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  1. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Our Blog Newsletter Home About Us The PSF Provides Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board International Affiliates Proteus Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift ...

  2. Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dragieva, G; Stahel, H U; Meyer, M; Kempf, W; Häffner, A; Burg, G; Hafner, J

    2003-08-01

    A 34-year-old male patient was referred with a recalcitrant leg ulcer overlying an extensive vascular malformation, which had led several times to septic soft tissue infections. During his infancy he had been diagnosed to have Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. Clinical examination revealed asymmetric hypertrophy of the lower extremities, an extensive portwine stain on the more severely affected left limb as well as prominent venous varicosities of both legs. Hands and feet showed striking cerebriform palmoplantar hypertrophy, and macrodactily with syndactily of several fingers. All toes had been amputated in early childhood due to extreme overgrowth and currently the patient walked on his forefeet in a prominent pes equinus deformity. Further symptoms consisted in several lipomas at both arms, another portwine stain at the left hemithorax and a single café-au-lait spot at the left scapula. Angio-magnetic resonance imaging scans of both legs showed an extensive venous-lymphatic vascular malformation involving the whole subcutis and infiltrating the muscle. The chronic wound was interpreted as venous stasis ulceration. Local percutaneous sclerotherapy of the dilated veins underneath the ulcer was discussed, but considered to carry a relevant risk of skin necrosis with consecutive progression of the wound. A conventional split-skin graft led to complete wound healing. Since, the patient consequently wears custom-made compression stockings and remained free from recurrences. The syndromatic constellation of palmoplantar overgrowth, multiple lipomas, giant fingers and toes, limb overgrowth, venous-lymphatic malformation and a café-au-lait spot led to the diagnosis of Proteus syndrome. The possible aetiology, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and management of this rare disorder are discussed. PMID:14524037

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Proteus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Proteus syndrome Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Human Genome Research Institute: NIH Researchers Identify Gene Variant in Proteus Syndrome (July 27, 2011) National Human Genome Research Institute: Proteus Syndrome: Background Information National Human ...

  4. Proteus at Sunset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  5. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Our Blog Newsletter Home About Us The PSF Provides Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board International Affiliates Proteus Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift ...

  6. Proteus: Mythology to modern times

    PubMed Central

    Sellaturay, Senthy V.; Nair, Raj; Dickinson, Ian K.; Sriprasad, Seshadri

    2012-01-01

    Aims: It is common knowledge that proteus bacteria are associated with urinary tract infections and urinary stones. Far more interesting however, is the derivation of the word proteus. This study examines the origin of the word proteus, its mythological, historical and literary connections and evolution to present-day usage. Materials and Methods: A detailed search for primary and secondary sources was undertaken using the library and internet. Results: Greek mythology describes Proteus as an early sea-god, noted for being versatile and capable of assuming many different forms. In the 8th century BC, the ancient Greek poet, Homer, famous for his epic poems the Iliad and Odyssey, describes Proteus as a prophetic old sea-god, and herdsman of the seals of Poseidon, God of the Sea. Shakespeare re-introduced Proteus into English literature, in the 15th century AD, in the comedy The Two Gentleman of Verona, as one of his main characters who is inconstant with his affections. The ‘elephant man’ was afflicted by a severely disfiguring disease, described as ‘Proteus syndrome’. It is particularly difficult to distinguish from neurofibromatosis, due to its various forms in different individuals. The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word ‘protean’ as to mean changeable, variable, and existing in multiple forms. Proteus bacteria directly derive their name from the Sea God, due to their rapid swarming growth and motility on agar plates. They demonstrate versatility by secreting enzymes, which allow them to evade the host's defense systems. Conclusions: Thus proteus, true to its name, has had a myriad of connotations over the centuries. PMID:23450503

  7. Early Recognition of Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodenbeck, Dorothy L; Greyling, Laura A; Anderson, John H; Davis, Loretta S

    2016-09-01

    Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare mosaic condition characterized by progressive overgrowth of tissues due to a somatic activating mutation of the AKT1 gene. Distinct cutaneous features, including cerebriform connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, vascular malformations, and adipose abnormalities, can alert the dermatologist to the underlying condition before the onset of asymmetric skeletal overgrowth. We present a series of photographs documenting the skin and musculoskeletal changes in a patient with Proteus syndrome over the first 2 years of life to emphasize the key signs that a dermatologist can recognize to facilitate an earlier diagnosis in these patients. PMID:27378680

  8. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  9. Proteus - Geology, shape, and catastrophic destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1992-01-01

    Least-squares fits to the two available limb profiles of Proteus yield a sphericity close to unity; the visual irregularity is due to a degree of surface roughness comparable to that of Hyperion and the smaller icy satellites. A network of streaks that can be interpreted as tectonic troughs cuts the surface of Proteus, and is organized concentrically around either one of the two nearly-coincident Proteus-Neptune of Pharos axes of symmetry. If the streaks are tectonic, they may be due to tidal stresses generated by a past change in Proteus' equilibrium orientation. The streaks may also be disruptive-stress fractures.

  10. Hemispherectomy Procedure in Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, PrastiyaIndra; Lusiana, Lusiana; Saharso, Darto

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proteus syndrome is a rare overgrowth disorder including bone, soft tissue, and skin. Central nervous system manifestations were reported in about 40% of the patients including hemimegalencephaly and the resultant hemicranial hyperplasia, convulsions and mental deficiency. We report a 1-month-old male baby referred to Pediatric Neurology Clinic Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia in 2014 presented recurrent seizures since birth with asymmetric dysmorphic face with the right side larger than the left, subcutaneous mass and linear nevi. Craniocervical MRI revealed hemimegalencephaly right cerebral hemisphere. Triple antiepileptic drugs were already given as well as the ketogenic diet, but the seizures persisted. The seizure then was resolved after hemispherectomy procedure. PMID:27375761

  11. Draft Genome Assemblies of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H E; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Coyne, S R; Chertkov, O; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Jaissle, J; Koroleva, G I; Ladner, J T; Palacios, G F; Redden, C L; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    The pleomorphic swarming bacilli of the genus Proteus are common human gut commensal organisms but also the causative agents of recurrent urinary tract infections and bacteremia. We sequenced and assembled the 3.99-Mbp genome of Proteus mirabilis ATCC 7002 (accession no. JOVJ00000000) and the 3.97-Mbp genome of Proteus vulgaris ATCC 49132 (accession no. JPIX00000000), both of which are commonly used reference strains. PMID:25342681

  12. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-01-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  13. Potential virulence factors of Proteus bacilli.

    PubMed

    Rózalski, A; Sidorczyk, Z; Kotełko, K

    1997-03-01

    The object of this review is the genus Proteus, which contains bacteria considered now to belong to the opportunistic pathogens. Widely distributed in nature (in soil, water, and sewage), Proteus species play a significant ecological role. When present in the niches of higher macroorganisms, these species are able to evoke pathological events in different regions of the human body. The invaders (Proteus mirabilis, P. vulgaris, and P. penneri) have numerous factors including fimbriae, flagella, outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, capsule antigen, urease, immunoglobulin A proteases, hemolysins, amino acid deaminases, and, finally, the most characteristic attribute of Proteus, swarming growth, enabling them to colonize and survive in higher organisms. All these features and factors are described and commented on in detail. The questions important for future investigation of these facultatively pathogenic microorganisms are also discussed. PMID:9106365

  14. Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 as a new representative of the O13 Proteus serogroup.

    PubMed

    Palusiak, Agata; Siwińska, Małgorzata; Zabłotni, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The unique feature of some Proteus O-polysaccharides is occurrence of an amide of galacturonic acid with N(ε)-[(S/R)-1-Carboxyethyl]-L-lysine, GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys). The results of the serological studies presented here, with reference to known O-antigens structures suggest that GalA6(2S,8S/R-AlaLys) or 2S,8R-AlaLys contribute to cross-reactions of O13 Proteus antisera, and Proteeae LPSs. It was also revealed that the Proteus mirabilis RMS 203 strain can be classified into the O13 serogroup, represented so far by two strains: Proteus mirabilis 26/57 and Proteus vulgaris 8344. The O13 LPS is a serologically important antigen with a fragment common to LPSs of different species in the Proteeae tribe. PMID:26645323

  15. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Bui, Trong T.; Cavicchi, Richard H.; Conley, Julianne M.; Molls, Frank B.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. The emphasis in the development of Proteus is not algorithm development or research on numerical methods, but rather the development of the code itself. The objective is to develop codes that are user-oriented, easily-modified, and well-documented. Well-proven, state-of-the-art solution algorithms are being used. Code readability, documentation (both internal and external), and validation are being emphasized. This paper is a status report on the Proteus development effort. The analysis and solution procedure are described briefly, and the various features in the code are summarized. The results from some of the validation cases that have been run are presented for both the two- and three-dimensional codes.

  16. Proteus syndrome: evaluation of the immunological profile.

    PubMed

    Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Cutrupi, Maricia; Baronio, Manuela; Moratto, Daniele; Pizzino, M R; Mankad, Kshitij; Briuglia, Silvana; Salpietro, Carmelo; Plebani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare and complex disease characterized by malformations and overgrowth of different tissues. Prognosis of affected patients may be complicated by premature death, mostly due to pulmonary embolism and respiratory failure. To date, immunological data in Proteus syndrome are scarse.We report on the novel immunologic findings of a 15 years old girl affected with PS. Detailed T and B cell evaluation revealed maturational alterations for both subsets and functional hyperactivation for the latter. Such findings have not been reported previously in PS and may be the spy of more complex immune abnormalities in this syndrome. PMID:26758562

  17. Using optoelectronic sensors in the system PROTEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Piszczek, M.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of optoelectronic devices for human protection in rescue activity. The system consists of an ground robots with predicted sensor. The multisensor construction of the system ensures significant improvement of security of using on-situ like chemical or explosive sensors. The article show a various scenario of use for individual sensor in system PROTEUS.

  18. User Manual for the PROTEUS Mesh Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Micheal A.; Shemon, Emily R.

    2015-06-01

    This report describes the various mesh tools that are provided with the PROTEUS code giving both descriptions of the input and output. In many cases the examples are provided with a regression test of the mesh tools. The most important mesh tools for any user to consider using are the MT_MeshToMesh.x and the MT_RadialLattice.x codes. The former allows the conversion between most mesh types handled by PROTEUS while the second allows the merging of multiple (assembly) meshes into a radial structured grid. Note that the mesh generation process is recursive in nature and that each input specific for a given mesh tool (such as .axial or .merge) can be used as “mesh” input for any of the mesh tools discussed in this manual.

  19. Esterase zymograms of Proteus and Providencia.

    PubMed

    Goullet, P

    1975-03-01

    The intracellular esterases of 80 strains of Proteus and Providencia were analysed by the acrylamide-agarose zymogram technique using several synthetic substrates. The esterase bands were classified in five main groups. The alphaA-esterase bands hydrolysed alpha-naphthyl acetate and were resistant or relatively insensitive to di-isofluoropropyl phosphate (DFP). The alphaB-esterase band hydrolysed both alpha-naphthyl acetate and alpha-naphthyl butyrate and were very sensitive to DFP. Both groups of esterase bands were inactivated by heat. The betaA- and betaB-esterase bands hydrolysed beta-naphthyl acetate and were sensitive to DFP; these were distinguishable by the difference in their relative activity towards beta-naphthyl butyrate and in their relative stability to heat. The alpha-beta-esterase bands hydrolysed alpha- and beta-naphthyl acetates and alpha- and beta-naphthyl butyrates; they were inactivated by heat and were sensitive to DFP. The distribution of these esterase bands among the strains of Proteus and Providencia and their electrophoretic patterns established esterase profile types which correlate with the classification based on traditional bacteriological tests. The degree of inter-strain similarity in esterase pattern varied highly among species. The homogeneity of Proteus mirabilis and especially of Providencia stuartii contrasted with the heterogeneity of other species. This disparity suggests that the bacteria of the tribe Proteae have not the same degree of intra-specific differentiation in physico-chemical properties of esterases. PMID:48538

  20. Some biological features of Proteus bacilli. 1. Comparison of Proteus mirabilis strains provided from various sources.

    PubMed

    Kotelko, K; Rozalski, A; Deka, M; Kaca, W; Sidorczyk, Z; Gromska, W; Zych, K

    1983-01-01

    Some properties which may contribute to the pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis were compared in urinary isolates and in strains provided from soil and from culture collection. Clinical isolates revealed the higher expression of all the features examined in this report: swarming growth, haemagglutination, adherence to human uroepithelial cells, urease activity and haemolytic activity. Noteworthy is the higher mean value of adherence to the uroepithelial cells in clinical strains. Three P. mirabilis urinary isolates were detected which produce an as yet unreported filterable haemolysin. However, the loss of this ability within a few months seems to suggest the temporary presence of a plasmid rapidly eliminated by the Proteus strains. PMID:6202101

  1. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  2. The Proteus Cabinet, or "We Are Here but Not Here"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nield, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    In the early nineteenth century, there were three stage illusions in which a magician could cause a person to disappear. In one of these, the Proteus Cabinet, participants would enter a box, and simply vanish. As the designers of the Proteus Cabinet said of them, they were "Here, but not Here." My essay explores this concept in relation to…

  3. Collective motion in Proteus mirabilis swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoran, Xu

    Proteus mirabilisis a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. It is widely distributed in soil and water, and it is well known for exhibiting swarming motility on nutrient agar surfaces. In our study, we focused on the collective motility of P. mirabilis and uncovered a range of interesting phenomena. Here we will present our efforts to understand these phenomena through experiments and simulation. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail:xhrphx@gmail.com.

  4. Radiologic findings in the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azouz, E M; Costa, T; Fitch, N

    1987-01-01

    The radiological findings in two patients with the Proteus syndrome are described. Features in our two cases not previously mentioned or stressed include vertebral dysplasia and enlargement (megaspondylodysplasia), bilateral genu valgum, recurrent after surgery and intraabdominal and mesenteric lipomatosis. Emergency laparotomy was performed on the first patient who had a twisted necrotic portion of mesenteric fat. Macrodactyly, skeletal muscle atrophy and subcutaneous fat accumulation in the abdominal wall were present in both. In addition the second patient was mentally retarded and had frontal bony prominence of skull. Computed tomography was used for the specific diagnosis of the lipomatous tissues in both patients. PMID:3684361

  5. Proteus in flight over mountains near Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  6. Proteus aircraft over Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  7. Proteus aircraft low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis, Proteus, anti-CCP antibodies and Karl Popper.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha; Wilson, Clyde

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling joint disease affecting over 20 million people worldwide. The cause of RA is most probably linked to the triad of microbial trigger, genetic association and autoimmunity and can be explained using the philosophical method of Karl Popper or Popperian sequences. Ten "Popper sequences" have been identified which point to the urinary microbe Proteus mirabilis as the cause of RA: Popper sequence 1 establishes that HLA-DR4 lymphocytes injected into a rabbit evoke specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria. Popper sequence 2 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria are present in RA patients from 14 different countries. Popper sequence 3 establishes that antibodies to Proteus bacteria in RA patients are disease specific since no such antibodies are found in other conditions. Popper sequence 4 establishes that when RA patients have high titres of antibodies to Proteus such bacteria are found in urinary cultures. Popper sequence 5 establishes that only Proteus bacteria and no other microbes evoke significantly elevated antibodies in RA patients. Popper sequence 6 establishes that the "shared epitope" EQR(K)RAA shows "molecular mimicry" with the sequence ESRRAL found in Proteus haemolysin. Popper sequence 7 establishes that Proteus urease contains a sequence IRRET which has "molecular mimicry" with LRREI found in collagen XI of hyaline cartilage. Popper sequence 8 establishes that sera obtained from RA patients have cytopathic properties against sheep red cells coated with the cross-reacting EQR(K)RAA and LRREI self-antigen peptides. Popper sequence 9 establishes that Proteus sequences in haemolysin and urease as well as the self antigens, HLA-DR1/4 and collagen XI, each contain an arginine doublet, thereby providing a substrate for peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) to give rise to citrulline, which is the main antigenic component of CCP, antibodies to which are found in early cases of RA. Popper sequence 10 establishes that

  9. Unique developmental characteristics of the swarm and short cells of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, J O; Hoffman, P S

    1984-06-01

    Swarming cells of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris could be distinguished from their short-cell counterparts by virtue of their synthesis (or lack of synthesis) of certain enzymes and outer membrane proteins. Urease synthesis was constitutive in swarm cells and uninducible in short cells. In contrast, phenylalanine deaminase was inducible in both short and swarm cells, demonstrating that transcriptional and translational processes were functional. During swarm cell development, the amount of one outer membrane protein (45 kilodaltons) fell and the amounts of two others (50 and 28.3 kilodaltons) rose significantly, the level of cytochrome b decreased, and the synthesis of cytochromes a and d were repressed. Respiratory activities of swarm cells were greatly diminished, suggesting that energy for swarming came from fermentation rather than from respiration. Widespread changes in the pattern of enzyme activities, in cytochrome composition, and in the composition and type of outer membrane proteins suggest that they are due to transcriptional regulation. PMID:6427187

  10. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1992-01-01

    Presented here is the first part of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the Proteus computer code. A review is given of previous studies on the implementation of multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. Also presented is a detailed stability analysis of upwind and central-difference based numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Results are given of a convergence study of the Proteus code on computational grids of different sizes. The results presented here form the foundation for the implementation of multigrid methods in the Proteus code.

  11. The Proteus syndrome: the Elephant Man diagnosed.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbles, J A; Cohen, M M

    1986-01-01

    Sir Frederick Treves first showed Joseph Merrick, the famous Elephant Man, to the Pathological Society of London in 1884. A diagnosis of neurofibromatosis was suggested in 1909 and was widely accepted. There is no evidence, however, of café au lait spots or histological proof of neurofibromas. It is also clear that Joseph Merrick's manifestations were much more bizarre than those commonly seen in neurofibromatosis. Evidence indicates that Merrick suffered from the Proteus syndrome and had the following features compatible with this diagnosis: macrocephaly; hyperostosis of the skull; hypertrophy of long bones; and thickened skin and subcutaneous tissues, particularly of the hands and feet, including plantar hyperplasia, lipomas, and other unspecified subcutaneous masses. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:3092979

  12. Proteus morgani is less frequently associated with urinary tract infections than Proteus mirabilis--an explanation.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1983-08-01

    The metabolic activities of faecal and urinary strains of Proteus morgani and P. mirabilis were compared. Regardless of origin, the generation time of P. morgani strains in urine was approximately twice as long as that of the P. mirabilis strains. Urease synthesis was constitutive in P. morgani strains but required induction with urea in the P. mirabilis strains. In the presence of urea, the P. mirabilis strains liberated ammonia more rapidly and produced alkaline conditions more quickly than P. morgani strains, although they synthesized much less urease. These characteristics may place P. morgani strains at a disadvantage in comparison with P. mirabilis strains in their ability to cause urinary tract infections. PMID:6348289

  13. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  14. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  15. The Location GNSS Modules for the Components of Proteus System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostowski, K.; Darakchiev, R.; Foks-Ryznar, A.; Sitek, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Proteus system - the Integrated Mobile System for Counterterrorism and Rescue Operations is a complex innovative project. To assure the best possible localization of mobile components of the system, many different Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) modules were taken into account. In order to chose the best solution many types of tests were done. Full results and conclusions are presented in this paper. The idea of measurements was to test modules in GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) with EGNOS system specification according to certain algorithms. The tests had to answer the question: what type of GNSS modules should be used on different components with respect to specific usage of Proteus system. The second goal of tests was to check the solution quality of integrated GNSS/INS (Inertial Navigation System) and its possible usage in some Proteus system components.

  16. Proteus - An experimenter's view. [of spacecraft carrying exchangable Explorer scientific experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The scientific experiments package to be carried by the Proteus system takes the form of an Instrument Load carried into orbit by a Space Shuttle, and there mated to a Proteus spacecraft with the Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System. The Proteus system extends to ground support equipment, development tools, and communications, as well as the orbiting satellites. It is expected that Proteus will be able to triple the number of Explorer missions while staying within the current budgetary allocation for such missions. The Proteus spacecraft encompasses a system interface assembly plug, a data handling module, remote interface units, and a power distribution module.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection Caused by a Capnophilic Proteus mirabilis Strain.

    PubMed

    Trapman, Maryse; van Ingen, Jakko; Keijman, Jeroen; Swanink, Caroline M

    2015-06-01

    From a urine sample from a patient with a urinary tract infection, a carbon dioxide-dependent Proteus mirabilis strain was isolated. It is important to perform urine cultures in 5% carbon dioxide and an anaerobic atmosphere if bacteria prominent in Gram stains do not grow on routine media in ambient air. PMID:25878339

  18. Swarming and pathogenicity of Proteus mirabilis in the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Belas, R

    1995-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is best known for its pattern of swarming differentiation on agar plates, as well as for its association with the development of renal stones in patients with urinary tract infection. Urease and flagella appear to contribute most significantly to virulence, with fimbriae playing a more subtle role, whereas hemolysin does not appear to contribute significantly to pathogenesis. PMID:7551643

  19. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae which provides a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericat. This s...

  20. Wave Features of the Neptune's Satellites: Triton, Proteus, Nereid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2014-07-01

    Fastly orbiting Triton shows Mars-like tectonic dichotomy and very fine granulation 18 km across. Observed Proteus' granules are due to wave modulation. Nereid's fr.is close to that of Earth, thus their relatively sized granules are quite similar.

  1. Neonatal meningoventriculitis due to proteus mirabilis - a case report.

    PubMed

    Juyal, Deepak; Rathaur, Vyas Kumar; Sharma, Neelam

    2013-02-01

    A five day old full term born baby was admitted to our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with seizures, opisthotonous posture and was icteric upto thigh. Baby had a three day history of poor feeding, lethargy and abnormal body movements. Mother was a 29 years old primigravida and had a normal vaginal delivery at home. Sepsis profile of the patient was requested, lumbar puncture and ventricular tap was performed. Patient was put on third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and phenobarbitone. Culture and sensitivity report of blood, Cerebro spinal fluid and ventricular fluid showed Proteus mirabilis. Computerized Tomography scan showed a large parenchymal lesion in the right frontal lobe and diffuse ependymal enhancement along both the lateral ventricles suggestive of meningoventriculitis. We hereby present a fatal case of neonatal meningoventriculitis due to Proteus mirabilis. PMID:23543669

  2. Genome sequencing and annotation of Proteus sp. SAS71

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-01-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Proteus sp. strain SAS71, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 3,037,704 bp with a G + C content of 39.3% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDIU00000000. PMID:26697338

  3. Mechanics and control of the cytoskeleton in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Dembo, M

    1989-06-01

    Many models of the cytoskeletal motility of Amoeba proteus can be formulated in terms of the theory of reactive interpenetrating flow (Dembo and Harlow, 1986). We have devised numerical methodology for testing such models against the phenomenon of steady axisymmetric fountain flow. The simplest workable scheme revealed by such tests (the minimal model) is the main preoccupation of this study. All parameters of the minimal model are determined from available data. Using these parameters the model quantitatively accounts for the self assembly of the cytoskeleton of A. proteus: for the formation and detailed morphology of the endoplasmic channel, the ectoplasmic tube, the uropod, the plasma gel sheet, and the hyaline cap. The model accounts for the kinematics of the cytoskeleton: the detailed velocity field of the forward flow of the endoplasm, the contraction of the ectoplasmic tube, and the inversion of the flow in the fountain zone. The model also gives a satisfactory account of measurements of pressure gradients, measurements of heat dissipation, and measurements of the output of useful work by amoeba. Finally, the model suggests a very promising (but still hypothetical) continuum formulation of the free boundary problem of amoeboid motion. by balancing normal forces on the plasma membrane as closely as possible, the minimal model is able to predict the turgor pressure and surface tension of A. proteus. Several dynamical factors are crucial to the success of the minimal model and are likely to be general features of cytoskeletal mechanics and control in amoeboid cells. These are: a constitutive law for the viscosity of the contractile network that includes an automatic process of gelation as the network density gets large; a very vigorous cycle of network polymerization and depolymerization (in the case of A. proteus, the time constant for this reaction is approximately 12 s); control of network contractility by a diffusible factor (probably calcium ion); and

  4. [Sensitivity of clinical Proteus strains to antibiotics and their combinations].

    PubMed

    Sheina, E P; Arutcheva, A A

    1978-05-01

    In 1976 isolation of Proteus from wounds of patients with various purulent processes amounted to 14.5 per cent. Serotypes 0-10, 0-3 and H-3 predominated among the isolates. Sensitivity of 35 clinical strains of Proteus to 10 antibiotics, furagin and nevigramone was studied by the method of serial dilutions in liquid media. All the isolates were highly resistant to the antibiotics except gentamicin, furagin and nevigramone, the MIC of which for most of the strains was 3.12, 1.6-3.12 and 6.25-12.5 gamma/ml, respectively. The effect of 14 combinations of chemotherapeutics was also studied. The combinations of gentamicin with carbenicillin, gentamicin with ampicillin and monomycin with ampicillin proved to be most effective against the Proteus strains tested. The following combinations may be of practical value: monomycin + carbenicillin, kanamycin + ampicillin, kanamycin + carbenicillin, ampicillin + furagin, gentamicin + nevigramone. The combinations of carbenicillin with furagin and gentamicin with furagin were also rational. PMID:350143

  5. Proteus Syndrome: a difficult diagnosis and management plan

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, MD; Burnei, G; Draghici, L; Draghici, I

    2014-01-01

    Rationale. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is an extremely rare congenital pathology that causes overgrowth of multiple tissues, in particular bone and fat, following a mosaic pattern. The estimated incidence is of less than 1 per 1,000.000 live births and represents a significant challenge to the pediatric and orthopedic surgeons in order to establish a diagnosis and to elaborate a management plan. Objectives. We had the opportunity of treating many children who were afflicted by overgrowth syndromes and have been previously misdiagnosed as Proteus Syndrome in our department of pediatric and orthopedic surgery of “Maria Sklodowska Curie” Clinical Emergency Hospital for Children. This study helped us develop a diagnostic for these patients and report the first case of a confirmed PS in Romania. Methods and Results. We report the case of a 5-year-old white male who is in the attention of the clinic since birth. He presented with multiple overgrowth bone segments, fatty subcutaneous or intraabdominal tumors and other connective tissues abnormalities. All the tests performed confirmed the diagnosis of PS at the age of 4 and the management is still to be decided. Discussions. We followed the latest diagnostic indications and the patient fulfilled the general and specific criteria. The treatment is still in progress and it represents a challenge for the multidisciplinary medical team. Abbreviation Proteus Syndrome = PS PMID:25713623

  6. Proteus cibarius sp. nov., a swarming bacterium from Jeotgal, a traditional Korean fermented seafood, and emended description of the genus Proteus.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dong-Wook; Jung, Mi-Ja; Kim, Min-Soo; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-06-01

    A novel Proteus-like, Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain JS9T, was isolated from Korean fermented seafood, Jeotgal. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain JS9T belonged to the genus Proteus in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of strain JS9T was to Proteus vulgaris KCTC 2579T (98.98 %) and the genomic DNA G+C content is 39.0 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization values were measured and strain JS9T showed <20.8 % genomic relatedness with closely-related members of the genus Proteus. The isolate showed bacterial motility and swarming activity similar to those of pathogenic Proteus mirabilis but distinct from those of other species of the genus Proteus. The isolate grows optimally at 30 °C, at pH 7, and in the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl. The main respiratory quinones are ubiquinone Q-8 and Q-10, and the major cellular fatty acids are C16 : 0, summed feature 3 and summed feature 8. The polar lipids comprise phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unidentified amino lipid, two unidentified amino-phospholipids, and three unidentified lipids. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses, strain JS9T represents a novel species of the genus Proteus, for which the name Proteus cibarius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JS9T (=KACC 18404T=JCM 30699T). An emended description of the genus Proteus is also provided. PMID:26944634

  7. An inducible tellurite-resistance operon in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Toptchieva, Anna; Sisson, Gary; Bryden, Louis J; Taylor, Diane E; Hoffman, Paul S

    2003-05-01

    Tellurite resistance (Te(r)) is widespread in nature and it is shown here that the natural resistance of Proteus mirabilis to tellurite is due to a chromosomally located orthologue of plasmid-borne ter genes found in enteric bacteria. The P. mirabilis ter locus (terZABCDE) was identified in a screen of Tn5lacZ-generated mutants of which one contained an insertion in terC. The P. mirabilis terC mutant displayed increased susceptibility to tellurite (Te(s)) and complementation with terC carried on a multicopy plasmid restored high-level Te(r). Primer extension analysis revealed a single transcriptional start site upstream of terZ, but only with RNA harvested from bacteria grown in the presence of tellurite. Northern blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses confirmed that the ter operon was inducible by tellurite and to a lesser extent by oxidative stress inducers such as hydrogen peroxide and methyl viologen (paraquat). Direct and inverted repeat sequences were identified in the ter promoter region as well as motifs upstream of the -35 hexamer that resembled OxyR-binding sequences. Finally, the 390 bp intergenic promoter region located between orf3 and terZ showed no DNA sequence identity with any other published ter sequences, whereas terZABCDE genes exhibited 73-85 % DNA sequence identity. The ter operon was present in all clinical isolates of P. mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris tested and is inferred for Morganella and Providencia spp. based on screening for high level Te(r) and preliminary PCR analysis. Thus, a chromosomally located inducible tellurite resistance operon appears to be a common feature of the genus Proteus. PMID:12724390

  8. Mechanics and control of the cytoskeleton in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M

    1989-01-01

    Many models of the cytoskeletal motility of Amoeba proteus can be formulated in terms of the theory of reactive interpenetrating flow (Dembo and Harlow, 1986). We have devised numerical methodology for testing such models against the phenomenon of steady axisymmetric fountain flow. The simplest workable scheme revealed by such tests (the minimal model) is the main preoccupation of this study. All parameters of the minimal model are determined from available data. Using these parameters the model quantitatively accounts for the self assembly of the cytoskeleton of A. proteus: for the formation and detailed morphology of the endoplasmic channel, the ectoplasmic tube, the uropod, the plasma gel sheet, and the hyaline cap. The model accounts for the kinematics of the cytoskeleton: the detailed velocity field of the forward flow of the endoplasm, the contraction of the ectoplasmic tube, and the inversion of the flow in the fountain zone. The model also gives a satisfactory account of measurements of pressure gradients, measurements of heat dissipation, and measurements of the output of useful work by amoeba. Finally, the model suggests a very promising (but still hypothetical) continuum formulation of the free boundary problem of amoeboid motion. by balancing normal forces on the plasma membrane as closely as possible, the minimal model is able to predict the turgor pressure and surface tension of A. proteus. Several dynamical factors are crucial to the success of the minimal model and are likely to be general features of cytoskeletal mechanics and control in amoeboid cells. These are: a constitutive law for the viscosity of the contractile network that includes an automatic process of gelation as the network density gets large; a very vigorous cycle of network polymerization and depolymerization (in the case of A. proteus, the time constant for this reaction is approximately 12 s); control of network contractility by a diffusible factor (probably calcium ion); and

  9. Nickel availability and urease expression in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Rando, D; Steglitz, U; Mörsdorf, G; Kaltwasser, H

    1990-01-01

    Cells of Proteus mirabilis, previously grown in nutrient broth (NB), exhibited an increase in urease activity during subsequent incubation in mineral medium even when protein biosynthesis was inhibited. During growth in NB, degradation of amino acids obviously led to the formation of nickel-complexing metabolites, and nickel ions were therefore unavailable for maximal expression of enzymatically active urease; this inhibition of urease biosynthesis was overcome by the addition of nickel to the growth medium, and also by added glucose. Experiments concerning the incorporation of radioactive nickel into urease finally indicated that the observed increase in urease activity was caused by posttranslational insertion of nickel into performed apo-urease. PMID:2256779

  10. Proteus syndrome: A rare cause of gigantic limb

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Nandini; Chattopadhyay, Chandan; Bhuban, Majhi; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A congenital disorder with variable manifestations, including partial gigantism of the hands and feet with hypertrophy of soles, nevi, hemihypertrophy, gynecomastia, macrocephaly and other skull abnormalities, and abdominal lipomatosis. The cause is unknown, although a genetic origin, generally of autosomal-dominant transmission, has been conjectured. Symptoms can be treated, but there is no known cure. We present the case of a young male with grotesque overgrowth of the right lower limb, splenomegaly and multiple nevi. Angiography revealed venous malformation within the limb. The findings are in conformity to the criteria for the Proteus syndrome. PMID:24860761

  11. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells. PMID:15340240

  12. Classification, Identification, and Clinical Significance of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Caroline Mohr; Brenner, Frances W.; Miller, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    This review presents the current taxonomy of the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella, along with the current methods for the identification of each species within the three genera, incorporating both conventional biochemical and commercial methods. While all of these organisms are ubiquitous in the environment, individual case reports and nosocomial outbreak reports that demonstrate their ability to cause major infectious disease problems are presented. Lastly, anticipated antimicrobial susceptibility patterns are reviewed. Many of these organisms are easily controlled, but the advent of newer and more powerful antimicrobial agents has led to some problems of which laboratorians need to be aware. PMID:11023955

  13. The Proteus aircraft and NASA Dryden's T-34 in flight over Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  14. Convergence acceleration of the Proteus computer code with multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to implement convergence acceleration techniques based on the multigrid concept in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional versions of the Proteus computer code. The first section presents a review of the relevant literature on the implementation of the multigrid methods in computer codes for compressible flow analysis. The next two sections present detailed stability analysis of numerical schemes for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, based on conventional von Neumann analysis and the bi-grid analysis, respectively. The next section presents details of the computational method used in the Proteus computer code. Finally, the multigrid implementation and applications to several two-dimensional and three-dimensional test problems are presented. The results of the present study show that the multigrid method always leads to a reduction in the number of iterations (or time steps) required for convergence. However, there is an overhead associated with the use of multigrid acceleration. The overhead is higher in 2-D problems than in 3-D problems, thus overall multigrid savings in CPU time are in general better in the latter. Savings of about 40-50 percent are typical in 3-D problems, but they are about 20-30 percent in large 2-D problems. The present multigrid method is applicable to steady-state problems and is therefore ineffective in problems with inherently unstable solutions.

  15. [Joint action of aminoglycoside antibiotics and nitrofurans with bile on bacteria of the genus Proteus].

    PubMed

    Sytnik, I A; Puzakova, E V

    1980-06-01

    The combined effect of monomycin, kanamycin, neomycin and nitrofurans, such as furacillin, furagin, nitrofurantoin and furazolidone with bovine bile was studied on 36 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 14 strains of Proteus vulgaris. It was found that sub-bacteriostatic doses of the bile significantly increased the antiproteus activity of the aminoglycoside antibiotics and nitrofurans. The combinations of the bile with monomycin and kanamycin and the bile with furazolidone and nitrofurantoin proved to be most effective. Clinical trials of the drugs in treatment of inflammatory diseases of the biliferous system of the Proteus etiology are recommended. PMID:7396441

  16. [Study on whorl swarming growth phenomenon of Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    He, Xianyuan; Liao, Sixiang; Liu, Junkang; Li, Kun; Liu, Yanxia; Yu, Lurong

    2015-02-01

    The present paper is aimed to explore the origins of Proteus mirabilis (PM) whorl swarming growth phenomenon. The whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM was observed by changed bacterial culture inoculation time, humidity, vaccination practices, cultured flat placement, magnetic field, pH and other factors. Bacterial ring spiral direction of rotation is counterclockwise and the volatile growth process of PM was whorl swarming growth phenomenon. Spiro fluctuation phenomenon was of high frequency in the sealing tanks by cultured anytime inoculation, wherever inoculation technique applied or not, the presence or absence of the magnetic field, and wherever the dish position was. The experimental results showed that the whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM requires specific pH environment, in which the facts may be relative to its genetic characteristics and the Earths rotation. PMID:25997280

  17. Merging mythology and morphology: the multifaceted lifestyle of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis, named for the Greek god who changed shape to avoid capture, has fascinated microbiologists for more than a century with its unique swarming differentiation, Dienes line formation and potent urease activity. Transcriptome profiling during both host infection and swarming motility, coupled with the availability of the complete genome sequence for P. mirabilis, has revealed the occurrence of interbacterial competition and killing through a type VI secretion system, and the reciprocal regulation of adhesion and motility, as well as the intimate connections between metabolism, swarming and virulence. This Review addresses some of the unique and recently described aspects of P. mirabilis biology and pathogenesis, and emphasizes the potential role of this bacterium in single-species and polymicrobial urinary tract infections. PMID:23042564

  18. Proteus mirabilis biofilms and the encrustation of urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Ganderton, L; King, J; Nettleton, J; Winters, C

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms were observed on 69 of 75 catheters taken from patients undergoing long-term bladder management. Ten catheters were colonized by pure cultures of Proteus mirabilis. In each of these cases the bacteria formed layers on the catheter surface, underlying encrustations of struvite and hydroxyapatite which partially or completely occluded the catheter lumen. Encrustation was also apparent on catheters colonized by P. mirabilis plus other species, but was rarely seen on catheters colonized by non-urease-producing species. These observations support the hypothesis that catheter encrustation is brought about by the activity of urease-producing biofilms and confirms that the main target in the control of catheter encrustation should be P. mirabilis. PMID:8171763

  19. Vaccines for Proteus mirabilis in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a documented cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in the complicated urinary tract. Urease-mediated urea hydrolysis is responsible for both virulence of the organism and the ability to cause urolithiasis. A urease-negative mutant of P. mirabilis is unable to initiate stone formation and colonizes the kidney at a significantly lower rate. The considerable pathology caused by P. mirabilis warrants the development of a vaccine. We have initiated the advancement of vaccine studies and have determined that the MR/P fimbria, a surface adhesin of P. mirabilis, is a promising vaccine candidate. Successful vaccination would be expected both to prevent colonization by P. mirabilis and urolithiasis. PMID:12135833

  20. Acidic environments induce differentiation of Proteus mirabilis into swarmer morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Masatoshi; Obara, Hisato; Watanabe, Yusaku; Ono, Hisaya K; Sasaki, Jun; Goryo, Masanobu; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-07-01

    Although swarmer morphotypes of Proteus mirabilis have long been considered to result from surfaced-induced differentiation, the present findings show that, in broth medium containing urea, acidic conditions transform some swimmer cells into elongated swarmer cells. This study has also demonstrates that P. mirabilis cells grown in acidic broth medium containing urea enhance virulence factors such as flagella production and cytotoxicity to human bladder carcinoma cell line T24, though no significant difference in urease activity under different pH conditions was found. Since there is little published data on the behavior of P. mirabilis at various hydrogen-ion concentrations, the present study may clarify aspects of cellular differentiation of P. mirabilis in patients at risk of struvite formation due to infection with urease-producing bacteria, as well as in some animals with acidic or alkaline urine. PMID:21707738

  1. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  2. Effect of Curcumin Against Proteus mirabilis During Crystallization of Struvite from Artificial Urine.

    PubMed

    Prywer, Jolanta; Torzewska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the activity of curcumin against Proteus mirabilis and the struvite crystallization in relation to urinary stones formation. In order to evaluate an activity of curcumin we performed an in vitro experiment of struvite growth from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis to mimic the real urinary tract infection, which usually leads to urinary stone formation. The results demonstrate that curcumin exhibits the effect against Proteus mirabilis inhibiting the activity of urease-an enzyme produced by these microorganisms. Addition of curcumin increases the induction time and decreases the efficiency of growth of struvite compared with the absence of curcumin. Interestingly, the addition of curcumin does not affect the crystal morphology and habit. In conclusion, curcumin has demonstrated its significant potential to be further investigated for its use in the case of struvite crystallization induced for the growth by Proteus mirabilis in relation to urinary stone formation. PMID:21808656

  3. [Dynamics of drug resistance in Proteus mirabilis cultures 1970-1985].

    PubMed

    Shvidenko, I G

    1988-04-01

    Resistance of 669 clinical strains of Proteus mirabilis to 18 chemotherapeutic drugs was studied in dynamics within 1970-1985. An increase in the number of cultures resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin was noted while the number of cultures resistant to cephalosporines did not change. Within the period from 1970 to 1975 there was observed a marked increase in the number of Proteus strains resistant to aminoglycoside antibiotics. After that period their number gradually lowered and in 1985 reached the level of 1970. Beginning from 1973 there were observed a decrease in the number of Proteus chloramphenicol resistant strains and simultaneous occurrence of cultures sensitive to this antibiotic. The predominating number of the tested strains preserved during the whole observation period their resistance to tetracycline, doxycycline, rifampicin, novobiocin, furazolidone and furagin. No increase in the number of Proteus strains with multiple drug resistance including those resistant to 5-7 drugs was noted in the observation periods of 1970-1975, 1980 and 1985. The most frequent were Proteus strains resistant to 2-4 drugs. Among them cultures resistant to chloramphenicol and aminoglycoside antibiotics of the first generation predominated. Grouping of the strains by the same resistance spectra provided dividing the rested cultures of Proteus mirabilis into 69 variants. PMID:3291802

  4. Haemagglutination, haemolysin production and serum resistance of proteus and related species isolated from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M; Thakar, Y S; Pathak, A A

    2001-01-01

    A total of 148 strains of Proteus and related species comprising of Proteus mirabilis (116), Proteus vulgaris (24), Providentia rettgeri (4), Providentia alcalifaciens (2), Providentia stuarti (1) and Morganella morganii (1), isolated from various sources, were examined for haemagglutination (HA), haemolysin production (HL) and serum resistance (SR). Maximum isolates were obtained from urine (47.30%) and pus (40.54%) and they were multidrug resistant. The sensitivity to Ciprofloxacin was 78.38%, Gentamicin: 62.84%, Cefotaxime: 29.73%, Norfloxacin: 22.97%, Tetracycline: 20.95% and Ampicillin: 6.76%. There were four commonest resistance patterns shown by 58.62% of Proteus mirabilis and 66.67% of Proteus vulgaris strains. Haemagglutination was shown by 91 (61.49%) strains, HL production in 126 (85.14%) strains and SR by 124 (83.78%) isolates. All the three i.e. HA, HL and SR were simultaneously present in 77 (52.27%) strains, any two were present in 40 (27.03%) strains and any one was positive in 30 (20.03%) strains. Thus in as many as 147 (98.32%) isolates, any one or more virulence factors were present. The virulence in commensal pathogen like Proteus is basically a multifactorial phenomenon. The presence of more virulence factors in one strain may increase its pathogenic ability. The evaluation of multiple virulence factors instead of one single parameter will be of greater help in assessing its pathogenic potential. PMID:17664798

  5. Case-control study of the risk factors for acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus species during tigecycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  6. Case-Control Study of the Risk Factors for Acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus Species during Tigecycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Eun; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  7. Classification of a Proteus penneri clinical isolate with a unique O-antigen structure to a new Proteus serogroup, O80.

    PubMed

    Siwińska, Małgorzata; Levina, Evgeniya A; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Drzewiecka, Dominika; Shashkov, Alexander S; Różalski, Antoni; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-04-30

    Proteus penneri is an opportunistic pathogen, which may cause severe diseases, most frequently urinary tract infections in immunocompromised patients. P. penneri Br 114 exhibiting a good swarming growth ability as an S-form strain was isolated from a wound of a patient in Łódź, Poland. Serological studies using ELISA and Western blotting and chemical analyses along with (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy showed that the O-antigen (O-polysaccharide) of this strain is unique among the known Proteus serotypes O1-O79. It possesses a linear pentasaccharide repeating unit containing a partially O-acetylated amide of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) with L-serine having the following structure: [structure: see text]. These data are a basis for creating a new Proteus serogroup, O80, so far represented by the single Br 114 isolate. The O80 is the 21st O-serogroup containing P. penneri strains and the fourth serogroup based on Proteus spp. clinical isolates from Łódź, Poland. PMID:25771295

  8. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  9. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bess, John D.; Montierth, Leland; Köberl, Oliver; Snoj, Luka

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the ²³⁵U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greatermore » than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  10. Proteus mirabilis interkingdom swarming signals attract blow flies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Fonseca, Alicia; Liu, Wenqi; Fields, Andrew T; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Spindola, Aline F; Tarone, Aaron M; Crippen, Tawni L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wood, Thomas K

    2012-01-01

    Flies transport specific bacteria with their larvae that provide a wider range of nutrients for those bacteria. Our hypothesis was that this symbiotic interaction may depend on interkingdom signaling. We obtained Proteus mirabilis from the salivary glands of the blow fly Lucilia sericata; this strain swarmed significantly and produced a strong odor that attracts blow flies. To identify the putative interkingdom signals for the bacterium and flies, we reasoned that as swarming is used by this bacterium to cover the food resource and requires bacterial signaling, the same bacterial signals used for swarming may be used to communicate with blow flies. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified six novel genes for swarming (ureR, fis, hybG, zapB, fadE and PROSTU_03490), then, confirming our hypothesis, we discovered that fly attractants, lactic acid, phenol, NaOH, KOH and ammonia, restore swarming for cells with the swarming mutations. Hence, compounds produced by the bacterium that attract flies also are utilized for swarming. In addition, bacteria with the swarming mutation rfaL attracted fewer blow flies and reduced the number of eggs laid by the flies. Therefore, we have identified several interkingdom signals between P. mirabilis and blow flies. PMID:22237540

  11. Radial and Spiral Stream Formation in Proteus mirabilis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuan; Budrene, Elena O.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis, which is a pathogen that forms biofilms in vivo, can swarm over hard surfaces and form a variety of spatial patterns in colonies. Colony formation involves two distinct cell types: swarmer cells that dominate near the surface and the leading edge, and swimmer cells that prefer a less viscous medium, but the mechanisms underlying pattern formation are not understood. New experimental investigations reported here show that swimmer cells in the center of the colony stream inward toward the inoculation site and in the process form many complex patterns, including radial and spiral streams, in addition to previously-reported concentric rings. These new observations suggest that swimmers are motile and that indirect interactions between them are essential in the pattern formation. To explain these observations we develop a hybrid model comprising cell-based and continuum components that incorporates a chemotactic response of swimmers to a chemical they produce. The model predicts that formation of radial streams can be explained as the modulation of the local attractant concentration by the cells, and that the chirality of the spiral streams results from a swimming bias of the cells near the surface of the substrate. The spatial patterns generated from the model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:22219724

  12. Computational protein design: the Proteus software and selected applications.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Thomas; Gaillard, Thomas; Mignon, David; Schmidt am Busch, Marcel; Lopes, Anne; Amara, Najette; Polydorides, Savvas; Sedano, Audrey; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios

    2013-10-30

    We describe an automated procedure for protein design, implemented in a flexible software package, called Proteus. System setup and calculation of an energy matrix are done with the XPLOR modeling program and its sophisticated command language, supporting several force fields and solvent models. A second program provides algorithms to search sequence space. It allows a decomposition of the system into groups, which can be combined in different ways in the energy function, for both positive and negative design. The whole procedure can be controlled by editing 2-4 scripts. Two applications consider the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase enzyme and its successful redesign to bind both O-methyl-tyrosine and D-tyrosine. For the latter, we present Monte Carlo simulations where the D-tyrosine concentration is gradually increased, displacing L-tyrosine from the binding pocket and yielding the binding free energy difference, in good agreement with experiment. Complete redesign of the Crk SH3 domain is presented. The top 10000 sequences are all assigned to the correct fold by the SUPERFAMILY library of Hidden Markov Models. Finally, we report the acid/base behavior of the SNase protein. Sidechain protonation is treated as a form of mutation; it is then straightforward to perform constant-pH Monte Carlo simulations, which yield good agreement with experiment. Overall, the software can be used for a wide range of application, producing not only native-like sequences but also thermodynamic properties with errors that appear comparable to other current software packages. PMID:24037756

  13. Thoracolumbar Scoliosis in a Patient With Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Liang, Jinqian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Proteus syndrome (PS) is a complex and rare congenital hamartomatous condition with a wide range of malformations. Little is reported about spinal deformity associated with this syndrome. This study presents a case of scoliosis occurring in the setting of PS and explores the possible mechanisms between the 2 diseases. The patient is a 17-year-old Chinese female with scoliosis and hemihypertrophy of the right upper and lower extremity as well as exostosis of the right lower leg joint including the hip, knee, ankle, and toes. These manifestations were suggestive of PS. She underwent a posterior correction at thoracic 2-lumbar 4 (T5–L4) levels, using the Moss-SI spinal system. At 3-month follow-ups, the patient was clinically pain free and well balanced. Plain radiographs showed solid spine fusion with no loss of deformity correction. The severity of scoliosis in PS is progressively aggravated and the correction of the extensive spinal deformities is generally difficult. Therefore, early diagnosis is required for adequate interdisciplinary treatment. PMID:25654373

  14. Ureolytic Biomineralization Reduces Proteus mirabilis Biofilm Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobao; Lu, Nanxi; Brady, Hannah R; Packman, Aaron I

    2016-05-01

    Ureolytic biomineralization induced by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis, is responsible for the formation of urinary tract calculi and the encrustation of indwelling urinary catheters. Such microbial biofilms are challenging to eradicate and contribute to the persistence of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, but the mechanisms responsible for this recalcitrance remain obscure. In this study, we characterized the susceptibility of wild-type (ure+) and urease-negative (ure-) P. mirabilis biofilms to killing by ciprofloxacin. Ure+ biofilms produced fine biomineral precipitates that were homogeneously distributed within the biofilm biomass in artificial urine, while ure- biofilms did not produce biomineral deposits under identical growth conditions. Following exposure to ciprofloxacin, ure+ biofilms showed greater survival (less killing) than ure- biofilms, indicating that biomineralization protected biofilm-resident cells against the antimicrobial. To evaluate the mechanism responsible for this recalcitrance, we observed and quantified the transport of Cy5-conjugated ciprofloxacin into the biofilm by video confocal microscopy. These observations revealed that the reduced susceptibility of ure+ biofilms resulted from hindered delivery of ciprofloxacin into biomineralized regions of the biofilm. Further, biomineralization enhanced retention of viable cells on the surface following antimicrobial exposure. These findings together show that ureolytic biomineralization induced by P. mirabilis metabolism strongly regulates antimicrobial susceptibility by reducing internal solute transport and increasing biofilm stability. PMID:26953206

  15. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. PMID:27091004

  16. Proteus mirabilis viability after lithotripsy of struvite calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabakharan, Sabitha; Teichman, Joel M. H.; Spore, Scott S.; Sabanegh, Edmund; Glickman, Randolph D.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Urinary calculi composed of struvite harbor urease-producing bacteria within the stone. The photothermal mechanism of holmium:YAG lithotripsy is uniquely different than other lithotripsy devices. We postulated that bacterial viability of struvite calculi would be less for calculi fragmented with holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices. Human calculi of known struvite composition (greater than 90% magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate) were incubated with Proteus mirabilis. Calculi were fragmented with no lithotripsy (controls), or shock wave, intracorporeal ultrasonic, electrohydraulic, pneumatic, holmium:YAG or pulsed dye laser lithotripsy. After lithotripsy, stone fragments were sonicated and specimens were serially plated for 48 hours at 38 C. Bacterial counts and the rate of bacterial sterilization were compared. Median bacterial counts (colony forming units per ml) were 8 X 106 in controls and 3 X 106 in shock wave, 3 X 107 in ultrasonic, 4 X 105 in electrohydraulic, 8 X 106 in pneumatic, 5 X 104 in holmium:YAG and 1 X 106 in pulsed dye laser lithotripsy, p less than 0.001. The rate of bacterial sterilization was 50% for holmium:YAG lithotripsy treated stones versus 0% for each of the other cohorts, p less than 0.01. P. mirabilis viability is less after holmium:YAG irradiation compared to other lithotripsy devices.

  17. Virulence determinants of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Island, M D; Massad, G

    1994-11-01

    The urinary tract is among the most common sites of bacterial infection and E. coli is by far the most common infecting agent. In patients with urinary catheters in place or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, Proteus mirabilis is also a frequent isolate. To study virulence of these bacterial species, we have isolated the genes that encode putative virulence factors, constructed specific mutations within these genes, introduced the mutation back into the wild type strain by allelic exchange, and analyzed these mutants for virulence in appropriate in vitro and in vivo models. Specific virulence markers have been identified for strains that cause urinary tract infection. For E. coli, these include P fimbriae, S fimbriae, hemolysin, aerobactin, serum resistance, and a small group of O-serotypes. Redundant virulence factors must be present in these organisms as mutation of the most clearly identified epidemiological marker, P fimbriae, does not result in attenuation of a virulent strain. For P. mirabilis, urease appears to contribute most significantly to virulence. Fimbriae play a significant but more subtle role in colonization. Hemolysin, although potently cytotoxic to renal cells in vitro, does not appear to contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of ascending urinary tract infection. We can conclude that the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection and acute pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis are multifactorial, as mutation of single genes rarely causes significant attenuation of virulence. PMID:7869662

  18. Proteus and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Polydorides, Savvas; Michael, Eleni; Mignon, David; Druart, Karen; Archontis, Georgios; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization and use of Proteus, a multitool computational suite for the optimization of protein and ligand conformations and sequences, and the calculation of pK α shifts and relative binding affinities. The software offers the use of several molecular mechanics force fields and solvent models, including two generalized Born variants, and a large range of scoring functions, which can combine protein stability, ligand affinity, and ligand specificity terms, for positive and negative design. We present in detail the steps for structure preparation, system setup, construction of the interaction energy matrix, protein sequence and structure optimizations, pK α calculations, and ligand titration calculations. We discuss illustrative examples, including the chemical/structural optimization of a complex between the MHC class II protein HLA-DQ8 and the vinculin epitope, and the chemical optimization of the compstatin analog Ac-Val4Trp/His9Ala, which regulates the function of protein C3 of the complement system. PMID:27094287

  19. Requirement of MrpH for Mannose-Resistant Proteus-Like Fimbria-Mediated Hemagglutination by Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Johnson, David E.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    1999-01-01

    Two new genes, mrpH and mrpJ, were identified downstream of mrpG in the mrp gene cluster encoding mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Since the predicted MrpH has 30% amino acid sequence identity to PapG, the Galα(1-4)Gal-binding adhesin of Escherichia coli P fimbriae, we hypothesized that mrpH encodes the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. MR/P fimbriae, expressed in E. coli DH5α, conferred on bacteria both the ability to cause mannose-resistant hemagglutination and the ability to aggregate to form pellicles on the broth surface. Both a ΔmrpH mutant expressed in E. coli DH5α and an isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of P. mirabilis were unable to produce normal MR/P fimbriae efficiently, suggesting that MrpH was involved in fimbrial assembly. Amino acid residue substitution of the N-terminal cysteine residues (C66S and C128S) of MrpH abolished the receptor-binding activity (hemagglutinating ability) of MrpH but allowed normal fimbrial assembly, supporting the notion that MrpH was the functional MR/P hemagglutinin. Immunogold electron microscopy of P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed that MrpH was located at the tip of MR/P fimbriae, also consistent with its role in receptor binding. The isogenic mrpH::aphA mutant of HI4320 was less able to colonize the urine, bladder, and kidneys in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection (P < 0.01), and therefore MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to bacterial colonization in mice. While there are similarities between P. mirabilis MR/P and E. coli P fimbriae, there are more notable differences: (i) synthesis of the MrpH adhesin is required to initiate fimbrial assembly, (ii) MR/P fimbriae confer an aggregation phenotype, (iii) site-directed mutation of specific residues can abolish receptor binding but allows fimbrial assembly, and (iv) mutation of the adhesin gene abolishes virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. PMID:10338487

  20. [Prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus spp. strains in clinical specimens and their susceptibility to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Reśliński, Adrian; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Mikucka, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Proteus sp. are opportunistic microorganisms which cause urinary tract and wounds infections, bacteriaemia and sepsis. The aim of this study was analysis of prevalence of multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. strains in clinical specimens and evaluation of their susceptibility to selected antibiotics. The study was carried out of 1499 Proteus sp. strains were isolated in 2000-2003 from patients of departments and dispensaries of the University Hospital CM in Bydgoszcz UMK in Torun. The strains were identified on the basis of appearance of bacterial colonies on bloody and McConkey's agars, movement ability, indole and urease production and in questionable cases biochemical profile in ID GN or ID E (bio-Mérieux) tests was also included. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested by disk diffusion method. Isolated strains were regarded as multidrug-resistant when they were resistant to three kinds of antibiotics at least. Received Proteus sp. the most frequently belonged to P. mirabilis species (92.3%). Most of these bacteria were isolated from urine from patients of Rehabilitation Clinic. All of multidrug-resistant strains were resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins, 98.9% to co-trimoxazole, 77.7% to quinolones, 63.8% to tetracyclines, 38.5% to aminoglycosides, 19.3% to monobactams and 3.4% to carbapenems. Almost 25% multidrug-resistant Proteus sp. produced ESBL. PMID:16134389

  1. Evaluation of Proteus as a Tool for the Rapid Development of Models of Hydrologic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, T. M.; Farthing, M. W.; Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Models of modern hydrologic systems can be complex and involve a variety of operators with varying character. The goal is to implement approximations of such models that are both efficient for the developer and computationally efficient, which is a set of naturally competing objectives. Proteus is a Python-based toolbox that supports prototyping of model formulations as well as a wide variety of modern numerical methods and parallel computing. We used Proteus to develop numerical approximations for three models: Richards' equation, a brine flow model derived using the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT), and a multiphase TCAT-based tumor growth model. For Richards' equation, we investigated discontinuous Galerkin solutions with higher order time integration based on the backward difference formulas. The TCAT brine flow model was implemented using Proteus and a variety of numerical methods were compared to hand coded solutions. Finally, an existing tumor growth model was implemented in Proteus to introduce more advanced numerics and allow the code to be run in parallel. From these three example models, Proteus was found to be an attractive open-source option for rapidly developing high quality code for solving existing and evolving computational science models.

  2. Modulation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm development on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, David J; Morgan, Sheridan D

    2006-05-01

    The crystalline biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis can seriously complicate the care of patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. The generation of alkaline urine by the bacterial urease causes calcium and magnesium phosphates to precipitate from urine and accumulate in the catheter biofilm, blocking the flow of urine from the bladder. The pH at which these salts crystallize from a urine sample, the nucleation pH (pH(n)), can be elevated by diluting the urine and by increasing its citrate content. The aim of this study was to examine whether manipulation of pH(n) in these ways modulated the rate at which crystalline biofilm developed. Experiments in laboratory models of the catheterized bladder infected with P. mirabilis showed that when the bladder was supplied with a concentrated urine (pH(n) 6.7) at a low fluid output (720 ml per 24 h), catheters blocked at 19-31 h. Diluting this urine 1:4 increased the pH(n) to 7.5 and models supplied with this urine at 2880 ml per 24 h took 110-137 h to block. When models were supplied with urine containing citrate at 1.5 mg ml(-1) or above (pH(n) 8.3-9.1), the catheters drained freely for the full 7 day experimental period. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the catheter biofilms that developed in urine with high pH(n) values were devoid of crystalline formations. These observations should encourage a clinical trial to examine the effect of increasing a patient's fluid intake with citrate-containing drinks on the encrustation and blockage of catheters. PMID:16585633

  3. New Aspects of RpoE in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Che; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Tsai, Yi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen causing recurrent or persistent urinary tract infections (UTIs). The underlying mechanisms for P. mirabilis to establish UTIs are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that loss of the sigma factor E (RpoE), mediating extracytoplasmic stress responses, decreased fimbria expression, survival in macrophages, cell invasion, and colonization in mice but increased the interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression of urothelial cells and swarming motility. This is the first study to demonstrate that RpoE modulated expression of MR/P fimbriae by regulating mrpI, a gene encoding a recombinase controlling the orientation of MR/P fimbria promoter. By real-time reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the IL-8 mRNA amount of urothelial cells was induced significantly by lipopolysaccharides extracted from rpoE mutant but not from the wild type. These RpoE-associated virulence factors should be coordinately expressed to enhance the fitness of P. mirabilis in the host, including the avoidance of immune attacks. Accordingly, rpoE mutant-infected mice displayed more immune cell infiltration in bladders and kidneys during early stages of infection, and the rpoE mutant had a dramatically impaired ability of colonization. Moreover, it is noteworthy that urea (the major component in urine) and polymyxin B (a cationic antimicrobial peptide) can induce expression of rpoE by the reporter assay, suggesting that RpoE might be activated in the urinary tract. Altogether, our results indicate that RpoE is important in sensing environmental cues of the urinary tract and subsequently triggering the expression of virulence factors, which are associated with the fitness of P. mirabilis, to build up a UTI. PMID:25547796

  4. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  5. Macrodactyly with skin hypertrophy: a minimal form of the Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Fiss, Roberto Coswig; Happle, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The Proteus syndrome was described 1983 . It has asymmetric gigantism of the limbs, verrucous epidermal naevi, cerebriform enlargement of the plantar region, vascular malformations and neoplasms, as lipomas. It received this denomination after Proteus from the Greek mythology, who had the ability to change his form . A 15 year-old boy, reported a congenital hypertrophy with syndactily of the second and third right fingers . The second case is a 35 year-old man, who reported that since birth the second right toe was bigger than the other toes, skin hypertrophy was also observed. These cases document a localized form if the Proteus syndrome, which may widen the spectrum of its variability. PMID:21738976

  6. Repression of AKT signaling by ARQ 092 in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Yourick, Miranda R.; Yu, Yi; Savage, Ronald E.; Ferrari, Dora; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    A somatic activating mutation in AKT1, c.49G>A, pGlu17Lys, that results in elevated AKT signaling in mutation-positive cells, is responsible for the mosaic overgrowth condition, Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 is an allosteric pan-AKT inhibitor under development for treatment in cancer. We tested the efficacy of this drug for suppressing AKT signaling in cells and tissues from patients with Proteus syndrome. ARQ 092 reduced phosphorylation of AKT and downstream targets of AKT in a concentration-dependent manner in as little as two hours. While AKT signaling was suppressed with ARQ 092 treatment, cells retained their ability to respond to growth factor stimulation by increasing pAKT levels proportionally to untreated cells. At concentrations sufficient to decrease AKT signaling, little reduction in cell viability was seen. These results indicate that ARQ 092 can suppress AKT signaling and warrants further development as a therapeutic option for patients with Proteus syndrome. PMID:26657992

  7. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: General Properties

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Para-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) was shown to be an effective agent to abolish the swarming of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris on predried solid culture media. The level required to abolish swarming varied with the strain of Proteus, the components of the medium, and also with the conditions of incubation. Generally 0.1 to 0.2 mM PNPG effectively abolished swarming for at least 24 h with aerobic incubation. Levels of PNPG that abolished swarming showed no effect upon the growth of the cells, little or no effect upon the motility characteristics of the organisms, and no effect upon the cellular morphology. PNPG was found to be freely water soluble, stable to autoclaving, and to retain biological activity for at least one month in prepared culture media stored under refrigeration. PMID:4577177

  8. Scaled Composites' Proteus and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are seen h

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  9. Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the PROTEUS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    White, J. R.; Ingersoll, D. T.; Schmocker, U.

    1980-01-01

    An extensive program of reactor physics experiments in GCFR fuel pin lattices has been completed recently at the PROTEUS critical facility located at EIR laboratory in Switzerland. The PROTEUS reactor consists of a central test zone surrounded by a uranium buffer and thermal driver region. The test lattices included a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fuel region with internal and axial blankets of UO/sub 2/, ThO/sub 2/, and thorium metal. Detailed analysis of the thorium-bearing lattices has been performed at EIR and at ORNL in order to validate nuclear data and methods used for reactor physics analysis of advanced GCFR designs.

  10. Cytotoxicity of the HpmA hemolysin and urease of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris against cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R; Swihart, K G; Welch, R A

    1991-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated bacteriuria, can cause acute pyelonephritis. In ascending infections, bacteria colonize the bladder and ascend the ureters to the proximal tubules of the kidney. We postulate that Proteus species uses the HpmA hemolysin and urease to elicit tissue damage that allows entry of these bacteria into the kidney. To study this interaction, strains of Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris and their isogenic hemolysin-negative (hpmA) or isogenic urease-negative (ureC) constructs were overlaid onto cultures of human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (HRPTEC) isolated from kidneys obtained by immediate autopsy. Cytotoxicity was measured by release of soluble lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Two strains of P. mirabilis inoculated at 10(6) CFU caused a release of 80% of total LDH after 6 h, whereas pyelonephritogenic hemolytic Escherichia coli CFT073 released only 25% at 6 h (P less than 0.012). Ten P. mirabilis isolates and five P. vulgaris isolates were all hemolytic and cytotoxic and produced urease which was induced by urea. The HpmA hemolysin is apparently responsible for the majority of cytotoxicity in vitro since the hemolysin-negative (hpmA) mutants of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris were significantly less cytotoxic than wild-type strains. P. mirabilis WPM111 (hemolysin negative) was used to test the effect of urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis on HRPTEC viability. In the presence of 50 mM urea, WPM111 caused the release of 42% of LDH versus 1% at 6 h in the absence of substrate (P = 0.003). We conclude that the HpmA hemolysin of Proteus species acts as a potent cytotoxin against HRPTEC. In addition, urease apparently contributes to this process when substrate urea is available. PMID:2037363

  11. Proteus mirabilis urease: transcriptional regulation by UreR.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Foxall, P A; Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1993-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea, initiating the formation of urinary stones. The enzyme is critical for kidney colonization and the development of acute pyelonephritis. Urease is induced by urea and is not controlled by the nitrogen regulatory system (ntr) or catabolite repression. Purified whole-cell RNA from induced and uninduced cultures of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli harboring cloned urease sequences was probed with a 4.2-kb BglI fragment from within the urease operon. Autoradiographs of slot blots demonstrated 4.2- and 5.8-fold increases, respectively, in urease-specific RNA upon induction with urea. Structural and accessory genes necessary for urease activity, ureD, A, B, C, E, and F, were previously cloned and sequenced (B. D. Jones and H. L. T. Mobley, J. Bacteriol. 171:6414-6422, 1989). A 1.2-kb EcoRV-BamHI restriction fragment upstream of these sequences confers inducibility upon the operon in trans. Nucleotide sequencing of this fragment revealed a single open reading frame of 882 nucleotides, designated ureR, which is transcribed in the direction opposite that of the urease structural and accessory genes and encodes a 293-amino-acid polypeptide predicted to be 33,415 Da in size. Autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of [35S]methionine-labeled polypeptides obtained by in vitro transcription-translation of the PCR fragments carrying only ureR yielded a single band with an apparent molecular size of 32 kDa. Fragments carrying an in-frame deletion within ureR synthesized a truncated product. The predicted UreR amino acid sequence contains a potential helix-turn-helix motif and an associated AraC family signature and is similar to that predicted for a number of DNA-binding proteins, including E. coli proteins that regulate acid phosphatase synthesis (AppY), porin synthesis (EnvY), and rhamnose utilization (RhaR). These data suggest that UreR governs the inducibility of P. mirabilis urease. PMID:7678244

  12. Genome sequence of a proteus mirabilis strain isolated from the salivary glands of larval lucilia sericata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We announced a draft genome sequence of a Proteus mirabilis strain derived from Lucilia sericata salivary glands. This strain is demonstrated to attract and induce oviposition by L. sericata, a common blow fly important to medicine, agriculture, and forensics. The genome will help to dissect inter...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence and Gene Annotation of the Uropathogenic Bacterium Proteus mirabilis Pr2921

    PubMed Central

    Giorello, F. M.; Romero, V.; Farias, J.; Scavone, P.; Umpiérrez, A.; Zunino, P.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of Proteus mirabilis Pr2921, a uropathogenic bacterium that can cause severe complicated urinary tract infections. After gene annotation, we identified two additional copies of ucaA, one of the most studied fimbrial protein genes, and other fimbriae related-proteins that are not present in P. mirabilis HI4320. PMID:27340058

  14. An Update on Improvements to NiCE Support for PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Andrew; McCaskey, Alexander J.; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has supported the development of the NEAMS Integrated Computational Environment (NiCE), a modeling and simulation workflow environment that provides services and plugins to facilitate tasks such as code execution, model input construction, visualization, and data analysis. This report details the developement of workflows for the reactor core neutronics application, PROTEUS. This advanced neutronics application (primarily developed at Argonne National Laboratory) aims to improve nuclear reactor design and analysis by providing an extensible and massively parallel, finite-element solver for current and advanced reactor fuel neutronics modeling. The integration of PROTEUS-specific tools into NiCE is intended to make the advanced capabilities that PROTEUS provides more accessible to the nuclear energy research and development community. This report will detail the work done to improve existing PROTEUS workflow support in NiCE. We will demonstrate and discuss these improvements, including the development of flexible IO services, an improved interface for input generation, and the addition of advanced Fortran development tools natively in the platform.

  15. Genome Sequence of a Proteus mirabilis Strain Isolated from the Salivary Glands of Larval Lucilia sericata

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Shuhua; Crippen, Tawni L.; Visi, David K.; Benbow, M. Eric; Allen, Michael S.; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.; Sze, Sing-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    We announce a draft genome sequence of a Proteus mirabilis strain derived from Lucilia sericata salivary glands. This strain is demonstrated to attract and induce oviposition by L. sericata, a common blow fly important to medicine, agriculture, and forensics. The genome sequence will help dissect interkingdom communication between the species. PMID:27469950

  16. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3410 - Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proteus spp. (Weil-Felix) serological reagents. 866.3410 Section 866.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. Endometrioid Paraovarian Borderline Cystic Tumor in an Infant with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Liliana; Tello, Mariela; Maza, Ivan; Oscanoa, Monica; Dueñas, Milagros; Castro, Haydee; Latorre, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian and paraovarian neoplasms are uncommon in children, mainly originating from germ cell tumors and, least frequently, epithelial tumors. There is an association between genital tract tumors and Proteus syndrome, a rare, sporadic, and progressive entity, characterized by a postnatal overgrowth in several tissues caused by a mosaic mutation in the AKT1 gene. We describe a 20-month-old asymptomatic infant with Proteus syndrome who developed an endometrioid paraovarian borderline cystic tumor. This is the youngest patient so far reported in the literature with this rare syndrome and an adnexal tumor of borderline malignancy. A total of nine patients have been described with female tract tumors and associated Proteus syndrome, which includes bilateral ovarian cystadenomas and other benign masses. A paraovarian neoplasm is extremely rare in children and could be considered a criterion for Proteus syndrome. Standardized staging and treatment of these tumors are not well established; however, most authors conclude that these neoplasms must be treated as their ovarian counterparts. PMID:26558123

  2. Proteus - A Free and Open Source Sensor Observation Service (SOS) Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, J.; Satapathy, G.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's 'electronic skin' is becoming ever more sophisticated with a growing number of sensors measuring everything from seawater salinity levels to atmospheric pressure. To further the scientific application of this data collection effort, it is important to make the data easily available to anyone who wants to use it. Making Earth Science data readily available will allow the data to be used in new and potentially groundbreaking ways. The US National Science and Technology Council made this clear in its most recent National Strategy for Civil Earth Observations report, when it remarked that Earth observations 'are often found to be useful for additional purposes not foreseen during the development of the observation system'. On the road to this goal the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is defining uniform data formats and service interfaces to facilitate the discovery and access of sensor data. This is being done through the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) stack of standards, which include the Sensor Observation Service (SOS), Sensor Model Language (SensorML), Observations & Measurements (O&M) and Catalog Service for the Web (CSW). End-users do not have to use these standards directly, but can use smart tools that leverage and implement them. We have developed such a tool named Proteus. Proteus is an open-source sensor data discovery client. The goal of Proteus is to be a general-purpose client that can be used by anyone for discovering and accessing sensor data via OGC-based services. Proteus is a desktop client and supports a straightforward workflow for finding sensor data. The workflow takes the user through the process of selecting appropriate services, bounding boxes, observed properties, time periods and other search facets. NASA World Wind is used to display the matching sensor offerings on a map. Data from any sensor offering can be previewed in a time series. The user can download data from a single sensor offering, or download data in bulk from all

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia by comparison of rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains suggests the reclassification of Proteus myxofaciens in a new genus, Cosenzaea gen. nov., as Cosenzaea myxofaciens comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Grimont, Patrick A D; Grimont, Francine; Lefevre, Martine; Giammanco, Giuseppe; Pignato, Sarina

    2011-07-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of partial rpoB gene sequences of type and clinical strains belonging to different 16S rRNA gene-fingerprinting ribogroups within 11 species of enterobacteria of the genera Proteus, Morganella and Providencia was performed and allowed the definition of rpoB clades, supported by high bootstrap values and confirmed by ≥2.5 % nucleotide divergence. None of the resulting clades included strains belonging to different species and the majority of the species were confirmed as discrete and homogeneous. However, more than one distinct rpoB clade could be defined among strains belonging to the species Proteus vulgaris (two clades), Providencia alcalifaciens (two clades) and Providencia rettgeri (three clades), suggesting that some strains represent novel species according to the genotypes outlined by rpoB gene sequence analysis. Percentage differences between the rpoB gene sequence of the type strain of Proteus myxofaciens and other members of the same genus (17.3-18.9 %) were similar to those calculated amongst strains of the genus Providencia (16.4-18.7 %), suggesting a genetic distance at the genus-level between Proteus myxofaciens and the rest of the Proteus-Providencia group. Proteus myxofaciens therefore represents a member of a new genus, for which the name Cosenzaea gen. nov., is proposed. PMID:20709916

  4. Anti-Proteus activity of some South African medicinal plants: their potential for the prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E; van Vuuren, S F

    2014-02-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional African medicine to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. Thirty-four extracts from 13 South African plant species with a history of ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation were investigated for their ability to control two microbial triggers for RA (Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris). Twenty-nine of the extracts (85.3 %) inhibited the growth of P. mirabilis and 23 of them tested (67.7 %) inhibited the growth of P. vulgaris. Methanol and water extracts of Carpobrotus edulis, Lippia javanica, Pelargonium viridflorum, Ptaeroxylon obliquum, Syzygium cordatum leaf and bark, Terminalia pruinoides, Terminalia sericea, Warburgia salutaris bark and an aqueous extract of W. salutaris leaf were effective Proteus inhibitors, with MIC values <2,000 μg/ml. The most potent extracts were examined by Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and UV-Vis spectroscopy for the presence of resveratrol. Only extracts from T. pruinoides and T. sericea contained resveratrol, indicating that it was not responsible for the anti-Proteus properties reported here. All extracts with Proteus inhibitory activity were also either non-toxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The low toxicity of these extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against Proteus spp. indicate their potential for blocking the onset of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:23877712

  5. Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center d

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Proteus aircraft and an F/A-18 Hornet from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a low-level flyby at Las Cruces Airport in New Mexico. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  6. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Yauba, M. S.; Ahmed, H.; Imoudu, I. A.; Yusuf, M. O.; Makarfi, H. U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species. PMID:25893125

  7. Pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis to Brown Tree Frogs (Litoria ewingii)

    PubMed Central

    Schadich, Ermin; Cole, Anthony LJ

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial dermatosepticemia, a systemic infectious bacterial disease of frogs, can be caused by several opportunistic gram-negative bacterial species including Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium indologenes, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia liquifaciens. Here we determined the pathogenicity of 3 bacterial species (Aeromonas hydrophila, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis) associated with an outbreak of fatal dermatosepticemia in New Zealand Litoria ewingii frogs. A bath challenge method was used to expose test frogs to individual bacterial species (2 × 107 cfu/mL in pond water); control frogs were exposed to uninfected pond water. None of the control frogs or those exposed to A. hydrophila or P. mirabilis showed any morbidity or mortality. Morbidity and mortality was 40% among frogs exposed to K. pneumonia, and the organism was reisolated from the hearts, spleens, and livers of affected animals. PMID:20412685

  8. Susceptibility to Polymyxin B of Penicillin G-induced Proteus mirabilis L Forms and Spheroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Teuber, Michael

    1969-01-01

    A polymyxin B-resistant strain of Proteus mirabilis was converted into L forms and spheroplasts in the presence of penicillin G. This treatment caused a 400-fold increase in polymyxin B susceptibility. The acquired susceptibility was in the range of the natural susceptibility reported for susceptible gram-negative bacteria (∼1 μg/ml). The high susceptibility to polymyxin B was lost as soon as the spheroplasts and L forms were allowed to reconvert into the bacillary form in penicillin-free media. This behavior is strong evidence that the natural resistance of Proteus strains to polymyxins is due to the impermeability of the outer cell wall structures to these antibiotic substances. PMID:4306537

  9. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Tehachapi Mountains in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unique shape of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft is clearly visible in this photo of the plane in flight above the rocky slopes of the Tehachapi Mountains near Mojave, California, where the Proteus was designed and built. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the

  10. Properties of a deep Proteus R mutant isolated from clinical material.

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Pietrasik, D; Rózalski, A; Bartodziejska, B; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, J; Mayer, H; Kotełko, K

    1991-06-01

    Some biological features of a deep P. mirabilis 17301 R mutant isolated from the urine of a patient with chronic UTI were studied and compared with similar features of P. mirabilis S forms and five induced Proteus R mutants of different chemotypes. There were no differences in lethal toxicity and adhesion to human uroepithelial cells. Of all the R mutants tested, two of them, 17301 and R4, exhibited strong cell-bound hemolytic activity. The P. mirabilis R 17301 was characterized as the most invasive (tested in L929 mouse fibroblasts) compared to the other Proteus S and R forms. The structure of PS from a clinical R mutant investigated and the results of serological studies prove that this mutant belongs to the Rc chemotype. PMID:2054167

  11. Operative Management of OSAS in a Complex Case of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Elena; Cavaliere, Michele; Castagna, Giovanni; Marino, Anna; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Iengo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in childhood with high prevalence in syndromic subjects with craniofacial malformations. Proteus Syndrome (PS) is a rare hamartoneoplastic disorder associated with disproportionate and asymmetric overgrowth of body parts and hypertrophy or malformation of lymphatic tissues, such as palatine tonsils. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy diagnosed with Proteus Syndrome (PS) and suffering from OSAS due to asymmetric palatine tonsillar hypertrophy, treated with partial resection of left tonsil. To avoid the risk of a general anesthesia and remove only the obstructive portion of the palatine tonsil bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermotherapy (RFITT) under local anesthesia was performed. Recovery of the obstructive respiratory disease was obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of partial tonsillar resection performed in a patient with PS suffering from OSAS under local anesthesia. PMID:26199778

  12. Growth and cell structure of Proteus vulgaris when cultivated in weightlessness in the Cytos apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kordyum, V A; Mashinsky, A L; Man'ko, V G; Babski, V G; Sytnik, K M; Kordyum, E L; Bochagova, O P; Nefedov, Y L; Kozharinov, V I; Grechko, G M

    1980-01-01

    Growth data and electron-microscopic analyses are presented for Proteus vulgaris cultures which were grown during space flight in polyethylene packets in a semisolid medium with Tryptose for 96 h. In the suboptimal culture conditions the growth and morphological characteristics of the flight and ground control variants were nearly identical, but we were able to detect a number of differences between the cellular ultrastructure of these variants. These differences testify to changes in the bacterial cell metabolism during space flight. PMID:11971287

  13. Proteus mirabilis urease. Partial purification and inhibition by boric acid and boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, J M; Hausinger, R P

    1988-03-15

    Urease was purified 800-fold and partially characterized from Proteus mirabilis, the predominant microorganism associated with urinary stones. Boric acid is a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor of urease. The pH-dependence of inhibition exhibited pKa values of 6.25 and 9.3, where the latter value is probably due to the inherent pKa of boric acid. Three boronic acids also were shown to inhibit urease competitively. PMID:3291857

  14. Crystallization of urine mineral components may depend on the chemical nature of Proteus endotoxin polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Staczek, Paweł; Rózalski, Antoni

    2003-06-01

    Formation of infectious urinary calculi is the most common complication accompanying urinary tract infections by members of the genus Proteus. The major factor involved in stone formation is the urease produced by these bacteria, which causes local supersaturation and crystallization of magnesium and calcium phosphates as carbonate apatite [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6).CO(3)] and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4).6H(2)O), respectively. This effect may also be enhanced by bacterial polysaccharides. Macromolecules of such kind contain negatively charged residues that are able to bind Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), leading to the accumulation of these ions around bacterial cells and acceleration of the crystallization process. The levels of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions bound by whole Proteus cells were measured, as well as the chemical nature of isolated LPS polysaccharides, and the intensity of the in vitro crystallization process was compared in a synthetic urine. The results suggest that the sugar composition of Proteus LPS may either enhance or inhibit the crystallization of struvite and apatite, depending on its chemical structure and ability to bind cations. This points to the increased importance of endotoxin in urinary tract infections. PMID:12748265

  15. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code. [two and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two and three dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. Proteus solves the Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. Turbulence is modeled using a Baldwin-Lomax based algebraic eddy viscosity model. In addition, options are available to solve thin layer or Euler equations, and to eliminate the energy equation by assuming constant stagnation enthalpy. An extensive series of validation cases have been run, primarily using the two dimensional planar/axisymmetric version of the code. Several flows were computed that have exact solution such as: fully developed channel and pipe flow; Couette flow with and without pressure gradients; unsteady Couette flow formation; flow near a suddenly accelerated flat plate; flow between concentric rotating cylinders; and flow near a rotating disk. The two dimensional version of the Proteus code has been released, and the three dimensional code is scheduled for release in late 1991.

  16. Development of a Phage Cocktail to Control Proteus mirabilis Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Luís D. R.; Veiga, Patrícia; Cerca, Nuno; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Almeida, Carina; Azeredo, Joana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterium that causes catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) due to its ability to colonize and form crystalline biofilms on the catheters surface. CAUTIs are very difficult to treat, since biofilm structures are highly tolerant to antibiotics. Phages have been used widely to control a diversity of bacterial species, however, a limited number of phages for P. mirabilis have been isolated and studied. Here we report the isolation of two novel virulent phages, the podovirus vB_PmiP_5460 and the myovirus vB_PmiM_5461, which are able to target, respectively, 16 of the 26 and all the Proteus strains tested in this study. Both phages have been characterized thoroughly and sequencing data revealed no traces of genes associated with lysogeny. To further evaluate the phages’ ability to prevent catheter’s colonization by Proteus, the phages adherence to silicone surfaces was assessed. Further tests in phage-coated catheters using a dynamic biofilm model simulating CAUTIs, have shown a significant reduction of P. mirabilis biofilm formation up to 168 h of catheterization. These results highlight the potential usefulness of the two isolated phages for the prevention of surface colonization by this bacterium. PMID:27446059

  17. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely shaped Proteus high-altitude aircraft soars over California's Mojave Desert during a July 1999 flight. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The

  18. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft in Flight over the Mojave Desert in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The unusual design of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft, incorporating a gull-wing shape for its main wing and a long, slender forward canard, is clearly visible in this view of the aircraft in flight over the Mojave Desert in California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer

  19. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera. The aircraft is designed to

  20. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taking Off from Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The uniquely-shaped Proteus high-altitude research aircraft lifts off from the runway at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS

  1. ERAST Program Proteus Aircraft Taxiing on Runway at Mojave Airport in Mojave, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A frontal view of the Proteus high-altitude aircraft on the ramp at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California in July 1999. In the Proteus Project, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is assisting Scaled Composites, Inc., Mojave, California, in developing a sophisticated station-keeping autopilot system and a Satellite Communications (SATCOM)-based uplink-downlink data system for aircraft and payload data under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. The ERAST Project is sponsored by the Office of Aero-Space Technology at NASA Headquarters, and is managed by the Dryden Flight Research Center. The Proteus is a unique aircraft, designed as a high-altitude, long-duration telecommunications relay platform with potential for use on atmospheric sampling and Earth-monitoring science missions. The aircraft is designed to be flown by two pilots in a pressurized cabin, but also has the potential to perform its missions semiautonomously or be flown remotely from the ground. Flight testing of the Proteus, beginning in the summer of 1998 at Mojave Airport through the end of 1999, included the installation and checkout of the autopilot system, including the refinement of the altitude hold and altitude change software. The SATCOM equipment, including avionics and antenna systems, had been installed and checked out in several flight tests. The systems performed flawlessly during the Proteus's deployment to the Paris Airshow in 1999. NASA's ERAST project funded development of an Airborne Real-Time Imaging System (ARTIS). Developed by HyperSpectral Sciences, Inc., the small ARTIS camera was demonstrated during the summer of 1999 when it took visual and near-infrared photos over the Experimental Aircraft Association's 'AirVenture 99' Airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The images were displayed on a computer monitor at the show only moments after they were taken. This was the second successful demonstration of the ARTIS camera

  2. Immunochemical characterization of the O antigens of two Proteus strains, O8-related antigen of Proteus mirabilis 12 B-r and O2-related antigen of Proteus genomospecies 5/6 12 B-k, infecting a hospitalized patient in Poland.

    PubMed

    Drzewiecka, Dominika; Shashkov, Alexander S; Arbatsky, Nikolay P; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-01

    A hospitalized 73-year-old woman was infected with a Proteus mirabilis strain, 12 B-r, isolated from the place of injection of a blood catheter. Another strain, 12 B-k, recognized as Proteus genomospecies 5 or 6, was isolated from the patient's faeces, which was an example of a nosocomial infection rather than an auto-infection. Serological investigation using ELISA and Western blotting showed that strain 12 B-k from faeces belonged to the Proteus O2 serogroup. Strain 12 B-r from the wound displayed cross-reactions with several Proteus O serogroups due to common epitopes on the core or O-specific parts of the lipopolysaccharide. Studies of the isolated 12 B-r O-specific polysaccharide by NMR spectroscopy revealed its close structural similarity to that of Proteus O8. The only difference in 12 B-r was the presence of an additional GlcNAc-linked phosphoethanolamine residue, which creates a putative epitope responsible for the cross-reactivity with Pt. mirabilis O16. The new O-antigen form could appear as a result of adaptation of the bacterium to a changing environment. On the basis of the data obtained, we suggest division of the O8 serogroup into two subgroups: O8a for strains of various Proteus species that have been previously classified into the O8 serogroup, and O8a,b for Pt. mirabilis 12 B-r, where 'a' is a common epitope and 'b' is a phosphoethanolamine-associated epitope. These findings further confirm serological and structural heterogeneity of O antigens of Proteus strains isolated lately from patients in Poland. PMID:26959528

  3. Proteus mirabilis mannose-resistant, Proteus-like fimbriae: MrpG is located at the fimbrial tip and is required for fimbrial assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Li, X; Zhao, H; Geymonat, L; Bahrani, F; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1997-01-01

    The mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbria, responsible for mannose-resistant hemagglutination, is a virulence factor for uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Based on known fimbrial gene organization, we postulated that MrpG, a putative minor subunit of the MR/P fimbria, functions as an adhesin responsible for hemagglutination, while MrpA serves as the major structural subunit for the filamentous structure. To test this hypothesis, an mrpG mutant was constructed by allelic-exchange mutagenesis and verified by PCR and Southern blotting. The mrpG mutant was found to be negative for hemagglutination, while wild-type strain H14320 and the complemented mutant were positive. Western blots with antiserum raised against an overexpressed MrpG'-His6 fusion protein showed that MrpG was present in the fimbrial preparations of both the wild-type strain and the complemented mutant but absent in that of the mrpG mutant. The mrpG mutant was significantly less virulent in a CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Western blots with antiserum to whole MR/P fimbriae showed that MrpA protein was also missing from the fimbrial preparation of the mrpG mutant. Using immunogold electron microscopy, we found that the normal MR/P-fimbrial structure was absent in the mrpG mutant, suggesting that MrpG is essential for initiation of normal fimbrial formation. In the wild-type strain, MrpG protein was localized to the tips of the fimbriae or at the surface of the cell when antiserum raised against overexpressed MrpG was used. Given the tip localization, MrpG may be required for initiation of assembly of MR/P fimbriae but does not appear to be the fimbrial adhesin. PMID:9119470

  4. Chemometric analysis of attenuated total reflectance infrared spectra of Proteus mirabilis strains with defined structures of LPS.

    PubMed

    Zarnowiec, Paulina; Mizera, Andrzej; Chrapek, Magdalena; Urbaniak, Mariusz; Kaca, Wieslaw

    2016-07-01

    Proteus spp. strains are some of the most important pathogens associated with complicated urinary tract infections and bacteremia affecting patients with immunodeficiency and long-term urinary catheterization. For epidemiological purposes, various molecular typing methods have been developed for this pathogen. However, these methods are labor intensive and time consuming. We evaluated a new method of differentiation between strains. A collection of Proteus spp. strains was analyzed by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region. ATR FT-IR spectroscopy used in conjunction with a diamond ATR accessory directly produced the biochemical profile of the surface chemistry of bacteria. We conclude that a combination of ATR FT-IR spectroscopy and mathematical modeling provides a fast and reliable alternative for discrimination between Proteus isolates, contributing to epidemiological research. PMID:27189426

  5. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Proteus mirabilis isolates from dogs.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Niina, Ayaka; Shimizu, Takae; Mukai, Yujiro; Kuwajima, Ken; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Kataoka, Yasushi

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale monitoring of resistance to 14 antimicrobial agents was performed using 103 Proteus mirabilis strains isolated from dogs in Japan. Resistant strains were analysed to identify their resistance mechanisms. Rates of resistance to chloramphenicol, streptomycin, enrofloxacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, kanamycin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, cephalothin, gentamicin, cefoxitin and cefotaxime were 20.4, 15.5, 12.6, 10.7, 9.7, 8.7, 5.8, 2.9, 2.9, 1.9 and 1.9%, respectively. No resistance to ceftazidime, aztreonam or imipenem was found. Class 1 and 2 integrases were detected in 2.9 and 11.7% of isolates, respectively. Class 1 integrons contained aadB or aadB-catB-like-blaOXA10-aadA1, whereas those of class 2 contained sat-aadA1, dhfr1-sat-aadA1 or none of the anticipated resistance genes. Of five distinct plasmid-mediated quinolone-resistance (PMQR) genes, only qnrD gene was detected in 1.9% of isolates. Quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA and parC from 13 enrofloxacin-intermediate and -resistant isolates were sequenced. Seven strains had double mutations and three had single mutations. Three of nine ampicillin-resistant isolates harboured AmpC-type β-lactamases (i.e. blaCMY-2, blaCMY-4 and blaDHA-1). These results suggest that canine Proteus mirabilis deserves continued surveillance as an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance determinants. This is the first report, to our knowledge, describing integrons, PMQRs and QRDR mutations in Proteus mirabilis isolates from companion animals. PMID:25187600

  6. Preliminary Analysis of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) with PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Lee, C. H.

    2015-11-30

    The neutron transport code PROTEUS has been used to perform preliminary simulations of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). TREAT is an experimental reactor designed for the testing of nuclear fuels and other materials under transient conditions. It operated from 1959 to 1994, when it was placed on non-operational standby. The restart of TREAT to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s resumption of transient testing is currently underway. Both single assembly and assembly-homogenized full core models have been evaluated. Simulations were performed using a historic set of WIMS-ANL-generated cross-sections as well as a new set of Serpent-generated cross-sections. To support this work, further analyses were also performed using additional codes in order to investigate particular aspects of TREAT modeling. DIF3D and the Monte-Carlo codes MCNP and Serpent were utilized in these studies. MCNP and Serpent were used to evaluate the effect of geometry homogenization on the simulation results and to support code-to-code comparisons. New meshes for the PROTEUS simulations were created using the CUBIT toolkit, with additional meshes generated via conversion of selected DIF3D models to support code-to-code verifications. All current analyses have focused on code-to-code verifications, with additional verification and validation studies planned. The analysis of TREAT with PROTEUS-SN is an ongoing project. This report documents the studies that have been performed thus far, and highlights key challenges to address in future work.

  7. Is the blind cave salamander Proteus anguinus equiped for magnetic orientation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouquerel, H.; Valet, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The Proteus anguinus is a blind cave salamander which can develop the ability of using the earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation. It has been shown that the strength of the geomagnetic field is not strong enough to excite the electroreceptors of these animals through induction mechanism so that the most likely hypothesis is that they would use cristals of magnetite as permanent magnets. We have been looking for evidence of remanent magnetism in several proteus collected from the underground CNRS laboratory at Moulis (France). Because the level of natural remanent magnetization, if any, was too low to be measured with confidence using a 3 axis squid 2G magnetometer (even bringing the animals as close as possible to the sensors), we stepwise remagnetized the samples between 0.2 and 1.2T. Measurements were performed in different parts of three proteus bodies. No significant magnetization was detected in the head, most of the signal being concentrated in the lower body of the animal. Saturation was attained after 0.2T while stepwise demagnetization by alternating field showed that most magnetization was removed after 40 mT (medium destructive field, MDF of about 10 mT), which is typical of magnetite. Independent measurements of clay soils taken from the surrounding immediate environment of the animals reveal a different magnetic signature for saturation, MDF and viscosity. Thus there is no apparent and direct link between food absorbed from their environment and the magnetic remamence of the animals. New experiments are currently in progress to determine whether magnetite is the unique magnetic carrier and also to provide better clue about the magnetic granulometry and its distribution.

  8. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  9. Mobilization of Morganocin 174 Plasmid and Kinetics of Morganocin Production in Proteus and Escherichia coli Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Morganocin 174 is coded by a plasmid, Mor174. The plasmid is not self-transmissible but may be mobilized by resistance factor R772. Morganocin synthesis in all Proteus and Providencia strains carrying Mor174 was characterized by a longer lag period after induction and higher titers than in Escherichia coli B(Mor174). The low titers obtained in E. coli B(Mor174) are due to a heatstable inhibitor produced by this strain. Synthesis of morganocin is not constitutive and may be induced by ultraviolet irradiation or mitomycin C. Morganocin production is not influenced by the growth medium of the organism. Images PMID:324393

  10. Warthog: A MOOSE-Based Application for the Direct Code Coupling of BISON and PROTEUS

    SciTech Connect

    McCaskey, Alexander J.; Slattery, Stuart; Billings, Jay Jay

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program from the Department of Energy s Office of Nuclear Energy provides a robust toolkit for the modeling and simulation of current and future advanced nuclear reactor designs. This toolkit provides these technologies organized across product lines: two divisions targeted at fuels and end-to-end reactor modeling, and a third for integration, coupling, and high-level workflow management. The Fuels Product Line and the Reactor Product line provide advanced computational technologies that serve each respective field well, however, their current lack of integration presents a major impediment to future improvements of simulation solution fidelity. There is a desire for the capability to mix and match tools across Product Lines in an effort to utilize the best from both to improve NEAMS modeling and simulation technologies. This report will detail a new effort to provide this Product Line interoperability through the development of a new application called Warthog. This application couples the BISON Fuel Performance application from the Fuels Product Line and the PROTEUS Core Neutronics application from the Reactors Product Line in an effort to utilize the best from all parts of the NEAMS toolkit and improve overall solution fidelity of nuclear fuel simulations. To acheive this, Warthog leverages as much prior work from the NEAMS program as possible, and in doing so, enables interoperability between the disparate MOOSE and SHARP frameworks, and the libMesh and MOAB mesh data formats. The remainder of this report will describe this work in full. We will begin with a detailed look at the individual NEAMS framework technologies used and developed in the various Product Lines, and the current status of their interoperability. We will then introduce the Warthog application: its overall architecture and the ways it leverages the best existing tools from accross the NEAMS toolkit to enable BISON-PROTEUS integration

  11. Proteus-MOC: A 3D deterministic solver incorporating 2D method of characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Lafleche, A.; Smith, M. A.; Lee, C.

    2013-07-01

    A new transport solution methodology was developed by combining the two-dimensional method of characteristics with the discontinuous Galerkin method for the treatment of the axial variable. The method, which can be applied to arbitrary extruded geometries, was implemented in PROTEUS-MOC and includes parallelization in group, angle, plane, and space using a top level GMRES linear algebra solver. Verification tests were performed to show accuracy and stability of the method with the increased number of angular directions and mesh elements. Good scalability with parallelism in angle and axial planes is displayed. (authors)

  12. First report of an OXA-48-producing multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain from Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Mediavilla, Jose R; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2015-07-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the bla(OXA-48)-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene bla(OXA-48), extended spectrum β-lactamase gene bla(CTX-M-14), and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3')-VIb. PMID:25896692

  13. Two novel Salmonella genomic island 1 variants in Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Wang, Hong-Ning; Yang, Li-Qin; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Four different Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) variants, including two novel variants, were characterized in one Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen sequence type ST1917 isolate and three Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China. One novel variant was derived from SGI1-B with the backbone gene S021 disrupted by a 12.72-kb IS26 composite transposon containing the dfrA17-aadA5 cassettes and macrolide inactivation gene cluster mphA-mrx-mphR. The other one was an integron-free SGI1 and contained a 183-bp truncated S025 next to IS6100 and S044. PMID:25918148

  14. Proteus: a direct forcing method in the simulations of particulate flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhi-Gang; Michaelides, Efstathios E.

    2005-01-01

    A new and efficient direct numerical method for the simulation of particulate flows is introduced. The method combines desired elements of the immersed boundary method, the direct forcing method and the lattice Boltzmann method. Adding a forcing term in the momentum equation enforces the no-slip condition on the boundary of a moving particle. By applying the direct forcing scheme, Proteus eliminates the need for the determination of free parameters, such as the stiffness coefficient in the penalty scheme or the two relaxation parameters in the adaptive-forcing scheme. The method presents a significant improvement over the previously introduced immersed-boundary-lattice-Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) where the forcing term was computed using a penalty method and a user-defined parameter. The method allows the enforcement of the rigid body motion of a particle in a more efficient way. Compared to the "bounce-back" scheme used in the conventional LBM, the direct-forcing method provides a smoother computational boundary for particles and is capable of achieving results at higher Reynolds number flows. By using a set of Lagrangian points to track the boundary of a particle, Proteus eliminates any need for the determination of the boundary nodes that are prescribed by the "bounce-back" scheme at every time step. It also makes computations for particles of irregular shapes simpler and more efficient. Proteus has been developed in two- as well as three-dimensions. This new method has been validated by comparing its results with those from experimental measurements for a single sphere settling in an enclosure under gravity. As a demonstration of the efficiency and capabilities of the present method, the settling of a large number (1232) of spherical particles is simulated in a narrow box under two different boundary conditions. It is found that when the no-slip boundary condition is imposed at the front and rear sides of the box the particles motion is significantly hindered

  15. Molecular Characteristics of Salmonella Genomic Island 1 in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Poultry Farms in China

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Qing-Qing; Cheng, Han; Zhang, Dong-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Six out of the 64 studied Proteus mirabilis isolates from 11 poultry farms in China contained Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). PCR mapping showed that the complete nucleotide sequences of SGI1s ranged from 33.2 to 42.5 kb. Three novel variants, SGI1-W, SGI1-X, and SGI1-Y, have been characterized. Resistance genes lnuF, dfrA25, and qnrB2 were identified in SGI1 for the first time. PMID:25267683

  16. Two Novel Salmonella Genomic Island 1 Variants in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Swine Farms in China

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Liu, Bi-Hui; Yang, Li-Qin; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Four different Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) variants, including two novel variants, were characterized in one Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen sequence type ST1917 isolate and three Proteus mirabilis isolates from swine farms in China. One novel variant was derived from SGI1-B with the backbone gene S021 disrupted by a 12.72-kb IS26 composite transposon containing the dfrA17-aadA5 cassettes and macrolide inactivation gene cluster mphA-mrx-mphR. The other one was an integron-free SGI1 and contained a 183-bp truncated S025 next to IS6100 and S044. PMID:25918148

  17. Sequence of the Proteus mirabilis urease accessory gene ureG.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1993-07-15

    We report the sequence of ureG, an accessory gene that is a part of the ure gene cluster of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and required for full enzymatic activity of urease. The 615-bp open reading frame predicts a M(r) 22,374 polypeptide, which contains a consensus amino acid (aa) sequence for ATP-binding. The polypeptide shares sequence homology with UreG of Escherichia coli (93% of identical aa), Klebsiella aerogenes (59%) and Helicobacter pylori (59%). PMID:8335248

  18. Identification of emergent blaCMY-2-carrying Proteus mirabilis lineages by whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mac Aogáin, M.; Rogers, T.R.; Crowley, B.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of 24 Proteus mirabilis isolates revealed the clonal expansion of two cefoxitin-resistant strains among patients with community-onset infection. These strains harboured blaCMY-2 within a chromosomally located integrative and conjugative element and exhibited multidrug resistance phenotypes. A predominant strain, identified in 18 patients, also harboured the PGI-1 genomic island and associated resistance genes, accounting for its broader antibiotic resistance profile. The identification of these novel multidrug-resistant strains among community-onset infections suggests that they are endemic to this region and represent emergent P. mirabilis lineages of clinical significance. PMID:26865983

  19. Proteus - A Mission to Investigate the Origins of Earth’s Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie Claire

    2015-08-01

    We still do not know how water and ingredients necessary for life were delivered to our planet. Comets were long thought to have seeded Earth with water, but new models and measurements have shown that comets may not be the right place to look. A growing number of small volatile-rich worlds in the outer asteroid belt - the main belt comets (MBCs) - have been observed to shed dust tails near perihelion and may hold the key to understanding the origin of inner solar system water.Proteus is a proposed Discovery-class solar system origins mission. Proteus, a 6.5-year mission, launches in 2021 to rendezvous with MBC 238P/Read shortly before it reaches perihelion in early 2028 and remains there for five months during its period of maximum activity. 238P/Read is of special interest because en route we have the opportunity to fly past and characterize its likely parent, asteroid 24 Themis. Proteus addresses five science objectives: (1) to determine where Read’s ices formed; (2) to distinguish whether the ices have a nitrogen isotope signature more like Earth or the outer solar system; (3) to determine at what temperature the ices formed; (4) to determine Read’s physical properties using surface composition and geomorphology, and (5) to determine whether Read’s outgassing emanates from discrete sources or diffuse regions and measure the scattering properties of the outgassed dust.To answer questions about the origin of water, isotopic measurements of MBC volatiles will be made with a new sensitive, precise, highly mature mass spectrometer, measuring isotopic abundances of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen as well as the abundances of noble gases. These measurements will be correlated with predictions from two types of models: chemical models which describe the distance-dependent chemistry in the nebula and dynamical models which describe where small bodies were gravitationally scattered during the era of giant-planet migration. Proteus additionally flies two redundant

  20. Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbrial operon: genetic organization, nucleotide sequence, and conditions for expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, an agent of urinary tract infection, expresses at least four fimbrial types. Among these are the MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. MrpA, the structural subunit, is optimally expressed at 37 degrees C in Luria broth cultured statically for 48 h by each of seven strains examined. Genes encoding this fimbria were isolated, and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The mrp gene cluster encoded by 7,293 bp predicts eight polypeptides: MrpI (22,133 Da), MrpA (17,909 Da), MrpB (19,632 Da), MrpC (96,823 Da), MrpD (27,886 Da), MrpE (19,470 Da), MrpF (17,363 Da), and MrpG (13,169 Da). mrpI is upstream of the gene encoding the major structural subunit gene mrpA and is transcribed in the direction opposite to that of the rest of the operon. All predicted polypeptides share > or = 25% amino acid identity with at least one other enteric fimbrial gene product encoded by the pap, fim, smf, fan, or mrk gene clusters. Images PMID:7910820

  1. Lytic bacteriophage PM16 specific for Proteus mirabilis: a novel member of the genus Phikmvvirus.

    PubMed

    Morozova, V; Kozlova, Yu; Shedko, E; Kurilshikov, A; Babkin, I; Tupikin, A; Yunusova, A; Chernonosov, A; Baykov, I; Кondratov, I; Kabilov, M; Ryabchikova, E; Vlassov, V; Tikunova, N

    2016-09-01

    Lytic Proteus phage PM16, isolated from human faeces, is a novel virus that is specific for Proteus mirabilis cells. Bacteriophage PM16 is characterized by high stability, a short latency period, large burst size and the occurrence of low phage resistance. Phage PM16 was classified as a member of the genus Phikmvvirus on the basis of genome organization, gene synteny, and protein sequences similarities. Within the genus Phikmvvirus, phage PM16 is grouped with Vibrio phage VP93, Pantoea phage LIMElight, Acinetobacter phage Petty, Enterobacter phage phiKDA1, and KP34-like bacteriophages. An investigation of the phage-cell interaction demonstrated that phage PM16 attached to the cell surface, not to the bacterial flagella. The study of P. mirabilis mutant cells obtained during the phage-resistant bacterial cell assay that were resistant to phage PM16 re-infection revealed a non-swarming phenotype, changes in membrane characteristics, and the absence of flagella. Presumably, the resistance of non-swarming P. mirabilis cells to phage PM16 re-infection is determined by changes in membrane macromolecular composition and is associated with the absence of flagella and a non-swarming phenotype. PMID:27350061

  2. Calcium and initial surface binding phase of pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus

    SciTech Connect

    Prusch, R.D.

    1986-08-01

    The uptake of membrane-bound solute and external medium by bulk-phase pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus is influenced by the level of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the external medium. Increasing external Ca/sup 2 +/ to approx.10/sup -4/ M increases pinocytotic intensity, while increases in Ca/sup 2 +/ above this level decrease the intensity of pinocytosis. The initial interaction of pinocytotic inducers and Ca/sup +2/ at the surface of A moeba proteus was therefore examined. Alcain blue and Na/sup +/, both inducers of pinocytosis, differ in the manner with which they associate with the amoeba surface, suggesting the possibility of different pinocytosis-inducing sites on the amoeba surface. Low levels of external Ca/sup 2 +/ in the range of 3 x 10/sup -5/ to 4.5 x 10/sup -4/ M increase the amount of cationic inducer associated with the cell surface while, at the same time, decreasing anion association with the cell surface. It is suggested that Ca/sup 2 +/ influences ion association with the cell surface by controlling the availability of negative surface sites, which in turn influences pinocytotic intensity. Surface binding of Na/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/ and Cl/sup -/ was determined by adding /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca or /sup 36/Cl.

  3. Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the proteus reactor

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed analysis has been completed for the ThO/sub 2/ and Th-metal axial blanket experiments performed at the Swiss PROTEUS critical facility in order to compare reaction rates and neutron spectra measured in prototypic GCFR configurations with calculated results. The PROTEUS configurations allowed the analysis of infinitely dilute thorium data in a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fast lattice spectrum at core center as well as the analysis of resonance self-shielding effects in the thorium-bearing axial blankets. These comparisons indicate that significant deficiencies still exist in the latest evaluated infinitely dilute thorium data file. Specifically, the analysis showed that the /sup 232/Th capture is underpredicted by ENDF/B-IV data, and the discrepancies are further exaggerated by ENDF/B-V data. On the other hand, ENDF/B-V /sup 232/Th fission data appear to be significantly improved relative to ENDF/B-IV data, while discrepancies are extremely large for the (n,2n) process in both data files. Finally, the (n,n') cross sections for thorium also appear improved in ENDF/B-V, except for a small energy range just above the 50 keV threshold. Therefore, these combined data deficiencies suggest that relatively large uncertainties should be associated with many of the results obtained from recent fast reactor alternate fuel cycle analyses. 38 figures, 12 tables.

  4. Tuberculous Otitis with Proteus mirabilis Co-Infection: An Unsuspected Presentation Encountered in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Sardar, Moumita; Jadhav, Savita Vivek; Vyawahare, Chanda; Misra, Rabindranath

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a contagious bacterial disease which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, primarily involves the lungs.Though Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is the commonest clinical presentation, there is a need for alertness towards uncommon presentations which involve other organs. Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is one such rare presentation seen in paediatric practice. It is characterized by painless otorrhoea which fails to respond to the routine antibacterial treatment. TOM usually occurs secondary to PTB. Here is a case of tuberculous otitis media with Proteus mirabilis co-infection, with no evidence of PTB. In the sample of ear discharge obtained from the patient, acid fast bacilli were demonstrated on direct microscopy after Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Culture done on Lowenstein-Jensen medium demonstrated slow-growing Mycobacterium. Bacteriological culture and identification helped in isolating Proteus mirabilis. PCR, followed by Line- Probe Assay for early identification and susceptibility testing to primary drugs, was done. Further, patient tested negative for the Mantoux test. Patient was enrolled in National Tuberculosis programme- RNTCP. This case emphasizes on one of the less common presentations of a common disease. A high clinical suspicion and laboratory confirmation are required for appropriate patient management. PMID:24995225

  5. Proteus mirabilis ambient-temperature fimbriae: cloning and nucleotide sequence of the aft gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Fulkerson, J F; Watson, D C; Mobley, H L

    1996-01-01

    Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis produces at least four types of fimbriae. Amino acid sequences from two peptides, derived by tryptic digestion of the structural subunit of one type of these fimbriae, the ambient-temperature fimbriae, were determined: NVVPGQPSSTQ and LIEGENQLNYNA. PCR primers, based on these sequences and that of the N terminus, were used to amplify a 359-bp fragment. A cosmid clone, isolated from a P. mirabilis genomic library by hybridization with the 359-bp PCR product, was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the atf gene cluster. A 3,903-bp region encodes three polypeptides: AtfA, the structural subunit; AtfB, the chaperone; and AtfC, the outer membrane molecular usher. No fimbria-related genes are evident either 5' or 3' to the three contiguous genes. AtfA demonstrates significant amino acid sequence identity with type 1 major fimbrial subunits of several enteric species. The 359-bp PCR product hybridized strongly with all Proteus isolates (n = 9) and 25% of 355 Escherichia coli isolates but failed to hybridize with any of 26 isolates among nine other uropathogenic species. Ambient-temperature fimbriae of P. mirabilis may represent a novel type of fimbriae of enteric species. PMID:8926119

  6. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae: identification, isolation, and characterization of a new ambient-temperature fimbria.

    PubMed Central

    Massad, G; Bahrani, F K; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract infections involving Proteus mirabilis may lead to complications including bladder and kidney stones, acute pyelonephritis, and bacteremia. This bacterium produces a number of fimbriae, two of which, MR/P fimbria and P. mirabilis fimbria, have been shown to contribute to the ability of this pathogen to colonize the bladder and kidney. We have now purified and characterized a previously undescribed fimbria of P. mirabilis, named ambient-temperature fimbria (ATF). Electron microscopy of a pure preparation and immunogold labeling of cells demonstrated that ATF was fimbrial in nature. The major fimbrial subunit of ATF has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, E-X-T-G-T-P-A-P-T-E-V-T-V-D-G-G-T-I-D-F, did not show significant similarity to that of any previously described fimbrial protein. ATF was expressed by all eight P. mirabilis strains examined. Culture conditions affected expression of ATF, with optimal expression observed in static broth cultures at 23 degrees C. This fimbria was not produced by cells grown at 42 degrees C or on solid medium. Expression of ATF did not correlate with mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) or mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutination and represents a novel fimbria of P. mirabilis. Images PMID:7909538

  7. Hemagglutinin, urease, and hemolysin production by Proteus mirabilis from clinical sources.

    PubMed

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R

    1990-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, can lead to serious complications including pyelonephritis. Adherence factors, urease, and hemolysin may be virulence determinants. These factors were compared for bacteria cultured from 16 patients with acute pyelonephritis and 35 with catheter-associated bacteriuria and for 20 fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates were more likely (P less than .05) to express the mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) hemagglutinin in the absence of mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutinin than were catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates produced urease activity of 63 +/- 27 (mean +/- SD) mumol of NH3/min/mg of protein, not significantly different from catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Hybridization of Southern blots of P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA with two urease gene probes demonstrated that urease gene sequences were conserved in all isolates. Geometric mean of reciprocal hemolytic titers for pyelonephritis isolates was 27.9; for urinary catheter isolates, 18.0; and for fecal isolates, 55.7 (not significantly different, P greater than .1). Although in vivo expression of urease and hemolysin may not be reliable indexes of virulence, MR/P hemagglutination in the absence of MR/K hemagglutination may be necessary for development of pyelonephritis. PMID:2179424

  8. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the murine urinary tract: virulence and nitrogen assimilation gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Melanie M; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2011-07-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  9. Development of an intranasal vaccine to prevent urinary tract infection by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Lane, M Chelsea; Warren, John W; Mobley, Harry L T

    2004-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis commonly infects the complicated urinary tract and is associated with urolithiasis. Stone formation is caused by bacterial urease, which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia, causing local pH to rise, and leads to the subsequent precipitation of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) and calcium phosphate (apatite) crystals. To prevent these infections, we vaccinated CBA mice with formalin-killed bacteria or purified mannose-resistant, Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, a surface antigen expressed by P. mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection, via four routes of immunization: subcutaneous, intranasal, transurethral, and oral. We assessed the efficacy of vaccination using the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Subcutaneous or intranasal immunization with formalin-killed bacteria and intranasal or transurethral immunization with purified MR/P fimbriae significantly protected CBA mice from ascending urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.05). To investigate the potential of MrpH, the MR/P fimbrial tip adhesin, as a vaccine, the mature MrpH peptide (residues 23 to 275, excluding the signal peptide), and the N-terminal receptor-binding domain of MrpH (residues 23 to 157) were overexpressed as C-terminal fusions to maltose-binding protein (MBP) and purified on amylose resins. Intranasal immunization of CBA mice with MBP-MrpH (residues 23 to 157) conferred effective protection against urinary tract infection by P. mirabilis (P < 0.002). PMID:14688082

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Isolated From Newly Weaned Infant Rhesus Monkeys and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenhai; He, Zhanlong; Huang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteus mirabilis is an important uropathogen that causes complicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and induces diarrhea in infants. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate P. mirabilis infection in newly weaned infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with diarrhea. Materials and Methods: Stool samples were collected from 74 rhesus monkeys and 12 ferrets with diarrhea. Proteus mirabilis was isolated from the samples through Polymerase Chain Reaction. The isolated P. mirabilis was subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Results: Seven (7/74, 9.5%) and four (4/12, 30%) P. mirabilis strains were detected in the stool samples collected from the monkeys and ferrets, respectively. Sequence analyses showed that the isolated P. mirabilis was closely related to P. mirabilis strain HI4320, which was isolated from the urine of a patient with a long-term indwelling urinary catheter. In addition, the isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Conclusions: Rhesus monkeys and ferrets are susceptible to P. mirabilis, making them useful as animal models for future studies on the mechanism of P. mirabilis-induced UTI and its corresponding treatment. PMID:26301055

  11. The expression of nonagglutinating fimbriae and its role in Proteus mirabilis adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tolson, D L; Harrison, B A; Latta, R K; Lee, K K; Altman, E

    1997-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common causative agent of human urinary tract infections, especially in catheterized patients and in those patients with structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. In addition to the production of hemolysin and urease, fimbriae-mediated adherence to uroepithelial cells and kidney epithelium may be essential for virulence of P. mirabilis. A single P. mirabilis strain is capable of expressing several morphologically distinct fimbrial species, which can each be favoured by specific in vitro growth conditions. The fimbrial species reported to date include mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbriae, ambient temperature fimbriae, P. mirabilis fimbriae, and nonagglutinating fimbriae (NAF). Here, using intact bacteria or purified NAF as immunogens, we have generated the first reported NAF-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Bacteria expressing NAF as their only fimbrial species adhered strongly to a number of cell lines in vitro, including uroepithelial cell lines. Binding of P. mirabilis was markedly reduced following preincubation with NAF-specific mAbs and Fab fragments. The presence of NAF with highly conserved N-terminal sequences on all P. mirabilis strains so far examined, combined with the ability of both anti-NAF mAbs and purified NAF molecules to inhibit P. mirabilis adherence in vitro, suggests that NAF may contribute to the pathogenesis of P. mirabilis. PMID:9304781

  12. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome. PMID:25725225

  13. Mass mortality in ornamental fish, Cyprinus carpio koi caused by a bacterial pathogen, Proteus hauseri.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Swaminathan, T Raja; Kumar, Rahul G; Dharmaratnam, Arathi; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2015-09-01

    Moribund koi carp, Cyprinus carpio koi, from a farm with 50% cumulative mortality were sampled with the aim of isolating and detecting the causative agent. Three bacterial species viz., Citrobacter freundii (NSCF-1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (NSKP-1) and Proteus hauseri [genomospecies 3 of Proteus vulgaris Bio group 3] (NSPH-1) were isolated, identified and characterized on the basis of biochemical tests and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene using universal bacterial primers. Challenge experiments with these isolates using healthy koi carp showed that P. hauseri induced identical clinical and pathological states within 3 d of intramuscular injection. The results suggest P. hauseri (NSPH-1) was the causative agent. In phylogenetic analysis, strain NSPH-1 formed a distinct cluster with other P. hauseri reference strains with ≥99% sequence similarity. P. hauseri isolates were found sensitive to Ampicillin, Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin and Cefixime and resistant to Gentamycin, Oxytetracycline, Chloramphenicol, and Kanamycin. The affected fish recovered from the infection after ciprofloxacin treatment. PMID:26028178

  14. The Ciprofloxacin Impact on Biofilm Formation by Proteus Mirabilis and P. Vulgaris Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecinska-Pirog, Joanna; Skowron, Krzysztof; Bartczak, Wojciech; Gospodarek-Komkowska, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Background Proteus spp. bacilli belong to opportunistic human pathogens, which are primarily responsible for urinary tract and wound infections. An important virulence factor is their ability to form biofilms that greatly reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics in the site of infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the value of the minimum concentration of ciprofloxacin that eradicates a biofilm of Proteus spp. strains. Materials and Methods A biofilm formation of 20 strains of P. mirabilis and 20 strains of P. vulgaris were evaluated by a spectrophotometric method using 0.1% 2, 3, 5-Triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride solution (TTC, AVANTORTM). On the basis of the results of the absorbance of the formazan, a degree of reduction of biofilm and minimum biofilm eradication (MBE) values of MBE50 and MBE90 were determined. Results All tested strains formed a biofilm. A value of 1.0 μg/mL ciprofloxacin is MBE50 for the strains of both tested species. An MBE90 value of ciprofloxacin for isolates of P. vulgaris was 2 μg/mL and for P. mirabilis was 512 μg/mL. Conclusions Minimum biofilm eradication values of ciprofloxacin obtained in the study are close to the values of the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC). PMID:27303616

  15. A Sensor To Detect the Early Stages in the Development of Crystalline Proteus mirabilis Biofilm on Indwelling Bladder Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Stickler, D. J.; Jones, S. M.; Adusei, G. O.; Waters, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    A simple sensor has been developed to detect the early stages of urinary catheter encrustation and avoid the clinical crises induced by catheter blockage. In laboratory models of colonization by Proteus mirabilis, the sensor signaled encrustation at an average time of 43 h before catheters were blocked with crystalline biofilm. PMID:16597888

  16. Investigation of the types and characteristics of the proteolytic enzymes formed by diverse strains of Proteus species.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W

    1999-07-01

    Many diverse clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis (48 strains), P. penneri (25), P. vulgaris biogroup 2 (48) and P. vulgaris biogroup 3 (21) from man were examined for their ability to produce proteolytic enzymes and the nature and characteristics of the proteases were studied. All the P. penneri isolates, most (94-90%) of the P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris biogroup 2 isolates, but only 71% of the P. vulgaris biogroup 3 isolates, secreted proteolytic enzymes. These were detected most readily at pH 8 with gelatin as substrate. A strong correlation was found between the ability of a strain to form swarming growth and its ability to secrete proteases. Non-swarming isolates invariably appeared to be non-proteolytic. However, some isolates, particularly of P. vulgaris biogroup 3, were non-proteolytic even when they formed swarming growth. Analysis of the secreted enzymes of the different Proteus spp. on polyacrylamide-gelatin gels under various constraints of pH and other factors showed that they were all EDTA-sensitive metalloproteinases. Analysis of the kinetics of production of the proteases revealed the formation of an additional protease of undefined type and function that was cell-associated and formed before the others were secreted. The secreted protease was subsequently modified to two isoforms whose mass (53-46 kDa) varied with the Proteus spp. and the strain. There was no evidence that the secreted proteases of strains of Proteus spp. were of types other than metalloproteinases. PMID:10403412

  17. Taxonomic characterisation of Proteus terrae sp. nov., a N2O-producing, nitrate-ammonifying soil bacterium.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Undine; Augustin, Jürgen; Spröer, Cathrin; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Schumann, Peter; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In the context of studying the influence of N-fertilization on N2 and N2O flux rates in relation to the soil bacterial community composition in fen peat grassland, a group of bacterial strains was isolated that performed dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and concomitantly produced N2O. The amount of nitrous oxide produced was influenced by the C/N ratio of the medium. The potential to generate nitrous oxide was increased by higher availability of nitrate-N. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA and the rpoB gene sequences demonstrated that the investigated isolates belong to the genus Proteus, showing high similarity with the respective type strains of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus penneri. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed differences at the species level. These differences were substantiated by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and several distinct physiological characteristics. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the soil isolates represent a novel species for which the name Proteus terrae sp. nov. (type strain N5/687(T) =DSM 29910(T) =LMG 28659(T)) is proposed. PMID:26437638

  18. Modeling Multiphase Coastal and Hydraulic Processes in an Interactive Python Environment with the Open Source Proteus Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Ahmadia, A. J.; Bakhtyar, R.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is dominated by multiphase flow processes, due to the importance of capturing water's interaction with soil and air phases. Unfortunately, many different mathematical model formulations are required to model particular processes and scales of interest, and each formulation often requires specialized numerical methods. The Proteus toolkit is a software package for research on models for coastal and hydraulic processes and improvements in numerics, particularly 3D multiphase processes and parallel numerics. The models considered include multiphase flow, shallow water flow, turbulent free surface flow, and various flow-driven processes. We will discuss the objectives of Proteus and recent evolution of the toolkit's design as well as present examples of how it has been used used to construct computational models of multiphase flows for the US Army Corps of Engineers. Proteus is also an open source toolkit authored primarily within the US Army Corps of Engineers, and used, developed, and maintained by a small community of researchers in both theoretical modeling and computational methods research. We will discuss how open source and community development practices have played a role in the creation of Proteus.

  19. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  20. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  1. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    PubMed

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1). PMID:17933343

  2. First Report of an OXA-48-Producing Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Strain from Gaza, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strain producing the carbapenemase OXA-48 (Pm-OXA-48) isolated at Al-Shifa hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Draft genome sequencing of Pm-OXA-48 identified 16 antimicrobial resistance genes, encoding resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, phenicols, streptothricin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complete sequencing of the blaOXA-48-harboring plasmid revealed that it is a 72 kb long IncL/M plasmid, harboring carbapenemase gene blaOXA-48, extended spectrum β-lactamase gene blaCTX-M-14, and aminoglycoside resistance genes strA, strB, and aph(3′)-VIb. PMID:25896692

  3. [Joint action of nitrofuran preparations and bile acids on bacteria of the genus Proteus].

    PubMed

    Sytnik, I A; Puzakova, E V

    1975-01-01

    Sensitivity of 25 fresh isolates of Proteus to some nitrofuran drugs most widely used in the clinical practice, such as furacillin, furagin, furazolidone and nitrofurantoin was studied. When the drugs were used in combination with some bile acids, i.e. desoxycholic, dehydrocholic, cholic and glycocholic acids, significant in vitro potentiation of the antibacterial activity of the nitrofurans against the isolates was observed. The combinations of the drugs with desoxycholic acid proved to be most effective. In the presence of this acid the bacteriostatic dose of the drugs decreased several thousand times. Combination of the nitrofurans with the other acids resulted in an increase in the antimicrobial activity amounting to several hundred times. The combinations of the drugs with the bile acids had not only bacteriostatic but also bactericidal effect. PMID:1225184

  4. Histochemical and biochemical urease localization in the periplasm and outer membrane of two Proteus mirabilis strains.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Cheng, K J; Gould, W D; Nickel, J C; Costerton, J W

    1986-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacillus, is often implicated in the formation of infectious kidney stones. As ureolytic activity of this organism is thought to play a major role in its pathogenesis, we adapted our recently described urease localization technique to visualize urease activity in vivo. Urease activity was ultrastructurally localized in two clinically isolated P. mirabilis strains by precipitating the enzymatic reaction product (ammonia) with sodium tetraphenylboron. Subsequent silver staining of the cells revealed urease activity to be predominantly associated with the periplasm and outer membranes of each strain. Biochemical measurements of urease activity in P. mirabilis cell fractions correlated well with histochemical observations in that the majority of urease activity was associated with the periplasm. Membrane-bound urease activity of these strains was associated mainly with the peptidoglycan in the detergent-insoluble (outer membrane) fraction. PMID:3539291

  5. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Regué, Miguel; Tomás, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS) phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104) were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104) was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104) product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains. PMID:24756091

  6. Insights into copper effect on Proteus hauseri through proteomic and metabolic analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Ye, Chiming; Li, Yuzhe; Chen, Bor-Yann

    2016-02-01

    This is the first-attempt to use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass (LC-MS-MS) in deciphering the effects of copper ion on Proteus hauseri. Total 941 proteins in copper-addition (+Cu) group and 898 proteins in non-copper-addition (-Cu) group were found, which containing 221 and 178 differential proteins in +Cu and -Cu group, respectively. Differential proteins in both groups were defined into 14 groups by their functional classification which transport/membrane function proteins were the major different part between the two groups, which took 19.5% and 7.7%, respectively. The result of BioCyc and KEGG analyses on metabolic pathway indicated that copper could interrupted the pathway of chemotaxis CheY and inhibited the swarming of P. hauseri, which provided a potential in controlling the pathogenicity of this strain. PMID:26194304

  7. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yingchen; Tong, Shuilong; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Qi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Zhou, Huihao

    2016-09-01

    l-amino acid oxidases/deaminases (LAAOs/LAADs) are a class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the oxidative deamination of l-amino acids to α-keto acids. They are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and exhibit diverse substrate specificity, post-translational modifications and cellular localization. While LAAOs isolated from snake venom have been extensively characterized, the structures and functions of LAAOs from other species are largely unknown. Here, we reported crystal structure of a bacterial membrane-bound LAAD from Proteus vulgaris (pvLAAD) in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). We found that the overall fold of pvLAAD does not resemble typical LAAOs. Instead it, is similar to d-amino acid oxidases (DAAOs) with an additional hydrophobic insertion module on protein surface. Structural analysis and liposome-binding assays suggested that the hydrophobic module serves as an extra membrane-binding site for LAADs. Bacteria from genera Proteus and Providencia were found to encode two classes of membrane-bound LAADs. Based on our structure, the key roles of residues Q278 and L317 in substrate selectivity were proposed and biochemically analyzed. While LAADs on the membrane were proposed to transfer electrons to respiratory chain for FAD re-oxidization, we observed that the purified pvLAAD could generate a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in vitro, suggesting it could use dioxygen to directly re-oxidize FADH2 as what typical LAAOs usually do. These findings provide a novel insights for a better understanding this class of enzymes and will help developing biocatalysts for industrial applications. PMID:27422658

  8. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  9. Interferences in the Optimization of the MTT Assay for Viability Estimation of Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Grela, Ewa; Ząbek, Adam; Grabowiecka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Background: The chromogenic assay based on MTT bioreduction was adapted to Proteus mirabilis viability estimations. We primarily intended to use the assay for the evaluation of novel antimicrobial compounds, including structures with possible permeabilizing activity. Therefore, the influence of basic permeabilizing agents like Triton X-100 and EDTA upon the MTT assay was studied. Methods: 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used as a substrate for the whole-cell dehydrogenase activity estimations. The amount of formazan product was evaluated in the end-point reactions terminated with acidic isopropanol or in the continuous reactions run in the presence of low detergent concentrations. Results: The generally established procedure of the end product dissolution with acidic isopropanol caused absorbance instability which strongly affected the results accuracy. The disadvantage was especially pronounced when the assay was conducted in Mueller-Hinton Broth. PBS with 0.01% Triton X-100 used as the reaction medium allowed to omit the formazan dissolution step and follow the microbial MTT reduction in a continuous mode. It was observed that in Proteus mirabilis with a compromised outer membrane the assay score was artificially increased above the untreated control. Conclusion: The dependence of the assay results on the cell integrity might be a major drawback of the MTT assay application for the evaluation of novel antimicrobials against Gram-negative microorganisms. On the other hand, the MTT reduction could be conveniently used to assay the permeabilization degree in biotechnological protocols. PMID:26605010

  10. Molecular detection of HpmA and HlyA hemolysin of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Silvia Emanoele; Ludovico, Marilucia Santos; Martins, Fernando Henrique; da Rocha, Sérgio Paulo Dejato; Elias, Waldir Pereira; Pelayo, Jacinta Sanchez

    2013-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the bacterial infections frequently documented in humans. Proteus mirabilis is associated with UTI mainly in individuals with urinary tract abnormality or related with vesicular catheterism and it can be difficult to treat because of the formation of stones in the bladder and kidneys. These stones are formed due to the presence of urease synthesized by the bacteria. Another important factor is that P. mirabilis produces hemolysin HpmA, used by the bacteria to damage the kidney tissues. Proteus spp. samples can also express HlyA hemolysin, similar to that found in Escherichia coli. A total of 211 uropathogenic P. mirabilis isolates were analyzed to detect the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes by the techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot and hlyA by PCR. The hpmA and hpmB genes were expressed by the RT-PCR technique and two P. mirabilis isolates were sequenced for the hpmA and hpmB genes. The presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes was confirmed by PCR in 205 (97.15 %) of the 211 isolates. The dot blot confirmed the presence of the hpmA and hpmB genes in the isolates that did not amplify in the PCR. None of the isolates studied presented the hlyA gene. The hpmA and hpmB genes that were sequenced presented 98 % identity with the same genes of the HI4320 P. mirabilis sample. This study showed that the PCR technique has good sensitivity for detecting the hpmA and hpmB genes of P. mirabilis. PMID:23884594

  11. A novel autotransporter of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis is both a cytotoxin and an agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Alamuri, Praveen; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-05-01

    One of the six predicted Proteus mirabilis autotransporters (ATs), ORF c2341, is predicted to contain a serine protease motif and was earlier identified as an immunogenic outer membrane protein in P. mirabilis. The 3.2 kb gene encodes a 117 kDa protein with a 58-amino-acid-long signal peptide, a 75-kDa-long N-terminal passenger domain and a 30-kDa-long C-terminal translocator. Affinity-purified 110 kDa AT exhibited chymotrypsin-like activity and hydrolysed N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNa and N-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Leu-pNa with a K(M) of 22 muM and 31 muM, respectively, under optimal pH of 8.5-9.0 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Activity was inhibited by subtilase-specific inhibitors leupeptin and chymostatin. Both the cell-associated and purified form elicited cytopathic effects on cultured kidney and bladder epithelial cells. Substrate hydrolysis as well as cytotoxicity was associated with the passenger domain and was compromised upon mutation of any of the catalytic residues (Ser366, His147 and Asp533). At alkaline pH and optimal cell density, the AT also promoted autoaggregation of P. mirabilis and this function was independent of its protease activity. Cytotoxicity, autoaggregation and virulence were significantly reduced in an isogenic pta mutant of P. mirabilis. Proteus toxic agglutinin (Pta) represents a novel autotransported cytotoxin with no bacterial homologues that works optimally in the alkalinized urinary tract, a characteristic of urease-mediated urea hydrolysis during P. mirabilis infection. PMID:18430084

  12. Proteus virulence: involvement of the pore forming alpha-hemolysin (a short review).

    PubMed

    Tóth, V; Emódy, L

    2000-01-01

    The genus Proteus belongs to the tribe of Proteae in the family of Enterobacteriaceae, and consists of five species: P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. morganii, P. penneri and P. myxofaciens. They are distinguished from the rest of Enterobacteriaceae by their ability to deaminate phenylalanine and tryptophane. They hydrolyze urea and gelatin and fail to ferment lactose, mannose, dulcitol and malonate; and do not form lysine and arginine decarboxylase or beta-galactosidase [1]. Colonies produce distinct "burned chocolate" odor and frequently show the characteristics of swarming motility on solid media. P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris and P. morganii are widely recognized human pathogens. They have been isolated from urinary tract infections, wounds, ear, and nosocomial bacteremic infections, often in immuncompromised patients [2-6]. P. myxofaciens has no clinical interest to this time. P. penneri as species nova was nominated by the recommendation of Hickman and co-workers [7]. Formerly it was recognized as P. vulgaris biogroup 1 or indole negative P. vulgaris [8, 9]. Although it has been less commonly isolated from clinical samples than the other three human pathogenic Proteus species, it has nevertheless been connected with infections of the urinary tract, wounds and has been isolated from the feces of both healthy and diarrheic individuals [10-12]. Potential virulence factors responsible for virulence of Proteae are: IgA protease, urease, type3 fimbriae associated with MR/K haemagglutinins of at least two antigenic types, endotoxin, swarming motility and HlyA and/or HpmA type hemolysins [for review see ref. 13]. In the followings we give a survey of accumulated concepts about the position and characteristics of HlyA type alpha-hemolysins both in general and with emphasis on virulence functions in the tribe of Proteae. PMID:11056765

  13. Involvement of polyphosphate kinase in virulence and stress tolerance of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Qiao; Pan, Jia-Yun; Deng, Cong; Yu, Jing-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Man; Huang, Sheng-He; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), a gram-negative enteric bacterium, frequently causes urinary tract infections. Many virulence factors of uropathogenic P. mirabilis have been identified, including urease, flagella, hemolysin and fimbriae. However, the functions of polyphosphate kinase (PPK), which are related to the pathogenicity of many bacteria, remain entirely unknown in P. mirabilis. In this study, a ppk gene encoding the PPK insertional mutant in P. mirabilis strain HI4320 was constructed, and its biological functions were examined. The results of survival studies demonstrated that the ppk mutant was deficient in resistance to oxidative, hyperosmotic and heat stress. The swarming and biofilm formation abilities of P. mirabilis were also attenuated after the ppk interruption. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that ppk was required for P. mirabilis to invade the bladder. The negative phenotypes of the ppk mutant could be restored by ppk gene complementation. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteomes of the wild-type strain and the ppk mutant. Compared with the wild-type strain, seven proteins including TonB-dependent receptor, universal stress protein G, major mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbrial protein (MR/P fimbriae), heat shock protein, flagellar capping protein, putative membrane protein and multidrug efflux protein were down-regulated, and four proteins including exported peptidase, repressor protein for FtsI, FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and phosphotransferase were up-regulated in the ppk mutant. As a whole, these results indicate that PPK is an important regulator and plays a crucial role in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:26233310

  14. Proteus mirabilis fimbriae- and urease-dependent clusters assemble in an extracellular niche to initiate bladder stone formation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Norsworthy, Allison N; Sun, Tung-Tien; Pearson, Melanie M

    2016-04-19

    The catheter-associated uropathogenProteus mirabilisfrequently causes urinary stones, but little has been known about the initial stages of bladder colonization and stone formation. We found thatP. mirabilisrapidly invades the bladder urothelium, but generally fails to establish an intracellular niche. Instead, it forms extracellular clusters in the bladder lumen, which form foci of mineral deposition consistent with development of urinary stones. These clusters elicit a robust neutrophil response, and we present evidence of neutrophil extracellular trap generation during experimental urinary tract infection. We identified two virulence factors required for cluster development: urease, which is required for urolithiasis, and mannose-resistantProteus-like fimbriae. The extracellular cluster formation byP. mirabilisstands in direct contrast to uropathogenicEscherichia coli, which readily formed intracellular bacterial communities but not luminal clusters or urinary stones. We propose that extracellular clusters are a key mechanism ofP. mirabilissurvival and virulence in the bladder. PMID:27044107

  15. Production of acylated homoserine lactone by a novel marine strain of Proteus vulgaris and inhibition of its swarming by phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Biswa, Pramal; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-10-01

    A marine strain of Proteus vulgaris capable of activating multiple acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter cultures was isolated. The cognate signal molecule was characterized as octanoyl homoserine lactone (OHL) and its production was observed to be growth dependent, with maximum production (5.675 µg l(-1)) at 24 h growth. The strain exhibited swarming, but its motility was not affected upon addition of pure OHL or culture supernatant. Phytochemicals such as quercitin and berberine chloride inhibited OHL production and reduced swarming. FliA, the predominantly upregulated protein during swarming, was considered as a possible target for these inhibitors, and docking of the two most active and two least active inhibitors to this protein suggested preferential binding of the former set of compounds. Apart from adding new evidence to AHL production in Proteus vulgaris, active inhibitors shortlisted from this study could help in identifying lead compounds to act against this opportunistic pathogen of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25012967

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the First KPC-Type Carbapenemase-Positive Proteus mirabilis Strain from a Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Chiarelli, Adriana; Boinett, Christine J; Riccobono, Eleonora; Harris, Simon R; D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Giani, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the blaKPC-positive strain Proteus mirabilis AOUC-001 was performed using both the MiSeq and PacBio RS II platforms and yielded a single molecule of 4,272,433 bp, representing the complete chromosome. Genome analysis showed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants, including two copies of blaKPC-2 carried on a fragment of a KPC-producing plasmid previously described in Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:27340072

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the First KPC-Type Carbapenemase-Positive Proteus mirabilis Strain from a Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Chiarelli, Adriana; Boinett, Christine J.; Riccobono, Eleonora; Harris, Simon R.; D’Andrea, Marco Maria; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the blaKPC-positive strain Proteus mirabilis AOUC-001 was performed using both the MiSeq and PacBio RS II platforms and yielded a single molecule of 4,272,433 bp, representing the complete chromosome. Genome analysis showed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants, including two copies of blaKPC-2 carried on a fragment of a KPC-producing plasmid previously described in Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:27340072

  18. Verification of the proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for 2-D/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal, and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent developing pipe flows, and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations, and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, initial conditions, grid size, and grid packing is given for each case.

  19. Verification of the Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for flat plate and pipe flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Zeman, Patrick L.

    1991-01-01

    The Proteus Navier-Stokes Code is evaluated for two-dimensional/axisymmetric, viscous, incompressible, internal and external flows. The particular cases to be discussed are laminar and turbulent flows over a flat plate, laminar and turbulent dveloping pipe flows and turbulent pipe flow with swirl. Results are compared with exact solutions, empirical correlations and experimental data. A detailed description of the code set-up, including boundary conditions, intitial conditions, grid size and grid packing is given for each case.

  20. Proteus mirabilis urease: operon fusion and linker insertion analysis of ure gene organization, regulation, and function.

    PubMed

    Island, M D; Mobley, H L

    1995-10-01

    Urease is an inducible virulence factor of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis. Although eight contiguous genes necessary for urease activity have been cloned and sequenced, the transcriptional organization and regulation of specific genes within the Proteus gene cluster has not been investigated in detail. The first gene, ureR, is located 400 bp upstream and is oriented in the direction opposite the other seven genes, ureDABCEFG. The structural subunits of urease are encoded by ureABC. Previously, UreR was shown to contain a putative helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif 30 residues upstream of a consensus sequence which is a signature for the AraC family of positive regulators; this polypeptide is homologous to other DNA-binding regulatory proteins. Nested deletions of ureR linked to either ureD-lacZ or ureA-lacZ operon fusions demonstrated that an intact ureR is required for urea-induced synthesis of LacZ from either ureA or ureD and identified a urea-regulated promoter in the ureR-ureD intergenic region. However, lacZ operon fusions to fragments encompassing putative promoter regions upstream of ureA and ureF demonstrated that no urea-regulated promoters occur upstream of these open reading frames; regions upstream of ureR, ureE, and ureG were not tested. These data suggest that UreR acts as a positive regulator in the presence of urea, activating transcription of urease structural and accessory genes via sequences upstream of ureD. To address the role of the nonstructural regulatory and accessory genes, we constructed deletion, cassette, and linker insertion mutations throughout the ure gene cluster and determined the effect of these mutations on production and regulation of urease activity in Escherichia coli. Mutations were obtained, with locations determine by DNA sequencing, in all genes except ureA and ureE. In each case, the mutation resulted in a urease-negative phenotype. PMID:7559355

  1. Production of a High Efficiency Microbial Flocculant by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 Using Compound Organic Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Zhang, Jiao

    2010-11-01

    The production of a high efficiency microbial flocculant (MBF) by Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 using compound organic wastewater was investigated. To cut down the cost of the MBF production, several nutritive organic wastewaters were selected to replace glucose and peptone as the carbon source and the nitrogen source in the optimized medium of strain TJ-1, respectively. The compound wastewater of the milk candy and the soybean milk was found to be good carbon source and nitrogen source for this strain to produce MBF. The cost-effective culture medium consists of (per liter): 800 mL wastewater of milk candy, 200 mL wastewater of soybean milk, 0.3 g MgSO4ṡ7 H2O, 5 g K2HPO4, 2 g and KH2PO4, pH 7.0. The economic cost for the MBF production can be cut down over a half by using the developed culture medium. Furthermore, the utilization of the two wastewaters in the preparation of culture medium of strain TJ-1 can not only save their big treatment cost, but also realize their resource reuse.

  2. Effects of Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide on the subunit vaccine of Proteus mirabilis in birds.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guolin; Zhong, Shixun; Yang, Shifa; Zuo, Xuemei; Liang, Manfei; Sun, Jing; Liu, Jingjing; Zhu, Ruiliang

    2013-05-01

    Three adjuvants, namely, Taishan Pinus massoniana pollen polysaccharide (TPPPS), white mineral oil (WO) and propolis (PP), were added to the outer membrane protein (OMP) of Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) and their effects were compared. Three hundred 1-day-old chicks were randomly divided into five groups (I-V), with 60 chicks per group, and injected subcutaneously with WO-OMP vaccine (I), PP-OMP vaccine (II), TPPPS-OMP vaccine (III), OMP-only vaccine (IV) and physiological saline (V) at 3, 7 and 12 days old. On days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42 and 49 after the first vaccination, the antibody titers, interleukin-2 levels (IL-2) and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in the peripheral blood as well as the secreting-type IgA levels (SIgA) in the duodenum were measured. On day 7 after the third vaccination, the chicks were challenged with P. mirabilis strain Q1 and the protective effects of each group were observed. The highest protective rate was observed in group III. Moreover, the antibody titers as well as IL-2, SIgA and T-lymphocyte proliferation rates in this group significantly increased and were significantly higher than those in the other groups at most time points. The results indicate that TPPPS could significantly enhance the effects of the subunit vaccine of P. mirabilis; induced stronger humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity as compared with WO and PP; and should be developed as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:23403027

  3. [Effect of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase on the activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 microM) stimulates activity of the contractile vacuole of proteus. The effect of ACh is not mimicked by its analogs which are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), i. e., carbacholine and 5-methylfurmethide. The effect of ACh is not sensitive to the blocking action of M-cholinolytics, atropine and mytolone, but is suppressed by N-cholinolytic, tubocurarine. The inhibitors of AChE, eserine (0.01 microM) and armine (0.1 microM), suppress the effect of ACh on amoeba contractile vacuole. ACh does not affect activation of contractile vacuole induced by arginine-vasopressin (1 microM), but it blocks such effect of opiate receptors agonist, dynorphin A1-13 (0.01 microM). This effect of ACh is also suppressed by the inhibitors of AChE. These results suggest that, in the above-described effects of ACh, AChE acts not as an antagonist, but rather as a synergist. PMID:21870511

  4. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Siqing; Wang, Xuejiang; Yang, Aming; Xu, Bin; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier

    2009-04-15

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery. PMID:18718709

  5. Laser hazard analysis for airborne AURA (Big Sky variant) Proteus platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-02-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the airborne AURA (Big Sky Laser Technology) lidar system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standard Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for the Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The AURA lidar system is installed in the instrument pod of a Proteus airframe and is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The targets are located at various distances or ranges from the airborne platform. In order to protect personnel, who may be in the target area and may be subjected to exposures, it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength, calculate the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD), and determine the maximum 'eye-safe' dwell times for various operational altitudes and conditions. It was also necessary to calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (ODmin) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel who may receive hazardous exposures during ground base operations of the airborne AURA laser system (system alignment and calibration).

  6. Modified insulator semiconductor electrode with functionalized nanoparticles for Proteus mirabilis bacteria biosensor development.

    PubMed

    Braham, Yosra; Barhoumi, Houcine; Maaref, Abderrazak; Bakhrouf, Amina; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2013-12-01

    The development of enzymatic sensors for biological purposes such as biomedicine, pharmacy, food industry, and environmental toxicity requires the purification step of the enzyme. To prevent the loss of the enzyme activity, a new strategy is held in order to immobilize the bacteria. It will constitute the biological sensing element leading to a high operational stability and multiple adaptations to various conditions such as temperature, pH and ionic strength changes. In this work we describe the development of a urea biosensor by immobilizing Proteus mirabilis bacteria onto an insulator-semiconductor electrode on functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs), using cationic, Poly (allylamine hydrochloride) then anionic, Poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolytes, BSA (serum bovin albumin), and glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The response of P. mirabilis to urea addition is evaluated in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Before the immobilization step, the activity of urease produced from the P. mirabilis bacteria was attempted using the ion ammonium selective electrodes (ISEs). Adhesion of the bacteria cells on IS electrodes have been studied using contact angle measurements. After immobilization of the bacteria, on the (Si/SiO2/Si3N4) and (Si/SiO2) substrates, the relationship between the evolution of the flat band potential ∆VFB and the urea concentration is found to be linear for values ranging from 10(-2)M to 10(-5)M. PMID:24094152

  7. Eugenol alters the integrity of cell membrane and acts against the nosocomial pathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Pandima; Sakthivel, R; Nisha, S Arif; Suganthy, N; Pandian, S Karutha

    2013-03-01

    Eugenol, a member of the phenylpropanoids class of chemical compounds, is a clear to pale yellow oily liquid extracted from certain essential oils especially from clove oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, and bay leaf. The antibacterial activity of eugenol and its mechanism of bactericidal action against Proteus mirabilis were evaluated. Treatment with eugenol at their minimum inhibitory concentration [0.125 % (v/v)] and minimum bactericidal concentration [0.25 % (v/v)] reduced the viability and resulted in complete inhibition of P. mirabilis. A strong bactericidal effect on P. mirabilis was also evident, as eugenol inactivated the bacterial population within 30 min exposure. Chemo-attractant property and the observance of highest antibacterial activity at alkaline pH suggest that eugenol can work more effectively when given in vivo. Eugenol inhibits the virulence factors produced by P. mirabilis as observed by swimming motility, swarming behavior and urease activity. It interacts with cellular membrane of P. mirabilis and makes it highly permeable, forming nonspecific pores on plasma membrane, which in turn directs the release of 260 nm absorbing materials and uptake of more crystal violet from the medium into the cells. SDS-polyacrylamide gel, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis further proves the disruptive action of eugenol on the plasma membrane of P. mirabilis. The findings reveal that eugenol shows an excellent bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis by altering the integrity of cell membrane. PMID:23444040

  8. Allicin from garlic inhibits the biofilm formation and urease activity of Proteus mirabilis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Omid, Mahsa; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Amani, Mojtaba; Shokri Al-Hashem, Seyyedeh Khadijeh; Amir Mozafari, Nour; Peeri Doghaheh, Hadi

    2015-05-01

    Several virulence factors contribute to the pathogenesis of Proteus mirabilis. This study determined the inhibitory effects of allicin on urease, hemolysin and biofilm of P. mirabilis ATCC 12453 and its antimicrobial activity against 20 clinical isolates of P. mirabilis. Allicin did not inhibit hemolysin, whereas it did inhibit relative urease activity in both pre-lysed (half-maximum inhibitory concentration, IC50 = 4.15 μg) and intact cells (IC50 = 21 μg) in a concentration-dependent manner. Allicin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (2-32 μg mL(-1)) showed no significant effects on the growth of the bacteria (P > 0.05), but it reduced biofilm development in a concentration-dependent manner (P < 0.001). A higher concentration of allicin was needed to inhibit the established biofilms. Using the microdilution technique, the MIC90 and MBC90 values of allicin against P. mirabilis isolates were determined to be 128 and 512 μg mL(-1), respectively. The results suggest that allicin could have clinical applications in controlling P. mirabilis infections. PMID:25837813

  9. Proteus vulgaris urinary tract infections in rats; treatment with nitrofuran derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, D. J. N.

    1962-01-01

    Ascending urinary tract infections with stone formation have been produced experimentally in rats, using a modification of the method of Vermuelen & Goetz (1954a, b). A zinc disc infected with a culture of Proteus vulgaris was inserted into the bladder by suprapubic cystotomy under ether anaesthesia. The pH of the urine rises from 6.9 to 8 or 9 and calculi develop in the bladder within a few days of infection. The bladder and ureters become swollen, distended and inflamed, and renal abscesses develop. Death from renal failure generally occurs within 10 days of infection. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin was commenced three days after infection and continued for one month. This arrested the initial rise in urine alkalinity and stone formation, and few, if any, macroscopic lesions were found at post-mortem examination. Of nine nitrofuran derivatives examined for activity against this infection several showed slight activity, but only one, N-(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-γ-butyric acid, was as active as nitrofurantoin when given at four times the dose, but it was also one-third as toxic. It is concluded that this technique is suitable for the examination of potential urinary antiseptics. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:13964160

  10. Inhibition of swarming and virulence factor expression in Proteus mirabilis by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Won-Bo; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Chiou, Robin Y-Y; Lin, Shwu-Bin; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2006-10-01

    Resveratrol (3,5,4-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a phytoalexin compound with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The effect of resveratrol on swarming and virulence factor expression of Proteus mirabilis, an important pathogen infecting the urinary tract, was determined on swarming agar plates with and without the compound. Bacteria harvested at different times were assayed for cell length and the production of flagella, haemolysin and urease. Resveratrol inhibited P. mirabilis swarming and virulence factor expression in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol significantly inhibited swarming at 15 microg ml(-1), and completely inhibited swarming at 60 microg ml(-1). Inhibition of swarming and virulence factor expression was mediated through RsbA, a His-containing phosphotransmitter of the bacterial two-component signalling system possibly involved in quorum sensing. Complementation of an rsbA-defective mutant with the rsbA gene restored its responsiveness to resveratrol. The compound also inhibited the ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells. These findings suggest that resveratrol has potential to be developed as an antimicrobial agent against P. mirabilis infection. PMID:17005777

  11. Role of swarming in the formation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilms on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian V; Mahenthiralingam, E; Sabbuba, N A; Stickler, D J

    2005-09-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is frequently complicated by infection with Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter, forming surface biofilm communities, and their urease activity generates alkaline conditions under which crystals of magnesium ammonium phosphate and calcium phosphate are formed and become trapped in the biofilm. As the biofilm develops it obstructs the flow of urine through the catheter, causing either incontinence due to leakage of urine around the catheter or retention of urine in the bladder. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the surface-associated swarming motility of P. mirabilis in the initiation and development of these crystalline catheter biofilms. A set of stable transposon mutants with a range of swimming and swarming abilities were tested for their ability to colonize silicone surfaces in a parallel-plate flow cell. A laboratory model of the catheterized bladder was then used to examine their ability to form crystalline, catheter-blocking biofilms. The results showed that neither swarming nor swimming motility was required for the attachment of P. mirabilis to silicone. Mutants deficient in swarming and swimming were also capable of forming crystalline biofilms and blocking catheters more rapidly than the wild-type strain. PMID:16091430

  12. Proteus mirabilis urease: genetic organization, regulation, and expression of structural genes.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1988-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of serious urinary tract infection, produces urease, an important virulence factor for this species. The enzyme hydrolyzes urea to CO2 and NH3, which initiates struvite or apatite stone formation. Genes encoding urease were localized on a P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA gene bank clone in Escherichia coli by deletion analysis, subcloning, Bal31 nuclease digestion, transposon Tn5 mutagenesis, and in vitro transcription-translation. A region of DNA between 4.0 and 5.4 kilobases (kb) in length was necessary for urease activity and was located within an 18.5-kb EcoRI fragment. The operon was induced by urea and encoded a multimeric, cytoplasmic enzyme comprising subunit polypeptides of 8,000, 10,000, and 73,000 daltons that were encoded by a single polycistronic mRNA and transcribed in that order. Seventeen urease-negative transposon insertions were isolated that synthesized either none of the structural subunit polypeptides, the 8,000-dalton polypeptide alone, or both the 8,000- and 10,000-dalton subunit polypeptides. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 212,000 by Superose-6 chromatography. Homologous sequences encoding the urease of Providencia stuartii synthesized subunit polypeptides of similar sizes and showed a similar genetic arrangement. However, restriction maps of the operons from the two species were distinct, indicating significant divergence. PMID:2841283

  13. Inhibition of virulence factor expression and swarming differentiation in Proteus mirabilis by p-nitrophenylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Liaw, S J; Lai, H C; Ho, S W; Luh, K T; Wang, W B

    2000-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of upper urinary tract infections that can involve invasion of host urothelial cells. The ability to invade urothelial cells is coupled closely to swarming, a form of multicellular behaviour in which vegetative bacteria differentiate into hyperflagellate, filamentous swarming cells capable of co-ordinated and rapid population migration. Co-ordinate expression of virulence factors including urease, protease, haemolysin and flagellin during swarm-cell differentiation in P. mirabilis has been reported. To investigate the effects of p-nitrophenylglycerol (PNPG), a potent anti-swarming agent, on the various swarming-associated traits of P. mirabilis and to elucidate the relationships among them, P. mirabilis growth rate, swarming/swimming activity, cell invasion ability and the ability to express various virulence factors were monitored in the presence or absence of PNPG. It was found that PNPG could inhibit the growth rate, swarming differentiation and swarming/swimming activities of P. mirabilis. The expression of virulence factors such as protease, urease, haemolysin and flagellin in P. mirabilis was also inhibited by PNPG. The ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells was reduced dramatically in the presence of PNPG. These results suggest that PNPG has the potential to be developed as an agent active against the effects of P. mirabilis infection. PMID:10933258

  14. Multiple proteins encoded within the urease gene complex of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Walz, S E; Wray, S K; Hull, S I; Hull, R A

    1988-03-01

    Chromosomal DNA fragments from a uropathogenic isolate of Proteus mirabilis were inserted into the cosmid vector pHC79 to construct a genomic library in Escherichia coli HB101. A urease-positive recombinant cosmid, designated pSKW1, was recovered. Sequential recombinant manipulation of pSKW1 yielded a 10.2-kilobase plasmid, designated pSKW4, which encoded three urease isozymes with electrophoretic mobilities identical to those of the donor P. mirabilis strain. Plasmid pSKW4 gene sequences encode seven proteins designated 68K (apparent molecular weight, of 68,000), 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 18.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K within the limits of the urease gene complex. Insertion mutations in genes encoding the 68K, 28K, 25K, 22.5K, 7.5K, and 5.2K proteins resulted in complete or partial (22.5K) loss of urease activity. There was no reduction in urease activity when the gene encoding the 18.5K protein was inactivated. PMID:2830226

  15. Cranberry impairs selected behaviors essential for virulence in Proteus mirabilis HI4320.

    PubMed

    McCall, Jennifer; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Asadishad, Bahareh; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an etiological agent of complicated urinary tract infections. North American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) have long been considered to have protective properties against urinary tract infections. This work reports the effects of cranberry powder (CP) on the motility of P. mirabilis HI4320 and its expression of flaA, flhD, and ureD. Our results show that swimming and swarming motilities and swarmer-cell differentiation were inhibited by CP. Additionally, transcription of the flagellin gene flaA and of flhD, the first gene of the flagellar master operon flhDC, decreased during exposure of P. mirabilis to various concentrations of CP. Moreover, using ureD-gfp, a fusion of the urease accessory gene ureD with gfp, we show that CP inhibits urease expression. Because we demonstrate that CP does not inhibit the growth of P. mirabilis, the observed effects are not attributable to toxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that CP hinders motility of P. mirabilis and reduces the expression of important virulence factors. PMID:23750959

  16. Development of an "early warning" sensor for encrustation of urinary catheters following Proteus infection.

    PubMed

    Malic, Sladjana; Waters, Mark G J; Basil, Leo; Stickler, David J; Williams, David W

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation in long-term urinary catheterized patients can lead to encrustation and blockage of urinary catheters with serious clinical complication. Catheter encrustation stems from infection with urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease generates ammonia from urea, and the elevated pH of the urine results in crystallization of calcium and magnesium phosphates, which block the flow of urine. The aim of this research is to develop an "early warning" silicone sensor for catheter encrustation following bacterial infection of an in vitro bladder model system. The in vitro bladder model was infected with a range of urease positive and negative bacterial strains. Developed sensors enabled catheter blockage to be predicted ~17-24 h in advance of its occurrence. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria and only when catheter blockage followed. In summary, sensors were developed that could predict urinary catheter blockage in in vitro infection models. Translation of these sensors to a clinical environment will allow the timely and appropriate management of catheter blockage in long-term catheterized patients. PMID:21954120

  17. Urease activity related to the growth and differentiation of swarmer cells of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Murray, R G

    1987-04-01

    Urease activity was measured using whole cells of both long (swarming) and short (nonswarming) populations of Proteus mirabilis from casein hydrolysate agar (CHA) and broth (CHB) cultures, and from brain heart infusion broth (BHIB) cultures. Urease is a constitutive enzyme for both long and short cells, but its activity was tremendously increased when urea was incorporated into the media. Urease production was also affected by culture age and media used. Before exponential phase, urease activity was very low, and it increased to its highest point after about 4 h in BHIB and 8 h in both CHA and CHB cultures at 37 degrees C. Long cells had higher urease activity than did short cells when grown on CHA, and was also expressed by two different strains cultured in BHIB. Strain PM23, in BHIB, was able to form long cells (swarming cells) to a maximum proportion after about 4 h, but strain IM47 could not differentiate in any of the liquid media. The former had more urease when swarming differentiation was initiated. PM23 grew relatively faster than IM47 when the former began to differentiate, but this fast growth could not be observed when nutrient broth or minimal medium was used. These observations suggest that long or swarming cells are "faster growing" rather than "nongrowing bacteria". PMID:3297270

  18. Polymer surface properties and their effect on the adhesion of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Downer, A; Morris, N; Feast, W J; Stickler, D

    2003-01-01

    A problem encountered in patients undergoing long-term catheterization of the urinary tract is that of encrustation and blockage of the catheter by crystalline bacterial biofilms. This is principally caused by the action of the urease-producing pathogen Proteus mirabilis. A major aim of this work is to develop materials resistant to encrustation. Here, the effects of polymer surface properties on the adhesion of P. mirabilis are examined. Spin-coated polymer films were characterized through contact angle measurements to give the Lifschitz-van der Waals, electron acceptor and electron donor terms of the surface free energy, gamma(s)LW, gamma(s)+ and gamma(s)- respectively. A parallel-plate flow cell was used to assess adhesion to these polymer films of P. mirabilis suspended in an aqueous phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, ionic strength 0.26 mol/kg. P. mirabilis was found to adhere significantly less (p < 0.02) to films of agarose, poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) and cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) than to more hydrophobic materials. These polymer films were found to be strongly electron donating, i.e. possessing large gamma(s)-. Films examined using scanning electron microscopy mostly showed no evidence of roughness down to a scale of 1-10 microm. The better performance is thought to be due to a repulsive interaction with the bacterial surface caused by acid/base-type interactions. PMID:12885198

  19. Co-solvent mediated thermal stabilization of chondroitinase ABC I form Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Robati, Mahdieh; Khajeh, Khosro; Aminian, Mahdi; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Golestani, Abolfazl

    2012-04-01

    Chondroitinase ABC I (cABC I) from Proteus vulgaris cleaves glycosaminoglycan chains which are responsible for most of the inhibition of axon regrowth in spinal cord injury. The clinical utilization of this enzyme is mainly limited by its thermal instability. This study has been undertaken to determine the effects of glycerol, sorbitol and trehalose on cABC I activity and thermal stability. The results indicated that the enzyme catalytic activity and intrinsic fluorescence intensity increased in the presence of these cosolvents whereas no considerable conformational changes observed in far-UV CD spectra. Thermal CD experiment revealed an increase in T(m) of cABC I in the presence of cosolvents which was significant for trehalose. Our results support the idea that cABC I has stabilized in the presence of glycerol, sorbitol and trehalose. Therefore, the use of these cosolvents seems to be promising for improvement in shelf-life and clinical applications of this drug enzyme. PMID:22274395

  20. Characterization of Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Natalia, Agnes; Kristiani, Lidya; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2014-10-01

    Proteus vulgaris K80 lipase was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells and immobilized on amine-terminated magnetic microparticles (Mag-MPs). The immobilization yield and activity retention were 84.15% and 7.87%, respectively. A homology model of lipase K80 was constructed using P. mirabilis lipase as the template. Many lysine residues were located on the protein surface, remote from active sites. The biochemical characteristics of immobilized lipase K80 were compared with the soluble free form of lipase K80. The optimum temperature of K80-Mag-MPs was 60°C, which was 20°C higher than that of the soluble form. K80-Mag-MPs also tended to be more stable than the soluble form at elevated temperatures and a broad range of pH. K80-Mag-MP maintained its stable form at up to 40°C and in a pH range of 5.0- 10.0, whereas soluble K80 maintained its activity up to 35°C and pH 6.0-10.0. K80-Mag-MPs had broader substrate specificity compared with that of soluble K80. K80-Mag-MPs showed about 80% residual relative activity after five recovery trials. These results indicate the potential benefit of K80-Mag-MPs as a biocatalyst in various industries. PMID:25001555

  1. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. PMID:22533980

  2. Penile reconstruction for a case of genital lymphoedema secondary to proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashouri, F; Manners, J; Rees, R

    2011-01-01

    To our knowledge penile lymphoedema secondary to Proteus syndrome has not previously been reported. Hence we report a case of a 16-year-old male who was referred with features of right hemi-hypertrophy and severe lymphoedema affecting his scrotum and penis. He had previously undergone scrotal reduction surgery at the age of 13, but had since developed worsening penile oedema. His main concern was that of cosmetic appearance prior to sexual debut, and he also complained of erectile dysfunction. An MRI confirmed gross oedema of the penile skin, but normal underlying cavernosal structure, and no other anatomical abnormality. Under general anaesthesia, the entire diseased penile skin was excised. Two full thickness skin grafts were harvested from the axillae, and grafted onto the dorsal and ventral penile shaft respectively. A compressive dressing and urinary catheter was applied for 7 days. Follow-up at 4 months confirmed complete graft take with minimal scarring, and the patient was very satisfied with the cosmetic outcome. He had also noticed a recovery in erectile activity, and feels psychologically and physically more prepared for sexual relations. PMID:22084799

  3. Flagellum Density Regulates Proteus mirabilis Swarmer Cell Motility in Viscous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Copeland, Matthew F.; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming—increases in cell length and flagellum density—and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD4C2, the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters. PMID:23144253

  4. Abolition of Swarming of Proteus by p-Nitrophenyl Glycerin: Application to Blood Agar Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Fred D.

    1973-01-01

    Comparative plate counts were made of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes growing on blood agar supplemented with individual chemicals to abolish the swarming of Proteus. B-phenylethanol, sodium azide, and p-nitrophenyl glycerin (PNPG) were used as anti-swarm agents. Each anti-swarm agent effectively abolished swarming for 24 h, but azide failed to control swarming for longer periods of incubation. In addition, azide displayed growth inhibition towards the staphylococci and streptococci resulting in no hemolysis and reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci. Phenylethanol showed reduced viable cell numbers with the streptococci and unreliable hemolytic reactions. At 0.1 to 0.3 mM, PNPG proved to be a superior anti-swarm agent in that it showed no growth inhibition and allowed normal hemolysis, but abolished swarming for extended periods of time. When laboratory strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Listeria monocytogenes, and Vibrio cholerae were screened on a blood agar medium containing 0.1 mm PNPG, they displayed similar growth and hemolytic characteristics to the identical medium without PNPG. PMID:4715553

  5. [A study of Proteus L forms during reversion by means of electron microscopy and ultrathin sections].

    PubMed

    Kats, L N; Glazacheva, L E; Mikhaĭlov, A B

    1976-10-01

    The method of scanning electron microscopy was applied to the study of the Proteus L-forms which reversed directly on the millipore filters. It appeared that reversion was accompanied by elongation of the cell, piriform cells forming as the result. Filamentous cells segmented into short fragments and large bodies with a spongy surface structure with numerous ruptures were also revealed in the reversing culture. The method of ultrathin sections showed the other membrane in many cells to be fragile and readily twisting forming vesicles collecting into chains. As supposed, this is connected with degenerative changes involving the outer membrane of the paternal L-forms at the early reversion periods. An interrupted structure of the outer membrane was also demonstrated in many cells. It is supposed that in this case a synthesis of the outer membrane de novo at the later stages of reversion is dealt with. Phenomenon of "extrusion" of the multilayer structures into the periplasmic space, characteristic of spheroplasts, is described. A marked similarity of the morphological picture of reversion and at the initial stages of L-transformation, i.e. of the processes representing a looking glass reflection of one another, is described. PMID:795230

  6. Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, S. M.; Stickler, D. J.; Mobley, H. L. T.; Shirtliff, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options. PMID:18202436

  7. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  8. Effect of nutrient and stress factors on polysaccharides synthesis in Proteus mirabilis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Moryl, Magdalena; Kaleta, Aleksandra; Strzelecki, Kacper; Różalska, Sylwia; Różalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix in biofilm consists of water, proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids and phospholipids. Synthesis of these components is influenced by many factors, e.g. environment conditions or carbon source. The aim of the study was to analyse polysaccharides levels in Proteus mirabilis biofilms after exposure to stress and nutritional conditions. Biofilms of 22 P. mirabilis strains were cultivated for 24, 48, 72 hours, 1 and 2 weeks in tryptone soya broth or in modified media containing an additional amount of nutrients (glucose, albumin) or stress factors (cefotaxime, pH 4, nutrient depletion). Proteins and total polysaccharides levels were studied by Lowry and the phenol-sulphuric acid methods, respectively. Glycoproteins levels were calculated by ELLA with the use of selected lectins (WGA and HPA). For CLSM analysis dual fluorescent staining was applied with SYTO 13 and WGA-TRITC. In optimal conditions the levels of polysaccharides were from 0 to 442 μg/mg of protein and differed depending on the strains and cultivation time. The agents used in this study had a significant impact on the polysaccharides synthesis in the P. mirabilis biofilm. Among all studied components (depending on tested methods), glucose and cefotaxime stimulated the greatest production of polysaccharides by P. mirabilis strains (more than a twofold increase). For most tested strains the highest amounts of sugars were detected after one week of incubation. CLSM analysis confirmed the overproduction of N-acetyloglucosamine in biofilms after cultivation in nutrient and stress conditions, with the level 111-1134%, which varied depending on the P. mirabilis strain and the test factor. PMID:24644556

  9. Lack of mutation-histopathology correlation in a patient with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Meggie E; Bloomhardt, Hadley M; Moroz, Krzysztof; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2016-06-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is characterized by progressive, disproportionate, segmental overgrowth, and tumor susceptibility caused by a somatic mosaic AKT1 activating mutation. Each individual has unique manifestations making this disorder extremely heterogeneous. We correlated three variables in 38 tissue samples from a patient who died with PS: the gross affection status, the microscopic affection status, and the mutation level. The AKT1 mutation was measured using a PCR-based RFLP assay. Thirteen samples were grossly normal; six had detectable mutation (2-29%) although four of these six were histopathologically normal. Of the seven grossly normal samples that had no mutation, only four were histologically normal. The mutation level in the grossly abnormal samples was 3-35% and all but the right and left kidneys, skull, and left knee bone, with mutation levels of 19%, 15%, 26%, and 17%, respectively, had abnormal histopathology. The highest mutation level was in a toe bone sample whereas the lowest levels were in the soft tissue surrounding that toe, and an omental fat nodule. We also show here that PS overgrowth can be caused by cellular proliferation or by extracellular matrix expansion. Additionally, papillary thyroid carcinoma was identified, a tumor not previously associated with PS. We conclude that gross pathology and histopathology correlate poorly with mutation levels in PS, that overgrowth can be mediated by cellular proliferation or extracellular matrix expansion, and that papillary thyroid carcinoma is part of the tumor susceptibility of PS. New methods need to be developed to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlation in mosaic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112325

  10. The RNA Chaperone Hfq Is Involved in Stress Tolerance and Virulence in Uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min-Cheng; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Hfq is a bacterial RNA chaperone involved in the riboregulation of diverse genes via small noncoding RNAs. Here, we show that Hfq is critical for the uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis to effectively colonize the bladder and kidneys in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and to establish burned wound infection of the rats. In this regard, we found the hfq mutant induced higher IL-8 and MIF levels of uroepithelial cells and displayed reduced intra-macrophage survival. The loss of hfq affected bacterial abilities to handle H2O2 and osmotic pressures and to grow at 50°C. Relative to wild-type, the hfq mutant had reduced motility, fewer flagella and less hemolysin expression and was less prone to form biofilm and to adhere to and invade uroepithelial cells. The MR/P fimbrial operon was almost switched to the off phase in the hfq mutant. In addition, we found the hfq mutant exhibited an altered outer membrane profile and had higher RpoE expression, which indicates the hfq mutant may encounter increased envelope stress. With the notion of envelope disturbance in the hfq mutant, we found increased membrane permeability and antibiotic susceptibilities in the hfq mutant. Finally, we showed that Hfq positively regulated the RpoS level and tolerance to H2O2 in the stationary phase seemed largely mediated through the Hfq-dependent RpoS expression. Together, our data indicate that Hfq plays a critical role in P. mirabilis to establish UTIs by modulating stress responses, surface structures and virulence factors. This study suggests Hfq may serve as a scaffold molecule for development of novel anti-P. mirabilis drugs and P. mirabilis hfq mutant is a vaccine candidate for preventing UTIs. PMID:24454905

  11. Characterization of 17 chaperone-usher fimbriae encoded by Proteus mirabilis reveals strong conservation

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Lisa; Schaffer, Jessica N.; Zouzias, Christos D.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes complicated urinary tract infections, particularly in patients with indwelling catheters. Sequencing of clinical isolate P. mirabilis HI4320 revealed the presence of 17 predicted chaperone-usher fimbrial operons. We classified these fimbriae into three groups by their genetic relationship to other chaperone-usher fimbriae. Sixteen of these fimbriae are encoded by all seven currently sequenced P. mirabilis genomes. The predicted protein sequence of the major structural subunit for 14 of these fimbriae was highly conserved (≥95 % identity), whereas three other structural subunits (Fim3A, UcaA and Fim6A) were variable. Further examination of 58 clinical isolates showed that 14 of the 17 predicted major structural subunit genes of the fimbriae were present in most strains (>85 %). Transcription of the predicted major structural subunit genes for all 17 fimbriae was measured under different culture conditions designed to mimic conditions in the urinary tract. The majority of the fimbrial genes were induced during stationary phase, static culture or colony growth when compared to exponential-phase aerated culture. Major structural subunit proteins for six of these fimbriae were detected using MS of proteins sheared from the surface of broth-cultured P. mirabilis, demonstrating that this organism may produce multiple fimbriae within a single culture. The high degree of conservation of P. mirabilis fimbriae stands in contrast to uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, which exhibit greater variability in their fimbrial repertoires. These findings suggest there may be evolutionary pressure for P. mirabilis to maintain a large fimbrial arsenal. PMID:24809384

  12. SU-E-T-566: Neutron Dose Cloud Map for Compact ProteusONE Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish the base line of neutron cloud during patient treatment in our new compact Proteus One proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) system with various beam delivery gantry angles, with or without range shifter (RS) at different body sites. Pencil beam scanning is an emerging treatment technique, for the concerns of neutron exposure, this study is to evaluate the neutron dose equivalent per given delivered dose under various treatment conditions at our proton therapy center. Methods: A wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, Thermo Scientific, MA) was used for neutron dose measurements. It was conducted in the proton therapy vault during beam was on. The measurement location was specifically marked in order to obtain the equivalent dose of neutron activities (H). The distances of 100, 150 and 200 cm at various locations are from the patient isocenter. The neutron dose was measured of proton energy layers, # of spots, maximal energy range, modulation width, field radius, gantry angle, snout position and delivered dose in CGE. The neutron dose cloud is reproducible and is useful for the future reference. Results: When distance increased the neutron equivalent dose (H) reading did not decrease rapidly with changes of proton energy range, modulation width or spot layers. For cranial cases, the average mSv/CGE was about 0.02 versus 0.032 for pelvis cases. RS will induce higher H to be 0.10 mSv/CGE in average. Conclusion: From this study, neutron per dose ratio (mSv/CGE) slightly depends upon various treatment parameters for pencil beams. For similar treatment conditions, our measurement demonstrates this value for pencil beam scanning beam has lowest than uniform scanning or passive scattering beam with a factor of 5. This factor will be monitored continuously for other upcoming treatment parameters in our facility.

  13. Loss of FliL Alters Proteus mirabilis Surface Sensing and Temperature-Dependent Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a dimorphic motile bacterium well known for its flagellum-dependent swarming motility over surfaces. In liquid, P. mirabilis cells are 1.5- to 2.0-μm swimmer cells with 4 to 6 flagella. When P. mirabilis encounters a solid surface, where flagellar rotation is limited, swimmer cells differentiate into elongated (10- to 80-μm), highly flagellated swarmer cells. In order for P. mirabilis to swarm, it first needs to detect a surface. The ubiquitous but functionally enigmatic flagellar basal body protein FliL is involved in P. mirabilis surface sensing. Previous studies have suggested that FliL is essential for swarming through its involvement in viscosity-dependent monitoring of flagellar rotation. In this study, we constructed and characterized ΔfliL mutants of P. mirabilis and Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly and unlike other fliL mutants, both P. mirabilis and E. coli ΔfliL cells swarm (Swr+). Further analysis revealed that P. mirabilis ΔfliL cells also exhibit an alteration in their ability to sense a surface: e.g., ΔfliL P. mirabilis cells swarm precociously over surfaces with low viscosity that normally impede wild-type swarming. Precocious swarming is due to an increase in the number of elongated swarmer cells in the population. Loss of fliL also results in an inhibition of swarming at <30°C. E. coli ΔfliL cells also exhibit temperature-sensitive swarming. These results suggest an involvement of FliL in the energetics and function of the flagellar motor. PMID:25331431

  14. Interaction of Proteus mirabilis urease apoenzyme and accessory proteins identified with yeast two-hybrid technology.

    PubMed

    Heimer, S R; Mobley, H L

    2001-02-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacterium associated with complicated urinary tract infections, produces a metalloenzyme urease which hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. The apourease is comprised of three structural subunits, UreA, UreB, and UreC, assembled as a homotrimer of individual UreABC heterotrimers (UreABC)(3). To become catalytically active, apourease acquires divalent nickel ions through a poorly understood process involving four accessory proteins, UreD, UreE, UreF, and UreG. While homologues of UreD, UreF, and UreG have been copurified with apourease, it remains unclear specifically how these polypeptides associate with the apourease or each other. To identify interactions among P. mirabilis accessory proteins, in vitro immunoprecipitation and in vivo yeast two-hybrid assays were employed. A complex containing accessory protein UreD and structural protein UreC was isolated by immunoprecipitation and characterized with immunoblots. This association occurs independently of coaccessory proteins UreE, UreF, and UreG and structural protein UreA. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, UreD was found to directly interact in vivo with coaccessory protein UreF. Unique homomultimeric interactions of UreD and UreF were also detected in vivo. To substantiate the study of urease proteins with a yeast two-hybrid assay, previously described UreE dimers and homomultimeric UreA interactions among apourease trimers were confirmed in vivo. Similarly, a known structural interaction involving UreA and UreC was also verified. This report suggests that in vivo, P. mirabilis UreD may be important for recruitment of UreF to the apourease and that crucial homomultimeric associations occur among these accessory proteins. PMID:11157956

  15. Pyrophosphate inhibition of Proteus mirabilis-induced struvite crystallization in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Downey, J; Clapham, L; Wilson, J W; Nickel, J C

    1991-08-30

    Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) crystals, the major mineral component of infectious urinary calculi, were produced in vitro by growth of a clinical isolate of Proteus mirabilis in artificial urine. P. mirabilis growth and urease-induced struvite production were monitored by phase contrast light microscopy and measurements of urease activity, pH, ammonia concentrations, turbidity, and culture viability. In the absence of pyrophosphate, struvite crystals appeared within 3-5 h due to the urease-induced elevation of pH and initially assumed a planar or 'X-shaped' crystal habit (morphology) characteristic of rapid growth. When pyrophosphate was present, initial precipitation and crystal appearance were significantly impaired and precipitates were largely amorphous. When crystals did appear (usually after 7 or 8 h) they were misshapen or octahedral in shape indicative of very slow growth. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) identified all crystals as struvite. Trace contaminates of carbonate-apatite (Ca10(PO4)6CO3) or newberyite (MgHPO4.H2O) were produced only in the absence of pyrophosphate. P. mirabilis viability and culture pH elevation were unaffected by the addition of pyrophosphate, whereas urease activity and ammonia concentrations were marginally reduced. Struvite could also be produced chemically by titration of the artificial urine with NH4OH. If pyrophosphate was present during titration, the same inhibitory effect on crystal growth occurred, so it is unlikely that urease inhibition is important. Lowering of pyrophosphate concentration from 13-0.45 mumol/l did not reduce its inhibitory activity so it is unlikely to act by chelating free Mg2+. We propose that pyrophosphate inhibits struvite growth principally through direct interference with the chemical mechanisms involved in crystal nucleation and growth, because of its effectiveness at very low concentrations. PMID:1663844

  16. Identification of virulence determinants in uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis using signature-tagged mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Himpsl, Stephanie D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Hebel, J Richard; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-09-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis causes urinary tract infections (UTIs) in individuals with long-term indwelling catheters or those with functional or structural abnormalities of the urinary tract. Known virulence factors include urease, haemolysin, fimbriae, flagella, DsbA, a phosphate transporter and genes involved in cell-wall synthesis and metabolism, many of which have been identified using the technique of signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM). To identify additional virulence determinants and to increase the theoretical coverage of the genome, this study generated and assessed 1880 P. mirabilis strain HI4320 mutants using this method. Mutants with disruptions in genes vital for colonization of the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI were identified after performing primary and secondary in vivo screens in approximately 315 CBA mice, primary and secondary in vitro screens in both Luria broth and minimal A medium to eliminate mutants with minor growth deficiencies, and co-challenge competition experiments in approximately 500 CBA mice. After completion of in vivo screening, a total of 217 transposon mutants were attenuated in the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI. Following in vitro screening, this number was reduced to 196 transposon mutants with a probable role in virulence. Co-challenge competition experiments confirmed significant attenuation for 37 of the 93 transposon mutants tested, being outcompeted by wild-type HI4320. Following sequence analysis of the 37 mutants, transposon insertions were identified in genes including the peptidyl-prolyl isomerases surA and ppiA, glycosyltransferase cpsF, biopolymer transport protein exbD, transcriptional regulator nhaR, one putative fimbrial protein, flagellar M-ring protein fliF and hook protein flgE, and multiple metabolic genes. PMID:18719175

  17. Unique ability of the Proteus mirabilis capsule to enhance mineral growth in infectious urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Dumanski, A J; Hedelin, H; Edin-Liljegren, A; Beauchemin, D; McLean, R J

    1994-07-01

    Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) calculi are a common complication of Proteus mirabilis urinary tract infections. Although urease is a major virulence factor in calculus formation, the polysaccharide capsule (CPS) of this organism also enhances struvite crystallization and growth in vitro (L. Clapham, R. J. C. McLean, J. C. Nickel, J. Downey, and J. W. Costerton, J. Crystal Growth 104:475-484, 1990). We obtained purified CPS, of known structure and varying anionic character, from P. mirabilis ATCC 49565 and several other organisms. Artificial urine was added to CPS, and the pH was elevated from 5.8 to 8.5 by the addition of urease or titration with 0.25 M NH4OH to induce struvite crystallization. Crystallization was measured by particle counting (Coulter counter), and the morphology (crystal habit) was examined by phase-contrast microscopy. In the presence of partially anionic P. mirabilis CPS, struvite formation occurred at a lower pH than in the absence of CPS or in the presence of other neutral, partially anionic, or anionic CPS. At pH 7.5 to 8.0, significantly more struvite crystals formed in the presence of P. mirabilis CPS than under other experimental conditions. With the exception of one polymer (curdlan) which did not bind Mg2+, enhancement of struvite formation by CPS polymers was inversely proportional to their Mg2+ binding ability. We speculate that the structure and partial anionic nature of P. mirabilis CPS enable it to enhance struvite formation by weakly concentrating Mg2+ ions during struvite crystal formation. This illustrates a new virulence aspect of bacterial CPS during infection. PMID:8005688

  18. Proteus mirabilis urease: nucleotide sequence determination and comparison with jack bean urease.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1989-12-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, produces a potent urease that hydrolyzes urea to NH3 and CO2, initiating kidney stone formation. Urease genes, which were localized to a 7.6-kilobase-pair region of DNA, were sequenced by using the dideoxy method. Six open reading frames were found within a region of 4,952 base pairs which were predicted to encode polypeptides of 31.0 (ureD), 11.0 (ureA), 12.2 (ureB), 61.0 (ureC), 17.9 (ureE), and 23.0 (ureF) kilodaltons (kDa). Each open reading frame was preceded by a ribosome-binding site, with the exception of ureE. Putative promoterlike sequences were identified upstream of ureD, ureA, and ureF. Possible termination sites were found downstream of ureD, ureC, and ureF. Structural subunits of the enzyme were encoded by ureA, ureB, and ureC and were translated from a single transcript in the order of 11.0, 12.2, and 61.0 kDa. When the deduced amino acid sequences of the P. mirabilis urease subunits were compared with the amino acid sequence of the jack bean urease, significant amino acid similarity was observed (58% exact matches; 73% exact plus conservative replacements). The 11.0-kDa polypeptide aligned with the N-terminal residues of the plant enzyme, the 12.2-kDa polypeptide lined up with internal residues, and the 61.0-kDa polypeptide matched with the C-terminal residues, suggesting an evolutionary relationship of the urease genes of jack bean and P. mirabilis. PMID:2687233

  19. Proteus mirabilis biofilm protection against struvite crystal dissolution and its implications in struvite urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Lawrence, J R; Korber, D R; Caldwell, D E

    1991-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation, struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) crystal formation and dissolution in an artificial urine mixture were monitored using computer-enhanced microscopy (CEM) and a 1 x 3 mm. glass flow cell. Image analysis showed that P. mirabilis biofilm formation did not occur to any extent at macroenvironment flow rates greater than two mL/h (equivalent to a microenvironment flow rate of less than 5 microns./sec). Essentially, cells attached to glass surfaces, grew slowly and divided. Daughter cells were generally released directly into the medium where they could then presumably colonize other regions. Microcolonies formed by the adhesion of aggregates of cells from the medium, and over time grew into biofilms. Struvite crystallization due to urease activity and pH elevation above neutrality, was preceded by the deposition of organic matter on the glass surface, followed by the appearance of a number of tiny (one to two microns.) crystals. Crystals forming within a biofilm at low dilution rates took on a characteristic twinned or "X-shaped" appearance (crystal habit) indicative of a rapid growth rate. Those forming outside the biofilm took on a more tabular appearance reflecting their slower growth. When the macroenvironment flow rate of artificial urine (initial pH 5.8) in the glass flow cell was increased from two mL/h to four mL/h, struvite crystals not associated with biofilms dissolved within five to 10 min. Crystals entrapped within the P. mirabilis biofilm withstood flow rates up to 200 mL/h presumably due to the maintenance of an alkaline Mg-saturated microenvironment within the biofilm. These observations may suggest a mechanism by which struvite calculi can grow in spite of neutral or acidic urine pH and resist mild acidification therapy. PMID:1895441

  20. Complete genome sequence of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis, a master of both adherence and motility.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Melanie M; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A; Seshasayee, Aswin S; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrosmith, Claire; Atkin, Becky; Chillingworth, Tracey; Hauser, Heidi; Jagels, Kay; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; Whithead, Sally; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rather, Philip N; Parkhill, Julian; Mobley, Harry L T

    2008-06-01

    The gram-negative enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a frequent cause of urinary tract infections in individuals with long-term indwelling catheters or with complicated urinary tracts (e.g., due to spinal cord injury or anatomic abnormality). P. mirabilis bacteriuria may lead to acute pyelonephritis, fever, and bacteremia. Most notoriously, this pathogen uses urease to catalyze the formation of kidney and bladder stones or to encrust or obstruct indwelling urinary catheters. Here we report the complete genome sequence of P. mirabilis HI4320, a representative strain cultured in our laboratory from the urine of a nursing home patient with a long-term (> or =30 days) indwelling urinary catheter. The genome is 4.063 Mb long and has a G+C content of 38.88%. There is a single plasmid consisting of 36,289 nucleotides. Annotation of the genome identified 3,685 coding sequences and seven rRNA loci. Analysis of the sequence confirmed the presence of previously identified virulence determinants, as well as a contiguous 54-kb flagellar regulon and 17 types of fimbriae. Genes encoding a potential type III secretion system were identified on a low-G+C-content genomic island containing 24 intact genes that appear to encode all components necessary to assemble a type III secretion system needle complex. In addition, the P. mirabilis HI4320 genome possesses four tandem copies of the zapE metalloprotease gene, genes encoding six putative autotransporters, an extension of the atf fimbrial operon to six genes, including an mrpJ homolog, and genes encoding at least five iron uptake mechanisms, two potential type IV secretion systems, and 16 two-component regulators. PMID:18375554

  1. Elucidating the genetic basis of crystalline biofilm formation in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Holling, N; Lednor, D; Tsang, S; Bissell, A; Campbell, L; Nzakizwanayo, J; Dedi, C; Hawthorne, J A; Hanlon, G; Ogilvie, L A; Salvage, J P; Patel, B A; Barnes, L M; Jones, B V

    2014-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms. PMID:24470471

  2. Elucidating the Genetic Basis of Crystalline Biofilm Formation in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Holling, N.; Lednor, D.; Tsang, S.; Bissell, A.; Campbell, L.; Nzakizwanayo, J.; Dedi, C.; Hawthorne, J. A.; Hanlon, G.; Ogilvie, L. A.; Salvage, J. P.; Patel, B. A.; Barnes, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms extensive crystalline biofilms on urethral catheters that occlude urine flow and frequently complicate the management of long-term-catheterized patients. Here, using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, we elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the formation of crystalline biofilms by P. mirabilis. Mutants identified as defective in blockage of urethral catheters had disruptions in genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and efflux systems but were unaffected in general growth, survival in bladder model systems, or the ability to elevate urinary pH. Imaging of biofilms directly on catheter surfaces, along with quantification of levels of encrustation and biomass, confirmed that the mutants were attenuated specifically in the ability to form crystalline biofilms compared with that of the wild type. However, the biofilm-deficient phenotype of these mutants was not due to deficiencies in attachment to catheter biomaterials, and defects in later stages of biofilm development were indicated. For one blocking-deficient mutant, the disrupted gene (encoding a putative multidrug efflux pump) was also found to be associated with susceptibility to fosfomycin, and loss of this system or general inhibition of efflux pumps increased sensitivity to this antibiotic. Furthermore, homologues of this system were found to be widely distributed among other common pathogens of the catheterized urinary tract. Overall, our findings provide fundamental new insight into crystalline biofilm formation by P. mirabilis, including the link between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance in this organism, and indicate a potential role for efflux pump inhibitors in the treatment or prevention of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms. PMID:24470471

  3. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide. PMID:19767424

  4. Multiple origins and incursions of the Atlantic barnacle Chthamalus proteus in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Zardus, John D; Hadfield, Michael G

    2005-10-01

    Chthamalus proteus, a barnacle native to the Caribbean and western Atlantic, was introduced to the Pacific within the last few decades. Using direct sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (COI), we characterized genetic variation in native and introduced populations and searched for genetic matches between regions to determine if there were multiple geographical sources and introduction points for this barnacle. In the native range, we found great genetic differences among populations (max. F(ST) = 0.613) encompassing four lineages: one endemic to Panama, one endemic to Brazil, and two occurring Caribbean-wide. All four lineages were represented in the Pacific, but not equally; the Brazilian lineage was most prevalent and the Panamanian least common. Twenty-one individuals spread among nearly every island from where the barnacle is known in the Pacific, exactly matched six haplotypes scattered among Curaçao, the Netherlands Antilles; St John, US Virgin Islands; Puerto Rico; and Brazil, confirming a multigeographical origin for the Pacific populations. Significant genetic differences were also found in introduced populations from the Hawaiian Islands (F(CT) = 0.043, P < 0.001), indicating introduction events have occurred at more than one locality. However, the sequence, timing and number of arrival events remains unknown. Possible reasons for limited transport of this barnacle through the Panama Canal are discussed. This and a preponderance of Brazilian-type individuals in the Pacific suggest an unexpected route of entry from around Cape Horn, South America. Unification in the Pacific of historically divergent lineages of this barnacle raises the possibility for selection of 'hybrids' with novel ecological adaptations in its new environment. PMID:16202091

  5. Dynamics of hybrid amoeba proteus containing zoochlorellae studied using fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-H.; Fong, B. A.; Alfano, S. A., Jr.; Rakhlin, I.; Wang, W. B.; Ni, X. H.; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R. C.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    The microinjection of organelles, plants, particles or chemical solutions into Amoeba proteus coupled with spectroscopic analysis and observed for a period of time provides a unique new model for cancer treatment and studies. The amoeba is a eukaryote having many similar features of mammalian cells. The amoeba biochemical functions monitored spectroscopically can provide time sequence in vivo information about many metabolic transitions and metabolic exchanges between cellar organelles and substances microinjected into the amoeba. It is possible to microinject algae, plant mitochondria, drugs or carcinogenic solutions followed by recording the native fluorescence spectra of these composites. This model can be used to spectroscopically monitor the pre-metabolic transitions in developing diseased cells such as a cancer. Knowing specific metabolic transitions could offer solutions to inhibit cancer or reverse it as well as many other diseases. In the present study a simple experiment was designed to test the feasibility of this unique new model by injecting algae and chloroplasts into amoeba. The nonradiative dynamics found from these composites are evidence in terms of the emission ratios between the intensities at 337nm and 419nm; and 684nm bands. There were reductions in the metabolic and photosynthetic processes in amoebae that were microinjected with chloroplasts and zoochlorellae as well of those amoebae that ingested the algae and chloroplasts. The changes in the intensity of the emissions of the peaks indicate that the zoochlorellae lived in the amoebae for ten days. Spectral changes in intensity under the UV and 633nm wavelength excitation are from the energy transfer of DNA and RNA, protein-bound chromophores and chlorophylls present in zoochlorellae undergoing photosynthesis. The fluorescence spectroscopic probes established the biochemical interplay between the cell organelles and the algae present in the cell cytoplasm. This hybrid state is indicative

  6. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  7. Bacteriophage Can Prevent Encrustation and Blockage of Urinary Catheters by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Hanin, Aurélie; Alves, Diana R; McCutcheon, Benjamin; Dedi, Cinzia; Salvage, Jonathan; Knox, Karen; Stewart, Bruce; Metcalfe, Anthony; Clark, Jason; Gilmore, Brendan F; Gahan, Cormac G M; Jenkins, A Toby A; Jones, Brian V

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis forms dense crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that occlude urine flow, leading to serious clinical complications in long-term catheterized patients, but there are presently no truly effective approaches to control catheter blockage by this organism. This study evaluated the potential for bacteriophage therapy to control P. mirabilis infection and prevent catheter blockage. Representative in vitro models of the catheterized urinary tract, simulating a complete closed drainage system as used in clinical practice, were employed to evaluate the performance of phage therapy in preventing blockage. Models mimicking either an established infection or early colonization of the catheterized urinary tract were treated with a single dose of a 3-phage cocktail, and the impact on time taken for catheters to block, as well as levels of crystalline biofilm formation, was measured. In models of established infection, phage treatment significantly increased time taken for catheters to block (∼3-fold) compared to untreated controls. However, in models simulating early-stage infection, phage treatment eradicated P. mirabilis and prevented blockage entirely. Analysis of catheters from models of established infection 10 h after phage application demonstrated that phage significantly reduced crystalline biofilm formation but did not significantly reduce the level of planktonic cells in the residual bladder urine. Taken together, these results show that bacteriophage constitute a promising strategy for the prevention of catheter blockage but that methods to deliver phage in sufficient numbers and within a key therapeutic window (early infection) will also be important to the successful application of phage to this problem. PMID:26711744

  8. Comparative evaluations on bio-treatment of hexavalent chromate by resting cells of Pseudochrobactrum sp. and Proteus sp. in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shimei; Dong, Xinjiao; Zhou, Jiangmin; Ge, Shichao

    2013-09-15

    Two marine bacterial strains, B5 and H24, were isolated from long-term Cr(VI) contaminated seawater and identified as Pseudochrobactrum and Proteus, respectively, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Both strains were examined for their tolerance to Cr(VI) and other metal salts and their abilities to reduce Cr(VI) to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. Growing cells of Pseudochrobactrum sp. B5 and Proteus sp. H24 could tolerate Cr(VI) at a concentration of 2000 and 1500 mg/l and completely reduce 1000 mg/l Cr(VI) in LB medium within 96 and 144 h, respectively. Resting cells of the two strains were able to reduce 200mg/l Cr(VI) in Tris-HCl buffer within 16 and 24h, respectively. Furthermore, resting cells of both strains were able to reduce Cr(VI) in industrial wastewaters three times consecutively. Overall, this study provides evidence of the potential for application of chromate-reducing bacteria to direct Cr(VI) decontamination of industrial effluents. PMID:23644665

  9. Reanalysis of the Gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility Proteus - Spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute which has been employed during the 1970's to study experimentally the physics of the gas-cooled fast reactor. Reaction rate distributions, flux spectrum and reactivity effects have been measured in several configurations featuring PuO2/UO2 fuel, absorbers, large iron shields, and thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasihomogeneously in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. This papers focus on the spectral indices - including fission and capture in 232Th and 237Np - measured in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattices and their predictions with an MCNPX model specially developed for the PROTEUS-GCFR core. Predictions were obtained with JEFF-3.1 and -3.11, ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, and JENDL-3.3 and -4.0. A general good agreement was demonstrated. The ratio of 232Th fission to 239Pu fission, however, was under-predicted by 8.7±2.1% and 6.5±2.1% using ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, respectively. Finally, the capture rates in 237Np tended to be underpredicted by the JEFF and JENDL libraries, although the new cross section in JEFF-3.1.1 slightly improved the 237Np capture to 239Pu fission results (3.4±2.4%).

  10. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  11. Regulation of the Min Cell Division Inhibition Complex by the Rcs Phosphorelay in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Howery, Kristen E.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Şimşek, Emrah; Kim, Minsu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key regulator of swarming in Proteus mirabilis is the Rcs phosphorelay, which represses flhDC, encoding the master flagellar regulator FlhD4C2. Mutants in rcsB, the response regulator in the Rcs phosphorelay, hyperswarm on solid agar and differentiate into swarmer cells in liquid, demonstrating that this system also influences the expression of genes central to differentiation. To gain a further understanding of RcsB-regulated genes involved in swarmer cell differentiation, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was used to examine the RcsB regulon. Among the 133 genes identified, minC and minD, encoding cell division inhibitors, were identified as RcsB-activated genes. A third gene, minE, was shown to be part of an operon with minCD. To examine minCDE regulation, the min promoter was identified by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′-RACE), and both transcriptional lacZ fusions and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase (qRT) PCR were used to confirm that the minCDE operon was RcsB activated. Purified RcsB was capable of directly binding the minC promoter region. To determine the role of RcsB-mediated activation of minCDE in swarmer cell differentiation, a polar minC mutation was constructed. This mutant formed minicells during growth in liquid, produced shortened swarmer cells during differentiation, and exhibited decreased swarming motility. IMPORTANCE This work describes the regulation and role of the MinCDE cell division system in P. mirabilis swarming and swarmer cell elongation. Prior to this study, the mechanisms that inhibit cell division and allow swarmer cell elongation were unknown. In addition, this work outlines for the first time the RcsB regulon in P. mirabilis. Taken together, the data presented in this study begin to address how P. mirabilis elongates upon contact with a solid surface. PMID:25986901

  12. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sandra A.; Fader, Mandy J.; Keevil, C. William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk

  13. [Virulence factors in Proteus spp. bacteria isolated from urinary tract infections: their detection and importance].

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    Nosocomial infections associated with biofilm formation have been a serious problem in recent years. Up to 32 % of them are urinary tract infections in patients with long-dwelling catheters. Catheters represent an ideal surface for bacterial adhesion, facilitating easier colonization of the urinary tract. Important pathogens causing these infections are bacteria of the genus Proteus that colonize catheters not only by biofilm formation but also using other virulence factors. Those were developed for survival in the host organism and are also used by bacteria to infect the host or fight the defence mechanisms. The study focused on the following selected virulence factors: swimming, swarming and twitching motility, swarming motility across various types of urinary catheters, biofilm formation in various media, formation of biofilm on catheters, haemolysin and urease production. A total of 102 strains isolated from urinary catheters and 50 strains isolated from stools were analyzed. In twitching motility, a difference between strains isolated from catheters and stools was statistically significant (p = 0.012). In swimming and swarming motility, the difference was not significant (p = 0.074 and p = 0.809, respectively). In motility across various catheter types, a statistically significant difference was found in strains isolated from both catheters and stools (p « 0.01 in both cases). For biofilm formation analyses, BHI and BHI with 4 % glucose were used. In BHI, biofilm was produced by all strains, with 65% of catheter strains and 88 % of strains from stools being strong producers. Similarly, all strains produced biofilm in BHI with 4 % glucose, with strong producers in 94 % and 92 % of strains isolated from catheters and stools, respectively. In formation of biofilm on catheters, there was a statistical difference between strains from catheters and stools (p = 0.00008). All strains isolated from both catheters and stools produced urease; no difference in urease

  14. Novel Insights into the Proteus mirabilis Crystalline Biofilm Using Real-Time Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sandra A; Fader, Mandy J; Keevil, C William

    2015-01-01

    The long-term use of indwelling catheters results in a high risk from urinary tract infections (UTI) and blockage. Blockages often occur from crystalline deposits, formed as the pH rises due to the action of urease-producing bacteria; the most commonly found species being Proteus mirabilis. These crystalline biofilms have been found to develop on all catheter materials with P. mirabilis attaching to all surfaces and forming encrustations. Previous studies have mainly relied on electron microscopy to describe this process but there remains a lack of understanding into the stages of biofilm formation. Using an advanced light microscopy technique, episcopic differential interference contrast (EDIC) microscopy combined with epifluorescence (EF), we describe a non-destructive, non-contact, real-time imaging method used to track all stages of biofilm development from initial single cell attachment to complex crystalline biofilm formation. Using a simple six-well plate system, attachment of P. mirabilis (in artificial urine) to sections of silicone and hydrogel latex catheters was tracked over time (up to 24 days). Using EDIC and EF we show how initial attachment occurred in less than 1 h following exposure to P. mirabilis. This was rapidly followed by an accumulation of an additional material (indicated to be carbohydrate based using lectin staining) and the presence of highly elongated, motile cells. After 24 h exposure, a layer developed above this conditioning film and within 4 days the entire surface (of both catheter materials) was covered with diffuse crystalline deposits with defined crystals embedded. Using three-dimensional image reconstruction software, cells of P. mirabilis were seen covering the crystal surfaces. EDIC microscopy could resolve these four components of the complex crystalline biofilm and the close relationship between P. mirabilis and the crystals. This real-time imaging technique permits study of this complex biofilm development with no risk

  15. FY2012 summary of tasks completed on PROTEUS-thermal work.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Smith, M.A.

    2012-06-06

    PROTEUS is a suite of the neutronics codes, both old and new, that can be used within the SHARP codes being developed under the NEAMS program. Discussion here is focused on updates and verification and validation activities of the SHARP neutronics code, DeCART, for application to thermal reactor analysis. As part of the development of SHARP tools, the different versions of the DeCART code created for PWR, BWR, and VHTR analysis were integrated. Verification and validation tests for the integrated version were started, and the generation of cross section libraries based on the subgroup method was revisited for the targeted reactor types. The DeCART code has been reorganized in preparation for an efficient integration of the different versions for PWR, BWR, and VHTR analysis. In DeCART, the old-fashioned common blocks and header files have been replaced by advanced memory structures. However, the changing of variable names was minimized in order to limit problems with the code integration. Since the remaining stability problems of DeCART were mostly caused by the CMFD methodology and modules, significant work was performed to determine whether they could be replaced by more stable methods and routines. The cross section library is a key element to obtain accurate solutions. Thus, the procedure for generating cross section libraries was revisited to provide libraries tailored for the targeted reactor types. To improve accuracy in the cross section library, an attempt was made to replace the CENTRM code by the MCNP Monte Carlo code as a tool obtaining reference resonance integrals. The use of the Monte Carlo code allows us to minimize problems or approximations that CENTRM introduces since the accuracy of the subgroup data is limited by that of the reference solutions. The use of MCNP requires an additional set of libraries without resonance cross sections so that reference calculations can be performed for a unit cell in which only one isotope of interest includes

  16. Forme fruste of Proteus syndrome: A limited form with bilateral plantar cerebriform collagenomas and varicose veins secondary to a mosaic AKT1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jamie S.; Mortimer, Peter S.; Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Chong, Heung; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Holden, Colin A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Proteus syndrome is an extremely rare disorder of mosaic postnatal overgrowth affecting multiple tissues including bone, soft tissue and skin. It typically presents in early childhood with asymmetric and progressive skeletal overgrowth that leads to severe distortion of the skeleton and disability. The genetic basis has recently been identified as a somatic activating mutation in the AKT1 gene, which encodes an enzyme mediating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Observations We present a 33-year-old man that developed plantar cerebriform collagenomas on the soles of both feet and varicose veins in early childhood, in the absence of any skeletal or other connective tissue abnormality. Although the patient did not meet the diagnostic criteria for Proteus syndrome, he was found to have the c.49G>A, p.Glu17Lys AKT1 mutation in lesional skin but not in his blood. Conclusions and Relevance To our knowledge, this is the mildest molecularly confirmed patient with Proteus syndrome, occurring in the absence of the characteristic skeletal overgrowth. These findings extend the spectrum of Proteus syndrome pathology and suggest that somatic mutations late in development and restricted in distribution cause subtle clinical presentations that do not meet the published clinical criteria. PMID:24850616

  17. Brentuximab vedotin in the treatment of a patient with refractory Hodgkin disease and Proteus syndrome – a case report and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Myakova, Natalia; Smirnova, Nadezhda; Evstratov, Dmitry; Abugova, Yulia; Balashov, Dmitry; Diakonova, Yulia; Konovalov, Dmitry; Skvortsova, Yulia; Maschan, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Treatment of patients with refractory Hodgkin lymphoma is a significant issue. We report a patient with Proteus syndrome and relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma, whose remission was finally achieved after brentuximab vedotin therapy, allowing her to receive a haploidentical stem cell transplant. The possible relationship between both disorders was discussed. PMID:26273462

  18. Detection of KPC-2 in a Clinical Isolate of Proteus mirabilis and First Reported Description of Carbapenemase Resistance Caused by a KPC Beta-Lactamase in P. mirabilis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Proteus mirabilis recovered from bacterial cultures was shown to be resistant to imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem by disk diffusion susceptibility testing. Amplification of whole cell and/or plasmid DNA recovered from the isolate using primers specific for the blaKPC carbapenemase g...

  19. Implementation/validation of a low Reynolds number two-equation turbulence model in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code: Two-dimensional/axisymmetric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation and validation of the Chien low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model in the two dimensional axisymmetric version Proteus, a compressible Navier-Stokes computer code, are presented. The set of k-epsilon equations are solved by marching in time using a coupled alternating direction implicit (ADI) solution procedure with generalized first or second order time differencing. To validate Proteus and the k-epsilon turbulence model, laminar and turbulent computations were done for several benchmark test cases: incompressible fully developed 2-D channel flow; fully developed axisymmetric pipe flow; boundary layer flow over a flat plate; and turbulent Sajben subsonic transonic diffuser flows. Proteus results from these test cases showed good agreement with analytical results and experimental data. Detailed comparisons of both mean flow and turbulent quantities showed that the Chien k-epsilon turbulence model given good results over a wider range of turbulent flow than the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model in the Proteus code with no significant CPU time penalty for more complicated flow cases.

  20. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  1. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka; Lengar, Igor; Koberl, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  2. The potential of selected Australian medicinal plants with anti-Proteus activity for the treatment and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cock, I. E.; Winnett, V.; Sirdaarta, J.; Matthews, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A wide variety of herbal medicines are used in indigenous Australian traditional medicinal systems to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and inflammation. The current study was undertaken to test the ability of a panel of Australian plants with a history of the ethnobotanical usage in the treatment of inflammation for the ability to block the microbial trigger of RA. Materials and Methods: One hundred and six extracts from 40 plant species were investigated for the ability to inhibit the growth of the bacterial trigger of RA (Proteus mirabilis). The extracts were tested for toxicity in the Artemia nauplii bioassay. The most potent inhibitor of P. mirabilis growth was further analyzed by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to high accuracy time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results: Sixty-five of the 106 extracts tested (61.3%) inhibited the growth of P. The Aleurites moluccanus, Datura leichardtii, Eucalyptus major, Leptospermum bracteata, L. juniperium, Macadamia integriflora nut, Melaleuca alternifolia, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Petalostigma pubescens, P. triloculorae, P. augustifolium, Scaevola spinescens, Syzygiumaustrale, and Tasmannia lanceolata extracts were determined to be the most effective inhibitors of P. mirabilis growth, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values generally significantly below 1000 μg/ml. T. lanceolata fruit extracts were the most effective P. mirabilis growth inhibitors, with a MIC values of 11 and 126 μg/ml for the methanolic and aqueous extracts, respectively. Subsequent analysis of the T. lanceolata fruit extracts by RP-HPLC coupled to high-resolution TOF mass spectroscopy failed to detect resveratrol in either T. lanceolata fruit extract. However, the resveratrol glycoside piceid and 2 combretastatin stilbenes (A-1 and A-4) were detected in both T. lanceolata fruit extracts. With the exception of the Eucalyptus and Syzygium extracts, all extracts exhibiting Proteus

  3. Modification biological activity of S and R forms of Proteus mirabilis and Burkholderia cepacia lipopolysaccharides by carrageenans.

    PubMed

    Arabski, Michał; Barabanova, Anna; Gałczyńska, Katarzyna; Węgierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Dzidowska, Kamila; Augustyniak, Daria; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Lankoff, Anna; Yermak, Irina; Molinaro, Antonio; Kaca, Wiesław

    2016-09-20

    The modification of biological features of S and R forms of Proteus mirabilis and Burkholderia cepacia LPS by kappa/iota and kappa/beta carrageenans was shown in Limulus activation test, ELISA, human complement activation and apoptotic assay. The role of positively charged substituent Ara4N in lipid A was evaluated as a suspected major domain for interactions with sulphate groups of carrageenans.The experiments obtained by three serological methods indicated that not only lipid A part of LPS but also polysaccharide elements such as core and O-specific chain are involved in interaction with carrageenes. Carrageenans turned out to be non-cytotoxic for A549 cells and were able to inhibit the apoptotic effect caused by lipid A of P. mirabilis and B. cepacia. PMID:27261765

  4. Morphological changes in Proteus mirabilis O18 biofilm under the influence of a urease inhibitor and a homoserine lactone derivative.

    PubMed

    Czerwonka, Grzegorz; Arabski, Michał; Wąsik, Sławomir; Jabłońska-Wawrzycka, Agnieszka; Rogala, Patrycja; Kaca, Wiesław

    2014-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium that frequently causes kidney infections, typically established by ascending colonization of the urinary tract. The present study is focused on ureolytic activity and urease inhibition in biofilms generated by P. mirabilis O18 cells. Confocal microscopy revealed morphological alterations in biofilms treated with urea and a urease inhibitor (acetohydroxamic acid, AHA), as some swarmer cells were found to protrude from the biofilm. The presence of a quorum-sensing molecule (N-butanoyl homoserine lactone, BHL) increased biofilm thickness and its ureolytic activity. Laser interferometric determination of diffusion showed that urea easily diffuses through P. mirabilis biofilm, while AHA is blocked. This may suggest that the use of urease inhibitors in CAUTIs may by less effective than in other urease-associated infections. Spectroscopic studies revealed differences between biofilm and planktonic cells indicating that polysaccharides and nucleic acids are involved in extracellular matrix and biofilm formation. PMID:24481535

  5. Visualization of Proteus mirabilis within the matrix of urease-induced bladder stones during experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhao, Hui; Lockatell, C Virginia; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-01-01

    The virulence of a urease-negative mutant of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis and its wild-type parent strain was assessed by using a CBA mouse model of catheterized urinary tract infection. Overall, catheterized mice were significantly more susceptible than uncatheterized mice to infection by wild-type P. mirabilis. At a high inoculum, the urease-negative mutant successfully colonized bladders of catheterized mice but did not cause urolithiasis and was still severely attenuated in its ability to ascend to kidneys. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the presence of P. mirabilis within the urease-induced stone matrix. Alizarin red S staining was used to detect calcium-containing deposits in bladder and kidney tissues of P. mirabilis-infected mice. PMID:11748205

  6. Pulmonary Pneumatocele in a Pneumonia Patient Infected with Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Ryou, Sung Hyeok; Bae, Jong Wook; Baek, Hyun Jin; Lee, Doo Hyuk; Lee, Sang Won; Choi, Gyu Ho; Han, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Se Weon; Kim, Hyunbeom

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary pneumatoceles are air-filled thin-walled spaces within the lung and are rare in adult cases of pneumonia. We report the case of a 74-year-old male who was admitted with a cough and sputum production. He had been treated with oral dexamethasone since a brain tumorectomy 6 months prior. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed a large pneumatocele in the right middle lobe and peripheral pneumonic consolidation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; cultures identified extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Proteus mirabilis. A 4-week course of intravenous ertapenem was administered, and the pneumatocele with pneumonia resolved on follow-up chest CT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of pulmonary pneumatocele caused by ESBL-producing P. mirabilis associated with pneumonia. PMID:26508927

  7. Antibacterial action of combinations of oxytetracycline, dimethyl sulfoxide, and EDTA-tromethamine on Proteus, Salmonella, and Aeromonas.

    PubMed

    Wooley, R E; Gilbert, J P; Shotts, E B

    1982-01-01

    Antibacterial effects against Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhimurium, and Aeromonas hydrophila were obtained with subminimal inhibitory concentrations of oxytetracycline and EDTA-tromethamine. Antibacterial effects were not observed with subminimal inhibitory concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide plus oxytetracycline or with dimethyl sulfoxide plus EDTA-tromethamine. Using a 2-dimensional Microtiter checkerboard technique, inhibitory activities of the various combinations of solutions were studied, and isobolograms were plotted. A synergistic effect was seen with combinations of oxytetracycline and EDTA-tromethamine. The greatest synergistic effect was observed when the mixture was caused to react with P mirabilis. These findings were confirmed by kinetic studies of microbial death, using one-fourth minimal inhibitory concentrations of these preparations. PMID:6807142

  8. Zinc uptake contributes to motility and provides a competitive advantage to Proteus mirabilis during experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nielubowicz, Greta R; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a Gram-negative bacterium, represents a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections in catheterized patients or those with functional or anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract. ZnuB, the membrane component of the high-affinity zinc (Zn(2+)) transport system ZnuACB, was previously shown to be recognized by sera from infected mice. Since this system has been shown to contribute to virulence in other pathogens, its role in Proteus mirabilis was investigated by constructing a strain with an insertionally interrupted copy of znuC. The znuC::Kan mutant was more sensitive to zinc limitation than the wild type, was outcompeted by the wild type in minimal medium, displayed reduced swimming and swarming motility, and produced less flaA transcript and flagellin protein. The production of flagellin and swarming motility were restored by complementation with znuCB in trans. Swarming motility was also restored by the addition of Zn(2+) to the agar prior to inoculation; the addition of Fe(2+) to the agar also partially restored the swarming motility of the znuC::Kan strain, but the addition of Co(2+), Cu(2+), or Ni(2+) did not. ZnuC contributes to but is not required for virulence in the urinary tract; the znuC::Kan strain was outcompeted by the wild type during a cochallenge experiment but was able to colonize mice to levels similar to the wild-type level during independent challenge. Since we demonstrated a role for ZnuC in zinc transport, we hypothesize that there is limited zinc present in the urinary tract and P. mirabilis must scavenge this ion to colonize and persist in the host. PMID:20385754

  9. Design of a proteus lattice representative of a burnt and fresh fuel interface at power conditions in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hursin, M.; Perret, G.

    2012-07-01

    The research program LIFE (Large-scale Irradiated Fuel Experiment) between PSI and Swissnuclear has been started in 2006 to study the interaction between large sets of burnt and fresh fuel pins in conditions representative of power light water reactors. Reactor physics parameters such as flux ratios and reaction rate distributions ({sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fissions and {sup 238}U capture) are calculated to estimate an appropriate arrangement of burnt and fresh fuel pins within the central element of the test zone of the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. The arrangement should minimize the number of burnt fuel pins to ease fuel handling and reduce costs, whilst guaranteeing that the neutron spectrum in both burnt and fresh fuel regions and at their interface is representative of a large uniform array of burnt and fresh pins in the same moderation conditions. First results are encouraging, showing that the burnt/fresh fuel interface is well represented with a 6 x 6 bundle of burnt pins. The second part of the project involves the use of TSUNAMI, CASMO-4E and DAKOTA to perform parametric and optimization studies on the PROTEUS lattice by varying its pitch (P) and fraction of D{sub 2}O in moderator (F{sub D2O}) to be as representative as possible of a power light water reactor core at hot full power conditions at beginning of cycle (BOC). The parameters P and F{sub D2O} that best represent a PWR at BOC are 1.36 cm and 5% respectively. (authors)

  10. In vivo phase variation of MR/P fimbrial gene expression in Proteus mirabilis infecting the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Blomfield, I; Mobley, H L

    1997-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, associated with complicated urinary tract infection, expresses mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae. Expression of these surface structures, which mediate haemagglutination and have a demonstrated role in virulence, undergoes phase variation. By DNA sequence analysis, a 252 bp invertible element was found in the intergenic region between mrpl, the putative site-specific recombinase gene, and mrpA, the primary structural subunit gene. The invertible segment is flanked by identical 21 bp inverted repeats and the presumptive half-sites for recombinase binding show homology to those recognized by FimB and FimE encoded by the Escherichia coli fim (Type 1 fimbriae) gene cluster. When amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from static broth cultures expressing MR/P fimbriae, the switch region was found in both ON and OFF positions. When PCR was used to amplify agar cultures which do not express the fimbriae, the switch region was OFF only. A canonical sigma 70 promoter inside the invertible element drives the transcription of mrpA when in the ON position; in the OFF position it is directed away from mrpA but does not appear to drive expression of mrpI. The mrpI gene was able to confer inversion of the mrp switch region in trans from both ON to OFF and OFF to ON. To examine the position of the switch in vivo, urine, bladder, and kidneys from mice transurethrally infected with P. mirabilis were used to prepare template DNA for PCR amplification. In the absence of urolithiasis (urease-mediated stone formation), the switch was found 100% in the ON position, a condition never observed following in vitro culture. We conclude that MR/P phase variation is regulated at the transcriptional level by the action of MrpI on an invertible element and that there is strong selective pressure for the expression of MR/P fimbriae in vivo. PMID:9076737

  11. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals

  12. Gene cloning and characterization of a novel highly organic solvent tolerant lipase from Proteus sp. SW1 and its application for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Whangsuk, Wirongrong; Sungkeeree, Pareenart; Thiengmag, Sirinthra; Kerdwong, Jarunee; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Loprasert, Suvit

    2013-01-01

    Proteus sp. SW1 was found to produce an extracellular solvent tolerant lipase. The gene, lipA, encoding a bacterial lipase, was cloned from total Proteus sp. SW1 DNA. lipA was predicted to encode a 287 amino acid protein of 31.2 kDa belonging to the Group I proteobacterial lipases. Purified His-tagged LipA exhibited optimal activity at pH 10.0 and 55°C. It was highly stable in organic solvents retaining 112% of its activity in 100% isopropanol after 24 h, and exhibited more than 200% of its initial activity upon exposure to 60% acetone, ethanol, and hexane for 18 h. Biodiesel synthesis reactions, using a single step addition of 13% an acyl acceptor ethanol, showed that LipA was highly effective at converting palm oil into biodiesel. PMID:22371263

  13. Outbreak caused by Proteus mirabilis isolates producing weakly expressed TEM-derived extended-spectrum β-lactamase in spinal cord injury patients with recurrent bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cremet, Lise; Bemer, Pascale; Rome, Joanna; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Navas, Dominique; Bourigault, Celine; Guillouzouic, Aurelie; Caroff, Nathalie; Lepelletier, Didier; Asseray, Nathalie; Perrouin-Verbe, Brigitte; Corvec, Stephane

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) molecular characterization of Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from urine of spinal cord injury patients. A incorrectly detected TEM-24-producing clone and a new weakly expressed TEM-derived ESBL were discovered. In such patients, ESBL detection in daily practice should be improved by systematic use of a synergy test in strains of P. mirabilis resistant to penicillins. PMID:21888562

  14. Effects of the pH and the urine infected by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis on chromic catgut, polyglycolic acid and polyglactin 910: study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hering, F L; Rosenberg, D; Chade, J

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the effects of the pH and the urine infected by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis on chromic catgut, polyglycolic acid (PGA) and polyglactin 910 (P910), we divided the experiment into three steps. In the first step, the behavior of suture material immersed in sterile urine, urine infected by E. coli and urine infected by P. mirabilis and in culture environment infected by P. mirabilis was studied. The physical features were observed continuously up to the 6th day. In the second step, every element of the urea-splitting reaction was isolatedly studied , without the presence of bacterial agents. And in the last step, that reaction was mimetized in sterile environments and in environments with acid and alkaline pH. While the chromic catgut was kept integral in all the environments, the PGA and the P910 dissolved in urine infected by Proteus, which was caused by the ammonia resulting from the urea-splitting reaction. This dissolution was also observed in sterile environment (mimetization of the urea-splitting reaction by urease, with no Proteus). The destruction of the sutures was not influenced by the pH variance. PMID:2552634

  15. Results of the Simulation of the HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 Using PEBBED-COMBINE: FY10 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Gougar

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. This report is a follow-on to INL/EXT-09-16620 in which the same calculation was performed but using earlier versions of the codes and less developed methods. In that report, results indicated that the cross sections generated using COMBINE-7.0 did not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. It was concluded in the report that the modeling of control rods was not satisfactory. In the past year, improvements to the homogenization capability in COMBINE have enabled the explicit modeling of TRIS particles, pebbles, and heterogeneous core zones including control rod regions using a new multi-scale version of COMBINE in which the 1-dimensional discrete ordinate transport code ANISN has been integrated. The new COMBINE is shown to yield benchmark quality results for pebble unit cell models, the first step in preparing few-group diffusion parameters for core simulations. In this report, the full critical core is modeled once again but with cross sections generated using the capabilities and physics of the improved COMBINE code. The new PEBBED-COMBINE model enables the exact modeling of the pebbles and control rod region along with better approximation to structures in the reflector. Initial results for the core multiplication factor indicate significant improvement in the INL’s tools for modeling the neutronic properties of a pebble bed reactor. Errors on the order of 1.6-2.5% in keff are obtained; a significant improvement over the 5-6% error observed in the earlier This is acceptable for a code system and model in the early stages of development but still too high for a production code. Analysis of a simpler core model indicates an over-prediction of the flux in the low end of the thermal spectrum. Causes of this discrepancy are under investigation. New

  16. Genetic and biochemical diversity of ureases of Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella species isolated from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Mobley, H L

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial urease, particularly from Proteus mirabilis, has been implicated as a contributing factor in the formation of urinary and kidney stones, obstruction of urinary catheters, and pyelonephritis. Weekly urine specimens (n = 1,135) from 32 patients, residing at two chronic-care facilities, with urinary catheters in place for greater than or equal to 30 days yielded 5,088 phenotypically and serotypically diverse bacterial isolates at greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml. A total of 86% of specimens contained at least one urease-positive species, and 46% of 3,939 gram-negative bacilli were urease positive. For investigation of genetic relatedness of urease determinants, whole-cell DNA from 50 urease-positive isolates each of Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Morganella morganii were hybridized with a urease gene probe derived from within the urease operon of Providencia stuartii BE2467. The percentage of strains hybridizing with the gene probe was 98 for Providencia stuartii, 100 for Providencia rettgeri, 70 for P. mirabilis, 2 for M. morganii, and 0 for P. vulgaris. Electrophoretic mobilities of ureases from representative isolates revealed nine different patterns among the five species. The urease gene probe hybridized with fragments of HindIII-digested chromosomal DNA from all isolates except M. morganii. Fragment sizes differed between species. Molecular sizes of the enzymes, determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography, were found to be 280 kilodaltons (kDa) (P. mirabilis), 323 to 337 kDa (Providencia stuartii, Providencia rettgeri, P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris), 620 kDa (providencia rettgeri), and greater than 700 kDa (M. morganii, Providencia rettgeri). Kms ranged from 0.7 mM urea for M. morganii to 60 mM urea for a P. mirabilis isolate. In general, P. mirabilis ureases demonstrated lower affinities for substrate but hydrolyzed urea at rates 6- to 25-fold faster than did enzymes from other species, which may

  17. Program PROTEUS for adding hydrogens to a protein structure and electrostatic field across carotenoids in light harvesting complexes and reaction centers from bacterial sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovaca, Samir

    The hydrogen construction method presented in the program PROTEUS treats hydrogens depending on their torsional degrees of freedom. The positions of hydrogens with restricted torsional degrees of freedom are completely determined by the heavy atoms positions in the structure. The hydroxyl and water hydrogens are the only hydrogens that PROTEUS accepts as movable hydrogens (having rotational degrees of freedom). Their positions are determined by the interactions with neighboring atoms. PROTEUS interaction energy corresponds to a view that the hydrogen bond is affected, besides electrostatic effects and steric constraints of neighboring groups, by an inherent energy barrier that opposes free rotation of the hydroxyl hydrogen. For the water hydrogens that barrier is zero. The hydroxyl and water hydrogens are minimized within a short distance using the Threshold Accepting (TA) energy minimization method. PROTEUS can provide reasonable positions of movable hydrogens and a good initial protein structure for further investigations. We applied the program PROTEUS to place hydrogens in several resolved three-dimensional crystal structures of light harvesting complexes (LHCs) and reaction centers (RCs) from bacterial sources. Using program DelPhi we calculated the local electrostatic field across carotenoid generated by the protein's charges. In each structure we identified amino acids responsible for the field. Much of the field is generated by the charged residues. There are different ways that a RC or LHC uses charged residues. A nearby dipole consisting of the charged residues which are ionized in the physiological pH range (like Arg-Asp), is often used. Clusters of charged residues or scattered isolated charged residues around the carotenoid molecule also contribute. The polarizable field is not necessarily along the carotenoid molecule principal axis. For soluble LHCs the contribution of polar residues to the field cannot be neglected. Our calculations indicate an

  18. Application of O-serotyping in a study of Providencia rettgeri (Proteus rettgeri) isolated from human and nonhuman sources.

    PubMed Central

    Penner, J L; Hennessy, J N

    1979-01-01

    A somatic (O) antigen serotyping scheme for Providencia rettgeri (Proteus rettgeri) was modified to exclude O-type strains recently reclassified as urea-positive Providencia stuartii and was extended to include new serotypes to provide for serotyping on the basis of 93 O-antigens. Isolates from two hospitals, five public health laboratories, and nonhuman sources (polluted water and frogs) were serotyped. The 112 isolates collected from a large general hospital over a 99-month period were distributed among 42 O-serotypes. No serotype showed significant predominance that would suggest the occurrence of human strains that are more prone than others to cause human infections, but in an institution experiencing cross-infection, 11 of the 22 (50%) isolates belonged to one serotype. The 54 isolates from the five public health laboratories belonged to 33 serotypes, 15 of which were found also among hospital isolates. All but 5 of 99 frog isolates were typable, and the 94 typable isolates were separated into 25 serotypes. Each of the four isolates from polluted water samples was of a different serotype. Sixteen of the serotypes found in frogs and three found in water were also identified among human isolates. PMID:521481

  19. Cooccurrence of Multiple AmpC β-Lactamases in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Chérif, Thouraya; Saidani, Mabrouka; Decré, Dominique; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem

    2015-01-01

    Over a period of 40 months, plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases were detected in Tunis, Tunisia, in 78 isolates (0.59%) of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis. In 67 isolates, only one ampC gene was detected, i.e., blaCMY-2-type (n = 33), blaACC (n = 23), blaDHA (n = 6) or blaEBC (n = 5). Multiple ampC genes were detected in 11 isolates, with the following distribution: blaMOX-2, blaFOX-3, and blaCMY-4/16 (n = 6), blaFOX-3 and blaMOX-2 (n = 3), and blaCMY-4 and blaMOX-2 (n = 2). A great variety of plasmids carrying these genes was found, independently of the species and the bla gene. If the genetic context of blaCMY-2-type is variable, that of blaMOX-2, reported in part previously, is unique and that of blaFOX-3 is unique and new. PMID:26459902

  20. Inhibition of crystallization caused by Proteus mirabilis during the development of infectious urolithiasis by various phenolic substances.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Rozalski, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Infectious urolithiasis is a consequence of persistent urinary tract infections caused by urease producing bacteria e.g. Proteus mirabilis. These stones are composed of struvite and carbonate apatite. Their rapid growth and high recurrence indicate that so far appropriate methods of treatment have not been found. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds was investigated in vitro against formation of struvite/apatite crystals. The impact of these substances with different chemical structures on crystallization caused by clinical isolates of P. mirabilis was tested spectrophotometrically using a microdilution method. Among the 11 tested compounds resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, peralgonidin, vanillic and coffee acids at the concentrations 250-1000 μg/ml inhibited P. mirabilis urease activity and crystallization. However, only vanillic acid had such an effect on all tested strains of P. mirabilis. Therefore, using an in vitro model, bacterial growth, crystallization, urease activity and pH were examined for 24h in synthetic urine with vanillic acid. Effect of vanillic acid was compared with that of other known struvite/apatite crystallization inhibitors (acetohydroxamic acid, pyrophosphate) and it was shown that vanillic acid strongly inhibited bacterial growth and the formation of crystals. It can be assumed that this compound, after further studies, can be used in the treatment or prophylaxis of infectious urolithiasis. PMID:24239192

  1. Unusual groups of Morganella ("Proteus") morganii isolated from clinical specimens: lysine-positive and ornithine-negative biogroups.

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, F W; Framer, J J; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J

    1980-01-01

    Morganella ("Proteus") morganii is the only species in the recently proposed genus Morganella, but we suspect there are yet undescribed species in the genus. Two candidates for new species were recently investigated. Nineteen strains isolated from clinical specimens resembled M. morganii but were lysine positive and nonmotile and fermented glycerol within 24 h. Typical M. morganii are lysine negative and motile and ferment glycerol slowly or not at all. The three-test variance from typical M. morganii suggested that this new group might be a new Morganella species; however, strains of the group were closely related to typical M. morganii by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-DNA hybridization. A second group of 14 strains isolated from clinical specimens was ornithine negative but was otherwise very similar to M. morganii. This group was also closely related to M. morganii by DNA hybridization. Both sets of strains clearly belong in the species Morganella morganii as distinct biogroups; they are not separate species as originally suspected. Initially both biogroups posed a problem in identification until their true relationship to M. morganii was determined. PMID:6775010

  2. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the User's Guide, and describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  3. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D has been developed to solve the three dimensional, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort has been to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation have been emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized non-orthogonal body-fitted coordinates by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the Analysis Description, and presents the equations and solution procedure. It describes in detail the governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models.

  4. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This is the Analysis Description, and presents the equations and solution procedure. The governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models are described in detail.

  5. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. This User's Guide describes the program's features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  6. Proteus two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 2.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 2D was developed to solve the two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. The Programmer's Reference contains detailed information useful when modifying the program. The program structure, the Fortran variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram are described.

  7. Proteus three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    A computer code called Proteus 3D was developed to solve the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The objective in this effort was to develop a code for aerospace propulsion applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The governing equations are solved in generalized nonorthogonal body fitted coordinates, by marching in time using a fully-coupled ADI solution procedure. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly. All terms, including the diffusion terms, are linearized using second-order Taylor series expansions. Turbulence is modeled using either an algebraic or two-equation eddy viscosity model. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. The energy equation may be eliminated by the assumption of constant total enthalpy. Explicit and implicit artificial viscosity may be used. Several time step options are available for convergence acceleration. The documentation is divided into three volumes. The Programmer's Reference contains detailed information useful when modifying the program. The program structure, the Fortran variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram are described.

  8. Cross-reactivity between the rheumatoid arthritis-associated motif EQKRAA and structurally related sequences found in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, H; Wilson, C; Alvarez, A; Abuknesha, R; Bansal, S; Ebringer, A

    1999-06-01

    Cross-reactivity or molecular mimicry may be one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antiserum against the RA susceptibility sequence EQKRAA was shown to bind to a similar peptide ESRRAL present in the hemolysin of the gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis, and an anti-ESRRAL serum reacted with EQKRAA. There was no reactivity with either anti-EQKRAA or anti-ESRRAL to a peptide containing the EDERAA sequence which is present in HLA-DRB1*0402, an allele not associated with RA. Furthermore, the EQKRAA and ESRRAL antisera bound to a mouse fibroblast transfectant cell line (Dap.3) expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 but not to DRB1*0402. However, peptide sequences structurally related to the RA susceptibility motif LEIEKDFTTYGEE (P. mirabilis urease), VEIRAEGNRFTY (collagen type II) and DELSPETSPYVKE (collagen type XI) did not bind significantly to cell lines expressing HLA-DRB1*0401 or HLA-DRB1*0402 compared to the control peptide YASGASGASGAS. It is suggested here that molecular mimicry between HLA alleles associated with RA and P. mirabilis may be relevant in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. PMID:10338479

  9. Co-ordinate expression of virulence genes during swarm-cell differentiation and population migration of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Allison, C; Lai, H C; Hughes, C

    1992-06-01

    The uropathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Proteus mirabilis exhibits a form of multicellular behaviour termed swarming, which involves cyclical differentiation of typical vegetative cells into filamentous, multinucleate, hyperflagellate swarm cells capable of rapid and co-ordinated population migration across surfaces. We observed that differentiation into swarm cells was accompanied by substantial increases in the activities of intracellular urease and extracellular haemolysin and metalloprotease, which are believed to be central to the pathogenicity of P. mirabilis. In addition, the ability of P. mirabilis to invade human urothelial cells in vitro was primarily a characteristic of differentiated swarm cells, not vegetative cells. These virulence factor activities fell back as the cells underwent cyclical reversion to the vegetative form (consolidation), in parallel with the diagnostic modulation of flagellin levels on the cell surface. Control cellular alkaline phosphatase activities did not increase during differentiation or consolidation. Non-flagellated, nonmotile transposon insertion mutants were unable to invade urothelial cells and they generated only low-level activities of haemolysin, urease and protease (0-10% of wild type). Motile mutants unable to differentiate into swarm cells were comparably reduced in their haemolytic, ureolytic and invasive phenotypes and generated threefold less protease activity. Mutants that were able to form swarm cells but exhibited various aberrant patterns of swarming migration produced wild-type activities of haemolysin, urease and protease, but their ability to enter urothelial cells was three- to 10-fold lower.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1495387

  10. Various intensity of Proteus mirabilis-induced crystallization resulting from the changes in the mineral composition of urine.

    PubMed

    Torzewska, Agnieszka; Różalski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Infectious urolithiasis is a result of recurrent and chronic urinary tract infections caused by urease-positive bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis. The main role in the development of this kind of stones is played by bacterial factors such as urease and extracellular polysaccharides, but urinary tract environment also contributes to this process. We used an in vitro model to establish how the changes in the basic minerals concentrations affect the intensity of crystallization which occurs in urine. In each experiment crystallization was induced by an addition of P. mirabilis to artificial urine with a precisely defined chemical composition. Crystallization intensity was determined using the spectrophotometric microdilution method and the chemical composition of formed crystals was established by atomic absorption spectroscopy and colorimetric methods. Increasing the concentration of all crystals forming ions such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and phosphate strongly intensified the process of crystallization, whereas reducing the amount of these components below the proper physiological concentration did not affect its intensity. The inhibitory influence of citrate on calcium and magnesium phosphate crystallization and competitive actions of calcium and oxalate ions on struvite crystals formation were not confirmed. In the case of infectious stones the chemical composition of urine plays an important role, which creates a necessity to support the treatment by developing a model of proper diet. PMID:25654361

  11. Arginine promotes Proteus mirabilis motility and fitness by contributing to conservation of the proton gradient and proton motive force

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Hodges, Steven A; Smith, Sara N; Alteri, Christopher J; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-01-01

    Swarming contributes to Proteus mirabilis pathogenicity by facilitating access to the catheterized urinary tract. We previously demonstrated that 0.1–20 mmol/L arginine promotes swarming on normally nonpermissive media and that putrescine biosynthesis is required for arginine-induced swarming. We also previously determined that arginine-induced swarming is pH dependent, indicating that the external proton concentration is critical for arginine-dependent effects on swarming. In this study, we utilized survival at pH 5 and motility as surrogates for measuring changes in the proton gradient (ΔpH) and proton motive force (μH+) in response to arginine. We determined that arginine primarily contributes to ΔpH (and therefore μH+) through the action of arginine decarboxylase (speA), independent of the role of this enzyme in putrescine biosynthesis. In addition to being required for motility, speA also contributed to fitness during infection. In conclusion, consumption of intracellular protons via arginine decarboxylase is one mechanism used by P. mirabilis to conserve ΔpH and μH+ for motility. PMID:25100003

  12. Influence of chondroitin sulfate, heparin sulfate, and citrate on Proteus mirabilis-induced struvite crystallization in vitro.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Downey, J; Clapham, L; Nickel, J C

    1990-11-01

    Struvite crystals were produced by Proteus mirabilis growth in artificial urine, in the presence of a number of naturally occurring crystallization inhibitors. The use of phase contrast light microscopy enabled the effects of added chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, heparin sulfate, or sodium citrate, on struvite crystal growth rates to be rapidly monitored as changes in crystal habit. Struvite crystals formed as a consequence of the urease activity of P. mirabilis under all chemical conditions. In the absence of inhibitor, early crystal development was marked by large quantities of amorphous precipitate, followed immediately by the appearance of rapidly growing X-shaped or planar crystals. Addition of the glycosaminoglycans, chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, or heparin sulfate to the artificial urine mixture had no effect on the rate of crystal growth or appearance. When sodium citrate was present in elevated concentrations, crystal appearance was generally slowed, and the crystals assumed an octahedral, slow growing appearance. None of the added compounds had any influence on bacterial viability, pH, or urease activity. It is therefore likely that the inhibitory activity displayed by sodium citrate might be related to its ability to complex magnesium or to interfere with the crystal structure during struvite formation. From these experiments it would appear that citrate may be a factor in the natural resistance of whole urine to struvite crystallization. PMID:2122009

  13. Evaluation of environmental scanning electron microscopy for analysis of Proteus mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ on urinary catheters

    PubMed Central

    Holling, Nina; Dedi, Cinzia; Jones, Caroline E; Hawthorne, Joseph A; Hanlon, Geoffrey W; Salvage, Jonathan P; Patel, Bhavik A; Barnes, Lara M; Jones, Brian V

    2014-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and frequently leads to blockage of catheters due to crystalline biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has proven to be a valuable tool in the study of these unusual biofilms, but entails laborious sample preparation that can introduce artefacts, undermining the investigation of biofilm development. In contrast, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) permits imaging of unprocessed, fully hydrated samples, which may provide much insight into the development of P. mirabilis biofilms. Here, we evaluate the utility of ESEM for the study of P. mirabilis crystalline biofilms in situ, on urinary catheters. In doing so, we compare this to commonly used conventional SEM approaches for sample preparation and imaging. Overall, ESEM provided excellent resolution of biofilms formed on urinary catheters and revealed structures not observed in standard SEM imaging or previously described in other studies of these biofilms. In addition, we show that energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) may be employed in conjunction with ESEM to provide information regarding the elemental composition of crystalline structures and demonstrate the potential for ESEM in combination with EDS to constitute a useful tool in exploring the mechanisms underpinning crystalline biofilm formation. PMID:24786314

  14. Rare occurrence of Proteus vulgaris in faeces: a reason for its rare association with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Leslie, D L

    1986-03-01

    The faecal carriage rates of different species of Proteeae were assessed in studies with 220 faecal isolates from 219 individuals of whom approximately one-third were well and the remainder had gastro-enteritis. As a result of the development of new media that allowed replacement of the phenylalanine deaminase test with the tryptophan deaminase test and made it possible to combine tests for indole and urease production and for hydrogen sulphide and ornithine decarboxylase formation in two single-tube tests, all strains were speciated with speed, economy and accuracy. Most (96%) isolates were either Proteus mirabilis (62%) or Morganella morgani (34%). The significance of these findings in relation to urinary tract infection is discussed. P. vulgaris was found in only one (0.45%) faecal specimen and this rarity of carriage in faeces is believed to be the main reason for its rare association with urinary tract infections. The frequent association of M. morgani, in the absence of other enteropathogenic bacteria, with severe gastroenteritis was noted with interest. PMID:3512839

  15. Structure of the Proteus vulgaris HigB-(HigA)2-HigB toxin-antitoxin complex.

    PubMed

    Schureck, Marc A; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Miles, Stacey J; Marquez, Jhomar; Cho, Shein Ei; Erdman, Rachel; Dunham, Christine M

    2014-01-10

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems regulate key cellular processes to promote cell survival during periods of stress. During steady-state cell growth, antitoxins typically interact with their cognate toxins to inhibit activity presumably by preventing substrate recognition. We solved two x-ray crystal structures of the Proteus vulgaris tetrameric HigB-(HigA)2-HigB TA complex and found that, unlike most other TA systems, the antitoxin HigA makes minimal interactions with toxin HigB. HigB adopts a RelE family tertiary fold containing a highly conserved concave surface where we predict its active site is located. HigA does not cover the solvent-exposed HigB active site, suggesting that, in general, toxin inhibition is not solely mediated by active site hindrance by its antitoxin. Each HigA monomer contains a helix-turn-helix motif that binds to its own DNA operator to repress transcription during normal cellular growth. This is distinct from antitoxins belonging to other superfamilies that typically only form DNA-binding motifs upon dimerization. We further show that disruption of the HigB-(HigA)2-HigB tetramer to a HigBA heterodimer ablates operator binding. Taken together, our biochemical and structural studies elucidate the novel molecular details of the HigBA TA system. PMID:24257752

  16. Evidence for N----O acetyl migration as the mechanism for O acetylation of peptidoglycan in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, C; Clarke, A J

    1991-01-01

    O-acetylated peptidoglycan was purified from Proteus mirabilis grown in the presence of specifically radiolabelled glucosamine derivatives, and the migration of the radiolabel was monitored. Mild-base hydrolysis of the isolated peptidoglycan (to release ester-linked acetate) from cells grown in the presence of 40 microM [acetyl-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine resulted in the release of [3H]acetate, as detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The inclusion of either acetate, pyruvate, or acetyl phosphate, each at 1 mM final concentration, did not result in a diminution of mild-base-released [3H]acetate levels. No such release of [3H]acetate was observed with peptidoglycan isolated from either Escherichia coli incubated with the same radiolabel or P. mirabilis grown with [1,6-3H]N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or D-[1-14C]glucosamine. These observations support a hypothesis that O acetylation occurs by N----O acetyl transfer within the sacculus. A decrease in [3H]acetate release by mild-base hydrolysis was observed with the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis cultures incubated in the presence of antagonists of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, penicillin G and D-cycloserine. The absence of free-amino sugars in the peptidoglycan of P. mirabilis but the detection of glucosamine in spent culture broths implies that N----O transacetylation is intimately associated with peptidoglycan turnover. PMID:2066331

  17. A total internal reflection ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy study of interactions between Proteus mirabilis lipopolysaccharides and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gleńska-Olender, J; Sęk, S; Dworecki, K; Kaca, W

    2015-07-01

    Specific antigen-antibody interactions play a central role in the human immune system. The objective of this paper is to detect immune complexes using label-free detection techniques, that is, total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE) and atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based topography and recognition imaging. Interactions of purified rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies with bacterial endotoxins (Proteus mirabilis S1959 O3 lipopolysaccharides) were studied. Lipopolysaccharide was adsorbed on gold surface for TIRE. In the AFM imaging experiments, LPS was attachment to the PEG linker (AFM tip modification). The mica surface was covered by IgG. In TIRE, the optical parameters Ψ and Δ change when a complex is formed. It was found that even highly structured molecules, such as IgG antibodies (anti-O3 LPS rabbit serum), preserve their specific affinity to their antigens (LPS O3). LPS P. mirabilis O3 response of rabbit serum anti-O3 was also tested by topography and recognition imaging. Both TIRE and AFM techniques were recruited to check for possible detection of antigen-antibody recognition event. The presented data allow for determination of interactions between a variety of biomolecules. In future research, this technique has considerable potential for studying a wide range of antigen-antibody interactions and its use may be extended to other biomacromolecular systems. PMID:25854960

  18. Bloodstream infections caused by multi-drug resistant Proteus mirabilis: Epidemiology, risk factors and impact of multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Korytny, Alexander; Riesenberg, Klaris; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Schlaeffer, Fransisc; Borer, Abraham

    2016-06-01

    Background The prevalence of antimicrobial co-resistance among ESBL-producing Enterobactereaceae is extremely high in Israel. Multidrug-resistant Proteus mirabilis strains (MDR-PM), resistant to almost all antibiotic classes have been described. The aim was to determine the risk factors for bloodstream infections caused by MDR-PM and clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective case-control study. Adult patients with PM bacteremia during 7 years were identified retrospectively and their files reviewed for demographics, underlying diseases, Charlson Comorbidity Index, treatment and outcome. Results One hundred and eighty patients with PM-bloodstream infection (BSI) were included; 90 cases with MDR-PM and 90 controls with sensitive PM (S-PM). Compared to controls, cases more frequently were from nursing homes, had recurrent hospital admissions in the past year and received antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months, were bedridden and suffered from peripheral vascular disease and peptic ulcer disease (p < 0.001). Two-thirds of the MDR-PM isolates were ESBL-producers vs 4.4% of S-PM isolates (p < 0.001, OR = 47.6, 95% CI = 15.9-142.6). In-hospital crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was 37.7% vs 23.3% in those with S-PM BSI (p = 0.0359, OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.4-3.81). Conclusions PM bacteremia in elderly and functionally-dependent patients is likely to be caused by nearly pan-resistant PM strains in the institution; 51.8% of the patients received inappropriate empiric antibiotic treatment. The crude mortality rate of patients with MDR-PM BSI was significantly higher than that of patients with S-PM BSI. PMID:26763474

  19. Lack of functional complementation between Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin and Proteus mirabilis HpmA hemolysin secretion machineries.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Dubuisson, F; Buisine, C; Willery, E; Renauld-Mongénie, G; Locht, C

    1997-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis has adapted specific secretion machineries for each of its major secretory proteins. In particular, the highly efficient secretion of filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is mediated by the accessory protein FhaC. FhaC belongs to a family of outer membrane proteins which are involved in the secretion of large adhesins or in the activation and secretion of Ca2+-independent hemolysins by several gram-negative bacteria. FHA shares with these hemolysins a 115-residue-long amino-proximal region essential for its secretion. To compare the secretory pathways of these hemolysins and FHA, we attempted functional transcomplementation between FhaC and the Proteus mirabilis hemolysin accessory protein HpmB. HpmB could not promote the secretion of FHA derivatives. Likewise, FhaC proved to be unable to mediate secretion and activation of HpmA, the cognate secretory partner of HpmB. In contrast, ShlB, the accessory protein of the closely related Serratia marcescens hemolysin, was able to activate and secrete HpmA. Two invariant asparagine residues lying in the region of homology shared by secretory proteins and shown to be essential for the secretion and activation of the hemolysins were replaced in FHA by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacements of these residues indicated that both are involved in, but only the first one is crucial to, FHA secretion. This slight discrepancy together with the lack of functional complementation demonstrates major differences between the hemolysins and FHA secretion machineries. PMID:9006033

  20. Lipopolysaccharide interaction is decisive for the activity of the antimicrobial peptide NK-2 against Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Malte U; Brauser, Annemarie; Olak, Claudia; Brezesinski, Gerald; Goldmann, Torsten; Gutsmann, Thomas; Andrä, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol is a widely used mimetic to study the effects of AMPs (antimicrobial peptides) on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. However, the antibacterial activities of novel NK-2-derived AMPs could not be sufficiently explained by using this simple model system. Since the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-containing outer membrane is the first barrier of Gram-negative bacteria, in the present study we investigated interactions of NK-2 and a shortened variant with viable Escherichia coli WBB01 and Proteus mirabilis R45, and with model membranes composed of LPS isolated from these two strains. Differences in net charge and charge distribution of the two LPS have been proposed to be responsible for the differential sensitivity of the respective bacteria to other AMPs. As imaged by TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and AFM (atomic force microscopy), NK-2-mediated killing of these bacteria was corroborated by structural alterations of the outer and inner membranes, the release of E. coli cytoplasma, and the formation of unique fibrous structures inside P. mirabilis, suggesting distinct and novel intracellular targets. NK-2 bound to and intercalated into LPS bilayers, and eventually induced the formation of transient heterogeneous lesions in planar lipid bilayers. However, the discriminative activity of NK-2 against the two bacterial strains was independent of membrane intercalation and lesion formation, which both were indistinguishable for the two LPS. Instead, differences in activity originated from the LPS-binding step, which could be demonstrated by NK-2 attachment to intact bacteria, and to solid-supported LPS bilayers on a surface acoustic wave biosensor. PMID:20187872

  1. Use of green fluorescent protein to assess urease gene expression by uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis during experimental ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Thompson, R B; Lockatell, V; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1998-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of complicated urinary tract infection, expresses urease when exposed to urea. While it is recognized that the positive transcriptional activator UreR induces gene expression, the levels of expression of the enzyme during experimental infection are not known. To investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis urease, the gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to construct reporter fusions. Translational fusions of urease accessory gene ureD, which is preceded by a urea-inducible promoter, were made with gfp (modified to express S65T/V68L/S72A [B. P. Cormack et al. Gene 173:33-38, 1996]). Constructs were confirmed by sequencing of the fusion junctions. UreD-GFP fusion protein was induced by urea in both Escherichia coli DH5alpha and P. mirabilis HI4320. By using Western blotting with antiserum raised against GFP, expression level was shown to correlate with urea concentration (tested from 0 to 500 mM), with highest induction at 200 to 500 mM urea. Fluorescent E. coli and P. mirabilis bacteria were observed by fluorescence microscopy following urea induction, and the fluorescence intensity of GFP in cell lysates was measured by spectrophotofluorimetry. P. mirabilis HI4320 carrying the UreD-GFP fusion plasmid was transurethrally inoculated into the bladders of CBA mice. One week postchallenge, fluorescent bacteria were detected in thin sections of both bladder and kidney samples; the fluorescence intensity of bacteria in bladder tissue was higher than that in the kidney. Kidneys were primarily infected with single-cell-form fluorescent bacteria, while aggregated bacterial clusters were observed in the bladder. Elongated swarmer cells were only rarely observed. These observations demonstrate that urease is expressed in vivo and that using GFP as a reporter protein is a viable approach to investigate in vivo expression of P. mirabilis virulence genes in experimental urinary tract infection. PMID:9423875

  2. H-NS is a repressor of the Proteus mirabilis urease transcriptional activator gene ureR.

    PubMed

    Coker, C; Bakare, O O; Mobley, H L

    2000-05-01

    Expression of Proteus mirabilis urease is governed by UreR, an AraC-like positive transcriptional activator. A poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence, consisting of A(6)TA(2)CA(2)TGGTA(5)GA(6)TGA(5), is located 16 bp upstream of the sigma(70)-like ureR promoter P2. Since poly(A) tracts of DNA serve as binding sites for the gene repressor histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS), we measured beta-galactosidase activity of wild-type Escherichia coli MC4100 (H-NS(+)) and its isogenic derivative ATM121 (hns::Tn10) (H-NS(-)) harboring a ureR-lacZ operon fusion plasmid (pLC9801). beta-Galactosidase activity in the H-NS(-) host strain was constitutive and sevenfold greater (P < 0.0001) than that in the H-NS(+) host. A recombinant plasmid containing cloned P. mirabilis hns was able to complement and restore repression of the ureR promoter in the H-NS(-) host when provided in trans. Deletion of the poly(A) tract nucleotide sequence from pLC9801 resulted in an increase in beta-galactosidase activity in the H-NS(+) host to nearly the same levels as that observed for wild-type pLC9801 harbored by the H-NS(-) host. Urease activity in strains harboring the recombinant plasmid pMID1010 (encoding the entire urease gene cluster of P. mirabilis) was equivalent in both the H-NS(-) background and the H-NS(+) background in the presence of urea but was eightfold greater (P = 0.0001) in the H-NS(-) background in the absence of urea. We conclude that H-NS represses ureR expression in the absence of urea induction. PMID:10762273

  3. Proteus mirabilis urease: use of a ureA-lacZ fusion demonstrates that induction is highly specific for urea.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Mobley, H L

    1991-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, is the most frequent cause of infection-induced bladder and kidney stones. Urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis initiates stone formation in urine and can be inhibited by acetohydroxamic acid and other structural analogs of urea. Since P. mirabilis urease is inducible with urea, there has been some concern that urease inhibitors actually induce urease during an active infection, thus compounding the problem of elevated enzyme activity. Quantitating induction by compounds that simultaneously inhibit urease activity has been difficult. Therefore, to study these problems, we constructed a fusion of ureA (a urease subunit gene) and lacZ (the beta-galactosidase gene) within plasmid pMID1010, which encodes an inducible urease of P. mirabilis expressed in E. coli JM103 (Lac-). The fusion protein, predicted to be 117 kDa, was induced by urea and detected on Western blots (immunoblots) with anti-beta-galactosidase antiserum. Peak beta-galactosidase activity of 9.9 mumol of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein, quantitated spectrophotometrically, was induced at 200 mM urea. The uninduced rate was 0.2 mumol of ONPG hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein. Induction was specific for urea, as no structural analog of urea (including acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, thiourea, hippuric acid, flurofamide, or hydroxylamine) induced fusion protein activity. These data suggest that induction by inactivation of UreR, the urease repressor protein that governs regulation of the urease operon, is specific for urea and does not respond to closely related structural analogs. PMID:1894350

  4. Contribution of Proteus mirabilis urease to persistence, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Lockatell, C V; Zulty, J C; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1993-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a significant cause of bacteriuria and acute pyelonephritis in humans, produces urease. This high-molecular-weight, multimeric, cytoplasmic enzyme hydrolyzes urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. To assess the role of urease in colonization, urolithiasis, and acute pyelonephritis in an animal model of ascending urinary tract infection, we compared a uropathogenic strain of P. mirabilis with its isogenic urease-negative mutant, containing an insertion mutation within ureC, the gene encoding the large subunit of the enzyme. Mice challenged transurethrally with the parent strain developed significant bacteriuria and urinary stones. The urease-negative mutant had a 50% infective dose of 2.7 x 10(9) CFU, a value more than 1,000-fold greater than that of the parent strain (2.2 x 10(6) CFU). The urease-positive parent strain reached significantly higher concentrations and persisted significantly longer in the bladder and kidney than did the mutant. Indeed, in the kidney, the parent strain increased in concentration while the mutant concentration fell so that, by 1 week, the parent strain concentration was 10(6) times that of the mutant. Similarly, the urease-positive parent produced significantly more severe renal pathology than the mutant. The initial abnormalities were in and around the pelvis and consisted of acute inflammation and epithelial necrosis. By 1 week, pyelitis was more severe, crystals were seen in the pelvis, and acute pyelonephritis, with acute interstitial inflammation, tubular epithelial cell necrosis, and in some cases abscesses, had developed. By 2 weeks, more animals had renal abscesses and radial bands of fibrosis. We conclude that the urease of P. mirabilis is a critical virulence determinant for colonization, urolithiasis, and severe acute pyelonephritis. PMID:8514376

  5. Proteus mirabilis urease: use of a ureA-lacZ fusion demonstrates that induction is highly specific for urea.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, E B; Concaugh, E A; Mobley, H L

    1991-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common agent of nosocomially acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infection, is the most frequent cause of infection-induced bladder and kidney stones. Urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis initiates stone formation in urine and can be inhibited by acetohydroxamic acid and other structural analogs of urea. Since P. mirabilis urease is inducible with urea, there has been some concern that urease inhibitors actually induce urease during an active infection, thus compounding the problem of elevated enzyme activity. Quantitating induction by compounds that simultaneously inhibit urease activity has been difficult. Therefore, to study these problems, we constructed a fusion of ureA (a urease subunit gene) and lacZ (the beta-galactosidase gene) within plasmid pMID1010, which encodes an inducible urease of P. mirabilis expressed in E. coli JM103 (Lac-). The fusion protein, predicted to be 117 kDa, was induced by urea and detected on Western blots (immunoblots) with anti-beta-galactosidase antiserum. Peak beta-galactosidase activity of 9.9 mumol of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside) hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein, quantitated spectrophotometrically, was induced at 200 mM urea. The uninduced rate was 0.2 mumol of ONPG hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein. Induction was specific for urea, as no structural analog of urea (including acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, thiourea, hippuric acid, flurofamide, or hydroxylamine) induced fusion protein activity. These data suggest that induction by inactivation of UreR, the urease repressor protein that governs regulation of the urease operon, is specific for urea and does not respond to closely related structural analogs. Images PMID:1894350

  6. Cranberry derivatives enhance biofilm formation and transiently impair swarming motility of the uropathogen Proteus mirabilis HI4320.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che; Amzallag, Olivier; Bechir, Karim; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a major cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), emphasizing that novel strategies for targeting this bacterium are needed. Potential targets are P. mirabilis surface-associated swarming motility and the propensity of these bacteria to form biofilms that may lead to catheter blockage. We previously showed that the addition of cranberry powder (CP) to lysogeny broth (LB) medium resulted in impaired P. mirabilis swarming motility over short time periods (up to 16 h). Herein, we significantly expanded on those findings by exploring (i) the effects of cranberry derivatives on biofilm formation of P. mirabilis, (ii) whether swarming inhibition occurred transiently or over longer periods more relevant to real infections (∼3 days), (iii) whether swarming was also blocked by commercially available cranberry juices, (iv) whether CP or cranberry juices exhibited effects under natural urine conditions, and (v) the effects of cranberry on medium pH, which is an indirect indicator of urease activity. At short time scales (24 h), CP and commercially available pure cranberry juice impaired swarming motility and repelled actively swarming bacteria in LB medium. Over longer time periods more representative of infections (∼3 days), the capacity of the cranberry material to impair swarming diminished and bacteria would start to migrate across the surface, albeit by exhibiting a different motility phenotype to the regular "bull's-eye" swarming phenotype of P. mirabilis. This bacterium did not swarm on urine agar or LB agar supplemented with urea, suggesting that any potential application of anti-swarming compounds may be better suited to settings external to the urine environment. Anti-swarming effects were confounded by the ability of cranberry products to enhance biofilm formation in both LB and urine conditions. These findings provide key insights into the long-term strategy of targeting P. mirabilis CAUTIs. PMID:27090825

  7. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  8. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  9. Antibiotic resistance pattern among biofilm producing and non producing Proteus strains isolated from hospitalized patients; matter of hospital hygiene and antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Shikh-Bardsiri, Houshang; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza

    2013-11-15

    A retrospective study on antimicrobial susceptibility and biofilm production were carried out for eighty eight strains of Proteus strains isolated from UTI and other hospital samples during April 2011-April 2012. The antibiotic susceptibility was carried out by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and MIC by E-test. Biofilm production was measured by microtiter method and confirmed by Scanning electron microscopy. Plasmids from biofilm producing isolates were detected by alkaline lysis technique. From 88 patients infected by proteus species, 58% were female and 42% were mail. The most frequent age range was 20-29 (77.39%) and the least were 60-69 years old (3.4%) (p = 0.05). Eighty one isolates were identified as P. mirabilis while, 7 identified as P. vulgaris. 67.04% [n = 59] of the isolates showed MIC range (16-32 +/- 0.05 microg mL(-1)) to ceftriaxone, 46.59% [n = 41] exhibited least MIC range to chloramphenicol (8-64 +/- 0.08 microg mL(-1)). 31% [n = 28] of the isolates also exhibited MIC range 1-4 microg mL(-1) to ciprofloxacin. 17% [n = 15] of the isolates exhibited strong biofilm while, 6% [n = 6] did not show any biofilm (p < or = 0.05). Plasmid isolation from biofilm producing isolates revealed that stains number 19, 24 and 87' that produced strong biofilm carried similar high M. Wt. plasmid. From above results it can be concluded that the majority of Proteus isolated from UTI patients were belong to P. mirabilis. Ciprofloxacin was the most effective antibiotic for treatment of the infected patients. Limited number of the isolates could produce strong biofilm that were bearing plasmids. Majority of the biofilm producing isolates were also resistance at least to 4 antibiotics routinely prescribed in our hospital. PMID:24511691

  10. High Prevalence of SXT/R391-Related Integrative and Conjugative Elements Carrying blaCMY-2 in Proteus mirabilis Isolates from Gulls in the South of France.

    PubMed

    Aberkane, Salim; Compain, Fabrice; Decré, Dominique; Dupont, Chloé; Laurens, Chrislène; Vittecoq, Marion; Pantel, Alix; Solassol, Jérôme; Carrière, Christian; Renaud, François; Brieu, Nathalie; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Bouzinbi, Nicolas; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Jean-Pierre, Hélène; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    The genetic structures involved in the dissemination of blaCMY-2 carried by Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from different gull species in the South of France were characterized and compared to clinical isolates. blaCMY-2 was identified in P. mirabilis isolates from 27/93 yellow-legged gulls and from 37/65 slender-billed gulls. It was carried by a conjugative SXT/R391-like integrative and conjugative element (ICE) in all avian strains and in 3/7 human strains. Two clinical isolates had the same genetic background as six avian isolates. PMID:26643344

  11. Cervical canal stenosis caused by progressive fusion and enlargement of cervical vertebrae with features of Proteus syndrome and Klippel-Feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Shurei; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ohya, Junichi; Taniguchi, Yuki; Takeshita, Katsushi; Haga, Nobuhiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sakae

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a female who presented with progressive fusion and an enlargement of the cervical vertebrae. Her cervical deformity gradually progressed with age, and the abnormal bony protrusion into the spinal canal caused myelopathy. We resected the affected vertebrae to decompress the spinal cord and performed combined anterior-posterior spinal fusion. The progression of the spinal deformity and enlargement of vertebrae stopped after surgery. The enlargement of vertebrae in the present case resembled that observed in Proteus syndrome; however, autonomous vertebral fusion has not been reported previously in patients with this condition. Our report may help expand the knowledge on developmental spine disorders. PMID:23760594

  12. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  13. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  14. Behavioral sensitivity of the European blind cave salamander, Proteus anguinus, and a Pyrenean newt, Euproctus asper, to electrical fields in water.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, P A

    1997-01-01

    In the urodeles Proteus anguinus and Euproctus asper, thresholds of an overt avoidance response to weak electrical field stimuli (continuous sine-waves) were measured as a function of frequency. Thresholds down to 0.1 mV/cm (30 nA/cm2) were found in P. anguinus and 2 mV/cm (600 nA/cm2) in E. asper at 'best frequencies' (B.F.) of 20-30 Hz, but sensitivity covered a total frequency range of below 0.1 Hz to 1-2 kHz, with up to 70 dB higher thresholds. Average thresholds of 1 mV/cm in P. anguinus and 40 mV/cm in E. asper were more than 30 dB apart and significantly different. Both species were sensitive to galvanic DC-pulses, clicks, and noise bursts with intensities of about the same order of magnitude. Specimens of the transparent catfish, Kryptopterus (Siluridae) reacted in the same frequency range as found for Proteus and Euproctus, and had still lower thresholds, down to 0.02 mV/cm (1.5 nA/cm2). The biological significance and possibly still ongoing evolution of the electrical sense in urodeles is interpreted in terms of comparative sensory physiology and more recent, still speculative, evolutionary diversification during and since the Pleistocene. PMID:9063590

  15. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Gold Nanoparticles Coated with Functional Acyl Homoserine Lactone Lactonase Protein from Bacillus licheniformis and Their Antibiofilm Activity against Proteus Species

    PubMed Central

    Vinoj, Gopalakrishnan; Pati, Rashmirekha; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    N-acylated homoserine lactonases are known to inhibit the signaling molecules of the biofilm-forming pathogens. In this study, gold nanoparticles were coated with N-acylated homoserine lactonase proteins (AiiA AuNPs) purified from Bacillus licheniformis. The AiiA AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectra, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The synthesized AiiA AuNPs were found to be spherical in shape and 10 to 30 nm in size. Treatment with AiiA protein-coated AuNPs showed maximum reduction in exopolysaccharide production, metabolic activities, and cell surface hydrophobicity and potent antibiofilm activity against multidrug-resistant Proteus species compared to treatment with AiiA protein alone. AiiA AuNPs exhibited potent antibiofilm activity at 2 to 8 μM concentrations without being harmful to the macrophages. We conclude that at a specific dose, AuNPs coated with AiiA can kill bacteria without harming the host cells, thus representing a potential template for the design of novel antibiofilm and antibacterial protein drugs to decrease bacterial colonization and to overcome the problem of drug resistance. In summary, our data suggest that the combined effect of the lactonase and the gold nanoparticles of the AiiA AuNPs has promising antibiofilm activity against biofilm-forming and multidrug-resistant Proteus species. PMID:25403677

  16. GlpC gene is responsible for biofilm formation and defense against phagocytes and imparts tolerance to pH and organic solvents in Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y L; Liu, K S; Yin, X T; Fei, R M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria are highly resistant to antibiotics, host immune defenses, and other external conditions. The formation of biofilms plays a key role in colonization and infection. To explore the mechanism of biofilm formation, mutant strains of Proteus vulgaris XC 2 were generated by Tn5 random transposon insertion. Only one biofilm defective bacterial species was identified from among 500 mutants. Inactivation of the glpC gene coding an anaerobic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase subunit C was identified by sequence analysis of the biofilm defective strain. Differences were detected in the growth phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains under pH, antibiotic, and organic solvent stress conditions. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the phagocytosis of the biofilm defective strain by the mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cell line compared to the wild-type strain. This study shows that the glpC gene plays an important role in biofilm formation, in addition to imparting pH, organic solvent, and antibiotic tolerance, and defense against phagocytosis to Proteus sp. The results further clarified the mechanism of biofilm formation at the genomic level, and indicated the importance of the glpC gene in this process. This data may provide innovative therapeutic measures against P. vulgaris infections; furthermore, as an important crocodile pathogen, this study also has important significance in the protection of Chinese alligators. PMID:26400293

  17. ε-Caprolactam Utilization by Proteus sp. and Bordetella sp. Isolated From Solid Waste Dumpsites in Lagos State, Nigeria, First Report.

    PubMed

    Sanuth, Hassan Adeyemi; Yadav, Amit; Fagade, Obasola Ezekiel; Shouche, Yogesh

    2013-06-01

    The ε-caprolactam is the monomer of the synthetic non-degradable nylon-6 and often found as nonreactive component of nylon-6 manufacturing waste effluent. Environmental consequences of its toxicity to natural habitats and humans pose a global public concern. Soil samples were collected from three designated solid waste dumpsites, namely, Abule-Egba, Olusosun and Isheri-Igando in Lagos State, Nigeria. Sixteen bacteria isolated from these samples were found to utilize the ε-caprolactam as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen at concentration of ≤20 g l(-1). The isolates were characterized using their 16S rRNA gene sequence and showed similarity with Pseudomonas sp., Proteus sp., Providencia sp., Corynebacterium sp., Lysinibacillus sp., Leucobacter sp., Alcaligenes sp. and Bordetella sp. Their optimal growth conditions were found to be at temperature range of 30 to 35 °C and pH range of 7.0-7.5. High Performance liquid chromatography analysis of the ε-caprolactam from supernatant of growth medium revealed that these isolates have potential to remove 31.6-95.7 % of ε-caprolactam. To the best of our knowledge, this study is first to report the ability of Proteus sp. and Bordetella sp. for ε-caprolactam utilization. PMID:24426112

  18. Current status of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis in Okinawa prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakama, Rika; Shingaki, Aoi; Miyazato, Hiroko; Higa, Rikako; Nagamoto, Chota; Hamamoto, Kouta; Ueda, Shuhei; Hachiman, Teruyuki; Touma, Yuki; Miyagi, Kazufumi; Kawahara, Ryuji; Toyosato, Takehiko; Hirai, Itaru

    2016-05-01

    Enterobacteriaceae producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) are distributed worldwide. In this study, 114 ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were isolated by analyzing 1672 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae collected from an Okinawa prefectural hospital in Japan between June 2013 and July 2014. The overall prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae was 6.8%; the prevalence of different bacterial species among the ESBL-producing isolates was as follows: 11.5% Escherichia coli (90 of 783 isolates), 6.2% Klebsiella pneumoniae (19 of 307 isolates), and 11.1% Proteus mirabilis (5 of 45 isolates). The ESBL types blaCTX-M-1, -3, -15, -2, -14, -27, and mutants of blaSHV-1 were detected. Among them, blaCTX-M-15 (33.3%), blaCTX-M-14 (27.8%) and blaCTX-M-27 (33.3%) were dominant in the E. coli isolates, whereas a blaSHV mutant which possessed four mutations (Tyr7Phe, Leu35Gln, Gly238Ser and Glu240Lys) in the amino acid sequence of SHV-1 dominated in the K. pneumoniae isolates (11 of 19, 57.9%). The pandemic E. coli ST131 clone was found to constitute 3.3% of the overall examined isolates and 62.2% of the ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. Our results suggest that the genetic combination of blaCTX-M, and blaSHV and antibiotics-resistant profile were different from that in other regions such as other areas of Japan, Asia, Europe, and North America, especially in the ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates and in the E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 isolates possessing blaCTX-M-15 (40.7% of the E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 isolates). Taken together, our results indicate that the ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Okinawa, Japan, might be of a unique nature. PMID:26898665

  19. Identification of UreR binding sites in the Enterobacteriaceae plasmid-encoded and Proteus mirabilis urease gene operons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, V J; Collins, C M

    1999-03-01

    The closely related Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacterlaceae plasmid-encoded urease genes are positively regulated by the AraC-like transcriptional activator UreR. In the presence of the effector molecule urea, UreR promotes transcription of ureD, the initial gene in the urease operon, and increases transcription of the divergently transcribed ureR. Here, we identify UreR-specific binding sites in the ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. Recombinant UreR (rUreR) was expressed and purified, and gel shift and DNase I protection assays were performed with this protein. These analyses indicated that there are two distinct rUreR binding sites in both the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. A consensus binding site of TA/GT/CA/TT/GC/TTA/TT/AATTG was predicted from the DNase I protection assays. Although rUreR bound to the specific DNA binding site in both the presence and the absence of urea, the dissociation rate constant k-1 of the rUreR-DNA complex interaction was measurably different when urea was present. In the absence of urea, the dissociation of the protein-DNA complexes, for both ureRp and ureDp, was complete at the earliest time point, and it was not possible to determine a rate. In the presence of urea, dissociation was measurable with a k-1 for the rUreR-ureRp interaction of 1.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-2) s-1 and a k-1 for the rUreR-ureDp interaction of 2.6 +/- 0.1 x 10(-3) s-1. This corresponds to a half-life of the ureRp-rUreR interaction of 58 s, and a half-life of the ureDp-rUreR interaction of 4 min 26 s. A model describing a potential role for urea in the activation of these promoters is proposed. PMID:10200962

  20. Differential regulation of the Proteus mirabilis urease gene cluster by UreR and H-NS.

    PubMed

    Poore, Carrie A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2003-12-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, relies on several virulence factors to colonize the urinary tract. Among these, urease contributes to the development of urinary stones resulting from the increase in local pH due to urease-mediated hydrolysis of urea to NH(3) and CO(2). UreR, an AraC-like transcriptional activator, activates transcription of the genes encoding the urease subunits and accessory proteins (ureDABCEFG) in the presence of urea. UreR also initiates transcription of its own gene in a urea-inducible manner by binding to the intergenic region between ureR and ureD. The intergenic region contains poly(A) tracts that appear to be the target of H-NS. It has been shown that Escherichia coli and P. mirabilis H-NS acts to repress transcription of ureR in an E. coli model system. It was hypothesized that H-NS represses urease gene expression in the absence of UreR and urea by binding to the intergenic region. To demonstrate this the P. mirabilis hns gene was cloned and the 15.6 kDa H-NS was overexpressed and purified as a myc-His tail fusion. Using a gel shift assay, purified H-NS-myc-His bound preferentially to a 609 bp DNA fragment containing the entire ureR-ureD intergenic region. H-NS and UreR were able to displace each other from the ureR-ureD intergenic region. Circular permutation analysis revealed that the intergenic region is bent. Moreover, H-NS recognizes this curvature, binds the DNA fragment and induces further bending of the DNA as shown by a circular ligation assay. The effects of H-NS, urea and temperature (25 vs 37 degrees C) on urease expression were shown in E. coli containing an hns knockout and P. mirabilis where expression was increased at 37 degrees C. Increased transcription from p(ureR) was seen in the E. coli hns knockout when temperature was increased from 25 to 37 degrees C. These findings suggest H-NS and UreR differentially regulate urease in a negative and positive manner, respectively. PMID

  1. Construction of an MR/P fimbrial mutant of Proteus mirabilis: role in virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bahrani, F K; Massad, G; Lockatell, C V; Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1994-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of acute pyelonephritis, produces at least four types of fimbriae, including MR/P (mannose-resistant/Proteus-like) fimbriae. To investigate the contribution of MR/P fimbriae to colonization of the urinary tract, we constructed an MR/P fimbrial mutant by allelic exchange. A 4.2-kb BamHI fragment carrying the mrpA gene was subcloned into a mobilizable plasmid, pSUP202. A 1.3-kb Kanr cassette was inserted into the mrpA open reading frame, and the construct was transferred to the parent P. mirabilis strain by conjugation. Following passage on nonselective medium, 1 of 500 transconjugants screened was found to have undergone allelic exchange as demonstrated by Southern blot. Colony immunoblot, Western immunoblot, and immunogold labeling with a monoclonal antibody to MR/P fimbriae revealed that MrpA was not expressed. Complementation with cloned mrpA restored MR/P expression as shown by hemagglutination, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy. To assess virulence, we challenged 40 CBA mice transurethrally with 10(7) CFU of wild-type or mutant strains. After 1 week, geometric means of log10 CFU per milliliter of urine or per gram of bladder or kidney for the wild-type and mutant strains were as follows: urine, 7.79 (wild type) versus 7.02 (mutant) (P = 0.035); bladder, 6.22 versus 4.78 (P = 0.019); left kidney, 5.02 versus 3.31 (P = 0.009); and right kidney, 5.28 versus 4.46 (P = 0.039). Mice challenged with the wild-type strain showed significantly more severe renal damage than did mice challenged with the MR/P-negative mutant (P = 0.007). We conclude that MR/P fimbriae contribute significantly to colonization of the urinary tract and increase the risk of development of acute pyelonephritis. Images PMID:7913698

  2. Comparative in vitro studies on disodium EDTA effect with and without Proteus mirabilis on the crystallization of carbonate apatite and struvite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prywer, Jolanta; Olszynski, Marcin; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Mielniczek-Brzóska, Ewa

    2014-06-01

    Effect of disodium EDTA (salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) on the crystallization of struvite and carbonate apatite was studied. To evaluate such an effect we performed an experiment of struvite and carbonate apatite growth from artificial urine. The crystallization process was induced by Proteus mirabilis to mimic the real urinary tract infection, which usually leads to urinary stone formation. The results demonstrate that disodium EDTA exhibits the effect against P. mirabilis retarding the activity of urease - an enzyme produced by these microorganisms. The spectrophotometric results demonstrate that, with and without P. mirabilis, the addition of disodium EDTA increases the induction time and decreases the growth efficiency compared to the baseline (without disodium EDTA). These results are discussed from the standpoint of speciation of complexes formed in the solution of artificial urine in the presence of disodium EDTA. The size of struvite crystals was found to decrease in the presence of disodium EDTA. However, struvite crystals are larger in the presence of bacteria while the crystal morphology and habit remain unchanged.

  3. Modulation of effects of lipopolysaccharide on macrophages by a major outer membrane protein of Proteus mirabilis as measured in a chemiluminescence assay.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, G; Heck, D; Bartlett, R R; Nixdorff, K

    1992-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that a major protein isolated from purified cell walls of Proteus mirabilis (39-kDa protein) is a strong modulator of the specific immune responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from this bacterium. When the protein is mixed with LPS before immunization of mice, the responses of antibody-producing cells specific for LPS are greatly enhanced and converted predominantly to the immunoglobulin G isotype. In the present study, the immunomodulating effects of the 39-kDa protein were tested at the level of interaction of LPS with macrophages. Activation of macrophages was determined by measuring the production of oxygen radicals in a chemiluminescence assay with lucigenin as the amplifier. LPS from P. mirabilis induced strong oxidative metabolism in both peritoneal and bone marrow-derived murine macrophages. These responses were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by mixing LPS with increasing amounts of the protein. In contrast, bovine serum albumin and methylated bovine serum albumin enhanced the response of macrophages dramatically when complexed with LPS. The inhibiting activity of the 39-kDa protein was also observed with LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. PMID:1541521

  4. Negative feedback from a Proteus class II flagellum export defect to the flhDC master operon controlling cell division and flagellum assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Furness, R B; Fraser, G M; Hay, N A; Hughes, C

    1997-01-01

    The Proteus mirabilis flagellum class I flhDC operon was isolated, and its transcript was shown to originate from a sigma70 promoter 244 bp 5' of flhD and 29 bp 3' of a putative cyclic AMP receptor protein-binding site. Expression of this regulatory master operon increased strongly as cells differentiated into elongated hyperflagellated swarm filaments, and cell populations artificially overexpressing flhDC migrated sooner and faster. A class II flhA transposon mutant was reduced in flagellum class III gene expression, as would be expected from the FlgM anti-sigma28 accumulation demonstrated in Salmonella typhimurium, but was unexpectedly also reduced in cell elongation. Here, we show that levels of flhDC transcript were ca. 10-fold lower in this flagellum export mutant, indicating that in cells defective in flagellum assembly, there is additional negative feedback via flhDC. In support of this view, artificial overexpression of flhDC in the flhA mutant restored elongation but not class III flagellum gene transcription. PMID:9287017

  5. Results of a Neutronic Simulation of HTR-Proteus Core 4.2 using PEBBED and other INL Reactor Physics Tools: FY-09 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hans D. Gougar

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s deterministic neutronics analysis codes and methods were applied to the computation of the core multiplication factor of the HTR-Proteus pebble bed reactor critical facility. A combination of unit cell calculations (COMBINE-PEBDAN), 1-D discrete ordinates transport (SCAMP), and nodal diffusion calculations (PEBBED) were employed to yield keff and flux profiles. Preliminary results indicate that these tools, as currently configured and used, do not yield satisfactory estimates of keff. If control rods are not modeled, these methods can deliver much better agreement with experimental core eigenvalues which suggests that development efforts should focus on modeling control rod and other absorber regions. Under some assumptions and in 1D subcore analyses, diffusion theory agrees well with transport. This suggests that developments in specific areas can produce a viable core simulation approach. Some corrections have been identified and can be further developed, specifically: treatment of the upper void region, treatment of inter-pebble streaming, and explicit (multiscale) transport modeling of TRISO fuel particles as a first step in cross section generation. Until corrections are made that yield better agreement with experiment, conclusions from core design and burnup analyses should be regarded as qualitative and not benchmark quality.

  6. Role of Proteus mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella in adhesion, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induction in T24 and Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Paola; Villar, Silvia; Umpiérrez, Ana; Zunino, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is frequently associated with complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). It is proposed that several virulence factors are associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. The aim of this work was to elucidate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects mediated by MR/P fimbriae and flagella in eukaryotic cells in vitro. Two cell lines (kidney- and bladder-derived) were infected with a clinical wild-type P. mirabilis strain and an MR/P and a flagellar mutant. We evaluated adhesion, genotoxicity and cytotoxicity by microscopy, comet assay and triple staining technique, respectively. Mutant strains displayed lower adhesion rates than the P. mirabilis wild-type strain and were significantly less effective to induce genotoxic and cytotoxic effects compared to the wild type. We report for the first time that P. mirabilis MR/P fimbriae and flagella mediate genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells, at least in in vitro conditions. These results could contribute to design new strategies for the control of UTI. PMID:25724892

  7. Development of recombinant Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing a novel alkaline lipase-coding gene from Proteus sp. for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Su, Erzheng; Lin, Jinping; Jiang, Zhengbing; Ma, Yushu; Wei, Dongzhi

    2009-01-15

    A lipase-producing bacterium K107 was isolated from soil samples of China and identified to be a strain of Proteus sp. With genome-walking method, the open reading frame of lipase gene lipK107, encoding 287 amino acids, was cloned and expressed in a heterologous host, Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant lipase was purified and characterized, and the optimum pH of the purified LipK107 was 9, at 35 degrees C. The recombinant E. coli expressing lipK107 was applied in biodiesel production in the form of whole-cell biocatalyst. Activity of the biocatalyst increased significantly when cells were permeabilized with 0.3% (w/v) cetyl-trimethylammoniumbromide (CTAB). This transesterification was carried out efficiently in a mixture containing 5M equivalents of methanol to the oil and 100% water by weight of the substrate. It was the first time to use E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing lipase in biodiesel production, and the biodiesel reached a yield of nearly 100% after 12h reaction at the optimal temperature of 15 degrees C, which was the lowest temperature among all the known catalyst in biodiesel production. PMID:19007827

  8. Construction of a urease-negative mutant of Proteus mirabilis: analysis of virulence in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Jones, B D; Lockatell, C V; Johnson, D E; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1990-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a urease-producing uropathogen, causes serious urinary tract infections in humans. To specifically evaluate the contribution of urease to virulence, a mutation was introduced into P. mirabilis HI4320 by homologous recombination. Virulence was assessed in the CBA mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. Twenty mice each were challenged transurethrally with P. mirabilis HI4320 and its urease-negative derivative (1 x 10(9) to 2 x 10(9) CFU). At 48 h animals were sacrificed and the mean log10 CFU per milliliter of urine (parent, 6.23; mutant, 4.19; P = 0.0014) or per gram of bladder (parent, 6.29; mutant, 4.28; P = 0.0002), left kidney (parent, 4.11; mutant, 1.02; P = 0.00009), and right kidney (parent, 4.11; mutant, 2.43; P = 0.036) were all shown to be significantly different. These data demonstrate a role for urease as a critical virulence determinant for uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:2180821

  9. UreR, the transcriptional activator of the Proteus mirabilis urease gene cluster, is required for urease activity and virulence in experimental urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dattelbaum, Jonathan D; Lockatell, C Virginia; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2003-02-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a cause of complicated urinary tract infection, produces urease, an essential virulence factor for this species. UreR, a member of the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators, positively activates expression of the ure gene cluster in the presence of urea. To specifically evaluate the contribution of UreR to urease activity and virulence in the urinary tract, a ureR mutation was introduced into P. mirabilis HI4320 by homologous recombination. The isogenic ureR::aphA mutant, deficient in UreR production, lacked measurable urease activity. Expression was not detected in the UreR-deficient strain by Western blotting with monoclonal antibodies raised against UreD. Urease activity and UreD expression were restored by complementation of the mutant strain with ureR expressed from a low-copy-number plasmid. Virulence was assessed by transurethral cochallenge of CBA mice with wild-type and mutant strains. The isogenic ureR::aphA mutant of HI4320 was outcompeted in the urine (P = 0.004), bladder (P = 0.016), and kidneys (P < or = 0.001) 7 days after inoculation. Thus, UreR is required for basal urease activity in the absence of urea, for induction of urease by urea, and for virulence of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:12540589

  10. Production of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters from Menhaden Oil Using Proteus vulgaris Lipase-Mediated One-Step Transesterification and Urea Complexation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2016-05-01

    An organic solvent-stable lipase from Proteus vulgaris K80 was used to produce the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ethyl esters (ω-3 PUFA EEs). First, the lyophilized recombinant lipase K80 (LyoK80) was used to perform the transesterification reaction of menhaden oil and ethanol. LyoK80 produced the ω-3 PUFA EEs with a conversion yield of 82 % in the presence of 20 % water content via a three-step ethanol-feeding process; however, in a non-aqueous condition, LyoK80 produced only a slight amount of the ω-3 PUFA EEs. To enhance its reaction properties, the lipase K80 was immobilized on a hydrophobic bead to derive ImmK80; the biochemical properties and substrate specificity of ImmK80 are similar to those of LyoK80. ImmK80 was then used to produce ω-3 PUFA EEs in accordance with the same transesterification reaction. Unlike LyoK80, ImmK80 achieved a high ω-3 PUFA EE conversion yield of 86 % under a non-aqueous system via a one-step ethanol-feeding reaction. The ω-3 PUFA EEs were purified up to 92 % using a urea complexation method. PMID:26842598

  11. Conservation of an ATP-binding domain among recA proteins from Proteus vulgaris, erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli K-12 and B/r

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Hess, R.M.; McEntee, K.

    1988-06-01

    The purified RecA proteins encoded by the cloned genes from Proteus vulgaris, Erwinia carotovora, Shigella flexneri, and Escherichia coli B/r were compared with the RecA protein from E. coli K-12. Each of the proteins hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of single-stranded DNA, and each was covalently modified with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (8N/sub 3/ATP). Two-dimensional tryptic maps of the four heterologous RecA proteins demonstrated considerable structural conservation among these bacterial genera. Moreover, when the (..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P)8N/sub 3/ATP-modified proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, a single peak of radioactivity was detected in each of the digests and these peptides eluted identically with the tryptic peptide T/sub 31/ of the E. coli K-12 RecA protein, which was the unique site of 8N/sub 3/ATP photolabeling. Each of the heterologous recA genes hybridized to oligonucleotide probes derived from the ATP-binding domain sequence of the E. coli K-12 gene. These last results demonstrate that the ATP-binding domain of the RecA protein has been strongly conserved for greater than 10/sup 7/ years.

  12. Anti-biofilm activity of biogenic selenium nanoparticles and selenium dioxide against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Forootanfar, Hamid; Golkari, Yaser; Mohammadi-Khorsand, Tayebe; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-biofilm activity of biologically synthesized selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) against the biofilm produced by clinically isolated bacterial strains compared to that of selenium dioxide. Thirty strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis were isolated from various specimens of the patients hospitalized in different hospitals (Kerman, Iran). Quantification of the biofilm using microtiter plate assay method introduced 30% of S. aureus, 13% of P. aeruginosa and 17% of P. mirabilis isolates as severely adherent strains. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the purified Se NPs (produced by Bacillus sp. MSh-1) showed individual and spherical nano-structure in the size range of 80-220nm. Obtained results of the biofilm formation revealed that selenium nanoparticles inhibited the biofilm of S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and P. mirabilis by 42%, 34.3%, and 53.4%, respectively, compared to that of the non-treated samples. Effect of temperature and pH on the biofilm formation in the presence of Se NPs and SeO2 was also evaluated. PMID:25175509

  13. Crystal structure of the dithiol oxidase DsbA enzyme from proteus mirabilis bound non-covalently to an active site peptide ligand.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A; Fairlie, David P; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-07-11

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  14. In silico design of fusion protein of FimH from uropathogenic Escherichia coli and MrpH from Proteus mirabilis against urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Proteus mirabilis are the most important pathogens causing UTIs. The FimH from type 1 pili of UPEC and the MrpH from P. mirabilis play critical roles in the UTI process and have presented as ideal vaccine candidates against UTIs. There is no effective vaccine against UTI and the development of an ideal UTI vaccine is required. Materials and Methods: In this study, we planned to design a novel fusion protein of FimH from UPEC and MrpH from P. mirabilis. For this purpose, we modeled fusion protein forms computationally using the Iterative Threading Assembly Refinement (I-TASSER) server and evaluated their interactions with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). The best fusion protein was constructed using overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (OE-PCR) and the biological activity of fusion was evaluated by the induction of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the HT-29 cell line. Results: Our study indicated that based on the Protein Structure Analysis (ProSA)-web and the docking results, MrpH.FimH showed better results than did FimH.MrpH, and it was selected for construction. The results of bioassay on the HT-29 showed that FimH and MrpH.FimH induced significantly higher IL-8 responses than untreated cells or MrpH alone in the cell line tested. Conclusions: In the present study, we designed and constructed the novel fusion protein MrpH.FimH from UPEC and P. mirabilis based on in silico methods. Our bioassay results indicate that the MrpH.FimH fusion protein is active and capable of inducing immune responses. PMID:26605246

  15. Crystal Structure of the Dithiol Oxidase DsbA Enzyme from Proteus Mirabilis Bound Non-covalently to an Active Site Peptide Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Fabian; Duprez, Wilko; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Schembri, Mark A.; Fairlie, David P.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    The disulfide bond forming DsbA enzymes and their DsbB interaction partners are attractive targets for development of antivirulence drugs because both are essential for virulence factor assembly in Gram-negative pathogens. Here we characterize PmDsbA from Proteus mirabilis, a bacterial pathogen increasingly associated with multidrug resistance. PmDsbA exhibits the characteristic properties of a DsbA, including an oxidizing potential, destabilizing disulfide, acidic active site cysteine, and dithiol oxidase catalytic activity. We evaluated a peptide, PWATCDS, derived from the partner protein DsbB and showed by thermal shift and isothermal titration calorimetry that it binds to PmDsbA. The crystal structures of PmDsbA, and the active site variant PmDsbAC30S were determined to high resolution. Analysis of these structures allows categorization of PmDsbA into the DsbA class exemplified by the archetypal Escherichia coli DsbA enzyme. We also present a crystal structure of PmDsbAC30S in complex with the peptide PWATCDS. The structure shows that the peptide binds non-covalently to the active site CXXC motif, the cis-Pro loop, and the hydrophobic groove adjacent to the active site of the enzyme. This high-resolution structural data provides a critical advance for future structure-based design of non-covalent peptidomimetic inhibitors. Such inhibitors would represent an entirely new antibacterial class that work by switching off the DSB virulence assembly machinery. PMID:24831013

  16. Alpha-keto acids are novel siderophores in the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella and are produced by amino acid deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, H; Thieken, A; Reissbrodt, R; Jung, G; Winkelmann, G

    1993-01-01

    Growth promotion and iron transport studies revealed that certain alpha-keto acids generated by amino acid deaminases, by enterobacteria of the Proteus-Providencia-Morganella group (of the tribe Proteeae), show significant siderophore activity. Their iron-binding properties were confirmed by the chrome azurol S assay and UV spectra. These compounds form ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands in the range of 400 to 500 nm. Additional absorption bands of the enolized ligands at 500 to 700 nm are responsible for color formation. Siderophore activity was most pronounced with alpha-keto acids possessing an aromatic or heteroaromatic side chain, like phenylpyruvic acid and indolylpyruvic acid, resulting from deamination of phenylalanine and tryptophan, respectively. In addition, alpha-keto acids possessing longer nonpolar side chains, like alpha-ketoisocaproic acid or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid and even alpha-ketoadipic acid, also showed siderophore activity which was absent or negligible with smaller alpha-keto acids or those possessing polar functional groups, like pyruvic acid, alpha-ketobutyric acid, or alpha-ketoglutaric acid. The fact that deaminase-negative enterobacteria, like Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp., could not utilize alpha-keto acids supports the view that specific iron-carboxylate transport systems have evolved in members of the tribe Proteeae and are designed to recognize ferric complexes of both alpha-hydroxy acids and alpha-keto acids, of which the latter can easily be generated by L-amino acid deaminases in an amino acid-rich medium. Exogenous siderophores, like ferric hydroxamates (ferrichromes) and ferric polycarboxylates (rhizoferrin and citrate), were also utilized by members of the tribe Proteeae. Images PMID:8478334

  17. Proteus mirabilis isolates of different origins do not show correlation with virulence attributes and can colonize the urinary tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Vanessa; Schlapp, Geraldine; Zunino, Pablo

    2006-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis has been described as an aetiological agent in a wide range of infections, playing an important role in urinary tract infections (UTIs). In this study, a collection of P. mirabilis isolates obtained from clinical and non-clinical sources was analysed in order to determine a possible correlation between origin, virulence factors and in vivo infectivity. Isolates were characterized in vitro, assessing several virulence properties that had been previously associated with P. mirabilis uropathogenicity. Swarming motility, urease production, growth in urine, outer-membrane protein patterns, ability to grow in the presence of different iron sources, haemolysin and haemagglutinin production, and the presence and expression of diverse fimbrial genes, were analysed. In order to evaluate the infectivity of the different isolates, the experimental ascending UTI model in mice was used. Additionally, the Dienes test and the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR assay were performed to assess the genetic diversity of the isolates. The results of the present study did not show any correlation between distribution of the diverse potential urovirulence factors and isolate source. No significant correlation was observed between infectivity and the origin of the isolates, since they all similarly colonized the urinary tract of the challenged mice. Finally, all isolates showed unique ERIC-PCR patterns, indicating that the isolates were genetically diverse. The results obtained in this study suggest that the source of P. mirabilis strains cannot be correlated with pathogenic attributes, and that the distribution of virulence factors between isolates of different origins may correspond to the opportunistic nature of the organism. PMID:16804188

  18. Proteus mirabilis genes that contribute to pathogenesis of urinary tract infection: identification of 25 signature-tagged mutants attenuated at least 100-fold.

    PubMed

    Burall, Laurel S; Harro, Janette M; Li, Xin; Lockatell, C Virginia; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Hebel, J Richard; Johnson, David E; Mobley, Harry L T

    2004-05-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infections (UTI) in individuals with functional or structural abnormalities or with long-term catheterization, forms bladder and kidney stones as a consequence of urease-mediated urea hydrolysis. Known virulence factors, besides urease, are hemolysin, fimbriae, metalloproteases, and flagella. In this study we utilized the CBA mouse model of ascending UTI to evaluate the colonization of mutants of P. mirabilis HI4320 that were generated by signature-tagged mutagenesis. By performing primary screening of 2088 P. mirabilis transposon mutants, we identified 502 mutants that ranged from slightly attenuated to unrecoverable. Secondary screening of these mutants revealed that 114 transposon mutants were reproducibly attenuated. Cochallenge of 84 of these single mutants with the parent strain in the mouse model resulted in identification of 37 consistently out-competed P. mirabilis transposon mutants, 25 of which were out-competed >100-fold for colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by the parent strain. We determined the sequence flanking the site of transposon insertion in 29 attenuated mutants and identified genes affecting motility, iron acquisition, transcriptional regulation, phosphate transport, urease activity, cell surface structure, and key metabolic pathways as requirements for P. mirabilis infection of the urinary tract. Two mutations localized to a approximately 42-kb plasmid present in the parent strain, suggesting that the plasmid is important for colonization. Isolation of disrupted genes encoding proteins with homologies to known bacterial virulence factors, especially the urease accessory protein UreF and the disulfide formation protein DsbA, showed that the CBA mouse model and mutant pools are a reliable source of attenuated mutants with mutations in virulence genes. PMID:15102805

  19. Proteus mirabilis flagella and MR/P fimbriae: isolation, purification, N-terminal analysis, and serum antibody response following experimental urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, F K; Johnson, D E; Robbins, D; Mobley, H L

    1991-10-01

    Urinary tract infection with Proteus mirabilis may lead to serious complications, including cystitis, acute pyelonephritis, fever, bacteremia, and death. In addition to the production of hemolysin and the enzyme urease, fimbriae and flagellum-mediated motility have been postulated as virulence factors for this species. We purified mannose-resistant/proteuslike (MR/P) fimbriae and flagella from strains CFT322 and HU2450, respectively. Electron microscopy revealed highly concentrated preparations of fimbriae and flagella. Fimbrial and flagellar structural subunits were estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be 18.5 and 41 kDa, respectively. N-terminal sequencing revealed that 10 of the first 20 amino acids of the major MR/P subunit matched the sequence of the P. mirabilis uroepithelial cell adhesin N terminus and 11 of 20 amino acids matched the predicted amino acid sequence of the Escherichia coli P fimbriae structural subunit, PapA. In addition, 90 and 80% homologies were found between the first 20 amino acids of P. mirabilis flagellin and those of Salmonella typhimurium phase-1 flagellin and the E. coli hag gene product, respectively. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified antigens showed a strong reaction between the MR/P fimbriae or flagella and sera of CBA mice challenged transurethrally with P. mirabilis. A possible role for MR/P fimbriae in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection is supported by (i) a strong immune response to the antigen in experimentally infected animals, (ii) amino acid sequence similarity to other enteric surface structure, and (iii) our previously reported observation that MR/P fimbriae are expressed preferentially as the sole fimbrial type in human pyelonephritis isolates. PMID:1680106

  20. Proteus mirabilis urease: histidine 320 of UreC is essential for urea hydrolysis and nickel ion binding within the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Mobley, H L

    1993-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease, a nickel-containing enzyme, has been established as a critical virulence determinant in urinary tract infection. An amino acid sequence (residues 308 to 327: TVDEHLDMLMVCHHLDPSIP) within the large urease subunit, UreC, is highly conserved for every urease examined thus far and has been suggested to reside within the enzyme active site. Histidine residues have been postulated to play a role in catalysis by coordinating Ni2+ ions. To test this hypothesis, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to change amino acid His-320 to Leu-320 within UreC. The base change (CAT for His-320 to CTT for Leu-320) was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The recombinant and mutant proteins were expressed at similar levels in Escherichia coli as detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) of denaturing and nondenaturing gels. Specific activities of the enzymes were quantitated after partial purification. Strains expressing the mutant enzyme showed no detectable activity, whereas strains expressing the recombinant enzyme hydrolyzed urea at 149 mumol of NH3 per min per mg of protein. In addition, the mutant enzyme was able to incorporate only about one-half (58%) of the amount of 63Ni2+ incorporated by the active recombinant enzyme. While the mutation of His-320 to Leu-320 within UreC does not affect expression or assembly of urease polypeptide subunits UreA, UreB, and UreC His-320 of UreC is required for urea hydrolysis and proper incorporation of Ni2+ into apoenzyme. PMID:8500894

  1. A straightforward kinetic evidence for coexistence of "induced fit" and "selected fit" in the reaction mechanism of a mutant tryptophan indole lyase Y72F from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Faleev, Nicolai G; Zakomirdina, Lyudmila N; Vorob'ev, Mikhail M; Tsvetikova, Marina A; Gogoleva, Olga I; Demidkina, Tatyana V; Phillips, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of the mutant tryptophan indole-lyase (TIL) from Proteus vulgaris Y72F with the transition state analogue, oxindolyl-l-alanine (OIA), with the natural substrate, l-tryptophan, and with a substrate S-ethyl-l-cysteine was examined. In the case of wild-type enzyme these reactions are described by the same kinetic scheme where binding of holoenzyme with an amino acid, leading to reversible formation of an external aldimine, proceeds very fast, while following transformations, leading finally to reversible formation of a quinonoid intermediate proceed with measureable rates. Principally the same scheme ("induced fit") is realized in the case of mutant Y72F enzyme reaction with OIA. For the reaction of mutant enzyme with l-Trp at lower concentrations of the latter a principally different kinetic scheme is observed. This scheme suggests that binding of the substrate and formation of the quinonoid intermediate are at fast equilibrium, while preceding conformational changes of the holoenzyme proceed with measureable rates ("selected fit"). For the reaction with S-ethyl-l-cysteine the observed concentration dependence of kobs agrees with the realization of both kinetic schemes, the "selected fit" becoming predominant at lower concentrations of substrate, the "induced fit"- at higher ones. In the reaction with S-ethyl-l-cysteine the formation of the quinonoid intermediate proceeds slower than does catalytic α,β-elimination of ethylthiol from S-ethyl-l-cysteine, and consequently does not play a considerable role in the catalysis, which may be effected by a concerted E2 mechanism. PMID:25084024

  2. Transurethral instillation with fusion protein MrpH.FimH induces protective innate immune responses against uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Bouzari, Saeid

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common infections in human. Innate immunity recognizes pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to activate responses against pathogens. Recently, we demonstrated that MrpH.FimH fusion protein consisting of MrpH from Proteus mirabilis and FimH from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) results in the higher immunogenicity and protection, as compared with FimH and MrpH alone. In this study, we evaluated the innate immunity and adjuvant properties induced by fusion MrpH.FimH through in vitro and in vivo methods. FimH and MrpH.FimH were able to induce significantly higher IL-8 and IL-6 responses than untreated or MrpH alone in cell lines tested. The neutrophil count was significantly higher in the fusion group than other groups. After 6 h, IL-8 and IL-6 production reached a peak, with a significant decline at 24 h post-instillation in both bladder and kidney tissues. Mice instilled with the fusion and challenged with UPEC or P. mirabilis showed a significant decrease in the number of bacteria in bladder and kidney compared to control mice. The results of these studies demonstrate that the use of recombinant fusion protein encoding TLR-4 ligand represents an effective vaccination strategy that does not require the use of a commercial adjuvant. Furthermore, MrpH.FimH was presented as a promising vaccine candidate against UTIs caused by UPEC and P. mirabilis. PMID:26918627

  3. Irrigation with N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-422) in a citrate buffer maintains urinary catheter patency in vitro and prevents encrustation by Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Rani, Suriani Abdul; Celeri, Chris; Najafi, Ron; Bley, Keith; Debabov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Long-term use of indwelling urinary catheters can lead to urinary tract infections and loss of catheter patency due to encrustation and blockage. Encrustation of urinary catheters is due to formation of crystalline biofilms by urease-producing microorganisms such as Proteus mirabilis. An in vitro catheter biofilm model (CBM) was used to evaluate current methods for maintaining urinary catheter patency. We compared antimicrobial-coated urinary Foley catheters, with both available catheter irrigation solutions and investigational solutions containing NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine; a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial). Inoculation of the CBM reactor with 10(8) colony-forming units of P. mirabilis resulted in crystalline biofilm formation in catheters by 48 h and blockage of catheters within 5 days. Silver hydrogel or nitrofurazone-coated catheters did not extend the duration of catheter patency. Catheters irrigated daily with commercially available solutions such as 0.25 % acetic acid and isotonic saline blocked at the same rate as untreated catheters. Daily irrigations of catheters with 0.2 % NVC-422 in 10 mM acetate-buffered saline pH 4 or Renacidin maintained catheter patency throughout 10-day studies, but P. mirabilis colonization of the CBM remained. In contrast, 0.2 % NVC-422 in citrate buffer (6.6 % citric acid at pH 3.8) resulted in an irrigation solution that not only maintained catheter patency for 10 days but also completely eradicated the P. mirabilis biofilm within one treatment day. These data suggest that an irrigation solution containing the rapidly bactericidal antimicrobial NVC-422 in combination with citric acid to permeabilize crystalline biofilm may significantly enhance catheter patency versus other approved irrigation solutions and antimicrobial-coated catheters. PMID:26282899

  4. 10′(Z),13′(E)-Heptadecadienylhydroquinone Inhibits Swarming and Virulence Factors and Increases Polymyxin B Susceptibility in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Won-Bo; Yuan, Yu-Han; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liaw, Shwu-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that 10′(Z), 13′(E)-heptadecadienylhydroquinone (HQ17-2), isolated from the lacquer tree, could decrease swarming motility and hemolysin activity but increase polymyxin B (PB) susceptibilityof Proteus mirabilis which is intrinsically highly-resistant to PB. The increased PB susceptibility induced by HQ17-2 was also observed in clinical isolates and biofilm-grown cells. HQ17-2 could inhibit swarming in the wild-type and rppA mutant but not in the rcsB mutant, indicating that HQ17-2 inhibits swarming through the RcsB-dependent pathway, a two-component signaling pathway negatively regulating swarming and virulence factor expression. The inhibition of hemolysin activity by HQ17-2 is also mediated through the RcsB-dependent pathway, because HQ17-2 could not inhibit hemolysin activity in the rcsB mutant. Moreover, the finding that HQ17-2 inhibits the expression of flhDC gene in the wild-type and rcsB-complemented strain but not in the rcsB mutant supports the notion. By contrast, HQ17-2 could increase PB susceptibility in the wild-type and rcsB mutant but not in the rppA mutant, indicating that HQ17-2 increases PB susceptibility through the RppA-dependent pathway, a signaling pathway positively regulating PB resistance. In addition, HQ17-2 could inhibit the promoter activities of rppA and pmrI, a gene positively regulated by RppA and involved in PB resistance, in the wild-type but not in the rppA mutant. The inhibition of rppA and pmrI expression caused lipopolysaccharide purified from HQ17-2-treated cells to have higher affinity for PB. Altogether, this study uncovers new biological effects of HQ17-2 and provides evidence for the potential of HQ17-2 in clinical applications. PMID:23029100

  5. Production of phenylpyruvic acid from L-phenylalanine using an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis: comparison of enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng

    2015-10-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is an important organic acid that has a wide range of applications. In this study, the membrane-bound L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) gene from Proteus mirabilis KCTC 2566 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and then the L-AAD was purified. After that, we used the purified enzyme and the recombinant E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst to produce PPA via a one-step biotransformation from L-phenylalanine. L-AAD was solubilized from the membrane and purified 52-fold with an overall yield of 13 %, which corresponded to a specific activity of 0.94 ± 0.01 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1). Then, the biotransformation conditions for the pure enzyme and the whole-cell biocatalyst were optimized. The maximal production was 2.6 ± 0.1 g·L(-1) (specific activity of 1.02 ± 0.02 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 86.7 ± 5 % mass conversion rate, and 1.04 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) and 3.3 ± 0.2 g L(-1) (specific activity of 0.013 ± 0.003 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 82.5 ± 4 % mass conversion rate, and 0.55 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) for the pure enzyme and whole-cell biocatalyst, respectively. Comparative studies of the enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation were performed in terms of specific activity, production, conversion, productivity, stability, need of external cofactors, and recycling. We have developed two eco-friendly and efficient approaches for PPA production. The strategy described herein may aid the biotransformational synthesis of other α-keto acids from their corresponding amino acids. PMID:26109004

  6. In vitro activity of flomoxef and comparators against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwen; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Zhipeng; Xu, Yingchun; Cao, Bin; Kong, Haishen; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Sun, Ziyong; Hu, Bijie; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Liao, Kang; Shen, Dingxia; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Juan; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the in vitro activity of flomoxef against clinical extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 401 ESBL-producing isolates, including 196 Escherichia coli, 124 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 81 Proteus mirabilis, were collected consecutively from 21 hospitals in China in 2013. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution methods. Phenotypic identification of ESBL production was detected as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). ESBL genes were detected by PCR and sequencing. Flomoxef, doripenem, meropenem, ertapenem, cefmetazole and piperacillin/tazobactam exhibited good activity against ESBL-producing isolates, with susceptibility rates >90%. Tigecycline showed good activity against E. coli and K. pneumoniae (100% and 97.6%, respectively). Cefotaxime and cefepime showed very low activities against ESBL-producing isolates, with susceptibility rates of 0-0.8% and 1.0-13.6%, respectively. blaCTX-M were the major ESBL genes, with occurrence in 99.5% of E. coli, 91.1% of K. pneumoniae and 97.5% of P. mirabilis. blaCTX-M-14 was the predominant ESBL gene, detected in 46.9% (188/401) of the isolates, followed by blaCTX-M-15 (21.4%), blaCTX-M-55 (17.2%), blaCTX-M-65 (12.7%) and blaCTX-M-3 (6.7%). Flomoxef exhibited excellent activity against the different CTX-M-type ESBL-producing isolates, with MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.064-0.125μg/mL and 0.25-0.5μg/mL, respectively. Against the isolates solely producing CTX-M-14, -15, -55, -3 or -65, flomoxef showed susceptibility rates of 98.6%, 98.0%, 98.1%, 100.0% and 97.4%, respectively. In conclusion, flomoxef showed good activity against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and may be a choice to treat infections caused by these isolates in China. PMID:25600890

  7. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  8. Single-step purification of Proteus mirabilis urease accessory protein UreE, a protein with a naturally occurring histidine tail, by nickel chelate affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sriwanthana, B; Island, M D; Maneval, D; Mobley, H L

    1994-11-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease, a nickel metalloenzyme, is essential for the virulence of this species in the urinary tract. Escherichia coli containing cloned structural genes ureA, ureB, and ureC and accessory genes ureD, ureE, ureF, and ureG displays urease activity when cultured in M9 minimal medium. To study the involvement of one of these accessory genes in the synthesis of active urease, deletion mutations were constructed. Cultures of a ureE deletion mutant did not produce an active urease in minimal medium. Urease activity, however, was partially restored by the addition of 5 microM NiCl2 to the medium. The predicted amino acid sequence of UreE, which concludes with seven histidine residues among the last eight C-terminal residues (His-His-His-His-Asp-His-His-His), suggested that UreE may act as a Ni2+ chelator for the urease operon. To exploit this potential metal-binding motif, we attempted to purify UreE from cytoplasmic extracts of E. coli containing cloned urease genes. Soluble protein was loaded onto a nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid column, a metal chelate resin with high affinity for polyhistidine tails, and bound protein was eluted with a 0 to 0.5 M imidazole gradient. A single polypeptide of 20-kDa apparent molecular size, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-10 to 20% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was eluted between 0.25 and 0.4 M imidazole. The N-terminal 10 amino acids of the eluted polypeptide exactly matched the deduced amino acid sequence of P. mirabilis UreE. The molecular size of the native protein was estimated on a Superdex 75 column to be 36 kDa, suggesting that the protein is a dimer. These data suggest that UreE is a Ni(2)+-binding protein that is necessary for synthesis of a catalytically active urease at low Ni(2+) concentrations. PMID:7961442

  9. Depression - The Proteus of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rao, A. Venkoba

    2004-01-01

    Depression is discussed as a disease of antiquity with suitable contemporary references also. The prevalence of this disorder, which at a given time constitutes 121 millions world-wide is mentioned. Among the types of depression, comorbid depression forms an important one. Classical depression forms the visible part of the depression iceberg while somatic and other life contextual situation forms the submerged part. Somatic manifestations per se do not carry diagnostic weightage unless the core features of depression are elicited. Non-recognition of somatic manifestations result in under-diagnosis and under treatment of the disorder. PMID:21408045

  10. Identification of protease and rpoN-associated genes of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis by negative selection in a mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Li, X; Johnson, D E; Mobley, H L

    1999-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a motile gram-negative bacterium, is a principal cause of urinary tract infections in patients with functional or anatomical abnormalities of the urinary tract or those with urinary catheters in place. Thus far, virulence factors including urease, flagella, haemolysin, various fimbriae, IgA protease and a deaminase have been characterized based on the phenotypic traits conferred by these proteins. In this study, an attempt was made to identify new virulence genes of P. mirabilis that may not have identifiable phenotypes using the recently described technique of signature-tagged mutagenesis. A pool of chromosomal transposon mutants was made through conjugation and kanamycin/tetracycline selection; random insertion was confirmed by Southern blotting of chromosomal DNA isolated from 16 mutants using the aphA gene as a probe. From the total pool, 2.3% (9/397) auxotrophic mutants and 3.5% (14/397) swarming mutants were identified by screening on minimal salts agar and Luria agar plates, respectively. Thirty per cent of the mutants, found to have either no tag or an unamplifiable tag, were removed from the input pool. Then 10(7) c.f.u. from a 96-mutant pool (approximately 10(5) c.f.u. of each mutant) were used as an input pool to transurethrally inoculate seven CBA mice. After 2 d infection, bacteria were recovered from the bladders and kidneys and yielded about 10(5) c.f.u. as an output pool. Dot blot analysis showed that two of the 96 mutants, designated B2 and B5, could not be hybridized by signature tags amplified from the bladder output pool. Interrupted genes from these two mutants were cloned and sequenced. The interrupted gene in B2 predicts a polypeptide of 37.3 kDa that shares amino acid similarity with a putative protease or collagenase precursor. The gene in B5 predicts a polypeptide of 32.6 kDa that is very similar to that encoded by ORF284 of the rpoN operon controlling expression of nitrogen-regulated genes from several bacterial species

  11. Identification of the domains of UreR, an AraC-like transcriptional regulator of the urease gene cluster in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Poore, C A; Coker, C; Dattelbaum, J D; Mobley, H L

    2001-08-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to CO(2) and NH(3), resulting in urinary stone formation in individuals with complicated urinary tract infections. UreR, a member of the AraC family, activates transcription of the genes encoding urease enzyme subunits and accessory proteins, ureDABCEFG, as well as its own transcription in the presence of urea. Based on sequence homology with AraC, we hypothesized that UreR contains both a dimerization domain and a DNA-binding domain. A translational fusion of the leucine zipper dimerization domain (amino acids 302 to 350) of C/EBP and the C-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 164 to 293) activated transcription from the ureD promoter (p(ureD)) and bound to a 60-bp fragment containing p(ureD), as analyzed by gel shift. These results were consistent with the DNA-binding specificity residing in the C-terminal half of UreR and dimerization being required for activity. To localize the dimerization domain of UreR, a translational fusion of the DNA-binding domain of the LexA repressor (amino acids 1 to 87) and the N-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 1 to 182) was constructed and found to repress transcription from p(sulA)-lacZ (sulA is repressed by LexA) and bind to the sulA operator site, as analyzed by gel shift. Since LexA binds this site only as a dimer, the UreR(1-182)-LexA(1-87) fusion also must dimerize to bind p(sulA). Indeed, purified UreR-Myc-His eluted from a gel filtration column as a dimer. Therefore, we conclude that the dimerization domain of UreR is located within the N-terminal half of UreR. UreR contains three leucines that mimic the leucines that contribute to dimerization of AraC. Mutagenesis of Leu147, Leu148, or L158 alone did not significantly affect UreR function. In contrast, mutagenesis of both Leu147 and Leu148 or all three Leu residues resulted in a 85 or 94% decrease, respectively, in UreR function in the presence of urea (P < 0.001). On the contrary, His102 and His175 mutations of Ure

  12. Identification of the Domains of UreR, an AraC-Like Transcriptional Regulator of the Urease Gene Cluster in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Poore, Carrie A.; Coker, Christopher; Dattelbaum, Jonathan D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2001-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis urease catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to CO2 and NH3, resulting in urinary stone formation in individuals with complicated urinary tract infections. UreR, a member of the AraC family, activates transcription of the genes encoding urease enzyme subunits and accessory proteins, ureDABCEFG, as well as its own transcription in the presence of urea. Based on sequence homology with AraC, we hypothesized that UreR contains both a dimerization domain and a DNA-binding domain. A translational fusion of the leucine zipper dimerization domain (amino acids 302 to 350) of C/EBP and the C-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 164 to 293) activated transcription from the ureD promoter (pureD) and bound to a 60-bp fragment containing pureD, as analyzed by gel shift. These results were consistent with the DNA-binding specificity residing in the C-terminal half of UreR and dimerization being required for activity. To localize the dimerization domain of UreR, a translational fusion of the DNA-binding domain of the LexA repressor (amino acids 1 to 87) and the N-terminal half of UreR (amino acids 1 to 182) was constructed and found to repress transcription from psulA-lacZ (sulA is repressed by LexA) and bind to the sulA operator site, as analyzed by gel shift. Since LexA binds this site only as a dimer, the UreR1–182-LexA1–87 fusion also must dimerize to bind psulA. Indeed, purified UreR-Myc-His eluted from a gel filtration column as a dimer. Therefore, we conclude that the dimerization domain of UreR is located within the N-terminal half of UreR. UreR contains three leucines that mimic the leucines that contribute to dimerization of AraC. Mutagenesis of Leu147, Leu148, or L158 alone did not significantly affect UreR function. In contrast, mutagenesis of both Leu147 and Leu148 or all three Leu residues resulted in a 85 or 94% decrease, respectively, in UreR function in the presence of urea (P < 0.001). On the contrary, His102 and His175 mutations of UreR resulted

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, Representative of a Multidrug-Resistant Clone Spreading in Europe and Expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-Type β-Lactamase.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Marco Maria; Giani, Tommaso; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Ciacci, Nagaia; Gniadkowski, Marek; Miriagou, Vivi; Torricelli, Francesca; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis NO-051/03, representative of a multidrug-resistant clone expressing the CMY-16 AmpC-type β-lactamase and circulating in Europe since 2003, was sequenced by a MiSeq platform using a paired-end approach. The genome was assembled in 100 scaffolds with a total length of 4,197,318 bp. Analysis of the draft genome sequence revealed the presence of several acquired resistance determinants to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, phenicols, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides, of one plasmid replicon, and of a type I-E clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) adaptive immune system. PMID:26868393

  14. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of AmpC- and/or extended-spectrum (ESBL) ß-lactamaseproducing Proteus spp. clinical isolates in Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Uzunović, Selma; Ibrahimagić, Amir; Hodžić, Dunja; Bedenić, Branka

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristics, and genetic relationship of AmpC- and/or extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL)- producing Proteus spp. clinical isolates in Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods according to CLSI guidelines. Double-disk synergy test was performed in order to screen for ESBLs, and combined disk test with phenylboronic acid to detect AmpC β -lactamases. PCR was used to detect blaESBL/blacarb genes. Genetic relatedness of the strains was determined by pulsed-fieldgel-electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Eleven ESBL-producing isolates were included in the study (six inpatients and five outpatients). Susceptibility rate to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, imipenem and meropenem was 100%. Resistance rate to cefuroxime was 100%, gentamicine 90.9%, piperacillin/tazobactam 81.8%, cefotaxim, ceftriaxone and ceftazidime 72.7%, cefoxitine and ciprofloxacine 63.6% and to cefepime 45.5%. In five (out of 11) isolates multi-drug resistance (MDR) to cephalosporins, cefamicines, amynocligosides and fluoroquinolones was detected. Besides TEM-1 which was detected in all isolates, CTX-M+OXA-1 β-lactamases were detected in seven (out of 11; 63.6%) isolates (five blaCTX-M-1 and two blaCTX-M-15 genes), and CMY-2 β-lactamase in two isolates. PFGE showed no genetic relatedness. Conclusion Because of high prevalence of MDR strains in epidemiologically unrelated patients with AmpC- and/or ESBL producing Proteus spp. infection, further surveillance is needed. Molecular characterization and strain typing, or at least phenotypic test for AmpC/ESBL production is important for appropriate therapy and the detection of sources and modes of spread, which is the main step in order to design targeted infection control strategies. PMID:27313108

  15. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  16. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  17. Identification of strains Bacillus aerophilus MTCC 7304T as Bacillus altitudinis and Bacillus stratosphericus MTCC 7305T as a Proteus sp. and the status of the species Bacillus aeriusShivaji et al. 2006. Request for an Opinion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Ramesh Kumar, N; Lai, Qiliang; Du, Juan; Dobritsa, Anatoly P; Samadpour, Mansour; Shao, Zongze

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of 16S rRNA, rpoB, gyrB and pycA gene sequence analyses, characterization of biochemical features and other phenotypic traits and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting, it was ascertained that strains Bacillus aerius MTCC 7303T, Bacillus aerophilus MTCC 7304(T) and Bacillus stratosphericus MTCC 7305(T) do not conform to the descriptions of the type strains of the respective species. Strains MTCC 7303(T) and MTCC 7304(T) were indistinguishable from Bacillus altitudinis DSM 21631(T), while strain MTCC 7305(T) should be classified as a representative of a Proteus sp. Our attempts to find other deposits of the type strains of these species were unsuccessful. Therefore, the results support the Request for an Opinion on the status of the species Bacillus aerophilus and Bacillus stratosphericus by Branquinho et al. [Branquinho, R., Klein, G., Kämpfer, P. & Peixe, L. V. (2015). Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 65, 1101]. It is also proposed that the Judicial Commission should place the name Bacillus aerius on the list of rejected names if a suitable replacement type strain cannot be found or a neotype is not proposed within two years following the publication of this Request (Rule 18c). PMID:26297145

  18. Structural properties of lipopolysaccharides from Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia prowazekii and their chemical similarity to the lipopolysaccharide from Proteus vulgaris OX19 used in the Weil-Felix test.

    PubMed

    Amano, K I; Williams, J C; Dasch, G A

    1998-03-01

    The lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) isolated from typhus group (TG) rickettsiae Rickettsia typhi and Rickettsia prowazekii were characterized by chemical analysis and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by silver staining. LPSs from two species of TG rickettsiae contained glucose, 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid, glucosamine, quinovosamine, phosphate, and fatty acids (beta-hydroxylmyristic acid and heneicosanoic acid) but not heptose. The O-polysaccharides of these LPSs were composed of glucose, glucosamine, quinovosamine, and phosphorylated hexosamine. Resolution of these LPSs by their apparent molecular masses by SDS-PAGE showed that they have a common ladder-like pattern. Based on the results of chemical composition and SDS-PAGE pattern, we suggest that these LPSs act as group-specific antigens. Furthermore, glucosamine, quinovosamine, and phosphorylated hexosamine were also found in the O-polysaccharide of the LPS from Proteus vulgaris OX19 used in the Weil-Felix test, suggesting that they may represent the antigens common to LPSs from TG rickettsiae and P. vulgaris OX19. PMID:9488376

  19. One-step biosynthesis of α-ketoisocaproate from L-leucine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to develop a whole-cell biotransformation process for the production of α-ketoisocaproate from L-leucine. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain was constructed by expressing an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris. To enhance α-ketoisocaproate production, the reaction conditions were optimized as follows: whole-cell biocatalyst 0.8 g/L, leucine concentration 13.1 g/L, temperature 35 °C, pH 7.5, and reaction time 20 h. Under the above conditions, the α-ketoisocaproate titer reached 12.7 g/L with a leucine conversion rate of 97.8%. In addition, different leucine feeding strategies were examined to increase the α-ketoisocaproate titer. When 13.1 g/L leucine was added at 2-h intervals (from 0 to 22 h, 12 addition times), the α-ketoisocaproate titer reached 69.1 g/L, while the leucine conversion rate decreased to 50.3%. We have developed an effective process for the biotechnological production of α-ketoisocaproate that is more environmentally friendly than the traditional petrochemical synthesis approach. PMID:26217895

  20. One-Step Biosynthesis of α-Keto-γ-Methylthiobutyric Acid from L-Methionine by an Escherichia coli Whole-Cell Biocatalyst Expressing an Engineered L-Amino Acid Deaminase from Proteus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Wang, Miao; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    α-Keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid (KMTB), a keto derivative of l-methionine, has great potential for use as an alternative to l-methionine in the poultry industry and as an anti-cancer drug. This study developed an environment friendly process for KMTB production from l-methionine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an engineered l-amino acid deaminase (l-AAD) from Proteus vulgaris. We first overexpressed the P. vulgaris l-AAD in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and further optimized the whole-cell transformation process. The maximal molar conversion ratio of l-methionine to KMTB was 71.2% (mol/mol) under the optimal conditions (70 g/L l-methionine, 20 g/L whole-cell biocatalyst, 5 mM CaCl2, 40°C, 50 mM Tris-HCl [pH 8.0]). Then, error-prone polymerase chain reaction was used to construct P. vulgaris l-AAD mutant libraries. Among approximately 104 mutants, two mutants bearing lysine 104 to arginine and alanine 337 to serine substitutions showed 82.2% and 80.8% molar conversion ratios, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of these mutations enhanced the catalytic activity and molar conversion ratio by 1.3-fold and up to 91.4% with a KMTB concentration of 63.6 g/L. Finally, the effect of immobilization on whole-cell transformation was examined, and the immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst with Ca2+ alginate increased reusability by 41.3% compared to that of free cell production. Compared with the traditional multi-step chemical synthesis, our one-step biocatalytic production of KMTB has an advantage in terms of environmental pollution and thus has great potential for industrial KMTB production. PMID:25531756

  1. Proteus Rising: Re-Imagining Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The idea that educational research should be "scientific", and ideally based on randomised control trials, is in danger of becoming hegemonic. In the face of this it seems important to ask what other kinds of educational research can be respectable in their own different terms. We might also note that the demand for research to be "scientific" is…

  2. Proteus rebound: reconsidering the "torture of nature".

    PubMed

    Pesic, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Though Carolyn Merchant has agreed that Francis Bacon did not advocate the "torture of nature," she still maintains that "the very essence of the experimental method arose out of human torture transferred onto nature." Her arguments do not address serious problems of logic, context, and contrary evidence. Her particular insistence on the influence of the torture of witches ignores Bacon's skepticism about witchcraft as superstitious or imaginary. Nor do the writings of his successors sustain her claim that they carried forward his supposed program to abuse nature. We should be wary of metaphorical generalizations that ignore the context of the metaphor, the larger intent of the writers, and the fundamental limitations of such metaphors as descriptions of science. There are no scientific methods which alone lead to knowledge! We have to tackle things experimentally, now angry with them and now kind, and be successively just, passionate, and cold with them. One person addresses things as a policeman, a second as a father confessor, a third as an inquisitive wanderer. Something can be wrung from them now with sympathy, now with force; reverence for their secrets will take one person forwards, indiscretion and roguishness in revealing their secrets will do the same for another. We investigators are, like all conquerors, discoverers, seafarers, adventurers, of an audacious morality and must reconcile ourselves to being considered on the whole evil. PMID:18702399

  3. The Worker as Proteus: Understanding Occupational Adaptability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faddis, Constance R.

    The purpose of this paper is to review and synthesize what is known about occupational adaptability and to propose a heuristic model of the process(es) of adaptation in work. Following an introductory chapter, three chapters contain a review of literature that draws from many disciplines and presents an overview of human adaptation in general, as…

  4. Methodological Approaches in MOOC Research: Retracing the Myth of Proteus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffaghelli, Juliana Elisa; Cucchiara, Stefania; Persico, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological approaches most commonly adopted in the scholarly literature on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), published during the period January 2008-May 2014. In order to identify trends, gaps and criticalities related to the methodological approaches of this emerging field of research, we analysed 60 papers…

  5. PROTEUS MIRABILIS VIABILITY AFTER LITHOTRIPSY OF STRUVITE CALCULI. (R825503)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Proteus: A Lecturer-Friendly Adaptive Tutoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessink, Olivier D. T.; Beeftink, Hendrik H.; Tramper, Johannes; Hartog, Rob J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Effectively targeting a heterogeneous student population is a common challenge in academic courses. Most traditional learning material targets the "average student," and is suboptimal for students who lack certain prior knowledge, or students who have already attained some of the course objectives. Student-activating learning material supports…

  7. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    PubMed Central

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  8. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

    PubMed

    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. PMID:26960264

  9. Proteus in Another Guise: The Changing Shape of Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Ronald N.

    1973-01-01

    This article attempts to outline five major areas of components, selected by virtue of the attention paid them in recent writings, which could provide the content for various combinations of art activities. (Author)

  10. GRAMMAR--THE PROTEUS OF THE ENGLISH CURRICULUM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASTON, KATHARINE O.

    THE ENGLISH CURRICULUM CAN BE MADE MORE EFFECTIVE BY CONSIDERING THE SIGNIFICANT PART PLAYED BY THE COMPONENT OF GRAMMAR. THE NATIVE SPEAKER OF ENGLISH POSSESSES AN INTUITIVE KNOWLEDGE OF THE RULES OF GRAMMAR AND YET CANNOT EXPLAIN WHAT HIS INTUITION KNOWS. THEREFORE, A PRECISE, ECONOMICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE LANGUAGE MECHANISM AND HOW IT FUNCTIONS…

  11. Proteus at Play with the Past: Historical Versus Mythical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lester D.

    1975-01-01

    The use of primary materials, interpretations, pictorial materials, and statistical information are recommended to break the hold of the mythical image of the past and replace it with a historical past. (Author/DE)

  12. Proteus, a Hybrid Virtualization Platform for Embedded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, Daniel; Kerstan, Timo

    By the use of virtualization the security of a system can be significantly increased and performance can be improved by sharing hardware resources while reducing the overall costs of the whole system. Nowadays virtualization also finds approval within the field of embedded systems. However, the currently available virtualization platforms designed for embedded systems only support para-virtualization trying to provide reasonable performance and support realtime applications only by the use of dedicated resources. Our approach introduces a hybrid configurable hypervisor architecture designed to support real-time applications. We do not restrict the set of applications which can be run virtualized on top of our hypervisor to para-virtualized applications but also allow applications to run unmodified or even partly para-virtualized while using state of the art methodologies to obtain high performance.

  13. Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G.

    2012-07-01

    High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

  14. [Effects of dopamine and adenosine on regulation of water-electrolyte exchange in Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine and adenosine both regulate transport of sodium chloride in the renal tubules in mammals. We have studied the effect of dopamine and adenosine on spontaneous activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteous. Both substances stimulated contractile vacuole. The effect of dopamine was suppressed by D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, but not by D1 antagonist, SCH 39166. Adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2.5-dideoxyadenosine, suppressed the effect of dopamine, but not of adenosine. Inhibitor of protein kinase C, staurosporine, in contrast, blocked the effect of adenosine, but not dopamine. Notably, dopamine opposed effect of adenosine and vice versa. These results suggest that similar effects of dopamine and adenosine could be mediated by different intracellulare mechanisms. PMID:25509166

  15. Folate, cancer risk, and the greek god, Proteus: a tale of two chameleons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence indicates that an abundant intake of foodstuffs rich in folate conveys protection against the development of colorectal cancer, and perhaps some other common cancers as well. The issue is a complex one however, since some observations in animal and human studies demonstrate that an overly ...

  16. From Procrustes to Proteus: Trends and Practices in the Assessment of Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oancea, Alis

    2007-01-01

    This article is a reflection on an area of particular interest in the current research environment, but which has not yet been explored satisfactorily in the education literature: the evaluation of educational research. The particular focus is on the UK context, but the article is informed by comparative evidence from six countries (gathered…

  17. A True Proteus: A history of energy conservation in German science and culture, 1847-1914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, F. D. A.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis follows the career of the law of energy conservation in German science and culture between 1847 and 1914. There is an interesting contrast between the initial reception of Hermann Helmholtz’ 1847 treatise ‘Über die Erhaltung der Kraft’, which was rejected by the editor of the Annalen der Physik, and its later status as a classic of science. ‘Energy’ was the shared concept of the disciplines. It was used by physiologists, physicists, psychologists, sociologists and philosophers. Moreover, the law of energy conservation also made a huge cultural impact. The period around 1900 has justly been called an energetic era. Why did the law of energy conservation become such a universal success? The obvious way to explain this success would be to say: because it is true, and subsequently comment upon its great scientific value. This thesis adopts a different perspective. It adopts Wittgenstein’s definition of meaning as use in language. Consequently, the meaning of the law is only referred to in relation to the way in which it was put to use in communicative practice. From this perspective it is immediately evident that the understanding of the law of energy conservation was subject to considerable change. Helmholtz initially conceptualized the law in terms of atoms and forces; Gustav Kirchhoff and Ernst Mach, rejected atoms and forces as hypothetical entities and they preferred to use the more mundane concept of work instead; Wilhelm Ostwald, finally, thought of energy as an immaterial substance. This thesis meticulously follows the changes in use and understanding to which the law was subject as it penetrated German science and culture. Communication and interests, rather than natural essences, are the central explanatory concepts of the thesis. From 1847 onwards Helmholtz and Du Bois-Reymond actively sought to spread the law of energy conservation among their colleagues and the general public. They told their fellow physiologists, for example, that the law could be invoked as an argument against vitalism. In popular scientific lectures they emphasized the law’s connection to Germany’s industrialization and its ethical value. Thus they partly shaped the reception of the law. But of course, its reception could not be completely controlled. People have interests of their own and they often appropriated the law in unexpected ways. This thesis’ stress on meaning as use, and its use of concepts like interests and appropriation may make it appear as if energy was whatever people wanted it to be. This is a misunderstanding. Obviously, within a specific community, there were limits to what one could reasonably make of energy. But these were social as much as intellectual constraints. More importantly, by the turn of the century, the law of energy conservation had acquired a certain ubiquity in German science and culture. The continuous talk about energy had a persuasive power of its own. Centerum censeo, Du Bois-Reymond said. Ultimately, the law imposed itself on everybody, even those who tried to ignore it.

  18. Expression, purification and thermostability of MBP-chondroitinase ABC I from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenya; Li, Ye; Yuan, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitinase ABC I (ChSase ABC I) which can degrade chondroitin sulfate (CS) and other glycosaminoglycan to oligosaccharide or unsaturated disaccharide, was fusionally expressed with maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) (E. coli BL21(DE3)) and purified for the first time in this study. The result showed that the productivity of recombinant MBP-ChSase ABC I was 3180 IU/(L fermentation liquor) with CS A as substrate, and the productivity might be the highest level when compared to the reported ones. The specific activity of recombinant MBP-ChSase ABC I was 76 IU/(mg protein) after purification. The Vmax, Km and kcat were 18.7 ± 0.3 μmol/Ls, 73.1 ± 4.1 μmol/L and 586.7 ± 10.8 s(-1), respectively. Enzyme activity of the purified enzyme remained about 78% after 210 min when the enzyme incubated at 30 °C. This study introduces a rapid method for highly expressing ChSase ABC I, and the method could be adopted in the process of industrial production. Furthermore the investigation of thermostability might lead to an important guide in clinical treatment. PMID:25077839

  19. Enhanced phenylpyruvic acid production with Proteus vulgaris in fed-batch and continuous fermentation.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid is a deaminated form of phenylalanine and is used in various areas such as development of cheese and wine flavors, diagnosis of phenylketonuria, and to decrease excessive nitrogen accumulation in the manure of farm animals. However, reported phenylpyruvic acid fermentation studies in the literature have been usually performed at shake-flask scale with low production. In this study, phenylpyruvic acid production was evaluated in bench-top bioreactors by conducting fed-batch and continuous fermentation for the first time. As a result, maximum phenylpyruvic acid concentrations increased from 1350 mg/L (batch fermentation) to 2958 mg/L utilizing fed-batch fermentation. Furthermore, phenylpyruvic acid productivity was increased from 48 mg/L/hr (batch fermentation) to 104 and 259 mg/L/hr by conducting fed-batch and continuous fermentation, respectively. Overall, this study demonstrated that fed-batch and continuous fermentation significantly improved phenylpyruvic acid production in bench-scale bioreactor production. PMID:25569523

  20. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: Piezoelectric ultrasonic resonant motor with stator diameter less than 250 µm: the Proteus motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, B.; Friend, J.; Yeo, L.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive and in vivo surgery is limited by the ability to provide controllable and powerful motion at scales appropriate for navigation within the human body. A motor for in vivo microbot propulsion is presented with a stator diameter of phi250 µm, demonstrating the potential to directly drive a flagellum for swimming at up to 1295 rpm with a torque of 13 nN m. The motor uses coupled axial-torsional vibration at 652-682 kHz in a helically cut structure excited by a thickness-polarized piezoelectric element. The output power is 4.25 µW, on the order of what is necessary to navigate small human arteries.

  1. The Proteus Effect: The Effect of Transformed Self-Representation on Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Nick; Bailenson, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Virtual environments, such as online games and web-based chat rooms, increasingly allow us to alter our digital self-representations dramatically and easily. But as we change our self-representations, do our self-representations change our behavior in turn? In 2 experimental studies, we explore the hypothesis that an individual's behavior conforms…

  2. Proteus in a Kaleidoscope: The Educational Technologist in Open University Course Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Janet

    1980-01-01

    Describes the educational technologist's work in Open University course production in terms of the work's context and the potential roles and tasks that may be assumed, and concludes that the educational technologist must continually construct and reconstruct his/her own role according to a number of sets of criteria. (Author/CMV)

  3. Micro PIV Measurements of the Internal Flow of an Amoeba proteus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resagk, Christian; Lobutova, Elka; Li, Ling; Voges, Danja

    2011-11-01

    We report about micro PIV measurements of the internal flow in the protoplasm of an amoeba. The velocity data shall give information about the mechanism of the change of amoeba's contour during its locomotion in water. The experimental data is used for an analytical modeling of the locomotion mechanism with the help of a variable contour and finally for the development of locomotion principles for micro robots. The experimental set-up consists of a microscope and a CCD camera with 12 frames per second and image analysis software. The illumination of the amoeba was done by the built-in microscope halogen lamp. We use the phase contrast configuration to capture images of the amoeba moving in water. We applied an electrical field to the water channel in order to control the movement of the amoeba in one direction. During this motion we measured time dependent velocity vector fields of the protoplasm flow, estimated velocity profiles and analyzed time series of the maximum velocity. The velocity vector plots are calculated from the images by using cross correlation and naturally occurring particles in the protoplasm. Beside the analyses of the internal flow we recorded the motion of the center of gravity and the variation of the sectional area.

  4. [Properties of a cephalosporinase produced by Proteus penneri inhibited by clavulanic acid].

    PubMed

    Miro, E; Barthelemy, M; Peduzzi, J; Reynaud, A; Morand, A; Prats, G; Labia, R

    1994-05-01

    P. penneri produces an inducible cephalosporinase, as many Enterobacteriaceae. Nevertheless this betalactamase is susceptible to clavulanic acid which is an exception also encountered for P. vulgaris. The authors studied the enzyme produced by P. penneri 14HBC resistant to cefotaxime (MIC 16 mg/l) isolated in Spain in 1992. This betalactamase of isoelectric point 6.65 hydrolyzes first generation cephalosporins, amoxycillin and poorly ticarcillin as it occurs for all cephalosporinases. However, this enzyme hydrolyzes strongly oxyimino-cephalosporins: cefuroxime, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefpirome as it occurs with extended-spectrum betalactamases. Cephamycins and imipenem are not substrates. Clavulanic acid has a very good affinity for this betalactamase which is inactivated progressively. These properties are similar to those of the enzyme of P. vulgaris Ro104 of isoelectric point 8.3 which, contrarily to other cephalosporinases, belongs to the structural Ambler's class A. PMID:7824319

  5. Folate, cancer risk, and the Greek god, Proteus: a tale of two chameleons.

    PubMed

    Mason, Joel B

    2009-04-01

    Evidence indicates that an abundant intake of foodstuffs rich in folate conveys protection against the development of colorectal cancer, and perhaps some other common cancers as well. The issue is complex, however, since some observations in animal and human studies demonstrate that an overly abundant intake of folate among those who harbor existing foci of neoplasia might instead produce a paradoxical promotion of tumorigenesis. The pharmaceutical form of the vitamin, folic acid, might affect the process in a manner that is distinct from natural forms of the vitamin, although this remains a speculative concept. Our limited understanding of this complex relationship is impeding efforts to move ahead with widespread folic acid fortification, but this delay may be necessary to ensure that such programs are instituted in a safe manner. PMID:19335714

  6. Psychiatric comorbidities in opioid-dependent patients undergoing a replacement therapy programme in Spain: The PROTEUS study.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Barral, Carmen; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Pérez-Pazos, Jesús; Martinez-Luna, Nieves; Casas, Miguel; Torrens, Marta; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-09-30

    Opioid-dependent patients show a high rate of psychiatric comorbidities. The prevalence and characteristics of patients with dual diagnosis have not been well established in Spanish opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programmes. Thus, 621 opioid-dependent patients enrolled in OAT programmes were assessed, using the EuropASI questionnaire, for psychiatric comorbidities, which were detected in 67% of patients (anxiety 53%, mood disorders 48%, sleep disorders 41%, substance-related disorders 36%). In addition, compared with patients without a dual diagnosis, patients with dual pathology were significantly older, used benzodiazepines and cannabis in significantly greater percentages, and showed significantly more frequent infectious and non-infectious comorbidities, worse overall working status, a lower proportion of drivers and higher levels of severity regarding medical, employment, alcohol, legal, family and psychological issues. Therefore, the data showed a very high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in opioid-dependent patients receiving OAT in Spain and several problems frequently associated with patients with dual diagnosis. Physicians treating opioid-dependent patients should be aware of these facts to correctly identify and manage patients with a dual diagnosis. PMID:27416536

  7. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 2: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the two-dimensional or axisymmetric, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 2 is the User's Guide, and describes the program's general features, the input and output, the procedure for setting up initial conditions, the computer resource requirements, the diagnostic messages that may be generated, the job control language used to run the program, and several test cases.

  8. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 3: Programmer's reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the 2-D or axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating-direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 3 is the Programmer's Reference, and describes the program structure, the FORTRAN variables stored in common blocks, and the details of each subprogram.

  9. PROTEUS two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computer code, version 1.0. Volume 1: Analysis description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Schwab, John R.; Benson, Thomas J.; Suresh, Ambady

    1990-01-01

    A new computer code was developed to solve the two-dimensional or axisymmetric, Reynolds averaged, unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in strong conservation law form. The thin-layer or Euler equations may also be solved. Turbulence is modeled using an algebraic eddy viscosity model. The objective was to develop a code for aerospace applications that is easy to use and easy to modify. Code readability, modularity, and documentation were emphasized. The equations are written in nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinates, and solved by marching in time using a fully-coupled alternating direction-implicit procedure with generalized first- or second-order time differencing. All terms are linearized using second-order Taylor series. The boundary conditions are treated implicitly, and may be steady, unsteady, or spatially periodic. Simple Cartesian or polar grids may be generated internally by the program. More complex geometries require an externally generated computational coordinate system. The documentation is divided into three volumes. Volume 1 is the Analysis Description, and describes in detail the governing equations, the turbulence model, the linearization of the equations and boundary conditions, the time and space differencing formulas, the ADI solution procedure, and the artificial viscosity models.

  10. 21 CFR 520.1618 - Orbifloxacin suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pseudintermedius, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis and skin and soft tissue..., Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-positive staphylococci, Pasteurella multocida, Proteus mirabilis,...

  11. Protein migration from transplanted nuclei in Amoeba proteus. I. The relation to the cell cycle and RNA migration, as studied by autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, K.I.; Bell, L.G.

    1982-11-01

    Autoradiography has been used to examine the migration of proteins from a radioactivity labelled amoeba nucleus following transplantation into an unlabelled homophasic amoeba. Nuclei were transferred at three times in the cell cycle coinciding with DNA synthesis (4 h post-division); a peak of RNA synthesis (25 h); and a relative lull in synthetic activity (43 h). Six amino acids were added individually to the culture medium to label the nuclear proteins. Migration of the proteins from the donor nucleui and least with proteins labelled with the basic amino acids. All amino acids exhibited the greatest extent of migration following the 25-h transfers, i.e., coinciding with a peak of RNA synthesis at 26-27.5 h. Actinomycin D (actD) inhibition of RNA synthesis reduced, but did not eliminate the extent of protein migration from the transplanted nucleus, thus indicating the existence of two classes of migratory proteins. Firstly, proteins, associated with RNA transport, which migrated mainly into the host cytoplasm. The second class migrated into the host nucleus from the transplanted nucleus, irrespective of RNA synthesis. The shuttling character of the latter class of proteins is consistent with a role of regulation of nuclear activity.

  12. 21 CFR 520.90d - Ampicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... infections (tracheobronchitis and tonsillitis) due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to E. coli, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Proteus spp.; bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli;...

  13. 21 CFR 520.90d - Ampicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... infections (tracheobronchitis and tonsillitis) due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to E. coli, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Proteus spp.; bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli;...

  14. 21 CFR 520.90d - Ampicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... infections (tracheobronchitis and tonsillitis) due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to E. coli, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Proteus spp.; bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli;...

  15. 21 CFR 520.90d - Ampicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... infections (tracheobronchitis and tonsillitis) due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to E. coli, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Proteus spp.; bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli;...

  16. 21 CFR 520.90d - Ampicillin trihydrate for oral suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... infections (tracheobronchitis and tonsillitis) due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to E. coli, Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Proteus spp.; bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli;...

  17. Long-term studies of urease-induced crystallization in human urine.

    PubMed

    Edin-Liljegren, A; Grenabo, L; Hedelin, H; Pettersson, S; Wang, Y H

    1994-07-01

    Urine samples were inoculated with viable Proteus mirabilis or purified Jack bean urease. The subsequent pH increase and crystallization were followed for 2 weeks. Particle formation was detected much earlier and at a lower pH in urines inoculated with Proteus, in which a higher end pH was also reached. The crystal configuration in bacteria and urease inoculated samples was different. Crystal aggregation was also much more pronounced in the Proteus mirabilis inoculated samples. The total precipitation was markedly increased in the Proteus mirabilis inoculated samples. The presence of live Proteus mirabilis thus has a profound influence on urease-induced crystallization in human urine. Despite the formation of rather large crystal aggregates in the Proteus-inoculated urines, no firm aggregates of a "prestone" type were observed. PMID:8201667

  18. 21 CFR 522.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... when caused by Streptococci, Staphylococci, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Proteus, or Shigella... disease caused by Streptococcus equi (strangles). (b) It is administered by intravenous injection at...

  19. 21 CFR 522.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... when caused by Streptococci, Staphylococci, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Proteus, or Shigella... disease caused by Streptococcus equi (strangles). (b) It is administered by intravenous injection at...

  20. 21 CFR 522.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... when caused by Streptococci, Staphylococci, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Proteus, or Shigella... disease caused by Streptococcus equi (strangles). (b) It is administered by intravenous injection at...

  1. 21 CFR 522.2220 - Sulfadimethoxine injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... when caused by Streptococci, Staphylococci, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Proteus, or Shigella... disease caused by Streptococcus equi (strangles). (b) It is administered by intravenous injection at...

  2. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  3. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  4. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  5. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  6. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  7. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Pasteurella spp., urinary tract infections (cystitis) due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due...

  8. 21 CFR 520.314 - Cefadroxil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and S. aureus. (ii) Cats. For the treatment of skin and soft...) Each tablet contains 50, 100, or 200 milligrams (mg) or 1 gram of cefadroxil. (2) Each milliliter...

  9. 21 CFR 522.56 - Amikacin sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) caused by susceptible strains of Escherichia coli and Proteus spp. and skin and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible strains of Pseudomonas spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. The drug is...

  10. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... day. (ii) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial dermatitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp....

  11. FATE OF BACILLUS SPHAERICUS 2362 SPORES IN NONTARGET INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predatory stonefly larvae (Paragnetina media) acquired B. sphaericus spores by eating spore-laden midge larvae. eaf shredding stonefly larvae (Pteronarcys proteus) and cranefly larvae (Tipula abdominalis) acquired spores by feeding on contaminated leaf discs. pon switching to unc...

  12. 21 CFR 522.56 - Amikacin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Escherichia coli and Proteus spp. and skin and soft tissue infections caused by susceptible strains of Pseudomonas spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  13. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  14. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  15. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  16. 21 CFR 522.313c - Ceftiofur sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mortality associated with Escherichia coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old chicks. (6) Turkeys.... For control of early mortality associated with E. coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old... associated with E. coli and Proteus mirabilis....

  17. 21 CFR 520.90b - Ampicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., tonsillitis, and bronchitis due to Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus...., Staphylococcus spp., E., coli, P. mirabilis, and Enterococcus spp.; gastrointestinal infections due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and E. coli. ; infections associated with...

  18. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  19. 21 CFR 522.313c - Ceftiofur sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mortality associated with Escherichia coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old chicks. (6) Turkeys.... For control of early mortality associated with E. coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old... associated with E. coli and Proteus mirabilis....

  20. 21 CFR 522.88 - Amoxicillin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., tracheobronchitis) due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis; genitourinary infections (cystitis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis; gastrointestinal infections (bacterial gastroenteritis) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and...

  1. 21 CFR 522.90c - Ampicillin sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (including S. equi), Escherichia coli, and Proteus mirabilis, and skin and soft tissue infections (abscesses and wounds) due to Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., E. coli, and P. mirabilis, when caused...

  2. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  3. Design and simulation of e-calendar system circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li-jun

    2015-02-01

    The digital calendar circuits controlled by 80C52 have been designed based on Proteus simulation software. The whole design process is made of three parts: hardware circuits, software programming and software simulation. Finally, it shows that the circuit design of hardware and software is correct through Proteus software simulation. The method of circuit design is systematic and practical, which will provide certain design ideas and reference value for display circuit in the future.

  4. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  5. Bacteraemia due to tribe Proteeae: a review of 132 cases during a decade (1991-2000).

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Kim, Nam Joong; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun-Hee; Ryu, Jiso

    2003-01-01

    To characterize the clinical features of bacteraemia due to tribe Proteeae, 132 cases among 130 patients from 1991 to 2000 were analysed. The organisms included the Proteus species in 63 cases (P. mirabilis in 41, P. penneri in 2 and P. vulgaris in 20), the Providencia species in 8 (P. rettgeri in 3 and P. stuartii 5) and Morganella morganii in 61. Morganella bacteraemia occurred more frequently in the hospital (70.5%). Biliary and hepatic diseases were predominant in cases with Morganella bacteraemia while cardiovascular, urological and neurological diseases were more common in cases with Proteus bacteraemia. Biliary drainage catheters had more frequently been placed in cases with Morganella bacteraemia (39.3%, p < 0.001), and urinary catheters more frequently in cases with Proteus bacteraemia (17.5%). Biliary infection was most common in cases with Morganella bacteraemia (49.2%), while urinary tract infection (UTI) was most common in cases with Proteus bacteraemia (47.6%). Mortality directly related to bacteraemia due to tribe Proteeae was 20.8% (22.6, 50.0 and 15.0% for Proteus, Providencia and Morganella bacteraemia, respectively). In conclusion, Morganella bacteraemia was most frequently associated with biliary infection, while Proteus bacteraemia was most frequently with UTI. Providencia bacteraemia was relatively uncommon and it can be associated with infections other than UTI. PMID:12693558

  6. Evidence for Sex Chromosome Turnover in Proteid Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Stanley K; Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Green, David M; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of genomic and reproductive biology is to understand the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes. Species of the 2 genera of the Salamander family Proteidae - Necturus of eastern North America, and Proteus of Southern Europe - have similar-looking karyotypes with the same chromosome number (2n = 38), which differentiates them from all other salamanders. However, Necturus possesses strongly heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes that Proteus lacks. Since the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of Necturus were detectable only with C-banding, we hypothesized that we could use C-banding to find sex chromosomes in Proteus. We examined mitotic material from colchicine-treated intestinal epithelium, and meiotic material from testes in specimens of Proteus, representing 3 genetically distinct populations in Slovenia. We compared these results with those from Necturus. We performed FISH to visualize telomeric sequences in meiotic bivalents. Our results provide evidence that Proteus represents an example of sex chromosome turnover in which a Necturus-like Y-chromosome has become permanently translocated to another chromosome converting heteromorphic sex chromosomes to homomorphic sex chromosomes. These results may be key to understanding some unusual aspects of demographics and reproductive biology of Proteus, and are discussed in the context of models of the evolution of sex chromosomes in amphibians. PMID:27351721

  7. Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New Mexico. Shane used this configuration as the ground control station to remotely pilot the Proteus aircraft during a NASA sponsored series of test flights. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  8. Protes Electrical Functional Chain: Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresp, Jean-Michel; Boutelet, Eric; Massot, Jean; Tastet, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Proteus is a multi-mission bus concept developed in partnership by Thales Alenia Space (France) and CNES (France). The first application of this platform was Jason1, an oceanography satellite launched in December 2001. Later on, led by the need for extra power for the next Proteus missions, the initial electrical functional chain has been modified by the replacement of the previous Nickel-Cadmium battery by a Lithium-ion one, baseline of the new Proteus 5PF platform. The Proteus electrical functional chain is based on the use of a single battery, permanently connected to the main bus. Its charge is ensured by the on-board software, which adapts the number of solar sections connected the bus. Due to the LEO orbits (700 Km for CALIPSO), the battery is submitted to a high number of cycles (typically 25500 cycles for Calipso). Roughly, a 78Ah nameplate battery, coupled to a solar array delivering 1KW, are able to supply a payload with a power demand up to 600W, for a lifetime higher than three years, under LEO environment. In 2006, on April 28th, the French-American CALIPSO satellite mission has been successfully launched. The CALIPSO mission, project involving NASA (US), CNES (France) and the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace (CNRS, France), is the first satellite using the Proteus 5PF. CALIPSO provides 3D perspectives of clouds and Aerosols. The second Proteus 5PF mission, the space telescope COROT, has been launched in 2006, on December 27th. COROT is a mission of astronomy led by CNES, in association with CNRS, aimed to detect extra-solar planets. The third Proteus 5PF mission, the oceanography satellite Jason2, has been successfully launched on 2008 June 20th. JASON2 is a fourth-partner mission with NASA, CNES, EUMETSAT and NOAA, whose objective is to continue JASON1 sea surface topography measurements with a goal of improving accuracy to 2.5 centimeters. The fourth Proteus 5PF mission, the scientific earth observation satellite SMOS, has been launched on 2009

  9. NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David E.; Brown, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy satellites and of water ice. The satellites we observed have a wide range of J-H colors, with Miranda being blue, Proteus being gray, and Puck, Portia, and Rosalind being red. For the satellites for which we could determine H-K (Miranda, Puck, and Proteus), the colors are gray to red. As a whole, spectrally, these five satellites lie between icy Solar System satellites (e.g., saturnian satellites or the major uranian satellites) and Kuiper belt objects. The redness of Proteus and Puck and perhaps other satellites suggests the presence of organic material, although the redness is also similar to that of C- and D-class asteroids and some outer jovian moons. In all cases, diagnostic spectral features could be masked by broadband photometry.

  10. Impact of adopting minimum inhibitory concentration as the determinant of susceptibility to cephalosporins and carbapenems in multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Parta, M

    2012-06-01

    The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute has recommended that Enterobacteriaceae susceptibility to most cephalosporins and carbapenems be reported according to minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) alone. We analyzed our record of multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae to assess the impact of these changes. We compared susceptibilities of ceftriaxone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae when using the 2009 and new 2010 MIC standards. Vitek2® (BioMerieux), was used to assess the changes in susceptibility. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus sp., and Escherichia coli were the major species from urine, sputum, blood, and other sterile sites. The new breakpoint for cephalosporins increased resistance in E. coli and P. mirabilis. Many Proteus categorized as resistant by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) detection or inferred resistance have MICs to ceftriaxone ≤ 1 mcg/ml. New carbapenem breakpoints increased resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The increased ceftriaxone resistance from lowering breakpoints was almost balanced by the loss of resistance in ESBL isolates with MICs ≤ 1 mcg/ml. MIC-based susceptibility for multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae increases the number of resistant isolates. Inferring mechanisms of resistance has a disproportionate effect on the susceptibility of Proteus mirabilis to cephalosporins, and the MIC-based standard has an almost equivalent but opposite effect on Proteus mirabilis susceptibility to carbapenems. PMID:21912922

  11. [Current resistence situation in a surgical and urological department].

    PubMed

    Wacha, H; Stix, H

    1976-04-15

    Spectrum and sensitivity of bacteria were studied at the Surgical (534 positive wound smears) and the Urological Clinics (7879 urine specimens). Krankenhaus Nordwest, Frankfurt/M., during the period of 1969-1971 and in 1973. The most common organisms identified in wound smears were E. coli, followed by Staph. areus, Aerobacter and Proteus species. E. coli were also predominant in urine, but followed by Enterococci, Proteus and Pseudomonas. E. coli, Proteus species and especially Pseudomonas increased in number whereas Enterococci decreased. There was no pronounced increase in resistance to 9 current antibiotics as well as to chemotherapeutics during the observation period which was particularly striking in the case of Ampicillin used on a large scale. The results of our study support the presently employed therapeutic method using bactericidal antibiotics of the penicillin group in strict indications. PMID:9344

  12. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of the stem bark of Cylicodiscus gabunensis (Mimosaceae).

    PubMed

    Kouitcheu Mabeku, Laure B; Kouam, J; Penlap, Beng V; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Fomum, Z T; Etoa, F X

    2006-01-01

    Ethyl acetate (EA) extract of the stem bark of Cylicodiscus gabunensis (CG) was analysed phytochemically and evaluated for its antimicrobial activity against 17 pathogenic species isolated from patient: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella flexneri, Morganella morganii, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter agglomerans, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus feacalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus T, Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Flavonoids, saponins, tannins, polyphenols, coumarins, triterpenes and/or sterols and reducing sugars were detected in the (EA) extract of CG. The best MIC and MBC values for the microorganisms sensitive to the extract were 0.00078 and 0.00315 mg/ml respectively. The greater and remarkable antimicrobial activity of the (EA) extract of CG was recorded with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus cereus T. These results provide a rationalization for the traditional use of this plant for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:20162076

  13. Clinical and historical aspects of the Elephant Man: exploring the facts and the myths.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Catherine; Hodder, Angus; Ramachandran, Manoj

    2015-01-15

    Joseph Merrick, the Elephant Man, presented to the Royal London Hospital in 1884 with an obscure condition that puzzled his contemporaries, and fascinates clinicians to this day. Throughout the 1900s, a number of theories were advanced to explain the numerous growths that covered his body: neurofibromatosis, Proteus syndrome, and a combination of childhood injury, fibrous dysplasia, and pyarthrosis. The debate continued throughout the 20th century without resolution. Today, new consensus on the genetic and clinical diagnosis of neurofibromatosis and Proteus syndrome has allowed advancements in the Elephant Man's diagnosis. Using recent clinical diagnostic criteria it is now possible to conclude that Joseph Merrick was in all likelihood suffering from Proteus syndrome. Nevertheless, details of his genotype remain unknown. Obtaining intact DNA from the Elephant Man's skeleton is challenging, yet it is possible that sequencing Merrick's genome could provide genetic confirmation of his clinical diagnosis, and shed light on the process of tumourigenesis. PMID:25280594

  14. A Modified Mixing Length Turbulence Model for Zero and Adverse Pressure Gradients. M.S. Thesis - Akron Univ., 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Julianne M.; Leonard, B. P.

    1994-01-01

    The modified mixing length (MML) turbulence model was installed in the Proteus Navier-Stokes code, then modified to make it applicable to a wider range of flows typical of aerospace propulsion applications. The modifications are based on experimental data for three flat-plate flows having zero, mild adverse, and strong adverse pressure gradients. Three transonic diffuser test cases were run with the new version of the model in order to evaluate its performance. All results are compared with experimental data and show improvements over calculations made using the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, the standard algebraic model in Proteus.

  15. Inhibition of urease activity by dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Odake, S; Nakahashi, K; Morikawa, T; Takebe, S; Kobashi, K

    1992-10-01

    A series of dipeptidyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-Gly-NHOH: X = amino acid residues) was synthesized, and the inhibitory activity against Jack bean and Proteus mirabilis ureases [EC 3.5.1.5] was examined. A number of H-X-Gly-NHOH inhibited Jack bean urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-6) M and inhibited Proteus mirabilis urease with an I50 of the order of 10(-5) M. The inhibition against Jack bean urease was more potent than that with the corresponding aminoacyl hydroxamic acids (H-X-NHOH). PMID:1464106

  16. Studies on the formation of crystalline bacterial biofilms on urethral catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D; Morris, N; Moreno, M C; Sabbuba, N

    1998-09-01

    A model of the catheterised bladder was used to test the ability of urease-producing urinary tract pathogens to encrust urethral catheters. Encrustation was assessed by determining the amounts of calcium and magnesium deposited on the catheters and visualised by scanning electron microscopy. Urease-positive Morganella morganii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa failed to raise the urinary pH and form crystalline biofilms. In contrast, strains of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Providencia rettgeri generated alkaline urine (pH 8.3-8.6) and extensive catheter encrustation within 24 h. PMID:9832268

  17. In vitro bactericidal activity of cefepime and cefpirome against clinical isolates at Karachi.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Adeel; Naqvi, Syed Baqar Shayam; Ali, Syed Abid; Ahmed, Sadia; Shakeel, Osama

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotics not only support to alleviate the infections but also facilitate to avert the multiplication of microbes. Due to the irrational use of antibiotics, the resistance of antibiotics has been augmented which results may increase in morbidity and mortality with the span of time. World renowned regulatory bodies like Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization (WHO) vigorously advocate the surveillance of the resistance of antibiotics. During the present study by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method 141 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (n=47, 33.34%), Escherichia coli (n=54, 38.3%), Proteus species (n=26, 18.4%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14, 9.92%) are evaluated against cefepime and cefpirome which comes of fourth generation cephalosporin. It has been found that cefpirome has better bactericidal activity than cefepime against E. coli and K. pneumoniae while cefepime has been possessed better antibacterial activity against S. aureus and Proteus species which were isolated from respiratory tract infections, blood stream infection, intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, and skin and soft tissue infections. K. pneumoniae, E. coli, Proteus species, and S. aureus were 34.8%, 26.3%, 11.3%, and 37.7% resistance against cefepime respectively. S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Proteus species has shown 41.4%, 21.7%, 17.6%, and 8.9% resistance against cefpirome correspondingly. PMID:26004702

  18. Small Body Shape Models V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stooke, P.

    2002-05-01

    This data set contains the Philip Stooke shape models for small solar system bodies, including 243 Ida, 951 Gaspra, comet Halley, J5 Amalthea, N7 Larissa, N8 Proteus, S10 Janus, S11 Epimetheus, S16 Prometheus, and S17 Pandora.

  19. 21 CFR 520.314 - Cefadroxil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Staphylococcus aureus. For the treatment of genitourinary tract infections (cystitis) due to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and S. aureus. (ii) Cats. For the treatment of skin and soft... strains of Pasteurella multocida, S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus spp....

  20. 21 CFR 520.314 - Cefadroxil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Staphylococcus aureus. For the treatment of genitourinary tract infections (cystitis) due to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and S. aureus. (ii) Cats. For the treatment of skin and soft... strains of Pasteurella multocida, S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus spp....

  1. Immunological properties of beta-lactamases that hydrolyze cefuroxime and cefotaxime.

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, K; Sato, K; Matsubara, N; Katsumata, R; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1981-01-01

    Antiserum against purified beta-lactamase from Proteus vulgaris GN7919 cross-reacted with beta-lactamases produced by strains of Pseudomonas cepacia in a neutralization test. Anti-P. cepacia beta-lactamase serum, however, did not show any cross-reactions with P. vulgaris beta-lactamases. Each of these enzymes can hydrolyze cefuroxime and cefotaxime. PMID:6269489

  2. Status of a UAV SAR Designed for Repeat Pass Interferometry for Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Hoffman, Jim; Miller, Tim; Lou, Yunling; Muellerschoen, Ron; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Under the NASA ESTO sponsored Instrument Incubator Program we have designed a lightweight, reconfigurable polarimetric L-band SAR designed for repeat pass deformation measurements of rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes. This radar will be installed on an unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) or a lightweight, high-altitude, and long endurance platform such as the Proteus. After a study of suitable available platforms we selected the Proteus for initial development and testing of the system. We want to control the repeat track capability of the aircraft to be within a 10 m tube to support the repeat deformation capability. We conducted tests with the Proteus using real-time GPS with sub-meter accuracy to see if pilots could fly the aircraft within the desired tube. Our results show that pilots are unable to fly the aircraft with the desired accuracy and therefore an augmented autopilot will be required to meet these objectives. Based on the Proteus flying altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and 16 km range swath. This radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry (RPI). This paper will present are design criteria, current design and expected science applications.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Euphorbia hirta and Asystasia gangeticum.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, M; Rao, Ch V; Rao, P M; Raju, D B; Venkateswarlu, Y

    2006-07-01

    The ethanolic extracts of the dry fruits of Caesalpinia pulcherrima, aerial parts of Euphorbia hirta and flowers of Asystasia gangeticum were tested for antimicrobial activity. The three plants exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli (enteropathogen), Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:16730921

  4. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  5. 21 CFR 522.313c - Ceftiofur sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the neck. (ii) Indications for use. For control of early mortality associated with Escherichia coli.... coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old poults. (7) Horses—(i) Amount. 2.2 to 4.4 mg/kg (1.0... infections associated with E. coli and Proteus mirabilis....

  6. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  7. Characterization of a plasmid-encoded urease gene cluster found in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, S E; Collins, C M

    1993-03-01

    Plasmid-encoded urease gene clusters found in uropathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli, Providencia stuartii, and Salmonella cubana demonstrated DNA homology, similar positions of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites, and manners of urease expression and therefore represent the same locus. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid-encoded urease genes are closely related to the Proteus mirabilis urease genes. PMID:8449894

  8. Ureases as a target for the treatment of gastric and urinary infections.

    PubMed

    Follmer, C

    2010-05-01

    Urease is known to be a major contributor to pathologies induced by Helicobacter pylori and Proteus species. In H pylori, urease allows the bacteria to survive in an acidic gastric environment during colonisation, playing an important role in the pathogenesis of gastric and peptic ulcers. Ureolytic activity also results in the production of ammonia in close proximity to the gastric epithelium, causing cell damage and inflammation. In the case of Proteus species (notably Proteus mirabilis) infection, stones are formed due to the presence of ammonia and carbon dioxide released by urease action. In addition, the ammonia released is able to damage the glycosaminoglycan layer, which protects the urothelial surface against bacterial infection. In this context, the administration of urease inhibitors may be an effective therapy for urease-dependent pathogenic bacteria. This is a review of the role of ureases in H pylori and Proteus species infections, focussing on the biochemical and clinical aspects of the most promising and/or potent urease inhibitors for the treatment of gastric and urinary tract infections. PMID:20418234

  9. Bacteria isolated from 25 hydatid cysts in sheep, cattle and goats.

    PubMed

    Ziino, G; Giuffrida, A; Bilei, S; Panebianco, A

    2009-08-22

    Bacteria were isolated from 12 of 25 hydatid cysts collected from the lungs and livers of cattle, sheep and goats slaughtered in the province of Messina, Sicily, Italy. Citrobacter freundii was isolated from seven of the cysts, Aeromonas hydrophila from three, Staphylococcus species from two, Salmonella species from two and Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris from one. PMID:19700784

  10. Pre-Service Training Model for TESOL/ABE Teachers and Teacher-Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    Developed by the Proteus Adult Education Team of Visalia, Calif., this preservice training model, the result of a project for teachers and teacher-aides of Mexican American adult students, recommends a structure of 30 hours intensive training conducted over a period of 2 weeks (to be followed by weekly 2 1/2-hour inservice sessions). This booklet…

  11. Design Considerations in Developing a Web-Based Mentor Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Todd

    This paper describes a Web-based mentor network designed to pair students in rural independent schools with undergraduates at selected liberal arts colleges. It is one of nine central program elements that constitute the Proteus(TM) system, a multimedia technologies architecture that supports distributed collaborations and work undertaken in the…

  12. The Application Study of MCU in Visual Classroom Interactive Teaching Based on Virtual Experiment Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Diankuan; Li, Lixin

    Because many students are lacking in perceptual knowledge of MCU, they are difficult to engage themselves in classroom activities. The paper therefore offers an interactive teaching mode of proteus-based MCU virtual laboratory. The teaching mode is of help in arousing students' interests, improving their learning efficiency and practical abilities, and promoting the teaching reform of MCU subject.

  13. Giving Structure to Legacy Finding Aids before Conversion to EAD: The Case of the Archives Departementales des Pyrenees-Atlantiques, France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, Anne; Maftei, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    At the Archives Departementales des Pyrenees-Atlantiques, the encoding of more than forty legacy finding aids written between 1863 and 2000 is part of a program of digitization of the collections. Because of the size of the project, an external consultant, ArchProteus, has been brought in and specific management procedures have been put in place…

  14. 78 FR 28733 - Medical Devices; General Hospital and Personal Use Monitoring Devices; Classification of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Testing. Clinical Evaluation. Failure to excrete Animal Testing. Usability Human Factors Testing. Labeling... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) (21 U.S.C. 360c(f)(1)), devices that were not in commercial... Designation Under Section 513(f)(2) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act From Proteus Biomedical,...

  15. 21 CFR 522.313c - Ceftiofur sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the neck. (ii) Indications for use. For control of early mortality associated with Escherichia coli.... coli organisms susceptible to ceftiofur in day-old poults. (7) Horses—(i) Amount. 2.2 to 4.4 mg/kg (1.0... infections associated with E. coli and Proteus mirabilis....

  16. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1618 - Orbifloxacin suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pseudintermedius, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis and skin and soft tissue... spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., E. faecalis, β-hemolytic...) in cats caused by susceptible strains of S. aureus, E. coli, and P. multocida....

  18. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate sterile suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... daily, for up to 3 days. (B) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial pneumonia caused by Pasteurella spp. susceptible to ampicillin. (C) Limitations. Not... tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1618 - Orbifloxacin suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pseudintermedius, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis and skin and soft tissue... spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., E. faecalis, β-hemolytic...) in cats caused by susceptible strains of S. aureus, E. coli, and P. multocida....

  20. 21 CFR 522.90a - Ampicillin trihydrate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. For treatment of bacterial enteritis in calves caused by Escherichia coli and bacterial... for use. Treatment of bacterial enteritis (colibacillosis) caused by E. coli and bacterial pneumonia...—(A) Treatment of respiratory tract infections due to E. coli, Pseudomonas spp., Proteus...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1618 - Orbifloxacin suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pseudintermedius, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis and skin and soft tissue... spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., E. faecalis, β-hemolytic...) in cats caused by susceptible strains of S. aureus, E. coli, and P. multocida....

  2. Bacterial agents causing chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Obi, C L; Enweani, I B; Giwa, J O

    1995-06-01

    Ear swabs from 350 patients with chronic otitis media attending different orthorhinolaryngological clinics at different hospitals and health centres in Benin City and Ekpoma in Edo State were screened for the presence of bacterial agents of chronic otitis media. Results revealed the presence of 19 different species indicating polymicrobial infections. Species isolated comprised Staphylococcus aureus (33.6%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19.3%), Proteus mirabilis (17%), Alcaligenes faecalis (6.2%) and Klebsiella aerogenes (4.3%). Others included Escherichia coli (3.3%), Proteus rettgeri (2.8%), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (2.2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Acinetobacter spp, Proteus morgani, Haemophilus influenzae, Providencia spp, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus faecalis, non-haemolytic streptococci and Diphotheroids, each accounted for less than 2% of isolates. The study also showed a higher prevalence of chronic otitis media among males (55.7%) than females (44.3%). Cases of chronic otitis media were highest among the age groups (0-5 years) with a prevalence rate of 50% and least among the 6-10 year age group with a prevalence rate of 14.9%. Antibiogram of isolates revealed marked sensitivities (over 90% of the isolates) to ciproxin, tarivid, rocephin and fortum whereas over 70% were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. Results have indicated that Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis are leading bacterial agents of otitis media and highlights the high risk involved in the use of penicillin, ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, cloxacillin and septrin in the management of chronic otitis media in our locality. PMID:7498006

  3. Novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coal-fired syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Tim

    2011-09-14

    This final report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of a novel polymer membrane process for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture from coalfired syngas (award number DE-FE0001124). The work was conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) from September 15, 2009, through December 14, 2011. Tetramer Technologies, LLC (Tetramer) was our subcontract partner on this project. The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at Wilsonville, AL, provided access to syngas gasifier test facilities. The main objective of this project was to develop a cost-effective membrane process that could be used in the relatively near-term to capture CO{sub 2} from shifted syngas generated by a coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this project, novel polymeric membranes (designated as Proteus™ membranes) with separation properties superior to conventional polymeric membranes were developed. Hydrogen permeance of up to 800 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 50 psig, which exceeds the original project targets of 200 gpu for hydrogen permeance and 10 for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Lab-scale Proteus membrane modules (with a membrane area of 0.13 m{sup 2}) were also developed using scaled-up Proteus membranes and high temperature stable module components identified during this project. A mixed-gas hydrogen permeance of about 160 gpu and H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity of >12 was achieved using a simulated syngas mixture at 150°C and 100 psig. We believe that a significant improvement in the membrane and module performance is likely with additional development work. Both Proteus membranes and lab-scale Proteus membrane modules were further evaluated using coal-derived syngas streams at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The results indicate that all module components, including the Proteus membrane, were stable under the field

  4. Digestion of cellulose and xylan by symbiotic bacteria in the intestine of the Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Prem Anand, A Alwin; Sripathi, K

    2004-09-01

    Bats (Order Chiroptera) are a widely distributed group of mammals. Pteropus giganteus belongs to the Suborder Megachiroptera. This bat consumes fruits and leaves as their major food. Cellulose and xylan are the major composition of leaves. As they consume leaves in their diet, their digestive tract must contain cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria which help in the digestion of cellulose and xylan. The cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria were isolated and screened on Berg's agar containing cellulose and xylan. The bacteria isolated were characterized biochemically and found to be Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. These bacteria help in digestion of cellulose and xylan in the diet of the bat, P. giganteus. Here we show that leaves are also used as a carbohydrate source by these bats. An insectivorous bat, Hipposideros fulvus, was used as a control and does not possess cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. PMID:15471682

  5. Microbiological Characteristics of Dungeness Crab (Cancer magister)1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. S.; Pfeifer, D. K.

    1975-01-01

    Aerobic, heterotropic microorganisms of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) were isolated from raw crab, cooked crab, crab meats obtained during commercial processing, and from retail crab meat samples. Each microbial isolate was then identified to the genus level employing the revised replica plating procedure. Microbial groups most commonly isolated from crab meat were, in the order of predominance, Moraxella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Flavobacterium-Cytophaga, and Bacillus sp. Proteus, Staphylococcus, yeasts, Vibrio, and Lactobacillus sp. were found less frequently in some samples. Distribution patterns of microbial flora in crab meat revealed the presence of three classes of microorganisms. Microorganisms that originated from the raw crab and gained predominance by growth during refrigerated storage were Moraxella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Flavobacterium-Cytophaga sp. Those that originated from the crab but did not grow in meat were Arthrobacter and Bacillus sp. Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, and Proteus sp. were introduced during processing, but they did not grow in the refrigerated crab meat. PMID:1096824

  6. Antibacterial Activity of Mangrove Leaf Extracts against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, G.; Mulla, N. S. S.; Ansari, Z. A.; Mohandass, C.

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extract of mangroves, namely, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia alba and Exoecaria agallocha from Chorao island, Goa was investigated against human bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis. As compared to aqueous, ethanol extract showed broad-spectrum activity. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria Salmonella typhi was inhibited by the ethanol extract of S. alba leaf whereas the other two resistant bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sp. were inhibited by the ethanol extract of leaves of all the species. The aqueous extract of S. alba and E. agallocha showed their activity against P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis, respectively. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of saponins, glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, phenol and volatile oils in the leaves of mangroves. Further studies using different solvents for extraction are necessary to confirm that mangroves are a better source for the development of novel antibiotics. PMID:23626390

  7. Carbapenem-induced endotoxin release in gram-negative bacterial sepsis rat models.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Kobayashi, M; Nadai, M; Ichiyama, S; Ohta, M

    1998-08-01

    The carbapenem-induced endotoxin release was evaluated using experimental models of gram-negative bacterial sepsis in Wistar rats. Infections with Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis resulted in an increase of the plasma endotoxin concentration after treatment with ceftazidime and carbapenems including imipenem, panipenem, meropenem and biapenem. Except for P. aeruginosa, the plasma endotoxin concentrations after carbapenem treatment were significantly lower than those after ceftazidime treatment. It is noteworthy that treatment of P. aeruginosa sepsis with meropenem or biapenem induced significantly more endotoxin release than other carbapenems and the endotoxin concentrations induced by these carbapenems reached those of ceftazidime treatment. The plasma endotoxin concentrations appeared to correlate with the reduction of platelet counts and the elevation of both glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase values. PMID:9753002

  8. Ureaplasma urealyticum-induced crystallization of magnesium ammonium phosphate and calcium phosphates in synthetic urine.

    PubMed

    Grenabo, L; Brorson, J E; Hedelin, H; Pettersson, S

    1984-10-01

    Crystallization of struvite and calcium phosphates was studied in vitro as encrustations on glass rods immersed in synthetic urine, to evaluate the crystallization capacity of Ureaplasma urealyticum and compare it with that of known urease and non-urease-producing bacteria. Inoculation of the synthetic urine with Ureaplasma urealyticum resulted in alkalinization of the synthetic urine and crystallization of struvite and brushite. Inoculation with Proteus mirabilis caused a faster and more pronounced alkalinization as well as crystallization of struvite and apatite. The alkalinization and crystallization caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum and Proteus mirabilis was completely prevented by acetohydroxamic acid, a potent urease inhibitor, linking the crystallization to the urease activity of the microorganisms. When the synthetic urine was inoculated with urease-negative Escherichia coli no alkalinization and no crystallization were seen. PMID:6381769

  9. In vitro activity of subinhibitory concentrations of quinolones on urea-splitting bacteria: effect on urease activity and on cell surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, M A; Tawfik, A F; el-Kersh, T A; Shibl, A M

    1995-02-01

    The effect of subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and sparfloxacin on urease activity and on cell surface hydrophobicity of urea-splitting bacteria was examined. Quinolones at 0.5 MICs demonstrated variable effects on bacterial-urease activity. Norfloxacin inhibited enzyme activity in Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis, while other quinolones had no effects. In Morganella morganii, sparfloxacin and ciprofloxacin enhanced urease activity, particularly at the initial phase of growth. All quinolones tested showed no marked effect on urease activity by Providencia rettgeri. Quinolones at the same concentrations induced an increase in the cell surface hydrophobicity, which was strain-dependent. There was no correlation between urease inhibition and cell surface hydrophobicity. Inhibition of urease activity by quinolones, in addition to their antibacterial activities, may prevent the progression of urinary tissue damage and stone formation. PMID:7844396

  10. Bis(aminomethyl)phosphinic Acid, a Highly Promising Scaffold for the Development of Bacterial Urease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of bacterial ureases are considered to be promising compounds in the treatment of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori in the gastric tract and/or by urealytic bacteria (e.g., Proteus species) in the urinary tract. A new, extended transition state scaffold, bis(aminomethyl)phosphinic acid, was successfully explored for the construction of effective enzyme inhibitors. A reliable methodology for the synthesis of phosphinate analogues in a three-component Mannich-type reaction was elaborated. The obtained molecules were assayed against ureases purified from Sporosarcina pasteurii and Proteus mirabilis, and aminomethyl(N-n-hexylaminomethyl)phosphinic acid was found to be the most potent inhibitor, with a Ki = 108 nM against the S. pasteurii enzyme. PMID:25699141

  11. Bis(aminomethyl)phosphinic Acid, a Highly Promising Scaffold for the Development of Bacterial Urease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Macegoniuk, Katarzyna; Dziełak, Anna; Mucha, Artur; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2015-02-12

    Inhibitors of bacterial ureases are considered to be promising compounds in the treatment of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori in the gastric tract and/or by urealytic bacteria (e.g., Proteus species) in the urinary tract. A new, extended transition state scaffold, bis(aminomethyl)phosphinic acid, was successfully explored for the construction of effective enzyme inhibitors. A reliable methodology for the synthesis of phosphinate analogues in a three-component Mannich-type reaction was elaborated. The obtained molecules were assayed against ureases purified from Sporosarcina pasteurii and Proteus mirabilis, and aminomethyl(N-n-hexylaminomethyl)phosphinic acid was found to be the most potent inhibitor, with a K i = 108 nM against the S. pasteurii enzyme. PMID:25699141

  12. Effects of bacteria involved with the pathogenesis of infection-induced urolithiasis on the urokinase and sialidase (neuraminidase) activity.

    PubMed

    du Toit, P J; van Aswegen, C H; Steyn, P L; Pols, A; du Plessis, D J

    1992-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that urinary urokinase and sialidase may play a role in urolithiasis. If these theories have substance it is to be expected that microorganisms may also affect these enzymes, since the association between urinary tract infection and renal stone formation is well known. It is generally assumed that Proteus mirabilis and Staphylococcus albus, which produce the urea-splitting enzyme urease, are responsible for stone formation. However, the importance of non-urease-producing microorganisms (Escherichia coli and Enterococcus) in urolithiasis is unclear. Spectrophotometric studies were therefore devised to clarify this problem. Microorganisms associated with infection-induced stones (Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli) respectively inhibited the urokinase and stimulated the sialidase activity. In contrast, microorganisms which were not associated with infection stones (Bacillus subtilis) had significantly less effect on urokinase and sialidase activity. This study may explain infection-induced stone formation and could open a completely new line of research. PMID:1462476

  13. [Renal calculi in an infant].

    PubMed

    Lauesen, N E

    1991-11-11

    Urinary concretions, particularly in the upper urinary tract, occur in otherwise healthy children in connection with Bacillus Proteus urinary infections. In other European countries, this occurs in 40-70% while, on the other hand, it is particularly rare in Scandinavia. A case of obstructing pelvic concretion in a boy aged three months is presented. This is the youngest case which could be found in the literature. Pyelolithotomy was performed and the child has been free from recurrence for six years. At the commencement of the disease, pain due to renal calculi may be misinterpreted as being due to three-months intestinal colic. Formation of calculi is presumed to be due the ability of Bacillus Proteus to form urease. The frequency of recurrences is 3-8% and is lowest if the urine can be maintained sterile for the first three months after removal of the stone. PMID:1957378

  14. Report: Studies on antibacterial activity of some traditional medicinal plants used in folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Israr, Fozia; Hassan, Fouzia; Naqvi, Baqir Shyum; Azhar, Iqbal; Jabeen, Sabahat; Hasan, S M Farid

    2012-07-01

    Ethanolic extracts of eight medicinal plants commonly used in folk medicine were tested for their antibacterial activity against four Gram positive strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and, Streptococcus pneumoniae) and six Gram negative strains (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis. Salmonella typhi para A, Salmonella typhi para B and Shigella dysenteriae) that were obtained from different pathological laboratories located in Karachi, Pakistan. Disc diffusion method was used to analyze antibacterial activity. Out of eight, five medicinal plants showed antibacterial activity against two or more than two microbial species. The most effective antimicrobial plant found to be Punica granatum followed by Curcuma zedoaria Rosc, Grewia asiatica L and Carissa carandas L, Curcuma caesia Roxb respectively. From these results, it is evident that medicinal plants could be used as a potential source of new antibacterial agents. PMID:22713958

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Eucalyptus globulus oil, xylitol and papain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mota, Valéria de Siqueira; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the Eucalyptus globulus essential oil, and of the xylitol and papain substances against the following microorganisms: Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Samonella sp.; Staphylococus aureus; Proteus vulgaris; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. METHOD The in vitro antimicrobial evaluation was used by means of the agar diffusion test and evaluation of the inhibition zone diameter of the tested substances. Chlorhexidine 0.5% was used as control. RESULTS The Eucalyptus globulus oil showed higher inhibition than chlorhexidine when applied to Staphylococcus aureus, and equal inhibition when applied to the following microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans. Papain 10% showed lower antimicrobial effect than chlorhexidine in relation to Candida albicans. Xylitol showed no inhibition of the tested microorganisms. CONCLUSION The Eucalyptus globulus oil has antimicrobial activity against different microorganisms and appears to be a viable alternative as germicidal agent hence, further investigation is recommended. PMID:25992819

  16. Microbicidal activity of TiO2 nanoparticles synthesised by sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Karathan Parakkandi; Sukirtha, Thiruvangium Henry; Balakrishna, Kagalagodu Manjunthiah; Varghese, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the authors investigated antimicrobial activity of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) synthesised by sol-gel method. As synthesised TiO2 NPs were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity of calcined TiO2 nanoparticle samples was examined in day light on Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia and Bacillus subtilis), Gram negative bacteria (Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) and fungal test pathogen Candida albicans. The synthesised TiO2 NPs were found to be effective in visible light against Streptococcus pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. PMID:27074858

  17. Rapid Parameterization Schemes for Aircraft Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A rapid shape parameterization tool called PROTEUS is developed for aircraft shape optimization. This tool can be applied directly to any aircraft geometry that has been defined in PLOT3D format, with the restriction that each aircraft component must be defined by only one data block. PROTEUS has eight types of parameterization schemes: planform, wing surface, twist, body surface, body scaling, body camber line, shifting/scaling, and linear morphing. These parametric schemes can be applied to two types of components: wing-type surfaces (e.g., wing, canard, horizontal tail, vertical tail, and pylon) and body-type surfaces (e.g., fuselage, pod, and nacelle). These schemes permit the easy setup of commonly used shape modification methods, and each customized parametric scheme can be applied to the same type of component for any configuration. This paper explains the mathematics for these parametric schemes and uses two supersonic configurations to demonstrate the application of these schemes.

  18. A comparison of certain extracting agents for extraction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from microorganisms for use in the firefly luciferase ATP assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knust, E. A.; Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    Firefly luciferase ATP assay is used in clinical and industrial applications, such as determination of urinary infection levels, microbial susceptibility testing, and monitoring of yeast levels in beverages. Three categories of extractants were investigated for their extracting efficiency. They were ionizing organic solvents, nonionizing organic solvents, and inorganic acids. Dimethylsulfoxide and formamide represented the ionizing organic solvents, while n-butanol, chloroform, ethanol, acetone, and methylene chloride were used for the nonionizing organic solvents. Nitric acid and perchloric acid were chosen for the inorganic acids category. Pathogens were tested with each solvent. They included: Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter species, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. These results are shown in graphic representations.

  19. Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

    2005-03-18

    The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

  20. Bacteriological evaluation of pre-cut fruits sold in Kano metropolis, Kano State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukwu, O O C; Olabode, O A; Chukwuedo, A A; Umoh, E G; Esiekpe, M K

    2009-04-01

    One hundred and fifty (150) pre-cut fruit samples comprising of Pineapples (50), Paw-paw (50) and Watermelon (50) at the point of stand retail outlets were tested by standard bacteriological methods to determine bacterial contamination of the fruits. Out of these 150 examined 136 (90.67%) were contaminated with bacteria. The bacterial distribution were; Escherichia coli 69 (46.00%), Staphylococcus aureus 29 (19.33%), Salmonella species 13 (8.67%), Proteus species 18 (12.00%), Enterobacter aerogenes 3 (2.00%), Klebsiella pneumoniae 2 (1.33%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 2 (1.33%). Among the 50 Pineapple pre-cuts, Escherichia coli 26 (17.33%), Staphylococcus aureus 6 (4.00%), Salmonella species 7 (4.67%), Proteus species 9 (6.00%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa 2 (1.33%); the 50 Watermelon had Escherchia coli 22 (14.67%), Staphylococcus aureus 13 (8.67%), Salmonella species 3 (2.00%), Proteus species 5 (3.33%), Enterobacter aerogenes 2 (1.33%), Klebsiella species 2 (1.33%). Of the 50 Paw-paw pre-cuts were: Escherichia coli 21 (14.00%), Staphylococcus aureus 10 (6.67%), Salmonella species 3 (2.00%), Proteus species 4 (2.67%), Enterobacter aerogenes 1 (0.67%) were isolated. The findings in this study have shown that the food vendors failed to adopt adequate hygiene for food handling and thus, suggest that the quality of all the pre-cut fruits sold at the retail outlets were not bacteriologically satisfactory. The public health risks associated with these pre-cut fruits may suggest that these fruits could serve as the vehicles for foodborne illnesses. This study has shown the need to educate the vendors on how to protect utensils and fruits to avoid contamination and spoilage. PMID:20000065

  1. Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis (L), Quercus infectoria (Oliver) and Canthium parviflorum (Lam).

    PubMed

    Priya, P Sathiya; Sasikumar, J M; Gowsigan, G

    2009-10-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis, L., (Rutaceae), Quercus infectoria Oliver., (Fagaceae) and Canthium parviflorum Lam., (Rubiaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytocoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The experiment was carried out using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that the methanol extract of aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis (L) presented the highest zone of inhibition against tested pathogens. Other plants showed significant zone of inhibition. PMID:22557348

  2. Launch Perspectives for CNES Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouiten, S.; Dutertre, C.; Bousquet, P.

    2008-08-01

    CNES is currently running two complementary families of small spacecrafts : the Myriade micro-satellites, each weighing up to 150 Kg, and affording quick, low-cost space access. Myriade makes space research more accessible to the scientific community, and can also be used for technological demonstrations and potential future applications. - the Proteus mini-satellites, which weigh around 500 Kg a piece, and provide a versatile small satellite bus able to handle various payloads for scientific or application missions. Six Myriade satellites have already been launched at the time of writing, and 8 are under development. One Proteus satellite was launched at the end of 2001, 2 in 2006, and 2 more are getting ready for launch in mid 2008 and at the beginning of 2009. This paper will first present the various launchers used for the Myriade and Proteus spacecrafts presently in orbit. Our future launcher choices for coming missions will then be argumented, with a strong emphasis on European solutions, in line with the decisions taken by the Council of Ministers of the European Space Agency in December 2005 in Berlin. The deployment of Soyuz and Vega launchers in French Guiana - Kourou will offer launch opportunities for our Myriade and Proteus spacecrafts. Specific structures for auxiliary payloads are being studied by Arianespace for Soyuz. They should be able to carry up five small satellites on Soyuz, for example, in addition to a main passenger. Vega has the challenge of offering multiple launch configurations in accordance with its performance. Conceptual studies performed by the CNES Launchers Directorate will be presented and show different opportunities to carry up to five micro-satellites. Finally, we will discuss the emergence of formation flying missions, and small LEO constellations, which might influence launch systems in the future.

  3. [Role of superoxide anion radicals in the bacterial corrosion of metals].

    PubMed

    Belov, D V; Kalinina, A A; Sokolova, T N; Smirnov, V F; Chelnokova, M V; Kartashov, V R

    2012-01-01

    It was found that seven strains of bacteria can cause corrosion damage to aluminum, its alloys, and zinc. With respect to the studied metals, the most active bacteria were Proteus vulgaris 1212 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 969. Superoxide anion radicals were demonstrated to play a role in the initiation of corrosive damage to aluminum and zinc, while bacterial exometabolites participate in the later stages of this process. PMID:22834301

  4. ["Antibiotic hierarchy" oriented antibacterial chemotherapy in urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Walther, H; Meyer, F P; Kiessig, R; Müller, G W

    1982-12-01

    The resistance of 708 germs isolated from 656 samples of ambulatory urological and gynecological origin was determined. The sensitivity of E. coli, proteus types and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to internationally used antibiotics was registered in detail as percentages. On the basis of the frequency of the germs and their resistence, an antibiotic "hierarchy" is drawn up, which can simplify the initial choice of therapy, especially in out-patient treatment. PMID:7164612

  5. Effect of triclosan on the formation of crystalline biofilms by mixed communities of urinary tract pathogens on urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gareth J; Stickler, David J

    2008-09-01

    The crystalline bacterial biofilms that encrust Foley catheters compromise the care of many elderly and disabled patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether the biocide triclosan can prevent encrustation by the mixed flora of uropathogens that commonly infect patients undergoing long-term catheterization. Models of the catheterized bladder were inoculated with communities of organisms isolated from patients who were experiencing catheter blockage. The catheter retention balloons were inflated with water or triclosan (3 g triclosan l(-1) in 0.1 M sodium carbonate) and urine was supplied to the models for up to 7 days. The effect of triclosan was recorded on the viable cell populations, the pH of the residual urine and the times that catheters took to block. The extent of encrustation of the catheters was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. In models inoculated with communities containing Proteus mirabilis, triclosan prevented the rise in urinary pH that drives crystalline biofilm formation and catheter blockage. The biocide had no effect on populations of Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were eliminated from the residual urine and the catheters drained freely for the 7-day experimental period. In models inoculated with a mixed community containing Providencia rettgeri, catheters inflated with triclosan continued to block rapidly. Although K. pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris were eliminated from the residual urine, there was no effect on the viability of Providencia rettgeri. The results indicate that the triclosan strategy should be limited to the treatment of patients who are infected with Proteus mirabilis. PMID:18719184

  6. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  7. Bioactivity guided isolation of antimicrobial compounds from Lythrum salicaria.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans; Scher, Jochen M; Speakman, John-Bryan; Zapp, Josef

    2005-09-01

    Lythrum salicaria extracts showed activity against the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum and activity against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis and Microccocus luteus. Bioautography on thin-layer chromatograms was used to isolate the two antifungal triterpenoids oleanolic and ursolic acid. The hexahydroxydiphenoyl ester vescalagin was isolated as active principle of the antibacterial activity. Furthermore, the flavon-C-glucosides vitexin, isovitexin, orientin and isoorientin were isolated. PMID:15975734

  8. Polyhalogenated benzo- and naphthoquinones are potent inhibitors of plant and bacterial ureases.

    PubMed

    Ashiralieva, Ainura; Kleiner, Diethelm

    2003-12-01

    Polyhalogenated benzo- and naphthoquinones were found to be potent inhibitors of pure ureases from Bacillus pasteurii and Canavalia ensiformis. They also inhibited ureases in whole cells of Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella oxytoca and Proteus mirabilis. Inhibition was non-competitive with K(i) values in the micromolar range or below. Inhibition was irreversible as shown by equilibrium dialysis. Inhibitory power decreased considerably when halogens were replaced by -OH, -CN, alkoxy or alkyl groups. PMID:14644444

  9. The urease structural gene ureA in Rhizobium meliloti is preceded by an open reading frame necessary for urease activity.

    PubMed

    Miksch, G

    1994-12-01

    An open reading frame (ORF1) located upstream of the urease structural gene ureA in Rhizobium meliloti strain AK631 was cloned and characterized by DNA sequencing. Comparison of the amino acid sequence revealed partial homology with the urease accessory gene ureD of Klebsiella aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis. Mutational analysis of ORF1 showed that the gene is necessary for urease activity. Its function is still unknown. PMID:7813887

  10. Synthesis of isomeric, oxathiolone fused chalcones, and comparison of their activity toward various microorganisms and human cancer cells line.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Marek Tadeusz; Konieczny, Wojciech; Sabisz, Michał; Skladanowski, Andrzej; Wakieć, Roland; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Zwolska, Zofia

    2007-05-01

    Isomeric oxathiolone fused chalcones were prepared by condensation of appropriate acetylbenzo[1,3]oxathiol-2-ones with benzaldehydes under acidic conditions. The synthesized compounds were screened for cytotoxic activity using HeLa cells, as well as for antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, antifungal activity against Candida albicans, and tuberculostatic activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv and Mycobacterium kansasii strains. PMID:17473478

  11. [Increased antibacterial activity of antibiotics with etonium in vitro].

    PubMed

    Petrunyk, I O

    2000-01-01

    The activity of compositions of antibiotics cefasolin, benzylpenicillin and gentamycin with etonium in respect to museum strains Staphylococcus aureus 209, Escherichia coli K-12, Proteus vulgaris 410, P. mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 19, Klebsiella pneumoniae 5054 and polyresistance strains S. aureus, E. coli, P. mirabilis in vitro was researched. The increase of the compositions activity as a result of synergy in the action of their component 4 up to 4496 times has been established. PMID:11421003

  12. In Vitro Activities of Doripenem and Six Comparator Drugs against 423 Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacterial Isolates from Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds▿

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2008-01-01

    Against 182 anaerobe and 241 aerobe strains obtained from diabetic foot infections, doripenem was the most active carbapenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC90, 2 μg/ml), more active than imipenem against Proteus mirabilis, and ertapenem was more active against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. The MIC50 and MIC90 values were ≤0.125 μg/ml for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and all streptococci and 0.25/1 for Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:18070958

  13. Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis (L), Quercus infectoria (Oliver) and Canthium parviflorum (Lam)

    PubMed Central

    Priya, P. Sathiya; Sasikumar, J.M.; Gowsigan, G.

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis, L., (Rutaceae), Quercus infectoria Oliver., (Fagaceae) and Canthium parviflorum Lam., (Rubiaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytocoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The experiment was carried out using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that the methanol extract of aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis (L) presented the highest zone of inhibition against tested pathogens. Other plants showed significant zone of inhibition. PMID:22557348

  14. Molecular identification of multi drug resistant bacteria from urinary tract infected urine samples.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M S; Das, A P

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are of great concern in both developing and developed countries all over the world. Even though the infections are more common in women and children, they are at a considerable rate in men and of all ages. The uropathogens causing the infections are spread through various routes. The treatment generally recommended by the physicians is antibiotic usage. But, most of the uropathogens have evolved antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This makes the present situation hectic in control and prevention of UTIs. The present study aims to illustrate the multidrug resistance patterns among isolated bacterial strains from infected urine samples in Odisha state, India. Four bacterial strains were isolated and identified as Proteus sp. SK3, Pseudomonas sp. ADMK77, Proteus sp. BLKB2 and Enterobacter hormaechei strain CW-3 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetc analysis indicated the strains belong to three various genera namely, Proteus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacter. The evolutionary timeline of the bacteria was studied by constructing phylogenetic trees by Neighborhood Joining method. The presence of ESBL gene and biofilm forming capability were studied for the four strains. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were studied toward the commonly recommended antibiotics. Both the Proteus strains were found commonly susceptible to aminoglycoside and sulphonamide groups. Pseudomonas strain was found to be susceptible to cephems, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Enterobacter sp was found to be resistant to almost all antibiotic groups and susceptible to only sulphonamides group. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the bacteria help in choosing the empirical antibiotic treatment for UTI. PMID:27354209

  15. Microbially Induced Precipitation of Strontianite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Serku; Yumi Kim; Lee, Young Jae; Roh, Yul

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the microbially mediated precipitation of strontium by microorganisms, and to examine the mineralogical characteristics of the precipitates. Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) enriched from rhodoliths was used to precipitate strontium at room temperature under aerobic environment. The growth of Wu Do-1 gradually increased over 16 days (OD600 = 2.6) and then decreased until 22 days (OD600 = 2.0) during microbial incubation for strontium precipitation. Also, the pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, and then the pH increased up to 8.6 at 25 days of incubation due to NH3+ generation. The Sr2+ concentration in the biotic group sharply decreased from 2,953 mg/L to 5.7 mg/L over 29 days of incubation. XRD, SEM-/TEM-EDS analyses revealed that the precipitates formed by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) were identified as 20-70 nm sized strontianite (SrCO3). Therefore, these results suggested that formation of sparingly soluble Sr precipitates mediated by Wu Do-1 (Proteus mirabilis) sequesters strontium and carbon dioxide into a more stable and less toxic form such as strontianite (SrCO3). These results also suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated water and biominealization of carbonate minerals may be feasible in the marine environment. PMID:26373143

  16. The susceptibility of nosocomial pathogens to ceftazidime.

    PubMed

    Brumfitt, W; Hamilton-Miller, J M

    1981-09-01

    The activities in vitro of ceftazidime and of cefuroxime have been compared against 201 strains of bacteria which had been isolated either from outbreaks of nosocomial infection or were typical of strains causing such outbreaks. Ceftazidime was found to be about 1000 times more active against Pseudomonas spp. and Proteus vulgaris, and between 10 and 100 times more active against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Proteus rettgeri, Proteus morganii, Providencia stuartii, Alcaligenes faecalis and Acinetobacter spp. On the other hand, cefuroxime was more active against Staphylococcus epidermidis. An increase in inoculum size to 106 had little effect on the activity of ceftazidime, except in the case of Pr. vulgaris strains, which grew, although only to a very limited extent, even in the presence of high concentrations of ceftazidime. Anaerobic and hypercapnic conditions did not adversely affect the activity of ceftazidime. Our in-vitro results thus indicate that ceftazidime had as broad a spectrum as gentamicin, and is more intrinsically active. PMID:19802966

  17. Dynamic self-assembly of motile bacteria in liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Mushenheim, Peter C.; Trivedi, Rishi R.; Tuson, Hannah H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation of dynamical behaviors of motile rod-shaped bacteria within anisotropic viscoelastic environments defined by lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs). In contrast to passive microparticles (including non-motile bacteria) that associate irreversibly in LCs via elasticity-mediated forces, we report that motile Proteus mirabilis bacteria form dynamic and reversible multi-cellular assemblies when dispersed in a lyotropic LC. By measuring the velocity of the bacteria through the LC (8.8 +/− 0.2 μm/s) and by characterizing the ordering of the LC about the rod-shaped bacteria (tangential anchoring), we conclude that the reversibility of the inter-bacterial interaction emerges from the interplay of forces generated by the flagella of the bacteria and the elasticity of the LC, both of which are comparable in magnitude (tens of pN) for motile Proteus mirabilis cells. We also measured the dissociation process, which occurs in a direction determined by the LC, to bias the size distribution of multi-cellular bacterial complexes in a population of motile Proteus mirabilis relative to a population of non-motile cells. Overall, these observations and others reported in this paper provide insight into the fundamental dynamical behaviors of bacteria in complex anisotropic environments and suggest that motile bacteria in LCs are an exciting model system for exploration of principles for the design of active materials. PMID:24652584

  18. Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae pathogens isolated from intensive care units and surgical units in Russia.

    PubMed

    Partina, Irina; Kalinogorskaya, Olga; Kojima, Satoshi; Gostev, Vladimir; Volkova, Marina; Ageevets, Vladimir; Lobzin, Yuri; Sidorenko, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A total of 473 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Serratia spp. and Providencia spp., were isolated from patients admitted to intensive care units and surgical units in Russia. About 90% of the isolates carried factors resistant to beta-lactams. The isolation rates of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producer defined in this study among E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 45%, 48% and 17%, respectively. In the settings with high prevalence of the ESBL producer, flomoxef, which belongs to the oxacephem subgroup, and carbapenems retain their activity. The MIC₅₀ of flomoxef, meropenem and imipenem against total isolates were 1 µg/mL, ≤ 0.063 µg/mL and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. Fifty-five carbapenem-resistant strains were isolated in this study. The carbapenem resistant rates of E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 3%, 16% and 29%, respectively PMID:27290829

  19. [Comparison between the bacterial flora airways and of the lung tissue].

    PubMed

    Budzko, D B; Roncoroni, A J

    1965-01-01

    In 44 patients tracheotomized and under mechanical ventilation bacteriological studies were carried out, inmediately after death, in bronchial secretions and in a small piece of lung obtained by thoracotomy. The more frequently found bacterium in bronchial secretions or the lung was the Pseudomona aeruginosa (Table 1). In order of decreasing frequency: Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, Proteus, etc. were found in the lung while in bronchial secretions the order was inverse by predominance of Proteus. Total bacteriological coincidence was found in 14 cases while it was partial in 8 more patients where another bacterium was added in bronchial secretions. Bacteria were different in 6 cases (Table 2) in 4 of them: staphylococcus was obtained in the lung while Pseudomonae, Proteus and Klebsiellae were present in bronchial secretions (Table 3). In 16 cases cultures of the piece of lung taken were negative. Not taking into account these last ones, it is possible to conclude that from the therapeutic stand point culture of bronchial secretions was useful in antibiotic selection in 22 out of 28 cases. PMID:15154229

  20. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery as a diagnostic and therapeutic instrument in non-tubercular spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Hans; Hoebink, Eric; Versteylen, Rob; Veen, Eelco

    2015-01-01

    Background Spondylodiscitis refers to an infection of one or more intervertebral disks and vertebrae, most commonly caused by tuberculosis. Initial therapy for spondylodiscitis is drug treatment. Indications for surgical treatment include compression of neural elements, spinal instability or severe deformities. When surgery is indicated, an open technique is still the standard, although video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is described in cases of thoracic disk herniation, scoliosis and tubercular spondylitis. Case report We report a case of a 79-year-old man with progressive back pain, paraparesis and paresthesias in both legs. During assessment, spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression was diagnosed. Immediate surgical decompression took place by means of VATS. Culture of the tissue obtained revealed Proteus mirabilis. Blood and urine cultures also revealed Proteus mirabilis, a rare cause of spondylodiscitis with an occurrence rate of 0.9%. Conclusion VATS offered a minimally invasive access to obtain the diagnosis of pyogenic spondylodiscitis following urosepsis with Proteus mirabilis. Moreover, it provided treatment with abscess drainage and decompression of the spinal cord. PMID:26609510

  1. Babes in the wood – a unique window into sea scorpion ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies on eurypterids have taken into account morphological changes that occur throughout postembryonic development. Here two species of eurypterid are described from the Pragian Beartooth Butte Formation of Cottonwood Canyon in Wyoming and included in a phylogenetic analysis. Both species comprise individuals from a number of instars, and this allows for changes that occur throughout their ontogeny to be documented, and how ontogenetically variable characters can influence phylogenetic analysis to be tested. Results The two species of eurypterid are described as Jaekelopterus howelli (Kjellesvig-Waering and Størmer, 1952) and Strobilopterus proteus sp. nov. Phylogenetic analysis places them within the Pterygotidae and Strobilopteridae respectively, both families within the Eurypterina. Jaekelopterus howelli shows positive allometry of the cheliceral denticles throughout ontogeny, while a number of characteristics including prosomal appendage length, carapace shape, lateral eye position, and relative breadth all vary during the growth of Strobilopterus proteus. Conclusions The ontogeny of Strobilopterus proteus shares much in common with that of modern xiphosurans, however certain characteristics including apparent true direct development suggest a closer affinity to arachnids. The ontogenetic development of the genital appendage also supports the hypothesis that the structure is homologous to the endopods of the trunk limbs of other arthropods. Including earlier instars in the phylogenetic analysis is shown to destabilise the retrieved topology. Therefore, coding juveniles as individual taxa in an analysis is shown to be actively detrimental and alternative ways of coding ontogenetic data into phylogenetic analyses should be explored. PMID:23663507

  2. Blockage of urinary catheters: role of microorganisms and constituents of the urine on formation of encrustations.

    PubMed

    Kunin, C M

    1989-01-01

    Long-term indwelling urinary catheters may become blocked in some patients by formation of encrustations made up of aggregated struvite crystals while other patients rarely develop blocked catheters. We have designated these groups as "blockers", "intermediates" or "non-blockers". To further understand this phenomenon we followed 32 catheterized elderly women in a nursing home. Catheters were changed six times at 2 week intervals. Patients tended to remain as "blockers", "intermediates" or "non-blockers" consistently over time. There were no significant differences in use of antibiotics, clinical manifestations of urinary infection or fever among the groups. "Blockers" were significantly more often colonized with Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii than "non-blockers", and significantly less often with Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, there was no evidence of interference among the organisms. "Blockers" excreted a significantly more alkaline urine, and lesser amounts of magnesium, urea and phosphate in their urine. Two "blockers" in whom Proteus sp. were eliminated by coincidental antimicrobial therapy converted to "non-blockers". These findings support the concept that "blockers" are patients who have prolonged colonization with urease producing Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii. PMID:2778465

  3. Mobility of a restriction-modification system revealed by its genetic contexts in three hosts.

    PubMed

    Naderer, Marc; Brust, Jessica R; Knowle, Dieter; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2002-05-01

    The flow of genes among prokaryotes plays a fundamental role in shaping bacterial evolution, and restriction-modification systems can modulate this flow. However, relatively little is known about the distribution and movement of restriction-modification systems themselves. We have isolated and characterized the genes for restriction-modification systems from two species of Salmonella, S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A and S. enterica serovar Bareilly. Both systems are closely related to the PvuII restriction-modification system and share its target specificity. In the case of S. enterica serovar Paratyphi A, the restriction endonuclease is inactive, apparently due to a mutation in the subunit interface region. Unlike the chromosomally located Salmonella systems, the PvuII system is plasmid borne. We have completed the sequence characterization of the PvuII plasmid pPvu1, originally from Proteus vulgaris, making this the first completely sequenced plasmid from the genus Proteus. Despite the pronounced similarity of the three restriction-modification systems, the flanking sequences in Proteus and Salmonella are completely different. The SptAI and SbaI genes lie between an equivalent pair of bacteriophage P4-related open reading frames, one of which is a putative integrase gene, while the PvuII genes are adjacent to a mob operon and a XerCD recombination (cer) site. PMID:11948154

  4. Information extraction for enhanced access to disease outbreak reports.

    PubMed

    Grishman, Ralph; Huttunen, Silja; Yangarber, Roman

    2002-08-01

    Document search is generally based on individual terms in the document. However, for collections within limited domains it is possible to provide more powerful access tools. This paper describes a system designed for collections of reports of infectious disease outbreaks. The system, Proteus-BIO, automatically creates a table of outbreaks, with each table entry linked to the document describing that outbreak; this makes it possible to use database operations such as selection and sorting to find relevant documents. Proteus-BIO consists of a Web crawler which gathers relevant documents; an information extraction engine which converts the individual outbreak events to a tabular database; and a database browser which provides access to the events and, through them, to the documents. The information extraction engine uses sets of patterns and word classes to extract the information about each event. Preparing these patterns and word classes has been a time-consuming manual operation in the past, but automated discovery tools now make this task significantly easier. A small study comparing the effectiveness of the tabular index with conventional Web search tools demonstrated that users can find substantially more documents in a given time period with Proteus-BIO. PMID:12755518

  5. MicroMAPS CO Measurements over North America and Europe during Summer-Fall 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Vickie S.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Reichle, Henry G., Jr.; Morrow, William H.; McMillan, Wallace; Sandy, Mary L.

    2006-01-01

    The MicroMAPS instrument is a nadir-viewing, gas filter-correlated radiometer which operating in the 4.67 micrometer fundamental band of carbon monoxide. Originally designed and built for a space mission, this CO remote sensor is being flown in support of satellite validation and science instrument demonstrations for potential UAV applications. The MicroMAPS instrument system, as flown on Proteus, was designed by a senior student design project in the Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, VA. and then revised by Systems Engineers at NASA Langley. The final instrument system was integrated and tested at NASA LaRC, in partnership with Scaled Composites and Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC). VSGC supervised the fabrication of the nacelle that houses the instrument system on the right rear tail boom of Proteus. Full system integration and flight testing was performed at Scaled Composites, in Mojave, in June 2004. Its successful performance enabled participation in four international science missions on Proteus: in 2004, INTEX -NA over eastern North America in July, ADRIEX over the Mediterranean region and EAQUATE over the United Kingdom region in September,and TWP-ICE over Darwin, Australia and the surrounding oceans in Jan-Feb 2006. These flights resulted in nearly 300 hours of data. In parallel with the engineering developments, theoretical radiative transfer models were developed specifically for the MicroMAPS instrument system at the University of Virginia, Mechanical Engineering Department by a combined undergraduate and graduate student team. With technical support from Resonance Ltd. in June 2005, the MicroMAPS instrument was calibrated for the conditions under which the Summer-Fall 2004 flights occurred. The analyses of the calibration data, combined with the theoretical radiative transfer models, provide the first data reduction for the science flights reported here. These early results and comparisons with profile data from the

  6. Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biodiesels are methyl esters of fatty acids that are usually produced by base catalyzed transesterification of triacylglyerol with methanol. Some lipase enzymes are effective catalysts for biodiesel synthesis and have many potential advantages over traditional base or acid catalyzed transesterification. Natural lipases are often rapidly inactivated by the high methanol concentrations used for biodiesel synthesis, however, limiting their practical use. The lipase from Proteus mirabilis is a particularly promising catalyst for biodiesel synthesis as it produces high yields of methyl esters even in the presence of large amounts of water and expresses very well in Escherichia coli. However, since the Proteus mirabilis lipase is only moderately stable and methanol tolerant, these properties need to be improved before the enzyme can be used industrially. Results We employed directed evolution, resulting in a Proteus mirabilis lipase variant with 13 mutations, which we call Dieselzyme 4. Dieselzyme 4 has greatly improved thermal stability, with a 30-fold increase in the half-inactivation time at 50°C relative to the wild-type enzyme. The evolved enzyme also has dramatically increased methanol tolerance, showing a 50-fold longer half-inactivation time in 50% aqueous methanol. The immobilized Dieselzyme 4 enzyme retains the ability to synthesize biodiesel and has improved longevity over wild-type or the industrially used Brukholderia cepacia lipase during many cycles of biodiesel synthesis. A crystal structure of Dieselzyme 4 reveals additional hydrogen bonds and salt bridges in Dieselzyme 4 compared to the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that polar interactions may become particularly stabilizing in the reduced dielectric environment of the oil and methanol mixture used for biodiesel synthesis. Conclusions Directed evolution was used to produce a stable lipase, Dieselzyme 4, which could be immobilized and re-used for biodiesel synthesis. Dieselzyme 4 outperforms

  7. Thermotolerance and multidrug resistance in bacteria isolated from equids and their environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, B R

    2009-06-13

    Sixty-nine vaginal swabs and 138 rectal swabs collected from 195 equids were analysed for the presence of thermotolerant bacteria, that is, bacteria surviving at 60+/-0.1 degrees C for one hour. Thermotolerant Escherichia coli, Enterobacter species, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus species and Pseudomonas species were isolated from 41, 16, nine, three and three of the 138 rectal swabs, respectively; seven of the E coli and two of the Enterobacter species isolates survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except three E coli, two Enterobacter species and one Proteus species isolate were resistant to three or more antimicrobial drugs, that is, they were multidrug resistant. Thermotolerant E coli, Enterobacter species and Proteus species were isolated from 11, two and two of the 69 vaginal swabs, respectively, but only one isolate of E coli survived pasteurisation at 63.8+/-0.1 degrees C for 30 minutes. All except two of the E coli isolates were multidrug resistant. None of the four thermotolerant isolates from nine soil samples collected on four of the farms where the equids were kept was pasteurisation resistant, but they were all multidrug resistant. Of the 10 pasteurisation-resistant isolates, nine were multidrug resistant but none was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, cotrimazine, cotrimoxazole or streptomycin. All the isolates grew at 42+/-0.1 degrees C but none grew at 46+/-0.1 degrees C or above. The Enterobacter isolates were more tolerant to pasteurisation than the E coli isolates, particularly during the first few minutes of exposure. PMID:19525523

  8. MicroMAPS CO Measurements over North America and Europe during Summer-Fall 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, V. S.; Hopkins, P. E.; Reichle, H. G.; Morrow, W. H.; McMillan, W. W.; Sandy, M.

    2006-12-01

    The MicroMAPS instrument is a nadir-viewing, gas filter-correlated radiometer which operating in the 4.67 micrometer fundamental band of carbon monoxide. Originally designed and built for a space mission, this CO remote sensor is being flown in support of satellite validation and science instrument demonstrations for potential UAV applications. The MicroMAPS instrument system, as flown on Proteus, was designed by a senior student design project in the Aerospace Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg, VA. and then revised by Systems Engineers at NASA Langley. The final instrument system was integrated and tested at NASA LaRC, in partnership with Scaled Composites and Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC). VSGC supervised the fabrication of the nacelle that houses the instrument system on the right rear tail boom of Proteus. Full system integration and flight testing was performed at Scaled Composites, in Mojave, in June 2004. Its successful performance enabled participation in four international science missions on Proteus: in 2004, INTEX -NA over eastern North America in July, ADRIEX over the Mediterranean region and EAQUATE over the United Kingdom region in September,and TWP-ICE over Darwin, Australia and the surrounding oceans in Jan-Feb 2006. These flights resulted in nearly 300 hours of data. In parallel with the engineering developments, theoretical radiative transfer models were developed specifically for the MicroMAPS instrument system at the University of Virginia, Mechanical Engineering Department by a combined undergraduate and graduate student team. With technical support from Resonance Ltd. in June 2005, the MicroMAPS instrument was calibrated for the conditions under which the Summer-Fall 2004 flights occurred. The analyses of the calibration data, combined with the theoretical radiative transfer models, provide the first data reduction for the science flights reported here. These early results and comparisons with profile data from the

  9. Experimental Determination of the Ratio of {sup 238}U Capture to {sup 235}U Fission in LEU-HTR Pebble-Bed Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, O.; Chawla, R.

    2004-01-15

    The shift toward low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel for gas-cooled high-temperature reactors (HTRs) has revealed a lack of experimental data for validating neutronics codes that are used for the design and licensing of such systems. In the framework of the LEU-HTR experimental program at the PROTEUS critical facility, the safety-related effects of accidental moderation increase (ingress of water or other hydrogeneous compounds) in pebble-bed HTR core configurations employing low-enriched (16.7%) fuel were investigated. An important neutron balance component in this context is the integral reaction rate ratio of {sup 238}U capture (C{sub 8}) relative to {sup 235}U fission (F{sub 5}).It was necessary to develop new experimental techniques for the accurate measurement of C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} in the doubly heterogeneous fuel pebbles. These have involved the utilization of specially prepared particle foils on the one hand and the counting of whole fuel pebbles on the other. Core-center measurements employing both experimental methods have been carried out in two different HTR-PROTEUS configurations (with and without accidental moderation increase simulation, respectively). In each case, satisfactory agreement was obtained between the experimental results based on the two techniques. By carrying out a comparison of particle-foil C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} measurements in the PROTEUS reactor's thermal column with the results of standard foil-activation measurement techniques, the systematic uncertainty (1{sigma}) of the core-center measurements could be reduced by {approx}0.6%, yielding a net experimental error of {+-}1% with either of the new methods. A comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on the MICROX-2/TWODANT codes in conjunction with JEF-1 cross sections has indicated that this calculational route overpredicts the core-center C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} value by {approx}2.5% in both the investigated configurations.

  10. Morganella morganii urease: purification, characterization, and isolation of gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hu, L T; Nicholson, E B; Jones, B D; Lynch, M J; Mobley, H L

    1990-06-01

    Morganella morganii, a very common cause of catheter-associated bacteriuria, was previously classified with the genus Proteus on the basis of urease production. M. morganii constitutively synthesizes a urease distinct from that of other uropathogens. The enzyme, purified 175-fold by passage through DEAE-Sepharose, phenyl-Sepharose, Mono-Q, and Superose 6 chromatography resins, was found to have a native molecular size of 590 kilodaltons and was composed of three distinct subunits with apparent molecular sizes of 63, 15, and 6 kilodaltons, respectively. Amino-terminal analysis of the subunit polypeptides revealed a high degree of conservation of amino acid sequence between jack bean and Proteus mirabilis ureases. Km for urea equalled 0.8 mM. Antiserum prepared against purified enzyme inhibited activity by 43% at a 1:2 dilution after 1 h of incubation. All urease activity was immunoprecipitated from cytosol by a 1:16 dilution. Antiserum did not precipitate ureases of other species except for one Providencia rettgeri strain but did recognize the large subunits of ureases of Providencia and Proteus species on Western blots (immunoblots). Thirteen urease-positive cosmid clones of Morganella chromosomal DNA shared a 3.5-kilobase (kb) BamHI fragment. Urease gene sequences were localized to a 7.1-kb EcoRI-SalI fragment. Tn5 mutagenesis revealed that between 3.3 and 6.6 kb of DNA were necessary for enzyme activity. A Morganella urease DNA probe did not hybridize with gene sequences of other species tested. Morganella urease antiserum recognized identical subunit polypeptides on Western blots of cytosol from the wild-type strain and Escherichia coli bearing the recombinant clone which corresponded to those seen in denatured urease. Although the wild-type strain and recombinant clone produced equal amounts of urease protein, the clone produced less than 1% of the enzyme activity of the wild-type strain. PMID:2345135

  11. Bacterial toxin HigB associates with ribosomes and mediates translation-dependent mRNA cleavage at A-rich sites.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2009-07-10

    Most pathogenic Proteus species are primarily associated with urinary tract infections, especially in persons with indwelling catheters or functional/anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections caused by Proteus vulgaris typically form biofilms and are resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The Rts1 conjugative plasmid from a clinical isolate of P. vulgaris carries over 300 predicted open reading frames, including antibiotic resistance genes. The maintenance of the Rts1 plasmid is ensured in part by the HigBA toxin-antitoxin system. We determined the precise mechanism of action of the HigB toxin in vivo, which is distinct from other known toxins. We demonstrate that HigB is an endoribonuclease whose enzymatic activity is dependent on association with ribosomes through the 50 S subunit. Using primer extension analysis of several test mRNAs, we showed that HigB cleaved extensively across the entire length of coding regions only at specific recognition sequences. HigB mediated cleavage of 100% of both in-frame and out-of-frame AAA sequences. In addition, HigB cleaved approximately 20% of AA sequences in coding regions and occasionally cut single As. Remarkably, the cleavage specificity of HigB coincided with one of the most frequently used codons in the AT-rich Proteus spp., AAA (lysine). Therefore, the HigB-mediated plasmid maintenance system for the Rts1 plasmid highlights the intimate relationship between host cells and extrachromosomal DNA that enables the dynamic acquisition of genes that impart a spectrum of survival advantages, including those encoding multidrug resistance and virulence factors. PMID:19423702

  12. Evaluation of anti-bacterial effects of some novel thiazole and imidazole derivatives against some pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Behzad; Sanjarani, Ghasem; Sanjarani, Zahra; Majidiani, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has motivated the researchers to evaluate the novel anti-bacterial compounds such as some thiazole and imidazole derivatives. Thereby, in this work, we investigated the anti-bacterial effects of one new thiazole and two new imidazole derivatives on Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis and Shigella dysenteriae. Materials and Methods: The thiazole and imidazole derivatives were dissolved in DMSO. The disk diffusion method was utilized to measure the growth inhibition zone diameter values, and the broth micro-dilution method was applied to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. Results: The synthesized imidazole derivatives lacked any inhibitory effect against the tested bacteria. On the other hand, although the synthesized thiazole derivative showed no inhibitory effect against Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli, it inhibited the growth of Proteus mirabilis, Shigella dysenteriae, and Listeria monocytogenes with the MIC values of 1000, 125, and 1000 μg/ml, respectively, and the growth inhibition zone diameter values of 9.3 ± 0.1, 15.6 ± 0.2, and 8.1 ± 0.0 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The anti-bacterial effect of the synthesized thiazole derivative on Shigella dysenteriae, Proteus mirabilis and Listeria monocytogenes was proven. However, its inhibition effect against Shigella dysenteriae was more than that against the others. Many in-vitro and in-vivo experiments are required to evaluate the effects of this compound on the bacteria and the human body. PMID:26719785

  13. Novel approach for the ammonium removal by simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and denitrification using a novel bacterial species co-culture.

    PubMed

    Angar, Yassmina; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Djelali, Nacer-Eddine; Khemili-Talbi, Souad

    2016-03-01

    Agricultural activities lead excessive emission of ammonia nitrogen in the environment and can profoundly interfere the equilibrium of the natural ecosystems leading to their contamination. Actually, the biological purification of wastewaters is the most adopted technique thanks to its several advantages such as high performance and low energy consumption. For this reason, two novel strains of Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 and Proteus sp. S19 genus were isolated from an activated sludge and applied in the treatment of ammonium and nitrite in aqueous solution. Under the optimum operating conditions of temperature (30 °C), pH (7), carbon substrate (2 g/L of glucose) and duration of incubation time (69 h), the strain Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 could oxidize 65% of the ammonium as high as 272.72 mg-NH4(+)/L. Moreover, during 48 h, the nitrate reduction rate performed by the strain Proteus S19 was about 99 % without production of nitrite intermediate (negligible concentration). Moreover, the coculture of the strains Alcaligenes sp. S84S3 and Proteus sp. S19 could eliminate 65.83% of the ammonium ions without production of toxic forms of nitrogen oxides during a short time of incubation (118 h) at the same operational conditions with providing the aeration in the first treatment phase. The coculture of our isolated strains is assumed to have a good potential for nitrification and denitrification reactions applied in the treatment of wastewater containing ammonium, nitrite and nitrate. As a result, we can consider that the mixed culture is a practical method in the treatment of high-strength ammonium wastewater with reducing of sludge production. PMID:26867597

  14. A delayed neutron technique for measuring induced fission rates in fresh and burnt LWR fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. A.; Perret, G.

    2011-04-01

    The LIFE@PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institut is being undertaken to characterize the interfaces between burnt and fresh fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Techniques are being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel following re-irradiation in the zero-power PROTEUS research reactor. One such technique utilizes the measurement of delayed neutrons. To demonstrate the feasibility of the delayed neutron technique, fresh and burnt UO 2 fuel samples were irradiated in different positions in the PROTEUS reactor, and their neutron outputs were recorded shortly after irradiation. Fission rate ratios of the same sample irradiated in two different positions (inter-positional) and of two different samples irradiated in the same position (inter-sample) were derived from the measurements and compared with Monte Carlo predictions. Derivation of fission rate ratios from the delayed neutron measured signal requires correcting the signal for the delayed neutron source properties, the efficiency of the measurement setup, and the time dependency of the signal. In particular, delayed neutron source properties strongly depend on the fissile and fertile isotopes present in the irradiated sample and must be accounted for when deriving inter-sample fission rate ratios. Measured inter-positional fission rate ratios generally agree within 1σ uncertainty (on the order of 1.0%) with the calculation predictions. For a particular irradiation position, however, a bias of about 2% is observed and is currently under investigation. Calculated and measured inter-sample fission rate ratios have C/E values deviating from unity by less than 1% and within 2σ of the statistical uncertainties. Uncertainty arising from delayed neutron data is also assessed, and is found to give an additional 3% uncertainty factor. The measurement data indicate that uncertainty is overestimated.

  15. The persistence toxicity of four insecticides against adult Hippodamia varigata (Coleptera: Cocinellidae).

    PubMed

    Almasi, A; Sabahi, Q; Kavousi, A

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of four insecticides on Hippodomia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), the predator of Aphis fabae, an experiment was carried out using IOBC/wprs method. Persistence toxicity of insecticides has been evaluated in the greenhouse condition. The insecticides abamectin 1.8 EC, deltamethrin 2.5 EC, imidacloprid 350 SC, and proteus OD 110 were used at recommended field rates. The insecticides were applied on broad bean foliage using a hand sprayer, until run-off. Contact toxicity of aged residues of insecticides on adult predator was evaluated using the cage-method. The trials were laid out in randomized complete design (CRD) with 3 replicates and an untreated check. The arcsine transformation was used for analysis. The mortality of adult predator, after 24 h contact with fresh residues of abamectin, deltamethrin, imidacloprid and proteus were 53.4, 52.1, 63.4 and 65.1%, respectively. After 5 days the effect of residues decreased so that the adult mortality diminished to 32.4, 36.5, 56.1 and 57.5% for mentioned above insecticides. 15-day old residues lead to 8.8, 23.1, 56.3 and 57.5%; and 31-day old residues lead to 8.8, 22.7, 29.5 and 41.7% mortality for these insecticides, respectively. Based on this study, abamectin and deltamethrin with persistence less than 5 d are classified as short lived (Class A) while imidacloprid and proteus with persistence between 16 to 31d, classified as moderately persistent (Class C) compounds. PMID:23885429

  16. Clinical Delineation and Natural History of the PIK3CA-Related Overgrowth Spectrum**

    PubMed Central

    Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Sapp, Julie C; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Parker, Victoria ER; Blumhorst, Cathy; Darling, Thomas; Tosi, Laura L; Huson, Susan M; Whitehouse, Richard W; Jakkula, Eveliina; Grant, Ian; Balasubramanian, Meena; Chandler, Kate E; Fraser, Jamie L; Gucev, Zoran; Crow, Yanick J; Brennan, Leslie Manace; Clark, Robin; Sellars, Elizabeth A; Pena, Loren DM; Krishnamurty, Vidya; Shuen, Andrew; Braverman, Nancy; Cunningham, Michael L; Sutton, V Reid; Tasic, Velibor; Graham, John M; Geer, Joseph; Henderson, Alex; Semple, Robert K; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the phosphatidylinositol/AKT/mTOR pathway cause segmental overgrowth disorders. Diagnostic descriptors associated with PIK3CA mutations include fibroadipose overgrowth (FAO), Hemihyperplasia multiple Lipomatosis (HHML), Congenital Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular malformations, Epidermal nevi, Scoliosis/skeletal and spinal (CLOVES) syndrome, macrodactyly, and the megalencephaly syndrome, Megalencephaly-Capillary malformation (MCAP) syndrome. We set out to refine the understanding of the clinical spectrum and natural history of these phenotypes, and now describe 35 patients with segmental overgrowth and somatic PIK3CA mutations. The phenotypic data show that these previously described disease entities have considerable overlap, and represent a spectrum. While this spectrum overlaps with Proteus syndrome (sporadic, mosaic, and progressive) it can be distinguished by the absence of cerebriform connective tissue nevi and a distinct natural history. Vascular malformations were found in 15/35 (43%) and epidermal nevi in 4/35 (11%) patients, lower than in Proteus syndrome. Unlike Proteus syndrome, 31/35 (89%) patients with PIK3CA mutations had congenital overgrowth, and in 35/35 patients this was asymmetric and disproportionate. Overgrowth was mild with little postnatal progression in most, while in others it was severe and progressive requiring multiple surgeries. Novel findings include: adipose dysregulation present in all patients, unilateral overgrowth that is predominantly left-sided, overgrowth that affects the lower extremities more than the upper extremities and progresses in a distal to proximal pattern, and in the most severely affected patients is associated with marked paucity of adipose tissue in unaffected areas. While the current data are consistent with some genotype–phenotype correlation, this cannot yet be confirmed. © The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24782230

  17. Specification of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor Multi-Physics Coupling Demonstration Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Shemon, E. R.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Lee, C. H.; Thomas, J. W.; Yu, Y. Q.

    2015-12-21

    This document specifies the multi-physics nuclear reactor demonstration problem using the SHARP software package developed by NEAMS. The SHARP toolset simulates the key coupled physics phenomena inside a nuclear reactor. The PROTEUS neutronics code models the neutron transport within the system, the Nek5000 computational fluid dynamics code models the fluid flow and heat transfer, and the DIABLO structural mechanics code models structural and mechanical deformation. The three codes are coupled to the MOAB mesh framework which allows feedback from neutronics, fluid mechanics, and mechanical deformation in a compatible format.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil from Schinus molle Linn.

    PubMed

    Gundidza, M

    1993-11-01

    The essential oil from the fresh leaves of Schinus molle isolated by hydrodistillation was tested for antibacterial activity using the hole plate diffusion method and for antifungal activity using the mycelium or single cell growth inhibition method. Results obtained showed that the volatile oil exhibited significant activity against the following bacterial species: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Alcaligenes faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Leuconostoc cremoris, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Clostridium sporogenes, Acinetobacter calcoacetica, Escherichia coli, Beneckea natriegens, Citrobacter freundii, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis and Brochothrix thermosphacata. The fungal species Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium culmorum and Alternaria alternata exhibited significant sensitivity to the volatile oil. PMID:8055554

  19. [Further investigations into the effectiveness of gentamicin and other antibiotics against urinary tract infection organisms (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schmid, W

    1976-12-10

    In continuance of our investigations from 1968 to 1972, we isolated 32939 microorganisms from urinary tract infections and subjected them to routine sensitivity tests against six antibiotics from 1973 to August 1975. All organisms except enterococci and proteus proved to be sensitive to gentamicin at a level exceeding 90% during the study period of two and a half years. A loss of activity of gentamicin worth mentioning was not detected during the studies. So this antibiotic must further be considered as one of the drugs of first choice in the treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:826773

  20. [Purple urine bag syndrome in two institutionalised patients].

    PubMed

    Iglesias Barreira, Rebeca; Albiñana Pérez, M Sandra; Rodríguez Penín, Isaura; Bilbao Salcedo, José

    2013-01-01

    Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS) is an uncommon but particularly striking phenomenon characterised by a chemical reaction involving the urine, plastic and certain enzymes from some sulphatase- and phosphatase-producing bacteria, including Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli and Morganella morganii, amongst others. Following this reaction, the catheter and the bag may be stained red, blue or purple. This phenomenon tends to occur in patients with multiple pathology and with urinary catheters, as part of a urinary tract infection. We describe two clinical cases of PUBS in institutionalised patients with permanent urinary catheters. PMID:23199817