxin polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Staczek, Paweł; Rózalski, Antoni

    2003-06-01

    Formation of infectious urinary calculi is the most common complication accompanying urinary tract infections by members of the genus Proteus. The major factor involved in stone formation is the urease produced by these bacteria, which causes local supersaturation and crystallization of magnesium and calcium phosphates as carbonate apatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6).CO(3)] and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O), respectively. This effect may also be enhanced by bacterial polysaccharides. Macromolecules of such kind contain negatively charged residues that are able to bind Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), leading to the accumulation of these ions around bacterial cells and acceleration of the crystallization process. The levels of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions bound by whole Proteus cells were measured, as well as the chemical nature of isolated LPS polysaccharides, and the intensity of the in vitro crystallization process was compared in a synthetic urine. The results suggest that the sugar composition of Proteus LPS may either enhance or inhibit the crystallization of struvite and apatite, depending on its chemical structure and ability to bind cations. This points to the increased importance of endotoxin in urinary tract infections. PMID:12748265

  8. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  9. Tolerance, uptake and removal of nitrobenzene by a newly-found remediation species Mirabilis jalapa L.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qixing; Diao, Chunyan; Sun, Yuebing; Zhou, Junliang

    2012-03-01

    The growth, photosynthesis rate, and ultrastructure of Mirabilis jalapa L. as a newly-found remediation species under stress of nitrobenzene (NB) and its uptake and removal of NB by the plants were investigated. The results showed that M. jalapa plants could endure contaminated soils by lower than 10.0 mg NB kg(-1) because there was no decrease in the total length of the plant roots, the maximum length of the hypocotyle, the length of the first seminal root, the height of the shoots and the dry biomass of the seedlings as well as the photosynthesis rate of the plants compared with those in the control. In particular, the growth of the plants could be significantly (P<0.01) enhanced by 0.1 mg NB kg(-1) under unautoclaved and autoclaved soils. Ultrastructural observations on leaf cells of the plants found that these cells had smooth, clean and continuous cell membranes and cell walls, indicating that there was no obvious damage by NB in comparison with those in the control. Although the absorption of NB in shoots and roots of M. jalapa was weak, plant-promoted biodegradation of NB was considerable and the dominant contribution in the removal of NB from contaminated soils, suggesting the feasibility of M. jalapa applied to phytoremediation of NB contaminated soils. PMID:22236591

  10. [Analysis of photosynthetic characteristics and its influencing factors of medicinal plant Mirabilis himalaica].

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi-Qiang; Quan, Hong; Lan, Xiao-Zhong; Li, Lian-Qiang; Li, Hui-E

    2014-07-01

    To study photosynthetic characteristics and its influencing factors in leaves of medicinal plant Mirabilis himalaica, and provide an evidence for guiding artificial planting and improving the quantity. The light-response and diurnal photosynthesis course of leaves at the booting stages of 1-3 year old M. himalaica were measured with LI-6400 system. The Results showed that the light response curves were fitted well by non rectangle hyperbola equation (R2 > or = 0.98). The values of the maximum photosynthetic rate (Pmax) and light use efficiency of three-year old M. himalaica leaves were higher than those of 1-2 year old individuals. The diurnal variation of net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (Gs) of 2-3 year old M. himalaica were typical double-peak curves determinately regulated by stomatal conductance. However, transpiration rate (Tr) of 1-3 year old plants leaves were single-peak curve, which was self-protection of harm reduction caused by the higher temperature at noontime. Correlation analysis showed that the changes between photosynthetic active radiation (PFD), air temperature (T ) and Pn, were significant positive related. Therefore, M. himalaica is a typical sun plant, which should be planted under the sufficient sunshine field and prolong the growing ages suitably in order to improve the yield. PMID:25272512

  11. Two new naphthalene glucosides and other bioactive compounds from the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Van; Thao, Nguyen Phuong; Dat, Le Duc; Huong, Phan Thi Thanh; Lee, Sang Hyun; Jang, Hae Dong; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Kiem, Phan Van; Minh, Chau Van; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-10-01

    Two new naphthalene diglucosides named nepenthosides A (1) and B (2), together with eleven known compounds (3-13), were isolated from the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis. The structures of these compounds were elucidated based on extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D- and 2D-NMR, and MS. The antioxidant activities of compounds 1-13 were evaluated in terms of their peroxyl radical-scavenging (trolox equivalent, TE) and reducing capacities. All isolates showed peroxyl radical-scavenging and reducing activities at concentrations of 1.0 and 10.0 μM. Anti-osteoporotic activities were investigated using murine osteoclastic RAW 264.7 cells. Compounds 1-7 and 9-12 significantly suppressed tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity down to 91.13 ± 1.18 to 42.39 ± 1.11%, relative to the control (100%) in nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANκL)-induced osteoclastic RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. PMID:25724283

  12. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of pigment echinochrome A from sea urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Pronto, Julius Ryan D; Sarankhuu, Bolor-Erdene; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P; Fedoreyev, Sergey A; Stonik, Valentin A; Han, Jin

    2014-06-01

    Echinochrome A (EchA) is a dark-red pigment of the polyhydroxynaphthoquinone class isolated from sea urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are used in the treatment of various neuromuscular disorders, and are considered as strong therapeutic agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although EchA is clinically used to treat ophthalmic diseases and limit infarct formation during ischemia/ reperfusion injury, anti-AChE effect of EchA is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-AChE effect of EchA in vitro. EchA and its exhausted form which lost anti-oxidant capacity did not show any significant cytotoxicy on the H9c2 and A7r5 cells. EchA inhibited AChE with an irreversible and uncompetitive mode. In addition, EchA showed reactive oxygen species scavenging activity, particularly with nitric oxide. These findings indicate new therapeutic potential for EchA in treating reduced acetylcholine-related diseases including AD and provide an insight into developing new AChE inhibitors. PMID:24918454

  13. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity of Pigment Echinochrome A from Sea Urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Pronto, Julius Ryan D.; Sarankhuu, Bolor-Erdene; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (EchA) is a dark-red pigment of the polyhydroxynaphthoquinone class isolated from sea urchin Scaphechinus mirabilis. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are used in the treatment of various neuromuscular disorders, and are considered as strong therapeutic agents for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although EchA is clinically used to treat ophthalmic diseases and limit infarct formation during ischemia/reperfusion injury, anti-AChE effect of EchA is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the anti-AChE effect of EchA in vitro. EchA and its exhausted form which lost anti-oxidant capacity did not show any significant cytotoxicy on the H9c2 and A7r5 cells. EchA inhibited AChE with an irreversible and uncompetitive mode. In addition, EchA showed reactive oxygen species scavenging activity, particularly with nitric oxide. These findings indicate new therapeutic potential for EchA in treating reduced acetylcholine-related diseases including AD and provide an insight into developing new AChE inhibitors. PMID:24918454

  14. Isolation and characterization of bioactive components from Mirabilis jalapaL.radix.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Jyotchna; Nakhuru, Khonamai Sewa; Policegoudra, Rudragoud S; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to isolate and characterize bioactive components from Mirabilis jalapa L. radix ( z? m l g?n). Thin-layer chromatography was used for the separation of spots from fractions of the crude extract. Separated spots were collected for identification of their activities. Free-radical scavenging activity was evaluated by spraying thin-layer chromatography plates (spotted with fractions) with 0.2% of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl solution. Activity against human pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were determined using the agar diffusion method. Potential spots were subjected to infrared (IR) analysis and gas chromatography for characterization. Two spots (5F1 and 1F3) showed free-radical scavenging activity. The 1F3 spot was active against both S.aureus and C.albicans, whereas the 5F1 spot was active against S.aureus only. IR spectral analysis indicated that 5F1 spot to be a triterpenoid. Using IR spectral analysis and an IR library search, the 1F3 spot was identified to be a flavone, which may have a hydroxyl group in ring "A" of the flavone nucleus. Our results indicated that the 1F3 and 5F1 spots are potential free-radical scavengers. Both 1F3 and 5F1 exhibited antimicrobial activity. IR spectral analysis coupled with an IR library search indicated 1F3 and 5F1 to be a flavone and a triterpenoid, respectively. PMID:26870679

  15. Perineural infiltrates in Pseudomonas keratitis.

    PubMed

    Robbie, Scott J; Vega, Felipe A; Tint, Naing L; Hau, Scott; Allan, Bruce

    2013-11-01

    We describe 2 cases of contact lens-related microbial keratitis caused by infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in which perineural infiltrates were observed at presentation. In both cases, examination by confocal microscopy was negative for Acanthamoeba cysts but bacterial cultures and microscopy of corneal scrapings were positive for P aeruginosa. Both cases responded rapidly to treatment with topical levofloxacin with no significant long-term sequelae. These observations indicate that perineural infiltrates may occur in Pseudomonas keratitis without underlying Acanthamoeba infection and are, therefore, not pathognomonic of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:24160385

  16. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  17. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely shaped Proteus high-altitude aircraft soars over California's Mojave Desert during a July 1999 flight. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  18. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taking Off from Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely-shaped Proteus high-altitude research aircraft lifts off from the runway at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  19. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  20. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taxiing on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A frontal view of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California in July 1999. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to cruise at altitudes from 59,000 to more than 65,000 feet for up to 18 hours. It was designed and built by Burt Rutan, president of Scaled Composites, Inc., to carry an 18-foot diameter telecommunications antenna system for relay of broadband data over major cities. The design allows for Proteus to be reconfigured at will for a variety of other missions such as atmospheric research, reconnaissance, commercial imaging, and launch of small space satellites. It is designed for extreme reliability and low operating costs, and to operate out of general aviation airports with minimal support. The aircraft consists of an all composite airframe with graphite-epoxy sandwich construction. It has a wingspan of 77 feet 7 inches, expandable to 92 feet with removable wingtips installed. It is 56.3 feet long and 17.6 feet high and weighs 5,900 pounds, empty. Proteus is powered by two Williams-Rolls FJ44-2 turbofan engines developing 2,300 pounds of thrust each.

  1. Molecular changes occurring during acquisition of abscission competence following auxin depletion in Mirabilis jalapa.

    PubMed

    Meir, Shimon; Hunter, Donald A; Chen, Jen-Chih; Halaly, Vita; Reid, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    To understand how auxin regulates sensitivity of abscission zone (AZ) tissues to ethylene, we used a polymerase chain reaction-based subtractive approach to identify gene transcripts in Mirabilis jalapa AZs that changed in abundance during the time the zones became competent to abscise in response to exogenous ethylene. Transcript expression was then examined in leaf and stem AZs over the period they became ethylene competent following indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) depletion either by leaf deblading, treatment with the IAA transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid, or cutting the stem above a node (decapitation). Transcripts down-regulated by deblading/decapitation included Mj-Aux/IAA1 and Mj-Aux/IAA2, encoding Aux/IAA proteins, and three other transcripts showing highest identity to a polygalacturonase inhibitor protein, a beta-expansin, and a beta-tubulin. Application of IAA to the cut end of petioles or stumps inhibited abscission, and prevented the decline in the levels of transcripts in both AZs. Transcripts up-regulated in the AZ following deblading/decapitation or treatment with naphthylphthalamic acid were isolated from plants pretreated with 1-methylcyclopropene before deblading to help select against ethylene-induced genes. Some of the up-regulated transcripts showed identity to proteins associated with ethylene or stress responses, while others did not show homology to known sequences. Sucrose infiltration of stem stumps enhanced abscission following ethylene treatment and also enhanced the induction of some of the up-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate a correlation between acquisition of competence to respond to ethylene in both leaf and stem AZs, and decline in abundance of auxin regulatory gene transcripts. PMID:16778017

  2. Molecular Changes Occurring during Acquisition of Abscission Competence following Auxin Depletion in Mirabilis jalapa1[W

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Shimon; Hunter, Donald A.; Chen, Jen-Chih; Halaly, Vita; Reid, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    To understand how auxin regulates sensitivity of abscission zone (AZ) tissues to ethylene, we used a polymerase chain reaction-based subtractive approach to identify gene transcripts in Mirabilis jalapa AZs that changed in abundance during the time the zones became competent to abscise in response to exogenous ethylene. Transcript expression was then examined in leaf and stem AZs over the period they became ethylene competent following indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) depletion either by leaf deblading, treatment with the IAA transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid, or cutting the stem above a node (decapitation). Transcripts down-regulated by deblading/decapitation included Mj-Aux/IAA1 and Mj-Aux/IAA2, encoding Aux/IAA proteins, and three other transcripts showing highest identity to a polygalacturonase inhibitor protein, a β-expansin, and a β-tubulin. Application of IAA to the cut end of petioles or stumps inhibited abscission, and prevented the decline in the levels of transcripts in both AZs. Transcripts up-regulated in the AZ following deblading/decapitation or treatment with naphthylphthalamic acid were isolated from plants pretreated with 1-methylcyclopropene before deblading to help select against ethylene-induced genes. Some of the up-regulated transcripts showed identity to proteins associated with ethylene or stress responses, while others did not show homology to known sequences. Sucrose infiltration of stem stumps enhanced abscission following ethylene treatment and also enhanced the induction of some of the up-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate a correlation between acquisition of competence to respond to ethylene in both leaf and stem AZs, and decline in abundance of auxin regulatory gene transcripts. PMID:16778017

  3. Isolation and characterization of bioactive components from Mirabilis jalapa L. radix

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Jyotchna; Nakhuru, Khonamai Sewa; Policegoudra, Rudragoud S.; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Rai, Ashok Kumar; Veer, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to isolate and characterize bioactive components from Mirabilis jalapa L. radix (紫茉莉根 zǐ mò lì gēn). Thin-layer chromatography was used for the separation of spots from fractions of the crude extract. Separated spots were collected for identification of their activities. Free-radical scavenging activity was evaluated by spraying thin-layer chromatography plates (spotted with fractions) with 0.2% of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl solution. Activity against human pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were determined using the agar diffusion method. Potential spots were subjected to infrared (IR) analysis and gas chromatography for characterization. Two spots (5F1 and 1F3) showed free-radical scavenging activity. The 1F3 spot was active against both S. aureus and C. albicans, whereas the 5F1 spot was active against S. aureus only. IR spectral analysis indicated that 5F1 spot to be a triterpenoid. Using IR spectral analysis and an IR library search, the 1F3 spot was identified to be a flavone, which may have a hydroxyl group in ring “A” of the flavone nucleus. Our results indicated that the 1F3 and 5F1 spots are potential free-radical scavengers. Both 1F3 and 5F1 exhibited antimicrobial activity. IR spectral analysis coupled with an IR library search indicated 1F3 and 5F1 to be a flavone and a triterpenoid, respectively. PMID:26870679

  4. Transcriptional responses to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal fish Gillichthys mirabilis (Cooper 1864).

    PubMed

    Logan, Cheryl A; Somero, George N

    2010-09-01

    Thermal acclimation (acclimatization) capacity may be critical for determining how successfully an ectotherm can respond to temperature change, and adaptive shifts in gene expression may be pivotal for mediating these acclimatory responses. Using a cDNA microarray, we examined transcriptional profiles in gill tissue of a highly eurythermal goby fish, Gillichthys mirabilis, following 4 wk of acclimation to 9 degrees C, 19 degrees C, or 28 degrees C. Overall, gill transcriptomes were not strikingly different among acclimation groups. Of the 1,607 unique annotated genes on the array, only 150 of these genes (9%) were significantly different in expression among the three acclimation groups (ANOVA, false discovery rate < 0.05). Principal component analysis revealed that 59% of the variation in expression among these genes was described by an expression profile that is upregulated with increasing acclimation temperature. Gene ontology analysis of these genes identified protein biosynthesis, transport, and several metabolic categories as processes showing the greatest change in expression. Our results suggest that energetic costs of macromolecular turnover and membrane-localized transport rise with acclimation temperature. The upregulation of several classes of stress-related proteins, e.g., heat shock proteins, seen in the species' response to acute thermal stress was not observed in the long-term 28 degrees C-acclimated fish. The transcriptional differences found among the acclimation groups thus may reflect an acclimation process that has largely remedied the effects of acute thermal stress and established a new steady-state condition involving changes in relative energy costs for different processes. This pattern of transcriptional alteration in steady-state acclimated fish may be a signature of eurythermy. PMID:20610827

  5. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity (5-8 April 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    As part of the celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Conference "Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity" was held in Golm, near Potsdam, Germany, on April 5-8, 2005. The Conference was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (also known as the Albert Einstein Institute), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2005. Conference participants discussed progress made in theoretical and experimental research during the 100 years since the publication of Einstein's famous papers in 1905, the year which has gone down in history as 'Albert Einstein's ANNUS MIRABILIS'.

  6. Is the blind cave salamander Proteus anguinus equiped for magnetic orientation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquerel, H.; Valet, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The Proteus anguinus is a blind cave salamander which can develop the ability of using the earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. It has been shown that the strength of the geomagnetic field is not strong enough to excite the electroreceptors of these animals through induction mechanism so that the most likely hypothesis is that they would use cristals of magnetite as permanent magnets. We have been looking for evidence of remanent magnetism in several proteus collected from the underground CNRS laboratory at Moulis (France). Because the level of natural remanent magnetization, if any, was too low to be measured with confidence using a 3 axis squid 2G magnetometer (even bringing the animals as close as possible to the sensors), we stepwise remagnetized the samples between 0.2 and 1.2T. Measurements were performed in different parts of three proteus bodies. No significant magnetization was detected in the head, most of the signal being concentrated in the lower body of the animal. Saturation was attained after 0.2T while stepwise demagnetization by alternating field showed that most magnetization was removed after 40 mT (medium destructive field, MDF of about 10 mT), which is typical of magnetite. Independent measurements of clay soils taken from the surrounding immediate environment of the animals reveal a different magnetic signature for saturation, MDF and viscosity. Thus there is no apparent and direct link between food absorbed from their environment and the magnetic remamence of the animals. New experiments are currently in progress to determine whether magnetite is the unique magnetic carrier and also to provide better clue about the magnetic granulometry and its distribution.

  7. Preliminary Analysis of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) with PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Lee, C. H.

    2015-11-30

    The neutron transport code PROTEUS has been used to perform preliminary simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). TREAT is an experimental reactor designed for the testing of nuclear fuels and other materials under transient conditions. It operated from 1959 to 1994, when it was placed on non-operational standby. The restart of TREAT to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s resumption of transient testing is currently underway. Both single assembly and assembly-homogenized full core models have been evaluated. Simulations were performed using a historic set of WIMS-ANL-generated cross-sections as well as a new set of Serpent-generated cross-sections. To support this work, further analyses were also performed using additional codes in order to investigate particular aspects of TREAT modeling. DIF3D and the Monte-Carlo codes MCNP and Serpent were utilized in these studies. MCNP and Serpent were used to evaluate the effect of geometry homogenization on the simulation results and to support code-to-code comparisons. New meshes for the PROTEUS simulations were created using the CUBIT toolkit, with additional meshes generated via conversion of selected DIF3D models to support code-to-code verifications. All current analyses have focused on code-to-code verifications, with additional verification and validation studies planned. The analysis of TREAT with PROTEUS-SN is an ongoing project. This report documents the studies that have been performed thus far, and highlights key challenges to address in future work.

  8. Cytotoxic, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of extracts of the bark of Melia azedarach (China Berry).

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Ahmed, Manzoor; Naz, Sumaira; Ayaz, Musarrat

    2015-01-01

    Nature provides a variety of drugs and medicinal agents derived from plants. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of extracts of Melia azedarach bark with methanol/water (9:1 v/v), chloroform, butanol, hexane, water and ethyl acetate. For the determination of the antimicrobial activities, the agar well diffusion method was employed. Cytotoxicity was studied by brine shrimp lethality assay; antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. The chloroform extract was active against Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis, the ethyl acetate extract had highest antibacterial spectrum against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the n-hexane extract had highest inhibition against E. aerogenes, the aqueous extract showed highest activities against P. mirabilis, the butanol fraction showed highest activities against E. aerogenes and the methanolic extract was highly active against P. mirabilis. PMID:25426766

  9. Proteus - A Mission to Investigate the Origins of Earth’s Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie Claire

    2015-08-01

    We still do not know how water and ingredients necessary for life were delivered to our planet. Comets were long thought to have seeded Earth with water, but new models and measurements have shown that comets may not be the right place to look. A growing number of small volatile-rich worlds in the outer asteroid belt - the main belt comets (MBCs) - have been observed to shed dust tails near perihelion and may hold the key to understanding the origin of inner solar system water.Proteus is a proposed Discovery-class solar system origins mission. Proteus, a 6.5-year mission, launches in 2021 to rendezvous with MBC 238P/Read shortly before it reaches perihelion in early 2028 and remains there for five months during its period of maximum activity. 238P/Read is of special interest because en route we have the opportunity to fly past and characterize its likely parent, asteroid 24 Themis. Proteus addresses five science objectives: (1) to determine where Read’s ices formed; (2) to distinguish whether the ices have a nitrogen isotope signature more like Earth or the outer solar system; (3) to determine at what temperature the ices formed; (4) to determine Read’s physical properties using surface composition and geomorphology, and (5) to determine whether Read’s outgassing emanates from discrete sources or diffuse regions and measure the scattering properties of the outgassed dust.To answer questions about the origin of water, isotopic measurements of MBC volatiles will be made with a new sensitive, precise, highly mature mass spectrometer, measuring isotopic abundances of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as well as the abundances of noble gases. These measurements will be correlated with predictions from two types of models: chemical models which describe the distance-dependent chemistry in the nebula and dynamical models which describe where small bodies were gravitationally scattered during the era of giant-planet migration. Proteus additionally flies two redundant Dawn-like cameras, which will be used to map the surface to characterize Read’s shape, rotation, topography, color, geology and jets and combined with radio science to infer its density.

  10. Proteus: a direct forcing method in the simulations of particulate flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.

    2005-01-01

    A new and efficient direct numerical method for the simulation of particulate flows is introduced. The method combines desired elements of the immersed boundary method, the direct forcing method and the lattice Boltzmann method. Adding a forcing term in the momentum equation enforces the no-slip condition on the boundary of a moving particle. By applying the direct forcing scheme, Proteus eliminates the need for the determination of free parameters, such as the stiffness coefficient in the penalty scheme or the two relaxation parameters in the adaptive-forcing scheme. The method presents a significant improvement over the previously introduced immersed-boundary-lattice-Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) where the forcing term was computed using a penalty method and a user-defined parameter. The method allows the enforcement of the rigid body motion of a particle in a more efficient way. Compared to the "bounce-back" scheme used in the conventional LBM, the direct-forcing method provides a smoother computational boundary for particles and is capable of achieving results at higher Reynolds number flows. By using a set of Lagrangian points to track the boundary of a particle, Proteus eliminates any need for the determination of the boundary nodes that are prescribed by the "bounce-back" scheme at every time step. It also makes computations for particles of irregular shapes simpler and more efficient. Proteus has been developed in two- as well as three-dimensions. This new method has been validated by comparing its results with those from experimental measurements for a single sphere settling in an enclosure under gravity. As a demonstration of the efficiency and capabilities of the present method, the settling of a large number (1232) of spherical particles is simulated in a narrow box under two different boundary conditions. It is found that when the no-slip boundary condition is imposed at the front and rear sides of the box the particles motion is significantly hindered. Under the periodic boundary conditions, the particles move faster. The simulations show that the sedimentation characteristics in a box with periodic boundary conditions at the two sides are very close to those found in the sedimentation of two-dimensional circular particles. In the Greek mythology Proteus is a hero, the son of Poseidon. In addition to his ability to change shapes and take different forms at will, Zeus granted him the power to make correct predictions for the future. One cannot expect better attributes from a numerical code.

  11. Proteus-MOC: A 3D deterministic solver incorporating 2D method of characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.; Lee, C.

    2013-07-01

    A new transport solution methodology was developed by combining the two-dimensional method of characteristics with the discontinuous Galerkin method for the treatment of the axial variable. The method, which can be applied to arbitrary extruded geometries, was implemented in PROTEUS-MOC and includes parallelization in group, angle, plane, and space using a top level GMRES linear algebra solver. Verification tests were performed to show accuracy and stability of the method with the increased number of angular directions and mesh elements. Good scalability with parallelism in angle and axial planes is displayed. (authors)

  12. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Gomila, Margarita; Peña, Arantxa; Mulet, Magdalena; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB, and rpoD) were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA), average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST) and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC). TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies. PMID:26074881

  13. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Y.; Cervantes, C.; Silver, S. )

    1990-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a K{sub m} of 40 {mu}M CrO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells.

  14. Chromium reduction in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Y; Cervantes, C; Silver, S

    1990-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium (chromate) to less-toxic trivalent chromium was studied by using cell suspensions and cell-free supernatant fluids from Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. Chromate reductase activity was associated with soluble protein and not with the membrane fraction. The crude enzyme activity was heat labile and showed a Km of 40 microM CrO4(2-). Neither sulfate nor nitrate affected chromate reduction either in vitro or with intact cells. PMID:2389940

  15. Sodium dependency of active chloride transport across isolated fish skin (Gillichthys mirabilis).

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, W S

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of thiocyanate, ouabain, ion-substituted Ringer solution and electrochemical gradients on Na+ and Cl- transport were examined using the isolated skin of the marine teleost, Gillichthys mirabilis. 2. Bilateral replacement of Na+ with choline in the bathing solutions reduces net Cl- flux by 93%, indicating that active Cl- transport by the skin is Na-dependent. 3. Thiocyanate inhibits short-circuit current with an ED50 of 6.4 x 10(-4)M, and, at 10(-2)M, decreases Cl-efflux, influx, net flux and short-circuit current by 68, 33, 74 and 81%, respectively. 4. Ouabain (10(-5)M) reduces Cl- efflux and net flux by 56 and 86%, respectively, indicating that the Cl- transport requires Na,K-ATPase. 5. Subsequent addition of thiocyanate to ouabain-treated skin reduces Cl- efflux, net flux and short-circuit current, suggesting that the two agents operate at different sites involved in Cl- transport. 6. Unilateral substitution of gluconate for Cl- on the serosal side does not affect Cl- influx, indicating that Cl- passive transport is via Fickean diffusion, not Cl-Cl exchange diffusion. 7. The addition of NaCl to the mucosal side, which mimics the in vivo sea-water condition, increases Cl- influx and transepithelial potential and decreases tissue resistance. The net flux (secretion) of Cl- with hypertonic saline on the mucosal side (0.51 +/- 0.06 muequiv/cm2 . hr) demonstrates that the skin could secrete Cl- in vivo. 8. Na+ fluxes across the skin are passive, as the observed flux ration (efflux/influx) is similar to that predicted by the Ussing-Teorell equation under both closed- and open-circuit conditions. 9. The permeability ratio (PNa:PCl) in approximately 5.4:1.0, indicating that the skin is more permeable to Na+, and that at least part of the serosa-positive transepithelial potential may be a Na+ diffusion potential. 10. The results suggest that Cl- secretion by Gillichthys skin is secondary active transport involving Na,K-ATPase and serosal Na+. PMID:7320911

  16. Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the proteus reactor

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed analysis has been completed for the ThO/sub 2/ and Th-metal axial blanket experiments performed at the Swiss PROTEUS critical facility in order to compare reaction rates and neutron spectra measured in prototypic GCFR configurations with calculated results. The PROTEUS configurations allowed the analysis of infinitely dilute thorium data in a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fast lattice spectrum at core center as well as the analysis of resonance self-shielding effects in the thorium-bearing axial blankets. These comparisons indicate that significant deficiencies still exist in the latest evaluated infinitely dilute thorium data file. Specifically, the analysis showed that the /sup 232/Th capture is underpredicted by ENDF/B-IV data, and the discrepancies are further exaggerated by ENDF/B-V data. On the other hand, ENDF/B-V /sup 232/Th fission data appear to be significantly improved relative to ENDF/B-IV data, while discrepancies are extremely large for the (n,2n) process in both data files. Finally, the (n,n') cross sections for thorium also appear improved in ENDF/B-V, except for a small energy range just above the 50 keV threshold. Therefore, these combined data deficiencies suggest that relatively large uncertainties should be associated with many of the results obtained from recent fast reactor alternate fuel cycle analyses. 38 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Mass mortality in ornamental fish, Cyprinus carpio koi caused by a bacterial pathogen, Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Swaminathan, T Raja; Kumar, Rahul G; Dharmaratnam, Arathi; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2015-09-01

    Moribund koi carp, Cyprinus carpio koi, from a farm with 50% cumulative mortality were sampled with the aim of isolating and detecting the causative agent. Three bacterial species viz., Citrobacter freundii (NSCF-1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (NSKP-1) and Proteus hauseri [genomospecies 3 of Proteus vulgaris Bio group 3] (NSPH-1) were isolated, identified and characterized on the basis of biochemical tests and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene using universal bacterial primers. Challenge experiments with these isolates using healthy koi carp showed that P. hauseri induced identical clinical and pathological states within 3 d of intramuscular injection. The results suggest P. hauseri (NSPH-1) was the causative agent. In phylogenetic analysis, strain NSPH-1 formed a distinct cluster with other P. hauseri reference strains with ≥99% sequence similarity. P. hauseri isolates were found sensitive to Ampicillin, Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin and Cefixime and resistant to Gentamycin, Oxytetracycline, Chloramphenicol, and Kanamycin. The affected fish recovered from the infection after ciprofloxacin treatment. PMID:26028178

  18. Structure of the alanopine-containing O-polysaccharide and serological cross-reactivity of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris HSC 438 classified into a new Proteus serogroup, O76.

    PubMed

    Siwinska, Malgorzata; Shashkov, Alexander S; Kondakova, Anna N; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Zablotni, Agnieszka; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Valueva, Olga A; Zych, Krystyna; Sidorczyk, Zygmunt; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-06-01

    The O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris HSC 438, and the following structure was established by chemical methods and one- and two-dimensional (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: →3)-β-d-Quip4NAlo-(1→3)-α-d-Galp6Ac-(1→6)-α-d-Glcp-(1→3)-α-l-FucpNAc-(1→3)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→, where d-Qui4N stands for 4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-glucose and Alo for N-((S)-1-carboxyethyl)-l-alanine (alanopine); only about half of the Gal residues are O-acetylated. This structure is unique among the Proteus O-polysaccharides, and therefore it is proposed to classify P. vulgaris HSC 438 into a new Proteus serogroup, O76. A serological cross-reactivity of HSC 438 O-antiserum and lipopolysaccharides of some other Proteus serogroups was observed and accounted for by shared epitopes on the O-polysaccharides or lipopolysaccharide core regions, including that associated with d-Qui4NAlo. PMID:23579689

  19. Distribution and evolution of pseudogenes, gene losses, and a gene rearrangement in the plastid genome of the nonphotosynthetic liverwort, Aneura mirabilis (Metzgeriales, Jungermanniopsida).

    PubMed

    Wickett, Norman J; Fan, Yu; Lewis, Paul O; Goffinet, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    The plastid genome sequence of the parasitic liverwort Aneura mirabilis revealed the loss of five chlororespiration (ndh) genes. Additionally, six ndh genes, subunits of photosystem I, photosystem II, and the cytochrome b6f complex were inferred to be pseudogenes. Pseudogenes of cysA, cyst, ccsA, and ycf3, an inversion of psbE and petL, were also detected. The designation of pseudogenes was made using comparisons with the distantly related liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. We sampled several populations of A. mirabilis and its photosynthetic sister groups to correlate functional gene losses with the evolution of a achlorophylly. The gene losses, pseudogenes, or the psbE-petL inversion were never detected in a photosynthetic Aneura but were detected in every population of A. mirabilis. One population of A. mirabilis revealed a unique deletion of 541 bp in the psbE-petL region; another is characterized by a unique deletion of 471 bp in the trnV(UAC)-ndhC region. The ratio of synonymous-to-nonsynonymous substitution rates (omega) was estimated for eight pseudogenes and six ORFs to detect relaxed purifying selection. A significant increase in omega for the nonphotosynthetic liverwort was detected in six pseudogenes. Relaxation purifying selection, determined by a significant increase in omega, was detected for three intact ORFs: psbA, psbM, and rbcL. PMID:18594897

  20. Modeling Multiphase Coastal and Hydraulic Processes in an Interactive Python Environment with the Open Source Proteus Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Ahmadia, A. J.; Bakhtyar, R.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is dominated by multiphase flow processes, due to the importance of capturing water's interaction with soil and air phases. Unfortunately, many different mathematical model formulations are required to model particular processes and scales of interest, and each formulation often requires specialized numerical methods. The Proteus toolkit is a software package for research on models for coastal and hydraulic processes and improvements in numerics, particularly 3D multiphase processes and parallel numerics. The models considered include multiphase flow, shallow water flow, turbulent free surface flow, and various flow-driven processes. We will discuss the objectives of Proteus and recent evolution of the toolkit's design as well as present examples of how it has been used used to construct computational models of multiphase flows for the US Army Corps of Engineers. Proteus is also an open source toolkit authored primarily within the US Army Corps of Engineers, and used, developed, and maintained by a small community of researchers in both theoretical modeling and computational methods research. We will discuss how open source and community development practices have played a role in the creation of Proteus.

  1. Taxonomic characterisation of Proteus terrae sp. nov., a N2O-producing, nitrate-ammonifying soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Augustin, Jürgen; Spröer, Cathrin; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Schumann, Peter; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In the context of studying the influence of N-fertilization on N2 and N2O flux rates in relation to the soil bacterial community composition in fen peat grassland, a group of bacterial strains was isolated that performed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and concomitantly produced N2O. The amount of nitrous oxide produced was influenced by the C/N ratio of the medium. The potential to generate nitrous oxide was increased by higher availability of nitrate-N. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the rpoB gene sequences demonstrated that the investigated isolates belong to the genus Proteus, showing high similarity with the respective type strains of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed differences at the species level. These differences were substantiated by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and several distinct physiological characteristics. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the soil isolates represent a novel species for which the name Proteus terrae sp. nov. (type strain N5/687(T) =DSM 29910(T) =LMG 28659(T)) is proposed. PMID:26437638

  2. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of the stem bark of Cylicodiscus gabunensis (Mimosaceae).

    PubMed

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure B; Kouam, J; Penlap, Beng V; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Fomum, Z T; Etoa, F X

    2006-01-01

    Ethyl acetate (EA) extract of the stem bark of Cylicodiscus gabunensis (CG) was analysed phytochemically and evaluated for its antimicrobial activity against 17 pathogenic species isolated from patient: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Morganella morganii, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter agglomerans, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus feacalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus T, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Flavonoids, saponins, tannins, polyphenols, coumarins, triterpenes and/or sterols and reducing sugars were detected in the (EA) extract of CG. The best MIC and MBC values for the microorganisms sensitive to the extract were 0.00078 and 0.00315 mg/ml respectively. The greater and remarkable antimicrobial activity of the (EA) extract of CG was recorded with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus cereus T. These results provide a rationalization for the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:20162076

  3. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. Genomics of Secondary Metabolism in Pseudomonas spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is a heterogeneous genus of bacteria known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its prolific production of secondary metabolites. The structurally diverse chemical structures produced by Pseudomonas spp. result from biosynthetic processes with unusual features that have revealed no...

  6. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  7. 21 CFR 522.88 - Amoxicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., tracheobronchitis) due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and...

  8. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  9. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  10. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  11. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  12. Bromoalkane-degrading Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    Shochat, E; Hermoni, I; Cohen, Z; Abeliovich, A; Belkin, S

    1993-01-01

    Two Pseudomonas isolates, named ES-1 and ES-2, were shown to possess a wide degradative spectrum for haloalkanes in general and bromoalkanes in particular but did not degrade nonsubstituted alkanes. The utilization of water-insoluble haloalkanes, such as 1-bromooctane, appeared to consist of three phases: (i) extracellular emulsification by a constitutively excreted, broad-spectrum surface-active agent, (ii) dehalogenation by an inducible hydrolytic dehalogenase (possibly periplasmic), and (iii) intracellular degradation of the residual carbon skeleton. Several observations suggest the existence of more than one dehalogenase in strain ES-2. PMID:8517736

  13. Pseudomonas mesophilica infections in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S M; Eng, R H; Forrester, C

    1985-01-01

    Reported here is the case of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lung who had bacteremia involving Pseudomonas mesophilica. Of the common laboratory media tested at 35 degrees C, buffered charcoal yeast extract agar and nutrient agar provided the best growth; however, other media supported growth at lower temperatures. Since blood cultures are routinely subcultured onto chocolate agar and then incubated at 35 degrees C, awareness of the characteristics of P. mesophilica and of the isolation techniques as outlined may enhance the recovery of this and related bacterial species. Images PMID:3980687

  14. Pseudomonas--an opportunistic foe.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    An honest account of some of the lessons learned in how to protect patients, staff, and visitors, against waterborne Pseudomonas aeruginosa by effectively monitoring a large healthcare facility's water supply, identifying potential 'trigger points', harnessing the expertise of a multidisciplinary team, encouraging all staff to 'go the extra mile' preventatively, and above all, 'going beyond compliance', was provided by George McCracken, head of Estates Risk and Environment at the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust--in whose Royal Jubilee Maternity Hospital three young babies died after an outbreak of the bacteraemia in early 2012--at a recent Water Management Society conference. HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, reports. PMID:24516937

  15. Characterization and heterologous expression of a PR-1 protein from traps of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Pauchet, Yannick; Rott, Matthias; Mithöfer, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Carnivorous plants capture and digest prey to obtain additional nutrients. Therefore, different trapping mechanisms were developed in different species. Plants of the genus Nepenthes possess pitfall-traps filled with a digestive fluid, which is secreted by the plants themselves. This pitcher fluid is composed of various enzymes to digest the captured prey. Besides hydrolytic enzymes, defense-related proteins have been identified in the fluid. The present study describes the identification and heterologous expression of a pathogenesis-related protein, NmPR-1, from pitchers of Nepenthes mirabilis with features that are unusual for PR-1 proteins. In particular, it was proven to be highly glycosylated and, furthermore, it exhibited antibacterial instead of antifungal activities. These properties are probably due to the specific environment of the pitcher fluid. PMID:24534104

  16. Differences in protein patterns of gill epithelial cells of the fish Gillichthys mirabilis after osmotic and thermal acclimation.

    PubMed

    Kültz, D; Somero, G N

    1996-01-01

    Different protein patterns in gill epithelium of a euryhaline and eurythermal teleost fish (Gillichthys mirabilis, Family Gobiidae) in response to long-term (2 months) osmotic and thermal acclimation were found for the first time. Gill epithelial cells were isolated to remove extracellular proteins and quantify specialized cell types. Chloride cells were identified on the basis of size (> 10 microns) and bright appearance after [2-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methyl-pyridinium-iodine] staining. Small mitochondria-rich cells were < 5 microns in diameter and showed intermediate fluorescence. Abundance of chloride cells and small mitochondria-rich cells was significantly influenced by osmotic but not thermal acclimation (dilute seawater/25 degrees C: 1.4 +/- 0.2% chloride cells, 11.9 +/- 4.6% small mitochondria-rich cells; seawater/25 degrees C: 2.4 +/- 0.6% chloride cells, 2.2 +/- 1.3% small mitochondria-rich cells; seawater/10 degrees C: 2.9 +/- 0.3% chloride cells, 1.2 +/- 0.7% small mitochondria-rich cells). Pavement cells, identified by low fluorescence and intermediate size (5-10 microns), largely predominated under all conditions (> 85% of cells). Thus, they represented the major protein source in gill epithelium. Differences in protein patterns were detectable using two-dimensional but not one-dimensional electrophoresis. Of 602 proteins identified by charge and molecular weight properties, only two were induced by high temperature (25 degrees C) and three in response to cold acclimation (10 degrees C). Nine proteins were induced in diluted seawater-acclimated fish, whereas no seawater-induced proteins were found. We hypothesize that proteins induced under dilute seawater conditions are important for the function of pavement cells in gills of hyper-osmoregulating G. mirabilis. PMID:8766907

  17. Involvement of myosin VI immunoanalog in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Sobczak, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kłopocka, Wanda; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2008-12-01

    Recently, we found a 130-kDa myosin VI immunoanalog in amoeba, which bound to actin in an ATP-sensitive manner and in migrating amoebae colocalized to filamentous actin and dynamin II-containing vesicular structures. To further characterize this protein, we assessed its involvement in amoeba pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of immunogold-stained cells revealed that, in pinocytotic and phagocytotic amoebae, the myosin VI immunoanalog was visible throughout the cells, including pinocytotic channels and pinocytotic vesicles as well as phagosomes and emerging phagocytic cups. Blocking endogenous protein with anti-porcine myosin VI antibody (introduced into cells by means of microinjection) caused severe defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. In comparison with control cells, the treated amoebae formed ~75% less pinocytotic channels and phagocytosed ~65% less Tetrahymena cells. These data indicate that the myosin VI immunoanalog has an important role in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus (Pal.). PMID:19088799

  18. Insights into copper effect on Proteus hauseri through proteomic and metabolic analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Ye, Chiming; Li, Yuzhe; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2016-02-01

    This is the first-attempt to use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass (LC-MS-MS) in deciphering the effects of copper ion on Proteus hauseri. Total 941 proteins in copper-addition (+Cu) group and 898 proteins in non-copper-addition (-Cu) group were found, which containing 221 and 178 differential proteins in +Cu and -Cu group, respectively. Differential proteins in both groups were defined into 14 groups by their functional classification which transport/membrane function proteins were the major different part between the two groups, which took 19.5% and 7.7%, respectively. The result of BioCyc and KEGG analyses on metabolic pathway indicated that copper could interrupted the pathway of chemotaxis CheY and inhibited the swarming of P. hauseri, which provided a potential in controlling the pathogenicity of this strain. PMID:26194304

  19. The structure of the capsular polysaccharide from a swarming strain of pathogenic Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Guard-Petter, J; Asokan, K; Carlson, R W

    1997-06-20

    The structure was determined for the capsular polysaccharide (CPS) isolated from a swarming strain of Proteus vulgaris, CP2-96, which was obtained from the spleen of an infected mouse. The CPS was extracted from the cell pellet by hot water, precipitated with ethanol, and further purified by gel-permeation chromatography. The structure was established by glycosyl composition and linkage analyses, and by NMR spectroscopy. The sequence of the glycosyl residues was determined by a NOESY experiment. The CPS is composed of a tetrasaccharide repeating unit with the following structure: OAc [symbol: see text] 4 -->4)-beta-D-Glcp-(1-->3)-beta-D-GalpNAc-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1-->4)-al pha- D-GlcpA-(1-->. PMID:9232841

  20. The structure of the core part of Proteus vulgaris OX2 lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, E; Bock, K

    1999-08-15

    The identity of a novel structural component, an open-chain acetalic linkage, in the core part of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Proteus vulgaris serotype OX2 has been determined by extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis of fragments isolated after mild acid hydrolysis of the intact LPS. The open-chain N-acetylgalactosamine fragment is substituted in the 4-position by non-stoichiometric amounts of a beta-galactopyranose residue and the overall structure of the core is as follows: [formula: see text] All sugars except the N-acetylgalactosamine are in the pyranose form, alpha-Hep refers to L-glycero-alpha-D-manno-heptopyranose and alpha-DDHep to D-glycero-alpha-D-manno-heptopyranose. Bold italics indicate non-stoichiometric substituents. PMID:10573861

  1. Structure of an O-acetylated acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O46.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, A V; Senchenkova, S N; Torzewska, A; Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    2000-09-01

    An acidic O-specific polysaccharide was obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O46 and studied by chemical methods (O-deacetylation, sugar and methylation analyses, partial solvolysis) and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Solvolysis of the O-deacetylated polysaccharide with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid resulted in a alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1 --> 3)-D-GlcA disaccharide that demonstrated the usefulness of this reagent for selective cleavage of heteropolysaccharides. The following structure for the polysaccharide was established: --> 4)-alpha-D-Glcp6Ac(1 --> 3)-beta-D-GlcpA4Ac-(1 --> 3)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1 --> 3)-beta-D-GlcpA4Ac-(1 --> where the degree of O-acetylation is approximately 65% at position 6 of Glc and 80-95% at position 4 of GlcA residues. PMID:11028790

  2. A case of disproportionate macrodactyly or a mild form of Proteus syndrome? An interesting case.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Shalimar; Haflah, Nor Hazla Mohd; Sapuan, Jamari; Das, Srijit

    2010-01-01

    We present a 20-year-old Malay male whom we believe has Proteus syndrome, a rare congenital disorder of asymmetrical overgrowth of body tissues. There are fewer than 100 confirmed cases reported worldwide thus the clinical presentation and histopathological findings are of significance. Our patient presented with an overgrown right small finger and subcutaneous purplish pigmentation over his left upper arm and chest since birth. His small finger gradually increased in size. He had no abnormalities in sensation or power. Radiographs revealed a delta shaped middle phalanx of the small finger. His activities of daily living were uninterrupted but he requested debulking surgery for cosmetic reasons. Histopathological examination reported hypertrophic fatty tissue composed of well formed lobules of mature adipocytes interspersed with fibrous elements. PMID:21400985

  3. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  4. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp. (iii... day. (ii) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial dermatitis due to Staphylococcus...

  5. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  6. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  7. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  8. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  9. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  10. [Influence of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. Growth on the Microbial Community and Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degradation in Petroleum Contaminated Saline-alkali Soil].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hai-hua; Cui, Bing-jian; Wu, Shang-hua; Bai, Zhi-hui; Huang, Zhan-bin

    2015-09-01

    In order to explore the effect of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. growth on the structure characteristics of the microbial community and the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the petroleum-contaminated saline-alkali soil, Microbial biomass and species in the rhizosphere soils of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. in the contaminated saline soil were studied with the technology of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis. The results showed that comparing to CK soils without Mirabilis jalapa Linn., the ratio of PLFAs species varied were 71. 4%, 69. 2% and 33. 3% in the spring, summer and autumn season, respectively. In addition, there was distinct difference of the biomasses of the microbial community between the CK and rhizosphere soils and among the difference seasons of growth of Mirabilis jalapa Linn.. Compare to CK soil, the degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) was increased by 47. 6%, 28. 3%, and 18. 9% in spring, summer, and autumn rhizosphere soils, respectively. Correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between TPH degradation and the soil microbial community. 77. 8% of the total soil microbial PLFAs species showed positive correlation to the TPH degradation (the correlation coefficient r > 0), among which, 55. 6% of PLFAs species showed high positive correlation(the correlation coefficient was r≥0. 8). In addition, the relative content of SAT and MONO had high correlation with TPH degradation in the CK sample soils, the corelation coefficient were 0. 92 and 0. 60 respectively; However, the percent of positive correlation was 42. 1% in the rhizosphere soils with 21. 1% of them had high positive correlation. The relative content of TBSAT, MONO and CYCLO had moderate or low correlation in rhizosphere soils, and the correlation coefficient were 0. 56, 0. 50, and 0. 07 respectively. Our study showed that the growth of mirabilis Mirabilis jalapa Linn. had a higher influence on the species and biomass of microbial community in the rhizosphere soils, and the results will provide a basis theory for the research of phytoremediation petroleum contaminated saline soil. PMID:26717712

  11. Regulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wade, Dana S; Calfee, M Worth; Rocha, Edson R; Ling, Elizabeth A; Engstrom, Elana; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients and is a major source of nosocomial infections. This bacterium controls many virulence factors by using two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. The las system is composed of the LasR regulator protein and its cell-to-cell signal, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone, and the rhl system is composed of RhlR and the signal N-butyryl homoserine lactone. A third intercellular signal, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone), also regulates numerous virulence factors. PQS synthesis requires the expression of multiple operons, one of which is pqsABCDE. Previous experiments showed that the transcription of this operon, and therefore PQS production, is negatively regulated by the rhl quorum-sensing system and positively regulated by the las quorum-sensing system and PqsR (also known as MvfR), a LysR-type transcriptional regulator protein. With the use of DNA mobility shift assays and beta-galactosidase reporter fusions, we have studied the regulation of pqsR and its relationship to pqsA, lasR, and rhlR. We show that PqsR binds the promoter of pqsA and that this binding increases dramatically in the presence of PQS, implying that PQS acts as a coinducer for PqsR. We have also mapped the transcriptional start site for pqsR and found that the transcription of pqsR is positively regulated by lasR and negatively regulated by rhlR. These results suggest that a regulatory chain occurs where pqsR is under the control of LasR and RhlR and where PqsR in turn controls pqsABCDE, which is required for the production of PQS. PMID:15968046

  12. Comparison of denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Paracoccus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C.A.; Ingraham, J.L.

    1983-04-01

    A comparision was made of denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Paracoccus denitrificans. Although all three organisms reduced nitrate to dinitrogen gas, they did so at different rates and accumulated different kinds and amounts of intermediates. Their rates of anaerobic growth on nitrate varied about 1.5-fold; concomitant gas production varied more than 8-fold. Cell yields from nitrate varied threefold. Rates of gas production by resting cells incubated with nitrate, nitrite, or nitrous oxide varied 2-, 6-, and 15-fold, respectively, among the three species. The composition of the gas produced also varied markedly: Pseudomonas stutzeri produced only dinitrogen; Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Paracoccus denitrificans produced nitrous oxide as well; and under certain conditions Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced even more nitrous oxide than dinitrogen. Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus dentrificans rapidly reduced nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide and were able to grow anaerobically when any of these nitrogen oxides were present in the medium. Pseudomonas aeruginosa reduced these oxides slowly and was unable to grow anaerobically at the expense of nitrous oxide. Futhermore, nitric and nitrous oxide reduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exceptionally sensitive to inhibition by nitrite. Thus, although it has been well studied physiologically and genetically, Pseudomonas aeruginosa may not be the best species for studying the later steps of the denitrification pathway.

  13. Maltose metabolism of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, A A; Corpe, W A

    1975-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens W uses maltose exclusively by hydrolyzing it to glucose via an inducible alpha-glucosidase (alpha-D-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.20). No evidence for phosphorolytic cleavage or oxidation to maltobionic acid was found in this organism. The alpha-glucosidase was totally intracellular and was most active at pH of 7.0. Induction occurred when cells were incubated with maltotriose or maltose. Induction was rapid and easily detectable within the first 5 min after the addition of the inducer. Glucose and its derivatives did not repress induction. Cells growing on DL-alanine or succinate plus maltose exhibited lower levels of alpha-glucosidase than those grown on maltose alone or maltose plus glucose. Induction required both messenger ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis. PMID:240805

  14. Glyphosate catabolism by Pseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Shinabarger, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The pathway for the degradation of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine) by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 has been determined using metabolic radiolabeling experiments. Radiorespirometry experiments utilizing (3-/sup 14/C) glyphosate revealed that approximately 50-59% of the C3 carbon was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Fractionation of stationary phase cells labeled with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that from 45-47% of the assimilated C3 carbon is distributed to proteins and that amino acids methionine and serine are highly labeled. The nucleic acid bases adenine and guanine received 90% of the C3 label that was incorporated into nucleic acids, and the only pyrimidine base labeled was thymine. Pulse labeling of PG2982 cells with (3-/sup 14/C)glyphosate revealed that (3-/sup 14/C)sarcosine is an intermediate in glyphosate degradation. Examination of crude extracts prepared from PG2982 cells revealed the presence of an enzyme that oxidizes sarcosine to glycine and formaldehyde. These results indicate that the first step in glyphosate degradation by PG2982 is cleavage of the carbon-phosphorus bond, resulting in the release of sarcosine and a phosphate group. The phosphate group is utilized as a source of phosphorus, and the sarcosine is degraded to glycine and formaldehyde. Phosphonate utilization by Pseudomonas sp. PG2982 was investigated. Each of the ten phosphonates tested were utilized as a sole source of phosphorus by PG2982. Representative compounds tested included alkylphosphonates, 1-amino-substituted alkylphosphonates, amino-terminal phosphonates, and an arylphosphonate. PG2982 cultures degraded phenylphosphonate to benzene and produced methane from methylphosphonate. The data indicate that PG2982 is capable of cleaving the carbon-phosphorus bond of several structurally different phosphonates.

  15. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  16. Production of acylated homoserine lactone by a novel marine strain of Proteus vulgaris and inhibition of its swarming by phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Biswa, Pramal; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-10-01

    A marine strain of Proteus vulgaris capable of activating multiple acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter cultures was isolated. The cognate signal molecule was characterized as octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) and its production was observed to be growth dependent, with maximum production (5.675 µg l(-1)) at 24 h growth. The strain exhibited swarming, but its motility was not affected upon addition of pure OHL or culture supernatant. Phytochemicals such as quercitin and berberine chloride inhibited OHL production and reduced swarming. FliA, the predominantly upregulated protein during swarming, was considered as a possible target for these inhibitors, and docking of the two most active and two least active inhibitors to this protein suggested preferential binding of the former set of compounds. Apart from adding new evidence to AHL production in Proteus vulgaris, active inhibitors shortlisted from this study could help in identifying lead compounds to act against this opportunistic pathogen of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25012967

  17. Reductive metabolism of aminoazobenzenes by Pseudomonas cepacia

    SciTech Connect

    Idaka, E.; Ogawa, T.; Horitsu, H.

    1987-07-01

    The authors earlier isolated a few strains of microbes in sludge from the sewage of an azo dye factory which had assimilability to azo dye. Among them, strain 13NA was identified as Pseudomonas cepacia based on Bergey's Manual and was named Pseudomonas cepacia 13NA. A model experiment for continuous treatment of dye waste was also reported. Some strain 13NA specificities for aminoazobenzenes and reductive and acetylating pathways are described in the present study.

  18. Verification of the proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for 2-D/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal, and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent developing pipe flows, and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations, and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, initial conditions, grid size, and grid packing is given for each case.

  19. Verification of the Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for two-dimensional/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent dveloping pipe flows and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, intitial conditions, grid size and grid packing is given for each case.

  20. Metabolic rates, enzyme activities and chemical compositions of some deep-sea pelagic worms, particularly Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuesen, Erik V.; Childress, James J.

    1993-05-01

    Investigations of metabolic rate, enzyme activity and chemical composition were undertaken on two abundant deep-sea pelagic worms: Nectonemertes mirabilis (Nemertea; Hoplonemertinea) and Poeobius meseres (Annelida; Polychaeta). Six other species of worms ( Pelagonemertes brinkmanni (Nemertea) and the following polychaetes: Pelagobia species A, Tomopteris nisseni, Tomopteris pacifica, Tomopteris species A, and Traviopsis lobifera) were captured in smaller numbers and used for comparison in the physiological and biochemical measurements. Polychaete worms had the highest oxygen consumption rates and, along with N. mirabilis, displayed significant size effects on metabolic rate. Poeobius meseres had the lowest rates of oxygen consumption and displayed no significant relationship of oxygen consumption rate to wet weight. No significant effect of size on the activities of citrate synthase, lactate dehydrogenase or pyruvate kinase was observed in P. meseres or N. mirabilis. Lipid content was higher than protein content for all the worms in this study. Carbohydrate was of little significance in these worms and was usually <0.01% of the total weight. Citrate synthase activities of pelagic worms showed excellent correlation with metabolic rates. It appears that polychaete worms as a group have higher metabolic rates than bathypelagic shrimps, copepods and fishes, and may be the animals with the highest metabolic rates in the bathypelagic regions of the world's oceans.

  1. Structural and serological studies on a new acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O32.

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Babicka, D; Grachev, A A; Torzewska, A; Paramonov, N A; Chernyak, A Y; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1998-09-01

    The following structure of the O-specific polysaccharide chain (O-antigen) of the Proteus vulgaris 032 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NOESY and H-detected 1H,13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments: -->2)-alpha-L-RhapI-(1-->2)-alpha-L-RhapII-(1-->4)-beta-D-++ +GalpA(I)-(1-->3)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpA(II)-(1-- >. In addition, an O-acetyl group was detected, which, most probably, is located at position 3 of a part of RhapI residues. Serological studies, using rabbit polyclonal anti-(P. vulgaris 032) serum, homologous and heterologous Proteus O-antigens and related artificial antigens, revealed the importance of an a-D-GalA-associated epitope in manifesting the immunospecificity of P. vulgaris 032 and substantiated serological relationships between the O-antigen studied and those of some other Proteus strains. PMID:9760190

  2. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  3. Development of an intra-molecularly shuffled efficient chimeric plant promoter from plant infecting Mirabilis mosaic virus promoter sequence.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sefali; Sengupta, Soumika; Patro, Sunita; Purohit, Sukumar; Samal, Sabindra K; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2014-01-01

    We developed an efficient chimeric promoter, MUASMSCP, with enhanced activity and salicylic acid (SA)/abscisic acid (ABA) inducibility, incorporating the upstream activation sequence (UAS) of Mirabilis mosaic virus full-length transcript (MUAS, -297 to -38) to the 5' end of Mirabilis mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript (MSCP, -306 to -125) promoter-fragment containing the TATA element. We compared the transient activity of the MUASMSCP promoter in tobacco/Arabidopsis protoplasts and in whole plant (Petunia hybrida) with the same that obtained from CaMV35S and MUAS35SCP promoters individually. The MUASMSCP promoter showed 1.1 and 1.5 times stronger GUS-activities over that obtained from MUAS35SCP and CaMV35S promoters respectively, in tobacco (Xanthi Brad) protoplasts. In transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum, var. Samsun NN), the MUASMSCP promoter showed 1.1 and 2.2 times stronger activities than MUAS35SCP and CaMV35S(2) promoters respectively. We observed a fair correlation between MUASMSCP-, MUAS35SCP- and CaMV35S(2)-driven GUS activities with the corresponding uidA-mRNA level in transgenic plants. X-gluc staining of transgenic germinating seed-sections and whole seedlings also support above findings. Protein-extracts made from tobacco protoplasts expressing GFP and human-IL-24 genes driven individually by the MUASMSCP promoter showed enhanced expression of the reporters compared to that obtained from the CaMV35S promoter. Furthermore, MUASMSCP-driven protoplast-derived human IL-24 showed enhanced cell inhibitory activity in DU-145 prostate cancer cells compared to that obtained from the CaMV35S promoter. We propose chimeric MUASMSCP promoter developed in the study could be useful for strong constitutive expression of transgenes in both plant/animal cells and it may become an efficient substitute for CaMV35S/CaMV35S(2) promoter. PMID:24060830

  4. Sigma factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Eric; Sanschagrin, François; Levesque, Roger C

    2008-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as in most bacterial species, the expression of genes is tightly controlled by a repertoire of transcriptional regulators, particularly the so-called sigma (sigma) factors. The basic understanding of these proteins in bacteria has initially been described in Escherichia coli where seven sigma factors are involved in core RNA polymerase interactions and promoter recognition. Now, 7 years have passed since the completion of the first genome sequence of the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. Information from the genome of P. aeruginosa PAO1 identified 550 transcriptional regulators and 24 putative sigma factors. Of the 24 sigma, 19 were of extracytoplasmic function (ECF). Here, basic knowledge of sigma and ECF proteins was reviewed with particular emphasis on their role in P. aeruginosa global gene regulation. Summarized data are obtained from in silico analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF including rpoD (sigma(70)), RpoH (sigma(32)), RpoF (FliA or sigma(28)), RpoS (sigma(S) or sigma(38)), RpoN (NtrA, sigma(54) or sigma(N)), ECF including AlgU (RpoE or sigma(22)), PvdS, SigX and a collection of uncharacterized sigma ECF, some of which are implicated in iron transport. Coupled to systems biology, identification and functional genomics analysis of P. aeruginosasigma and ECF are expected to provide new means to prevent infection, new targets for antimicrobial therapy, as well as new insights into the infection process. PMID:18070067

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: breaking down barriers.

    PubMed

    Berube, Bryan J; Rangel, Stephanie M; Hauser, Alan R

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved ingenious ways to escape from the lung during pneumonia to cause bacteremia. Unfortunately, the clinical consequences of this spread to the bloodstream are frequently dire. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to breach the lung barrier. We have recently shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired pneumonia, utilizes the type III secretion system effector ExoS to intoxicate pulmonary epithelial cells. Injection of these cells leads to localized disruption of the pulmonary-vascular barrier and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to the bloodstream. We put these data in the context of previous studies to provide a holistic model of P. aeruginosa dissemination from the lung. Finally, we compare P. aeruginosa dissemination to that of other bacteria to highlight the complexity of bacterial pneumonia. Although respiratory pathogens use distinct and intricate strategies to escape from the lungs, a thorough understanding of these processes can lay the foundation for new therapeutic approaches for bacterial pneumonia. PMID:26407972

  6. Biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, many researchers have written numerous articles about microbial biofilms. Biofilm is a complex community of microorganisms and an example of bacterial group behavior. Biofilm is usually considered a sessile mode of life derived from the attached growth of microbes to surfaces, and most biofilms are embedded in self-produced extracellular matrix composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), such as polysaccharides, extracellular DNAs (eDNA), and proteins. Dispersal, a mode of biofilm detachment indicates active mechanisms that cause individual cells to separate from the biofilm and return to planktonic life. Since biofilm cells are cemented and surrounded by EPSs, dispersal is not simple to do and many researchers are now paying more attention to this active detachment process. Unlike other modes of biofilm detachment such as erosion or sloughing, which are generally considered passive processes, dispersal occurs as a result of complex spatial differentiation and molecular events in biofilm cells in response to various environmental cues, and there are many biological reasons that force bacterial cells to disperse from the biofilms. In this review, we mainly focus on the spatial differentiation of biofilm that is a prerequisite for dispersal, as well as environmental cues and molecular events related to the biofilm dispersal. More specifically, we discuss the dispersal-related phenomena and mechanisms observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen and representative model organism for biofilm study. PMID:26832663

  7. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  8. Gene cloning, expression and characterization of novel phytase from Obesumbacterium proteus.

    PubMed

    Zinin, Nickolay V; Serkina, Anna V; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Shevelev, Aleksei B; Sineoky, Sergei P

    2004-07-15

    The gene phyA encoding phytase was isolated from Obesumbacterium proteus genomic library and sequenced. The cleavage site of the PhyA signal peptide was predicted and experimentally proved. The PhyA protein shows maximum identity of 53% and 47% to phosphoanhydride phosphorylase from Yersinia pestis and phytase AppA from Escherichia coli, respectively. Based on protein sequence similarity of PhyA and its homologs, the phytases form a novel subclass of the histidine acid phosphatase family. To characterize properties of the PhyA protein, we expressed the phyA gene in E. coli. The specific activity of the purified recombinant PhyA was 310 U mg(-1) of protein. Recombinant PhyA showed activity at pH values from 1.5 through 6.5 with the optimum at 4.9. The temperature optimum was 40-45 degrees C at pH 4.9. The Km value for sodium phytate was 0.34 mM with a Vmax of 435 U mg(-1). PMID:15251209

  9. [Urinary tract infections and microbiological characteristics of Proteus penneri isolated in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Tsai, W C; Chow, S F

    1987-05-01

    Proteus penneri has been reported to be involved in urinary tract infections and calculi formation. We analyzed 2,265 positive urine cultures from patients hospitalized in Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan and found that 47 patients (2.1%) were infected by P. penneri. Most of the patients were male with age over sixty and had been treated with various kinds of antibiotics. Most of the patient's urine were collected by catheter. They were alkaline (pH 8.0) and contained amorphous phosphate, triple phosphate and protein. All the isolates of P. penneri in Taiwan showed beta-hemolysis and slight swarming on sheep blood agar plate, and exhibited a green color on upper layer of sulfide-indole-motility medium after addition of Kovacs indole reagent. Except for nitrate reduction and N2 production, the biochemical characteristics of the P. penneri isolated in Taiwan were similar to those of P. penneri isolated otherwise. The Taiwan isolates of this organism were highly susceptible to cefotaxime, cefotazidime, cefotizoxime, moxalactam, nalidixic acid; but were resistant to ampicillin, carbenicillin, cefonicid, cefoperazone, ceftriaxone, cephalexin, cephapirin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, oxacillin, piperacillin, tetracycline, tobramycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and cephalothin. PMID:3652782

  10. Naloxone-reversible effect of opioids on pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, J O; Johansson, P

    1979-11-01

    A characteristic feature of induced pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus is the formation of broad channels by invagination of the cell membrane. This process, which requires Ca2+, occurs in response to depolarising cations. High Ca2+ levels reduce pinocytosis induced by cations such as Na+ and Tris+, whereas pinocytosis induced by K+ is less affected by Ca2+ (ref. 4). Agents which interfere with the calcium metabolism of the amoeba will therefore either stimulate or inhibit pinocytosis induced by Na+ (ref. 5). Among the agents which are supposed to reduce Ca2+ influx across cell membranes or otherwise decrease cellular availability of Ca2+ are the opiates and opioid peptides, high doses of which have been reported to affect the amoeba. Accordingly, Met-enkephalin, morphine and codeine potentiate the inhibition of pinocytosis caused by Ca2+-binding agents and reverse the calcium blockade of pinocytosis mediated by caffeine. In this report we show that pinocytosis induced by Na+ or Tris+ is suppressed by beta-endorphin, Metenkephalin and morphine. These effects were abolished or diminished by an opiate receptor antagonist, (-)naloxone, by increasing the Na+ concentration, or by addition of Ca2+. PMID:503190

  11. Laser hazard analysis for airborne AURA (Big Sky variant) Proteus platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the airborne AURA (Big Sky Laser Technology) lidar system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances or ranges from the airborne platform. In order to protect personnel, who may be in the target area and may be subjected to exposures, it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength, calculate the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD), and determine the maximum 'eye-safe' dwell times for various operational altitudes and conditions. It was also necessary to calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (ODmin) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel who may receive hazardous exposures during ground base operations of the airborne AURA laser system (system alignment and calibration).

  12. Penile reconstruction for a case of genital lymphoedema secondary to proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashouri, F; Manners, J; Rees, R

    2011-01-01

    To our knowledge penile lymphoedema secondary to Proteus syndrome has not previously been reported. Hence we report a case of a 16-year-old male who was referred with features of right hemi-hypertrophy and severe lymphoedema affecting his scrotum and penis. He had previously undergone scrotal reduction surgery at the age of 13, but had since developed worsening penile oedema. His main concern was that of cosmetic appearance prior to sexual debut, and he also complained of erectile dysfunction. An MRI confirmed gross oedema of the penile skin, but normal underlying cavernosal structure, and no other anatomical abnormality. Under general anaesthesia, the entire diseased penile skin was excised. Two full thickness skin grafts were harvested from the axillae, and grafted onto the dorsal and ventral penile shaft respectively. A compressive dressing and urinary catheter was applied for 7 days. Follow-up at 4 months confirmed complete graft take with minimal scarring, and the patient was very satisfied with the cosmetic outcome. He had also noticed a recovery in erectile activity, and feels psychologically and physically more prepared for sexual relations. PMID:22084799

  13. Burnup calculations and chemical analysis of irradiated fuel samples studied in LWR-PROTEUS phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, P.; Guenther-Leopold, I.; Berger, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The isotopic compositions of 5 UO{sub 2} samples irradiated in a Swiss PWR power plant, which were investigated in the LWR-PROTEUS Phase II programme, were calculated using the CASMO-4 and BOXER assembly codes. The burnups of the samples range from 50 to 90 MWd/kg. The results for a large number of actinide and fission product nuclides were compared to those of chemical analyses performed using a combination of chromatographic separation and mass spectrometry. A good agreement of calculated and measured concentrations is found for many of the nuclides investigated with both codes. The concentrations of the Pu isotopes are mostly predicted within {+-}10%, the two codes giving quite different results, except for {sup 242}Pu. Relatively significant deviations are found for some isotopes of Cs and Sm, and large discrepancies are observed for Eu and Gd. The overall quality of the predictions by the two codes is comparable, and the deviations from the experimental data do not generally increase with burnup. (authors)

  14. [Effect of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase on the activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 microM) stimulates activity of the contractile vacuole of proteus. The effect of ACh is not mimicked by its analogs which are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), i. e., carbacholine and 5-methylfurmethide. The effect of ACh is not sensitive to the blocking action of M-cholinolytics, atropine and mytolone, but is suppressed by N-cholinolytic, tubocurarine. The inhibitors of AChE, eserine (0.01 microM) and armine (0.1 microM), suppress the effect of ACh on amoeba contractile vacuole. ACh does not affect activation of contractile vacuole induced by arginine-vasopressin (1 microM), but it blocks such effect of opiate receptors agonist, dynorphin A1-13 (0.01 microM). This effect of ACh is also suppressed by the inhibitors of AChE. These results suggest that, in the above-described effects of ACh, AChE acts not as an antagonist, but rather as a synergist. PMID:21870511

  15. A natural phenylpropionate derivative from Mirabilis himalaica inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, LingHu; Zhu, Shunqin; Zhang, Haoxing; Yang, Panpan; Fan, Haixia; Li, Shanlin; Liao, Zhihua; Lan, Xiaozhong; Cui, Hongjuan; Chen, Min

    2014-12-01

    Bioactivity-guided study led to the isolation of a natural phenylpropionate derivative, (E)-3-(4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenyl)-propenoic acid 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl ester from the roots of Mirabilis himalaica. Cellular analysis showed that compound 1 specifically inhibited the cancer cell growth through the S phase arrest. Mechanistically, compound 1 was able to induce the apoptosis in HepG2 cells through mitochondrial apoptosis pathway in which Bcl-2 and p53 were required. Interestingly, the cellular phenotype of compound 1 were shown specifically in cancer cells originated from hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) while compromised influence by compound 1 were detected within the normal human liver cells (L-02). Consistently, the in vivo inhibitory effects of compound 1 on tumor growth were validated by the in xenograft administrated with HepG2 cells. Our results provided a novel compound which might serve as a promising candidate and shed light on the therapy of the hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25455489

  16. The effectiveness and risk comparison of EDTA with EGTA in enhancing Cd phytoextraction by Mirabilis jalapa L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Liu, Jianv

    2014-02-01

    In the previous study, Mirabilis jalapa L. had revealed the basic Cd hyperaccumulator characteristics, but the accumulation ability was not as strong as that of other known Cd hyperaccumulators. In order to improve the accumulation ability of this ornamental plant, the chelants were used to activate the Cd in soil. As a substitute, ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl) tetraacetic acid (EGTA) was selected to testify whether it has better effectiveness and can bring lesser metal leaching risk than EDTA. The data showed that the growth of M. jalapa was inhibited, while the Cd concentration of the plant was significantly increased under the treatments containing EDTA or EGTA. The Cd translocation ability under the EGTA treatments was higher than that under the EDTA treatments. The available Cd resulted from the application of chelant EGTA to the contaminated soils can be limited to the top 5 cm, while the application of chelant EDTA to the contaminated soils can be limited to the top 10 cm. In a word, EGTA showed better effectiveness than EDTA in enhancing Cd phytoextraction of M. jalapa. As an ornamental plant, M. jalapa has the potential to be used for phytoextraction of Cd-contaminated soils and it can beautify the environment at the same time. PMID:24068285

  17. Hypoglycemic and Hypolipidemic Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Mirabilis jalapa L. Root on Normal and Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Yin; Zhou, Shi-Wen; Zeng, Sheng-Ya; Zhou, Jian-Yun; Jiang, Ming-Jin; He, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the insulin sensitivity, hypoglycemic, and hypolipidemic activities of ethanolic extract of Mirabilis jalapa L. root (EEM) in normal and diabetic mice. After induction of diabetes with streptozotocin, both normal and diabetic mice were singly or repeatedly for 28 days administrated with EEM at doses of 2, 4, 8 g/kg, respectively. Before induction of diabetes, mice were administrated with EEM at doses of 2, 4, 8 g/kg for 14 days and were injected with streptozotocin and continued on EEM administration for another 28 days. Both after and before induction of diabetes, repeated administration with 4, 8 g/kg EEM continually lowered blood glucose level, decreased serum insulin level and improved insulin sensitivity index, and lowered serum total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and triglyceride content in liver and skeletal muscle, and increased glycogen content in these tissues; but repeated administration had no influence on those indexes of normal mice. Single administration with EEM (4, 8 g/kg) showed hypoglycemic effect in oral glucose tolerance test in normal and diabetic mice. Single administration with EEM had no hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects on normal and diabetic mice. These results suggest that EEM possesses both potential insulin sensitivity, hypoglycemic, and hypolipidemic effects on diabetes. PMID:22474494

  18. Glycerophospholipid synthesis and functions in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Kondakova, Tatiana; D'Heygère, François; Feuilloley, Marc J; Orange, Nicole; Heipieper, Hermann J; Duclairoir Poc, Cécile

    2015-09-01

    The genus Pseudomonas is one of the most heterogeneous groups of eubacteria, presents in all major natural environments and in wide range of associations with plants and animals. The wide distribution of these bacteria is due to the use of specific mechanisms to adapt to environmental modifications. Generally, bacterial adaptation is only considered under the aspect of genes and protein expression, but lipids also play a pivotal role in bacterial functioning and homeostasis. This review resumes the mechanisms and regulations of pseudomonal glycerophospholipid synthesis, and the roles of glycerophospholipids in bacterial metabolism and homeostasis. Recently discovered specific pathways of P. aeruginosa lipid synthesis indicate the lineage dependent mechanisms of fatty acids homeostasis. Pseudomonas glycerophospholipids ensure structure functions and play important roles in bacterial adaptation to environmental modifications. The lipidome of Pseudomonas contains a typical eukaryotic glycerophospholipid--phosphatidylcholine -, which is involved in bacteria-host interactions. The ability of Pseudomonas to exploit eukaryotic lipids shows specific and original strategies developed by these microorganisms to succeed in their infectious process. All compiled data provide the demonstration of the importance of studying the Pseudomonas lipidome to inhibit the infectious potential of these highly versatile germs. PMID:26148574

  19. Meropenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Sumita, Y; Fukasawa, M

    1996-01-01

    Two genetically distinct classes of meropenem-low-susceptibility Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO2152 mutants, which arose spontaneously, were isolated. Two meropenem resistance genes, mpmA and mpmB, were mapped near ilvB/C and proC, respectively, on the P. aeruginosa PAO chromosome. The mpmA was thought to be identical to oprD2 because of the cross-resistance to carbapenems and the association with the loss of the outer membrane protein D2 (OprD2). The mpmB mutation conferred a 4-fold increase in resistance to meropenem, and cross-resistance to various types of antimicrobial agents, e.g. carbenicillin, norfloxacin and chloramphenicol. However, the mpmB mutant was susceptible to imipenem. This mutant still possessed OprD2 and showed increased expression of a 48-kD outer membrane protein, although its profiles of beta-lactamase activity and affinities of penicillin-binding proteins for beta-lactams were indistinguishable from those of the parent strain. The resistance gene mpmB was considered to be an allele of nalB (or cfxB or oprK) from the results of the transductional analysis. The mutation frequency of mpmA:mpmB was in the ratio of 4:1. The same results were obtained in another clinically isolated P. aeruginosa strain. Meropenem resistance caused by both mpmA and mpmB mutations seemed to be due to the reduction in permeability of antibiotics through the outer membrane. These findings suggest a new pathway for the translocation of meropenem other than that mediated by OprD2 across the outer membrane. Thus, meropenem showed about 4- to 8-fold higher activity than imipenem against OprD2-deficient P. aeruginosa. PMID:8751266

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections. PMID:24096885

  1. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    García-Valdés, E; Cozar, E; Rotger, R; Lalucat, J; Ursing, J

    1988-01-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridization demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons. Images PMID:3202629

  2. Specific gonadotropin binding to Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Richert, N D; Ryan, R J

    1977-03-01

    Binding of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin to Pseudomonas maltophilia is dependent on time, temperature, and pH and the binding to this procaryotic species is hormone-specific and saturable. The equilibrium dissociation constant is 2.3 X 10(-9) M. There are no cooperative interactions between binding sites (Hill coefficient, 1.05). The number of sites is estimaated as 240 fmol/100 mug of protein. NaCl and KCl, at concentrations from 1 to 10 mM, have no effect on binding. Divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+) and 1 mM EDTA inhibit hormone binding. Binding is destroyed by heat or by treatment with Pronase of alpha-chymotrypsin and is increased by phospholipase C. Binding of the labeled gonadotropin is not observed with other gram-negative organisms--e.g., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas testosteroni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, or Enterobacter cloacae. PMID:265583

  3. New naphthalene-degrading marine Pseudomonas strains

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Valdes, E.; Cozar, E.; Rotger, R. Lalucat, J. ); Ursing, J. )

    1988-10-01

    Over 100 strains that utilized naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source were isolated from samples of marine sediments taken from a heavily polluted area. The isolates were characterized taxonomically and physiologically. Most of these strains belonged to the genus Pseudomonas, and seven of them did not fit any previous taxonomic description. They differed from type strains in a few biochemical characteristics and in the utilization of aromatic compounds. None had catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activity, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase was responsible for the aromatic ring cleavage. DNA hybridizations demonstrated a close relationship between two isolates and the Pseudomonas stutzeri type strain, and between five isolates and the Pseudomonas testosteroni type strain. On the basis of nutritional and enzymatic characteristics, it was assumed that the seven isolates represent new biovars belonging to the species P. testosteroni and P. stutzeri that are able to degrade aromatic hydrocarbons.

  4. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  5. Multiple origins and incursions of the Atlantic barnacle Chthamalus proteus in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zardus, John D; Hadfield, Michael G

    2005-10-01

    Chthamalus proteus, a barnacle native to the Caribbean and western Atlantic, was introduced to the Pacific within the last few decades. Using direct sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (COI), we characterized genetic variation in native and introduced populations and searched for genetic matches between regions to determine if there were multiple geographical sources and introduction points for this barnacle. In the native range, we found great genetic differences among populations (max. F(ST) = 0.613) encompassing four lineages: one endemic to Panama, one endemic to Brazil, and two occurring Caribbean-wide. All four lineages were represented in the Pacific, but not equally; the Brazilian lineage was most prevalent and the Panamanian least common. Twenty-one individuals spread among nearly every island from where the barnacle is known in the Pacific, exactly matched six haplotypes scattered among Curaçao, the Netherlands Antilles; St John, US Virgin Islands; Puerto Rico; and Brazil, confirming a multigeographical origin for the Pacific populations. Significant genetic differences were also found in introduced populations from the Hawaiian Islands (F(CT) = 0.043, P < 0.001), indicating introduction events have occurred at more than one locality. However, the sequence, timing and number of arrival events remains unknown. Possible reasons for limited transport of this barnacle through the Panama Canal are discussed. This and a preponderance of Brazilian-type individuals in the Pacific suggest an unexpected route of entry from around Cape Horn, South America. Unification in the Pacific of historically divergent lineages of this barnacle raises the possibility for selection of 'hybrids' with novel ecological adaptations in its new environment. PMID:16202091

  6. Dynamics of hybrid amoeba proteus containing zoochlorellae studied using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-H.; Fong, B. A.; Alfano, S. A., Jr.; Rakhlin, I.; Wang, W. B.; Ni, X. H.; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R. C.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    The microinjection of organelles, plants, particles or chemical solutions into Amoeba proteus coupled with spectroscopic analysis and observed for a period of time provides a unique new model for cancer treatment and studies. The amoeba is a eukaryote having many similar features of mammalian cells. The amoeba biochemical functions monitored spectroscopically can provide time sequence in vivo information about many metabolic transitions and metabolic exchanges between cellar organelles and substances microinjected into the amoeba. It is possible to microinject algae, plant mitochondria, drugs or carcinogenic solutions followed by recording the native fluorescence spectra of these composites. This model can be used to spectroscopically monitor the pre-metabolic transitions in developing diseased cells such as a cancer. Knowing specific metabolic transitions could offer solutions to inhibit cancer or reverse it as well as many other diseases. In the present study a simple experiment was designed to test the feasibility of this unique new model by injecting algae and chloroplasts into amoeba. The nonradiative dynamics found from these composites are evidence in terms of the emission ratios between the intensities at 337nm and 419nm; and 684nm bands. There were reductions in the metabolic and photosynthetic processes in amoebae that were microinjected with chloroplasts and zoochlorellae as well of those amoebae that ingested the algae and chloroplasts. The changes in the intensity of the emissions of the peaks indicate that the zoochlorellae lived in the amoebae for ten days. Spectral changes in intensity under the UV and 633nm wavelength excitation are from the energy transfer of DNA and RNA, protein-bound chromophores and chlorophylls present in zoochlorellae undergoing photosynthesis. The fluorescence spectroscopic probes established the biochemical interplay between the cell organelles and the algae present in the cell cytoplasm. This hybrid state is indicative that a symbiotic system is in place and the results definitely support the potential use of this unique new model. This model many help in plant / animal and cancer processes.

  7. Lack of mutation-histopathology correlation in a patient with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Meggie E; Bloomhardt, Hadley M; Moroz, Krzysztof; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2016-06-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is characterized by progressive, disproportionate, segmental overgrowth, and tumor susceptibility caused by a somatic mosaic AKT1 activating mutation. Each individual has unique manifestations making this disorder extremely heterogeneous. We correlated three variables in 38 tissue samples from a patient who died with PS: the gross affection status, the microscopic affection status, and the mutation level. The AKT1 mutation was measured using a PCR-based RFLP assay. Thirteen samples were grossly normal; six had detectable mutation (2-29%) although four of these six were histopathologically normal. Of the seven grossly normal samples that had no mutation, only four were histologically normal. The mutation level in the grossly abnormal samples was 3-35% and all but the right and left kidneys, skull, and left knee bone, with mutation levels of 19%, 15%, 26%, and 17%, respectively, had abnormal histopathology. The highest mutation level was in a toe bone sample whereas the lowest levels were in the soft tissue surrounding that toe, and an omental fat nodule. We also show here that PS overgrowth can be caused by cellular proliferation or by extracellular matrix expansion. Additionally, papillary thyroid carcinoma was identified, a tumor not previously associated with PS. We conclude that gross pathology and histopathology correlate poorly with mutation levels in PS, that overgrowth can be mediated by cellular proliferation or extracellular matrix expansion, and that papillary thyroid carcinoma is part of the tumor susceptibility of PS. New methods need to be developed to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlation in mosaic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112325

  8. High potential application in bioremediation of selenate by Proteus hauseri strain QW4

    PubMed Central

    Khalilian, Mohaddeseh; Zolfaghari, Mohammad Reza; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Selenium is essential for biological systems at low concentrations and toxic at higher levels. Heavy metals and metalloids such as selenium are major contaminants in 40% of hazardous waste sites. Thus, bioremediation has been considered as an effective means of cleaning up of selenium-contaminated sites. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 strains were isolated from wastewater samples collected from selenium-contaminated sites in Qom, Iran using the enrichment culture technique. One bacterial strain designated QW4, identified as Proteus hauseri by morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing was studied for its ability to tolerate different concentrations of sodium selenate (100–800 mM). Also, the disk diffusion method was performed to determine resistance to some antibiotics Results: Strain QW4 showed maximum minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to selenate (760 mM). The maximum selenate removal was exhibited at 35 °C, while the removal activity reduced by 30.7% and 37% at 25 °C and 40 °C, respectively. The optimum pH and shaking incubator for removal activity was shown to be 7.0 and 150 rpm, with 60.2% and 60.3%, respectively. This bacterial strain was resistant to some antibiotics. Conclusion: The concentration of toxic sodium selenate (1000 μg/ml) in the supernatant of the bacterial culture medium decreased by 100% after 2 days and the color of the medium changed to red due to the formation of less toxic elemental selenium. Also, our results imply that heavy metal pollution may contribute to increased antibiotic resistance through indirect selection. PMID:26622970

  9. Immediate and long-term galvanotactic responses of Amoeba proteus to dc electric fields.

    PubMed

    Korohoda, W; Mycielska, M; Janda, E; Madeja, Z

    2000-01-01

    The long-term and immediate galvanotactic responses of Amoeba proteus to the direct current electric fields (dcEFs) were studied with the methods of computer-aided image analysis. It was found that in contrast to earlier reports, amoebae continued locomotion towards cathode (the negative pole) for hours and the increase in the field strength in the range 300-600 mV/mm caused the straightening of cell trajectories accompanied by the decreased frequency of the lateral pseudopods formation and lesser change in the speed of cell movement. In the cell regions pointing to the anode, the formation of new pseudopodia was prevented and the higher cEFs strength the more extended were the regions in which formation of new pseudopods was inhibited. Replacement of calcium with magnesium in the extracellular medium reduced the galvanotactic cell responses. Research on the localisation and kinetics of the primary cell responses to the dcEF or to change in its direction revealed that the primary cell responses occurred at the anode oriented cell regions. The cell response to the field reversal appeared to be localised and to take place in less than 1 sec. First the retraction and withdrawal of the anode-directed pseudopodium was observed whereas the uroid (cell tail) moved for 10-40 sec in the original direction before it begun to react to the field reversal. The exposure of amoebae to the dcEFs sensitised them to the reversion in the field direction and induced an acceleration of cell responses. The results presented are difficult to reconcile with the attempt to explain the cell galvanotaxis as a consequence of the membrane protein lateral electrophoresis or electroosmosis. It is suggested that the lateral electrophoresis of ions and the modification of ionic conditions at the vicinity of ion channels may be involved in the induction of fast responses of cells to external dcEFs. PMID:10618163

  10. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Structure Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Pot, Bruno; Cornelis, Pierre; Zizi, Martin; Van Eldere, Johan; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Jennes, Serge; Pitt, Tyrone; De Vos, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    At present there are strong indications that Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibits an epidemic population structure; clinical isolates are indistinguishable from environmental isolates, and they do not exhibit a specific (disease) habitat selection. However, some important issues, such as the worldwide emergence of highly transmissible P. aeruginosa clones among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and the spread and persistence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains in hospital wards with high antibiotic pressure, remain contentious. To further investigate the population structure of P. aeruginosa, eight parameters were analyzed and combined for 328 unrelated isolates, collected over the last 125 years from 69 localities in 30 countries on five continents, from diverse clinical (human and animal) and environmental habitats. The analysed parameters were: i) O serotype, ii) Fluorescent Amplified-Fragment Length Polymorphism (FALFP) pattern, nucleotide sequences of outer membrane protein genes, iii) oprI, iv) oprL, v) oprD, vi) pyoverdine receptor gene profile (fpvA type and fpvB prevalence), and prevalence of vii) exoenzyme genes exoS and exoU and viii) group I pilin glycosyltransferase gene tfpO. These traits were combined and analysed using biological data analysis software and visualized in the form of a minimum spanning tree (MST). We revealed a network of relationships between all analyzed parameters and non-congruence between experiments. At the same time we observed several conserved clones, characterized by an almost identical data set. These observations confirm the nonclonal epidemic population structure of P. aeruginosa, a superficially clonal structure with frequent recombinations, in which occasionally highly successful epidemic clones arise. One of these clones is the renown and widespread MDR serotype O12 clone. On the other hand, we found no evidence for a widespread CF transmissible clone. All but one of the 43 analysed CF strains belonged to a ubiquitous P. aeruginosa core lineage and typically exhibited the exoS+/exoU? genotype and group B oprL and oprD alleles. This is to our knowledge the first report of an MST analysis conducted on a polyphasic data set. PMID:19936230

  12. Structure and serological specificity of a new acidic O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45.

    PubMed

    Bartodziejska, B; Shashkov, A S; Torzewska, A; Grachev, A A; Ziolkowski, A; Paramonov, N A; Rozalski, A; Knirel, Y A

    1999-01-01

    The following structure of the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) of Proteus vulgaris O45 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was established using 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional NOESY and H-detected 1H, 13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence ( HMQC) experiments: [structure: see text text] Immunochemical studies, using rabbit polyclonal anti-P. vulgaris O45 serum and LPS, OPS and Smith-degraded OPS of P. vulgaris O45, showed the importance of beta-D-GlcA in manifesting the serological specificity of the O-antigen studied. PMID:9914495

  13. Structure and promoter/leader deletion analysis of mirabilis mosaic virus (MMV) full-length transcript promoter in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Dey, N; Maiti, I B

    1999-07-01

    A full-length transcript (FLt) promoter fragment was isolated from a genomic clone of mirabilis mosaic virus (MMV), a double-stranded DNA plant pararetrovirus belonging to the caulimovirus family. The boundaries required for maximal promoter expression were defined by 5' and 3' deletion analysis of the MMV promoter fragments coupled to a GUS reporter gene. The expression patterns of these chimeric gene constructs were evaluated both in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants and in protoplast transient expression experiments. A 360 bp FLt promoter fragment (sequence -297 to +63 from the transcription start site) was found sufficient for strong promoter activity. The transcription start site (TSS) of the MMV FLt promoter was determined by primer extension analysis using total RNA isolated from transgenic plants containing a MMV promoter:uidA fusion gene. Analysis of the 5' and 3' deletion constructs showed that an upstream region (sequence -248 to -193 from the transcription start site) is required for the MMV FLt promoter activity along with the as-1, TATA box regions. In addition, a 31 bp sequence (+33 to +63 from the transcription start site) located downstream of a TATA box is also essential for the maximum expression of the MMV FLt promoter. Analysis of transcripts (mRNA) from these chimeric constructs also indicated that the MMV FLt promoter fragment (-297 to +63 from the transcription start site) has the highest promoter activity. In a comparative analysis the MMV FLt promoter showed much greater activity than the CaMV 35S promoter. PMID:10487212

  14. Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. and Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov., isolated from raw cow's milk.

    PubMed

    von Neubeck, M; Huptas, C; Glück, C; Krewinkel, M; Stoeckel, M; Stressler, T; Fischer, L; Hinrichs, J; Scherer, S; Wenning, M

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the microbiota of raw cow's milk and semi-finished milk products yielded seven isolates assigned to the genus Pseudomonas that formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis based on partial rpoD and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The two groups could be differentiated from each other and also from their closest relatives as well as from the type species Pseudomonas aeruginosa by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values within the groups were higher than 97.3 %, whereas similarity values to the closest relatives were 85 % or less. The major cellular lipids of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; the major quinone was Q-9 in both strains, with small amounts of Q-8 in strain WS4917T. The DNA G+C contents of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were 58.08 and 57.30 mol%, respectively. Based on these data, strains WS4917T, WS4995 ( = DSM 29141 = LMG 28434), WS4999, WS5001 and WS5002 should be considered as representatives of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas helleri is strain WS4917T ( = DSM 29165T = LMG 28433T). Strains WS4993T and WS4994 ( = DSM 29140 = LMG 28438) should be recognized as representing a second novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis is strain WS4993T ( = DSM 29166T = LMG 28437T). PMID:26675012

  15. Susceptibility of current clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enteric gram-negative bacilli to amikacin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dámaso, D; Moreno-López, M; Martínez-Beltrán, J; García-Iglesias, M C

    1976-11-01

    The susceptibility of current clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae to amikacin and other aminoglycosides was tested by a standardized disk sensitivity method. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for all 200 isolates tested, and mean MICs were calculated for each of 10 bacterial species. Amikacin proved to be the most effective of six aminoglycosides against nine bacterial species; isolates of Proteus morganii were slightly more sensitive to gentamicin than to amikacin. Whereas 50% of the 200 isolates could be considered resistant to gentamicin (MIC, greater than 16 mug/ml), 94.4% of the 126 enteric gram-negative bacilli and all 74 isolates of P. aeruginosa were sensitive to amikacin. At a concentration of 8 mug/ml, gentamicin inhibited 50% and tobramycin inhibited 67% of the 200 isolates. At 16 mug/ml, amikacin inhibited 96.5% of the 200 isolates; the respective figures for kanamycin, aminosidine, and streptomycin were 28.5%, 26.5%, and 24%. The virtual absence of cross-resistance between amikacin and gentamicin and between amikacin and the other four aminoglycosides was confirmed. PMID:825591

  16. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  17. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus.

    PubMed

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; Garca-Valds, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described. PMID:26919540

  18. ECF Sigma Factor regulation in Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomanads are renowned for their capacity to adapt to diverse environments, a fact that is reflected by the proportion of their genomes dedicated to encoding transcription regulators. Members of the Pseudomonas genus include species that are adapted to pathogenic and symbiotic lifestyles in asso...

  19. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO2 , H2 O, and NH3 . Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides. PMID:26837064

  20. Incidence of exotoxin production by Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Bjorn, M J; Vasil, M L; Sadoff, J C; Iglewski, B H

    1977-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A has been shown to catalyze the transfer of the adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-ribose moiety of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide onto elongation factor 2, resulting in the inhibition of mammalian protein synthesis. The enzymatic activity (ADP-ribosyl [ADPR]-transferase) is thought to account for the toxicity of exotoxin A. The distribution of the expression of exotoxin A within Pseudomonas species was examined. Laboratory strains as well as clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were tested. The production of exotoxin A was determined by assaying for ADPR-transferase activity in dialyzed frozen (-20 degrees C) and thawed cell-free supernatants from 22-h cultures or in 10-fold-concentrated supernatants. In addition, toxin production was detected immunologically using a modified Elek test. Exotoxin A production was detected in approximately 90% of the 111 isolates of P. aeruginosa. In contrast, none of the other species of Pseudomonas examined produced exotoxin A detectable by either ADPR-transferase activity or immunological reactivity. Images PMID:68931

  1. [Macrolides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Guillot, M; Amiour, M; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Paris, C

    2006-10-01

    Long-term low dose azithromycin treatment in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is safe and reduces the decline in lung function, the number of acute exacerbations and improves nutritional status; underlying efficacy mechanisms are multiple and synergistic. PMID:17370396

  2. New Pseudomonas spp. Are Pathogenic to Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Beiki, Farid; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Rahimian, Heshmat; Lalucat, Jorge; García-Valdés, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Five putative novel Pseudomonas species shown to be pathogenic to citrus have been characterized in a screening of 126 Pseudomonas strains isolated from diseased citrus leaves and stems in northern Iran. The 126 strains were studied using a polyphasic approach that included phenotypic characterizations and phylogenetic multilocus sequence analysis. The pathogenicity of these strains against 3 cultivars of citrus is demonstrated in greenhouse and field studies. The strains were initially grouped phenotypically and by their partial rpoD gene sequences into 11 coherent groups in the Pseudomonas fluorescens phylogenetic lineage. Fifty-three strains that are representatives of the 11 groups were selected and analyzed by partial sequencing of their 16S rRNA and gyrB genes. The individual and concatenated partial sequences of the three genes were used to construct the corresponding phylogenetic trees. The majority of the strains were identified at the species level: P. lurida (5 strains), P. monteilii (2 strains), P. moraviensis (1 strain), P. orientalis (16 strains), P. simiae (7 strains), P. syringae (46 strains, distributed phylogenetically in at least 5 pathovars), and P. viridiflava (2 strains). This is the first report of pathogenicity on citrus of P. orientalis, P. simiae, P. lurida, P. moraviensis and P. monteilii strains. The remaining 47 strains that could not be identified at the species level are considered representatives of at least 5 putative novel Pseudomonas species that are not yet described. PMID:26919540

  3. Pseudomonas septicaemia following tribal tatoo marks.

    PubMed

    Mathur, D R; Sahoo, A

    1984-09-01

    It is tradition in Northern Nigeria to make tribal tatoo marks on the face of a newborn, commonly on both sides of the angle of the mouth. A case of fatal septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following such tribal tatoo marks is reported. PMID:6506210

  4. Characterization of a cDNA of peroxiredoxin II responding to hydrogen peroxide and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Park, Miey; Shin, Hae J; Lee, Soo Y; Ahn, Tae I

    2005-01-01

    Phagocytic cells have defense systems against reactive oxygen species generated as the first non-specific defense mechanism against invading pathogens or microorganisms. We cloned a cDNA encoding a 21.69-kDa protein in Amoeba proteus homologous to 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx-Ap). In the disk inhibition assay using H2O2 as an oxidizing agent, Escherichia coli overproducing Prx-Ap showed better viability than did E. coli transformed with pBluescript II SK for control. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) produced against Prx-Ap reacted with a 22.5-kDa protein and several minor proteins. In Western blot analysis, levels of the 22.5-kDa protein in amoebae treated with 2-mM H2O2 for 1 h increased about 2-fold over those in control cells. Immunofluorescence scattered throughout the cytoplasm also increased after H2O2 treatment. In Northern blot analysis using the cDNA as a probe, the level of transcripts also changed with H2O2 treatment. When amoebae were fed with Tetrahymena, the intensity of immunofluorescence increased from 15 min and persisted until 2 h after phagocytosis. These results suggest that the 22.5-kDa protein of A. proteus is a Prx protein and that it has an antioxidant property responding to phagocytosis. PMID:15926998

  5. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  6. Reanalysis of the Gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility Proteus - Spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute which has been employed during the 1970's to study experimentally the physics of the gas-cooled fast reactor. Reaction rate distributions, flux spectrum and reactivity effects have been measured in several configurations featuring PuO2/UO2 fuel, absorbers, large iron shields, and thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasihomogeneously in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. This papers focus on the spectral indices - including fission and capture in 232Th and 237Np - measured in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattices and their predictions with an MCNPX model specially developed for the PROTEUS-GCFR core. Predictions were obtained with JEFF-3.1 and -3.11, ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, and JENDL-3.3 and -4.0. A general good agreement was demonstrated. The ratio of 232Th fission to 239Pu fission, however, was under-predicted by 8.7±2.1% and 6.5±2.1% using ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, respectively. Finally, the capture rates in 237Np tended to be underpredicted by the JEFF and JENDL libraries, although the new cross section in JEFF-3.1.1 slightly improved the 237Np capture to 239Pu fission results (3.4±2.4%).

  7. [Virulence factors in Proteus spp. bacteria isolated from urinary tract infections: their detection and importance].

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    Nosocomial infections associated with biofilm formation have been a serious problem in recent years. Up to 32 % of them are urinary tract infections in patients with long-dwelling catheters. Catheters represent an ideal surface for bacterial adhesion, facilitating easier colonization of the urinary tract. Important pathogens causing these infections are bacteria of the genus Proteus that colonize catheters not only by biofilm formation but also using other virulence factors. Those were developed for survival in the host organism and are also used by bacteria to infect the host or fight the defence mechanisms. The study focused on the following selected virulence factors: swimming, swarming and twitching motility, swarming motility across various types of urinary catheters, biofilm formation in various media, formation of biofilm on catheters, haemolysin and urease production. A total of 102 strains isolated from urinary catheters and 50 strains isolated from stools were analyzed. In twitching motility, a difference between strains isolated from catheters and stools was statistically significant (p = 0.012). In swimming and swarming motility, the difference was not significant (p = 0.074 and p = 0.809, respectively). In motility across various catheter types, a statistically significant difference was found in strains isolated from both catheters and stools (p « 0.01 in both cases). For biofilm formation analyses, BHI and BHI with 4 % glucose were used. In BHI, biofilm was produced by all strains, with 65% of catheter strains and 88 % of strains from stools being strong producers. Similarly, all strains produced biofilm in BHI with 4 % glucose, with strong producers in 94 % and 92 % of strains isolated from catheters and stools, respectively. In formation of biofilm on catheters, there was a statistical difference between strains from catheters and stools (p = 0.00008). All strains isolated from both catheters and stools produced urease; no difference in urease production was statistically significant (p = 0.653). On agar with washed sheep erythrocytes, haemolysin production was not detected in any of the isolated strains. The quantitative method using horse erythrocytes revealed haemolysis production in three strains isolated from catheters. PMID:22052099

  8. Synergistic antibacterial activity between L-norvalyl-L-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid and nocardicin A.

    PubMed Central

    Angehrn, P; Hall, M J; Lloyd, W J; Westmacott, D

    1984-01-01

    The phosphonopeptide L- norvalyl -L-1- aminoethylphosphonic acid [ Nva -Ala(P)] has been studied in combination with 12 beta-lactam antibiotics for activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Nocardicin A was found to give the most potent synergistic combination with Nva -Ala(P). This interaction was widely observed in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in a mouse septicemia model. Synergy was also observed in vitro and in vivo in several other species, including Proteus mirabilis, indole-positive Proteus spp., and Serratia marcescens. The interaction between Nva -Ala(P) and nocardicin A involved a strongly bacteriolytic mechanism. In addition, the individual components were complementary to one another in their action against organisms not showing synergy. These properties resulted in a broad spectrum of activity of the combination Nva -Ala(P) plus nocardicin A when used to treat experimental gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:6428312

  9. Carbapenem-induced endotoxin release in gram-negative bacterial sepsis rat models.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Kobayashi, M; Nadai, M; Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M

    1998-08-01

    The carbapenem-induced endotoxin release was evaluated using experimental models of gram-negative bacterial sepsis in Wistar rats. Infections with Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis resulted in an increase of the plasma endotoxin concentration after treatment with ceftazidime and carbapenems including imipenem, panipenem, meropenem and biapenem. Except for P. aeruginosa, the plasma endotoxin concentrations after carbapenem treatment were significantly lower than those after ceftazidime treatment. It is noteworthy that treatment of P. aeruginosa sepsis with meropenem or biapenem induced significantly more endotoxin release than other carbapenems and the endotoxin concentrations induced by these carbapenems reached those of ceftazidime treatment. The plasma endotoxin concentrations appeared to correlate with the reduction of platelet counts and the elevation of both glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase values. PMID:9753002

  10. 21 CFR 520.88b - Amoxicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary tract (cystitis) caused by S. aureus.... aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., and P. mirabilis; and soft tissues (abscesses, lacerations, and wounds) caused by S....

  11. 21 CFR 520.88b - Amoxicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary tract (cystitis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal tract (bacterial gastroenteritis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis caused by S....

  12. 21 CFR 520.88b - Amoxicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary tract (cystitis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal tract (bacterial gastroenteritis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis caused by S....

  13. 21 CFR 520.88b - Amoxicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary tract (cystitis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal tract (bacterial gastroenteritis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis caused by S....

  14. 21 CFR 520.88b - Amoxicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary tract (cystitis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal tract (bacterial gastroenteritis) caused by S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; bacterial dermatitis caused by S....

  15. The effect of leaf biopesticide Mirabilis jalapa and fungi Metarhizium anisopliae to immune response and mortality of Spodoptera exigua instar IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, A. Irma; Anggraeni, Tjandra

    2014-03-01

    Spodoptera exigua is one of insect causing damage in agriculture sector. This insect can be controlled by a natural biopesticide by combining two agents of biological control, biopesticides Mirabilis jalapa and entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae, considered to be virulent toward a wide range of insects. The objective of research was to determine the effect of biopesticides M. jalapa and fungi M. anisopliae against immune system and mortality of S. exigua. This research used a complete randomized block design with five concentrations Mirabilis jalapa and optimum dose of M. anisopliae. A high dose of M. jalapa (0.8% w/v) is the most effective one to decrease total haemocytes especially granulocyt and plasmatocyt (cellular immune) and decrease the concentration of lectin (humoral immune) from S. exigua (p < 0.05). The combination of M. jalapa (0, 8% w/v) and lethal dose of M. anisopliae 2.59 × 107 spore/ml were significant to increase mortality of S. exigua within 48 hours (p < 0.05).

  16. Ailinella mirabilis gen. n., sp. n. (eucestoda: pseudophyllidea) from Galaxias maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) in the Andean-Patagonian region of Argentina.

    PubMed

    de Pertierra, Alicia A Gil; Semenas, Liliana G

    2006-12-01

    Ailinella gen. n. (Pseudophyllidea: Triaenophoridae) is proposed to accommodate Ailinella mirabilis sp. n. from Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1842), a freshwater fish inhabiting the Andean lakes in Argentinean Patagonia. Ailinella belongs to the Triaenophoridae because it has a marginal genital pore, a follicular vitelline gland, and a ventral uterine pore. The new genus can be distinguished from other triaenophorids by the following combination of characters: a small body size, a low number of proglottides, which are longer than wide, a truncated pyramidal to globular scolex, a rectangular apical disc, presence of the neck, lack of internal longitudinal musculature separating the cortex from the medulla, testes distributed in one central field surrounding the ovary laterally and posteriorly, the vagina predominantly anterior to the cirrus sac, vitelline follicles circum-medullary, the genital pores post-equatorial, a saccate uterus, and operculate eggs. Blade-like spiniform microtriches were present on all tegument surfaces, and tumuli on all surfaces of the scolex and the anterior surface of the neck. Microtriches were characterized according to their size and density, and tumuli according to their size, inter-tumulus distance and density. Ailinella mirabilis is the first cestode described from G. maculatus and the second triaenophorid species recorded from a South American freshwater fish. PMID:17256203

  17. Long-term studies of urease-induced crystallization in human urine.

    PubMed

    Edin-Liljegren, A; Grenabo, L; Hedelin, H; Pettersson, S; Wang, Y H

    1994-07-01

    Urine samples were inoculated with viable Proteus mirabilis or purified Jack bean urease. The subsequent pH increase and crystallization were followed for 2 weeks. Particle formation was detected much earlier and at a lower pH in urines inoculated with Proteus, in which a higher end pH was also reached. The crystal configuration in bacteria and urease inoculated samples was different. Crystal aggregation was also much more pronounced in the Proteus mirabilis inoculated samples. The total precipitation was markedly increased in the Proteus mirabilis inoculated samples. The presence of live Proteus mirabilis thus has a profound influence on urease-induced crystallization in human urine. Despite the formation of rather large crystal aggregates in the Proteus-inoculated urines, no firm aggregates of a "prestone" type were observed. PMID:8201667

  18. Forme fruste of Proteus syndrome: A limited form with bilateral plantar cerebriform collagenomas and varicose veins secondary to a mosaic AKT1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jamie S.; Mortimer, Peter S.; Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Chong, Heung; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Holden, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare disorder of mosaic postnatal overgrowth affecting multiple tissues including bone, soft tissue and skin. It typically presents in early childhood with asymmetric and progressive skeletal overgrowth that leads to severe distortion of the skeleton and disability. The genetic basis has recently been identified as a somatic activating mutation in the AKT1 gene, which encodes an enzyme mediating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Observations We present a 33-year-old man that developed plantar cerebriform collagenomas on the soles of both feet and varicose veins in early childhood, in the absence of any skeletal or other connective tissue abnormality. Although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria for Proteus syndrome, he was found to have the c.49G>A, p.Glu17Lys AKT1 mutation in lesional skin but not in his blood. Conclusions and Relevance To our knowledge, this is the mildest molecularly confirmed patient with Proteus syndrome, occurring in the absence of the characteristic skeletal overgrowth. These findings extend the spectrum of Proteus syndrome pathology and suggest that somatic mutations late in development and restricted in distribution cause subtle clinical presentations that do not meet the published clinical criteria. PMID:24850616

  19. Implementation/validation of a low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence model in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code: Two-dimensional/axisymmetric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation and validation of the Chien low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model in the two dimensional axisymmetric version Proteus, a compressible Navier-Stokes computer code, are presented. The set of k-epsilon equations are solved by marching in time using a coupled alternating direction implicit (ADI) solution procedure with generalized first or second order time differencing. To validate Proteus and the k-epsilon turbulence model, laminar and turbulent computations were done for several benchmark test cases: incompressible fully developed 2-D channel flow; fully developed axisymmetric pipe flow; boundary layer flow over a flat plate; and turbulent Sajben subsonic transonic diffuser flows. Proteus results from these test cases showed good agreement with analytical results and experimental data. Detailed comparisons of both mean flow and turbulent quantities showed that the Chien k-epsilon turbulence model given good results over a wider range of turbulent flow than the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model in the Proteus code with no significant CPU time penalty for more complicated flow cases.

  20. FY2012 summary of tasks completed on PROTEUS-thermal work.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Smith, M.A.

    2012-06-06

    PROTEUS is a suite of the neutronics codes, both old and new, that can be used within the SHARP codes being developed under the NEAMS program. Discussion here is focused on updates and verification and validation activities of the SHARP neutronics code, DeCART, for application to thermal reactor analysis. As part of the development of SHARP tools, the different versions of the DeCART code created for PWR, BWR, and VHTR analysis were integrated. Verification and validation tests for the integrated version were started, and the generation of cross section libraries based on the subgroup method was revisited for the targeted reactor types. The DeCART code has been reorganized in preparation for an efficient integration of the different versions for PWR, BWR, and VHTR analysis. In DeCART, the old-fashioned common blocks and header files have been replaced by advanced memory structures. However, the changing of variable names was minimized in order to limit problems with the code integration. Since the remaining stability problems of DeCART were mostly caused by the CMFD methodology and modules, significant work was performed to determine whether they could be replaced by more stable methods and routines. The cross section library is a key element to obtain accurate solutions. Thus, the procedure for generating cross section libraries was revisited to provide libraries tailored for the targeted reactor types. To improve accuracy in the cross section library, an attempt was made to replace the CENTRM code by the MCNP Monte Carlo code as a tool obtaining reference resonance integrals. The use of the Monte Carlo code allows us to minimize problems or approximations that CENTRM introduces since the accuracy of the subgroup data is limited by that of the reference solutions. The use of MCNP requires an additional set of libraries without resonance cross sections so that reference calculations can be performed for a unit cell in which only one isotope of interest includes resonance cross sections, among the isotopes in the composition. The OECD MHTGR-350 benchmark core was simulated using DeCART as initial focus of the verification/validation efforts. Among the benchmark problems, Exercise 1 of Phase 1 is a steady-state benchmark case for the neutronics calculation for which block-wise cross sections were provided in 26 energy groups. This type of problem was designed for a homogenized geometry solver like DIF3D rather than the high-fidelity code DeCART. Instead of the homogenized block cross sections given in the benchmark, the VHTR-specific 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 library of DeCART was directly used for preliminary calculations. Initial results showed that the multiplication factors of a fuel pin and a fuel block with or without a control rod hole were off by 6, -362, and -183 pcm Dk from comparable MCNP solutions, respectively. The 2-D and 3-D one-third core calculations were also conducted for the all-rods-out (ARO) and all-rods-in (ARI) configurations, producing reasonable results. Figure 1 illustrates the intermediate (1.5 eV - 17 keV) and thermal (below 1.5 eV) group flux distributions. As seen from VHTR cores with annular fuels, the intermediate group fluxes are relatively high in the fuel region, but the thermal group fluxes are higher in the inner and outer graphite reflector regions than in the fuel region. To support the current project, a new three-year I-NERI collaboration involving ANL and KAERI was started in November 2011, focused on performing in-depth verification and validation of high-fidelity multi-physics simulation codes for LWR and VHTR. The work scope includes generating improved cross section libraries for the targeted reactor types, developing benchmark models for verification and validation of the neutronics code with or without thermo-fluid feedback, and performing detailed comparisons of predicted reactor parameters against both Monte Carlo solutions and experimental measurements. The following list summarizes the work conducted so far for PROTEUS-Thermal Tasks: Unification of different versions of DeCART was initiated, and at the same time code modernization was conducted to make code unification efficient; (2) Regeneration of cross section libraries was attempted for the targeted reactor types, and the procedure for generating cross section libraries was updated by replacing CENTRM with MCNP for reference resonance integrals; (3) The MHTGR-350 benchmark core was simulated using DeCART with VHTR-specific 238-group ENDF/B-VII.0 library, and MCNP calculations were performed for comparison; and (4) Benchmark problems for PWR and BWR analysis were prepared for the DeCART verification/validation effort. In the coming months, the work listed above will be completed. Cross section libraries will be generated with optimized group structures for specific reactor types.

  1. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database.

    PubMed

    Winsor, Geoffrey L; Griffiths, Emma J; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Shay, Julie A; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  2. Enhanced annotations and features for comparing thousands of Pseudomonas genomes in the Pseudomonas genome database

    PubMed Central

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Griffiths, Emma J.; Lo, Raymond; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K.; Shay, Julie A.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas Genome Database (http://www.pseudomonas.com) is well known for the application of community-based annotation approaches for producing a high-quality Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome annotation, and facilitating whole-genome comparative analyses with other Pseudomonas strains. To aid analysis of potentially thousands of complete and draft genome assemblies, this database and analysis platform was upgraded to integrate curated genome annotations and isolate metadata with enhanced tools for larger scale comparative analysis and visualization. Manually curated gene annotations are supplemented with improved computational analyses that help identify putative drug targets and vaccine candidates or assist with evolutionary studies by identifying orthologs, pathogen-associated genes and genomic islands. The database schema has been updated to integrate isolate metadata that will facilitate more powerful analysis of genomes across datasets in the future. We continue to place an emphasis on providing high-quality updates to gene annotations through regular review of the scientific literature and using community-based approaches including a major new Pseudomonas community initiative for the assignment of high-quality gene ontology terms to genes. As we further expand from thousands of genomes, we plan to provide enhancements that will aid data visualization and analysis arising from whole-genome comparative studies including more pan-genome and population-based approaches. PMID:26578582

  3. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka; Lengar, Igor; Koberl, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  5. Tryptophan Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S.; Rodriguez, Karien J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been implicated in the pathology of chronic wounds. Both the d and l isoforms of tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on tissue culture plates, with an equimolar ratio of d and l isoforms producing the greatest inhibitory effect. Addition of d-/l-tryptophan to existing biofilms inhibited further biofilm growth and caused partial biofilm disassembly. Tryptophan significantly increased swimming motility, which may be responsible in part for diminished biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. PMID:23318791

  6. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Oguiza, José A; Kiil, Kristoffer; Ussery, David W

    2005-12-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF sigma factor that is an interesting target for future studies because of its potential role in the adaptation of P. syringae to its specialized phytopathogenic lifestyle. PMID:16257528

  7. Using Pseudomonas spp. for Integrated Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Stack, James P

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades as model organisms for biological control of plant disease. Currently, there are three commercial formulations of pseudomonads registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for plant disease suppression, Bio-Save 10 LP, Bio-Save 11 LP, and BlightBan A506. Bio-Save 10 LP and Bio-Save 11 LP, products of Jet Harvest Solutions, Longwood, FL, contain Pseudomonas syringae strains ESC-10 and ESC-11, respectively. These products are applied in packinghouses to prevent postharvest fungal diseases during storage of citrus, pome, stone fruits, and potatoes. BlightBan A506, produced by NuFarm Americas, Burr Ridge, IL, contains P. fluorescens strain A506. BlightBan A506 is applied primarily to pear and apple trees during bloom to suppress the bacterial disease fire blight. Combining BlightBan A506 with the antibiotic streptomycin improves control of fire blight, even in areas with streptomycin-resistant populations of the pathogen. BlightBan A506 also may reduce fruit russet and mild frost injury. These biocontrol products consisting of Pseudomonas spp. provide moderate to excellent efficacy against multiple production constraints, are relatively easy to apply, and they can be integrated with conventional products for disease control. These characteristics will contribute to the adoption of these products by growers and packinghouses. PMID:18944382

  8. Pseudomonas putida Stimulates Primordia on Agaricus bitorquis.

    PubMed

    Colauto, Nelson B; Fermor, Terry R; Eira, Augusto F; Linde, Giani A

    2016-04-01

    Casing layer is one step of Agaricus bisporus cultivation where there is a competitive environment with a high number of microorganisms and diversity interacting with mycelia. It is suggested that a minimal community of these microorganisms would be necessary to stimulate fructification. However, A. bisporus is not able to produce primordia in sterile casing layers or Petri dishes. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize bacterial microbiota of casing layers from A. bisporus cultivation, isolate, identify and characterize the bacteria responsible for the stimulation of primordium and their action mechanism using Agaricus bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Bacterial and Pseudomonas spp. communities of different casing layers of A. bisporus cultivation were collected and quantified. It was concluded that Pseudomonas spp. corresponds to 75-85 % of bacterial population of the casing layers in A. bisporus cultivation and among those 12 % are Pseudomonas putida. Four biochemical assays were used to identify P. putida. In vitro primordium stimulation of living P. putida and non-living bacterial suspensions, after chemical or physical treatments, was tested using A. bitorquis as a primordium stimulation model. Primordium stimulation assay was registered by photographs, and micrographs of vertical cut of primordium were registered by scanning electron microscope. Interaction of living P. putida with A. bitorquis mycelia is capable of stimulating primordial instead of non-living bacterial suspensions. Stimulation of A. bitorquis primordia does not imply or is related to mycelial growth inhibition, but a hierarchical relation of primordium succession and development is suggested. PMID:26742772

  9. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  10. Adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens onto nanophase materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Thomas J.; Tong, Zonghua; Liu, Jin; Banks, M. Katherine

    2005-07-01

    Nanobiotechnology is a growing area of research, primarily due to the potentially numerous applications of new synthetic nanomaterials in engineering/science. Although various definitions have been given for the word 'nanomaterials' by many different experts, the commonly accepted one refers to nanomaterials as those materials which possess grains, particles, fibres, or other constituent components that have one dimension specifically less than 100 nm. In biological applications, most of the research to date has focused on the interactions between mammalian cells and synthetic nanophase surfaces for the creation of better tissue engineering materials. Although mammalian cells have shown a definite positive response to nanophase materials, information on bacterial interactions with nanophase materials remains elusive. For this reason, this study was designed to assess the adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on nanophase compared to conventional grain size alumina substrates. Results provide the first evidence of increased adhesion of Pseudomonas fluorescens on alumina with nanometre compared to conventional grain sizes. To understand more about the process, polymer (specifically, poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid or PLGA) casts were made of the conventional and nanostructured alumina surfaces. Results showed similar increased Pseudomonas fluorescens capture on PLGA casts of nanostructured compared to conventional alumina as on the alumina itself. For these reasons, a key material property shown to enhance bacterial adhesion was elucidated in this study for both polymers and ceramics: nanostructured surface features.

  11. Interaction of Pseudomonas Bacteriophage 2 with the Slime Polysaccharide and Lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain BI

    PubMed Central

    Bartell, Pasquale F.; Orr, Thomas E.; Reese, John F.; Imaeda, Tamotsu

    1971-01-01

    Purified slime polysaccharide B and lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BI were shown to possess receptor-like properties in inactivating Pseudomonas phage 2, whereas lipoprotein and glycopeptide fractions were devoid of activity. On a weight basis, slime polysaccharide B was more effective than lipopolysaccharide in inactivating phage. The specificity of the reaction with slime polysaccharide B was indicated by the fact that slime polysaccharide A of P. aeruginosa strain EI failed to inactivate phage 2. Electron micrographs showed phage 2 in typical, tail-first position of attachment on intact cells of strain BI, slime polysaccharide B, and lipopolysaccharide. Tail fibers were discernible during phage attachment. Images PMID:4107541

  12. A comparative study of nemertean complete mitochondrial genomes, including two new ones for Nectonemertes cf. mirabilis and Zygeupolia rubens, may elucidate the fundamental pattern for the phylum Nemertea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome is important for studying genome evolution as well as reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been reported for more than 2200 metazoans, mainly vertebrates and arthropods. To date, from a total of about 1275 described nemertean species, only three complete and two partial mitochondrial DNA sequences from nemerteans have been published. Here, we report the entire mitochondrial genomes for two more nemertean species: Nectonemertes cf. mirabilis and Zygeupolia rubens. Results The sizes of the entire mitochondrial genomes are 15365 bp for N. cf. mirabilis and 15513 bp for Z. rubens. Each circular genome contains 37 genes and an AT-rich non-coding region, and overall nucleotide composition is AT-rich. In both species, there is significant strand asymmetry in the distribution of nucleotides, with the coding strand being richer in T than A and in G than C. The AT-rich non-coding regions of the two genomes have some repeat sequences and stem-loop structures, both of which may be associated with the initiation of replication or transcription. The 22 tRNAs show variable substitution patterns in nemerteans, with higher sequence conservation in genes located on the H strand. Gene arrangement of N. cf. mirabilis is identical to that of Paranemertes cf. peregrina, both of which are Hoplonemertea, while that of Z. rubens is the same as in Lineus viridis, both of which are Heteronemertea. Comparison of the gene arrangements and phylogenomic analysis based on concatenated nucleotide sequences of the 12 mitochondrial protein-coding genes revealed that species with closer relationships share more identical gene blocks. Conclusion The two new mitochondrial genomes share many features, including gene contents, with other known nemertean mitochondrial genomes. The tRNA families display a composite substitution pathway. Gene order comparison to the proposed ground pattern of Bilateria and some lophotrochozoans suggests that the nemertean ancestral mitochondrial gene order most closely resembles the heteronemertean type. Phylogenetic analysis proposes a sister-group relationship between Hetero- and Hoplonemertea, which supports one of two recent alternative hypotheses of nemertean phylogeny. PMID:22507536

  13. Characterization of an Unusual Strain of Proteus rettgeri Associated with an Outbreak of Nosocomial Urinary-Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Traub, W. H.; Craddock, M. E.; Raymond, E. A.; Fox, M.; McCall, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    An outbreak of nosocomial urinary-tract infection was caused by a strain of Proteus rettgeri that fermented lactose overnight and was resistant to all antimicrobial drugs tested. The nonmotile isolates shared an O (somatic) antigen that differed from those of wild-type P. rettgeri. The organisms proved markedly serum-sensitive. In rats, the isolates elicited an acute interstitial nephritis with associated transient bacteriuria. Attempts to transfer the lac+ trait and drug-resistance markers to recipient strains of Escherichia coli K-12 failed; exposure of the isolates to acridine orange yielded small numbers of non-lactose-fermenting variants which, however, were still as drug-resistant as before. Epidemiological studies failed to uncover the source of this unique strain and appeared to indicate exogenous spread of infection. PMID:4940869

  14. Within-Pin Reaction Rate Distributions: CASMO-4 and HELIOS Compared Against Tomographic Measurements at the PROTEUS Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchere, C. Pralong; Murphy, M.; Jatuff, F.; Chawla, R.

    2005-05-15

    In the framework of the LWR-PROTEUS project - an extended validation program for advanced light water reactor core analysis tools conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute - the radial, internal variations of the total fission rate (F{sub tot}) and the capture rate in {sup 238}U (C{sub 8}) have been calculated for zero-burnup pins of a Westinghouse SVEA-96+ boiling water reactor fuel assembly using two codes, namely, CASMO-4 and HELIOS. While F{sub tot} distributions predicted by CASMO-4 and HELIOS are in good agreement, C{sub 8} distributions show significant inconsistencies (20 to 30%). The calculations are compared with experimental results obtained using single photon emission computerized tomography for several SVEA-96+ pins irradiated in the zero-power reactor PROTEUS. The comparisons confirm the predicted shape of the F{sub tot} distributions within UO{sub 2} pins and clearly indicate that HELIOS within-pin predictions for C{sub 8} are more reliable than CASMO-4 results. This is important for the derivation of gamma-ray self-absorption corrections when pin-integrated reaction rates are to be determined using the gamma-scanning technique. Thus, the use of CASMO-4-type within-pin distributions would lead to 3 to 4% discrepancies in the absolute, self-absorption-corrected pin-integrated values deduced for C{sub 8} and hence for C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}. For relative C{sub 8} distributions, the discrepancy would be much smaller, namely, up to {approx}1% if pins containing a burnable absorber are involved.

  15. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G.

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  16. The influence of microinjected phalloidin on locomotion, protoplasmic streaming and cytoplasmic organization in Amoeba proteus and Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Stockem, W; Weber, K; Wehland, J

    1978-10-01

    Microinjected phalloidin induces both time and concentration-dependent changes in morphology and motility of amoebae and acellular slime moulds. In A. proteus injection of a 10(-3)M solution of the drug causes a separation of cortical hyaline plasma from central granular plasma. Simultaneously protoplasmic streaming and cellular locomotion are lost irreversibly. Lowering the concentration of phalloidin to 2 x 10(-4)M results in a reversible disturbance; amoebae recover after 30 to 60 minutes and show normal movement. In Ph. polycephalum the injection of a 10(-3)M solution of phalloidin into single veins induces a local gelation of the protoplasm followed by the separation of hyalo- and granuloplasm. In semi-thin and ultrathin sections the hyaline plasma regions contain a fine granular groundplasm rich in ribosomes but free of cellular organelles. The central granular plasma consists mainly of membrane-surrounded cellular compartments. The two morphologically distinct plasma regions are separated by a 0.5 to 1.0 micrometer layer of filamentous material. In A. proteus the filamentous layer is found shortly after phalloidin injection in close proximity to the plasma membrane, and consists of thin 5 to 6 nm filaments. With increasing time this layer contracts, separates from the inner plasma membrane and moves to the interior of the cell. During contraction thicker filaments with diameters of 10 to 30 nm and lengths of 300 to 500 nm are formed. The results indicate that the display and contraction of the phalloidin-induced filament layer can account for the changes observed in cellular movement and cytoplasmic organization. The resulting phenomena i.e. separation of hyaline plasma from granular plasma and changes in both the protoplasmic streaming pattern and locomotory activity of the cells, are discussed in terms of a general understanding of amoeboid movement. PMID:710672

  17. CONSERVATION OF THE RESPONSE REGULATOR GENE GACA IN PSEUDOMONAS SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulator gene gacA influences production of several secondary metabolites in Pseudomonas spp. Primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas spp. were developed and a gacA fragment was sequenced from 10 strains isolated from different plant-associated environments. PCR analysis and Sou...

  18. Genomics of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas spp. are prolific producers of secondary metabolites, and the availability of genomic sequences now opens the door for discovery of novel natural products with potential roles in the ecology and plant growth promoting properties of these bacteria. The rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas f...

  19. Genetic Detection of Pseudomonas spp. in Commercial Amazonian Fish

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Alba; Linde, Ana R.; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Brazilian freshwater fish caught from large drainages like the River Amazon represent a million ton market in expansion, which is of enormous importance for export to other continents as exotic seafood. A guarantee of bacteriological safety is required for international exports that comprise a set of different bacteria but not any Pseudomonas. However, diarrhoea, infections and even septicaemia caused by some Pseudomonas species have been reported, especially in immune-depressed patients. In this work we have employed PCR-based methodology for identifying Pseudomonas species in commercial fish caught from two different areas within the Amazon basin. Most fish caught from the downstream tributary River Tapajòs were contaminated by five different Pseudomonas species. All fish samples obtained from the River Negro tributary (Manaus markets) contained Pseudomonas, but a less diverse community with only two species. The most dangerous Pseudomonas species for human health, P. aeruginosa, was not found and consumption of these fish (from their Pseudomonas content) can be considered safe for healthy consumers. As a precautionary approach we suggest considering Pseudomonas in routine bacteriological surveys of imported seafood. PMID:24065035

  20. The Gac Regulon of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 showed that 702 genes were differentially regulated (FC>4, P<0.0001) in a gacS::Tn5 mutant, with 300 and 402 genes up- and down-regulated, respectively. Similar to the Gac-regulon of four other Pseudomonas species, genes involved in motility, b...

  1. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    PubMed Central

    Michalska, Marta; Wolf, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE) is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells. PMID:26441897

  2. Recombineering using RecET from Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  3. Massetolide A Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens▿

    PubMed Central

    de Bruijn, I.; de Kock, M. J. D.; de Waard, P.; van Beek, T. A.; Raaijmakers, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Massetolide A is a cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotic produced by various Pseudomonas strains from diverse environments. Cloning, sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, and complementation showed that massetolide A biosynthesis in P. fluorescens SS101 is governed by three nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes, designated massA, massB, and massC, spanning approximately 30 kb. Prediction of the nature and configuration of the amino acids by in silico analysis of adenylation and condensation domains of the NRPSs was consistent with the chemically determined structure of the peptide moiety of massetolide A. Structural analysis of massetolide A derivatives produced by SS101 indicated that most of the variations in the peptide moiety occur at amino acid positions 4 and 9. Regions flanking the mass genes contained several genes found in other Pseudomonas CLP biosynthesis clusters, which encode LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, ABC transporters, and an RND-like outer membrane protein. In contrast to most Pseudomonas CLP gene clusters known to date, the mass genes are not physically linked but are organized in two separate clusters, with massA disconnected from massB and massC. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of massC is strongly reduced when massB is mutated, suggesting that these two genes function in an operon, whereas transcription of massA is independent of massBC and vice versa. Massetolide A is produced in the early exponential growth phase, and biosynthesis appears not to be regulated by N-acylhomoserine lactone-based quorum sensing. Massetolide A production is essential in swarming motility of P. fluorescens SS101 and plays an important role in biofilm formation. PMID:17993540

  4. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-02-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs.

  5. Current status of Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccine.

    PubMed

    Michelim, Lessandra; Medeiros, Gregory Saraiva; Zavascki, Alexandre P

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the major pathogens responsible for a wide variety of severe nosocomial and community acquired infections. Numerous vaccine candidates and several monoclonal antibodies have been developed over the past 40 years but only a few have reached clinical trials and none of these vaccine candidates has obtained market authorization. The understanding of P. aeruginosa pathogenesis and its virulence factors is essential in the identification of immunogens that can be used for a P. aeruginosa vaccine. This review summarizes the present status of vaccine development for this important pathogen. PMID:24372247

  6. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable core genome and a highly variable accessory genome. Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection mimicking erythema annulare centrifugum.

    PubMed

    Czechowicz, R T; Warren, L J; Moore, L; Saxon, B

    2001-02-01

    A 3-year-old girl receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukaemia developed a rapidly expanding red annular plaque on her thigh, initially without signs of systemic toxicity or local pain. Subsequently she developed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis and purpura at the leading edge of the plaque. Skin biopsy showed an extensive necrotizing vasculitis with numerous Gram-negative bacilli in the blood vessel walls. In immunocompromised individuals, skin biopsy and culture of cutaneous lesions for bacteria and fungi should be considered even in the absence of signs of systemic toxicity or multiple lesions. PMID:11233725

  8. Binding of germanium of Pseudomonas putida cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klapcinska, B.; Chmielowski, J.

    1986-05-01

    The binding of germanium to Pseudomonas putida ATCC 33015 was investigated by using whole intact cells grown in a medium supplemented with GeO/sub 2/ and catechol or acetate. Electron-microscopic examination of the control and metal-loaded samples revealed that germanium was bound within the cell envelope. A certain number of small electron-dense deposits of the bound element were found in the cytoplasm when the cells were grown in the presence of GeO/sub 2/ and catechol. The study of germanium distribution in cellular fractions revealed that catechol facilitated the intracellular accumulation of this element.

  9. Degradation of bromacil by a Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, G R; Cortez, L

    1988-01-01

    A gram-negative rod, identified as a Pseudomonas sp., was isolated from soil by using bromacil as the sole source of carbon and energy. During growth on bromacil or 5-bromouracil, almost stoichiometric amounts of bromide were released. The bacterium was shown to harbor two plasmids approximately 60 and 100 kilobases in size. They appeared to be associated with the ability to utilize bromacil as a sole source of carbon and also with resistance to ampicillin. This microorganism also showed the potential to decontaminate soil samples fortified with bromacil under laboratory conditions. Images PMID:3056270

  10. Inability of Pseudomonas stutzeri denitrification mutants with the phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to grow in nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.A.; Jeter, R.M.; Carlson, C.A.

    1985-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 reduced nitrous oxide to dinitrogen but did not grow anaerobically in nitrous oxide. Two transposition insertion Nos/sup -/ mutants of Pseudomonas stutzeri exhibited the P. aeruginosa phenotype. Growth yield studies demonstrated that nitrous oxide produced in vivo was productively respired, but nitrous oxide supplied exogenously was not. The defect may be in electron transport or in nitrous oxide uptake.

  11. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOAL-CALIGENES KF707

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. hese results are attributed to differences in the...

  12. Gene cloning and characterization of a novel highly organic solvent tolerant lipase from Proteus sp. SW1 and its application for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Sungkeeree, Pareenart; Thiengmag, Sirinthra; Kerdwong, Jarunee; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Loprasert, Suvit

    2013-01-01

    Proteus sp. SW1 was found to produce an extracellular solvent tolerant lipase. The gene, lipA, encoding a bacterial lipase, was cloned from total Proteus sp. SW1 DNA. lipA was predicted to encode a 287 amino acid protein of 31.2 kDa belonging to the Group I proteobacterial lipases. Purified His-tagged LipA exhibited optimal activity at pH 10.0 and 55°C. It was highly stable in organic solvents retaining 112% of its activity in 100% isopropanol after 24 h, and exhibited more than 200% of its initial activity upon exposure to 60% acetone, ethanol, and hexane for 18 h. Biodiesel synthesis reactions, using a single step addition of 13% an acyl acceptor ethanol, showed that LipA was highly effective at converting palm oil into biodiesel. PMID:22371263

  13. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45 containing 3-acetamido-3,6-dideoxy-D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Bartodziejska, Beata; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Shashkov, Alexander S; Rozalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2003-02-01

    An O-specific polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris O45 and studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, H-detected 1H,13C HSQC and HMBC experiments. The following structure of the pentasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was established:-->6)-alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpNAc-(1-->4)-alpha-D-GalpA-(1-->3)-beta-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->2)-beta-D-Fucp3NAc4Ac-(1-->where Fuc3NAc4Ac is 3-acetamido-4-O-acetyl-3,6-dideoxygalactose. A cross-reactivity of anti-P. vulgaris O45 serum was observed with several other Proteus lipopolysaccharides, which contains Fuc3N derivatives. PMID:12559730

  14. Ethylene glycol metabolism by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Mückschel, Björn; Simon, Oliver; Klebensberger, Janosch; Graf, Nadja; Rosche, Bettina; Altenbuchner, Josef; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin; Hauer, Bernhard

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the metabolism of ethylene glycol in the Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and JM37 by employing growth and bioconversion experiments, directed mutagenesis, and proteome analysis. We found that strain JM37 grew rapidly with ethylene glycol as a sole source of carbon and energy, while strain KT2440 did not grow within 2 days of incubation under the same conditions. However, bioconversion experiments revealed metabolism of ethylene glycol by both strains, with the temporal accumulation of glycolic acid and glyoxylic acid for strain KT2440. This accumulation was further increased by targeted mutagenesis. The key enzymes and specific differences between the two strains were identified by comparative proteomics. In P. putida JM37, tartronate semialdehyde synthase (Gcl), malate synthase (GlcB), and isocitrate lyase (AceA) were found to be induced in the presence of ethylene glycol or glyoxylic acid. Under the same conditions, strain KT2440 showed induction of AceA only. Despite this difference, the two strains were found to use similar periplasmic dehydrogenases for the initial oxidation step of ethylene glycol, namely, the two redundant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent enzymes PedE and PedH. From these results we constructed a new pathway for the metabolism of ethylene glycol in P. putida. Furthermore, we conclude that Pseudomonas putida might serve as a useful platform from which to establish a whole-cell biocatalyst for the production of glyoxylic acid from ethylene glycol. PMID:23023748

  15. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet (UV) analysis, gas chromatography (GC), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0%) and α-terpineol (7.7%) and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5%) and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%), with a total yield of 88.8%. PMID:21609445

  16. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. PMID:27062344

  17. Fragmentation of 23S rRNA in Strains of Proteus and Providencia Results from Intervening Sequences in the rrn (rRNA) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wayne L.; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Sanderson, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    Intervening sequences (IVSs) were originally identified in the rrl genes for 23S rRNA (rrl genes, for large ribosomal subunit, part of rrn operon encoding rRNA) of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium LT2 and Arizonae. These sequences are transcribed but later removed during RNase III processing of the rRNA, resulting in fragmentation of the 23S species; IVSs are uncommon, but have been reported in at least 10 bacterial genera. Through PCR amplification of IVS-containing regions of the rrl genes we showed that most Proteus and Providencia strains contain IVSs similar to those of serovar Typhimurium in distribution and location in rrl genes. By extraction and Northern blotting of rRNA, we also found that these IVSs result in rRNA fragmentation. We report the first finding of two very different sizes of IVS (113 bp and 183 to 187 bp) in different rrl genes in the same strain, in helix 25 of Proteus and Providencia spp.; IVSs from helix 45 are 113 to 123 bp in size. Analysis of IVS sequence and postulated secondary structure reveals striking similarities of Proteus and Providencia IVSs to those of serovar Typhimurium, with the stems of the smaller IVSs from helix 25 being similar to those of Salmonella helix 25 IVSs and with both the stem and the central loop domain of helix 45 IVSs being similar. Thus, IVSs of related sequences are widely distributed throughout the Enterobacteriaceae, in Salmonella, Yersinia, Proteus, and Providencia spp., but we did not find them in Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, or Morganella spp.; the sporadic distribution of IVSs of related sequence indicates that lateral genetic transfer has occurred. PMID:10648538

  18. Heterogeneity of heat-resistant proteases from milk Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Sophie; Vandriesche, Gonzalez; Coorevits, An; Coudijzer, Katleen; De Jonghe, Valerie; Dewettinck, Koen; De Vos, Paul; Devreese, Bart; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Block, Jan

    2009-07-31

    Pseudomonas fragi, Pseudomonas lundensis and members of the Pseudomonas fluorescens group may spoil Ultra High Temperature (UHT) treated milk and dairy products, due to the production of heat-stable proteases in the cold chain of raw milk. Since the aprX gene codes for a heat-resistant protease in P. fluorescens, the presence of this gene has also been investigated in other members of the genus. For this purpose an aprX-screening PCR test has been developed. Twenty-nine representatives of important milk Pseudomonas species and thirty-five reference strains were screened. In 42 out of 55 investigated Pseudomonas strains, the aprX gene was detected, which proves the potential of the aprX-PCR test as a screening tool for potentially proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk samples. An extensive study of the obtained aprX-sequences on the DNA and the amino acid level, however, revealed a large heterogeneity within the investigated milk isolates. Although this heterogeneity sets limitations to a general detection method for all proteolytic Pseudomonas strains in milk, it offers a great potential for the development of a multiplex PCR screening test targeting individual aprX-genes. Furthermore, our data illustrated the potential use of the aprX gene as a taxonomic marker, which may help in resolving the current taxonomic deadlock in the P. fluorescens group. PMID:19481283

  19. Results of the Simulation of the HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 Using PEBBED-COMBINE: FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Gougar

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. This report is a follow-on to INL/EXT-09-16620 in which the same calculation was performed but using earlier versions of the codes and less developed methods. In that report, results indicated that the cross sections generated using COMBINE-7.0 did not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. It was concluded in the report that the modeling of control rods was not satisfactory. In the past year, improvements to the homogenization capability in COMBINE have enabled the explicit modeling of TRIS particles, pebbles, and heterogeneous core zones including control rod regions using a new multi-scale version of COMBINE in which the 1-dimensional discrete ordinate transport code ANISN has been integrated. The new COMBINE is shown to yield benchmark quality results for pebble unit cell models, the first step in preparing few-group diffusion parameters for core simulations. In this report, the full critical core is modeled once again but with cross sections generated using the capabilities and physics of the improved COMBINE code. The new PEBBED-COMBINE model enables the exact modeling of the pebbles and control rod region along with better approximation to structures in the reflector. Initial results for the core multiplication factor indicate significant improvement in the INL’s tools for modeling the neutronic properties of a pebble bed reactor. Errors on the order of 1.6-2.5% in keff are obtained; a significant improvement over the 5-6% error observed in the earlier This is acceptable for a code system and model in the early stages of development but still too high for a production code. Analysis of a simpler core model indicates an over-prediction of the flux in the low end of the thermal spectrum. Causes of this discrepancy are under investigation. New homogenization techniques and assumptions were used in this analysis and as such, they require further confirmation and validation. Further refinement and review of the complex Proteus core model are likely to reduce the errors even further.

  20. Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov., isolated from forest soil.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Flores-Félix, José David; Mulas, Rebeca; Rivas, Raúl; Castro-Pinto, Joao; Brañas, Javier; Mulas, Daniel; González-Andrés, Fernando; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2014-07-01

    A bacterial strain, OHA11(T), was isolated during the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in a forest soil from Salamanca, Spain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain OHA11(T) shared 99.1% similarity with respect to Pseudomonas baetica a390(T), and 98.9% similarity with the type strains of Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas moorei, Pseudomonas umsongensis, Pseudomonas mohnii and Pseudomonas koreensis. The analysis of housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed its phylogenetic affiliation to the genus Pseudomonas and showed similarities lower than 95% in almost all cases with respect to the above species. Cells possessed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, positive for arginine dihydrolase but negative for nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis. It was able to grow at 31 °C and at pH 11. The DNA G+C content was 58.1 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 49% relatedness with respect to the type strains of the seven closest related species. Therefore, the combined genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strain OHA11(T) to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helmanticensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OHA11(T) ( = LMG 28168(T) = CECT 8548(T)). PMID:24744015