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Sample records for proto-oncogene proteins

  1. Proto-oncogenes II.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P

    1988-12-01

    In reviewing recent literature on activated proto-oncogenes including retroviral infection (without oncogene), translocation and inherited childhood cancer, I have come to the conclusion that activated proto-oncogenes are not involved in development of tumors. There is one exception in which a translocated proto-myc leads to transformation. That is the case of the trangenic mouse embryo where faulty development occurs. PMID:3226361

  2. Pax-5 (BSAP) recruits Ets proto-oncogene family proteins to form functional ternary complexes on a B-cell-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, D; Hodsdon, W; Wheat, W; Maira, S M; Wasylyk, B; Hagman, J

    1996-09-01

    The paired box transcription factor Pax-5 (B-cell-specific activator protein) is a key regulator of lineage-specific gene expression and differentiation in B-lymphocytes. We show that Pax-5 functions as a cell type-specific docking protein that facilitates binding of the early B-cell-specific mb-1 promoter by proteins of the Ets proto-oncogene family. Transcriptional activity of the mb-1 promoter in pre-B-cells is critically dependent on binding sites for Pax-5:Ets complexes. Ternary complex assembly requires only the Pax-5 paired box and ETS DNA-binding domains. Mutation of a single base pair in the ternary complex binding site allows for independent binding by Ets proteins but, conversely, inhibits the binding of Pax-5 by itself. Strikingly, the mutation reverses the pattern of complex assembly: Ets proteins recruit Pax-5 to bind the mutated sequence. Recruitment of Net and Elk-1, but not SAP1a, by Pax-5 defines a functional difference between closely related Ets proteins. Replacement of a valine (V68) in the ETS domain of SAP1a by aspartic acid (as found in c-Ets-1, Elk-1, and Net) enhanced ternary complex formation by more than 60-fold. Together, these observations define novel transcription factor interactions that regulate gene expression in B cells. PMID:8804314

  3. The regulatory c1 locus of Zea mays encodes a protein with homology to myb proto-oncogene products and with structural similarities to transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, J; Ghosal, D; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the wild-type c1 locus of Zea mays was determined by sequence analysis of one genomic and two cDNA clones. The coding region is composed of three exons (150 bp, 129 bp and one, at least 720 bp) and two small introns (88 bp and 145 bp). Transcription of the mRNAs corresponding to the two cDNA clones cLC6 (1.1 kb) and cLC28 (2.1 kb) starts from the same promoter. Both cDNAs are identical except that cLC28 extends further at its 3' end. A putative protein, 273 amino acids in length was deduced from the sequence of both transcripts. It contains two domains, one basic and the other acidic and might function as a transcriptional activator. The basic domain of this c1-encoded protein shows 40% sequence homology to the protein products of animal myb proto-oncogenes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3428265

  4. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Analysis Identifies the Proto-oncogene Tyrosine-Protein Kinase Src as a Crucial Virulence Determinant of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus in Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Wang, Fengjie; Han, Zongxi; Gao, Qi; Li, Huixin; Shao, Yuhao; Sun, Nana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the side effects of vaccination against infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), novel strategies for ILT control and therapy are urgently needed. The modulation of host-virus interactions is a promising strategy to combat the virus; however, the interactions between the host and avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) are unclear. Using genome-wide transcriptome studies in combination with a bioinformatic analysis, we identified proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src) to be an important modulator of ILTV infection. Src controls the virulence of ILTV and is phosphorylated upon ILTV infection. Functional studies revealed that Src prolongs the survival of host cells by increasing the threshold of virus-induced cell death. Therefore, Src is essential for viral replication in vitro and in ovo but is not required for ILTV-induced cell death. Furthermore, our results identify a positive-feedback loop between Src and the tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which is necessary for the phosphorylation of either Src or FAK and is required for Src to modulate ILTV infection. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to identify a key host regulator controlling host-ILTV interactions. We believe that our findings have revealed a new potential therapeutic target for ILT control and therapy. IMPORTANCE Despite the extensive administration of live attenuated vaccines starting from the mid-20th century and the administration of recombinant vaccines in recent years, infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) outbreaks due to avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) occur worldwide annually. Presently, there are no drugs or control strategies that effectively treat ILT. Targeting of host-virus interactions is considered to be a promising strategy for controlling ILTV infections. However, little is known about the mechanisms governing host-ILTV interactions. The results from our study advance our understanding of host-ILTV interactions on a molecular level and provide experimental

  5. Eukaryotic translation initiator protein 1A isoform, CCS-3, enhances the transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yuri; Yu, Mi-young; Park, Jungeun; Lee, Choong-Eun; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    FBI-1, a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors, plays a role in differentiation, oncogenesis, and adipogenesis. eEF1A is a eukaryotic translation elongation factor involved in several cellular processes including embryogenesis, oncogenic transformation, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal organization. CCS-3, a potential cervical cancer suppressor, is an isoform of eEF1A. We found that eEF1A forms a complex with FBI-1 by co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF Mass analysis of the immunoprecipitate. GST fusion protein pull-downs showed that FBI-1 directly interacts with eEF1A and CCS-3 via the zinc finger and POZ-domain of FBI-1. FBI-1 co-localizes with either eEF1A or CCS-3 at the nuclear periplasm. CCS-3 enhances transcriptional repression of the p21CIP1 gene (hereafter referred to as p21) by FBI-1. The POZ-domain of FBI-1 interacts with the co-repressors, SMRT and BCoR. We found that CCS-3 also interacts with the co-repressors independently. The molecular interaction between the co-repressors and CCS-3 at the POZ-domain of FBI-1 appears to enhance FBI-1 mediated transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that CCS-3 may be important in cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and oncogenesis by interacting with the proto-oncogene FBI-1 and transcriptional co-repressors. PMID:19471103

  6. Oncofetal protein IGF2BP3 facilitates the activity of proto-oncogene protein eIF4E through the destabilization of EIF4E-BP2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, R; Imamachi, N; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, H; Tochigi, N; Oonishi, T; Suzuki, Y; Akimitsu, N

    2016-07-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have important roles in tumorigenesis. Although IGF2BP3, an evolutionally conserved RBP, has been reported as a useful diagnostic marker for various cancers and has been considered a regulator of tumorigenesis, little is known of the function of IGF2BP3 because of lack of information regarding IGF2BP3 target mRNAs. Here, we report the identification of IGF2BP3 target mRNAs and IGF2BP3 function in cancer proliferation. We identified mRNAs with altered expression in IGF2BP3-depleted cells by massive sequencing analysis and IGF2BP3-binding RNAs by immunoprecipitation of IGF2BP3 followed by massive sequencing analysis, resulting in the identification of 110 candidates that are negatively regulated by IGF2BP3. We found that IGF2BP3 destabilized EIF4E-BP2 and MEIS3 mRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the interaction between IGF2BP3 and ribonucleases such as XRN2 and exosome component. The retarded proliferation of IGF2BP3-depleted cells was partially rescued by the depletion of EIF4E-BP2, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), an activator of translation and a well-known proto-oncogene. Consistent with this observation, IGF2BP3 depletion reduced phosphorylated eIF4E, the active form, and translational efficiency of eIF4E target transcripts. Reduction of phosphorylated eIF4E by IGF2BP3 depletion was rescued by EIF4E-BP2 depletion. At last, we found an inverse correlation between the expression level of IGF2BP3 and EIF4E-BP2 in human lung adenocarcinoma tissues. Together, these results suggest that IGF2BP3 promotes eIF4E-mediated translational activation through the reduction of EIF4E-BP2 via mRNA degradation, leading to enhanced cell proliferation. This is the first report demonstrating that IGF2BP3 is an RNA-destabilizing factor. Notably, here we provide the first evidence for the functional linkage between two previously well-known cancer biomarkers, IGF2BP3 and eIF4E. PMID:26522719

  7. The mRNA-binding protein HuR promotes hypoxia-induced chemoresistance through posttranscriptional regulation of the proto-oncogene PIM1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanco, F F; Jimbo, M; Wulfkuhle, J; Gallagher, I; Deng, J; Enyenihi, L; Meisner-Kober, N; Londin, E; Rigoutsos, I; Sawicki, J A; Risbud, M V; Witkiewicz, A K; McCue, P A; Jiang, W; Rui, H; Yeo, C J; Petricoin, E; Winter, J M; Brody, J R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumors exhibit high levels of hypoxia, characterized by low oxygen pressure (pO2) and decreased O2 intracellular perfusion. Chronic hypoxia is strongly associated with resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy and chemoradiation in an understudied phenomenon known as hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible, pro-oncogenic, serine-threonine kinase PIM1 (Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1) has emerged as a key regulator of hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in PDA and other cancers. Although its role in therapeutic resistance has been described previously, the molecular mechanism behind PIM1 overexpression in PDA is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cis-acting AU-rich elements (ARE) present within a 38-base pair region of the PIM1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region mediate a regulatory interaction with the mRNA stability factor HuR (Hu antigen R) in the context of tumor hypoxia. Predominantly expressed in the nucleus in PDA cells, HuR translocates to the cytoplasm in response to hypoxic stress and stabilizes the PIM1 mRNA transcript, resulting in PIM1 protein overexpression. A reverse-phase protein array revealed that HuR-mediated regulation of PIM1 protects cells from hypoxic stress through phosphorylation and inactivation of the apoptotic effector BAD and activation of MEK1/2. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HuR by MS-444 inhibits HuR homodimerization and its cytoplasmic translocation, abrogates hypoxia-induced PIM1 overexpression and markedly enhances PDA cell sensitivity to oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil under physiologic low oxygen conditions. Taken together, these results support the notion that HuR has prosurvival properties in PDA cells by enabling them with growth advantages in stressful tumor microenvironment niches. Accordingly, these studies provide evidence that therapeutic disruption of HuR's regulation of PIM1 may be a key strategy in

  8. The first intron of human c-fms proto-oncogene contains a processed pseudogene (RPL7P) for ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Sapi, E.; Flick, M.B.; Kacinski, B.M.

    1994-08-01

    During sequence analysis of the first intron of the human c-fms oncogene, we identified an open reading frame encoding the ribosomal protein L7 (RPL7). The presence of this sequence within intron 1 of the c-fms gene was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization and by sequence analysis of two independent cosmid clones (cos2-e and cos1-22) that span the human genomic c-fms locus. The RPL7 sequence was detected in a region of sequence overlapped by the cos2-e and cos1-22 cosmid clones but oriented opposite to the c-fms gene. We demonstrate that the sequence is identical to the full-length RPL7 cDNA sequence, but lacks any recognizable introns, has a 30-bp poly(A) tail, and is bracketed by two perfect direct repeats of 14 bp. We also showed that despite the fact that the 5{prime} flanking region of the RPL7 sequence contains a potential TATA box upstream of an intact open reading frame, this pseudogene (RPL7P) is not actively transcribed. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells. PMID:26940867

  10. Regulation of B versus T lymphoid lineage fate decision by the proto-oncogene LRF

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Takahiro; Merghoub, Taha; Hobbs, Robin M.; Dong, Lin; Maeda, Manami; Zakrzewski, Johannes; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Zelent, Arthur; Shigematsu, Hirokazu; Akashi, Koichi; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow give rise to lymphoid progenitors, which subsequently differentiate into B and T lymphocytes. Here we show that the proto-oncogene LRF plays an essential role in the B versus T lymphoid cell fate decision. We demonstrate that LRF is key for instructing early lymphoid progenitors to develop into B lineage cells by repressing T cell-instructive signals produced by the cell fate signal protein, Notch. We propose a new model for lymphoid lineage commitment, in which LRF acts as a master regulator of B versus T lineage fate decision. PMID:17495164

  11. Tuning of alternative splicing--switch from proto-oncogene to tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S; Kazansky, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  12. Tuning of Alternative Splicing - Switch From Proto-Oncogene to Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Kazansky, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  13. Methylation profile and amplification of proto-oncogenes in rat pancreas induced with phytoestrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn-Cook, B.D.; Blann, E.; Bo, J.

    1995-01-01

    Specific gene hypermethylation has been shown in DNA from neonatal rats exposed to the phytoestrogens, coumestrol, and equol. The pancreas is an organ in which estrogen receptors have been shown to be present. Studies have correlated the development of acute pancreatitis with rising levels of human estrogen binding proteins. Neonatal rats were dosed with 10 or 100 {mu}g of coumestrol or equol on postnatal day (PND) 1-10. The animals were sacrificed at Day 15. The pancreas was excised and pancreatic acinar cells isolated for molecular analysis. DNA was isolated from the cells by lysis in TEN-9 buffer supplemented with proteinase K and 0.1% SDS. High molecular weight (HMW) DNA was digested with the methylated DNA specific restriction enzymes, Hpa II and Msp I, for determination of methylation profiles. Both coumestrol and equol at high doses caused hypermethylation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene. No hypermethylation or hypomethylation was observed in the proto-oncogenes, c-myc or c-fos. Methylation is thought to be an epigenetic mechanism involved in the activation (hypomethylation) or inactivation (hypermethylation) of cellular genes which are known to play a role in carcinogenesis. Epidemiology studies have shown that equol may have anti-carcinogenic effects on some hormone-dependent cancers. Additional studies are needed to further understand the role of phytoestrogens and methylation in relation to pancreatic disorders. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  14. DNA sequence, structure, and tyrosine kinase activity of the Drosophila melanogaster abelson proto-oncogene homolog

    SciTech Connect

    Henkemeyer, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Gertler, F.B.; Hoffmann, F.M.

    1988-02-01

    The authors report their molecular characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Abelson gene (abl), a gene in which recessive loss-of-function mutations result in lethality at the pupal stage of development. This essential gene consists of 10 exons extending over 26 kilobase pairs of genomic DNA. The DNA sequence encodes a protein of 1,520 amino acids with strong sequence similarity to the human c-abl proto-oncogene beginning in the type 1b 5' exon and extending through the region essential for tyrosine kinase activity. When the tyrosine kinase homologous region was expressed in Escherichia coli, phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine residues was observed with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody. These results show that the abl gene is highly conserved through evolution and encodes a functional tyrosine protein kinase required for Drosophila development.

  15. The proto-oncogene c-ets is preferentially expressed in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J H

    1985-01-01

    The transforming sequences of the avian acute leukemia virus, E26, contain two distinct oncogenes, v-mybE and v-ets, fused together. By using a probe containing v-ets sequences, polyadenylated transcripts of the c-ets proto-oncogene were detected in avian tissues; they included a major 7.0-kilobase and a minor 2.0-kilobase species. These c-ets mRNAs were detected at high levels only in lymphoid organs and in avian T and B lymphoid cell lines. A similar pattern of c-ets transcription was observed in human hematopoietic cell lines, with transcripts detected in lymphoid B and T cells but not in erythroid or myeloid cells. The E26 oncogene was inserted into an inducible expression vector, and a 90-kilodalton protein (bp90) was produced in bacteria. Rabbit antisera raised to purified bp90 precipitated P135gag-mybE-ets, the v-mybE-ets polyprotein expressed in E26-transformed cells, and also reacted with p50v-mybA, the transforming protein of the avian myeloblastosis virus. Antiserum to bp90 was absorbed with a bacterially synthesized v-mybA protein to remove anti-myb activity. The absorbed anti-bp90 serum retained the ability to immunoprecipitate P135gag-mybE-ets from E26-transformed cells and specifically reacted with a 56-kilodalton polypeptide (p56) detected in chicken lymphoid organs and in T and B lymphocytes of both avian and human origin. The data suggest that p56 is a translational product of the c-ets proto-oncogene and imply that p56 may be involved in regulating the growth of lymphoid cells. Images PMID:3018492

  16. Identification of novel splicing variants from RON proto-oncogene pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heegyum; Cho, Sunghee; Yang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Jianhua; Loh, Tiing Jen; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2012-12-01

    RON is a proto-oncogene that induces cell dissociation, migration and matrix invasion. RON∆160, a splicing variant of RON, is a natural splicing product in colon cancers that is produced through skipping of exons 5 and 6 in alternative splicing process. RON∆160 promotes cellular transformation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. We present, here, two novel splicing variants of RON in the partial splicing events that involve exons 5 and 6. The common facts of these two novel splicing variants are that exons 4-7 are included. In addition, intron 4 is spliced whereas intron 5 is included in both variants. The difference of these two isoforms is the inclusion or skipping of intron 6. In one variant intron 6 is included, but intron 6 is skipped in another variant. These two variants should be truncated but these proteins have not yet been detected. PMID:22993024

  17. Expression of the Pokemon proto-oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei; Liu, Fei; Tang, Feng-Zhu; Lan, Jiao; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Chen, Xing-Zhou; Ye, Hui-Lan; Cai, Yong-Lin

    2013-01-01

    To study the differentiated expression of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines and tissues, mRNA and protein expression levels of CNE1, CNE2, CNE3 and C666-1 were detected separately by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR and Western-blotting. The immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP69 was used as a control. The Pokemon protein expression level in biopsy specimens from chronic rhinitis patients and undifferentiated non keratinizing NPC patients was determined by Western-blotting and arranged from high to low: C666-1>CNE1>CNE2> CNE3>NP69. The Pokemon mRNA expression level was also arranged from high to low: CNE1>CNE2>NP69>C666-1>CNE3. Pokemon expression of NP69 and C666-1 obviously varied from mRNA to protein. The Pokemon protein level of NPC biopsy specimens was obviously higher than in chronic rhinitis. The data suggest that high Pokemon protein expression is closely associated with undifferentiated non-keratinizing NPC and may provide useful information for NPC molecular target therapy. PMID:24377524

  18. HMGA1 pseudogenes as candidate proto-oncogenic competitive endogenous RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesco; De Martino, Marco; Petti, Maria Grazia; Forzati, Floriana; Tornincasa, Mara; Federico, Antonella; Arra, Claudio; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The High Mobility Group A (HMGA) are nuclear proteins that participate in the organization of nucleoprotein complexes involved in chromatin structure, replication and gene transcription. HMGA overexpression is a feature of human cancer and plays a causal role in cell transformation. Since non-coding RNAs and pseudogenes are now recognized to be important in physiology and disease, we investigated HMGA1 pseudogenes in cancer settings using bioinformatics analysis. Here we report the identification and characterization of two HMGA1 non-coding pseudogenes, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7. We show that their overexpression increases the levels of HMGA1 and other cancer-related proteins by inhibiting the suppression of their synthesis mediated by microRNAs. Consistently, embryonic fibroblasts from HMGA1P7-overexpressing transgenic mice displayed a higher growth rate and reduced susceptibility to senescence. Moreover, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 were overexpressed in human anaplastic thyroid carcinomas, which are highly aggressive, but not in differentiated papillary carcinomas, which are less aggressive. Lastly, the expression of the HMGA1 pseudogenes was significantly correlated with HMGA1 protein levels thereby implicating HMGA1P overexpression in cancer progression. In conclusion, HMGA1P6 and HMGA1P7 are potential proto-oncogenic competitive endogenous RNAs. PMID:25268743

  19. A complex containing PBX2 contributes to activation of the proto-oncogene HOX11.

    PubMed

    Brake, R L; Kees, U R; Watt, P M

    2002-05-31

    Ectopic expression of the homeobox gene HOX11 is associated with a significant proportion of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (T-ALLs). We hypothesise that one mechanism of gene deregulation involves overcoming the silencing mechanism(s) of gene expression present in normal cells. Here, we describe a search for trans-acting factors that control transcriptional activity from a distal 5' region of the HOX11 promoter. We have identified a region of this promoter which contributes significantly to HOX11 activation and two distinct regulatory elements are involved. First, a PBX2 Regulatory Element PRE-1048 has been identified which contains a novel DNA-binding sequence and mediates significant activation of the HOX11 gene in K562 cells. This is the first report of a homeobox gene being specifically regulated by PBX2 and the second report of a vertebrate homeobox target gene of a PBX protein. The PREP1 protein was also shown to be part of the PRE-1048-binding complex. The other regulatory element we describe here RE-1019 contains little sequence conservation to known transcription control elements. It appears that this element is a novel sequence that binds an as yet unidentified factor, mediating significant activation of the HOX11 gene in K562 cells. This is the first detailed report of elements that mediate regulation of the proto-oncogene HOX11. PMID:12054735

  20. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of the human fgr proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, T.J. . Dept. of Medicine); Connolly, N.L.; Senior, R.M. ); Katamine, S.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Robbins

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the authors show that c-fgr proto-oncogene expression is limited to normal peripheral blood granulocytes, monocytes, and alveolar macrophages, all of which contain 50 to 100 copies of c-fgr mRNA per cell. The c-fgr RNA molecules in these cells consisted of partially spliced transcripts containing intron 7 and completely spliced molecules capable of encoding the predicted p55 c-fgr protein. The splicing of intron 7 appeared to occur after the splicing of most of the other introns; partially spliced molecules containing intron 7 did not appear to be transported into the cytoplasm. Very low levels of fgr transcripts were also present in U937 promonocytic cells and increased in abundance with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation. The level of fgr transcripts began to increase 2 to 4 after TPA addition peaked at 8 h, and subsequently declined. Since the authors found that the half-life of fgr mRNA was longer than 8 h, these changes are best explained by transient transcriptional activation of fgr during TPA-induced differentiation, although nuclear runoff experiments were not sensitive enough to detect this event. Their results demonstrate that the c-fgr gene is expressed in a tissue- and development-specific fashion and suggest that constitutive expression of c-fgr in U937 cells is regulated by a labile transcriptional repressor.

  1. Triplex targeting of human PDGF-B (c-sis, proto-oncogene) promoter specifically inhibits factors binding and PDGF-B transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Xu, Ren-Huan; Jin, You-Xin; Wang, De-Bao

    2001-01-01

    Human c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene has been shown to be overexpressed in a large percentage of human tumor cells establishing a growth-promoting, autocrine growth circuit. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can recognize and bind sequences in duplex DNA, and have received considerable attention because of their potential for targeting specific genomic sites. The c-sis/PDGF-B promoter contains a unique homopurine/homopyrimidine sequence (SIS proximal element, SPE), which is crucial for binding nuclear factors that provoke transcription. In order to develop specific transcriptional inhibitors of the human c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene, 20 potential TFOs targeting part or all of the SPE were screened by gel mobility analysis. DNase I footprinting shows that the TFOs we designed can form a sequence-specific triplex with the target. Protein binding assays demonstrate that triplex formation inhibits nuclear factors binding the c-sis/PDGF-B promoter. Both transient and stable transfection experiments demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of the promoter is considerably inhibited by the TFOs. We propose that TFOs represent a therapeutic potential to specifically diminish the expression of c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene in various pathologic settings where constitutive expression of this gene has been observed. PMID:11160902

  2. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  3. Tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of the human fgr proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Ley, T J; Connolly, N L; Katamine, S; Cheah, M S; Senior, R M; Robbins, K C

    1989-01-01

    In this study, we show that c-fgr proto-oncogene expression is limited to normal peripheral blood granulocytes, monocytes, and alveolar macrophages, all of which contain 50 to 100 copies of c-fgr mRNA per cell. The c-fgr RNA molecules in these cells consisted of partially spliced transcripts containing intron 7 and completely spliced molecules capable of encoding the predicted p55 c-fgr protein. The splicing of intron 7 appeared to occur after the splicing of most of the other introns; partially spliced molecules containing intron 7 did not appear to be transported into the cytoplasm. Very low levels of fgr transcripts were also present in U937 promonocytic cells and increased in abundance with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced differentiation. The level of fgr transcripts began to increase 2 to 4 h after TPA addition, peaked at 8 h, and subsequently declined. Since we found that the half-life of fgr mRNA was longer than 8 h, these changes are best explained by transient transcriptional activation of fgr during TPA-induced differentiation, although nuclear runoff experiments were not sensitive enough to detect this event. Cycloheximide also caused accumulation of c-fgr transcripts in U937 cells; no superinduction was observed when TPA and cycloheximide were added at the same time. Induction by either agent was blocked with actinomycin D. These results demonstrate that the c-fgr gene is expressed in a tissue- and development-specific fashion and suggest that constitutive expression of c-fgr in U937 cells is regulated by a labile transcriptional repressor. Images PMID:2538725

  4. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of fatty-acid synthase gene (FASN).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-10-24

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  5. An African swine fever virus gene with similarity to the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and the Epstein-Barr virus gene BHRF1.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Lu, Z; Afonso, C L; Kutish, G F; Sussman, M D; Rock, D L

    1993-07-01

    An open reading frame, LMW5-HL, in the African swine fever virus genome displays a high degree of similarity to the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and, to a lesser degree, the Epstein-Barr virus gene BHRF1. A highly conserved central region is found in all three proteins. LMW5-HL encodes a protein of 18 kDa that is present in infected porcine macrophages at both early and late times postinfection. The similarity of LMW5-HL to bcl-2 and BHRF1 suggests a role for it in cell maintenance during productive or persistent viral infection. PMID:8389936

  6. An African swine fever virus gene with similarity to the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and the Epstein-Barr virus gene BHRF1.

    PubMed Central

    Neilan, J G; Lu, Z; Afonso, C L; Kutish, G F; Sussman, M D; Rock, D L

    1993-01-01

    An open reading frame, LMW5-HL, in the African swine fever virus genome displays a high degree of similarity to the proto-oncogene bcl-2 and, to a lesser degree, the Epstein-Barr virus gene BHRF1. A highly conserved central region is found in all three proteins. LMW5-HL encodes a protein of 18 kDa that is present in infected porcine macrophages at both early and late times postinfection. The similarity of LMW5-HL to bcl-2 and BHRF1 suggests a role for it in cell maintenance during productive or persistent viral infection. Images PMID:8389936

  7. Proto-oncogene expression in porcine myocardium subjected to ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Brand, T; Sharma, H S; Fleischmann, K E; Duncker, D J; McFalls, E O; Verdouw, P D; Schaper, W

    1992-12-01

    The molecular basis of myocardial adaptation to ischemia and reperfusion is poorly understood. It is thought that nuclear proto-oncogenes act as third messengers, converting cytoplasmic signal transduction into long-term changes of gene expression. We studied the expression of six nuclear proto-oncogenes (Egr-1, c-fos, fosB, c-jun, junB, and c-myc) in myocardium subjected to ischemia and reperfusion in anesthetized pigs. Stunning was achieved by two 10-minute left anterior descending coronary artery occlusions separated by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Hearts were excised after the first occlusion, after the first reperfusion, and at 30, 120, 150, and 210 minutes of reperfusion after the second occlusion. Total RNA was prepared from stunned as well as normally perfused myocardial tissue and subjected to Northern blotting. The response of the six nuclear proto-oncogenes varied.fosB gene expression was never detected. The c-myc gene was expressed, but its level was unchanged by ischemia. c-jun expression was slightly increased by ischemia (3.1 +/- 0.6-fold). The c-fos, Egr-1, and junB genes were highly induced, being fivefold to sevenfold higher in experimental than in control tissue. In three animals pretreated with the beta 1-antagonist metoprolol and then subjected to the above experimental protocol, the induction of proto-oncogenes was similar to that in nonblocked controls. Our results show that the myocardial adaptive response to ischemic stress includes the induction of at least four transcription factors that may be further operative in repair processes and angiogenesis. PMID:1385005

  8. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions. PMID:26811379

  9. Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2B and RET proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B (MEN 2B) is an autosomal dominant complex oncologic neurocristopathy including medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, gastrointestinal disorders, marphanoid face, and mucosal multiple ganglioneuromas. Medullary thyroid carcinoma is the major cause of mortality in MEN 2B syndrome, and it often appears during the first years of life. RET proto-oncogene germline activating mutations are causative for MEN 2B. The 95% of MEN 2B patients are associated with a point mutation in exon 16 (M918/T). A second point mutation at codon 883 has been found in 2%-3% of MEN 2B cases. RET proto-oncogene is also involved in different neoplastic and not neoplastic neurocristopathies. Other RET mutations cause MEN 2A syndrome, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma, or Hirschsprung's disease. RET gene expression is also involved in Neuroblastoma. The main diagnosis standards are the acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa and the molecular analysis of RET. In our protocol the rectal biopsy is, therefore, the first approach. RET mutation detection offers the possibility to diagnose MEN 2B predisposition at a pre-clinical stage in familial cases, and to perform an early total prophylactic thyroidectomy. The surgical treatment of MEN 2B is total thyroidectomy with cervical limphadenectomy of the central compartment of the neck. When possible, this intervention should be performed with prophylactic aim before 1 year of age in patients with molecular genetic diagnosis. Recent advances into the mechanisms of RET proto-oncogene signaling and pathways of RET signal transduction in the development of MEN 2 and MTC will allow new treatment possibilities. PMID:22429913

  10. Transcriptional down regulation of the nov proto-oncogene in fibroblasts transformed by p60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, G; Martinerie, C; Perbal, B; Hanafusa, H

    1996-01-01

    We have sought to identify genes whose expression is altered as a consequence of transformation by p60v-src. Using the mRNA differential display method, we have identified the nov proto-oncogene as one gene that is down regulated in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) transformed by p60v-src. nov transcripts were also found to be present at only very low levels in proliferating CEFs in comparison with quiescent CEFs. Serum stimulation of quiescent CEFs also resulted in a decline in the steady-state level of nov transcripts. Taken together, these findings suggest that the nov gene is expressed only in quiescent fibroblasts and that its down regulation may contribute to cellular transformation by the v-src oncogene. Down regulation of the nov gene appears to occur at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Results obtained from experiments with a protein kinase inhibitor suggest that protein kinase C may be a key downstream effector in mediating the down regulation of nov transcripts in response to activation of p60src or serum stimulation. In addition, we found that transcription of an unknown gene is required for the decline in the steady-state level of nov transcripts in response to serum stimulation. PMID:8552074

  11. Molecular Evolution of the Yap/Yorkie Proto-Oncogene and Elucidation of Its Core Transcriptional Program

    PubMed Central

    Ikmi, Aissam; Gaertner, Bjoern; Seidel, Christopher; Srivastava, Mansi; Zeitlinger, Julia; Gibson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout Metazoa, developmental processes are controlled by a surprisingly limited number of conserved signaling pathways. Precisely how these signaling cassettes were assembled in early animal evolution remains poorly understood, as do the molecular transitions that potentiated the acquisition of their myriad developmental functions. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of the proto-oncogene yes-associated protein (Yap)/Yorkie, a key effector of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Based on heterologous functional analysis of evolutionarily distant Yap/Yorkie orthologs, we demonstrate that a structurally distinct interaction interface between Yap/Yorkie and its partner TEAD/Scalloped became fixed in the eumetazoan common ancestor. We then combine transcriptional profiling of tissues expressing phylogenetically diverse forms of Yap/Yorkie with ChIP-seq validation to identify a common downstream gene expression program underlying the control of tissue growth in Drosophila. Intriguingly, a subset of the newly identified Yorkie target genes are also induced by Yap in mammalian tissues, thus revealing a conserved Yap-dependent gene expression signature likely to mediate organ size control throughout bilaterian animals. Combined, these experiments provide new mechanistic insights while revealing the ancient evolutionary history of Hippo signaling. PMID:24509725

  12. Cloning and characterization of the murine homolog of the sno proto-oncogene reveals a novel splice variant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelzer, T.; Lyons, G. E.; Kim, S.; Moreadith, R. W.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The cellular function(s) of the SNO protein remain undefined. To gain a better understanding of possible developmental roles of this cellular proto-oncogene, we have cloned two murine sno cDNAs and have investigated their expression patterns in embryonic and postnatal tissues. A single major transcript of 7.5 kb is detected in multiple tissues by Northern blot. However, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAse protection assays revealed a novel splice variant in every tissue examined. Two isoforms, termed sno N and sno-dE3 (dE3, deletion within exon 3), were identified. The sno-dE3 isoform employs a novel 5' splice site located within the coding region of the third exon and deletes potential kinase recognition motifs. Transcripts of both sno isoforms accumulate ubiquitously but are most abundant in the developing central nervous system. The in situ hybridization patterns of sno expression during murine development suggest potential roles in tissues with a high degree of cellular proliferation. Expression in terminally differentiated tissues such as muscle and neurons indicates that SNO may have multiple functional activities.

  13. Molecular evolution of the Yap/Yorkie proto-oncogene and elucidation of its core transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Ikmi, Aissam; Gaertner, Bjoern; Seidel, Christopher; Srivastava, Mansi; Zeitlinger, Julia; Gibson, Matthew C

    2014-06-01

    Throughout Metazoa, developmental processes are controlled by a surprisingly limited number of conserved signaling pathways. Precisely how these signaling cassettes were assembled in early animal evolution remains poorly understood, as do the molecular transitions that potentiated the acquisition of their myriad developmental functions. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of the proto-oncogene yes-associated protein (Yap)/Yorkie, a key effector of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Based on heterologous functional analysis of evolutionarily distant Yap/Yorkie orthologs, we demonstrate that a structurally distinct interaction interface between Yap/Yorkie and its partner TEAD/Scalloped became fixed in the eumetazoan common ancestor. We then combine transcriptional profiling of tissues expressing phylogenetically diverse forms of Yap/Yorkie with ChIP-seq validation to identify a common downstream gene expression program underlying the control of tissue growth in Drosophila. Intriguingly, a subset of the newly identified Yorkie target genes are also induced by Yap in mammalian tissues, thus revealing a conserved Yap-dependent gene expression signature likely to mediate organ size control throughout bilaterian animals. Combined, these experiments provide new mechanistic insights while revealing the ancient evolutionary history of Hippo signaling. PMID:24509725

  14. Retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene in a Marek's disease T-lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, E; Perbal, B

    1996-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an avian herpesvirus that causes, in chickens, a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by malignant transformation of T lymphocytes. The rapid onset of polyclonal tumors indicates the existence of MDV-encoded oncogenic products. However, the molecular basis of MDV-induced lymphoproliferative disease and latency remains largely unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that MDV and Rous-associated virus (RAV) might cooperate in the development of B-cell lymphomas induced by RAV. Our present results indicate for the first time that MDV and RAV might also act synergistically in the development of T-cell lymphomas. We report an example of an MDV-transformed T-lymphoblastoid cell line (T9) expressing high levels of a truncated C-MYB protein as a result of RAV integration within one c-myb allele. The chimeric RAV-c-myb mRNA species initiated in the 5' long terminal repeat of RAV are deprived of sequences corresponding to c-myb exons 1 to 3. The attenuation of MDV oncogenicity has been strongly related to structural changes in the MDV BamHI-D and BamHI-H DNA fragments. We have established that both DNA restriction fragments are rearranged in the T9 MDV-transformed cells. Our results suggest that retroviral insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is a critical factor involved in the maintenance of the transformed phenotype and the tumorigenic potential of this T-lymphoma cell line. PMID:8892859

  15. The RET proto-oncogene: a potential target for molecular cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pützer, Brigitte M; Drosten, Matthias

    2004-07-01

    The inhibition of activated receptor tyrosine kinases has defined a new era of selective cancer therapy. The value of these approaches has been demonstrated for a growing number of tyrosine kinases. Gain-of-function alterations within the RET proto-oncogene are responsible for the development of medullary, as well as papillary, thyroid carcinoma and make it a candidate for the design of targeted therapies. Recently, various strategies have been used to block the activity of RET in pre-clinical models, providing evidence that RET is a potential target for a selective cancer-therapy approach, especially when considering that the inhibition of RET activity is sufficient to revert neoplastic characteristics. Although the ideal clinically useful therapeutic option has yet to be developed, successes with other selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors encourages further effort. PMID:15242684

  16. [Advances Research on C-MYC Proto-oncogene in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Guo, Wen-Jian; Yao, Ron-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM) as one of the most common tumors of hmatologic system, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells, and the chemotherapy is the main therapeutic method. MM is an incurable disease because of drug-resistance of MM cells. Although the pathogenesis of MM remains unknown, the chromosome abnormalities exit in half of the patients, particularly the highly expressed gene C-MYC. Furthermore, plenty of clinical researches indicated a high expression level of C-MYC implied worse progression and/or poor prognosis of MM. Recently, the work exploiting the compounds targeting MYC has made substantial progress, even in the MM therapy. In this article, briefly the recent advances of the research on C-MYC proto-oncogene in multiple myeloma are reviewed. PMID:27531809

  17. Cigarette smoke activates the proto-oncogene c-src to promote airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew; Foronjy, Robert F

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke-mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  18. Cigarette Smoke Activates the Proto-Oncogene c-Src to Promote Airway Inflammation and Lung Tissue Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Patrick; Hardigan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) confers a 2-fold increased lung cancer risk even after adjusting for cigarette smoking, suggesting that common pathways are operative in both diseases. Although the role of the tyrosine kinase c-Src is established in lung cancer, less is known about its impact in other lung diseases, such as COPD. This study examined whether c-Src activation by cigarette smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of COPD. Cigarette smoke increased c-Src activity in human small airway epithelial (SAE) cells from healthy donors and in the lungs of exposed mice. Similarly, higher c-Src activation was measured in SAE cells from patients with COPD compared with healthy control subjects. In SAE cells, c-Src silencing or chemical inhibition prevented epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling in response to cigarette smoke but not EGF stimulation. Further studies showed that cigarette smoke acted through protein kinase C α to trigger c-Src to phosphorylate EGF receptor and thereby to induce mitogen-activated protein kinase responses in these cells. To further investigate the role of c-Src, A/J mice were orally administered the specific Src inhibitor AZD-0530 while they were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2 months. AZD-0530 treatment blocked c-Src activation, decreased macrophage influx, and prevented airspace enlargement in the lungs of cigarette smoke–exposed mice. Moreover, inhibiting Src deterred the cigarette smoke–mediated induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -12 in alveolar macrophages and lung expression of cathepsin K, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, and KC, all key factors in the pathogenesis of COPD. These results indicate that activation of the proto-oncogene c-Src by cigarette smoke promotes processes linked to the development of COPD. PMID:24111605

  19. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 Synergistically Activate Transcription of Fatty-acid Synthase Gene (FASN)*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F.; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  20. Exclusion of the RET proto-oncogene as candidate for total colonic aganglionsis in the spotting lethal (sl) rat strain

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccherini, I.; Matera, I.; Devoto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Causative germline mutations and deletions of the RET proto-oncogene have been demonstrated in a number of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients showing either short- or long-segment intestinal aganglionosis, including both sporadic and familial cases with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The spotting lethal (sl) rats show autosomal recessive recurrence of total colonic aganglionosis which resembles the long-segment HSCR type in humans with 100% mortality of the homozygotes at 4-5 weeks of age. Heterozygotes were backcrossed with DA rats and the F2 offspring was used to test the possible cosegregation of the aganglionosis and the RET proto-oncogene. A genomic DNA fragment of the rat RET gene was amplified using degenerated oligonucleotides, subcloned and sequenced. The coding portion of this DNA fragment (300bp) shares 93% and 81% of its amino acids with the murine and human RET proto-oncogene, respectively. An A{yields}G transition in the third nucleotide of the alanine codon corresponding to amino acid Glu90 of the human RET gene was identified in the sl but not in the wild type DA strain. This mutation creates a Bsp 1286I restriction site. Restriction analysis performed on 57 affected rats (mutated homozygotes) of the F2 generation revealed independent segregation between the rat colonic aganglionosis gene and RET, thus allowing the exclusion of the latter proto-oncogene as candidate for the mutation present in the sl rat strain. Several different candidate rat chromosomal regions are being analyzed in order to proceed with the mapping of the genetic defect in the sl rats.

  1. The dark and the bright side of Stat3: proto-oncogene and tumor-suppressor.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Andrea; Simma, Olivia; Hoelbl, Andrea; Kenner, Lukas; Beug, Hartmut; Moriggl, Richard; Sexl, Veronika

    2009-01-01

    Stat transcription factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis in mice and men. Stat3 and Stat5 are considered powerful proto-oncogenes, whereas Stat1 has been demonstrated to suppress tumor formation. We demonstrate here for the first time that a constitutive active version of Stat3alpha (Stat3alphaC) may also suppress transformation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for p53 can be transformed with either c-myc or with rasV12 alone. Interestingly, transformation by c-myc is efficiently suppressed by co-expression of Stat3alphaC, but Stat3alphaC does not interfere with transformation by the rasV12-oncogene. In contrast, transplantation of bone marrow cells expressing Stat3alphaC induces the formation of a highly aggressive T cell leukemia in mice. The leukemic cells invaded multiple organs including lung, heart, salivary glands, liver and kidney. Interestingly, transplanted mice developed a similar leukemia when the bone marrow cells were transduced with Stat3beta, which is also constitutively active when expressed at significant levels. Our experiments demonstrate that Stat3 has both - tumor suppressing and tumor promoting properties. PMID:19273247

  2. B-cell development fails in the absence of the Pbx1 proto-oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Mrinmoy; Tung, James W.; Karsunky, Holger; Zeng, Hong; Selleri, Licia; Weissman, Irving L.; Herzenberg, Leonore A.

    2007-01-01

    Pbx1, a homeodomain transcription factor that was originally identified as the product of a proto-oncogene in acute pre-B–cell leukemia, is a global regulator of embryonic development. However, embryonic lethality in its absence has prevented an assessment of its role in B-cell development. Here, using Rag1-deficient blastocyst complementation assays, we demonstrate that Pbx1 null embryonic stem (ES) cells fail to generate common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) resulting in a complete lack of B and NK cells, and a partial impairment of T-cell development in chimeric mice. A critical role for Pbx1 was confirmed by rescue of B-cell development from CLPs following restoration of its expression in Pbx1-deficient ES cells. In adoptive transfer experiments, B-cell development from Pbx1-deficient fetal liver cells was also severely compromised, but not erased, since transient B lymphopoiesis was detected in Rag-deficient recipients. Conditional inactivation of Pbx1 in pro-B (CD19+) cells and thereafter revealed that Pbx1 is not necessary for B-cell development to proceed from the pro-B–cell stage. Thus, Pbx1 critically functions at a stage between hematopoietic stem cell development and B-cell commitment and, therefore, is one of the earliest-acting transcription factors that regulate de novo B-lineage lymphopoiesis. PMID:17244677

  3. Mutations in exon 10 of the RET proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Attie, T.; Eng, C.; Mulligan, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglion cells in the terminal hindgut. Recently, we have identified mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Mutations of the RET gene have also been reported in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). While RET mutations in HSCR are scattered on the whole coding sequence, MEN 2A and FMTC mutations are clustered in 5 cystein codons of exons 10 and 11. Here, we report on HSCR families carrying mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene, one of them involving a cystein codon. Germ-line mutations in exon 10 of the RET gene may contribute to either an early development defect (HSCR) or inherited predisposition to cancer (MEN 2A and FMTC), probable depending on the nature and location of the mutation. These data also suggest that HSCR patients with mutations in exon 10 might subsequently prove to be at risk for MEN 2A or FMTC since several MEN 2A/HSCR associations have been reported.

  4. Mutation detection in autosomal dominant Hirschsprung disease: SSCP analysis of the RET proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Angrist, M.; Bolk, S.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or congenital aganglionic megacolon, is the most common cause of congenital bowel obstruction, with an incidence of 1 in 5000. Recently, linkage of an incompletely penetrant, dominant form of HSCR to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 10 was reported, followed by identification of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR patients. RET mutations have also been reported in both sporadic and familial forms of three neuroendrocrine tumor syndromes. Unlike the clustered RET mutations observed in these syndromes, the 18 reported HSCR mutations are distributed throughout the extracellular and tryosine kinase domains of RET. In an effort to determine the frequency of RET mutations in HSCR and correlate genotype with phenotype, we have begun to screen for mutations among 80 HSCR probands representing a wide range of phenotypes and pedigree structures. Non-isotopic single strand conformation of polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was carried out using the Pharmacia PhastSystem{trademark}. Initial screening of exons 2 through 6 detected variants in 11 patients not seen in 24 controls. One additional band shift in exon 6 has been observed in both patients and controls. Preliminary sequence analysis has revealed two putative familial mutations in exon 2: a single base pair deletion (49Pro del C 296) and a point mutation that leads to a conservative amino acid substitution (93Gly{r_arrow}Ser). These results suggest that HSCR may be associated with a range of alterations in the coding sequence of the RET extracellular domain. Additional mutations will be described.

  5. Spectrum of mutations of the ret proto-oncogene in Hirschsprung`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lyonnet, S.; Attie, T.; Pelet, A.

    1994-09-01

    Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR) is a frequent congenital malformation (1 in 5,000 live births) ascribed to the absence of autonomic ganglia cells in the terminal hindgut. HSCR is a neurocristopathie resulting in intestinal obstruction in neonates and in milder phenotypes in adults. Recently, we have mapped a dominant gene for familial HSCR to chromosome 10q11.2 and identified mutations of the RET proto-oncogene in HSCR families. Studying a large number of HSCR patients by DGGE analysis of the RET coding sequence we observed: (a) various RET mutations in our series of 30 HSCR families, (b) de novo mutations in several sporadic HSCR cases, (c) the variable clinical expression of RET mutations in HSCR families and the absence of genotype/phenotype correlations at the RET locus, (d) the low penetrance of RET mutations in HSCR families supporting the role of one or several modifier genes, and (e) the existence of syndromic HSCR families unlinked to the RET locus.

  6. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  7. Control of c-fos and c-myc proto-oncogene induction in rat thyroid cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Isozaki, O.; Kohn, L.D. )

    1987-11-01

    Removal of TSH, insulin, and cortisol from the medium, and decreasing the serum content to 0.2%, abolishes both the proliferate and differentiated state of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in culture. In these basal conditions, the individual addition of TSH, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA), alpha 1-adrenergic agents, or A23187, increase c-myc and/or c-fos proto-oncogene expression. Under the same conditions, only the addition of TSH increased cAMP levels; 8-bromo-cAMP can increase c-myc or c-fos mRNA levels. Pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, an agent which down regulates the C-kinase, completely inhibits the effect of TPA on proto-oncogene expression but has no affect on the A23187 induced-increase. The sum of these results indicate that at least four separate signal systems independently increase c-myc or c-fos gene expression in FRTL-5 cells cAMP (TSH), C-kinase (TPA), Ca++/phosphoinositide (A23187), and that influenced by insulin/IGF-I. None of the ligands, when individually returned to cells in basal medium (no TSH, insulin, or cortisol and only 0.2% serum), increases cell number; norepinephrine, and A23187 do not increase (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA under these conditions; and combinations of the ligands can be more than additive in effecting (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA but are only additive in effecting proto-oncogene expression. Insulin/IGF-I plus TSH or insulin/IGF-I plus norepinephrine can increase both proto-oncogene expression and (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA to the same extent; however, the former combination can increase cell number whereas the latter cannot. There is therefore no simple correlation between the ability of the above ligands to increase proto-oncogene expression and their ability to increase cell number or induce DNA synthesis.

  8. Unexpected functional similarities between gatekeeper tumour suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes revealed by systems biology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongzhong; Epstein, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    Familial tumor suppressor genes comprise two subgroups: caretaker genes (CTs) that repair DNA, and gatekeeper genes (GKs) that trigger cell death. Since GKs may also induce cell cycle delay and thus enhance cell survival by facilitating DNA repair, we hypothesized that the prosurvival phenotype of GKs could be selected during cancer progression, and we used a multivariable systems biology approach to test this. We performed multidimensional data analysis, non-negative matrix factorization and logistic regression to compare the features of GKs with those of their putative antagonists, the proto-oncogenes (POs), as well as with control groups of CTs and functionally unrelated congenital heart disease genes (HDs). GKs and POs closely resemble each other, but not CTs or HDs, in terms of gene structure (P<0.001), expression level and breadth (P<0.01), DNA methylation signature (P<0.001) and evolutionary rate (P<0.001). The similar selection pressures and epigenetic trajectories of GKs and POs so implied suggest a common functional attribute that is strongly negatively selected-that is, a shared phenotype that enhances cell survival. The counterintuitive finding of similar evolutionary pressures affecting GKs and POs raises an intriguing possibility: namely, that cancer microevolution is accelerated by an epistatic cascade in which upstream suppressor gene defects subvert the normal bifunctionality of wild-type GKs by constitutively shifting the phenotype away from apoptosis towards survival. If correct, this interpretation would explain the hitherto unexplained phenomenon of frequent wild-type GK (for example, p53) overexpression in tumors. PMID:21368766

  9. The proto-oncogene PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Vu, Ngoc; Shultz, Michael D.; Mba, Uzoma; Shapiro, Brian A.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Two splice variants derived from the BCL-x gene via alternative 5′ splice site selection (5′SS) are pro-apoptotic Bcl-x(s) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L). Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that apoptotic signaling pathways regulated the alternative 5′SS selection via protein phosphatase-1 and de novo ceramide. In this study, we examined the elusive pro-survival signaling pathways that regulate the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA in cancer cells. Taking a broad-based approach by utilizing a number of small molecule inhibitors of various mitogenic/survival pathways, we found that only treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 (50 μM) or the pan-PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 (25 μM) decreased the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Pan-PKC inhibitors that did not target the atypical PKCs, PKCι and PKCζ, had no effect on the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Additional studies demonstrated that downregulation of the proto-oncogene, PKCι, in contrast to PKCζ, also resulted in a decrease in the Bcl-x(L)/Bcl-x(s) mRNA ratio. Furthermore, downregulation of PKCι correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of SAP155, an RNA trans-acting factor that regulates the 5′SS selection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA. Inhibition of the PI3K or atypical PKC pathway induced a dramatic loss of SAP155 complex formation at ceramide-responsive RNA cis-element 1. Lastly, forced expression of Bcl-x(L) “rescued” the loss of cell survival induced by PKCι siRNA. In summary, the PI3K/PKCι regulates the alternative splicing of Bcl-x pre-mRNA with implications in the cell survival of NSCLC cells. PMID:22522453

  10. Loss of E-Cadherin–mediated Cell–Cell Contacts Activates a Novel Mechanism for Up-Regulation of the Proto-Oncogene c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    Knirsh, Revital; Ben-Dror, Iris; Spangler, Barbara; Matthews, Gideon D.; Kuphal, Silke; Bosserhoff, Anja K.

    2009-01-01

    Loss of E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell contacts can elicit a signaling pathway that leads to acquisition of an invasive phenotype. Here, we show that at the receiving end of this pathway is the proto-oncogene c-Jun, a member of the activator protein-1 family of transcription factors that play a key role in stimulation of cell proliferation and tumor promotion. Cell separation or abrogation of E-cadherin–mediated cell–cell contacts both cause a dramatic increase in accumulation of the c-Jun protein. Unlike growth factors that enhance the expression of c-Jun by activating the transcription of the c-jun gene, the cell contact-dependent increase in c-Jun accumulation is not accompanied by a corresponding increase in c-Jun mRNA or c-Jun protein stability but rather in the translatability of the c-Jun transcript. Consistently, the increase in c-Jun accumulation is not dependent on activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or β-catenin pathways but is mediated by signals triggered by the restructured cytoskeleton. Depolymerization of the cytoskeleton can mimic the effect of cell separation and cause a dramatic increase in c-Jun accumulation, whereas Taxol inhibits the cell contact-dependent increase. This novel mechanism of c-Jun regulation seems to underlie the robust overexpression of c-Jun in tumor cells of patients with colon carcinoma. PMID:19193763

  11. The gep proto-oncogene Gα13 Mediates Lysophosphatidic acid-mediated Migration of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jacob A; Ha, Ji Hee; Jayaraman, Muralidharan; Dhanasekaran, Danny N.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Tumor microenvironment, defined by a variety of growth factors including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose levels are increased in pancreatic cancer patients, plays a major role in the genesis and progression of pancreatic cancer. Since the gep proto-oncogenes, Gα12 and Gα13, are implicated in LPA-stimulated oncogenic signaling, this study is focused on evaluating the role of these proto-oncogenes in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. METHODS Effect of LPA on the migration and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells was assessed using BxPC3, Dan-G, MDAPanc-28, Panc-1, and PaCa-2 cell-lines. The role of Gα13 in the migration of pancreatic cancer cells was interrogated by disrupting LPAR-Gα13 interaction using CT13, a dominant negative mutant of Gα13, and by silencing the expression of Gα13. RESULTS Results indicate that LPA stimulates the migration of pancreatic cancer cells and such LPA-stimulated migratory response is mediated by Gα13. Furthermore, the results establish that the silencing of Gα13, but not Gα12, abrogates LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. CONCLUSION These results report for the first time a critical role for Gα13 in LPA-stimulated invasive migration of pancreatic cancer cells. These findings identify LPA-LPAR-Gα13 signaling node as a novel therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer treatment and control. PMID:23508014

  12. CT45A1 acts as a new proto-oncogene to trigger tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Shang, B; Gao, A; Pan, Y; Zhang, G; Tu, J; Zhou, Y; Yang, P; Cao, Z; Wei, Q; Ding, Y; Zhang, J; Zhao, Y; Zhou, Q

    2014-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigen (CTA)-45 family (CT45) belongs to a new family of genes in phylogenetics and is absent in normal tissues except for testis, but is aberrantly overexpressed in various cancer types. Whether CT45 and other CTAs act as proto-oncogenes has not been determined. Using breast cancer as a model, we found that CT45A1, a representative CT45 family member, alone had a weak tumorigenic effect. However, its neoplastic potency was greatly enhanced in the presence of growth factors. Overexpression of CT45A1 in breast cancer cells markedly upregulated various oncogenic and metastatic genes, constitutively activated ERK and CREB signaling pathways, promoted epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and increased cell stemness, tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastasis, whereas silencing CT45A1 significantly reduced cancer cell migration and invasion. We propose that CT45A1 functions as a novel proto-oncogene to trigger oncogenesis and metastasis. CT45A1 and other CT45 members are therefore excellent targets for anticancer drug discovery and targeted tumor therapy, and valuable genes in the study of a molecular phylogenetic tree. PMID:24901056

  13. Tumor suppressor p53 inhibits transcriptional activation of invasion gene thromboxane synthase mediated by the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ella; Günther, Willy; Yoshizato, Kimio; Meissner, Hildegard; Zapf, Srenja; Nüsing, Rolf M; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Van Meir, Erwin G; Deppert, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf

    2003-10-30

    Cancer formation and progression is a complex process determined by several mechanisms that promote cell growth, invasiveness, neo-angiogenesis, and render neoplastic cells resistant to apoptosis. The tumor suppressor p53 and the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1 are important regulators of such mechanisms. While it is well established that p53 and ets-1 influence various aspects of cell behavior by regulating the transcription of specific genes, little is known about the functional relationship between these transcription factors. We found that the gene encoding thromboxane synthase (TXSA), which we recently identified as a factor promoting invasion and resistance to apoptosis in gliomas, is a novel target gene for both p53 and ets-1. We demonstrate that p53 and ets-1 coregulate TXSA in an antagonistic and inter-related manner, with ets-1 being a potent transcriptional activator and p53 inhibiting ets-1-dependent transcription. Negative interference with ets-1 transcription requires functional p53 and is lost in mutant p53 proteins. We show that ets-1 and p53 associate physically in vitro and in vivo and that their interaction, rather than a direct binding of p53 to the TXSA promoter, is required for transcriptional repression of TXSA by wild-type p53. An important implication of our findings is that the loss of p53-mediated negative control over ets-1-dependent transcription may lead to the acquisition of an invasive phenotype in tumor cells. PMID:14586398

  14. LncRNA Khps1 Regulates Expression of the Proto-oncogene SPHK1 via Triplex-Mediated Changes in Chromatin Structure.

    PubMed

    Postepska-Igielska, Anna; Giwojna, Alena; Gasri-Plotnitsky, Lital; Schmitt, Nina; Dold, Annabelle; Ginsberg, Doron; Grummt, Ingrid

    2015-11-19

    Although thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, very little is known about their mode of action. Here we functionally characterize an E2F1-regulated lncRNA named Khps1, which is transcribed in antisense orientation to the proto-oncogene SPHK1. Khps1 activates SPHK1 expression by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP to the SPHK1 promoter, which leads to local changes of the chromatin structure that ensures E2F1 binding and enhances transcription. Mechanistically, this is achieved by direct association of Khps1 with a homopurine stretch upstream of the transcription start site of SPHK1, which forms a DNA-RNA triplex that anchors the lncRNA and associated effector proteins to the gene promoter. The results reveal an lncRNA- and E2F1-driven regulatory loop in which E2F1-dependent induction of antisense RNA leads to changes in chromatin structure, facilitating E2F1-dependent expression of SPHK1 and restriction of E2F1-induced apoptosis. PMID:26590717

  15. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy. PMID:26606454

  16. Immunohistochemichal Assessment of the CrkII Proto-oncogene Expression in Common Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors and Pleomorphic Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Askari, Mitra; Darabi, Masoud; Jahanzad, Esa; Mostakhdemian Hosseini, Zahra; Musavi Chavoshi, Marjan; Darabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various morphologies are seen in different salivary gland tumorsor within an individual tumor, and the lesions show divers biological behaviors. Experimental results support the hypothesis that increased CrkII proto-oncogene is associated with cytokine-induced tumor initiation and progression by altering cell motility signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the CrkII expression in common malignant salivary gland tumors and pleomorphic ade-noma. Materials and methods. Immunohistochemical analysis of CrkII expression was performed on paraffin blocks of 64 car-cinomas of salivary glands, 10 pleomorphic adenomas, and 10 normal salivary glands. Biopsies were subjected to immu-nostaining with EnVision detection system using monoclonal anti-CrkII. Evaluation of immunoreactivity of CrkII was based on the immunoreaction intensity and percentage of stained tumor cells which were scored semi-quantitatively on a scale with four grades 0 to 3. Kruskal-wallis test and additional Mann-Whitney statistical test were used for analysis of CrkII expression levels. Results. Increased expression of CrkII was seen (P=0.005) in malignant tumors including: mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma, but CrkII expression in acinic cell carcinoma was weak. CrkII expression in pleomorphic adenoma was weak or negative. A weak staining was sparsely seen in normal acinar serous cell. Conclusion. Increased expression of CrkII and its higher intensity of staining in tumors with more aggressive biologic behavior in carcinomas of salivary gland is consistent with a role for this proto-oncogene in salivary gland tumorigenesis and cancer progression. PMID:25973151

  17. Targeted Disruption of the Murine fps/fes Proto-Oncogene Reveals that Fps/Fes Kinase Activity Is Dispensable for Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Senis, Yotis; Zirngibl, Ralph; McVeigh, Jennifer; Haman, Andre; Hoang, Trang; Greer, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase that is functionally implicated in the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors and in signaling from several members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. To gain further insight into the physiological function of fps/fes, we targeted the mouse locus with a kinase-inactivating missense mutation. Mutant Fps/Fes protein was expressed at normal levels in these mice, but it lacked detectable kinase activity. Homozygous mutant animals were viable and fertile, and they showed no obvious defects. Flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow showed no statistically significant differences in the levels of myeloid, erythroid, or B-cell precursors. Subtle abnormalities observed in mutant mice included slightly elevated total leukocyte counts and splenomegaly. In bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cell colony-forming assays, mutant mice gave slightly elevated numbers and variable sizes of CFU-granulocyte macrophage in response to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 and Stat5A in bone marrow-derived macrophages was dramatically reduced in response to GM-CSF but not to IL-3 or IL-6. This suggests a distinct nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in signaling from the GM-CSF receptor that does not extend to the closely related IL-3 receptor. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Erk1/2 activation was also reduced in mutant macrophages. These subtle molecular phenotypes suggest a possible nonredundant role for Fps/Fes in myelopoiesis and immune responses. PMID:10523632

  18. MiR-744 functions as a proto-oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression and metastasis via transcriptional control of ARHGAP5.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jian; Li, Na; Li, Dianhe; Sakib, Nazmus; Sha, Zhou; Song, Wen

    2015-05-30

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastasis-prone epithelial cancer. The paucity of effective treatment strategies for recurrent and metastatic NPC is the major cause for stagnating survival rate of NPC. Therefore, it's urgent to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying NPC progression and identify novel avenues for targeted therapy. It has emerged recently that microRNAs are potential pro-tumorigenic or tumor-suppressive factors that participate in oncogenesis. In this study, we found that miR-744 expression was upregulated in NPC specimens compared to nasopharyngeal epithelium (NPE) tissue, and miR- 744 upregulation was significantly associated with TNM stage, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Functional studies revealed that miR-744 acts as a novel tumor promotor in NPC. Moreover, we determined that miR-744 targets ARHGAP5 (Rho GTPase activating protein 5), a protumorigenic gene, by directly interacting with its promoter and thereby regulating its expression at transcriptional level. Reintroduction of ARHGAP5 resembled the effects of miR-744 and silencing of ARHGAP5 clearly abrogated miR-744-induced enhancement of cell migration and invasion. High level of ARHGAP5 was positively correlated with that of miR-744 and with advanced stages of NPC, as well as with lymph node metastasis. Taken together, these data reveal for the first time that miR-744 exerts its proto-oncogenic function by directly targeting ARHGAP5 promoter. This newly identified miR-744/ARHGAP5 pathway provides further insight into the progression and metastasis of NPC and indicates potential novel therapeutic targets for NPC. PMID:25961434

  19. The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M.; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R.; Walkley, Carl R.; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease. PMID:24415629

  20. Nucleotide sequence of cDNA clones of the murine myb proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Gonda, T J; Gough, N M; Dunn, A R; de Blaquiere, J

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones of murine c-myb mRNA which contain approximately 2.8 kb of the 3.9-kb mRNA sequence. Nucleotide sequencing has shown that these clones extend both 5' and 3' to sequences homologous to the v-myb oncogenes of avian myeloblastosis virus and avian leukemia virus E26. The sequence contains an open reading frame of 1944 nucleotides, and could encode a protein which is both highly homologous, and of similar size (71 kd), to the chicken c-myb protein. Examination of the deduced amino acid sequence of the murine c-myb protein revealed the presence of a 3-fold tandem repeat of 52 residues near the N terminus of the protein, and has enabled prediction of some of the likely structural features of the protein. These include a high alpha-helix content, a basic region toward the N terminus of the protein and an overall globular configuration. The arrangement of genomic c-myb sequences, detected using the cDNA clones as probes, was compared with the reported structure of rearranged c-myb in certain tumour cells. This comparison suggested that the rearranged c-myb gene may encode a protein which, like the v-myb protein, lacks the N-terminal region of c-myb. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2998780

  1. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations. PMID:26678667

  2. Inhibition of carcinogen induced c-Ha-ras and c-fos proto-oncogenes expression by dietary curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Limtrakul, Porn-ngarm; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Lipigorngoson, Suwiwek; Dunn, Floyd W

    2001-01-01

    Background We investigated the chemopreventive action of dietary curcumin on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted skin tumor formation in Swiss albino mice. Curcumin, a yellow coloring matter isolated from roots of Curcuma longa Linn, is a phenolic compound possessing antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and antiinflammatory properties. It has been shown by previously reported work that TPA-induced skin tumors were inhibited by topical application of curcumin, and curcumin has been shown to inhibit a variety of biological activities of TPA. Topical application of curcumin was reported to inhibit TPA-induced c-fos, c-jun and c-myc gene expression in mouse skin. This paper reports the effects of orally administered curcumin, which was consumed as a dietary component at concentrations of 0.2 % or 1 %, in ad libitum feeding. Results Animals in which tumors had been initiated with DMBA and promoted with TPA experienced significantly fewer tumors and less tumor volume if they ingested either 0.2% or 1% curcumin diets. Also, the dietary consumption of curcumin resulted in a significantly decreased expression of ras and fos proto-oncogenes in the tumorous skin, as measured by enhanced chemiluminesence Western blotting detection system (Amersham). Conclusions Whereas earlier work demonstrated that topical application of curcumin to mouse skin inhibited TPA-induced expression of c-fos, c-jun and c-myc oncogenes, our results are the first to show that orally consumed curcumin significantly inhibited DMBA- and TPA-induced ras and fos gene expression in mouse skin. PMID:11231886

  3. The Proto-oncogene SET Interacts with Muscarinic Receptors and Attenuates Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Violaine; Guidry, Jessie; Gettys, Thomas W.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Lanier, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cell responses to extra-cellular stimuli and likely function in the context of a larger signal transduction complex. Utilizing the third intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor in glutathione S-transfer-ase pulldown assays from rat brain lysates coupled with high sensitivity detection methods and subsequent functional studies, we report the identification of SET as a regulator of muscarinic receptor signaling. SET is a putative oncogene reported to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A and regulate gene transcription. SET binds the carboxyl region of the M3-muscarinic receptor i3 loop, and endogenous SET co-immunoprecipitates with intact M3 muscarinic receptor expressed in cells. Small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous SET in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the M3 muscarinic receptor augmented receptor-mediated mobilization of intracellular calcium by ∼35% with no change in agonist EC50, indicating that interaction of SET with the M3 muscarinic receptor reduces its signaling capacity. SET knockdown had no effect on the mobilization of intracellular calcium by the P2-purinergic receptor, ionomycin, or a direct activator of phospholipase C, indicating a specific regulation of M3 muscarinic receptor signaling. These data provide expanded functionality for SET and a previously unrecognized mechanism for regulation of GPCR signaling capacity. PMID:17065150

  4. Neu proto-oncogene amplification and expression in ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    King, B. L.; Carter, D.; Foellmer, H. G.; Kacinski, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this communication, the authors summarize their characterization of eight ovarian adenocarcinoma-derived cell lines for level of neu gene amplification, expression of neu transcripts and protein, and intraperitoneal tumorigenicity in nude mice. Two of the eight cell lines in our study (SKOV3 and YAOVBIX1) exhibited five- to ninefold neu DNA sequence amplification, accompanied by up to 200-fold overexpression of transcripts and protein (p185). Both of these cell lines expressed a major approximately 7.5 kb neu-complementary transcript not previously reported in other neu-positive tumor cell lines. One pair of cell lines (YAOVBIX1 and YAOVBIX3), isolated from a single ovarian carcinoma patient's ascites sample differed dramatically in regard to level of neu gene amplification and expression. Immunohistochemical staining of the primary ovarian tumor from which these two lines were derived demonstrated populations of both neu-positive and neu-negative malignant epithelial cells. Seven of the eight ovarian carcinoma lines produced intra-abdominal tumors after intraperitoneal injection into nude mice, irrespective of level of neu gene expression. This study demonstrates tumor cell heterogeneity with regard to neu gene amplification and expression in an ovarian adenocarcinoma, reveals the overexpression of novel neu-complementary transcripts in two independently isolated ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines, and suggests that neu gene expression is not required for intraperitoneal tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma xenografts in a nude mouse model system. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1346236

  5. Loss of Vav2 Proto-Oncogene Causes Tachycardia and Cardiovascular Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Jerkic, Mirjana; López-Novoa, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The Vav family is a group of signal transduction molecules that activate Rho/Rac GTPases during cell signaling. Experiments using knockout mice have indicated that the three Vav proteins present in mammals (Vav1, Vav2, and Vav3) are essential for proper signaling responses in hematopoietic cells. However, Vav2 and Vav3 are also highly expressed in nonhematopoietic tissues, suggesting that they may have additional functions outside blood cells. Here, we report that this is the case for Vav2, because the disruption of its locus in mice causes tachycardia, hypertension, and defects in the heart, arterial walls, and kidneys. We also provide physiological and pharmacological evidence demonstrating that the hypertensive condition of Vav2-deficient mice is due to a chronic stimulation of the renin/angiotensin II and sympathetic nervous systems. Together, these results indicate that Vav2 plays crucial roles in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis in mice. PMID:17202406

  6. Axotomized neonatal motoneurons overexpressing the bcl2 proto-oncogene retain functional electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed Central

    Alberi, S; Raggenbass, M; de Bilbao, F; Dubois-Dauphin, M

    1996-01-01

    Bcl2 overexpression prevents axotomy-induced neuronal death of neonatal facial motoneurons, as defined by morphological criteria. However, the functional properties of these surviving lesioned transgenic neurons are unknown. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the protein Bcl2, we have investigated the bioelectrical properties of transgenic facial motoneurons from 7 to 20 days after neonatal unilateral axotomy using brain-stem slices and whole cell patch-clamp recording. Nonaxotomized facial motoneurons from wild-type and transgenic mice had similar properties; they had an input resistance of 38 +/- 6 M omega and fired repetitively after injection of positive current pulses. When cells were voltage-clamped at or near their resting membrane potential, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), or vasopressin generated sustained inward currents. In transgenic axotomized mice, facial motoneurons could be found located ipsilaterally to the lesion; they had an input resistance of 150 +/- 30 M omega, indicating that they were smaller in size, fired repetitively, and were also responsive to AMPA, NMDA, and vasopressin. Morphological measurements achieved 1 week after the lesion have shown that application of brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevented the reduction in size of axotomized transgenic motoneurons. These data indicate that Bcl2 not only prevents morphological apoptotic death of axotomized neonatal transgenic motoneurons but also permits motoneurons to conserve functional electrophysiological properties. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633001

  7. The role of proto-oncogene GLI1 in pituitary adenoma formation and cell survival regulation.

    PubMed

    Lampichler, Katharina; Ferrer, Patricio; Vila, Greisa; Lutz, Mirjam I; Wolf, Florian; Knosp, Engelbert; Wagner, Ludwig; Luger, Anton; Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is an important regulator of early tissue patterning and stem cell propagation. It was found to be aberrantly activated in numerous types of human cancer and might be relevant in cancer stem cells. The identification of adult stem cells in the pituitary raised the question if tumor-initiating cells and Hh signaling are involved in pituitary adenoma formation. The present study aimed at the evaluation of Hh signaling in relation to stem cell and cell cycle markers in 30 human pituitary adenomas and in cultured murine adenoma cells. Therefore, expression levels of components of the Hh pathway, stem cell marker SOX2, cell cycle regulator tumor-protein 53 (TP53), proliferation marker Ki67 (MKI67) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) were evaluated in 30 human pituitary adenomas in comparison to control tissue. Modulation of cell function and target gene expression by the inhibition and activation of the Hh pathway were studied in murine adenoma cells. We show that transcription factor glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) is overexpressed in 87% of all pituitary adenomas. The expression of GLI1 significantly correlated with that of SOX2, TP53, MKI67 and SOD1. Inhibition of GLI1 resulted in the downregulation of the above genes and severe cell death in mouse adenoma cells. On the other hand, activation of the Hh pathway increased cell viability and target gene expression. In conclusion, our findings point toward an alternative, ligand-independent Hh pathway activation with GLI1 playing a major role in the cell survival of pituitary adenoma cells. PMID:26219678

  8. Expression of the c-myb proto-oncogene in bovine vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, K E; Kindy, M S; Sonenshein, G E

    1992-03-01

    Previously we have shown that bovine vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) express c-myb mRNA (Reilly, C. F., Kindy, M. S., Brown, K. E., Rosenberg, R. D., and Sonenshein, G. E. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 6990-6995). Here we have characterized changes in the low level of c-myb mRNA expressed in quiescent serum-deprived subconfluent SMCs upon entry into the cell cycle. After serum stimulation, levels of c-myb mRNA increased 3-4-fold during late G1 and remained at this level during S phase. A 1.5-kilobase partial c-myb cDNA clone, isolated from a bovine SMC library, was partially sequenced and found to be 89 and 85% homologous to the human and murine c-myb genes, respectively. Using bovine and murine c-myb clones, no change in the rate of c-myb gene transcription or mRNA stability was detected during the cell cycle. Thus, the regulation of changes in c-myb mRNA levels in SMCs appears distinct from mechanisms seen in hematopoietic or fibroblastic cells. Vectors containing myb binding sites linked to the thymidine kinase promoter and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene were transiently transfected into SMC cultures. KHK-CAT-dAX, which contains nine concatenated myb binding sites, exhibited 7-fold more activity than the parental dAX-TK-CAT vector in exponentially growing SMCs. The levels of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in exponentially growing cells were approximately 2-fold higher than in cells that had been serum deprived for 24 h and were entering quiescence. Thus SMCs produce a functional c-myb protein that can activate transcription from a heterologous promoter. Furthermore, introduction of antisense c-myb oligonucleotides to quiescent serum-deprived SMC cultures severely inhibited entry of cells into S phase upon serum addition. Thus, expression of the c-myb oncogene plays an important role in cell cycle progression of SMCs. PMID:1537845

  9. The proto-oncogene c-Src and its downstream signaling pathways are inhibited by the metastasis suppressor, NDRG1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wensheng; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Merlot, Angelica; Bae, Dong-Hun; Huang, Michael; Lane, Darius; Jansson, Patric; Liu, Goldie Yuan Lam; Richardson, Vera; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des. R.

    2015-01-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor that plays a key role in regulating signaling pathways involved in mediating cancer cell invasion and migration, including those derived from prostate, colon, etc. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets through which NDRG1 reduces cancer cell invasion and migration, leading to inhibition of cancer metastasis, are not fully elucidated. In this investigation, using NDRG1 over-expression models in three tumor cell-types (namely, DU145, PC3MM and HT29) and also NDRG1 silencing in DU145 and HT29 cells, we reveal that NDRG1 decreases phosphorylation of a key proto-oncogene, cellular Src (c-Src), at a well-characterized activating site (Tyr416). NDRG1-mediated down-regulation of EGFR expression and activation were responsible for the decreased phosphorylation of c-Src (Tyr416). Indeed, NDRG1 prevented recruitment of c-Src to EGFR and c-Src activation. Moreover, NDRG1 suppressed Rac1 activity by modulating phosphorylation of a c-Src downstream effector, p130Cas, and its association with CrkII, which acts as a “molecular switch” to activate Rac1. NDRG1 also affected another signaling molecule involved in modulating Rac1 signaling, c-Abl, which then inhibited CrkII phosphorylation. Silencing NDRG1 increased cell migration relative to the control and inhibition of c-Src signaling using siRNA, or a pharmacological inhibitor (SU6656), prevented this increase. Hence, the role of NDRG1 in decreasing cell migration is, in part, due to its inhibition of c-Src activation. In addition, novel pharmacological agents, which induce NDRG1 expression and are currently under development as anti-metastatic agents, markedly increase NDRG1 and decrease c-Src activation. This study leads to important insights into the mechanism involved in inhibiting metastasis by NDRG1 and how to target these pathways with novel therapeutics. PMID:25860930

  10. Proviral activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene is detectable in preleukemic mice infected neonatally with Moloney murine leukemia virus but not in resulting end stage T lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Belli, B; Wolff, L; Nazarov, V; Fan, H

    1995-08-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus induces myeloid leukemia when inoculated intravenously into pristane-primed adult BALB/c mice. One hundred percent of these tumors show insertional activation of the c-myb proto-oncogene, and reverse transcriptase PCR assays have shown that the c-myb activation could be detected soon after infection. We tested BALB/c and NIH Swiss mice that had been inoculated as newborns with Moloney murine leukemia virus, under which conditions they develop T lymphomas exclusively. Reverse transcriptase-PCR assays indicated that c-myb activations were detectable soon after neonatal infection. However, none of the resulting T lymphomas contained c-myb activations. The implications of these results to the timing of proto-oncogene activations in leukemogenesis and the specificity of proto-oncogene activations for different diseases are discussed. PMID:7609084

  11. Interstitial telomeric sequences in human chromosomes cluster with common fragile sites, mutagen sensitive sites, viral integration sites, cancer breakpoints, proto-oncogenes and breakpoints involved in primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adekunle, S.S.A.; Wyandt, H.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Recently we mapped the telomeric repeat sequences to 111 interstitial sites in the human genome and to sites of gaps and breaks induced by aphidicolin and sister chromatid exchange sites detected by BrdU. Many of these sites correspond to conserved fragile sites in man, gorilla and chimpazee, to sites of conserved sister chromatid exchange in the mammalian X chromosome, to mutagenic sensitive sites, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes, breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and to breakpoints indicated as the sole anomaly in neoplasia. This observation prompted us to investigate if the interstitial telomeric sites cluster with these sites. An extensive literature search was carried out to find all the available published sites mentioned above. For comparison, we also carried out a statistical analysis of the clustering of the sites of the telomeric repeats with the gene locations where only nucleotide mutations have been observed as the only chromosomal abnormality. Our results indicate that the telomeric repeats cluster most with fragile sites, mutagenic sensitive sites and breakpoints implicated in primate evolution and least with cancer breakpoints, mapped locations of proto-oncogenes and other genes with nucleotide mutations.

  12. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) represses transcription of the tumor suppressor Rb gene via binding competition with Sp1 and recruitment of co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-11-28

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp -308 to -188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp -65 to -56) and GC-box 2 (bp -18 to -9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp -244 to -236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  13. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  14. Mutations of the KIT (Mast/Stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene account for a continuous range of phenotypes in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Holmes, S.A. ); Ramesar, R.; Greenberg, J.; Beighton, P.; Curtis, D.

    1992-11-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of pigmentation, characterized by congenital patches of white skin and hair from which melanocytes are absent. The authors have previously shown that piebaldism can result from missense and frameshift mutations of the KIT proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular receptor tyrosine kinase for the mast/stem cell growth factor. Here, the authors report two novel KIT mutations associated with human piebaldism. A proximal frameshift is associated with a mild piebald phenotype, and a splice-junction mutation is associated with a highly variable piebald phenotype. They discuss the apparent relationship between the predicted impact of specific KIT mutations on total KIT-dependent signal transduction and the severity of the resultant piebald phenotypes. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Dominant negative and loss of function mutations of the c-kit (mast/stem cell growth factor receptor) proto-oncogene in human piebaldism

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Giebel, L.B.; Holmes, S.A. )

    1992-02-01

    Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development and is characterized by congenital white parches of skin and hair from which melanocytes are completely absent. A similar disorder of the mouse, 'dominant white spotting' (W), results from mutations of the c-kit proto-oncogene, which encodes the cellular tyrosine kinases receptor for the mast/stem cell growth factor. The authors have identified c-kit gene mutations in three patients with piebaldism. A missense substitution (Phe[r arrow]Leu) at codon 584, within the tyrosine kinases domain, is associated with a severe piebald phenotype, whereas two different frameshifts, within codons 561 and 642, are both associated with a variable and relatively mild piebald phenotype. This is consistent with a possible 'dominant negative' effect of missense c-kit polypeptides on the function of the dimeric receptor.

  16. Dose-dependent carcinogenicity and frequent Ki-ras proto-oncogene activation by dietary N-nitrosodiethylamine in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, J D; Cheng, R; Shelton, D W; Pereira, C B; Bailey, G S

    1994-07-01

    While the experimental data upon which current concepts in mechanistically based risk assessment and molecular epidemiology are grounded derive almost entirely from rodent models, fish models have several attributes (e.g., low background incidence, extremely low cost tumor studies, nonmammalian comparative status for extrapolation of mechanisms to humans) that make them valuable adjuncts for addressing these concepts. This report provides an initial characterization of the dose dependency of dietary N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) hepatocarcinogenicity in Shasta strain rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the potential of DEN to elicit ras proto-oncogene activation in this species. Carcinogen was administered in the diet at five concentrations for 12 months. Necropsies were performed at 9, 12, and 18 months, the latter on fish maintained on control diet for 6 months after cessation of DEN exposure. The incidence of hepatic neoplasms at the lower dietary concentrations (< or = 70 ppm) did not consistently exceed that for control groups, which were higher in this particular study (2%) than expected (historically 0.1%). For the higher DEN concentrations, a linear relationship between the hepatic tumor incidence (expressed as log odds, log [p/(1-p)], where p = proportion of fish bearing tumors), and the logarithm of total cumulative dose was observed, with response being independent of the length of time (9 or 12 months) during which the dose was accumulated. The dose-response curve for fish maintained an additional 6 months postexposure was shifted toward higher incidence but was parallel to the curve for fish killed at cessation of exposure. The model predicts that doubling the dose will produce somewhat more than a doubling of the odds (p/(100-p)) for tumor incidence and that the odds for lesions 6 months postexposure will be approximately double those at cessation of exposure. Comparison of these results with previous studies using rats suggests an overall

  17. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity. PMID:26909958

  18. A PCR-mutagenesis strategy for rapid detection of mutations in codon 634 of the ret proto-oncogene related to MEN 2A.

    PubMed Central

    Roqué, María; Pusiol, Eduardo; Perinetti, Héctor; Godoy, Clara Pott; Mayorga, Luis S

    2002-01-01

    Background Multiple endocrine neoplasias type 2A (MEN 2A) is a dominantly inherited cancer syndrome. Missence mutations in the codon encoding cysteine 634 of the ret proto-oncogene have been found in 85% of the MEN 2A families. The main tumour type always present in MEN 2A is medullar thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Only 25% of all MTC are hereditary, and generally they are identified by a careful family history. However, some familial MTCs are not easily detected by this means and underdiagnosis of MEN 2A is suspected. Methods DNA samples from MEN 2A patients were amplified by PCR. The products were incubated with the restriction enzyme Bst ApI or Bgl I. The samples were loaded in non-denaturing 10% Polyacrilamyde Gel and run at 120 volts for 40 min. The gels were stained with 10 μg/ml ethidium bromide, and the bands were visualized under a UV lamp. Results We developed a PCR-mutagenic method to check the integrity of the three bases of the cysteine 634 codon. Conclusion The method can be used to detect inherited mutations in MTC patients without a clear family history. The method is relatively simple to use as a routine test in these patients to decrease the underdiagnosis of MEN 2A. In addition, the assay can be used to screen affected families with any mutation in cysteine 634. PMID:12033991

  19. Diagnostic correlation between RET proto-oncogene mutation, imaging techniques, biochemical markers and morphological examination in MEN2A syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sovrea, Alina Simona; Dronca, Eleonora; Galatâr, Mihaela; Radian, Serban; Vornicescu, Corina; Georgescu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2) is a rare autosomal dominant monogenic disorder caused mostly by missense mutations in the RET (REarranged during Transfection) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. MEN2A represents more than 50% of all MEN2 cases, having a regular pattern with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) incidence of 90-100%, bilateral pheochromocytoma (PCC) incidence of 40-50% and primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) incidence of 10-25%. Until recently, the diagnosis of MTC was most frequently based on fine-needle aspiration of thyroid nodules, after an ultrasound examination and endocrine evaluation of serum calcitonin levels. Nowadays, RET gene screening (starting with exons 10 and 11) is a mandatory test used for identification of both symptomatic and non-symptomatic MTC carriers or for exclusion of healthy individuals from subsequent periodical clinical/biochemical screening. In this context, and in the idea of PCC preceding MTC, the early detection of germline RET mutations are highly suggestive for hereditary disease. PCC diagnosis is established in classical manner by abdominal ultrasound imaging or computed tomography confirming the presence of adrenal gland masses, elevated plasma metanephrines and normetanephrines values and histopathological examination. Additional HPT diagnosis is acknowledged by serum ionized calcium and parathormone levels. Here we report a hereditary case of MEN2A in a two-generation Romanian family, along with data presenting the importance of correlative plurifactorial diagnostic scheme in this syndrome and a short literature review. PMID:24969991

  20. The proto-oncogene Myc drives expression of the NK cell-activating NKp30 ligand B7-H6 in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Textor, Sonja; Bossler, Felicitas; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Pollmann, Julia; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Waldburger, Nina; Breuhahn, Kai; Golfier, Sven; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-07-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate effector cells that are able to recognize and eliminate tumor cells through engagement of their surface receptors. NKp30 is a potent activating NK cell receptor that elicits efficient NK cell-mediated target cell killing. Recently, B7-H6 was identified as tumor cell surface expressed ligand for NKp30. Enhanced B7-H6 mRNA levels are frequently detected in tumor compared to healthy tissues. To gain insight in the regulation of expression of B7-H6 in tumors, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms driving B7-H6 expression by promoter analyses. Using luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we mapped a functional binding site for Myc, a proto-oncogene overexpressed in certain tumors, in the B7-H6 promoter. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA/shRNA-mediated knock-down of c-Myc or N-Myc significantly decreased B7-H6 expression on a variety of tumor cells including melanoma, pancreatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In tumor cell lines from different origin and primary tumor tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), lymphoma and neuroblastoma, mRNA levels of c-Myc positively correlated with B7-H6 expression. Most importantly, upon inhibition or knock-down of c-Myc in tumor cells impaired NKp30-mediated degranulation of NK cells was observed. Thus, our data imply that Myc driven tumors could be targets for cancer immunotherapy exploiting the NKp30/B7-H6 axis. PMID:27622013

  1. The formation and characteristics of the i-motif structure within the promoter of the c-myb proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Hai, Jinhui; Zhou, Jiang; Yuan, Gu

    2016-09-01

    C-myb proto-oncogene is a potential therapeutic target for some human solid tumors and leukemias. A long cytosine-rich sequence, which locates the downstream of the transcription initiation site, is demonstrated to fold into an intramolecular i-motif DNA using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Effects of factors, including the pH value, the number of C:C(+) dimers, the concentration of buffer, the molecular crowding condition, and the coexistence of the complementary DNA, on the formation and the structural stability of the i-motif DNA are systematically studied. We have demonstrated that the i-motif folding in the c-myb promoter could be accelerated upon synergistic physiological stimuli including intracellular molecular crowding and low pH values, as well as the large number of the i-motif C:C(+) dimers. Meanwhile, various inputs, such as acids/bases and metal ions, have exhibited their abilities in controlling the conformational switch of the c-myb GC-rich DNA. Acidic pH values and the presence of K(+) ions can induce the dissociation of the double helix. Our present strategy can greatly extend the potential usages of i-motif DNA molecules with specific sequences as conformational switch-controlled devices. Moreover, this work demonstrates the superiority of CD spectroscopy associated with ESI-MS as a rapid, more cost-effective and sensitive structural change responsive method in the research of DNA conformational switching. PMID:27487467

  2. PBX2 and PBX3, new homeobox genes with extensive homology to the human proto-oncogene PBX1

    SciTech Connect

    Monica, K.; Galili, N.; Nourse, J.; Saltman, D.; Cleary, M.L. )

    1991-12-01

    Two new homeobox genes, PBX2 and PBX3, were isolated on the basis of their extensive homology to PBX1, a novel human homeobox gene involved in t(1;19) translocation in acute pre-B-cell leukemias. The predicted pbx2 and pbx3 proteins are 92 and 94% identical to Pbx1 over a large region of 266 amino acids within and flanking their homeodomains, but all three proteins diverge significantly near their amino and carboxy termini. Chromosome in situ hybridizations demonstrated that the PBX genes are not clustered but map to separate chromosomal loci: PBX1, 1q23; PBX2, 3q22-23; PBX3, 9q33-34. Expression of PBX2 or PBX3 was not restricted to particular states of differentiation or development, as mRNA transcripts of these genes were detected in most fetal and adult tissues and all cell lines, unlike PBX1, which is not expressed in lymphoid cell lines. Similar to PBX1RNA, PBX3 RNA is alternatively spliced to yield two translation products with different carboxy termini, a feature not observed for PBX2. Their extensive sequence similarity and widespread expression suggest a generalized, overlapping role for Pbx proteins in most cell types. Differences in their amino and carboxy termini may modulate their activities, mediated in part by differential splicing and, for PBX1, protein fusion following t(1;19) chromosomal translocation.

  3. The proto-oncogene PBF binds p53 and is associated with prognostic features in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, Martin L; Seed, Robert I; Modasia, Bhavika; Kwan, Perkin P K; Sharma, Neil; Smith, Vicki E; Watkins, Rachel J; Bansal, Sukhchain; Gagliano, Teresa; Stratford, Anna L; Ismail, Tariq; Wakelam, Michael J O; Kim, Dae S; Ward, Stephen T; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; Turnell, Andrew S; McCabe, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The PTTG1-binding factor (PBF) is a transforming gene capable of eliciting tumor formation in xenograft models. However, the precise role of PBF in tumorigenesis and its prognostic value as a cancer biomarker remain largely uncharacterised, particularly in malignancies outside the thyroid. Here, we provide the first evidence that PBF represents a promising prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. Examination of a total of 39 patients demonstrated higher PBF expression at both the mRNA (P = 0.009) and protein (P < 0.0001) level in colorectal tumors compared to matched normal tissue. Critically, PBF was most abundant in colorectal tumors associated with Extramural Vascular Invasion (EMVI), increased genetic instability (GI) and somatic TP53 mutations, all features linked with recurrence and poorer patient survival. We further demonstrate by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation that PBF binds to the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as to p53 mutants (Δ126-132, M133K, V197E, G245D, I255F and R273C) identified in the colorectal tumors. Importantly, overexpression of PBF in colorectal HCT116 cells interfered with the transcriptional activity of p53-responsive genes such as mdm2, p21 and sfn. Diminished p53 stability (> 90%; P < 0.01) was also evident with a concurrent increase in ubiquitinated p53. Human colorectal tumors with wild-type TP53 and high PBF expression also had low p53 protein levels (P < 0.05), further emphasizing a putative interaction between these genes in vivo. Overall, these results demonstrate an emerging role for PBF in colorectal tumorigenesis through regulating p53 activity, with implications for PBF as a prognostic indicator for invasive tumors. PMID:25408419

  4. Activation of the proto-oncogene p60c-src by point mutations in the SH2 domain.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, M C; Fukui, Y; Hanafusa, H

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the importance of a conserved region spanning residues 137 to 241 in the noncatalytic domain of p60c-src (SH2 region), we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to change residues that are highly conserved in this region. Chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with a p60c-src variant containing arginine instead of tryptophan at residue 148 (W148R) appeared more rounded than cells overexpressing a normal c-src gene, and they formed colonies in soft agar. p60c-src variants containing serine instead of arginine at residue 155 (R155S) or isoleucine instead of glycine at residue 170 (G170I) also appeared transformed and were anchorage independent, but to a lesser extent than W148R. Mutation of residue 201 from histidine to leucine (H201L) had no observable effect. The in vitro kinase activity of cells infected with W148R or G170I was elevated twofold. Expression of p60W148R (or, to a lesser extent, of p60G170I) increased the number of proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in infected cells. All of the mutants were phosphorylated in vivo on Tyr-527, instead of Tyr-416 as observed for p60v-src. Immunoprecipitated p60W148R and p60G170I were found to be associated with a phosphatidylinositol kinase activity, a factor which appears to be necessary for transformation by tyrosine-specific protein kinases. These results show that a single point mutation in the SH2 region of the cellular src gene can activate its transforming potential. This type of activation is in a new category of alterations at the amino terminus that activate but do not cause a shift in phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus. Images PMID:2111444

  5. Modulation of c-fms proto-oncogene in an ovarian carcinoma cell line by a hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Y.; Morishita, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Tamaya, T.

    1997-01-01

    Co-expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and its receptor (c-fms) is often found in ovarian epithelial carcinoma, suggesting the existence of autocrine regulation of cell growth by M-CSF. To block this autocrine loop, we have developed hammerhead ribozymes against c-fms mRNA. As target sites of the ribozyme, we chose the GUC sequence in codon 18 and codon 27 of c-fms mRNA. Two kinds of ribozymes were able to cleave an artificial c-fms RNA substrate in a cell-free system, although the ribozyme against codon 18 was much more efficient than that against codon 27. We next constructed an expression vector carrying a ribozyme sequence that targeted the GUC sequence in codon 18 of c-fms mRNA. It was introduced into TYK-nu cells that expressed M-CSF and its receptor. Its transfectant showed a reduced growth potential. The expression levels of c-fms protein and mRNA in the transfectant were clearly decreased with the expression of ribozyme RNA compared with that of an untransfected control or a transfectant with the vector without the ribozyme sequence. These results suggest that the ribozyme against GUC in codon 18 of c-fms mRNA is a promising tool for blocking the autocrine loop of M-CSF in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9376277

  6. G-quadruplex formation within the promoter of the KRAS proto-oncogene and its effect on transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2006-01-01

    In human and mouse, the promoter of the KRAS gene contains a nuclease hypersensitive polypurine–polypyrimidine element (NHPPE) that is essential for transcription. An interesting feature of the polypurine G-rich strand of NHPPE is its ability to assume an unusual DNA structure that, according to circular dichroism (CD) and DMS footprinting experiments, is attributed to an intramolecular parallel G-quadruplex, consisting of three G-tetrads and three loops. The human and mouse KRAS NHPPE G-rich strands display melting temperature of 64 and 73°C, respectively, as well as a K+-dependent capacity to arrest DNA polymerase. Photocleavage and CD experiments showed that the cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 stacks to the external G-tetrads of the KRAS quadruplexes, increasing the Tm by ∼20°C. These findings raise the intriguing question that the G-quadruplex formed within the NHPPE of KRAS may be involved in the regulation of transcription. Indeed, transfection experiments showed that the activity of the mouse KRAS promoter is reduced to 20% of control, in the presence of the quadruplex-stabilizing TMPyP4. In addition, we found that G-rich oligonucleotides mimicking the KRAS quadruplex, but not the corresponding 4-base mutant sequences or oligonucleotides forming quadruplexes with different structures, competed with the NHPPE duplex for binding to nuclear proteins. When vector pKRS-413, containing CAT driven by the mouse KRAS promoter, and KRAS quadruplex oligonucleotides were co-transfected in 293 cells, the expression of CAT was found to be downregulated to 40% of the control. On the basis of these data, we propose that the NHPPE of KRAS exists in equilibrium between a double-stranded form favouring transcription and a folded quadruplex form, which instead inhibits transcription. Such a mechanism, which is probably adopted by other growth-related genes, provides useful hints for the rational design of anticancer drugs against the KRAS oncogene. PMID:16687659

  7. Identification of the miR-106b∼25 MicroRNA Cluster as a Proto-Oncogenic PTEN-Targeting Intron That Cooperates with Its Host Gene MCM7 in Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Poliseno, Laura; Salmena, Leonardo; Riccardi, Luisa; Fornari, Alessandro; Song, Min Sup; Hobbs, Robin M.; Sportoletti, Paolo; Varmeh, Shorheh; Egia, Ainara; Fedele, Giuseppe; Rameh, Lucia; Loda, Massimo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) is a tumor suppressor that antagonizes signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase–Akt pathway. We have demonstrated that subtle decreases in PTEN abundance can have critical consequences for tumorigenesis. Here, we used a computational approach to identify miR-22, miR-25, and miR-302 as three PTEN-targeting microRNA (miRNA) families found within nine genomic loci. We showed that miR-22 and the miR-106b∼25 cluster are aberrantly overexpressed in human prostate cancer, correlate with abundance of the miRNA processing enzyme DICER, and potentiate cellular transformation both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that the intronic miR-106b∼25 cluster cooperates with its host gene MCM7 in cellular transformation both in vitro and in vivo, so that the concomitant overexpression of MCM7 and the miRNA cluster triggers prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in transgenic mice. Therefore, the MCM7 gene locus delivers two simultaneous oncogenic insults when amplified or overexpressed in human cancer. Thus, we have uncovered a proto-oncogenic miRNA-dependent network for PTEN regulation and defined the MCM7 locus as a critical factor in initiating prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:20388916

  8. The Jak2V617F oncogene associated with myeloproliferative diseases requires a functional FERM domain for transformation and for expression of the Myc and Pim proto-oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wernig, Gerlinde; Gonneville, Jeffrey R.; Crowley, Brian J.; Rodrigues, Margret S.; Reddy, Mamatha M.; Hudon, Heidi E.; Walz, Christoph; Reiter, Andreas; Podar, Klaus; Royer, Yohan; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Griffin, James D.; Gilliland, D. Gary

    2008-01-01

    The V617F activating point mutation in Jak2 is associated with a proportion of myeloproliferative disorders. In normal hematopoietic cells, Jak2 signals only when associated with a growth factor receptor, such as the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR). We sought to identify the molecular requirements for activation of Jak2V617F by introducing a point mutation in the FERM domain (Y114A), required for receptor binding. Whereas BaF3.EpoR cells are readily transformed by Jak2V617F to Epo independence, we found that the addition of the FERM domain mutation blocked transformation and the induction of reactive oxygen species. Further, while cells expressing Jak2V617F had constitutive activation of STAT5, cells expressing Jak2V617F/Y114A did not, suggesting that signaling is defective at a very proximal level. In addition, expression of the Myc and Pim proto-oncogenes by Jak2V617F was found to be FERM domain dependent. An inducible constitutively active STAT5 mutant expressed in BaF3 cells was sufficient to induce Myc and Pim. Finally, the FERM domain in Jak2V617F was also required for abnormal hematopoiesis in transduced primary murine fetal liver cells. Overall, our results suggest that constitutive activation of Jak2 requires an intact FERM domain for a transforming phenotype, and is necessary for activation of the major target of Jak2, STAT5. PMID:18216297

  9. A Founding Locus within the RET Proto-Oncogene May Account for a Large Proportion of Apparently Sporadic Hirschsprung Disease and a Subset of Cases of Sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Borrego, Salud; Wright, Fred A.; Fernández, Raquel M.; Williams, Nita; López-Alonso, Manuel; Davuluri, Ramana; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Eng, Charis

    2003-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a common congenital disorder characterized by aganglionosis of the gut. The seemingly unrelated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma, and hyperparathyroidism. Yet, germline mutations in the RET proto-oncogene are associated with both MEN 2 and HSCR. In the former, gain-of-function mutations in a limited set of codons is found, whereas, in the latter, loss-of-function mutations are found. However, germline RET mutation is associated with only 3% of a population-based series of isolated HSCR, and little is known about susceptibility to sporadic MTC. We have found previously that specific haplotypes comprising RET coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) comprising exon 2 SNP A45A were strongly associated with HSCR, whereas haplotypes associated with exon 14 SNP S836S were associated with MTC. In this study, we describe three novel intron 1 SNPs, and, together with the coding SNP haplotypes, the data suggest the presence of distinct ancestral haplotypes for HSCR and sporadic MTC in linkage disequilibrium with a putative founding susceptibility locus/loci. The data are consistent with the presence of a very ancient, low-penetrance founder locus ∼20–30 kb upstream of SNP A45A, but the failure of the SNPs to span the locus presents challenges in modeling mode of transmission or ancestry. We postulate that this founding locus is germane to both isolated HSCR and MTC but also that different mutations in this locus would predispose to one or the other. PMID:12474140

  10. Degradation of the proto-oncogene product p39mos is not necessary for cyclin proteolysis and exit from meiotic metaphase: requirement for a Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent event.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Galas, S; Fesquet, D; Devault, A; Cavadore, J C; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Exit from M phase, which requires cyclin degradation, is prevented from occurring in unfertilized eggs of vertebrates arrested at second meiotic metaphase due to a cytostatic factor recently identified as p39mos, the product of the proto-oncogene c-mos. Calpain can destroy both p39mos and cyclin in vitro in extracts prepared from metaphase-arrested Xenopus eggs, but only when free Ca2+ concentration is raised to the millimolar range. When free Ca2+ concentration is raised for only 30 s to the micromolar range, as occurs in physiological conditions after fertilization, cyclin degradation is induced, byt p39mos is not degraded. Cyclin proteolysis at micromolar free Ca2+, is not inhibited by calpastatin, and therefore does not involve calpain. A cyclin mutant modified in the destruction box is found to be resistant at micromolar, but not millimolar free Ca2+, suggesting that the ubiquitin pathway mediates cyclin degradation at micromolar Ca2+ concentration whereas calpain is involved at the millimolar level. A synthetic peptide which binds Ca(2+)-calmodulin with high affinity suppresses cyclin degradation at micromolar but not millimolar free Ca2+, and this only when it is present in the extract during the first 30 s after raising free Ca2+ concentration. The inhibition of the cyclin degradation pathway by the Ca(2+)-calmodulin binding peptide can be overcome by adding calmodulin. These results strongly suggest that a Ca(2+)-calmodulin process is required as an early event following fertilization to release the cyclin degradation pathway from inhibition in metaphase-arrested eggs. In contrast, p39mos degradation is not required. Images PMID:1829675

  11. The cell survival pathways of the primordial RNA–DNA complex remain conserved in the extant genomes and may function as proto-oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Malignantly transformed (cancer) cells of multicellular hosts, including human cells, operate activated biochemical pathways that recognizably derived from unicellular ancestors. The descendant heat shock proteins of thermophile archaea now chaperon oncoproteins. The ABC cassettes of toxin-producer zooxantella Symbiodinia algae pump out the cytoplasmic toxin molecules; malignantly transformed cells utilize the derivatives of these cassettes to get rid of chemotherapeuticals. High mobility group helix–loop–helix proteins, protein arginine methyltransferases, proliferating cell nuclear antigens, and Ki-67 nuclear proteins, that protect and repair DNA in unicellular life forms, support oncogenes in transformed cells. The cell survival pathways of Wnt–β-catenin, Hedgehog, PI3K, MAPK–ERK, STAT, Ets, JAK, Pak, Myb, achaete scute, circadian rhythms, Bruton kinase and others, which are physiological in uni- and early multicellular eukaryotic life forms, are constitutively encoded in complex oncogenic pathways in selected single cells of advanced multicellular eukaryotic hosts. Oncogenes and oncoproteins in advanced multicellular hosts recreate selected independently living and immortalized unicellular life forms, which are similar to extinct and extant protists. These unicellular life forms are recognized at the clinics as autologous “cancer cells”. PMID:25883792

  12. The cell survival pathways of the primordial RNA-DNA complex remain conserved in the extant genomes and may function as proto-oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, J G

    2015-03-01

    Malignantly transformed (cancer) cells of multicellular hosts, including human cells, operate activated biochemical pathways that recognizably derived from unicellular ancestors. The descendant heat shock proteins of thermophile archaea now chaperon oncoproteins. The ABC cassettes of toxin-producer zooxantella Symbiodinia algae pump out the cytoplasmic toxin molecules; malignantly transformed cells utilize the derivatives of these cassettes to get rid of chemotherapeuticals. High mobility group helix-loop-helix proteins, protein arginine methyltransferases, proliferating cell nuclear antigens, and Ki-67 nuclear proteins, that protect and repair DNA in unicellular life forms, support oncogenes in transformed cells. The cell survival pathways of Wnt-β-catenin, Hedgehog, PI3K, MAPK-ERK, STAT, Ets, JAK, Pak, Myb, achaete scute, circadian rhythms, Bruton kinase and others, which are physiological in uni- and early multicellular eukaryotic life forms, are constitutively encoded in complex oncogenic pathways in selected single cells of advanced multicellular eukaryotic hosts. Oncogenes and oncoproteins in advanced multicellular hosts recreate selected independently living and immortalized unicellular life forms, which are similar to extinct and extant protists. These unicellular life forms are recognized at the clinics as autologous "cancer cells". PMID:25883792

  13. Alternative splicing within the chicken c-ets-1 locus: implications for transduction within the E26 retrovirus of the c-ets proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Leprince, D; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Li, R P; Henry, C; Flourens, A; Debuire, B; Stehelin, D

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping c-ets-1 cDNA clones were isolated which contained the alpha and beta genomic sequences homologous to the 5' end of v-ets not detected in the previously described c-ets RNA species or proteins. Nucleotide sequencing demonstrated that these cDNAs corresponded to the splicing of alpha and beta to a common set of 3' exons (a through F) already found in the p54c-ets-1 mRNA. They contained an open reading frame of 1,455 nucleotides which could encode a polypeptide of 485 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53 kilodaltons. However, when expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNAs directed the synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular mass in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 68 kilodaltons, p68c-ets-1, comigrating with a protein expressed at low levels in normal chicken spleen cells. These two proteins were shown to be identical by partial digestion with protease V8. Northern (RNA) blot hybridization analysis with the p68c-ets-1 -specific sequence and RNase protection experiments showed that the corresponding mRNA was expressed in normal chicken spleen and not in normal chicken thymus or in various T lymphoid cell lines. Thus, two closely related proteins, having distinct amino-terminal parts, are generated within the same locus by alternative addition of different 5' exons, alpha and beta or I54, respectively, onto a common set of 3' exons (a to F). Finally, we demonstrate that an aberrant splicing event between a cryptic splice donor site in c-myb exon E6 and the normal splice acceptor site of c-ets-1 exon alpha involved in the genesis of the E26 myb-ets sequence. Images PMID:2841475

  14. Molecular cloning of the human proto-oncogene Wnt-5A and mapping of the gene (WNT5A) to chromosome 3p14-p21

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.C.; Cohen, I.; Eichstetter, I.; Cannizzaro, L.A.; Iozzo, R.V. ); McPherson, J.D.; Wasmuth, J.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The highly conserved Wnt genes belong to a widely distributed family of presumptive signaling molecules that have been implicated not only in the regulation of normal pattern formation during embryogenesis and differentiation of cell lineages, but also in oncogenic events. All of the known vertebrate Wnt genes encode for 38- to 43-kDa cysteine-rich putative glycoproteins, which have features typical of secreted growth factors: A hydrophobic signal sequence, a conserved asparagine-linked oligosaccharide consensus sequence, and 22 conserved cysteine residues whose relative spacing is maintained. In this study, the authors report the cloning and sequencing of several overlapping cDNAs encoding [approximately]4.1 kb of the human homologue of Wnt-5A. The mature protein contained 343 residues (M[sub r] [approximately] 38,000 excluding any post-translational modifications) with a >93% homology to the reported sequences of other Wnt-5A proteins (>99% homologous to mouse Wnt-5A). This protein maintained certain features - a hydrophobic signal sequence, the Wnt-1 family [open quotes]signature sequence[close quotes] (CKCHGvSGSC), and a number of other conserved amino acid residues - 24 cysteine residues, 4 asparagine-linked oligosaccharide consensus sequences, and a tyrosine sulfation site - that have been found in all other Wnt-5A proteins. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA from a variety of human embryonic, neonatal, and adult cells and/or tissues showed that human Wnt-5A expression was detected only in neonatal heart and lung. It may be relevant, however, that the 3[prime]-untranslated region contained numerous AT-rich motifs that could be involved in the rapid degradation of mRNA. Finally, using a combination of Southern blotting, PCR amplification, and in situ hybridization, the human Wnt-5A (WNT5A) gene was mapped to chromosome 3p14-p21. 36 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Down-regulation of the PTTG1 proto-oncogene contributes to the melanoma suppressive effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor PHA-848125.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Simona; Alvino, Ester; Levati, Lauretta; Esposito, Alessia I; Ciomei, Marina; Brasca, Maria G; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Desideri, Marianna; Bonmassar, Enzo; Pfeffer, Ulrich; D'Atri, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that PHA-848125, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor presently under Phase II clinical investigation, impairs melanoma cell growth. In this study, gene expression profiling showed that PHA-848125 significantly modulated the expression of 128 genes, predominantly involved in cell cycle control, in the highly drug-sensitive GL-Mel (p53 wild-type) melanoma cells. Up-regulation of 4 selected genes (PDCD4, SESN2, DDIT4, DEPDC6), and down-regulation of 6 selected genes (PTTG1, CDC25A, AURKA, AURKB, PLK1, BIRC5) was confirmed at protein levels. The same protein analysis performed in PHA-848125-treated M10 melanoma cells - p53 mutated and less sensitive to the drug than GL-Mel cells - revealed no DEPDC6 expression and no changes of PTTG1, PDCD4 and BIRC5 levels. Upon PHA-848125 treatment, a marked PTTG1 down-modulation was also observed in A375 cells (p53 wild-type) but not in CN-Mel cells (p53 mutated). PTTG1 silencing significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced senescence, with effects less pronounced in p53 mutated cells. PTTG1 silencing increased PHA-848125 sensitivity of p53 mutated cells but not that of A375 or GL-Mel cells. Accordingly, in M10 but not in A375 cells a higher level of senescence was detected in PHA-848125-treated/PTTG1-silenced cells with respect to PHA-848125-treated controls. In A375 and GL-Mel cells, TP53 silencing attenuated PHA-848125-induced down-modulation of PTTG1 and decreased cell sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate that PHA-848125-induced down-regulation of PTTG1 depends, at least in part, on p53 function and contributes to the antiproliferative activity of the drug. Our study provides further molecular insight into the antitumor mechanism of PHA-848125. PMID:22704958

  16. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta stimulates hepatic jun-B and fos-B proto-oncogenes and decreases albumin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, R D; Sheng, H M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C

    1992-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates some components of the acute phase response in hepatic cells. The mechanisms for these actions of TGF-beta are largely unknown. The authors recently found that the decrease in albumin mRNA after TGF-beta 1 treatment required de novo RNA and protein synthesis, suggesting that TGF-beta acts through induction of another gene. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether TGF-beta 1 could regulate the expression of both the jun and fos genes that encode transcriptional regulatory proteins that constitute the AP-1 complex, and to determine whether expression of these genes may be coordinated with the decrease in albumin mRNA. Northern blot hybridization was used to determine levels of specific mRNAs. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 increased the levels of both jun-B and fos-B mRNA by 60 minutes after treatment of mouse hepatoma (BWTG3) cells. When TGF-beta 1 was removed from the media after 4 hours, there was a sustained effect of increased jun-B and decreased albumin mRNA (greater than 48 hours), and the subsequent decrease in jun-B levels coincided with the increase in albumin mRNA. The tumor-promoting phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA]), known to induce jun and fos gene expression, caused increases in jun-B and fos-B that preceded the decrease in albumin mRNA levels at 24 hours. These observations are consistent with our hypothesis that jun-B and fos-B induction may participate in downregulation of albumin synthesis as well as other hepatic responses to TGF-beta. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIG. 4. FIG. 5. FIG. 6. PMID:1417179

  17. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  18. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1–3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  19. Overexpression of proto-oncogene FBI-1 activates membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase in association with adverse outcome in ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background FBI-1 (factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of human immunodeficiency virus-1) is a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors and play important roles in cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that FBI-1 is expressed at high levels in a subset of human lymphomas and some epithelial solid tumors. However, the function of FBI-1 in human ovarian cancers remains elusive. Results In this study, we investigated the role of FBI-1 in human ovarian cancers, in particularly, its function in cancer cell invasion via modulating membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). Significantly higher FBI-1 protein and mRNA expression levels were demonstrated in ovarian cancers samples and cell lines compared with borderline tumors and benign cystadenomas. Increased FBI-1 mRNA expression was correlated significantly with gene amplification (P = 0.037). Moreover, higher FBI-1 expression was found in metastatic foci (P = 0.036) and malignant ascites (P = 0.021), and was significantly associated with advanced stage (P = 0.012), shorter overall survival (P = 0.032) and disease-free survival (P = 0.016). In vitro, overexpressed FBI-1 significantly enhanced cell migration and invasion both in OVCA 420 and SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells, irrespective of p53 status, accompanied with elevated expression of MT1-MMP, but not MMP-2 or TIMP-2. Moreover, knockdown of MT1-MMP abolished FBI-1-mediated cell migration and invasion. Conversely, stable knockdown of FBI-1 remarkably reduced the motility of these cells with decreased expression of MT1-MMP. Promoter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study indicated that FBI-1 could directly interact with the promoter spanning ~600bp of the 5'-flanking sequence of MT1-MMP and enhanced its expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, stable knockdown and ectopic expression of FBI-1 decreased and increased cell proliferation respectively in OVCA 420, but not in

  20. Topical application of preparations containing DNA repair enzymes prevents ultraviolet-induced telomere shortening and c-FOS proto-oncogene hyperexpression in human skin: an experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Enzo; Altabas, Velimir; Altabas, Karmela; Berardesca, Enzo

    2013-09-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is one of the most important risk factors for skin aging and increases the risk of malignant transformation. Telomere shortening and an altered expression of the proto-oncogene c-FOS are among the key molecular mechanisms associated with photoaging and tumorigenesis. Photolyase from A. nidulans and endonuclease from M. luteus are xenogenic DNA repair enzymes which can reverse the molecular events associated with skin aging and carcinogenosis caused by UVR exposure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the topical application of preparations containing DNA repair enzymes may prevent UVR-induced acute telomere shortening and FOS gene hyperexpression in human skin biopsies. Twelve volunteers (Fitzpatrick skin types I and II) were enrolled for this experimental study, and six circular areas (10 mm diameter) were marked out on the nonexposed lower back of each participant. One site was left untreated (site 1: negative control), whereas the remaining five sites (designated sites 2-6) were exposed to solar-simulated UVR at 3 times the MED on four consecutive days. Site 2 received UVR only (site 2: positive control), whereas the following products were applied to sites 3-6, respectively: vehicle (moisturizer base cream; applied both 30 minutes before and immediately after each irradiation; site 3); a traditional sunscreen (SS, SPF 50) 30 minutes before irradiation and a vehicle immediately after irradiation (site 4); a SS 30 minutes before irradiation and an endonuclease preparation immediately after irradiation (site 5); a SS plus photolyase 30 minutes before irradiation and an endonuclease preparation immediately after irradiation (site 6). Skin biopsies were taken 24 h after the last irradiation. The degree of telomere shortening and c-FOS gene expression were measured in all specimens. Strikingly, the combined use of a SS plus photolyase 30 minutes before irradiation and an endonuclease preparation

  1. The trk Tyrosine Protein Kinase Mediates the Mitogenic Properties of Nerve Growth Factor and Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Tapley, Peter; Jing, Shuqian; Nanduri, Venkata; O’Rourke, Edward; Lamballe, Fabienne; Kovary, Karla; Klein, Rüdiger; Jones, Kevin R.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Barbacid, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Summary The product of the trk proto-oncogene encodes a receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF). Here we show that NGF is a powerful mitogen that can induce resting NIH 3T3 cells to enter S phase, grow in semisolid medium, and become morphologically transformed. These mitogenic effects are absolutely dependent on expression of gp140trk receptors, but do not require the presence of the previously described low affinity NGF receptor. gp140trk also serves as a receptor for the related factor neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), but not for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Both NGF and NT-3 induce the rapid phosphorylation of gp140trk receptors and the transient expression of c-Fos proteins. However, NT-3 appears to elicit more limited mitogenic responses than NGF. These results indicate that the product of the trk proto-oncogene is sufficient to mediate signal transduction processes induced by NGF and NT-3, at least in proliferating cells. PMID:1649007

  2. High Pressure NMR Methods for Characterizing Functional Substates of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proteins usually exist in multiple conformational states in solution. High pressure NMR spectroscopy is a well-suited method to identify these states. In addition, these states can be characterized by their thermodynamic parameters, the free enthalpies at ambient pressure, the partial molar volumes, and the partial molar compressibility that can be obtained from the analysis of the high pressure NMR data. Two main types of states of proteins exist, functional states and folding states. There is a strong link between these two types, the functional states represent essential folding states (intermediates), other folding states may have no functional meaning (optional folding states). In this chapter, this concept is tested on the Ras protein, an important proto-oncogen in humans where all substates required by theory can be identified experimentally by high pressure NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we show how these data can be used to develop allosteric inhibitors of proteins. PMID:26174382

  3. Identification of a second promoter in the human c-ets-2 proto-oncogene.

    PubMed

    Bègue, A; Crepieux, P; Vu-Dac, N; Hautefeuille, A; Spruyt, N; Laudet, V; Stehelin, D

    1997-01-01

    We localized and characterized a new regulatory element with promoter activity in the human c-ets-2 intron 1. This promoter governs the expression of 5' divergent c-ets-2 transcripts through multiple start sites dispersed within 300 bp. Among the multiple start sites detected, three are major transcriptional initiation points. We detected transcripts initiated from this new promoter in various cell lines such as COLO 320, NBE, or HepG2 cells. This promoter exhibits transcriptional activity when linked to the CAT gene, and deletion constructs reveal that it contains activating and repressing elements. The sequence of the promoter reveals putative binding sites for ETS, MYB, GATA, and Oct factors. In addition, we show that this promoter is functionally conserved in the chicken. PMID:9495315

  4. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  5. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. )

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  6. THE ROLE OF THE PROTO-ONCOGENE ETS2 IN ACUTE MEGAKARYOCYTIC LEUKEMIA BIOLOGY AND THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yubin; LaFiura, Katherine M.; Dombkowski, Alan A.; Chen, Qing; Payton, Scott G.; Buck, Steven A.; Salagrama, Sridevi; Diakiw, Amy E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Down syndrome (DS) children has several unique features including a predominance of the acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) phenotype, higher event-free survivals compared to non-DS children using cytosine arabinoside (ara-C)/anthracycline-based protocols, and a uniform presence of somatic mutations in the X-linked transcription factor gene, GATA1. Several chromosome 21-localized transcription factor oncogenes including ETS2 may contribute to the unique features of DS AMkL. ETS2 transcripts measured by real-time RT-PCR were 1.8- and 4.1-fold, respectively, higher in DS and non-DS megakaryoblasts than those in non-DS myeloblasts. In a doxycycline-inducible erythroleukemia cell line, K562pTet-on/ETS2, induction of ETS2 resulted in an erythroid to megakaryocytic phenotypic switch independent of GATA1 levels. Microarray analysis of doxycycline induced and uninduced cells revealed an upregulation by ETS2 of cytokines (e.g. interleukin 1 and CSF2) and transcription factors (e.g. TAL1), which are key regulators of megakaryocytic differentiation. In the K562pTet-on/ETS2 cells, ETS2 induction conferred differences in sensitivities to ara-C and daunorubicin, depending on GATA1 levels. These results suggest that ETS2 expression is linked to the biology of AMkL in both DS and non-DS children, and acts by regulating expression of hematopoietic lineage and transcription factor genes involved in erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis, and in chemotherapy sensitivities. PMID:18094719

  7. A Comprehensive Review of Mutations in the MERTK Proto-Oncogene.

    PubMed

    Parinot, Célia; Nandrot, Emeline F

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis and elimination of shed aged photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by retinal pigment epithelial cells is crucial for photoreceptor function and survival. Genetic studies on a natural animal model of recessive retinal degeneration allowed the identification of MerTK, the gene encoding the surface receptor required for POS internalization. Following this discovery, screenings of DNA samples from patients have revealed that MERTK mutations cause retinal degenerations in humans. MERTK patients present some of the classical symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa, but it is atypical in that the disease develops very early during childhood and the macula is also involved early on. Therefore, the phenotype ought to be qualified as a rod-cone dystrophy. Recently, MERTK has been implicated in various types of cancers and sclerosis. This review identifies the different MERTK mutations known so far and describes associated pathologies. PMID:26427420

  8. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  9. Vav3 proto-oncogene deficiency leads to sympathetic hyperactivity and cardiovascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sauzeau, Vincent; Sevilla, María A; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; de Álava, Enrique; Montero, María J; López-Novoa, José M; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2007-01-01

    Although much is known about environmental factors that predispose individuals to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, little information is available regarding the genetic and signaling events involved1-3. Indeed, few genes associated with the progression of these pathologies have been discovered despite intensive research in animal models and human populations1-3. Here we identify Vav3, a GDP-GTP exchange factor that stimulates Rho and Rac GTPases4, as an essential factor regulating the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system.Vav3-deficient mice exhibited tachycardia, systemic arterial hypertension and extensive cardiovascular remodeling. These mice also showed hyperactivity of sympathetic neurons from the time of birth. The high catecholamine levels associated with this condition led to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system, increased levels of kidney-related hormones and the progressive loss of cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with drugs targeting sympathetic and renin-angiotensin responses confirmed the causative role and hierarchy of these events in the development of theVav3-null mouse phenotype. These observations uncover the crucial role of Vav3 in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and cardiovascular physiology, and reveal a signaling pathway that could be involved in the pathophysiology of human disease states involving tachycardia and sympathetic hyperactivity with unknown etiologies2,5,6. PMID:16767097

  10. Meis proteins are major in vivo DNA binding partners for wild-type but not chimeric Pbx proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C P; Jacobs, Y; Nakamura, T; Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Cleary, M L

    1997-01-01

    The Pbx1 and Meis1 proto-oncogenes code for divergent homeodomain proteins that are targets for oncogenic mutations in human and murine leukemias, respectively, and implicated by genetic analyses to functionally collaborate with Hox proteins during embryonic development and/or oncogenesis. Although Pbx proteins have been shown to dimerize with Hox proteins and modulate their DNA binding properties in vitro, the biochemical compositions of endogenous Pbx-containing complexes have not been determined. In the present study, we demonstrate that Pbx and Meis proteins form abundant complexes that comprise a major Pbx-containing DNA binding activity in nuclear extracts of cultured cells and mouse embryos. Pbx1 and Meis1 dimerize in solution and cooperatively bind bipartite DNA sequences consisting of directly adjacent Pbx and Meis half sites. Pbx1-Meis1 heterodimers display distinctive DNA binding specificities and cross-bind to a subset of Pbx-Hox sites, including those previously implicated as response elements for the execution of Pbx-dependent Hox programs in vivo. Chimeric oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 is unable to bind DNA with Meis1, due to the deletion of amino-terminal Pbx1 sequences following fusion with E2a. We conclude that Meis proteins are preferred in vivo DNA binding partners for wild-type Pbx1, a relationship that is circumvented by its oncogenic counterpart E2a-Pbx1. PMID:9315626

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein mediates yes-associated protein 1 upregulation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Junhe; Zhang, Huaihong; Zhai, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) is implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP) is an important proto-oncogene, which is a downstream effector molecule in the Hippo signaling pathway. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between HBx expression in HCC samples and YAP expression in the Hippo pathway. A total of 20 pathologically confirmed HCC samples, 20 corresponding adjacent non-tumor liver tissues and 5 normal liver tissue samples were collected. The expression of HBx and YAP in the tissues was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The intensity and location of YAP expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. YAP mRNA and protein expression levels in HCC samples infected with HBV were significantly higher than those of normal liver tissues. Furthermore, YAP expression was positively correlated with HBx expression in HBV-positive HCC samples. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that YAP was predominantly expressed in the nuclei in HBV-positive HCC tissues. YAP expression was significantly decreased in the normal liver tissue and corresponding adjacent liver tissue when compared with the HCC tissues and by contrast to HCC tissues, YAP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm. In conclusion, these results indicate that the YAP gene is a key driver of HBx-induced liver cancer. Therefore, YAP may present a novel target in the treatment of HBV-associated HCC.

  12. Novel interactions between erythroblast macrophage protein and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Yeboah, Fred; Lee, Youngil; Soni, Shivani

    2016-09-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein is a novel protein known to mediate attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages to form erythroblastic islands in bone marrow during erythropoiesis. Emp-null macrophages are small with round morphologies, and lack cytoplasmic projections which imply immature structure. The role of Emp in macrophage development and function is not fully elucidated. Macrophages perform varied functions (e.g. homeostasis, erythropoiesis), and are implicated in numerous pathophysiological conditions such as cellular malignancy. The objective of the current study is to investigate the interaction of Emp with cytoskeletal- and cell migration-associated proteins involved in macrophage functions. A short hairpin RNA lentiviral system was use to down-regulate the expression of Emp in macrophage cells. A cell migration assay revealed that the relocation of macrophages was significantly inhibited when Emp expression was decreased. To further analyze changes in gene expression related to cell motility, PCR array was performed by down-regulating Emp expression. The results indicated that expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 were significantly higher when Emp was down-regulated. The results implicate Emp in abnormal cell motility, thus, warrants to assess its role in cancer where tumor cell motility is required for invasion and metastasis. PMID:27519940

  13. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  14. miRNAs Need a Trim : Regulation of miRNA Activity by Trim-NHL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interaction domain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology. PMID:21755476

  15. MiRNA need a TRIM regulation of miRNA activity by Trim-NHL proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interactiondomain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology. PMID:21627033

  16. Translocation of a store of maternal cytoplasmic c-myc protein into nuclei during early development.

    PubMed Central

    Gusse, M; Ghysdael, J; Evan, G; Soussi, T; Méchali, M

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is expressed as a maternal protein during oogenesis in Xenopus laevis, namely, in nondividing cells. A delayed translation of c-myc mRNA accumulated in early oocytes results in the accumulation of the protein during late oogenesis. The oocyte c-myc protein is unusually stable and is located in the cytoplasm, contrasting with its features in somatic cells. A mature oocyte contains a maternal c-myc protein stockpile of 4 x 10(5) to 6 x 10(5) times the level in a somatic growing cell. This level of c-myc protein is preserved only during the cleavage stage of the embryo. Fertilization triggers its rapid migration into the nuclei of the cleaving embryo and a change in the phosphorylation state of the protein. The c-myc protein content per nucleus decreases exponentially during the cleavage stage until a stoichiometric titration by the embryonic nuclei is reached during a 0.5-h period at the midblastula stage. Most of the maternal c-myc store is degraded by the gastrula stage. These observations implicate the participation of c-myc in the events linked to early embryonic development and the midblastula transition. Images PMID:2685563

  17. The BET family of proteins targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus integration near transcription start sites

    PubMed Central

    De Rijck, Jan; de Kogel, Christine; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Vets, Sofie; Ashkar, Sara El; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D; Landuyt, Bart; Husson, Steven J.; Busschots, Katrien; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2014-01-01

    Summary A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome in the host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4) and MLV integrase specifically interact and co-localize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75, retargets MLV integration away from TSS and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conform to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration pattern. Together these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors. PMID:24183673

  18. Deregulated cell death and lymphocyte homeostasis cause premature lethality in mice lacking the BH3-only proteins Bim and Bmf

    PubMed Central

    Labi, Verena; Woess, Claudia; Tuzlak, Selma; Erlacher, Miriam; Bouillet, Philippe; Strasser, Andreas; Tzankov, Alexandar

    2014-01-01

    BH3 domain-only proteins (BH3-only) proteins are members of the Bcl-2 family that play crucial roles in embryogenesis and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis by triggering apoptotic cell death. The BH3-only protein Bim is critical for developmental apoptosis of lymphocytes, securing establishment of tolerance and for the termination of immune responses. Bim is believed to act in concert with other BH3-only proteins or members of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family in getting rid of unwanted cells. Bmf, a related BH3-only protein, was shown to play a role in B-cell homeostasis and to mediate cell death in response to certain apoptotic triggers, including glucocorticoid, histone deacetylase inhibitors, and overexpression of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Here we show that Bim and Bmf have overlapping functions during mouse development and coregulate lymphocyte homeostasis and apoptosis in a nonredundant manner. Double deficiency of Bim and Bmf caused more B lymphadenopathy than loss of either BH3-only protein alone, and this was associated with autoimmune glomerulonephritis and a range of malignancies in aged mice. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bim and Bmf act in concert to prevent autoimmunity and malignant disease, strengthening the rational for the development of BH3-only protein mimicking therapeutics for the treatment of such disorders. PMID:24632712

  19. Avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 virus oncogene products are nuclear proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, W J; Lampert, M A; Lipsick, J S; Baluda, M A

    1984-01-01

    The defective acute leukemia viruses avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) and E26 virus each contain an inserted cellular sequence related to the same highly conserved cellular gene, proto-amv. The oncogenes of these two retroviruses differ from this cellular proto-oncogene in gene structure, transcript structure, and gene product. The product of the AMV oncogene (myb) is a 48,000 Mr protein, p48myb, encoded by a transduced segment (amv) of proto-amv flanked by short helper-virus-derived terminal sequences. The E26 virus oncogene product is a 135,000 Mr protein, p135gag-amve-ets, encoded by significant portions of a viral structural gene (gag), sequences related to proto-amv (amve), and additional E26-specific sequences (ets) transduced from cellular proto-ets. Both p48myb and p135gag-amve-ets transforming proteins are located in the nucleus of cells transformed by these viruses. A protein of 110,000 Mr which is specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera to amv peptides and may be the product of the normal cellular gene (proto-amv) has been located in the cytoplasm of cells that express proto-amv mRNA. Images PMID:6087315

  20. Netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activities through enhancing Yes-associated protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Li, Dean Y.; Luo, Hongbo R.; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is the major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, which plays a critical role in organ size control and cancer development. However, how YAP is regulated by extracellular stimuli in tumorigenesis remains incompletely understood. Netrin-1, a laminin-related secreted protein, displays proto-oncogenic activity in cancers. Nonetheless, the downstream signaling mediating its oncogenic effects is not well defined. Here we show that netrin-1 via its transmembrane receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer and uncoordinated-5 homolog, up-regulates YAP expression, escalating YAP levels in the nucleus and promoting cancer cell proliferation and migration. Inactivating netrin-1, deleted in colorectal cancer, or uncoordinated-5 homolog B (UNC5B) decreases YAP protein levels, abrogating cancer cell progression by netrin-1, whereas knockdown of mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) or large tumor suppressor kinase 1/2 (Lats1/2), two sets of upstream core kinases of the Hippo pathway, has no effect in blocking netrin-1–induced up-regulation of YAP. Netrin-1 stimulates phosphatase 1A to dephosphorylate YAP, which leads to decreased ubiquitination and degradation, enhancing YAP accumulation and signaling. Hence, our findings support that netrin-1 exerts oncogenic activity through YAP signaling, providing a mechanism coupling extracellular signals to the nuclear YAP oncogene. PMID:26039999

  1. c-Abl kinase regulates the protein binding activity of c-Crk.

    PubMed Central

    Feller, S M; Knudsen, B; Hanafusa, H

    1994-01-01

    c-Crk is a proto-oncogene product composed largely of Src homology (SH) 2 and 3 domains. We have identified a kinase activity, which binds to the first Crk SH3 domain and phosphorylates c-Crk on tyrosine 221 (Y221), as c-Abl. c-Abl has a strong preference for c-Crk, when compared with common tyrosine kinase substrates. The phosphorylation of c-Crk Y221 creates a binding site for the Crk SH2 domain. Bacterially expressed c-Crk protein lacks phosphorylation on Y221 and can bind specifically to several proteins, while mammalian c-Crk, which is phosphorylated on tyrosine, remains uncomplexed. The protein binding activity of c-Crk is therefore likely regulated by a mechanism similar to that of the Src family kinases. v-Crk is truncated before c-Crk Y221 and forms constitutive complexes with c-Abl and other proteins. Our results suggest that c-Abl regulates c-Crk function and that it could be involved in v-Crk transformation. Images PMID:8194526

  2. 5-Azacytidine-induced Protein 2 (AZI2) Regulates Bone Mass by Fine-tuning Osteoclast Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M.; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  3. 5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-04-10

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  4. The expression of c-kit protein in human adult and fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Horie, K; Fujita, J; Takakura, K; Kanzaki, H; Suginami, H; Iwai, M; Nakayama, H; Mori, T

    1993-11-01

    The c-kit proto-oncogene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor and is allelic with the dominant white-spotting (W) locus of the mouse. In this study we investigated the expression of human c-kit protein in various adult and fetal human tissues immunohistochemically using anti-human c-kit monoclonal antibody. To discriminate c-kit+ cells from mast cells expressing c-kit, mast cells were identified by staining with Toluidine blue. In oogonia, spermatogonia and skin melanocytes of the fetus and in oocytes of adult ovary, c-kit expression was detected. In adult uterus, c-kit+ cells were widely distributed in the basal layer of the endometrium, myometrium and cervix, the number and distribution being almost identical to those of mast cells. In fetal uterus, c-kit+ non-mast cells clustered beneath the epithelium and a few mast cells were observed in the myometrium and subserosal layer. In both adult and fetus, c-kit+ non-mast cells were detected within smooth muscle layers of the intestine, colon and oesophagus, while mast cells were observed in the mucosal and submucosal layers of these organs. In contrast to mice, no expression of c-kit protein was detected in the human placenta and decidua. Thus, the distribution of c-kit+ cells in various tissues is similar but not identical between adult and fetus and between human and mouse. PMID:7507133

  5. Expression of deletion mutants of the hepatitis B virus protein HBx in E. coli and characterization of their RNA binding activities.

    PubMed

    Rui, E; de Moura, P R; Kobarg, J

    2001-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus protein HBx has been implicated in the development of liver cancer. It has been shown that the HBx protein is able to bind to single-stranded DNA in a specific manner. This DNA binding activity might be relevant for HBx oncogene character. To study the HBx interaction with nucleic acids in more detail we expressed full-length HBx as well as several N- and C-terminally truncated HBx proteins as 6xHis and GST-fusions in E. coli. Using a gel shift assay, we were able to demonstrate that all of the truncated HBx proteins have the ability to bind to an AU-rich RNA. The affinity of GST-HBx #3 (residues 80-142) was an order of magnitude higher than that of GST-HBx #2 (residues 5-79), indicating that a high affinity RNA binding site is located in HBx C-terminal half. AUF1 is the protein ligand that binds to AU-rich RNA regions present in certain proto-oncogene mRNAs and causes their rapid degradation. By a competitive binding experiment of AUF1 and HBx to the AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide, we show that HBx is able to displace AUF1 from its binding site on the RNA oligonucleotide. This new aspect of HBx function is discussed in the context of cellular transformation. PMID:11226575

  6. p66Shc--a longevity redox protein in human prostate cancer progression and metastasis : p66Shc in cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Thomes, Paul; Zhang, Li; Veeramani, Suresh; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2010-03-01

    p66Shc, a 66 kDa proto-oncogene Src homologous-collagen homologue (Shc) adaptor protein, is classically known in mediating receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and recently identified as a sensor to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and as a longevity protein in mammals. The expression of p66Shc is decreased in mice and increased in human fibroblasts upon aging and in aging-related diseases, including prostate cancer. p66Shc protein level correlates with the proliferation of several carcinoma cells and can be regulated by steroid hormones. Recent advances point that p66Shc protein plays a role in mediating cross-talk between steroid hormones and redox signals by serving as a common convergence point in signaling pathways on cell proliferation and apoptosis. This article first reviews the unique function of p66Shc protein in regulating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Subsequently, we discuss its novel role in androgen-regulated prostate cancer cell proliferation and metastasis and the mechanism by which it mediates androgen action via the redox signaling pathway. The data together indicate that p66Shc might be a useful biomarker for the prognosis of prostate cancer and serve as an effective target for its cancer treatment. PMID:20111892

  7. Mutation of the proto-oncogene c-kit blocks development of interstitial cells and electrical rhythmicity in murine intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, S M; Burns, A J; Torihashi, S; Sanders, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICs) have been proposed as pacemakers in the gastrointestinal tract. We studied the characteristics and distribution of ICs and electrical activity of small intestinal muscles from mice with mutations at the dominant-white spotting/c-kit (W) locus because the tyrosine kinase function of c-kit may be important in the development of the IC network. 2. W/WV mutants (days 3-30 postpartum) had few ICs in the myenteric plexus region compared with wild type (+/+) siblings. The few ICs present were associated with neural elements and lay between myenteric ganglia and the longitudinal muscle layer. 3. Electrical recordings from intestinal muscle strips showed that electrical slow waves were always present in muscles of +/+ siblings, but were absent in W/WV mice. 4. Muscles from W/WV mice responded to stimulation of intrinsic nerves. Neural responses, attributed to the release of acetylcholine, nitric oxide and other unidentified transmitters, were recorded. 5. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ICs are a critical element in the generation of electrical rhythmicity in intestinal muscles. The data also show that neural regulation of gastrointestinal muscles can develop independently of the IC network. 6. W locus mutants provide a powerful new model for studies of the physiological role of ICs and the significance of electrical rhythmicity to normal gastrointestinal motility. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7853230

  8. Convergence and divergence of tumor-suppressor and proto-oncogenes in chimpanzee from human chromosome 17

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, R.S.; Ramesh, K.H.

    1994-09-01

    Due to the emergence of molecular technology, the phylogenetic evolution of the human genome via apes has become a saltatory even. In the present investigation, cosmid probes for P53, Charcot-Marie-Tooth [CMTIA], HER-2/NEU and myeloperoxidase [MPO] were used. Probes mapping to these genetic loci are well-defined on human chromosome 17 [HSA 17]. We localized these genes on chimpanzee [Pan troglodyte] chromosomes by FISH technique employing two different cell lines. Our results indicate that chimpanzee chromosome 19 [PTR 19] differs from HSA 17 by a pericentric inversion. The P53 gene assigned to HSA 17p13.1 is localized on PTR 19p15 and the MPO sequence of HSA 17q21.3-23 hybridized to PTR 19q23. Perplexing enough, HER-2/NEU assigned to HSA 17q11.2 localized to PTR 19p12. Obviously, there is convergence of P53 and MPO regions and distinctive divergence of HER-2/NEU and CMT1A regions of human and chimpanzee. This investigation has demonstrated the pronounced genetic shuffling which occurred during the origin of HSA 17. Molecular markers should serve as evolutionary punctuations in defining the precise sequence of genetic events that led to the evolution of other chromosomes whose genomic synteny, although similar, have surprisingly evolved through different mechanisms.

  9. Multiple proto-oncogene activations in avian leukosis virus-induced lymphomas: evidence for stage-specific events.

    PubMed Central

    Clurman, B E; Hayward, W S

    1989-01-01

    We have examined avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas for multiple, stage-specific oncogene activations. Three targets for viral integration were identified: c-myb, c-myc, and a newly identified locus termed c-bic. The c-myb and c-myc genes were associated with different lymphoma phenotypes. The c-bic locus was a target for integration in one class of lymphomas, usually in conjunction with c-myc activation. The data indicate that c-myc and c-bic may act synergistically during lymphomagenesis and that c-bic is involved in late stages of tumor progression. Images PMID:2548084

  10. The first exon of the c-myc proto-oncogene contains a novel positive control element.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J Q; Remmers, E F; Marcu, K B

    1986-01-01

    We have identified a positive modulator within the c-myc first exon downstream of the gene's transcription initiation sites, P1 and P2. We introduced myc-CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) hybrid genes into three cell lines (BJAB, COS and HeLa) and measured their expression by either CAT enzymatic activity, S1 nuclease protection or by a nuclear 'run-on' transcription assay. Removal of 46 bp from the 3' end of the first exon results in a decrease of myc-CAT expression and P2 activity. A 438-bp exon 1 segment, lacking the normal myc promoters, efficiently drives the expression of SV40 early promoters. We find that this first exon segment efficiently functions as a positive modulator only in its sense orientation, 3' of a nearby promoter. The positive effects of the myc first exon and the SV40 enhancer are complementary. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3030732

  11. A proto-oncogene BCL6 is up-regulated in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hideshima, Teru; Mitsiades, Constantine; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Raje, Noopur; Gorgun, Gullu; Hideshima, Hiromasa; Munshi, Nikhil C; Richardson, Paul G; Carrasco, Daniel R; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2010-05-01

    Constitutive B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl-6) expression was undetectable in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines, except U266 cells. However, it was up-regulated by coculture with bone marrow (BM) stromal cell-culture supernatant (SCCS). Bcl-6 expression in patient MM cells in the BM was positive. Anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6)-neutralizing antibody significantly blocked SCCS-induced Bcl-6 in MM cells. Indeed, IL-6 strongly triggered Bcl-6 expression in MM cells, whereas Janus kinase inhibitor and STAT3 siRNA down-regulated Bcl-6. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) also triggered Bcl-6, but independently of STAT3, whereas IkappaB kinasebeta inhibitor down-regulated TNF-alpha-induced Bcl-6, indicating that the canonical nuclear factor-kappaB pathway mediates TNF-alpha-induced Bcl-6 expression. Importantly, down-regulation of Bcl-6 by shRNA significantly inhibited MM cell growth in the presence of SCCS. Our results therefore suggest that Bcl-6 expression in MM cells is modulated, at least in part, via Janus kinase/STAT3 and canonical nuclear factor-kappaB pathways and that targeting Bcl-6, either directly or via these cascades, inhibits MM cell growth in the BM milieu. PMID:20228272

  12. The vav proto-oncogene is required early in embryogenesis but not for hematopoietic development in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Zmuidzinas, A; Fischer, K D; Lira, S A; Forrester, L; Bryant, S; Bernstein, A; Barbacid, M

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the vav protooncogene plays an important role in hematopoiesis. To study this further, we have ablated the vav protooncogene by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Homozygous vav (-/-) ES clones differentiate normally in culture and generate cells of erythroid, myeloid and mast cell lineages. Mice heterozygous for the targeted vav allele do not display any obvious abnormalities. However, homozygous embryos die very early during development. Crosses of vav (+/-) heterozygous mice yield apparently normal vav (-/-) E3.5 embryos but not post-implantation embryos (> or = E7.5). Furthermore, homozygous vav (-/-) blastocysts do not hatch in vitro. These results indicate that vav is essential for an early developmental step(s) that precedes the onset of hematopoiesis. Consistent with the phenotypic analysis of vav (-/-) embryos, we have identified Vav immunoreactivity in the extra-embryonic trophoblastic cell layer but not in the inner embryonic cell mass of E3.5 preimplantation embryos or in the egg cylinder of E6.5 and E7.5 post-implantation embryos. These results suggest that the vav gene is essential for normal trophoblast development and for implantation of the developing embryo. Images PMID:7828581

  13. The Dioxin Receptor Regulates the Constitutive Expression of the Vav3 Proto-Oncogene and Modulates Cell Shape and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose M.; Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Roman, Angel Carlos; Sauzeau, Vincent; Merino, Jaime M.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2009-01-01

    The dioxin receptor (AhR) modulates cell plasticity and migration, although the signaling involved remains unknown. Here, we report a mechanism that integrates AhR into these cytoskeleton-related functions. Immortalized and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking AhR (AhR−/−) had increased cell area due to spread cytoplasms that reverted to wild-type morphology upon AhR re-expression. The AhR-null phenotype included increased F-actin stress fibers, depolarized focal adhesions, and enhanced spreading and adhesion. The cytoskeleton alterations of AhR−/− cells were due to down-regulation of constitutive Vav3 expression, a guanosine diphosphate/guanosine triphosphate exchange factor for Rho/Rac GTPases and a novel transcriptional target of AhR. AhR was recruited to the vav3 promoter and maintained constitutive mRNA expression in a ligand-independent manner. Consistently, AhR−/− fibroblasts had reduced Rac1 activity and increased activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase (Rock) pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 shifted AhR+/+ fibroblasts to the null phenotype, whereas Rock inhibition changed AhR-null cells to the AhR+/+ morphology. Knockdown of vav3 transcripts by small interfering RNA induced cytoskeleton defects and changes in adhesion and spreading mimicking those of AhR-null cells. Moreover, vav3−/− MEFs, as AhR−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts, had increased cell area and enhanced stress fibers. By modulating Vav3-dependent signaling, AhR could regulate cell shape, adhesion, and migration under physiological conditions and, perhaps, in certain pathological states. PMID:19158396

  14. Transcriptional expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes and proto-oncogenes in north African nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Djennaoui, D; Belaoui, H; Bouguermouh, A; Decaussin, G; Ooka, T

    1996-05-01

    Cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from North Africa show an unusual bimodal age distribution. As elsewhere, the tumor is closely associated with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The expression of EBV genes and c-onc genes was studied in biopsy specimens from tumors at different clinical stages from 11 young (10 to 30-year-old) and 11 adult (30 to 65-year-old) patients. It was found that the two age groups do not differ in their pattern of gene expression, that there is a tendency for later stage biopsies to express more viral and c-onc transcripts, and that samples expressing larger numbers of EBV genes also tend to express many different c-onc specificities. PMID:8732865

  15. A Novel Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Is Responsive to Raf and Mediates Growth Factor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Janulis, Mark; Trakul, Nicholas; Greene, Geoffrey; Schaefer, Erik M.; Lee, J. D.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2001-01-01

    The proto-oncogene Raf is a major regulator of growth and differentiation. Previous studies from a number of laboratories indicate that Raf activates a signaling pathway that is independent of the classic MEK1,2-ERK1,2 cascade. However, no other signaling cascade downstream of Raf has been identified. We describe a new member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family, p97, an ERK5-related kinase that is activated and Raf associated when cells are stimulated by Raf. Furthermore, p97 is selectively responsive to different growth factors, providing a mechanism for specificity in cellular signaling. Thus, p97 is activated by the neurogenic factor fibroblast growth factor (FGF) but not the mitogenic factor epidermal growth factor (EGF) in neuronal cells. Conversely, the related kinase ERK5 is activated by EGF but not FGF. p97 phosphorylates transcription factors such as Elk-1 and Ets-2 but not MEF2C at transactivating sites, whereas ERK5 phosphorylates MEF2C but not Elk-1 or Ets-2. Finally, p97 is expressed in a number of cell types including primary neural and NIH 3T3 cells. Taken together, these results identify a new signaling pathway that is distinct from the classic Raf-MEK1,2-ERK1,2 kinase cascade and can be selectively stimulated by growth factors that produce discrete biological outcomes. PMID:11238956

  16. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome XVI, caused a loss of copper resistance in strains which possessed CUP1 and ACE1, as well as in the cup1 ace1 deletion strain. Measurement of intracellular copper levels of the wild-type and cup9-1 mutant demonstrated that total intracellular copper concentrations were unaffected by CUP9. CUP9 mRNA levels were, however, down regulated by copper when yeast cells were grown with glucose but not with lactate or glycerol-ethanol as the sole carbon source. This down regulation was independent of the copper metalloregulatory transcription factor ACE1. The DNA sequence of CUP9 predicts an open reading frame of 306 amino acids in which a 55-amino-acid sequence showed 47% identity with the homeobox domain of the human proto-oncogene PBX1, suggesting that CUP9 is a DNA-binding protein which regulates the expression of important copper homeostatic genes. Images PMID:7969120

  17. The inhibition of the GTPase activating protein-Ha-ras interaction by acidic lipids is due to physical association of the C-terminal domain of the GTPase activating protein with micellar structures.

    PubMed Central

    Serth, J; Lautwein, A; Frech, M; Wittinghofer, A; Pingoud, A

    1991-01-01

    The effects of fatty acids and phospholipids on the interaction of the full-length GTPase activating protein (GAP) as well as its isolated C-terminal domain and the Ha-ras proto-oncogene product p21 were studied by various methods, viz. GTPase activity measurements, fluorescence titrations and gel permeation chromatography. It is shown that all fatty acids and acidic phospholipids tested, provided the critical micellar concentration and the critical micellar temperature are reached, inhibit the GAP stimulated p21 GTPase activity. This is interpreted to mean that it is not the molecular structure of acidic lipid molecules per se but rather their physical state of aggregation which is responsible for the inhibitory effect of lipids on the GTPase activity. The relative inhibitory potency of various lipids was measured under defined conditions with mixed Triton X-100 micelles to follow the order: unsaturated fatty acids greater than saturated acids approximately phosphatidic acids greater than or equal to phosphatidylinositol phosphates much greater than phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine. GTPase experiments with varying concentrations of p21 and constant concentrations of GAP and lipids indicate that the binding of GAP by the lipid micelles is responsible for the inhibition, a finding which was confirmed by fluorescence titrations and gel filtrations which show that the C-terminal domain of GAP is bound by lipid micelles. PMID:2026138

  18. The trkB Tyrosine Protein Kinase Is a Receptor for Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Rüdiger; Nanduri, Venkata; Jing, Shuqian; Lamballe, Fabienne; Tapley, Peter; Bryant, Sherri; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Jones, Kevin R.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Barbacid, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Summary trkB is a tyrosine protein kinase gene highly related to trk, a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). trkB expression is confined to structures of the central and peripheral nervous systems, suggesting it also encodes a receptor for neurotrophic factors. Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and NT-3, but not NGF, can induce rapid phosphorylation on tyrosine of gp145trkB, one of the receptors encoded by trkB. BDNF and NT-3 can induce DNA synthesis in quiescent NIH 3T3 cells that express gp145trkB. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding gp145trkB and BDNF or NT-3 leads to transformation of recipient NIH 3T3 cells. In these assays, BDNF elicits a response at least two orders of magnitude higher than NT-3. Finally, 125I-NT-3 binds to NIH 3T3 cells expressing gp145trkB; binding can be competed by NT-3 and BDNF but not by NGF. These findings indicate that gp145trkB may function as a neurotrophic receptor for BDNF and NT-3. PMID:1649702

  19. Utility of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 protein expression in the distinction between nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Olga; Maeda, Takahiro; Filatov, Alexander; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) are considered separate entities with different prognosis and treatment. However, morphologic features can be similar and immunohistochemical studies are essential in the distinction; thus, determination of additional biomarkers is of utmost importance. LRF/Pokemon is a proto-oncogene, an interacting partner co-expressed with BCL6 in germinal centers and highly expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Conversely, loss of the LRF gene in mouse hematopoietic stem cells results in complete block of early B cell development with concomitant Notch de-repression, indicating its critical role in B versus T cell fate decision at the hematopoietic stem cell stage. For the first time, we show that LRF/Pokemon is predominantly expressed in NLPHL cases as is BCL6 with low to absent NOTCH1 protein expression; while Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in CHL show low to absent BCL6 and LRF/Pokemon expression with higher NOTCH1 expression. We illustrate a potential functional interaction between LRF and BCL6 in NLPHL pathogenesis, and differential expression of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 proteins in CHL thus showing differential expression, making for an additional diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:24326827

  20. Activation of tyrosinase kinase and microfilament-binding functions of c-abl by bcr sequences in bcr/abl fusion proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McWhirter, J R; Wang, J Y

    1991-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia and one type of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are characterized by a 9;22 chronosome translocation in which 5' sequences of the bcr gene become fused to the c-abl proto-oncogene. The resulting chimeric genes encode bcr/abl fusion proteins which have deregulated tyrosine kinase activity and appear to play an important role in induction of these leukemias. A series of bcr/abl genes were constructed in which nested deletions of the bcr gene were fused to the c-abl gene. The fusion proteins encoded by these genes were assayed for autophosphorylation in vivo and for differences in subcellular localization. Our results demonstrate that bcr sequences activate two functions of c-abl; the tyrosine kinase activity and a previously undescribed microfilament-binding function. Two regions of bcr which activate these functions to different degrees have been mapped: amino acids 1 to 63 were strongly activating and amino acids 64 to 509 were weakly activating. The tyrosine kinase and microfilament-binding functions were not interdependent, as a kinase defective bcr/abl mutant still associated with actin filaments and a bcr/abl mutant lacking actin association still had deregulated kinase activity. Modification of actin filament functions by the bcr/abl tyrosine kinase may be an important event in leukemogenesis. Images PMID:1705008

  1. Responsive Fluorescent PNA Analogue as a Tool for Detecting G-quadruplex Motifs of Oncogenes and Activity of Toxic Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Pramod M; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescent oligomers that are resistant to enzymatic degradation and report their binding to target oligonucleotides (ONs) by changes in fluorescence properties are highly useful in developing nucleic-acid-based diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies. Here, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of fluorescent peptide nucleic acid (PNA) building blocks made of microenvironment-sensitive 5-(benzofuran-2-yl)- and 5-(benzothiophen-2-yl)-uracil cores. The emissive monomers, when incorporated into PNA oligomers and hybridized to complementary ONs, are minimally perturbing and are highly sensitive to their neighboring base environment. In particular, benzothiophene-modified PNA reports the hybridization process with significant enhancement in fluorescence intensity, even when placed in the vicinity of guanine residues, which often quench fluorescence. This feature was used in the turn-on detection of G-quadruplex-forming promoter DNA sequences of human proto-oncogenes (c-myc and c-kit). Furthermore, the ability of benzothiophene-modified PNA oligomer to report the presence of an abasic site in RNA enabled us to develop a simple fluorescence hybridization assay to detect and estimate the depurination activity of ribosome-inactivating protein toxins. Our results demonstrate that this approach with responsive PNA probes will provide new opportunities to develop robust tools to study nucleic acids. PMID:27271025

  2. Sesamin, a lignan of sesame, down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression in human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoya; Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kawanaka, Mayumi; Enoki-Konishi, Masako; Okuyama, Yusuke; Takayasu, Junko; Nishino, Hoyoku; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Osawa, Toshihiko; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2007-09-01

    Sesamin is a major lignan constituent of sesame and possesses multiple functions such as antihypertensive, cholesterol-lowering, lipid-lowering and anticancer activities. Several groups have previously reported that sesamin induces growth inhibition in human cancer cells. However, the nature of this growth inhibitory mechanism remains unknown. The authors here report that sesamin induces growth arrest at the G1 phase in cell cycle progression in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Furthermore, sesamin dephosphorylates tumor-suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB). It is also shown that inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation by sesamin is correlated with down-regulated cyclin D1 protein expression, a proto-oncogene that is overexpressed in many human cancer cells. It was found that sesamin-induced down-regulation of cyclin D1 was inhibited by proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that sesamin suppresses cyclin D1 protein expression by promoting proteasome degradation of cyclin D1 protein. Sesamin down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression in various kinds of human tumor cells, including lung cancer, transformed renal cells, immortalized keratinocyte, melanoma and osteosarcoma. Furthermore, depletion of cyclin D1 protein using small interfering RNA rendered MCF-7 cells insensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of sesamin, implicating that cyclin D1 is at least partially related to the antiproliferative effects of sesamin. Taken together, these results suggest that the ability of sesamin to down-regulate cyclin D1 protein expression through the activation of proteasome degradation could be one of the mechanisms of the antiproliferative activity of this agent. PMID:17640297

  3. The product of the cph oncogene is a truncated, nucleotide-binding protein that enhances cellular survival to stress.

    PubMed

    Velasco, J A; Avila, M A; Notario, V

    1999-01-21

    Cph was isolated from neoplastic Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts initiated by 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA), and was shown to be a single copy gene in the hamster genome, conserved from yeast to human cells, expressed in fetal cells and most adult tissues, and acting synergistically with H-ras in the transformation of murine NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We have now isolated Syrian hamster full-length cDNAs for the cph oncogene and proto-oncogene. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that cph was activated in MCA-treated cells by a point-mutational deletion at codon 214, which caused a shift in the normal open reading frame (ORF) and brought a translation termination codon 33 amino acids downstream. While proto-cph encodes a protein (pcph) of 469 amino acids, cph encodes a truncated protein (cph) of 246 amino acids with a new, hydrophobic C-terminus. Similar mechanisms activated cph in other MCA-treated Syrian hamster cells. The cph and proto-cph proteins have partial sequence homology with two protein families: GDP/GTP exchange factors and nucleotide phosphohydrolases. In vitro translated, gel-purified cph proteins did not catalyze nucleotide exchange for H-ras, but were able to bind nucleotide phosphates, in particular ribonucleotide diphosphates such as UDP and GDP. Steady-state levels of cph mRNA increased 6.7-fold in hamster neoplastic cells, relative to a 2.2-fold increase in normal cells, when they were subjected to a nutritional stress such as serum deprivation. Moreover, cph-transformed NIH3T3 cells showed increased survival to various forms of stress (serum starvation, hyperthermia, ionizing radiation), strongly suggesting that cph participates in cellular mechanisms of response to stress. PMID:9989819

  4. Purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of an AU-rich element RNA-binding protein, AUF1.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, W; Wagner, B J; Ehrenman, K; Schaefer, A W; DeMaria, C T; Crater, D; DeHaven, K; Long, L; Brewer, G

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of some proto-oncogene and lymphokine mRNAs is controlled in part by an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' untranslated region. It was shown previously (G. Brewer, Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:2460-2466, 1991) that two polypeptides (37 and 40 kDa) copurified with fractions of a 130,000 x g postribosomal supernatant (S130) from K562 cells that selectively accelerated degradation of c-myc mRNA in a cell-free decay system. These polypeptides bound specifically to the c-myc and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor 3' UTRs, suggesting they are in part responsible for selective mRNA degradation. In the present work, we have purified the RNA-binding component of this mRNA degradation activity, which we refer to as AUF1. Using antisera specific for these polypeptides, we demonstrate that the 37- and 40-kDa polypeptides are immunologically cross-reactive and that both polypeptides are phosphorylated and can be found in a complex(s) with other polypeptides. Immunologically related polypeptides are found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The antibodies were also used to clone a cDNA for the 37-kDa polypeptide. This cDNA contains an open reading frame predicted to produce a protein with several features, including two RNA recognition motifs and domains that potentially mediate protein-protein interactions. These results provide further support for a role of this protein in mediating ARE-directed mRNA degradation. Images PMID:8246982

  5. PPARδ Activation Acts Cooperatively with 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinase-1 to Enhance Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Claire B.; Yin, Yuzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Zeng, Xiao; King, Sruthi; Li, Xin; Kopelovich, Levy; Albanese, Chris; Glazer, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorδ (PPARδ) is a transcription factor that is associated with metabolic gene regulation and inflammation. It has been implicated in tumor promotion and in the regulation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). PDK1 is a key regulator of the AGC protein kinase family, which includes the proto-oncogene AKT/PKB implicated in several malignancies, including breast cancer. To assess the role of PDK1 in mammary tumorigenesis and its interaction with PPARδ, transgenic mice were generated in which PDK1 was expressed in mammary epithelium under the control of the MMTV enhancer/promoter region. Transgene expression increased pT308AKT and pS9GSK3β, but did not alter phosphorylation of mTOR, 4EBP1, ribosomal protein S6 and PKCα. The transgenic mammary gland also expressed higher levels of PPARδ and a gene expression profile resembling wild-type mice maintained on a diet containing the PPARδ agonist, GW501516. Both wild-type and transgenic mice treated with GW501516 exhibited accelerated rates of tumor formation that were more pronounced in transgenic animals. GW501516 treatment was accompanied by a distinct metabolic gene expression and metabolomic signature that was not present in untreated animals. GW501516-treated transgenic mice expressed higher levels of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolites than treated wild-type mice, suggesting the involvement of PDK1 in enhancing PPARδ-driven energy metabolism. These results reveal that PPARδ activation elicits a distinct metabolic and metabolomic profile in tumors that is in part related to PDK1 and AKT signaling. PMID:21297860

  6. Activator protein-2gamma (AP-2gamma) expression is specifically induced by oestrogens through binding of the oestrogen receptor to a canonical element within the 5'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Orso, Francesca; Cottone, Erika; Hasleton, Mark D; Ibbitt, J Claire; Sismondi, Piero; Hurst, Helen C; De Bortoli, Michele

    2004-01-01

    The activator protein 2 (AP-2) transcription factors are essential proteins for oestrogenic repression of the ERBB2 proto-oncogene in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we have examined the possible oestrogenic regulation of AP-2 genes themselves in breast-tumour-derived lines. As early as 1 h after oestrogen treatment, AP-2gamma mRNA was markedly increased, whereas AP-2alpha was down-regulated, but with slower kinetics, and AP-2beta was not affected at all. Addition of anti-oestrogens ablated these effects. Modulation of the protein levels corresponded to changes in the transcript levels, thus suggesting that in oestrogen-treated cells, an inversion of the balance between AP-2alpha and AP-2gamma isoforms occurs. The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the human AP-2gamma gene contains one consensus and one degenerate oestrogen-responsive element (ERE). Reporter constructs carrying the AP-2gamma promoter and the 5'-UTR were up-regulated by oestrogens in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the most conserved (but not of the degenerate) ERE from reporter constructs abrogated the oestrogenic response, although both ERE-containing segments were footprinted in DNaseI protection assays. In vitro binding assays demonstrated the ability of oestrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) to bind to this site, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the endogenous gene showed that ERalpha occupies this region in response to oestrogens. We conclude that AP-2gamma is a primary oestrogen-responsive gene and suggest that AP-2 proteins may mediate some oestrogenic responses. PMID:14565844

  7. Protein phosphatase 2A is expressed in response to colony-stimulating factor 1 in macrophages and is required for cell cycle progression independently of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, N J; Moss, S T; Csar, X F; Ward, A C; Hamilton, J A

    1999-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is required for the development of monocytes/macrophages from progenitor cells and for the survival and activation of mature macrophages. The receptor for CSF-1 is the product of the c-fms proto-oncogene, which, on binding ligand, can stimulate a mitogenic response in the appropriate cells. To investigate which genes are regulated in response to CSF-1-stimulation in murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMM), we employed mRNA differential display reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to identify cDNA species induced by CSF-1. Both Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed the increased expression of one of the cDNA species identified as coding for the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), an observation not previously reported during the response to a growth factor. To determine the significance of the increased expression of PP2A in response to CSF-1, the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) was added to CSF-1-treated BMM and found to inhibit DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis with flow cytometry in the presence of OA led to the novel conclusion that PP2A activity is critical for CSF-1-driven BMM cell cycle progression in both early G1 and S phases. Surprisingly, in the light of previous studies with other cells, the PP2A-dependent proliferation could be dissociated from activation by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in macrophages because OA did not affect either the basal or CSF-1-induced ERK activity in BMM. Two-dimensional SDS/PAGE analysis of lysates of 32P-labelled BMM, which had been treated with CSF-1 in the presence or absence of OA, identified candidate substrates for PP2A. PMID:10215588

  8. Neurofibromin protein loss in desmoplastic melanoma subtypes: implicating NF1 allelic loss as a distinct genetic driver?

    PubMed

    Kadokura, Alexander; Frydenlund, Noah; Leone, Dominick A; Yang, Shi; Hoang, Mai P; Deng, April; Hernandez-Perez, Marier; Biswas, Asok; Singh, Rajendra; Yaar, Ron; Mahalingam, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Loss of the NF1 allele, coding for the protein neurofibromin, and polymorphism in the proto-oncogene RET (RETp) are purportedly common in desmoplastic melanoma (DM). DM is categorized into pure (PDM) and mixed (MDM) subtypes, which differ in prognosis. Most NF1 mutations result in a truncated/absent protein, making immunohistochemical screening for neurofibromin an ideal surrogate for NF1 allelic loss. Using antineurofibromin, our aims were to ascertain the incidence of neurofibromin loss in DM subtypes and to evaluate the relationship with RET, perineural invasion (PNI) and established histopathologic prognosticators. A total of 78 archival samples of DM met criteria for inclusion (54 cases of non-DM serving as controls). Immunohistochemistry was performed for neurofibromin, whereas direct DNA sequencing was used for RETp and BRAF mutation status. Statistical analyses included χ(2) test as well as Fisher exact test. Neurofibromin loss was more common in DM than non-DM (69% versus 54%; P=.02). In DM, significant differences in neurofibromin loss were noted in the following: non-head and neck versus head and neck biopsy site (88% versus 55%) and PDM versus MDM variants (80% versus 56%). No significant associations were noted with sex, presence of a junctional component, Breslow depth, ulceration, mitoses, host response, RETp, BRAF status, or PNI. RETp was marginally associated with PNI-positive DM versus PNI-negative DM (36 versus 18%; P=.08). Our findings, the largest to date investigating neurofibromin in DM, validate the incidence of NF1 mutations/allelic loss in DM and suggest that the DM subtypes have distinct genetic drivers. PMID:26980030

  9. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kowhi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-02-24

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3-CD4-CD8 triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4{sup +} single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-7R{alpha} genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4{sup 4+}-CD{sup 8+} double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages.

  10. The MAR-binding protein SATB1 orchestrates temporal and spatial expression of multiple genes during T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, John D.; Yasui, Dag H.; Niida, Hiroyuki; Joh, Tadashi; Loh, Dennis Y.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2000-01-01

    SATB1 is expressed primarily in thymocytes and can act as a transcriptional repressor. SATB1 binds in vivo to the matrix attachment regions (MARs) of DNA, which are implicated in the loop domain organization of chromatin. The role of MAR-binding proteins in specific cell lineages is unknown. We generated SATB1-null mice to determine how SATB1 functions in the T-cell lineage. SATB1-null mice are small in size, have disproportionately small thymi and spleens, and die at 3 weeks of age. At the cellular level, multiple defects in T-cell development were observed. Immature CD3−CD4−CD8− triple negative (TN) thymocytes were greatly reduced in number, and thymocyte development was blocked mainly at the DP stage. The few peripheral CD4+ single positive (SP) cells underwent apoptosis and failed to proliferate in response to activating stimuli. At the molecular level, among 589 genes examined, at least 2% of genes including a proto-oncogene, cytokine receptor genes, and apoptosis-related genes were derepressed at inappropriate stages of T-cell development in SATB1-null mice. For example, IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα genes were ectopically transcribed in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. SATB1 appears to orchestrate the temporal and spatial expression of genes during T-cell development, thereby ensuring the proper development of this lineage. Our data provide the first evidence that MAR-binding proteins can act as global regulators of cell function in specific cell lineages. PMID:10716941

  11. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Antigen 2 (EBNA2) Target Proteins by Proteome Analysis: Activation of EBNA2 in Conditionally Immortalized B Cells Reflects Early Events after Infection of Primary B Cells by EBV

    PubMed Central

    Schlee, Martin; Krug, Tanja; Gires, Olivier; Zeidler, Reinhard; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Laux, Gerhard; Sauer, Guido; Lovric, Josip; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2004-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous B-lymphotropic herpesvirus associated with several malignant tumors, e.g., Burkitt's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and is able to efficiently immortalize primary B lymphocytes in vitro. The growth program of infected B cells is initiated and maintained by the viral transcription factor EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2), which regulates viral and cellular genes, including the proto-oncogene c-myc. In our study, patterns of protein expression in B cells with and without EBNA2 were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For this purpose, we used a conditional immortalization system for EBV, a B cell line (EREB2-5) that expresses an estrogen receptor-EBNA2 fusion protein. In order to discriminate downstream targets of c-Myc from c-Myc-independent EBNA2 targets, we used an EREB2-5-derived cell line, P493-6, in which c-Myc is expressed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. Of 20 identified EBNA2 target proteins, 11 were c-Myc dependent and therefore most probably associated with proliferation, and one of these proteins was a posttranslationally modified protein, i.e., hypusinylated eIF5a. Finally, to estimate the relevance of EBNA2 targets during early EBV infection, we analyzed the proteomes of primary B cells before and after infection with EBV. The protein expression pattern induced upon EBV infection was similar to that following EBNA2 activation. These findings underscore the value of EREB2-5 cells as an appropriate model system for the analysis of early events in the process of EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. PMID:15047810

  12. Stimulation of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Yes but not c-Src by neurotrophins in human brain-metastatic melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, D; Parikh, N; Sudol, M; Gallick, G E

    1998-06-25

    The c-Yes proto-oncogene (pp62c-Yes) encodes a non-receptor-type protein tyrosine kinase (NRPTK) of the Src family. c-Yes activities and protein levels are elevated in human melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. Because the neurotrophins (NT) are important in the progression of melanoma to the brain-metastatic phenotype, we determined whether NT stimulate c-Yes activity in human MeWo melanoma cells and two variant sublines with opposite metastatic capabilities, 3 S 5 and 70W. The highly brain-metastatic 70W subline had an intrinsically higher c-Yes activity than parental MeWo or poorly metastatic 3 S 5 cells. c-Yes kinase was further induced by the prototypic human NT, nerve growth factor (NGF) in a dose and time-dependent manner. In contrast, c-Src activity (pp60-Src) was similar in all these cells and unaffected by NGF exposure. Additionally, human NGF and neurotrophin-3 stimulated c-Yes in brain-metastatic 70W cells. The magnitude of c-Yes activation correlated with the degree of invasion of 70 W cells following incubation of these neurotrophins. To further examine NT stimulation of c-Yes in melanoma cells, three additional cell lines were examined. Metastatic TXM-13 and TXM-18 increased c-Yes activity in response to NGF. In contrast, no increase was observed in low-metastatic TXM-40 cells. Together, these data suggest that altered c-Yes expression may play a role in the malignant progression of the human melanocyte towards the brain-metastatic phenotype and that NT enhance the activity of c-Yes in signaling penetration into the matrix of NT-rich stromal microenvironments such as the brain. PMID:9681823

  13. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SINKOVICS, JOSEPH G.

    2015-01-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the Dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it. PMID:26239915

  14. The cnidarian origin of the proto-oncogenes NF-κB/STAT and WNT-like oncogenic pathway drives the ctenophores (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2015-10-01

    The cell survival pathways of the diploblastic early multicellular eukaryotic hosts contain and operate the molecular machinery resembling those of malignantly transformed individual cells of highly advanced multicellular hosts (including Homo). In the present review, the STAT/NF-κB pathway of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis is compared with that of human tumors (malignant lymphomas, including Reed-Sternberg cells) pointing out similarities, including possible viral initiation in both cases. In the ctenophore genome and proteome, β-catenin gains intranuclear advantages due to a physiologically weak destructive complex in the cytoplasm, and lack of natural inhibitors (the dickkopfs). Thus, a scenario similar to what tumor cells initiate and achieve is presented through several constitutive loss-of-function type mutations in the destructive complex and in the elimination of inhibitors. Vice versa, malignantly transformed individual cells of advanced multicellular hosts assume pheno-genotypic resemblance to cells of unicellular or early multicellular hosts, and presumably to their ancient predecessors, by returning to the semblance of immortality and to the resumption of the state of high degree of resistance to physicochemical insults. Human leukemogenic and oncogenic pathways are presented for comparisons. The supreme bioengineers RNA/DNA complex encoded both the malignantly transformed immortal cell and the human cerebral cortex. The former generates molecules for the immortality of cellular life in the Universe. The latter invents the inhibitors of the process in order to gain control over it. PMID:26239915

  15. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish p...

  16. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  17. Activation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene by retrovirus insertion and chromosomal rearrangement in a Moloney leukemia virus-induced T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ihle, J N; Smith-White, B; Sisson, B; Parker, D; Blair, D G; Schultz, A; Kozak, C; Lunsford, R D; Askew, D; Weinstein, Y

    1989-01-01

    A rearrangement of the c-H-ras locus was detected in a T-cell line (DA-2) established from a Moloney leukemia virus-induced tumor. This rearrangement was associated with the high-level expression of H-ras RNA and the H-ras gene product, p21. DNA from DA-2 cells transformed fibroblasts in DNA transfection experiments, and the transformed fibroblasts contained the rearranged H-ras locus. The rearrangement involved one allele and was present in tissue from the primary tumor from which the cell line was isolated. Cloning and sequencing of the rearranged allele and comparison with the normal allele demonstrated that the rearrangement was complex and probably resulted from the integration of a retrovirus in the H-ras locus between a 5' noncoding exon and the first coding exon and a subsequent homologous recombination between this provirus and another newly acquired provirus also located on chromosome 7. These events resulted in the translocation of the coding exons of the H-ras locus away from the 5' noncoding exon region to a new genomic site on chromosome 7. Sequencing of the coding regions of the gene failed to detect mutations in the 12th, 13th, 59th, or 61st codons. The possible reasons for the complexity of the rearrangement and the significance of the activation of the H-ras locus to T-cell transformation are discussed. Images PMID:2542606

  18. Developmental regulation of early mouse embryogenesis. A. Onset of insulin and related growth factor binding. B. Expression of selected proto-oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggest a role for insulin and related growth factors in fetal growth. It was therefore of interest to determine the onset of insulin binding to cells of early embryos. These studies are the first to demonstrate stage-specific insulin binding during mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. Insulin binding was detected at the morula, blastocyst, and blastocyst outgrowth stages using indirect immunofluorescence and light microscopic autoradiographic techniques. No evidence of insulin binding was seen on unfertilized oocytes, two-, four-, or eight-cell embryos. Results of competitive inhibition studies using unlabeled insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) suggest binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to type I IGF receptors as well. Further studies are needed to confirm the presence of an IGF receptor in preimplantation embryos.

  19. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) is a potential c-Myc regulator in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its expression promotes ESCC progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jun-Ya; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Bao, Bo-Jun; Guan, Cheng-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yan-Hua; Huang, Yue-Jiao; Ni, Run-Zhou; Ji, Li-Li

    2016-03-01

    The human far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 1 (FUBP1) belongs to an ancient family which is required for proper regulation of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Although c-Myc plays an important role in development of various carcinomas, the relevance of FUBP1 and their contribution to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between FUBP1 and c-Myc as well as their contribution to ESCC development. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate FUBP1 expression. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis was performed to explore the correlation between FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC. In addition, the role of FUBP1 in ESCC proliferation was studied in ESCC cells through knocking FUBP1 down. The regulation of FUBP1 on proliferation was confirmed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, flow cytometric assays, and clone formation assays. The expressions of FUBP1 and c-Myc were both upregulated in ESCC tissues. In addition to correlation between expression of FUBP1 and tumor grade, we also confirmed the correlation of FUBP1, c-Myc, and Ki-67 expression by twos. Moreover, upregulation of FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC was associated with poor survival. FUBP1 was confirmed to activate c-Myc in ESCC tissues and cells. FUBP1 was demonstrated to promote proliferation of ESCC cells. Moreover, downregulation of both FUBP1 and c-Myc was confirmed to inhibit proliferation of ESCC cells. Our results indicated that FUBP1 may potentially stimulate c-Myc expression in ESCC and its expression may promote ESCC progression. PMID:26490982

  20. Chewing the fat for Akt1 inhibition and oncosuppression.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Sara M; Solmonson, Ashley; Mills, Edward M

    2016-03-01

    The catabolic and energy-dissipating actions of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) conflict with many of the bioenergetic hallmarks of malignancy. We have recently demonstrated that overexpression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (Ucp3) in the basal epidermis impedes skin tumorigenesis through a novel pathway of thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 (Akt1) inhibition via increased mitochondrial lipid catabolism. PMID:27308618

  1. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies inhibit guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylyl cyclase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and cross-react with a 150-kilodalton mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E; Marbach, I; Engelberg, D; Segal, M; Simchen, G; Levitzki, A

    1992-01-01

    The CDC25 gene product of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a positive regulator of the Ras protein. The high degree of homology between yeast RAS and the mammalian proto-oncogene ras suggests a possible resemblance between the mammalian regulator of Ras and the regulator of the yeast Ras (Cdc25). On the basis of this assumption, we have raised antibodies against the conserved C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 protein in order to identify its mammalian homologs. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies raised against a beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and were shown by immunoblotting to specifically recognize the Cdc25 portion of the antigen and a truncated Cdc25 protein, also expressed in bacteria. These antibodies were shown both by immunoblotting and by immunoprecipitation to recognize the CDC25 gene product in wild-type strains and in strains overexpressing Cdc25. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies potently inhibited the guanyl nucleotide-dependent and, approximately 3-fold less potently, the Mn(2+)-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in S. cerevisiae. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies do not inhibit cyclase activity in a strain harboring RAS2Val-19 and lacking the CDC25 gene product. These results support the view that Cdc25, Ras2, and Cdc35/Cyr1 proteins are associated in a complex. Using these antibodies, we were able to define the conditions to completely solubilize the Cdc25 protein. The results suggest that the Cdc25 protein is tightly associated with the membrane but is not an intrinsic membrane protein, since only EDTA at pH 12 can solubilize the protein. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies strongly cross-reacted with the C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 yeast homolog, Sdc25. Most interestingly, these antibodies also cross-reacted with mammalian proteins of approximately 150 kDa from various tissues of several species of animals. These interactions were specifically blocked by the beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein. Images

  2. Retinoblastoma Protein and MyoD Function Together to Effect the Repression of Fra-1 and in Turn Cyclin D1 during Terminal Cell Cycle Arrest Associated with Myogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hasan N.; Takahashi, Chiaki; Ewen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of skeletal muscle-specific function and terminal cell cycle arrest represent two important features of the myogenic differentiation program. These cellular processes are distinct and can be separated genetically. The lineage-specific transcription factor MyoD and the retinoblastoma protein pRb participate in both of these cellular events. Whether and how MyoD and pRb work together to effect terminal cell cycle arrest is uncertain. To address this question, we focused on cyclin D1, whose stable repression is required for terminal cell cycle arrest and execution of myogenesis. MyoD and pRb are both required for the repression of cyclin D1; their actions, however, were found not to be direct. Rather, they operate to regulate the immediate early gene Fra-1, a critical player in mitogen-dependent induction of cyclin D1. Two conserved MyoD-binding sites were identified in an intronic enhancer of Fra-1 and shown to be required for the stable repression of Fra-1 and, in turn, cyclin D1. Localization of MyoD alone to the intronic enhancer of Fra-1 in the absence of pRb was not sufficient to elicit a block to Fra-1 induction; pRb was also recruited to the intronic enhancer in a MyoD-dependent manner. These observations suggest that MyoD and pRb work together cooperatively at the level of the intronic enhancer of Fra-1 during terminal cell cycle arrest. This work reveals a previously unappreciated link between a lineage-specific transcription factor, a tumor suppressor, and a proto-oncogene in the control of an important facet of myogenic differentiation. PMID:25006242

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Koeffler, H. P.; McCormick, F.; Denny, C.

    1991-01-01

    Cancer is caused by specific DNA damage. Several common mechanisms that cause DNA damage result in specific malignant disorders: First, proto-oncogenes can be activated by translocations. For example, translocation of the c-myc proto-oncogene from chromosome 8 to one of the immunoglobulin loci on chromosomes 2, 14, or 22 results in Burkitt's lymphomas. Translocation of the c-abl proto-oncogene from chromosome 9 to the BCR gene located on chromosome 22 produces a hybrid BCR/ABL protein resulting in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Second, proto-oncogenes can be activated by point mutations. For example, point mutations of genes coding for guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins, such as H-, K-, or N-ras or G proteins, can be oncogenic as noted in a large variety of malignant neoplasms. Proteins from these mutated genes are constitutively active rather than being faithful second messengers of periodic extracellular signals. Third, mutations that inactivate a gene can result in tumors if the product of the gene normally constrains cellular proliferation. Functional loss of these "tumor suppressor genes" is found in many tumors such as colon and lung cancers. The diagnosis, classification, and treatment of cancers will be greatly enhanced by understanding their abnormalities at the molecular level. PMID:1815390

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Southwestern Blotting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberényi, József

    2014-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Southern blotting, Western blotting, restriction endonucleases, agarose gel electrophoresis, nitrocellulose filter, molecular hybridization, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, proto-oncogene, c-abl, Src-homology domains, tyrosine protein kinase, nuclear localization signal, cDNA,…

  5. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  6. What Has Cancer Taught Us about the Cell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Mary E.; Hatton, Mark P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses what is cancer; proto-oncogenes that encode four classes of proteins including growth factors, growth factor receptors, intracellular signaling messengers, and transcription factors; tumor suppressors; and cancer therapy including metabolic inhibitors, alkylating agents and antibiotics, mitotic inhibitors, and hormone-related therapy.…

  7. Dietary exposure to soy or whey proteins alters colonic global gene expression profiles during rat colon tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rijin; Badger, Thomas M; Simmen, Frank A

    2005-01-01

    Background We previously reported that lifetime consumption of soy proteins or whey proteins reduced the incidence of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in rats. To obtain insights into these effects, global gene expression profiles of colons from rats with lifetime ingestion of casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein isolate (SPI), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) diets were determined. Results Male Sprague Dawley rats, fed one of the three purified diets, were studied at 40 weeks after AOM injection and when tumors had developed in some animals of each group. Total RNA, purified from non-tumor tissue within the proximal half of each colon, was used to prepare biotinylated probes, which were hybridized to Affymetrix RG_U34A rat microarrays containing probes sets for 8799 rat genes. Microarray data were analyzed using DMT (Affymetrix), SAM (Stanford) and pair-wise comparisons. Differentially expressed genes (SPI and/or WPH vs. CAS) were found. We identified 31 induced and 49 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the SPI-fed group and 44 induced and 119 repressed genes in the proximal colons of the WPH-fed group, relative to CAS. Hierarchical clustering identified the co-induction or co-repression of multiple genes by SPI and WPH. The differential expression of I-FABP (2.92-, 3.97-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.023, P = 0.01, respectively), cyclin D1 (1.61-, 2.42-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P = 0.033, P = 0.001, respectively), and the c-neu proto-oncogene (2.46-, 4.10-fold down-regulated in SPI and WPH fed rats; P < 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively) mRNAs were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. SPI and WPH affected colonic neuro-endocrine gene expression: peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon mRNAs were down-regulated in WPH fed rats, whereas somatostatin mRNA and corresponding circulating protein levels, were enhanced by SPI and WPH. Conclusions The identification of transcripts co- or differentially-regulated by SPI

  8. High-level expression, purification, and characterization of bifunctional ScFv-9R fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiguang; Xie, Jiasen; Sun, Yan; Xu, Huijing; Du, Tonghua; Liu, Zixuan; Chen, Jinhui; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Keqiang; Zhang, Jizhou; Kan, Mujie; Li, Xiaokun; Xiao, Yechen

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a noted proto-oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of many tumors, so more and more studies focus on the potential use of receptor kinase inhibitor and therapeutic antibodies against FGFR3. In this study, we designed a novel fusion protein containing the single-chain Fv (ScFv) against FGFR3 and 9-arginine, denoted as ScFv-9R. To achieve the high-level production and soluble expression, ScFv and ScFv-9R were fused with small ubiquitin-related modifier (Sumo) by polymerase chain reaction and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant bacteria was induced by 0.5 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside for 20 h at 20 °C; supernatants of Sumo-ScFv was harvested and purified by DEAE Sepharose FF and Ni-NTA orderly, and supernatants of Sumo-ScFv-9R was harvested and purified by Ni-NTA. After cleaved by the Sumo protease, the recombinant ScFv or ScFv-9R was released from the fusion protein, respectively. The purity of ScFv or ScFV-9R was shown to be higher than 90 %, and their yield reached 3-5 mg per liter of bacterial culture. In vitro data showed that ScFV-9R can attenuate the phosphorylation of FGFR3 and ERK in the absence or presence of FGF9. Gel retardation assay showed that 1 μg of ScFv-9R could efficiently bind to about 4 pmol siRNA. Fluorescent microscope analysis showed that ScFv-9R can efficiently bind and deliver siRNA into RT112 cells. In conclusion, we use Sumo fusion system to acquire high-level production, soluble expression, and bifunctional activity of ScFv-9R in E. coli. Our results also revealed that ScFv-9R, as a novel carrier, may have potential applications in antitumor studies and pharmaceutical development. PMID:24519456

  9. Evaluation of colocalization interactions between the IE110, IE175, and IE63 transactivator proteins of herpes simplex virus within subcellular punctate structures.

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, M A; Gerstberger, S; Ciufo, D M; Mosca, J D; Hayward, G S

    1995-01-01

    A number of previous studies have implied that three herpes simplex virus-encoded nuclear transactivator proteins, IE175 (ICP4), IE110 (ICP0), and IE63 (ICP27), may cooperate in transcriptional and posttranscriptional stimulation of viral gene expression. Using double-label immunofluorescence assays (IFA) in transient expression assays, we have examined the intracellular localization of these three proteins in DNA-transfected cells. The IE110 protein on its own forms spherical punctate domains within the nucleus, whereas the IE175 and IE63 proteins alone give uniform and speckled diffuse patterns, respectively. In infected cells, the IE110 punctate granules have been shown to correspond to novel preexisting subnuclear structures referred to as ND10 domains or PODs that contain a variety of cellular proteins, including SP100 and the PML proto-oncogene product. Cotransfection experiments with wild-type nuclear forms of both IE175 and IE110 provided direct evidence for partial redistribution of IE175 into the same punctate granules that contained IE110. Surprisingly, nuclear forms of IE110 were found to move a cytoplasmic form of IE175 into nuclear punctate structures, and a cytoplasmic form of IE110 was able to retain nuclear forms of IE175 in cytoplasmic punctate structures. Therefore, the punctate characteristic of IE110 appeared to both dominate the interactions and override the normal nuclear localization signals. The domains responsible for the interaction mapped to between codons 518 and 768 in 1E110 and to between codons 835 and 1029 in IE175. Importantly, a truncated nuclear form of the 1,298-amino-acid IE175 protein, which lacked the C-terminal domain beyond codon 834, was found to be excluded from the IE110 punctate granules. Cotransfection of nuclear or cytoplasmic IE110 with a truncated nuclear form of IE63 also led to partial redistribution of IE63 into either nuclear or cytoplasmic punctate granules containing IE110. Both the IE63-IE110 and IE175-IE110

  10. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  11. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  12. U-rich sequence-binding proteins (URBPs) interacting with a 20-nucleotide U-rich sequence in the 3' untranslated region of c-fos mRNA may be involved in the first step of c-fos mRNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    You, Y; Chen, C Y; Shyu, A B

    1992-01-01

    Rapid decay of the c-fos transcript plays a critical role in controlling transforming potential of the c-fos proto-oncogene. One of the mRNA instability determinants is a 75-nucleotide AU-rich element (ARE) present in the 3' untranslated region of the c-fos transcript. It appears to control two steps in the process of c-fos mRNA degradation: removal of the poly(A) tail, which does not require the AUUUA motifs, and subsequent degradation of deadenylated mRNA, which appears to be dependent on the AUUUA motifs. In this study, we report the identification of four U-rich sequence binding proteins (URBPs) that specifically interact with a 20-nucleotide U-rich sequence within the c-fos ARE. Gel mobility shift assay and competition experiments showed that these protein factors form three specific band-shifted complexes with the c-fos ARE. Binding activity of one of the protein factors, a 37-kDa protein, is significantly affected by serum induction and by pretreatment of cells with drugs known to stabilize many of the immediate-early gene mRNAs. Combining UV cross-linking with a new approach, designated sequential RNase digestion, we were able to better determine the molecular masses of these cellular proteins. The binding sites for the four proteins were all mapped to a 20-nucleotide U-rich sequence located at the 3' half of the c-fos ARE, which contains no AUUUA pentanucleotides but stretches of uridylate residues. Single U-to-A point mutations in each of the three AUUUA motifs within the c-fos ARE have little effect on formation of the mobility-shifted complexes. Our data indicate c-fos ARE-protein interaction involves recognition of U stretches rather than recognition of the AUUUA motifs. We propose that UTBP binding may be involved in the first step, removal of the Poly(A) tail, in the c-fos ARE-mediated decay pathway. Images PMID:1620106

  13. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  14. MET — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The proto-oncogene MET product is the hepatocyte growth factor receptor and encodes tyrosine-kinase activity. The primary single chain precursor protein is post-translationally cleaved to produce the alpha and beta subunits, which are disulfide linked to form the mature receptor. Various mutations in the MET gene are associated with papillary renal carcinoma. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008

  15. ROS1 rearranged non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases respond to low dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Hasan, Yasmin; Nicholas, Martin K; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    We present a young woman with ROS1 gene rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastases. ROS is a proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase. The patient received a partial course of whole brain radiation therapy and experienced a sustained partial response in the brain. We hypothesize that ROS1 rearranged NSCLC brain metastases may be particularly sensitive to radiation therapy. PMID:26159887

  16. Oncogenes and growth control

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.; Graf, T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six sections, each consisting of several papers. Some of the paper titles are: A Role for Proto-Oncogenes in Differentiation.; The ras Gene Family; Regulation of Human Globin Gene Expression; Regulation of Gene Expression by Steroid Hormones; The Effect of DNA Methylation on DNA-Protein Interactions and on the Regulation of Gene Expression; and Trans-Acting Elements Encoded in Immediate Early Genes of DNA Tumor Viruses.

  17. Ras trafficking, localization and compartmentalized signalling

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Ian A.; Hancock, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Ras proteins are proto-oncogenes that are frequently mutated in human cancers. Three closely related isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are expressed in all cells and have overlapping but distinctive functions. Recent work has revealed how differences between the Ras isoforms in their trafficking, localization and protein-membrane orientation enable signalling specificity to be determined. We review the various strategies used to characterize compartmentalized Ras localization and signalling. Localization is an important contextual modifier of signalling networks and insights from the Ras system are of widespread relevance for researchers interested in signalling initiated from membranes. PMID:21924373

  18. Oncogenic and oncosuppressive signal transduction at mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Oparka, Monika; Duszynski, Jerzy; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pinton, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The different mechanisms employed by proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death pathways are strictly linked to their localization. In addition to the canonical control of apoptosis at a transcriptional/nuclear level, intracellular zones are emerging as pivotal sites for the activities of several proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors. Here, we review the function of the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interface as a primary platform for decoding danger signals as well as a structural accommodation for several regulator or effector proteins. PMID:27308328

  19. HIF and c-Myc: sibling rivals for control of cancer cell metabolism and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, John D.; Thompson, Craig B.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2011-01-01

    O2 deprivation (hypoxia) and cellular proliferation engage opposite cellular pathways, yet often coexist during tumor growth. The ability of cells to grow during hypoxia results in part from crosstalk between hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) and the proto-oncogene c-Myc. Acting alone, HIF and c-Myc partially regulate complex adaptations undertaken by tumor cells growing in low O2. However, acting in concert, these transcription factors reprogram metabolism, protein synthesis and cell cycle progression, to “fine tune” adaptive responses to hypoxic environments. PMID:17692803

  20. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames

    PubMed Central

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  1. Comprehensive translational control of tyrosine kinase expression by upstream open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Wethmar, K; Schulz, J; Muro, E M; Talyan, S; Andrade-Navarro, M A; Leutz, A

    2016-03-31

    Post-transcriptional control has emerged as a major regulatory event in gene expression and often occurs at the level of translation initiation. Although overexpression or constitutive activation of tyrosine kinases (TKs) through gene amplification, translocation or mutation are well-characterized oncogenic events, current knowledge about translational mechanisms of TK activation is scarce. Here, we report the presence of translational cis-regulatory upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the majority of transcript leader sequences of human TK mRNAs. Genetic ablation of uORF initiation codons in TK transcripts resulted in enhanced translation of the associated downstream main protein-coding sequences (CDSs) in all cases studied. Similarly, experimental removal of uORF start codons in additional non-TK proto-oncogenes, and naturally occurring loss-of-uORF alleles of the c-met proto-oncogene (MET) and the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), was associated with increased CDS translation. Based on genome-wide sequence analyses we identified polymorphisms in 15.9% of all human genes affecting uORF initiation codons, associated Kozak consensus sequences or uORF-related termination codons. Together, these data suggest a comprehensive role of uORF-mediated translational control and delineate how aberrant induction of proto-oncogenes through loss-of-function mutations at uORF initiation codons may be involved in the etiology of cancer. We provide a detailed map of uORFs across the human genome to stimulate future research on the pathogenic role of uORFs. PMID:26096937

  2. Retroviral Insertions in Evi12, a Novel Common Virus Integration Site Upstream of Tra1/Grp94, Frequently Coincide with Insertions in the Gene Encoding the Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptor Cnr2

    PubMed Central

    Valk, Peter J. M.; Vankan, Yolanda; Joosten, Marieke; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud

    1999-01-01

    The common virus integration site (VIS) Evi11 was recently identified within the gene encoding the hematopoietic G-protein-coupled peripheral cannabinoid receptor Cnr2 (also referred to as Cb2). Here we show that Cnr2 is a frequent target (12%) for insertion of Cas-Br-M murine leukemia virus (MuLV) in primary tumors in NIH/Swiss mice. Multiple provirus insertions in Evi11 were cloned and shown to be located within the 3′ untranslated region of the candidate proto-oncogene Cnr2. These results suggest that proviral insertion in the Cnr2 gene is an important step in Cas-Br-M MuLV-induced leukemogenesis in NIH/Swiss mice. To isolate Evi11/Cnr2 collaborating proto-oncogenes, we searched for novel common VISs in the Cas-Br-M MuLV-induced primary tumors and identified a novel frequent common VIS, Evi12 (14%). Interestingly, 54% of the Evi11/Cnr2-rearranged primary tumors contained insertions in Evi12 as well, which suggests cooperative action of the target genes in these two common VISs in leukemogenesis. By interspecific backcross analysis it was shown that Evi12 resides on mouse chromosome 10 in a region that shares homology with human chromosomes 12q and 19p. Sequence analysis demonstrated that Evi12 is located upstream of the gene encoding the molecular chaperone Tra1/Grp94, which was previously mapped to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 12q22–24. Thus, Tra1/Grp94 is a candidate target gene for retroviral activation or inactivation in Evi12. However, Northern and Western blot analyses did not provide evidence that proviral insertion had altered the expression of Tra1/Grp94. Additional studies are required to determine whether Tra1/Grp94 or another candidate proto-oncogene in Evi12 is involved in leukemogenesis. PMID:10196250

  3. Association of RET codon 691 polymorphism in radiation-induced human thyroid tumours with C-cell hyperplasia in peritumoural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bounacer, A; Du Villard, J A; Wicker, R; Caillou, B; Schlumberger, M; Sarasin, A; Suárez, H G

    2002-01-01

    The RET proto-oncogene encodes a protein structurally related to transmembrane receptors with an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. In human thyroid gland, the RET proto-oncogene is normally expressed in parafollicular C-cells. Thyroid C-cell hyperplasia is associated with inherited medullary thyroid carcinomas and is considered as a pre-neoplastic stage of C-cells disease. It has also been observed in thyroid tissues adjacent to follicular and papillary carcinomas. In order to study the relationship between a misfunctioning of the RET proto-oncogene and the presence of C-cell hyperplasia, we compared a series of thyroid glands presenting sporadic or radiation-associated tumours, as well as samples of unrelated normal thyroid tissues, for alteration in exons 10 and 11 of the gene and for the presence or absence of C-cell hyperplasia. Here we report a significantly higher frequency of C-cell hyperplasia present in peritumoural thyroid tissues of radiation-induced epithelial thyroid tumours, than in peritumoural of sporadic thyroid tumours or in control normal thyroid tissues (P=0.001). A G691S RET polymorphism was present with a higher frequency in radiation-induced epithelial thyroid tumours (55%) than in sporadic tumours (20%) and in control normal thyroid tissues (15%). Interestingly, this polymorphism was associated in the majority (88%) of radiation-induced tumours with a C-cell hyperplasia in the peritumoural tissues. Several explanations for this association are discussed. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1929–1936. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600371 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085189

  4. Cytogenetics and molecular genetics of carcinomas arising from thyroid epithelial follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Pierotti, M A; Bongarzone, I; Borello, M G; Greco, A; Pilotti, S; Sozzi, G

    1996-05-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular analyses of thyroid tumors have indicated that these neoplasms represent a good model for analyzing human epithelial cell multistep carcinogenesis. They comprise, in fact, a broad spectrum of lesions with different phenotypes and variable biological and clinical behavior. Molecular analysis has detected specific genetic alterations in the different types of thyroid tumors. In particular, the well-differentiated carcinomas of the papillary type are characterized by activation of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), RET and NTRK1 proto-oncogenes. Cytogenetic analysis of these tumors has contributed to defining the chromosomal mechanisms leading to RTK oncogenic activation. In the majority of cases, intrachromosomal inversions of chromosome 10 and chromosome 1 led to the formation of RET-derived and NTRK1-derived oncogenes, respectively. Interestingly, molecular analysis of these oncogenes revealed their nature of chimeric fusion proteins all sharing the tyrosine kinase (TK) domains of the respective proto-oncogenes. Moreover, the sequencing of the oncogenic rearrangements led to the identification of a breakpoint cluster region in both RTK proto-oncogenes. Exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with papillary carcinomas and RET activation has been suggested to be related to this event. Conversely, RAS point mutations are frequently observed in tumors with follicular histology and have been associated with metastatic dissemination. Iodide-deficient areas seem to provide a higher frequency of RAS positive follicular carcinomas. Finally, a high prevalence of TPS3 point mutations has been detected only in undifferentiated or anaplastic carcinomas and found to correlate inversely with 8CL2 expression. All of these findings are contributing to the definition of genetic and environmental factors relevant for the pathogenesis of thyroid tumors. Moreover, the characterization of specific genetic lesions could provide significant molecular

  5. Binding site identification and role of permanent water molecule of PIM-3 kinase: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Gul, Sana; Usmani, Saman; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Waqasuddin

    2015-11-01

    The kinome is a protein kinase complement of the human genome, categorized as serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. These kinases catalyze phosphorylation reaction by using ATP as phosphoryl donor. Proviral Integration Site for Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (PIM) kinase encodes serine/threonine protein kinases that recognized as proto-oncogene, responsible for rapid growth of cancerous cells. It is implicated in cell survival and function via cell cycle progression and its metabolism. PIM-3, sub-member of PIM kinases is a proto-oncogene, its overexpression inhibits apoptosis, and results in progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. PIM-3 is considered as a promising drug target but attempts to develop its specific inhibitors is slowed down due to the lack of 3D structure by any experimental technique. In silico techniques generally facilitate scientist to explore hidden structural features in order to improve drug discovery. In the present study, homology modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation techniques were utilized to explore the structure and dynamics of PIM-3 kinase. Induction of water molecules during molecular docking simulation explored differences in the hinge region between PIM-1 and PIM-3 kinases that may be responsible for specificity. Furthermore, role of water molecules in the active site was also explored via radial distribution function (RDF) after a 10 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Generated RDF plots exhibited the importance of water for inhibitor binding through their bridging capability that links the ligand with binding site residues. PMID:26529487

  6. An oligomer complementary to c-myc mRNA inhibits proliferation of HL-60 promyelocytic cells and induces differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, J T; Redner, R L; Nienhuis, A W

    1988-01-01

    To study the role of a nuclear proto-oncogene in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, we inhibited HL-60 c-myc expression with a complementary antisense oligomer. This oligomer was stable in culture and entered cells, forming an intracellular duplex. Incubation of cells with the anti-myc oligomer decreased the steady-state levels of c-myc protein by 50 to 80%, whereas a control oligomer did not significantly affect the c-myc protein concentration. Direct inhibition of c-myc expression with the anti-myc oligomer was associated with a decreased cell growth rate and an induction of myeloid differentiation. Related antisense oligomers with 2- to 12-base-pair mismatches with c-myc mRNA did not influence HL-60 cells. Thus, the effects of the antisense oligomer exhibited sequence specificity, and furthermore, these effects could be reversed by hybridization competition with another complementary oligomer. Antisense inhibition of a nuclear proto-oncogene apparently bypasses cell surface events in affecting cell proliferation and differentiation. Images PMID:3280975

  7. Cellular signaling in normal and cancerous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, Edgar; Wernet, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Self-renewing divisions of normal and cancerous stem cells are responsible for the initiation and maintenance of normal and certain cancerous tissues, respectively. Recent findings suggest that tumor surveillance mechanisms can reduce regenerative capacity and frequency of normal stem cells, thereby contributing to tissue aging. Signaling pathways promoting self-renewal of stem cells can also drive proliferation in cancer. The BMI-1 proto-oncogene is required for the maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells and is involved in carcinogenesis within the same tissues. BMI-1 promotes self-renewal of stem cells largely by interfering with two central cellular tumor suppressor pathways, p16(Ink4a)/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and ARF/p53, whose disruption is a hallmark of cancer. Nucleolin, an Rb-associated protein, is abundant in proliferating cancerous cells and likely contributes to the maintenance of human CD34-positive stem/progenitor cells of hematopoiesis. Elucidation of the involvement of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors in the maintenance of stem cells might have therapeutic implications. PMID:17651940

  8. JNK1 determines the oncogenic or tumor-suppressive activity of the integrin-linked kinase in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Somers, Gino R; Forrester, Michael; Pienkowska, Malgorzata; Hannigan, Gregory E; Malkin, David

    2009-06-01

    Although most reports describe the protein kinase integrin-linked kinase (ILK) as a proto-oncogene, occasional studies detail opposing functions in the regulation of normal and transformed cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrated that ILK functions as an oncogene in the highly aggressive pediatric sarcoma alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) and as a tumor suppressor in the related embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). These opposing functions hinge on signaling through a noncanonical ILK target, JNK1, to the proto-oncogene c-Jun. RNAi-mediated depletion of ILK induced activation of JNK and its target, c-Jun, resulting in growth of ERMS cells, whereas in ARMS cells, it led to loss of JNK/c-Jun signaling and suppression of growth both in vitro and in vivo. Ectopic expression of the fusion gene characteristic of ARMS (paired box 3-forkhead homolog in rhabdomyosarcoma [PAX3-FKHR]) in ERMS cells was sufficient to convert them to an ARMS signaling phenotype and render ILK activity oncogenic. Furthermore, restoration of JNK1 in ARMS reestablished a tumor-suppressive function for ILK. These findings indicate what we believe to be a novel effector pathway regulated by ILK, provide a mechanism for interconversion of oncogenic and tumor-suppressor functions of a single regulatory protein based on the genetic background of the tumor cells, and suggest a rationale for tailored therapy of rhabdomyosarcoma based on the different activities of ILK. PMID:19478459

  9. G48A, a New KRAS Mutation Found in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marabese, Mirko; Caiola, Elisa; Garassino, Marina C; Rastelli, Giulio; Settanni, Giulio; Brugnara, Sonia; Broggini, Massimo; Ganzinelli, Monica

    2016-07-01

    A new somatic mutation in the coding region of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), G48A, has been identified in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). No other mutations were found by screening several genes known to be mutated in NSCLC. The patient responded to first-line therapy and is still under maintenance treatment 18 months after diagnosis. Normal and cancer cells were engineered to express the KRAS(G48A) mutation. KRAS(G48A) overexpression did not change the growth or the response to treatment compared with KRAS(wild type)-expressing cells. Analysis of the structure of the KRAS(G48A) mutant predicted altered interactions with other proteins. Analysis of KRAS binding to B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase showed that the KRAS(G48A) mutant behaves more like a wild-type than a classical KRAS(G12) mutant. In conclusion, this new mutation in the coding region of KRAS, found in NSCLC, does not induce phenotypic changes similar to those induced by G12 mutants but presumably affects KRAS binding to proteins other than B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase. PMID:27058911

  10. Direct regulation of GAS6/AXL signaling by HIF promotes renal metastasis through SRC and MET.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Erinn B; Fuh, Katherine C; Castellini, Laura; Viswanathan, Kartik; Finger, Elizabeth C; Diep, Anh N; LaGory, Edward L; Kariolis, Mihalis S; Chan, Andy; Lindgren, David; Axelson, Håkan; Miao, Yu R; Krieg, Adam J; Giaccia, Amato J

    2014-09-16

    Dysregulation of the von Hippel-Lindau/hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) signaling pathway promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) progression and metastasis. The protein kinase GAS6/AXL signaling pathway has recently been implicated as an essential mediator of metastasis and receptor tyrosine kinase crosstalk in cancer. Here we establish a molecular link between HIF stabilization and induction of AXL receptor expression in metastatic ccRCC. We found that HIF-1 and HIF-2 directly activate the expression of AXL by binding to the hypoxia-response element in the AXL proximal promoter. Importantly, genetic and therapeutic inactivation of AXL signaling in metastatic ccRCC cells reversed the invasive and metastatic phenotype in vivo. Furthermore, we define a pathway by which GAS6/AXL signaling uses lateral activation of the met proto-oncogene (MET) through SRC proto-oncogene nonreceptor tyrosine kinase to maximize cellular invasion. Clinically, AXL expression in primary tumors of ccRCC patients correlates with aggressive tumor behavior and patient lethality. These findings provide an alternative model for SRC and MET activation by growth arrest-specific 6 in ccRCC and identify AXL as a therapeutic target driving the aggressive phenotype in renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:25187556

  11. Gender Differences in Response to Prolonged Every-Other-Day Feeding on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Zgutka, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent fasting decreases glucose and insulin levels and increases insulin sensitivity and lifespan. Decreased food intake influences the liver. Previous studies have shown gender differences in response to various types of caloric restriction, including every-other-day (EOD) feeding, in humans and rodents. Our goal was to show the influence of prolonged EOD feeding on the morphology, proliferation and apoptosis of livers from male and female mice. After nine months of an EOD diet, the livers from male and female mice were collected. We examined their morphology on histological slides using the Hematoxilin and Eosine (H_E) method and Hoechst staining of cell nuclei to evaluate the nuclear area of hepatocytes. We also evaluated the expression of mRNA for proto-oncogens, pro-survival proteins and apoptotic markers using Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We noted increased lipid content in the livers of EOD fed female mice. EOD feeding lead to a decrease of proliferation and apoptosis in the livers of female and male mice, which suggest that tissue maintenance occurred during EOD feeding. Our experiment revealed sex-specific expression of mRNA for proto-oncogenes and pro-survival and pro-apoptotic genes in mice as well as sex-specific responses to the EOD treatment. PMID:27007393

  12. HTLV-I Tax-Mediated Inactivation of Cell Cycle Checkpoints and DNA Repair Pathways Contribute to Cellular Transformation: “A Random Mutagenesis Model”

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    To achieve cellular transformation, most oncogenic retroviruses use transduction by proto-oncogene capture or insertional mutagenesis, whereby provirus integration disrupts expression of tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes. In contrast, the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been classified in a separate class referred to as “transactivating retroviruses”. Current views suggest that the viral encoded Tax protein transactivates expression of cellular genes leading to deregulated growth and transformation. However, if Tax-mediated transactivation was indeed sufficient for cellular transformation, a fairly high frequency of infected cells would eventually become transformed. In contrast, the frequency of transformation by HTLV-I is very low, likely less than 5%. This review will discuss the current understanding and recent discoveries highlighting critical functions of Tax in cellular transformation. HTLV-I Tax carries out essential functions in order to override cell cycle checkpoints and deregulate cellular division. In addition, Tax expression is associated with increased DNA damage and genome instability. Since Tax can inhibit multiple DNA repair pathways and stimulate unfaithful DNA repair or bypass checkpoints, these processes allow accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome. Given this, a “Random Mutagenesis” transformation model seems more suitable to characterize the oncogenic activities of HTLV-I. PMID:26835512

  13. Gender Differences in Response to Prolonged Every-Other-Day Feeding on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Katarzyna; Tarnowski, Maciej; Zgutka, Katarzyna; Pawlik, Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent fasting decreases glucose and insulin levels and increases insulin sensitivity and lifespan. Decreased food intake influences the liver. Previous studies have shown gender differences in response to various types of caloric restriction, including every-other-day (EOD) feeding, in humans and rodents. Our goal was to show the influence of prolonged EOD feeding on the morphology, proliferation and apoptosis of livers from male and female mice. After nine months of an EOD diet, the livers from male and female mice were collected. We examined their morphology on histological slides using the Hematoxilin and Eosine (H_E) method and Hoechst staining of cell nuclei to evaluate the nuclear area of hepatocytes. We also evaluated the expression of mRNA for proto-oncogens, pro-survival proteins and apoptotic markers using Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We noted increased lipid content in the livers of EOD fed female mice. EOD feeding lead to a decrease of proliferation and apoptosis in the livers of female and male mice, which suggest that tissue maintenance occurred during EOD feeding. Our experiment revealed sex-specific expression of mRNA for proto-oncogenes and pro-survival and pro-apoptotic genes in mice as well as sex-specific responses to the EOD treatment. PMID:27007393

  14. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2014-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  15. Protein Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunton, James D.; Shiryayev, Andrey; Pagan, Daniel L.

    2007-09-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Globular protein structure; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics; 5. Protein-protein interactions; 6. Theoretical studies of equilibrium; 7. Nucleation theory; 8. Experimental studies of nucleation; 9. Lysozyme; 10. Some other globular proteins; 11. Membrane proteins; 12. Crystallins and cataracts; 13. Sickle hemoglobin and sickle cell anemia; 14, Alzheimer's disease; Index.

  16. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins found in the fluid portion of your ... nutritional problems, kidney disease or liver disease . If total protein is abnormal, you will need to have more ...

  17. Storage Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Toru; Nambara, Eiji; Yamagishi, Kazutoshi; Goto, Derek B.; Naito, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Plants accumulate storage substances such as starch, lipids and proteins in certain phases of development. Storage proteins accumulate in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and serve as a reservoir to be used in later stages of plant development. The accumulation of storage protein is thus beneficial for the survival of plants. Storage proteins are also an important source of dietary plant proteins. Here, we summarize the genome organization and regulation of gene expression of storage protein genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303197

  18. Dietary Proteins

    MedlinePlus

    ... grains and beans. Proteins from meat and other animal products are complete proteins. This means they supply all of the amino acids the body can't make on its own. Most plant proteins are incomplete. You should eat different types of plant proteins every day to get ...

  19. Protein Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sam K. C.

    Proteins are an abundant component in all cells, and almost all except storage proteins are important for biological functions and cell structure. Food proteins are very complex. Many have been purified and characterized. Proteins vary in molecular mass, ranging from approximately 5000 to more than a million Daltons. They are composed of elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Twenty α-amino acids are the building blocks of proteins; the amino acid residues in a protein are linked by peptide bonds. Nitrogen is the most distinguishing element present in proteins. However, nitrogen content in various food proteins ranges from 13.4 to 19.1% (1) due to the variation in the specific amino acid composition of proteins. Generally, proteins rich in basic amino acids contain more nitrogen.

  20. The roles of PIKE in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qi; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is the process by which normal cells evolve the capacity to evade and overcome the constraints usually placed upon their growth and survival. To ensure the integrity of organs and tissues, the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is tightly maintained. The proteins controlling this balance are either considered oncogenes, which promote tumorigenesis, or tumor suppressors, which prevent tumorigenesis. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) is a family of GTP-binding proteins that possess anti-apoptotic functions and play an important role in the central nervous system. Notably, accumulating evidence suggests that PIKE is a proto-oncogene involved in tumor progression. The PIKE gene (CENTG1) is amplified in a variety of human cancers, leading to the resistance against apoptosis and the enhancement of invasion. In this review, we will summarize the functions of PIKE proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss their potential implications in cancer therapy. PMID:23770988

  1. An insight into the molecular characteristics of hepatitis C virus for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lingyao; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) consists of envelope proteins, core proteins, and genome RNA. The structural genes and non-structural genes in the open reading frame of its genome encode functional proteins essential to viral life cycles, ranging from virus attachment to progeny virus secretion. After infection, the host cells suffer damage from virus-induced oxidative stress, steatosis, and activation of proto-oncogenes. Every process during the viral life cycle can be considered as targets for direct acting antivirals. However, protective immunity cannot be easily acquired for the volatility in HCV antigenic epitopes. Understanding its molecular characteristics, especially pathogenesis and targets the drugs act on, not only helps professionals to make optimal therapeutic decisions, but also helps clinicians who do not specialize in infectious diseases/hepatology to provide better management for patients. This review serves to provide an insight for clinicians and this might provide a possible solution for any possible collision. PMID:27146609

  2. [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Mateus, C; Mortier, L; Dhermain, F; Guillot, B; Grob, J-J; Lebbe, C; Thomas, M; Jouary, T; Leccia, M-T; Robert, C

    2015-02-01

    Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase). PMID:25656856

  3. [mTOR, the mammalian target of rapamycin].

    PubMed

    Julien, Louis-André; Roux, Philippe P

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of rapamycin from a soil sample on Easter Island in the mid 60's marked the beginning of an exciting field of research in cell biology and medicine. While it was first used as an antifungal and as an immunosuppressive drug, more recent studies confirmed rapamycin's antiproliferative properties over a variety of solid tumors. Research aimed at identifying its mechanism of action uncovered mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), a protein kinase that regulates mRNA translation and protein synthesis, an essential step in cell division and proliferation. Recent evidence suggests a more complex role for mTOR in the regulation of several growth factor-stimulated protein kinases, including the proto-oncogene Akt. This article reviews mTOR function and regulation, and briefly details the future challenges for anti-cancer therapies based on mTOR inhibition. PMID:21187044

  4. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    PubMed

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis. PMID:12888294

  5. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  6. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... shows that taking whey protein in combination with strength training increases lean body mass, strength, and muscle size. ... grams/kg of whey protein in combination with strength training for 6-10 weeks. For HIV/AIDS-related ...

  7. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  8. Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  9. LncRNA-MIF, a c-Myc-activated long non-coding RNA, suppresses glycolysis by promoting Fbxw7-mediated c-Myc degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Cao, Limian; Fan, Pingsheng; Mei, Yide; Wu, Mian

    2016-08-01

    The c-Myc proto-oncogene is activated in more than half of all human cancers. However, the precise regulation of c-Myc protein stability is unknown. Here, we show that the lncRNA-MIF (c-Myc inhibitory factor), a c-Myc-induced long non-coding RNA, is a competing endogenous RNA for miR-586 and attenuates the inhibitory effect of miR-586 on Fbxw7, an E3 ligase for c-Myc, leading to increased Fbxw7 expression and subsequent c-Myc degradation. Our data reveal the existence of a feedback loop between c-Myc and lncRNA-MIF, through which c-Myc protein stability is finely controlled. Additionally, we show that the lncRNA-MIF inhibits aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis by suppressing c-Myc and miR-586. PMID:27317567

  10. AMBRA1 links autophagy to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting c-MYC dephosphorylation and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Lorente, Mar; Salazar, Maria; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Gherardini, Pier Federico; De Zio, Daniela; Nazio, Francesca; Antonioli, Manuela; D’Orazio, Melania; Skobo, Tatjana; Bordi, Matteo; Rohde, Mikkel; Dalla Valle, Luisa; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Gretzmeier, Christine; Dengjel, Joern; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Velasco, Guillermo; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of a main regulator of cell metabolism, the protein kinase mTOR, induces autophagy and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways involved in the cross-talk between these two mTOR-dependent cell processes are largely unknown. Here we show that the scaffold protein AMBRA1, a member of the autophagy signalling network and a downstream target of mTOR, regulates cell proliferation by facilitating the dephosphorylation and degradation of the proto-oncogene C-MYC. We found that AMBRA1 favors the interaction between C-MYC and its phosphatase PP2A and that, when mTOR is inhibited, it enhances PP2A activity on this specific target, thereby reducing the cell division rate. As expected, such a de-regulation of C-MYC correlates with increased tumorigenesis in AMBRA1-defective systems, thus supporting a role for AMBRA1 as a haploinsufficient tumour suppressor gene. PMID:25438055

  11. The Smad7–Skp2 complex orchestrates Myc stability, impacting on the cytostatic effect of TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Aug; Kang, Jin Muk; Hyun, Ja-Shil; Lee, Bona; Kim, Staci Jakyong; Yang, Eun-Sung; Hong, Suntaek; Lee, Ho-Jae; Fujii, Makiko; Niederhuber, John E.; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In most human cancers the Myc proto-oncogene is highly activated. Dysregulation of Myc oncoprotein contributes to tumorigenesis in numerous tissues and organs. Thus, targeting Myc stability could be a crucial step for cancer therapy. Here we report Smad7 as a key molecule regulating Myc stability and activity by recruiting the F-box protein, Skp2. Ectopic expression of Smad7 downregulated the protein level of Myc without affecting the transcription level, and significantly repressed its transcriptional activity, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and tumorigenic activity. Furthermore, Smad7 enhanced ubiquitylation of Myc through direct interaction with Myc and recruitment of Skp2. Ablation of Smad7 resulted in less sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect of TGF-β by inducing stable Myc expression. In conclusion, these findings that Smad7 functions in Myc oncoprotein degradation and enhances the cytostatic effect of TGF-β signaling provide a possible new therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. PMID:24259667

  12. Structure and Dynamic Regulation of Abl Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Panjarian, Shoghag; Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Shugui; Engen, John R.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The c-abl proto-oncogene encodes a unique protein-tyrosine kinase (Abl) distinct from c-Src, c-Fes, and other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases. In normal cells, Abl plays prominent roles in cellular responses to genotoxic stress as well as in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Abl is also well known in the context of Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic fusion protein characteristic of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Selective inhibitors of Bcr-Abl, of which imatinib is the prototype, have had a tremendous impact on clinical outcomes in chronic myelogenous leukemia and revolutionized the field of targeted cancer therapy. In this minireview, we focus on the structural organization and dynamics of Abl kinases and how these features influence inhibitor sensitivity. PMID:23316053

  13. Contactin 1 as a potential biomarker promotes cell proliferation and invasion in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kaiyuan; Xu, Dong; Yang, Chen; Wang, Liping; Pan, Weiyun; Zheng, Chuanming; Fan, Linyin

    2015-01-01

    Contactin 1 (CNTN1) as a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily plays important role in the development of nervous system. Recent studies find that elevated CNTN1 can promote the metastasis of cancer. However, the expression and function of CNTN1 in thyroid cancer are still unknown. Here, we firstly find CNTN1 is a new gene which can be regulated by RET/PTC3 (Ret proto-oncogene and Ret-activating protein ELE1) rearrangement gene and the protein level of CNTN1 is increasing in thyroid cancer. Besides this change is positively associated with the TNM stage and tumor size. Moreover, we confirm that knockdown of CNTN1 significantly inhibits the tumor proliferation, invasiveness and represses the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). In conclusion, CNTN1 will be a poteintial diagnosis biomarker and therapy target for thyroid cancer. PMID:26722434

  14. Transcription factors as master regulator for cancer stemness: remove milk from fox?

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Some cancers display a cellular hierarchy of varying differentiation states, as if they phenocopy the normal organ development processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that the molecular signals that control carcinogenesis, at least partially, overlap with those involved in organogenesis. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex of cellular hierarchy are likely one, if not the only, critical therapeutic target in cancers. The proto-oncogene FOXM1 is a transcription factor (TF) defined as a master regulator for a broad array of genes required for CSCs and therefore FOXM1 is overexpressed in various cancers. In general, therapeutic development for TFs is a challenging task. Recently, on the other hand, novel insight has been brought by the discovery of a protein complex of FOXM1 with the mitotic kinase MELK in CSCs in brain cancers, as this protein complex appears to be cancer-specific. This editorial describes FOXM1 signaling in cancers and its potential therapeutic development. PMID:25017123

  15. Protein folds and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, R. Dustin; Daggett, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The classification of protein folds is necessarily based on the structural elements that distinguish domains. Classification of protein domains consists of two problems: the partition of structures into domains and the classification of domains into sets of similar structures (or folds). Although similar topologies may arise by convergent evolution, the similarity of their respective folding pathways is unknown. The discovery and the characterization of the majority of protein folds will be followed by a similar enumeration of available protein folding pathways. Consequently, understanding the intricacies of structural domains is necessary to understanding their collective folding pathways. We review the current state of the art in the field of protein domain classification and discuss methods for the systematic and comprehensive study of protein folding across protein fold space via atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Finally, we discuss our large-scale Dynameomics project, which includes simulations of representatives of all autonomous protein folds. PMID:21051320

  16. Labdane type diterpenes down-regulate the expression of c-Myc protein, but not of Bcl-2, in human leukemia T-cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dimas, K; Demetzos, C; Vaos, V; Ioannidis, P; Trangas, T

    2001-06-01

    Sclareol (1) and ent-3beta-hydroxy-13-epi-manoyl oxide (2) belong to the labdane type diterpenes. They were isolated from the leaves and from the fruits of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus, and were found to be active against human leukemic cell lines. Compound 2 was converted to its thiomidazolide derivative (3). Compounds 1 and 3 were found to induce apoptotic cell death in human T-cell leukemia lines and to interfere with their cell cycle, arresting cells at G(0/1) phase. Apoptosis can involve the activation and/or suppression of critical genes such as c-myc whose reduction or its inappropriate expression can be associated with induction of cell death and bcl-2 whose activation prevents apoptosis in the latter case. In order to detect any concomitant effect (1 and 3) upon c-myc and bcl-2 oncogene expression, we performed Western blot analysis to determine the levels of expression of these two genes upon treatment with the above compounds. Western blot analysis showed that of c-myc proto-oncogene levels were markedly reduced before massive apoptosis ensued in H33AJ-JA1 and MOLT3 cells, while bcl-2 expression remained unaffected. Thus, induction of apoptosis due to compounds 1 and 3 in these T-cell leukemic cell lines is preceded by c-myc down regulation and furthermore sustained bcl-2 expression does not rescue cells from apoptosis under the conditions used. PMID:11337016

  17. Protein Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauenfelder, Hans

    2011-03-01

    Proteins combine properties of solids, liquids, and glasses. Schrödinger anticipated the main features of biomolecules long ago by stating that they had to be solid-like, but able to assume many different conformations. Indeed proteins can assume a gigantic number of conformational substates with the same primary sequence but different conformations. The different substates are described as craters in a very-high-dimensional energy landscape. The energy landscape is organized in a hierarchy of tiers, craters within craters within craters. Protein motions are pictured as transition between substates - jumps from crater to crater. Initially we assumed that these jumps were controlled by internal barriers between substates, but experiments have shown that nature selected a different approach. Proteins are surrounded by one to two layers of water and are embedded in a bulk solvent. Structural motions of the protein are controlled by the alpha fluctuations in the solvent surrounding the protein. Some internal motions most likely involving side chains are controlled electrostatically by beta fluctuations in the hydration shell. The dynamics of proteins is consequently dominated by the environment (H. Frauenfelder et al. PNAS 106, 5129 (2009). One can speculate that this organization permits exchange of information among biomolecules. The energy landscape is not just organized into two tiers, alpha and beta, but cryogenic experiments have revealed more tiers and protein more properties similar to that of glasses. While proteins function at ambient temperatures, cryogenic studies are necessary to understand the physics relevant for biology.

  18. p53, erbB-2 and K-ras gene alterations are rare in spontaneous and plutonium-239-induced canine lung neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1996-02-01

    Inhalation of high-linear energy transfer radiation in the form of radon progeny is a suspected cause of human lung cancer. To gain insight into the types of genetic derangements caused by this type of radiation, lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} and those arising in animals with no known carcinogen exposure were examined for evidence of aberrations in genes known to be altered in lung tumors. Altered expression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and proto-oncogene erbB-2 proteins (p185{sup erbB2}) was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of 117 tumors representing different histological types in exposed (n = 80) and unexposed (n = 37) animals. Twenty-eight tumors were analyzed for K-ras proto-oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Fourteen percent (16/116) of all lung neoplasms showed elevated nuclear accumulation of p53 protein. Regardless of exposure history, adenosquamous and squamous cell cancers comprised 94% of all tumors with p53 abnormalities. Eighteen percent (21/117) of all tumors had evidence of erbB-2 protein overexpression. K-ras mutations were not detected in codons 12, 13 or 61 of tumors from unexposed (n = 9) or plutonium-exposed dogs (n = 19). These data indicate that p53 and K-ras gene abnormalities as a result of missense mutation are infrequent events in spontaneous and {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}-induced lung neoplasia in this colony of beagle dogs. Alternative mechanisms of gene alteration may be involved in canine pulmonary carcinogenesis. 45 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  20. A Caged Ret Kinase Inhibitor and its Effect on Motoneuron Development in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bliman, David; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Kettunen, Petronella; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase receptor RET is implicated in the development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Attaching activity-compromising photocleavable groups (caging) to inhibitors could allow for external spatiotemporally controlled inhibition using light, potentially providing novel information on how these kinase receptors are involved in cellular processes. Here, caged RET inhibitors were obtained from 3-substituted pyrazolopyrimidine-based compounds by attaching photolabile groups to the exocyclic amino function. The most promising compound displayed excellent inhibitory effect in cell-free, as well as live-cell assays upon decaging. Furthermore, inhibition could be efficiently activated with light in vivo in zebrafish embryos and was shown to effect motoneuron development. PMID:26300345

  1. A G-Rich Sequence within the c-kit Oncogene Promoter Forms a Parallel G-Quadruplex Having Asymmetric G-Tetrad Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Varnai, Peter; Bugaut, Anthony; Reszka, Anthony P.; Neidle, Stephen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Guanine-rich DNA sequences with the ability to form quadruplex structures are enriched in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes, particularly those of proto-oncogenes. G-quadruplexes are structurally polymorphic and their folding topologies can depend on the sample conditions. We report here on a structural study using solution state NMR spectroscopy of a second G-quadruplex-forming motif (c-kit2) that has been recently identified in the promoter region of the c-kit oncogene. In the presence of potassium ions, c-kit2 exists as an ensemble of structures that share the same parallel-stranded propeller-type conformations. Subtle differences in structural dynamics have been identified using hydrogen–deuterium exchange experiments by NMR spectroscopy, suggesting the coexistence of at least two structurally similar but dynamically distinct substates, which undergo slow interconversion on the NMR timescale. PMID:19705869

  2. A G-rich sequence within the c-kit oncogene promoter forms a parallel G-quadruplex having asymmetric G-tetrad dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Varnai, Peter; Bugaut, Anthony; Reszka, Anthony P; Neidle, Stephen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2009-09-23

    Guanine-rich DNA sequences with the ability to form quadruplex structures are enriched in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes, particularly those of proto-oncogenes. G-quadruplexes are structurally polymorphic and their folding topologies can depend on the sample conditions. We report here on a structural study using solution state NMR spectroscopy of a second G-quadruplex-forming motif (c-kit2) that has been recently identified in the promoter region of the c-kit oncogene. In the presence of potassium ions, c-kit2 exists as an ensemble of structures that share the same parallel-stranded propeller-type conformations. Subtle differences in structural dynamics have been identified using hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments by NMR spectroscopy, suggesting the coexistence of at least two structurally similar but dynamically distinct substates, which undergo slow interconversion on the NMR timescale. PMID:19705869

  3. The role of G-quadruplex/i-motif secondary structures as cis-acting regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Samantha; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of DNA has captivated scientists for more than fifty years. The discovery of the double-helix model of DNA by Watson and Crick in 1953 not only established the primary structure of DNA, but also provided the mechanism behind DNA function. Since then, researchers have continued to further the understanding of DNA structure and its pivotal role in transcription. The demonstration of DNA secondary structure formation has allowed for the proposal that the dynamics of DNA itself can function to modulate transcription. This review presents evidence that DNA can exist in a dynamic equilibrium between duplex and secondary conformations. In addition, data demonstrating that intracellular proteins as well as small molecules can shift this equilibrium in either direction to alter gene transcription will be discussed, with a focus on the modulation of proto-oncogene expression. PMID:21796223

  4. ID4 controls luminal lineage commitment in normal mammary epithelium and inhibits BRCA1 function in basal-like breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura A; Holliday, Holly; Swarbrick, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (ID) proteins are key regulators of development and tumorigenesis. One member of this family, ID4, controls lineage commitment during mammary gland development by acting upstream of key developmental pathways. Recent evidence suggests an emerging role for ID4 as a lineage-dependent proto-oncogene that is overexpressed and amplified in a subset of basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs), conferring poor prognosis. Several lines of evidence suggest ID4 may suppress BRCA1 function in BLBC and in doing so, define a subset of BLBC patients who may respond to therapies traditionally used in BRCA1-mutant cancers. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the requirement for ID4 in mammary lineage commitment and the role for ID4 in BLBC. We address current shortfalls in this field and identify important areas of future research. PMID:27412917

  5. [The biochemical carcinogenesis of selected heavy metals in bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Rorbach-Dolata, Anna; Marchewka, Zofia; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer takes the second place in the classification of morbidity of urinary system cancers. Many chemical factors take part in cancerogenesis. It is suggested that exposure to heavy metals such as arsenic, chromium, nickel and cadmium as well as its metabolites may trigger the bladder cancer through inducing excessive reactive oxygen species production and oxidative stress formation which are responsible for DNA damage. In patients with bladder cancer is observed the disorder of processes regulated by p-53, including apoptosis. There are many patients with bladder cancer with confirmed absence of retinoblastoma protein, which is responsible of holding on the process of coming up the cells with mutation into synthesis, where the replication process undergoes. It is mentioned that excessive expression of proto-oncogenes may also cause the bladder cancer. The article concerns biochemical effects of exposure to chosen heavy metals and their potential role in bladder cancer progression. PMID:26689010

  6. Updating the Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jia; Virshup, David M.

    2014-01-01

    In the three decades since the discovery of the Wnt1 proto-oncogene in virus-induced mouse mammary tumours, our understanding of the signalling pathways that are regulated by the Wnt proteins has progressively expanded. Wnts are involved in an complex signalling network that governs multiple biological processes and cross-talk with multiple additional signalling cascades, including the Notch, FGF (fibroblast growth factor), SHH (Sonic hedgehog), EGF (epidermal growth factor) and Hippo pathways. The Wnt signalling pathway also illustrates the link between abnormal regulation of the developmental processes and disease manifestation. Here we provide an overview of Wnt-regulated signalling cascades and highlight recent advances. We focus on new findings regarding the dedicated Wnt production and secretion pathway with potential therapeutic targets that might be beneficial for patients with Wnt-related diseases. PMID:25208913

  7. KIT — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    SCF-sR, also known as KIT, is the human homolog of the proto-oncogene c-kit. C-kit was first identified as the cellular homolog of the feline sarcoma viral oncogene v-kit. Human KIT is a tyrosine-protein kinase that acts as cell-surface receptor for the cytokine KITLG/SCF and plays an essential role in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, hematopoiesis, stem cell maintenance, gametogenesis, mast cell development, migration and function, and in melanogenesis. KIT is a type 3 transmembrane receptor for MGF (mast cell growth factor, also known as stem cell factor). Mutations in this gene are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors, mast cell disease, acute myelogenous lukemia, and piebaldism. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene.

  8. Coexistence of Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Choriocarcinoma: Complete Response to Trastuzumab and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Seyda; Elpek, Gulsum Ozlem; Uysal, Mukremin; Goksu, Sema Sezgin; Tatli, Murat; Arslan, Deniz; Coskun, Hasan Senol; Bozcuk, Hakan; Savas, Burhan; Ozdogan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Gastric choriocarcinoma is a rare neoplasm and usually accompanies gastric adenocarcinoma. The prognosis is poor due to the aggressive course of the disease. A 57-year-old female patient with weight loss and abdominal pain was examined. The patient was operated following the examination, and pathological analysis revealed the presence of a gastric adenocarcinoma associated with choriocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a positive reaction with antibodies to beta-human chorionic gonadotropin and overexpression of the cErbB2 proto-oncogene. Staging revealed multiple metastases in the liver. A complete response was obtained with a combination of trastuzumab and chemotherapy. The diagnosis of gastric choriocarcinomas without pathological examination is difficult due to their rare occurrence. A complete response can be obtained with trastuzumab in the treatment of cases with overexpression of the cErbB2 protein. PMID:23525369

  9. The epigenetic factor Kmt2a/Mll1 regulates neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal and glial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yin-Cheng; Shih, Hung-Yu; Lin, Sheng-Jia; Chiu, Ching-Chi; Ma, Tsu-Lin; Yeh, Tu-Hsueh; Cheng, Yi-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    Multiple epigenetic factors play a critical role in cell proliferation and differentiation. However, their function in embryogenesis, especially in neural development, is currently unclear. The Trithorax group (TrxG) homolog KMT2A (MLL1) is an important epigenetic regulator during development and has an especially well-defined role in hematopoiesis. Translocation and aberrant expression of KMT2A is often observed in many tumors, indicating its proto-oncogenic character. Here, we show that Kmt2a was essential for neural development in zebrafish embryos. Disrupting the expression of Kmt2a using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides and a dominant-negative variant resulted in neurogenic phenotypes, including downregulated proliferation of neural progenitors, premature differentiation of neurons, and impaired gliogenesis. This study therefore revealed a novel function of Kmt2a in cell proliferation and differentiation, providing further insight into the function of TrxG proteins in neural development and brain tumors. PMID:25284327

  10. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for longer times. The appearance of three distinct RET states suggested a spatially heterogeneous surface – with areas of high protein density (i.e. strongly-interacting clusters) coexisting with mobile monomers. Distinct association states exhibited characteristic behavior, i.e. partial-RET (monomer-monomer) associations were shorter-lived than complete-RET (protein-cluster) associations. While the fractional surface area covered by regions with high protein density (i.e. clusters) increased with increasing concentration, the distribution of contact times between monomers and clusters was independent of solution concentration, suggesting that associations were a local phenomenon, and independent of the global surface coverage. PMID:24274729

  11. Role of progesterone and estrogen in the preparation of the uterus and induction of implantation in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Huet-Hudson, Y.M.

    1989-01-01

    The implantation of the embryo into the uterine wall and subsequent decidualization of the uterine endometrium requires ovarian progesterone and estrogen. Prerequisites for implantation include (1) the preparation of the uterus for embryo implantation and (2) increase stromal capillary permeability at the site of embryo attachment. During the first three days of pregnancy, epithelial cells undergo proliferation, death and differentiation, in response to preovaluatory estrogen. These events occur in stromal cells in response to progesterone on days 4 and 5. The mechanism by which the steroid hormones modulate their functions and how estrogen initiates implantation in a progesterone-primed (P{sub 4}) uterus in not clearly understood. The author shows that 24h of P{sub 4}-priming is adequate for induction of implantation in the mouse. In addition, following this initial exposure of the uterus to P{sub 4} a long lasting effect is induced i.e. 24h of priming is no longer required for the induction of implantation. The uterine cell proliferation and differentiation that occurs in response to steroid hormones could be through their modulation of the expression of proto-oncogenes and growth factors. Results show that the proto-oncogene, c-myc and the growth factor, EGF are expressed in a cell-type specific manner in the uterus and are regulated by P{sub 4} and estrogen in a spatial and temporal manner during early pregnancy. It is apparent that c-myc protein in epithelia is primarily regulated by estrogen, while in the stroma by P{sub 4}. {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation in specific uterine cell-types correlated with expression of the c-myc protein. On the other hand, EGF is always localized to the epithelia and is primarily regulated by estrogen.

  12. Nifurtimox reduces N-Myc expression and aerobic glycolysis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Bruchelt, Gernot; Handgretinger, Rupert; Holzer, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common solid tumors in childhood and usually accompanied with poor prognosis and rapid tumor progression when diagnosed with amplification of the proto-oncogene N-Myc. The amplification of N-Myc has major influence on the maintenance of aerobic glycolysis, also known as the Warburg effect. This specific switch in the conversion of pyruvate to lactate instead of the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A even in the presence of oxygen has important benefits for the tumor, e.g. increased production of enzymes and enzyme substrates that are involved in tumor progression, angiogenesis and inhibition of apoptosis. The antiprotozoal drug nifurtimox, which is generally used for the treatment of infections with the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has been reported to have cytotoxic properties in the therapy of neuroblastoma. However, its action of mechanism has not been described in detail yet. The presented in vitro study on the neuroblastoma cell lines LA-N-1, IMR-32, LS and SK-N-SH shows an increased production of oxidative stress, a reduced lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity and reduced lactate production after nifurtimox treatment. Furthermore, nifurtimox leads to reduced mRNA and protein levels of the proto-oncogene protein N-Myc. Thus, the current work gives new insights into the effect of nifurtimox on tumor metabolism revealing a shifted glucose metabolism from production of lactate to oxidative phosphorylation and a reduced expression of the major molecular prognostic factor in neuroblastoma N-Myc, presenting nifurtimox as a possible adjuvant therapeutic agent against (high risk) neuroblastoma. PMID:26177922

  13. Evidence of a correlation of estrogen receptor level and avian osteoclast estrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Pederson, L; Kremer, M; Foged, N T; Winding, B; Ritchie, C; Fitzpatrick, L A; Oursler, M J

    1997-05-01

    Isolated osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens respond to estradiol treatment in vitro with decreased resorption activity, increased nuclear proto-oncogene expression, and decreased lysosomal enzyme secretion. This study examines osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and egg-laying hens for evidence of estrogen responsiveness. Although osteoclasts from both of these sources express estrogen receptor mRNA and protein, estradiol treatment had no effect on resorption activity. In contrast to the lack of effect on resorption, estradiol treatment for 30 minutes resulted in steady-state mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun increasing in osteoclasts from embryonic chickens and decreasing in osteoclasts from egg-laying hens. These data suggest that a nuclear proto-oncogene response may not be involved in estradiol-mediated decreased osteoclast resorption activity. To examine the influence of circulating estrogen on osteoclast estrogen responsiveness, 5-week-old chickens were injected with estrogen for 4 days prior to sacrifice. Estradiol treatment of osteoclasts from these chickens did not decrease resorption activity in vitro. Transfection of an estrogen receptor expression vector into osteoclasts from the estradiol-injected chickens and egg-laying hens restored estrogen responsiveness. Osteoclasts from 5-week-old chickens and estradiol treated 5-week-old chickens transfected with the estrogen receptor expression vector contained significantly higher levels of estrogen receptor protein and responded to estradiol treatment by decreasing secretion of cathepsins B and L and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. In contrast, osteoclasts from embryonic chickens, egg-laying hens, and estradiol-treated 5-week-old chickens either untransfected or transfected with an empty expression vector did not respond similarly. These data suggest that modulation of osteoclast estrogen responsiveness may be controlled by changes in the osteoclast estrogen receptor levels. PMID:9144340

  14. Whey Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance, for replacing or supplementing milk-based infant formulas, and for reversing weight loss and increasing glutathione ( ... allergic reactions compared to infants who receive standard formula. However, taking why protein might not be helpful ...

  15. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs. PMID:27443349

  16. PIKE mediates EGFR proliferative signaling in squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z; Jiang, Y; Liao, E-Y; Chen, Y; Pennypacker, S D; Peng, J; Chang, S M

    2012-12-01

    One of the key drivers for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) proliferation is activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known proto-oncogene. However, the mechanism of EGFR-dependent SCC proliferation remains unclear. Our previous studies indicate that epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced SCC cell proliferation requires the SH3 domain of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1), but not its catalytic activity. The SH3 domain of PLC-γ1 is known to activate the short form of nuclear phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) that enhances the activity of nuclear class Ia phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) required for proliferation. However, PIKE has been described for more than a decade to be present exclusively in neuronal cells. In the present study, we found that PIKE was highly expressed in malignant human keratinocytes (SCC4 and SCC12B2) but had low expression in normal human keratinocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed strong nuclear staining of PIKE in human epidermal and tongue SCC specimens but little staining in the adjacent non-cancerous epithelium. Treatment of SCC4 cells with EGF-induced translocation of PLC-γ1 to the nucleus and binding of PLC-γ1 to the nuclear PIKE. Knockdown of PLC-γ1 or PIKE blocked EGF-induced activation of class Ia PI3K and protein kinase C-ζ and phosphorylation of nucleolin in the nucleus as well as EGF-induced SCC cell proliferation. However, inhibition of the catalytic activity of PLC-γ1 had little effect. These data suggest that PIKE has a critical role in EGF-induced SCC cell proliferation and may function as a proto-oncogene in SCC. PMID:22349826

  17. Retroviral insertions in the VISION database identify molecular pathways in mouse lymphoid leukemia and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Keith C.; Liu, Bin; Hansen, Gwenn M.; Skapura, Darlene; Hentges, Kathryn E.; Yarlagadda, Sujatha; Morse III, Herbert C.

    2007-01-01

    AKXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains develop a variety of leukemias and lymphomas due to somatically acquired insertions of retroviral DNA into the genome of hematopoetic cells that can mutate cellular proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We generated a new set of tumors from nine AKXD RI strains selected for their propensity to develop B-cell tumors, the most common type of human hematopoietic cancers. We employed a PCR technique called viral insertion site amplification (VISA) to rapidly isolate genomic sequence at the site of provirus insertion. Here we describe 550 VISA sequence tags (VSTs) that identify 74 common insertion sites (CISs), of which 21 have not been identified previously. Several suspected proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes lie near CISs, providing supportive evidence for their roles in cancer. Furthermore, numerous previously uncharacterized genes lie near CISs, providing a pool of candidate disease genes for future research. Pathway analysis of candidate genes identified several signaling pathways as common and powerful routes to blood cancer, including Notch, E-protein, NFκB, and Ras signaling. Misregulation of several Notch signaling genes was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Our data suggest that analyses of insertional mutagenesis on a single genetic background are biased toward the identification of cooperating mutations. This tumor collection represents the most comprehensive study of the genetics of B-cell leukemia and lymphoma development in mice. We have deposited the VST sequences, CISs in a genome viewer, histopathology, and molecular tumor typing data in a public web database called VISION (Viral Insertion Sites Identifying Oncogenes), which is located at http://www.mouse-genome.bcm.tmc.edu/vision. PMID:17926094

  18. Designed protein-protein association.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Dirk; Treiber, Nora; Ziegler, Mathias O P; Koetter, Jochen W A; Schulze, Monika-Sarah; Schulz, Georg E

    2008-01-11

    The analysis of natural contact interfaces between protein subunits and between proteins has disclosed some general rules governing their association. We have applied these rules to produce a number of novel assemblies, demonstrating that a given protein can be engineered to form contacts at various points of its surface. Symmetry plays an important role because it defines the multiplicity of a designed contact and therefore the number of required mutations. Some of the proteins needed only a single side-chain alteration in order to associate to a higher-order complex. The mobility of the buried side chains has to be taken into account. Four assemblies have been structurally elucidated. Comparisons between the designed contacts and the results will provide useful guidelines for the development of future architectures. PMID:18187656

  19. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  20. Bacteriophage protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Häuser, Roman; Blasche, Sonja; Dokland, Terje; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; von Brunn, Albrecht; Salas, Margarita; Casjens, Sherwood; Molineux, Ian; Uetz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages T7, λ, P22, and P2/P4 (from Escherichia coli), as well as ϕ29 (from Bacillus subtilis), are among the best-studied bacterial viruses. This chapter summarizes published protein interaction data of intraviral protein interactions, as well as known phage-host protein interactions of these phages retrieved from the literature. We also review the published results of comprehensive protein interaction analyses of Pneumococcus phages Dp-1 and Cp-1, as well as coliphages λ and T7. For example, the ≈55 proteins encoded by the T7 genome are connected by ≈43 interactions with another ≈15 between the phage and its host. The chapter compiles published interactions for the well-studied phages λ (33 intra-phage/22 phage-host), P22 (38/9), P2/P4 (14/3), and ϕ29 (20/2). We discuss whether different interaction patterns reflect different phage lifestyles or whether they may be artifacts of sampling. Phages that infect the same host can interact with different host target proteins, as exemplified by E. coli phage λ and T7. Despite decades of intensive investigation, only a fraction of these phage interactomes are known. Technical limitations and a lack of depth in many studies explain the gaps in our knowledge. Strategies to complete current interactome maps are described. Although limited space precludes detailed overviews of phage molecular biology, this compilation will allow future studies to put interaction data into the context of phage biology. PMID:22748812

  1. Recombinant protein production technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  2. Protein inference: A protein quantification perspective.

    PubMed

    He, Zengyou; Huang, Ting; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Peijun; Teng, Ben; Deng, Shengchun

    2016-08-01

    In mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics, protein quantification and protein identification are two major computational problems. To quantify the protein abundance, a list of proteins must be firstly inferred from the raw data. Then the relative or absolute protein abundance is estimated with quantification methods, such as spectral counting. Until now, most researchers have been dealing with these two processes separately. In fact, the protein inference problem can be regarded as a special protein quantification problem in the sense that truly present proteins are those proteins whose abundance values are not zero. Some recent published papers have conceptually discussed this possibility. However, there is still a lack of rigorous experimental studies to test this hypothesis. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem. Protein inference methods aim to determine whether each candidate protein is present in the sample or not. Protein quantification methods estimate the abundance value of each inferred protein. Naturally, the abundance value of an absent protein should be zero. Thus, we argue that the protein inference problem can be viewed as a special protein quantification problem in which one protein is considered to be present if its abundance is not zero. Based on this idea, our paper tries to use three simple protein quantification methods to solve the protein inference problem effectively. The experimental results on six data sets show that these three methods are competitive with previous protein inference algorithms. This demonstrates that it is plausible to model the protein inference problem as a special protein quantification task, which opens the door of devising more effective protein inference algorithms from a quantification perspective. The source codes of our methods are available at: http://code.google.com/p/protein-inference/. PMID:26935399

  3. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Isy Lima; Carreno, Ana Maria; Prazeres, Vania Mesquita Gadelha; Chirano, Caroline Albuquerque Rodrigues; Ihara, Gabriel Maroja; Akel, Patricia Bandeira de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a rare genetic disorder, first described by Costello in 1971, caused by mutations in the HRAS proto-oncogene. Clinical findings include facial dysmorphism, skin disorders, cognitive impairment, cardiac and musculoskeletal defects. There is an increased risk of malignancies in these patients, due to the proto-oncogene mutation, and also sudden death secondary to heart disease. We report a case with characteristic phenotype, highlighting the peculiar skin changes. PMID:25387514

  4. Interfacing protein lysine acetylation and protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Hue T.; Uhrig, R. Glen; Nimick, Mhairi; Moorhead, Greg B.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition that different protein covalent modifications can operate in concert to regulate a single protein has forced us to re-think the relationship between amino acid side chain modifications and protein function. Results presented by Tran et al. 2012 demonstrate the association of a protein phosphatase (PP2A) with a histone/lysine deacetylase (HDA14) on plant microtubules along with a histone/lysine acetyltransferase (ELP3). This finding reveals a regulatory interface between two prevalent covalent protein modifications, protein phosphorylation and acetylation, emphasizing the integrated complexity of post-translational protein regulation found in nature. PMID:22827947

  5. Proteomic profiling of human colon cancer cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat.

    PubMed

    Beck, Hans Christian; Petersen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren Jensby; Morsczeck, Christian; Morszeck, Christian; Jensen, Peter B; Sehested, Maxwell; Grauslund, Morten

    2010-08-01

    The anticancer drug belinostat is a hydroxamate histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown significant antitumour activity in various tumour models and also in clinical trials. In this study, we utilized a proteomic approach in order to evaluate the effect of this drug on protein expression in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116. Protein extracts from untreated HCT116 cells, and cells grown for 24 h in the presence of 1 and 10 muM belinostat were analysed by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Proteins were visualized by colloidal Coomassie blue staining and quantitative analysis of gel images revealed 45 unique differentially expressed proteins that were identified by LC-MSMS analysis. Among these proteins, of particular interest are the downregulated proteins nucleophosmin and stratifin, and the upregulated proteins nucleolin, gelsolin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, annexin 1, and HSP90B that all were related to the proto-oncogene proteins p53, Myc, activator protein 1, and c-fos protein. The modulation of these proteins is consistent with the observations that belinostat is able to inhibit clonogenic cell growth of HCT116 cells and the biological role of these proteins will be discussed. PMID:20717991

  6. Length, protein protein interactions, and complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Taison; Frenkel, Daan; Gupta, Vishal; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-05-01

    The evolutionary reason for the increase in gene length from archaea to prokaryotes to eukaryotes observed in large-scale genome sequencing efforts has been unclear. We propose here that the increasing complexity of protein-protein interactions has driven the selection of longer proteins, as they are more able to distinguish among a larger number of distinct interactions due to their greater average surface area. Annotated protein sequences available from the SWISS-PROT database were analyzed for 13 eukaryotes, eight bacteria, and two archaea species. The number of subcellular locations to which each protein is associated is used as a measure of the number of interactions to which a protein participates. Two databases of yeast protein-protein interactions were used as another measure of the number of interactions to which each S. cerevisiae protein participates. Protein length is shown to correlate with both number of subcellular locations to which a protein is associated and number of interactions as measured by yeast two-hybrid experiments. Protein length is also shown to correlate with the probability that the protein is encoded by an essential gene. Interestingly, average protein length and number of subcellular locations are not significantly different between all human proteins and protein targets of known, marketed drugs. Increased protein length appears to be a significant mechanism by which the increasing complexity of protein-protein interaction networks is accommodated within the natural evolution of species. Consideration of protein length may be a valuable tool in drug design, one that predicts different strategies for inhibiting interactions in aberrant and normal pathways.

  7. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  8. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  9. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  10. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.