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Sample records for protocol home-based telehealth

  1. Study protocol: home-based telehealth stroke care: a randomized trial for veterans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stroke is one of the most disabling and costly impairments of adulthood in the United States. Stroke patients clearly benefit from intensive inpatient care, but due to the high cost, there is considerable interest in implementing interventions to reduce hospital lengths of stay. Early discharge rehabilitation programs require coordinated, well-organized home-based rehabilitation, yet lack of sufficient information about the home setting impedes successful rehabilitation. This trial examines a multifaceted telerehabilitation (TR) intervention that uses telehealth technology to simultaneously evaluate the home environment, assess the patient's mobility skills, initiate rehabilitative treatment, prescribe exercises tailored for stroke patients and provide periodic goal oriented reassessment, feedback and encouragement. Methods We describe an ongoing Phase II, 2-arm, 3-site randomized controlled trial (RCT) that determines primarily the effect of TR on physical function and secondarily the effect on disability, falls-related self-efficacy, and patient satisfaction. Fifty participants with a diagnosis of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) TR; or (b) Usual Care. The TR intervention uses a combination of three videotaped visits and five telephone calls, an in-home messaging device, and additional telephonic contact as needed over a 3-month study period, to provide a progressive rehabilitative intervention with a treatment goal of safe functional mobility of the individual within an accessible home environment. Dependent variables will be measured at baseline, 3-, and 6-months and analyzed with a linear mixed-effects model across all time points. Discussion For patients recovering from stroke, the use of TR to provide home assessments and follow-up training in prescribed equipment has the potential to effectively supplement existing home health services, assist transition to home and increase efficiency. This may

  2. Home-Based Telehealth Hospitalization for Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Findings from “The Virtual Hospital” Trial

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Lars C.; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Østergaard, Birte; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Emme, Christina; Schou, Lone; Phanareth, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Telehealth interventions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have focused primarily on stable outpatients. Telehealth designed to handle the acute exacerbation that normally requires hospitalization could also be of interest. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of home-based telehealth hospitalization with conventional hospitalization for exacerbation in severe COPD. Materials and Methods: A two-center, noninferiority, randomized, controlled effectiveness trial was conducted between June 2010 and December 2011. Patients with severe COPD admitted because of exacerbation were randomized 1:1 either to home-based telehealth hospitalization or to continue standard treatment and care at the hospital. The primary outcome was treatment failure defined as re-admission due to exacerbation in COPD within 30 days after initial discharge. The noninferiority margin was set at 20% of the control group's risk of re-admission. Secondary outcomes were mortality, need for manual or mechanical ventilation or noninvasive ventilation, length of hospitalization, physiological parameters, health-related quality of life, user satisfaction, healthcare costs, and adverse events. Results: In total, 57 patients were randomized: 29 participants in the telehealth group and 28 participants in the control group. Testing the incidence of re-admission within 30 days after discharge could not confirm noninferiority (lower 95% confidence limit [CL], −24.8%; p=0.35). Results were also nonsignificant at 90 days (lower 95% CL, −16.2%; p=0.33) and 180 days (lower 95% CL, −16.6%; p =0.33) after discharge. Superiority testing on secondary outcomes showed nonsignificant differences between groups. Healthcare costs have not yet been evaluated. Conclusions: Whether home-based telehealth hospitalization is noninferior to conventional hospitalization requires further investigation. The results indicate that a subgroup of patients with severe COPD

  3. Patient Compliance in Home-Based Self-Care Telehealth Projects.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Anthony; Poultney, Nathan; Morgan, Gary; Lippiatt, Robert

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the findings of a literature review on patient compliance in home-based self-care telehealth monitoring situations, intended to establish a knowledge base for this aspect which is often neglected alongside more conventional clinical, economic and service evaluations. A systematic search strategy led to 72 peer-reviewed published scientific papers being selected as most relevant to the topic, 58 of which appeared in the last 10 years. Patient conditions in which most evidence for compliance was found were blood pressure, heart failure and stroke, diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other respiratory diseases. In general, good compliance at the start of a study was found to drop off over time, most rapidly in the period immediately after the start. Success factors identified in the study included the extent of patient health education, telehealth system implementation style, user training and competence in system usage, active human support from the healthcare provider and maintaining strong participant motivation. PMID:26556057

  4. Telehealth

    MedlinePlus

    ... independence TELEHEALTH AND INSURANCE Not all health insurance companies pay for all telehealth services. And services may ... a good idea to check with your insurance company to be sure telehealth services will be covered.

  5. The Telehealth Skills, Training, and Implementation Project: An Evaluation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Andrew; Mullan, Judy; Moscova, Michelle; Barnett, Stephen; Iverson, Don; Saffioti, Daniel; Eastland, Elisabeth; Guppy, Michelle; Weston, Kathryn; Wilson, Ian; Hudson, Judith Nicky; Pond, Dimity; Gill, Gerard; Hespe, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Telehealth appears to be an ideal mechanism for assisting rural patients and doctors and medical students/registrars in accessing specialist services. Telehealth is the use of enhanced broadband technology to provide telemedicine and education over distance. It provides accessible support to rural primary care providers and medical educators. A telehealth consultation is where a patient at a general practice, with the assistance of the general practitioner or practice nurse, undertakes a consultation by videoconference with a specialist located elsewhere. Multiple benefits of telehealth consulting have been reported, particularly those relevant to rural patients and health care providers. However there is a paucity of research on the benefits of telehealth to medical education and learning. Objective This protocol explains in depth the process that will be undertaken by a collaborative group of universities and training providers in this unique project. Methods Training sessions in telehealth consulting will be provided for participating practices and students. The trial will then use telehealth consulting as a real-patient learning experience for students, general practitioner trainees, general practitioner preceptors, and trainees. Results Results will be available when the trial has been completed in 2015. Conclusions The protocol has been written to reflect the overarching premise that, by building virtual communities of practice with users of telehealth in medical education, a more sustainable and rigorous model can be developed. The Telehealth Skills Training and Implementation Project will implement and evaluate a theoretically driven model of Internet-facilitated medical education for vertically integrated, community-based learning environments PMID:25567780

  6. Home-based telehealth to deliver evidence-based psychotherapy in veterans with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Martha; Gros, Daniel F; Yuen, Erica; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Foa, Edna B; Acierno, Ron

    2012-03-01

    Although medical service delivery via home-based telehealth technology (HBT) is gaining wider acceptance in managing chronic illnesses such as diabetes or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, few studies have tested HBT applications of psychotherapy. Clinicians, administrators, and researchers question whether delivering psychotherapeutic services to patients in their homes via video-conferencing technology compromises patient safety, potency of treatment, or data security. Despite these concerns, HBT service delivery may increase access to evidence-based psychotherapies for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who may be less willing or less able to receive weekly treatment at a VA medical center or outpatient clinic due to symptom severity or other similar barriers to care. Indeed, although combat-exposed service members endorse high rates of psychiatric disorders, few appear to initiate mental health services or receive an adequate dose of treatment. Thus, using HBT technologies to administer evidence-based therapies remains uncharted territory in both the clinical and research arenas. This manuscript describes an ongoing four year randomized controlled trial comparing in-person Prolonged Exposure (PE) - a specialized evidence-based psychotherapy for PTSD - and PE delivered via HBT, with a particular focus on the selection, application, and strengths/weaknesses of HBT procedures. PMID:22101225

  7. Telehealth

    MedlinePlus

    Telehealth; Telemedicine; Mobile health (mHealth); Remote patient monitoring; E-health ... American Telemedicine Association. What Is Telehealth? www.americantelemed.org/about-telemedicine/what-is-telemedicine#.Vfsv-t9Viko . Accessed October 8, ...

  8. Multi-site videoconferencing for home-based education of older people with chronic conditions: the Telehealth Literacy Project.

    PubMed

    Banbury, Annie; Parkinson, Lynne; Nancarrow, Susan; Dart, Jared; Gray, Len; Buckley, Jennene

    2014-10-01

    We examined the acceptability of multi-site videoconferencing as a method of providing group education to older people in their homes. There were 9 groups comprising 52 participants (mean age 73 years) with an average of four chronic conditions. Tablet computers or PCs were installed in participant's homes and connected to the Internet by the National Broadband Network (high-speed broad band network) or by the 4G wireless network. A health literacy and self-management programme was delivered by videoconference for 5 weeks. Participants were able to view and interact with all group members and the facilitator on their devices. During the study, 44 group videoconferences were conducted. Evaluation included 16 semi-structured interviews, 3 focus groups and a journal detailing project implementation. The participants reported enjoying home-based group education by videoconference and found the technology easy to use. Using home-based groups via videoconference was acceptable for providing group education, and considered particularly valuable for people living alone and/or with limited mobility. Audio difficulties were the most commonly reported problem. Participants connected with 4G experienced more problems (audio and visual) than participants on the National Broadband Network and those living in multi-dwelling residences reported more problems than those living in single-dwelling residences. Older people with little computer experience can be supported to use telehealth equipment. Telehealth has the potential to improve access to education about chronic disease self-management. PMID:25399994

  9. Protocol for a Systematic Review of Telehealth Privacy and Security Research to Identify Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Watzlaf, Valerie J M; Dealmeida, Dilhari R; Zhou, Leming; Hartman, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professionals engaged in telehealth are faced with complex US federal regulations (e.g., HIPAA/HITECH) and could benefit from the guidance provided by best practices in Privacy and Security (P&S). This article describes a systematic review protocol to address this need. The protocol described herein uses the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P). The PRISMA-P contains 17 items that are considered essential, as well as minimum components to include in systematic reviews. PICOS (participants, interventions, comparisons, outcome(s) and study design of the systematic review) are also relevant to the development of best practices in P&S in telehealth systems. A systematic process can best determine what information should be included and how this information should be retrieved, condensed, analyzed, organized, and disseminated. PMID:27563383

  10. Protocol for a Systematic Review of Telehealth Privacy and Security Research to Identify Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    WATZLAF, VALERIE J.M.; DEALMEIDA, DILHARI R.; ZHOU, LEMING; HARTMAN, LINDA M.

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professionals engaged in telehealth are faced with complex US federal regulations (e.g., HIPAA/HITECH) and could benefit from the guidance provided by best practices in Privacy and Security (P&S). This article describes a systematic review protocol to address this need. The protocol described herein uses the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P). The PRISMA-P contains 17 items that are considered essential, as well as minimum components to include in systematic reviews. PICOS (participants, interventions, comparisons, outcome(s) and study design of the systematic review) are also relevant to the development of best practices in P&S in telehealth systems. A systematic process can best determine what information should be included and how this information should be retrieved, condensed, analyzed, organized, and disseminated. PMID:27563383

  11. Attitudes towards acceptance of an innovative home-based and remote sensing rehabilitation protocol among cardiovascular patients in Shantou, China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Ying; Li, Ji-Lin; Li, Zhong-Han; Xu, Duan-Min; Chen, Chang; Xie, Bin; Chen, Helen; Au, William W

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) protocols have diversified to include home-based cardiac tele-rehabilitation (HBCTR) as an alternative to hospital-based or center-based CR. To adopt the use of home-based cardiac tele-rehabilitation, it is necessary to assess cardiac patients' attitudes towards acceptance of such e-health technology, especially in China where knowledge of such technology is deficient. Methods Interviews were conducted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China. After percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) surgery, patients completed the survey. Results Among the 150 patients, only 13% had ever heard of HBCTR. After an introduction of our HBCTR program, 60% of patients were willing to participate in the program. From our multivariate analysis of questionnaire data, age (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.86–0.98; P = 0.007), average family monthly income (OR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.05–0.34; P < 0.001), education level (OR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.10–0.59; P = 0.002) and physical exercise time (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.06–0.56; P = 0.003) were independent predictors for acceptance of HBCTR. From the reasons for participation, patients selected: enhanced safety and independence (28.3%), ability to self-monitor physical conditions daily (25.4%), and having automatic and emergency alert (23.1%). Reasons for refusal were: too cumbersome operation (34.3%) and unnecessary protocol (19.4%). Conclusions Most patients lacked knowledge about HBCTR but volunteered to participate after they have learned about the program. Several personal and life-style factors influenced their acceptance of the program. These indicate that both improvement of technology and better understanding of the program will enhance active participation. PMID:27403142

  12. Home-based oral immunotherapy (OIT) with an intermittent loading protocol in children unlikely to outgrow egg allergy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Home based oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergy has often been used for young children in Japan, the majority of whom are believed to outgrow the allergy by the school age, therefore the true efficacy of the therapy has been controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a newly developed slow- type home-based oral immunotherapy (OIT) regimen in children with hen’s egg (HE) allergy, who had low likelihood of outgrowing the allergy, with treatment involving only elimination diet. Method We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 43 children with egg allergy (30 males; median age 6) who fulfilled Burks et al.’s criteria of being unlikely to outgrow the allergy. Thirty children who agreed to start OIT were assigned to the treatment group, and 13 who did not want to participate immediately were assigned to the untreated group; the patients underwent an elimination diet for 1 year, during which they were monitored. The OIT regimen involved the intake of the maximum tolerated dose 2 to 3 times a week at home, with initial dose introduction followed by dose build-ups with medical supervision. We statistically evaluated the rate of children who changed their threshold up to 32 g of egg – defined as, oral tolerance induction– in both the groups for 1 year and in the OIT group for 2 years, as well as the rate of children who fulfilled Savage et al.’s criteria of clinical tolerance after reaching the abovementioned remission stage. Results The rate of children who achieved oral tolerance induction to 32 g of egg after 1 year in the OIT group (9/30) was significantly higher than that in the untreated group (0/13). The total rate within the OIT group was significantly increased from 9/30 at 1 year to 17/30 at two years without any severe adverse reaction; of the above 17 children, we followed 14 children, and noted that 11 of these were able to obtain clinical tolerance. Conclusion The home-based OIT with

  13. Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ken; Kwong, Mabel; Alzougool, Basil; Hines, Carolyn; Tidhar, Gil; Frukhtman, Feodor

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described

  14. A home-based comprehensive care model in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A study pre-protocol

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lufei; Healey, Kathleen; Charlton, Mary; Schmid, Kendra; Zabad, Rana; Wester, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability is prevalent in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to difficulty in care access, significant caregiver burden, immense challenges in self-care and great societal burden.  Without highly coordinated, competent and accessible care, individuals living with progressive MS experience psychological distress, poor quality of life, suffer from life-threatening complications, and have frequent but avoidable healthcare utilizations. Unfortunately, current healthcare delivery models present severe limitations in providing easily accessible, patient-centered, coordinated comprehensive care to those with progressive MS. We propose a home-based comprehensive care model (MAHA) to address the unmet needs, challenges, and avoidable complications in individuals with progressive MS with disabling disease. Objective The article aims to describe the study design and methods used to implement and evaluate the proposed intervention.   Method The study will use a randomized controlled design to evaluate the feasibility of providing a 24-month, home-based, patient-centered comprehensive care program to improve quality of life, reduce complications and healthcare utilizations overtime (quarterly) for 24 months. A transdisciplinary team led by a MS-Comprehensivist will carry out this project. Fifty MS patients will be randomly assigned to the intervention and usual care program using block randomization procedures. We hypothesize that patients in the intervention group will have fewer complications, higher quality of life, greater satisfaction with care, and reduced healthcare utilization. The proposed project is also expected to be financially sustainable in fee-for-service models but best suited for and gain financial success in valued-based care systems.   Discussion This is the first study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based comprehensive care management program in MS patients living with progressive disability. If

  15. A home-based comprehensive care model in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A study pre-protocol.

    PubMed

    Young, Lufei; Healey, Kathleen; Charlton, Mary; Schmid, Kendra; Zabad, Rana; Wester, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background Disability is prevalent in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), leading to difficulty in care access, significant caregiver burden, immense challenges in self-care and great societal burden.  Without highly coordinated, competent and accessible care, individuals living with progressive MS experience psychological distress, poor quality of life, suffer from life-threatening complications, and have frequent but avoidable healthcare utilizations. Unfortunately, current healthcare delivery models present severe limitations in providing easily accessible, patient-centered, coordinated comprehensive care to those with progressive MS. We propose a home-based comprehensive care model (MAHA) to address the unmet needs, challenges, and avoidable complications in individuals with progressive MS with disabling disease. Objective The article aims to describe the study design and methods used to implement and evaluate the proposed intervention.   Method The study will use a randomized controlled design to evaluate the feasibility of providing a 24-month, home-based, patient-centered comprehensive care program to improve quality of life, reduce complications and healthcare utilizations overtime (quarterly) for 24 months. A transdisciplinary team led by a MS-Comprehensivist will carry out this project. Fifty MS patients will be randomly assigned to the intervention and usual care program using block randomization procedures. We hypothesize that patients in the intervention group will have fewer complications, higher quality of life, greater satisfaction with care, and reduced healthcare utilization. The proposed project is also expected to be financially sustainable in fee-for-service models but best suited for and gain financial success in valued-based care systems.   Discussion This is the first study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a home-based comprehensive care management program in MS patients living with progressive disability. If

  16. Home based exercise to improve turning and mobility performance among community dwelling older adults: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Turning is a common activity for older people, and is one of the activities commonly associated with falls during walking. Falls that occur while walking and turning have also been associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in older people. Despite the importance of stability during turning, there has been little focus on identifying this impairment in at risk older people, or in evaluating interventions aiming to improve this outcome. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a 16 week tailored home based exercise program in older adults aged (50 years and above) who were identified as having unsteadiness during turning. Methods/Design A single blind randomized controlled trial will be conducted, with assessors blind to group allocation. Study participants will be aged 50 years and above, living in the community and have been identified as having impaired turning ability [outside of age and gender normal limits on the Step Quick Turn (180 degree turn) task on the Neurocom® Balance Master with long plate]. After a comprehensive baseline assessment, those classified as having balance impairment while turning will be randomized to intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive a 16 week individualized balance and strength home exercise program, based on the Otago Exercise Program with additional exercises focused on improving turning ability. Intervention group will attend four visit to the assessment centre over 16 weeks period, for provision, monitoring, modification of the exercise and encourage ongoing participation. Participants in the control group will continue with their usual activities. All participants will be re-assessed on completion of the 16 week program. Primary outcome measures will be the Step Quick Turn Test and Timed-Up and Go test. Secondary outcomes will include other clinical measures of balance, psychological aspects of falls, incidence of falls and falls risk factors. Discussion Results of this study

  17. Home-based neurologic music therapy for upper limb rehabilitation with stroke patients at community rehabilitation stage—a feasibility study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Street, Alexander J.; Magee, Wendy L.; Odell-Miller, Helen; Bateman, Andrew; Fachner, Jorg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Impairment of upper limb function following stroke is more common than lower limb impairment and is also more resistant to treatment. Several lab-based studies with stroke patients have produced statistically significant gains in upper limb function when using musical instrument playing and techniques where rhythm acts as an external time-keeper for the priming and timing of upper limb movements. Methods: For this feasibility study a small sample size of 14 participants (3–60 months post stroke) has been determined through clinical discussion between the researcher and study host in order to test for management, feasibility and effects, before planning a larger trial determined through power analysis. A cross-over design with five repeated measures will be used, whereby participants will be randomized into either a treatment (n = 7) or wait list control (n = 7) group. Intervention will take place twice weekly over 6 weeks. The ARAT and 9HPT will be used to measure for quantitative gains in arm function and finger dexterity, pre/post treatment interviews will serve to investigate treatment compliance and tolerance. A lab based EEG case comparison study will be undertaken to explore audio-motor coupling, brain connectivity and neural reorganization with this intervention, as evidenced in similar studies. Discussion: Before evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based intervention in a larger scale study, it is important to assess whether implementation of the trial methodology is feasible. This study investigates the feasibility, efficacy and patient experience of a music therapy treatment protocol comprising a chart of 12 different instrumental exercises and variations, which aims at promoting measurable changes in upper limb function in hemiparetic stroke patients. The study proposes to examine several new aspects including home-based treatment and dosage, and will provide data on recruitment, adherence and variability of outcomes. PMID:26441586

  18. Home Telehealth Video Conferencing: Perceptions and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Greg; Pech, Joanne; Rechter, Stuart; Carati, Colin; Kidd, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Background The Flinders Telehealth in the Home trial (FTH trial), conducted in South Australia, was an action research initiative to test and evaluate the inclusion of telehealth services and broadband access technologies for palliative care patients living in the community and home-based rehabilitation services for the elderly at home. Telehealth services at home were supported by video conferencing between a therapist, nurse or doctor, and a patient using the iPad tablet. Objective The aims of this study are to identify which technical factors influence the quality of video conferencing in the home setting and to assess the impact of these factors on the clinical perceptions and acceptance of video conferencing for health care delivery into the home. Finally, we aim to identify any relationships between technical factors and clinical acceptance of this technology. Methods An action research process developed several quantitative and qualitative procedures during the FTH trial to investigate technology performance and users perceptions of the technology including measurements of signal power, data transmission throughput, objective assessment of user perceptions of videoconference quality, and questionnaires administered to clinical users. Results The effectiveness of telehealth was judged by clinicians as equivalent to or better than a home visit on 192 (71.6%, 192/268) occasions, and clinicians rated the experience of conducting a telehealth session compared with a home visit as equivalent or better in 90.3% (489/540) of the sessions. It was found that the quality of video conferencing when using a third generation mobile data service (3G) in comparison to broadband fiber-based services was concerning as 23.5% (220/936) of the calls failed during the telehealth sessions. The experimental field tests indicated that video conferencing audio and video quality was worse when using mobile data services compared with fiber to the home services. As well, statistically

  19. Telehealth Education in Nursing Curricula.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nagia S; Carlton, Kay Hodson; Ali, Omar S

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth care is a fast-growing avenue of providing health care services at a distance. A descriptive study was conducted to identify trends of telehealth education in 43 schools of nursing. Findings reflected inadequate integration of telehealth in classroom content, simulation, and clinical experiences. Interviews with 4 nursing leaders of telehealth provided some recommendations on how to integrate telehealth education in nursing curricula. PMID:25689080

  20. A randomised, feasibility trial of a tele-health intervention for Acute Coronary Syndrome patients with depression ('MoodCare'): Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) and depression are leading causes of disease burden globally and the two often co-exist. Depression is common after Myocardial Infarction (MI) and it has been estimated that 15-35% of patients experience depressive symptoms. Co-morbid depression can impair health related quality of life (HRQOL), decrease medication adherence and appropriate utilisation of health services, lead to increased morbidity and suicide risk, and is associated with poorer CHD risk factor profiles and reduced survival. We aim to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised, multi-centre trial designed to compare a tele-health program (MoodCare) for depression and CHD secondary prevention, with Usual Care (UC). Methods Over 1600 patients admitted after index admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) are being screened for depression at six metropolitan hospitals in the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland. Consenting participants are then contacted at two weeks post-discharge for baseline assessment. One hundred eligible participants are to be randomised to an intervention or a usual medical care control group (50 per group). The intervention consists of up to 10 × 30-40 minute structured telephone sessions, delivered by registered psychologists, commencing within two weeks of baseline screening. The intervention focuses on depression management, lifestyle factors (physical activity, healthy eating, smoking cessation, alcohol intake), medication adherence and managing co-morbidities. Data collection occurs at baseline (Time 1), 6 months (post-intervention) (Time 2), 12 months (Time 3) and 24 months follow-up for longer term effects (Time 4). We are comparing depression (Cardiac Depression Scale [CDS]) and HRQOL (Short Form-12 [SF-12]) scores between treatment and UC groups, assessing the feasibility of the program through patient acceptability and exploring long term maintenance effects. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the costs and

  1. Inclusion of Ethnic Minorities in Telehealth Trials for Type 2 Diabetes: Protocol for a Systematic Review Examining Prevalence and Language Issues

    PubMed Central

    Rooshenas, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is common, on the rise, and disproportionately affects ethnic minority groups. Telehealth interventions may mitigate diabetes-related complications, but might under-recruit or even exclude ethnic minorities, in part because of English language requirements. The under-representation of minority patients in trials could threaten the generalizability of the findings, whereby the patients who might stand to benefit most from such interventions are not being included in their evaluation. Objective The aims of this systematic review are twofold: (1) to assess the reporting and prevalence of ethnic minorities in published telehealth trials for type 2 diabetes, including identifying trial features associated with successful patient recruitment; and (2) to determine the proportion of such trials that report English language proficiency as an inclusion/exclusion criterion, including how and why they do so. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults with type 2 diabetes in Western, English-speaking countries that included telehealth interventions targeting diabetes as a primary condition, and those that did not specifically recruit minority groups will be included. Search strategies were devised for indexed and keyword terms capturing type 2 diabetes, telehealth/health technology, and RCTs in English language publications from 2000 to July 2015 in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL. Reference lists of included studies will also be searched. Two reviewers will independently screen abstracts and full-text articles against inclusion criteria, mediated by a third reviewer if consensus cannot be reached. Data extracted from included studies will be checked by a second reviewer and will be summarized using narrative synthesis. Results This research is in progress, with findings expected by Spring 2016. Conclusions This review will address research reporting and recruitment practices of ethnic minorities in telehealth RCTs for type 2

  2. Telehealth brings benefits.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    A telehealth clinical lead writing in Primary Health Care says that for the NHS to thrive, front line staff and patients must be empowered. New ways of working are needed and the use of technology should be maximised. Telehealth allows nurses to work more efficiently, communicate better with patients and families, and improve health outcomes cost-effectively. The author encourages frontline nurses to implement changes in the work place and suggests NHS Change Day in October as a starting point. The article also notes the importance of social media in opening up opportunities to connect with other nurses. PMID:27484572

  3. Economic Modeling of Heart Failure Telehealth Programs: When Do They Become Cost Saving?

    PubMed

    Liu, Sheena Xin; Xiang, Rui; Lagor, Charles; Liu, Nan; Sullivan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth programs for congestive heart failure have been shown to be clinically effective. This study assesses clinical and economic consequences of providing telehealth programs for CHF patients. A Markov model was developed and presented in the context of a home-based telehealth program on CHF. Incremental life expectancy, hospital admissions, and total healthcare costs were examined at periods ranging up to five years. One-way and two-way sensitivity analyses were also conducted on clinical performance parameters. The base case analysis yielded cost savings ranging from $2832 to $5499 and 0.03 to 0.04 life year gain per patient over a 1-year period. Applying telehealth solution to a low-risk cohort with no prior admission history would result in $2502 cost increase per person over the 1-year time frame with 0.01 life year gain. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the cost savings were most sensitive to patient risk, baseline cost of hospital admission, and the length-of-stay reduction ratio affected by the telehealth programs. In sum, telehealth programs can be cost saving for intermediate and high risk patients over a 1- to 5-year window. The results suggested the economic viability of telehealth programs for managing CHF patients and illustrated the importance of risk stratification in such programs. PMID:27528868

  4. Discovering untapped relationship potential with patients in telehealth: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Axel; Ali, Lilas; Sonntag, Steffen Mark; Ekman, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore factors that influence relationship building between telehealth professionals and patients with chronic illness over a distance, from a telehealth professional's perspective. Design 4 focus group interviews were conducted in June 2014. Digital recordings were transcribed verbatim and qualitative content analysis was performed using an iterative process of 3 coding rounds. Participants 20 telehealth professionals. Setting A telehealth service centre in the south of Germany that provided care for 12 000 patients with chronic heart failure across Germany. Results Non-video telehealth technology creates an atmosphere that fosters sharing of personal information and a non-judgemental attitude. This facilitates the delivery of fair and equal healthcare. A combination of a protocol-driven service structure along with shared team and organisational values provide a basis for establishing long-term healthcare relationships. However, each contact between a telehealth professional and a patient has an uncertain outcome and requires skilful negotiation of the relationship. Although care provision was personalised, there was scope to include the patients as ‘experts on their own illness’ to a greater extent as advocated by person-centred care. Currently, provision of person-centred care is not sufficiently addressed in telehealth professional training. Conclusions Telehealth offers a viable environment for the delivery of person-centred care for patients with long-standing disease. Current telehealth training programmes may be enhanced by teaching person-centred care skills. PMID:26936904

  5. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on pain in healthcare workers: study protocol for a single blinded cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence and consequences of musculoskeletal pain is considerable among healthcare workers, allegedly due to high physical work demands of healthcare work. Previous investigations have shown promising results of physical exercise for relieving pain among different occupational groups, but the question remains whether such physical exercise should be performed at the workplace or conducted as home-based exercise. Performing physical exercise at the workplace together with colleagues may be more motivating for some employees and thus increase adherence. On the other hand, physical exercise performed during working hours at the workplace may be costly for the employers in terms of time spend. Thus, it seems relevant to compare the efficacy of workplace- versus home-based training on musculoskeletal pain. This study is intended to investigate the effect of workplace-based versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. Methods/Design This study was designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial performed at 3 hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clusters are hospital departments and hospital units. Cluster randomization was chosen to increase adherence and avoid contamination between interventions. Two hundred healthcare workers from 18 departments located at three different hospitals is allocated to 10 weeks of 1) workplace based physical exercise performed during working hours (using kettlebells, elastic bands and exercise balls) for 5 × 10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions, or 2) home based physical exercise performed during leisure time (using elastic bands and body weight exercises) for 5 × 10 minutes per week. Both intervention groups will also receive ergonomic instructions on patient handling and use of lifting aides etc. Inclusion criteria are female healthcare workers working at a hospital. Average pain intensity (VAS scale 0-10) of the back, neck and shoulder

  6. Home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia affects the mood of people with dementia but also of their caregivers. In the coming years, the number of people with dementia will increase worldwide and most of them will continue to live in the community as long as possible. Home-based psychosocial interventions reducing the depressive symptoms of both people with dementia and their caregivers in their own home are highly needed. Methods/Design This manuscript describes the design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) of the effects of a home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers. The aim is to randomly assign 156 dyads (caregiver and dementia diagnosed person) to an intervention group or a comparison group. The experimental group receives a home programme in which exercise and support for the people with dementia and their caregivers are combined and integrated. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention. Primary outcomes are physical health (people with dementia) and mood (people with dementia and caregivers). In addition, to get more insight in the working components of the intervention and the impact of the intervention on the relationship of the dyads a qualitative sub-study is carried out. Discussion This study aims to contribute to an evidence-based treatment to reduce depressive symptoms among people with dementia and their caregivers independently living in the community. Trial Registration The study has been registered at the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR), which is connected to the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the WHO. Trial number: NTR1802. PMID:22117691

  7. Evolving telehealth reimbursement in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bursell, S-E; Zang, S; Keech, A C; Jenkins, A J

    2016-08-01

    Video-based consultation is the only telehealth service reimbursed by the Medicare Benefits Schedule in Australia, but the uptake of telehealth is still low and inconsistent. There is a clear need for the development of appropriate medical evidence to support implementation of telehealth services. With the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, mobile health becomes important in facilitating health services and impacting clinical outcomes anywhere. PMID:27553999

  8. Maternity telehealth: ringing the changes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Dorothy; Brown, Sheona

    2013-12-01

    This article describes NHS Scotland's Maternity telehealth options project and the implementation of the recommendations made. This 17-month project resulted in the development of national documentation for recording telehealth calls; the development of a self-directed eLearning tool on maternity telehealth call structure which was made available to all health boards in Scotland; a comprehensive programme of training on telehealth for student midwives; a programme of 'Train-the-trainer' events for qualified midwives to enable the cascade of learning throughout the service. The project also involved collaboration with Health Scotland, signposting for women to contact the appropriate caregiver at the appropriate time. PMID:24386706

  9. Task–Technology Fit of Video Telehealth for Nurses in an Outpatient Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task–technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task–technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. Materials and Methods: The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time–motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task–technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Results: Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task–technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Conclusions: Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task–technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology. PMID:24841219

  10. Covering and Reimbursing Telehealth Services.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers who are striving to achieve better health care, improved health outcomes and lower costs are considering new strategies and technologies. Telehealth is a tool that uses technology to provide health services remotely, and state leaders are looking to it now more than ever as a way to address workforce gaps and reach underserved patients. Among the challenges facing state lawmakers who are working to introduce or expand telehealth is how to handle covering patients and reimbursing providers. PMID:27032126

  11. Telehealth system (e-CUIDATE) to improve quality of life in breast cancer survivors: rationale and study protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 version 3.0 and breast module called The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire. The secondary outcomes: pain (algometry, Visual Analogue Scale, Brief Pain Inventory short form); body composition; physical measurement (abdominal test, handgrip strength, back muscle strength, and multiple sit-to-stand test); cardiorespiratory fitness (International Fitness Scale, 6-minute walk test, International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form); fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale and Borg Fatigue Scale); anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale); cognitive function (Trail Making Test and Auditory Consonant Trigram); accelerometry; lymphedema; and anthropometric perimeters. Discussion This study investigates the feasibility and effectiveness of a telerehabilitation system during adjuvant treatment of patients with breast cancer. If this treatment option is effective, telehealth systems could offer a choice of supportive care to cancer patients during the survivorship phase. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01801527 PMID:23799886

  12. Development of the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ)

    PubMed Central

    PARMANTO, BAMBANG; LEWIS, ALLEN NELSON; GRAHAM, KRISTIN M.; BERTOLET, MARNIE H.

    2016-01-01

    Current telehealth usability questionnaires are designed primarily for older technologies, where telehealth interaction is conducted over dedicated videoconferencing applications. However, telehealth services are increasingly conducted over computer-based systems that rely on commercial software and a user supplied computer interface. Therefore, a usability questionnaire that addresses the changes in telehealth service delivery and technology is needed. The Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) was developed to evaluate the usability of telehealth implementation and services. This paper addresses: (1) the need for a new measure of telehealth usability, (2) the development of the TUQ, (3) intended uses for the TUQ, and (4) the reliability of the TUQ. Analyses indicate that the TUQ is a solid, robust, and versatile measure that can be used to measure the quality of the computer-based user interface and the quality of the telehealth interaction and services. PMID:27563386

  13. Development of the Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ).

    PubMed

    Parmanto, Bambang; Lewis, Allen Nelson; Graham, Kristin M; Bertolet, Marnie H

    2016-01-01

    Current telehealth usability questionnaires are designed primarily for older technologies, where telehealth interaction is conducted over dedicated videoconferencing applications. However, telehealth services are increasingly conducted over computer-based systems that rely on commercial software and a user supplied computer interface. Therefore, a usability questionnaire that addresses the changes in telehealth service delivery and technology is needed. The Telehealth Usability Questionnaire (TUQ) was developed to evaluate the usability of telehealth implementation and services. This paper addresses: (1) the need for a new measure of telehealth usability, (2) the development of the TUQ, (3) intended uses for the TUQ, and (4) the reliability of the TUQ. Analyses indicate that the TUQ is a solid, robust, and versatile measure that can be used to measure the quality of the computer-based user interface and the quality of the telehealth interaction and services. PMID:27563386

  14. Home-Based Supervisor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    The Head Start home-based supervisor provides guidance, support, direction, and continuing staff development opportunities while attempting to maintain and improve quality of services to Head Start children and families. This guide is designed to help the home-based supervisor in carrying out responsibilities while supporting the home visitor, who…

  15. Categorizing the telehealth policy response of countries and their implications for complementarity of telehealth policy.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sunil; Scott, Richard E

    2004-01-01

    Developing countries are exploring the role of telehealth to overcome the challenges of providing adequate health care services. However, this process faces disparities, and no complementarity in telehealth policy development. Telehealth has the potential to transcend geopolitical boundaries, yet telehealth policy developed in one jurisdiction may hamper applications in another. Understanding such policy complexities is essential for telehealth to realize its full global potential. This study investigated 12 East Asian countries that may represent a microcosm of the world, to determine if the telehealth policy response of countries could be categorized, and whether any implications could be identified for the development of complementary telehealth policy. The countries were Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. Three categories of country response were identified in regard to national policy support and development. The first category was "None" (Cambodia, Myanmar, and Vietnam) where international partners, driven by humanitarian concerns, lead telehealth activity. The second category was "Proactive" (China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand) where national policies were designed with the view that telehealth initiatives are a component of larger development objectives. The third was "Reactive" (Hong Kong and Japan), where policies were only proffered after telehealth activities were sustainable. It is concluded that although complementarity of telehealth policy development is not occurring, increased interjurisdictional telehealth activity, regional clusters, and concerted and coordinated effort amongst researchers, practitioners, and policy makers may alter this trend. PMID:15104917

  16. The role of human factors in telehealth.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Charness, Neil; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Ben-Arieh, David; Washington, Karla; Wu, John; Farberow, Bonne

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the field of human factors (HFs) and its role in telehealth. We discuss HF concepts and methodologies that affect the design, implementation, and evaluation of telehealth applications and provide examples from numerous application areas that highlight the significance of HF principles and methodologies. We also provide recommendations for inclusion of HFs in telehealth system design and evaluation, and discuss resulting implications for system designers, practitioners, vendors, and policy makers. PMID:20420540

  17. Effect of telehealth on hospital utilisation and mortality in routine clinical practice: a matched control cohort study in an early adopter site

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Adam; Ariti, Cono; Fisher, Elizabeth; Bardsley, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effects of a home-based telehealth intervention on the use of secondary healthcare and mortality. Design Observational study of a mainstream telehealth service, using person-level administrative data. Time to event analysis (Cox regression) was performed comparing telehealth patients with controls who were matched using a machine-learning algorithm. Setting A predominantly rural region of England (North Yorkshire). Participants 716 telehealth patients were recruited from community, general practice and specialist acute care, between June 2010 and March 2013. Patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure or diabetes, and a history of associated inpatient admission. Patients were matched 1:1 to control patients, also selected from North Yorkshire, with respect to demographics, diagnoses of health conditions, previous hospital use and predictive risk score. Interventions Telehealth involved the remote exchange of medical data between patients and healthcare professionals as part of the ongoing management of the patient's health condition. Monitoring centre staff alerted healthcare professionals if the telemonitored data exceeded preset thresholds. Control patients received usual care, without telehealth. Primary and secondary outcome measures Time to the first emergency (unplanned) hospital admission or death. Secondary metrics included time to death and time to first admission, outpatient attendance and emergency department visit. Results Matched controls and telehealth patients were similar at baseline. Following enrolment, telehealth patients were more likely than matched controls to experience emergency admission or death (adjusted HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.56, p<0.001). They were also more likely to have outpatient attendances (adjusted HR=1.25, 1.11 to 1.40, p<0.001), but mortality rates were similar between groups. Sensitivity analyses showed that we were unlikely to have missed reductions in the

  18. Practical aspects of telehealth: establishing telehealth in an institution.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, S; Allen, D T; Caldwell, P; Loh, P K; Mozer, R; Komesaroff, P A; Talman, P; Williams, M; Shaheen, N; Grabinski, O

    2014-02-01

    The fifth in a series of papers on practical aspects of telehealth, this paper discusses telehealth models that can facilitate the provision of specialist services to rural and remote patients closer to home. Some of the barriers to successful implementation of these models relates to workforce, funding and infrastructure at rural sites, as well as the traditional mindset of healthcare professionals. Therefore, the rural sector needs to be adequately resourced for telehealth models to be substantive and successful. This paper describes the development of a large teleoncology network over a vast geographical area in North Queensland. Adequate resourcing for the rural sites and undertaking quality improvement activities has continually enhanced the model over a 5- to 6-year period. The benefits of this model of care are twofold: (i) patients received their care closer to home and (ii) the workforce, service capabilities and infrastructure for the hospital in Mt Isa (a rural town 900 km away from its tertiary centre) has improved. PMID:24528818

  19. Education of health professionals using a proposed telehealth system.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, B. L.; Trelease, R.

    1999-01-01

    The movement of health care from hospitals to the community has demanded a major shift in the way in which health care professionals are being taught. This paper describes the collaboration of the Schools of Nursing and Medicine in the use of telehealth technology for the education of health care professionals. The specific aims of the project were to use the technology for the verification of the students' assessment and physical examinations, for the conduct of multi-professional patient rounds, and provision of consultations to professionals at remote sites. Capitalizing on the Schools' previous experience for observing students via computer technology at remote sites, we employed PC-based workstations, specialized peripherals, and Internet connecting protocols to implement a telehealth project for professional clinical education. Initial student, faculty and staff reactions were generally positive. The formal evaluation plan focuses on students, faculty, and staff. Structured questionnaires are used and a comparison of learning by telehealth technology will be made with alternative (more conventional) methods in evaluating knowledge and quality of verification of physical examination findings, and satisfaction with the learning process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10566408

  20. Assessing home care agencies' readiness for telehealth.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Patrick, Timothy; Khatri, Naresh

    2003-01-01

    Home healthcare is facing a set of challenging new realities in the 21st century such as funding limitations and increased life expectancy. Many believe that the use of telehealth enabling patients at home to interact with nurses at the clinical site using videoconferencing technology, will be a cost-effective solution to providing quality care services. Many agencies have adopted or are planning on implementing a telehealth solution. Level of agencies' readiness can lead to a lower level of risk, and a more successful innovation outcome. We developed a framework for assessing home care agencies' readiness for telehealth consisting of 35 items. This instrument can be used as a decision support tool for agencies that are about to implement a telehealth system as well as a formative or summative evaluation tool for agencies already utilizing telehealth. PMID:14728330

  1. Home-based renal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, G K; Lutz, L J; Gregory, M C

    1988-02-01

    About 20 percent of chronic dialysis patients receive treatment in their homes. An increasing number of these patients choose peritoneal dialysis. Physicians should be aware of the techniques and possible complications of home-based dialysis so that they can assist patients in choosing a form of dialysis and can help manage problems if they arise. An understanding of the technical and psychosocial problems is also necessary. PMID:3344646

  2. Telehealth: An Assessment of Growth and Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigsby, William J.

    2002-01-01

    National surveys of telehealth networks, 1994-99, examined program characteristics; clinical activities (telemedicine); nonclinical activities related to continuing medical education, paraprofessional training, health promotion, administration, and research; technology; and barriers to growth and sustainability. Despite growing utilization,…

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme delivered through a tablet computer for preventing falls in older community-dwelling people over 2 years: study protocol for the Standing Tall randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Delbaere, K; Valenzuela, T; Woodbury, A; Davies, T; Yeong, J; Steffens, D; Miles, L; Pickett, L; Zijlstra, G A R; Clemson, L; Close, J C T; Howard, K; Lord, S R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In order to prevent falls, older people should exercise for at least 2 h per week for 6 months, with a strong focus on balance exercises. This article describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme delivered through a tablet computer to prevent falls in older people. Methods and analysis Participants aged 70 years or older, living in the community in Sydney will be recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. The intervention consists of a tailored, home-based balance training delivered through a tablet computer. Intervention participants will be asked to complete 2 h of exercises per week for 2 years. Both groups will receive an education programme focused on health-related information relevant to older adults, delivered through the tablet computer via weekly fact sheets. Primary outcome measures include number of fallers and falls rate recorded in weekly fall diaries at 12 months. A sample size of 500 will be necessary to see an effect on falls rate. Secondary outcome measures include concern about falling, depressive symptoms, health-related quality of life and physical activity levels (in all 500 participants); and physiological fall risk, balance, functional mobility, gait, stepping and cognitive performance (in a subsample of 200 participants). Adherence, acceptability, usability and enjoyment will be recorded in intervention group participants over 2 years. Data will be analysed using the intention-to-treat principle. Secondary analyses are planned in people with greater adherence. Economic analyses will be assessed from a health and community care provider perspective. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from UNSW Ethics Committee in December 2014 (ref number HC#14/266). Outcomes will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conferences. Trial registration number

  4. Practical aspects of telehealth: doctor-patient relationship and communication.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, S; Allen, D; Caldwell, P; Loh, P K; Mozer, R; Komesaroff, P A; Talman, P; Williams, M; Shaheen, N; Grabinski, O

    2014-01-01

    The fourth in a series of articles about the practical aspects of telehealth, this paper provides advice and information for specialists to communicate effectively with patients during a telehealth video consultation. PMID:24450527

  5. [An overview of telehealth initiatives in Latin America].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Alaneir de Fátima; D'Agostino, Marcelo; Bouskela, Maurício Simon; Fernandéz, Andrés; Messina, Luiz Ary; Alves, Humberto José

    2014-01-01

    This article aimed to systematize the views on telehealth in Latin America and to present the experience of building an instrument for monitoring the development of telehealth initiatives based on the reality of this region. A group was structured to coordinate telehealth efforts in Latin America, with members appointed by the ministries of health of 16 countries. Five thematic groups were also set up. Based on international experiences and focusing on the reality of telehealth in the continent, an instrument was created to monitor the development of telehealth in Latin America. Several countries have national telehealth projects: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama. Others are in the process of development and early deployment: Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Peru, Venezuela. The instrument described in the article, which is still being tested, proposes a characterization of countries according to their telehealth development stage: nonexistent, nascent, intermediate, advanced, and exemplary. Currently, important telehealth initiatives are already underway in Latin America. PMID:25211578

  6. Telehealth in the school setting: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Cori A; Maughan, Erin D

    2015-02-01

    Telehealth, the provision of health care through long-distance telecommunications technology, is a tool that can be used by school nurses to address and improve the health status of schoolchildren. The purpose of this literature review is to examine research related to implementation of telehealth in the school setting. A review of the literature was conducted using CINAHL, ERIC, Medline, and PubMed databases and the search terms such as telehealth, telecare, telemedicine, school, and schools. Fifteen research studies related to telehealth in the school setting were identified. Themes identified included benefits, barriers, feasibility, and limitations of telehealth. Implications for practice are presented, along with the potential of telehealth to integrate with the Affordable Care Act. School nurses who use telehealth can further meet the health needs of children in their care. The future of health care and school nursing is changing, and telehealth is a tool that can improve care in an innovative and efficient way. PMID:24970886

  7. A Telehealth Intervention Using Nintendo Wii Fit Balance Boards and iPads to Improve Walking in Older Adults With Lower Limb Amputation (Wii.n.Walk): Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Bita; Finlayson, Heather C; Eng, Janice J; Payne, Michael WC; Jarus, Tal; Goldsmith, Charles H; Mitchell, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of older adults living with lower limb amputation (LLA) who require rehabilitation for improving their walking capacity and mobility is growing. Existing rehabilitation practices frequently fail to meet this demand. Nintendo Wii Fit may be a valuable tool to enable rehabilitation interventions. Based on pilot studies, we have developed “Wii.n.Walk”, an in-home telehealth Wii Fit intervention targeted to improve walking capacity in older adults with LLA. Objective The objective of this study is to determine whether the Wii.n.Walk intervention enhances walking capacity compared to an attention control group. Methods This project is a multi-site (Vancouver BC, London ON), parallel, evaluator-blind randomized controlled trial. Participants include community-dwelling older adults over the age of 50 years with unilateral transtibial or transfemoral amputation. Participants will be stratified by site and block randomized in triplets to either the Wii.n.Walk intervention or an attention control group employing the Wii Big Brain cognitive software. This trial will include both supervised and unsupervised phases. During the supervised phase, both groups will receive 40-minute sessions of supervised group training three times per week for a duration of 4 weeks. Participants will complete the first week of the intervention in groups of three at their local rehabilitation center with a trainer. The remaining 3 weeks will take place at participants’ homes using remote supervision by the trainer using Apple iPad technology. At the end of 4 weeks, the supervised period will end and the unsupervised period will begin. Participants will retain the Wii console and be encouraged to continue using the program for an additional 4 weeks’ duration. The primary outcome measure will be the “Two-Minute Walk Test” to measure walking capacity. Outcome measures will be evaluated for all participants at baseline, after the end of both the supervised and

  8. Results of a telehealth-enabled chronic care management service to support people with long-term conditions at home.

    PubMed

    Venter, Anton; Burns, Rosemary; Hefford, Martin; Ehrenberg, Nieves

    2012-04-01

    Both congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are more common among Māori than non-Māori people, and the cultural acceptability of home-based remote monitoring technology has not been tested. We conducted a 12-month pilot trial of home telemonitoring. Patients were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. Patients in the control group showed no clear differences in quality of life at the end of the trial. The telehealth group showed a consistent trend towards improved quality of life on several instruments, including the SF-36, the St George Respiratory Questionnaire and the K10 questionnaire; the improvement in the latter was significant. Hospitalizations were reduced in both the control (-19%) and telehealth group (-25%). Patient interviews indicated that the technology was acceptable to most patients and their families, including the Māori. The results from the pilot trial suggest that wider implementation with a cost benefit evaluation could be worthwhile. PMID:22362838

  9. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-Compliant Ocular Telehealth Network for the Remote Diagnosis and Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaquin; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Giancardo, Luca; Garg, Seema; Fox, Karen; Chaum, Edward

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the design and implementation of a regional ocular telehealth network for remote assessment and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR), including the design requirements, network topology, protocol design, system work flow, graphics user interfaces, and performance evaluation. The Telemedical Retinal Image Analysis and Diagnosis Network is a computer-aided, image analysis telehealth paradigm for the diagnosis of DR and other retinal diseases using fundus images acquired from primary care end users delivering care to underserved patient populations in the mid-South and southeastern United States.

  10. Theory-based telehealth and patient empowerment.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula; Suter, W Newton; Johnston, Donna

    2011-04-01

    Health care technology holds great potential to improve the quality of health care delivery. One effective technology is remote patient monitoring, whereby patient data, such as vital signs or symptom reports, are captured from home monitoring devices and transmitted to health care professionals for review. The use of remote patient monitoring, often referred to as telehealth, has been widely adopted by health care providers, particularly home care agencies. Most agencies have invested in telehealth to facilitate the early identification of disease exacerbation, particularly for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure and diabetes. This technology has been successfully harnessed by agencies to reduce rehospitalization rates through remote data interpretation and the provision of timely interventions. We propose that the use of telehealth by home care agencies and other health care providers be expanded to empower patients and promote disease self-management with resultant improved health care outcomes. This article describes how remote monitoring, in combination with the application of salient adult learning and cognitive behavioral theories and applied to telehealth care delivery and practice, can promote improved patient self-efficacy with disease management. We present theories applicable for improving health-related behaviors and illustrate how theory-based practices can be implemented in the field of home care. Home care teams that deliver theory-based telehealth function as valuable partners to physicians and hospitals in an integrated health care delivery system. PMID:21241182

  11. Self-delivered home-based mirror therapy for lower limb phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Beth D

    2009-01-01

    Home-based patient-delivered mirror therapy is a promising approach in the treatment of phantom limb pain. Previous studies and case reports of mirror therapy have used a therapist-guided, structured protocol of exercises. No case report has described treatment for either upper or lower limb phantom pain by using home-based patient-delivered mirror therapy. The success of this case demonstrates that home-based patient-delivered mirror therapy may be an efficacious, low-cost treatment option that would eliminate many traditional barriers to care. PMID:19096290

  12. Proposal for a telehealth concept in the translational research model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Angélica Baptista; Morel, Carlos Médicis; de Moraes, Ilara Hämmerli Sozzi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the conceptual relationship between telehealth and translational research. METHODS Bibliographical search on telehealth was conducted in the Scopus, Cochrane BVS, LILACS and MEDLINE databases to find experiences of telehealth in conjunction with discussion of translational research in health. The search retrieved eight studies based on analysis of models of the five stages of translational research and the multiple strands of public health policy in the context of telehealth in Brazil. The models were applied to telehealth activities concerning the Network of Human Milk Banks, in the Telemedicine University Network. RESULTS The translational research cycle of human milk collected, stored and distributed presents several integrated telehealth initiatives, such as video conferencing, and software and portals for synthesizing knowledge, composing elements of an information ecosystem, mediated by information and communication technologies in the health system. CONCLUSIONS Telehealth should be composed of a set of activities in a computer mediated network promoting the translation of knowledge between research and health services. PMID:24897057

  13. Telehealth Innovations in Health Education and Training

    PubMed Central

    De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W.; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences. PMID:20155874

  14. Telehealth innovations in health education and training.

    PubMed

    Conde, José G; De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C Y

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences. PMID:20155874

  15. Occupational Therapy Home Safety Intervention via Telehealth.

    PubMed

    Breeden, Lori E

    2016-01-01

    Photography can be an effective addition for education-based telehealth services delivered by an occupational therapist. In this study, photography was used as antecedent to telehealth sessions delivered by an occupational therapist focused on narrative learning about home safety. After taking photographs of past home safety challenges, six participants experienced three web-based occupational therapy sessions. Sessions were recorded and transcribed. Data were examined using content analysis. The content analysis identified the following themes: the value of photos to support learning; the value of narrative learning related to home safety education; and abstract versus concrete learners. Procedural findings are included to support future endeavors. Findings indicate that within a wellness context, home safety education for older adults can be delivered effectively via telehealth when using photography as a part of an occupational therapy intervention. PMID:27563389

  16. Occupational Therapy Home Safety Intervention via Telehealth

    PubMed Central

    BREEDEN, LORI E.

    2016-01-01

    Photography can be an effective addition for education-based telehealth services delivered by an occupational therapist. In this study, photography was used as antecedent to telehealth sessions delivered by an occupational therapist focused on narrative learning about home safety. After taking photographs of past home safety challenges, six participants experienced three web-based occupational therapy sessions. Sessions were recorded and transcribed. Data were examined using content analysis. The content analysis identified the following themes: the value of photos to support learning; the value of narrative learning related to home safety education; and abstract versus concrete learners. Procedural findings are included to support future endeavors. Findings indicate that within a wellness context, home safety education for older adults can be delivered effectively via telehealth when using photography as a part of an occupational therapy intervention. PMID:27563389

  17. Towards a Formal Representation of Processes and Objects Regarding the Delivery of Telehealth Services: The Telehealth Ontology (TEON).

    PubMed

    Santana, Filipe; Schulz, Stefan; Campos, Amadeu; Novaes, Magdala A

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces ontological aspects concerning the Telehealth Ontology (TEON), an ontology that represents formal-ontological content concerning the delivery of telehealth services. TEON formally represents the main services, actors and other entity types relevant to telehealth service delivery. TEON uses the upper level ontology BioTopLite2 and reuses content from the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI). The services embedded in telehealth services are considered as essential as the common services provided by the health-related practices. We envision TEON as a service to support the development of telehealth systems. TEON might also enable the integration of heterogeneous telehealth systems, and provide a base to automatize the processing of telehealth-related content. PMID:26262407

  18. Personalized Telehealth in the Future: A Global Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Dinesen, Birthe; Nonnecke, Brandie; Lindeman, David; Toft, Egon; Kidholm, Kristian; Jethwani, Kamal; Young, Heather M; Spindler, Helle; Oestergaard, Claus Ugilt; Southard, Jeffrey A; Gutierrez, Mario; Anderson, Nick; Albert, Nancy M; Han, Jay J; Nesbitt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    As telehealth plays an even greater role in global health care delivery, it will be increasingly important to develop a strong evidence base of successful, innovative telehealth solutions that can lead to scalable and sustainable telehealth programs. This paper has two aims: (1) to describe the challenges of promoting telehealth implementation to advance adoption and (2) to present a global research agenda for personalized telehealth within chronic disease management. Using evidence from the United States and the European Union, this paper provides a global overview of the current state of telehealth services and benefits, presents fundamental principles that must be addressed to advance the status quo, and provides a framework for current and future research initiatives within telehealth for personalized care, treatment, and prevention. A broad, multinational research agenda can provide a uniform framework for identifying and rapidly replicating best practices, while concurrently fostering global collaboration in the development and rigorous testing of new and emerging telehealth technologies. In this paper, the members of the Transatlantic Telehealth Research Network offer a 12-point research agenda for future telehealth applications within chronic disease management. PMID:26932229

  19. Personalized Telehealth in the Future: A Global Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As telehealth plays an even greater role in global health care delivery, it will be increasingly important to develop a strong evidence base of successful, innovative telehealth solutions that can lead to scalable and sustainable telehealth programs. This paper has two aims: (1) to describe the challenges of promoting telehealth implementation to advance adoption and (2) to present a global research agenda for personalized telehealth within chronic disease management. Using evidence from the United States and the European Union, this paper provides a global overview of the current state of telehealth services and benefits, presents fundamental principles that must be addressed to advance the status quo, and provides a framework for current and future research initiatives within telehealth for personalized care, treatment, and prevention. A broad, multinational research agenda can provide a uniform framework for identifying and rapidly replicating best practices, while concurrently fostering global collaboration in the development and rigorous testing of new and emerging telehealth technologies. In this paper, the members of the Transatlantic Telehealth Research Network offer a 12-point research agenda for future telehealth applications within chronic disease management. PMID:26932229

  20. Managing congestive heart failure using home telehealth.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nina M

    2004-10-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of rehospitalization and loss of revenue for home care agencies and hospitals. This article outlines how an agency used telehealth to provide CHF patients quality care and improved outcomes while decreasing the number of skilled home nursing visits and reducing rehospitalization rates to 1.2%. PMID:15486513

  1. Telehealth in developmental-behavioral pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Soares, Neelkamal S; Langkamp, Diane L

    2012-10-01

    Developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) is recognized as one of the fields with the greatest shortages of pediatric subspecialists. Families who access care often must travel great distances to tertiary academic medical centers or endure long waiting lists. While the shortages are likely to persist due to limited provider availability and an increasing number of children with developmental and behavioral disorders being identified, our field must look to innovative ways to reduce the barriers to access. One such way is telehealth, the use of videoconferencing to deliver DBP services to underserved populations. We aim to describe the practical uses of telehealth for the delivery of diagnostic and management clinical services in a variety of settings and for the additional educational and research benefits of the modality. We will highlight the obstacles to setting up a successful DBP telehealth practice and direct readers to resources to address these in their communities. Most of all, we will demonstrate the benefit to families and children, practitioners, and health care systems of supplementing traditional in-person DBP services with telehealth modalities to enhance outreach and engagement with communities. PMID:23027140

  2. Nurses Leading the Transformation of Patient Care Through Telehealth.

    PubMed

    Yesenofski, Lori; Kromer, Sharon; Hitchings, Kim

    2015-12-01

    The essential role of nurses in leading, developing, and improving Lehigh Valley Health Network (LVHN) telehealth services and programs was a key reason the organization was selected to receive the American Nurses Credentialing Center 2013 Magnet® Prize. This article describes the application of telehealth as a nurse-led technology. The innovations within LVHN telehealth services are presented as well as essential success factors of design, implementation, and evaluation. PMID:26565644

  3. A Review of Telehealth Service Implementation Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    van Dyk, Liezl

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential of telehealth services to increase the quality and accessibility of healthcare, the success rate of such services has been disappointing. The purpose of this paper is to find and compare existing frameworks for the implementation of telehealth services that can contribute to the success rate of future endeavors. After a thorough discussion of these frameworks, this paper outlines the development methodologies in terms of theoretical background, methodology and validation. Finally, the common themes and formats are identified for consideration in future implementation. It was confirmed that a holistic implementation approach is needed, which includes technology, organizational structures, change management, economic feasibility, societal impacts, perceptions, user-friendliness, evaluation and evidence, legislation, policy and governance. Furthermore, there is some scope for scientifically rigorous framework development and validation approaches. PMID:24464237

  4. A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–Compliant Ocular Telehealth Network for the Remote Diagnosis and Management of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqin; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Tobin, Kenneth W.; Giancardo, Luca; Morris, Scott; Sparrow, Sylvia E.; Garg, Seema; Fox, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present the design and implementation of a regional ocular telehealth network for remote assessment and management of diabetic retinopathy (DR), including the design requirements, network topology, protocol design, system work flow, graphics user interfaces, and performance evaluation. The Telemedical Retinal Image Analysis and Diagnosis Network is a computer-aided, image analysis telehealth paradigm for the diagnosis of DR and other retinal diseases using fundus images acquired from primary care end users delivering care to underserved patient populations in the mid-South and southeastern United States. PMID:21819244

  5. What Facilitates the Use of Telehealth Applications Among Nurses?

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Marita; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the preliminary results of the facilitators of the use of telehealth applications from nurses' point of view based on a qualitative systematic literature review synthetizing 25 previously published papers. The study brought out two main categories that facilitate the use of telehealth among nurses: 1) Nurses' skills and attitudes, and 3) Changes in nurses' work and operations. PMID:27332423

  6. The Use of Telehealth in Schools. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Susan; Dolatowski, Rosemary; McDowell, Bernadette; Mancuso, Patty; Rochkes, Laura L.; Wavra, Theresa Ernst; Selekman, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Telehealth has been defined as "the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, public health and health administration" (United States Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], n.d.). Telehealth enables collaboration of…

  7. An Art Therapy Solution to a Telehealth Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collie, Kate; Cubranic, Davor

    1999-01-01

    Describes a gap that exists in the area of telehealth, the use of telecommunications technology to increase equality of access to healthcare, and proposes that computer-assisted distance art therapy can fill the need for telehealth delivery methods. Discusses a research study in which a computer system that supports distance art therapy was…

  8. Telehealth in the School Setting: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cori A.; Maughan, Erin D.

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth, the provision of health care through long-distance telecommunications technology, is a tool that can be used by school nurses to address and improve the health status of schoolchildren. The purpose of this literature review is to examine research related to implementation of telehealth in the school setting. A review of the literature…

  9. Extension and Home-Based Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loker, Suzanne; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Building Home Businesses in Rural Communities" (Loker et al.); "Home-Based Business...A Means to Economic Growth in Rural Areas" (Bastow-Shoop et al.); "Business Not As Usual" (Millar, Mallilo); and "Economic Options for Farm Families" (Williams). (SK)

  10. A Handbook for Home-Based Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Maggie

    The manual discusses home based approaches to support families of developmentally disabled children. The first section presents in question and answer format the rationale for such support services. Succeeding sections address the following aspects: respite care, sitter/companion services; parent counseling, education, and training; in home…

  11. Effective Treatment in Home-Based Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simboli, Tim; Darou, Wes G.

    The use of home-based treatment programs has become increasingly popular over the last few years. Such a program is offered by the Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa-Carleton through its Detached Worker Program. This program uses paraprofessionals who employ an eclectic combination of behavioral, client-centered, family and reality therapies. Two…

  12. Telehealth: important concepts for future nursing practice in space environments.

    PubMed

    Chonin, A

    1998-01-01

    The concept of telehealth has become a vital issue to healthcare providers in this day of instantaneous, varied, and technology-based communications. This article discusses the issues and implications of telehealth to nurses on Earth and in future space environments. Telehealth will be defined as currently implemented and the legal ramifications of practice across state lines, national borders, rural, and in remote and hazardous locations (space environments: orbital, Moon and Mars bases) will be delineated. The age of information is now here, and the age of communication is beginning. Telehealth is and will be an important means of providing communication links and healthcare to clients and providers alike. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of important concepts related to telehealth for their current and future practice. PMID:11871451

  13. Using the Australian and New Zealand Telehealth Committee framework to evaluate telehealth: identifying conceptual gaps.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emma; King, Chris; Kitt, Sharon

    2002-12-01

    Telehealth is strongly supported in policy rhetoric as being economically significant to Australia, but evaluation standards have been insufficiently developed to ensure that this is the case. The use of one such evaluation standard, the Australian and New Zealand Telehealth Committee (ANZTC) framework, for telehealth evaluation in Australia makes good sense. However, that framework emphasizes economic and technical considerations at the expense of social contexts. Furthermore, there must be questions about the utility of a framework which, it appears, has been used to evaluate only a single telehealth project in Australia. The combination of the economic rationalism of health-care policy and the technological determinism of a tool model of information and communication technologies (ICTs) can result in evaluations that fail to match the complexities of the intersection of health-care and ICTs. Using the ANZTC framework while at the same time focusing on explaining, rather than just describing, the links between interventions and outcomes seems a reasonable compromise. This involves understanding complex socio-technical networks and relationships, and requires investigators to engage with the gulf between private opinions, public statements and actual behaviour. PMID:12537899

  14. Using the Australian and New Zealand Telehealth Committee framework to evaluate telehealth: identifying conceptual gaps.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emma; King, Chris; Kitt, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Telehealth is strongly supported in policy rhetoric as being economically significant to Australia, but evaluation standards have been insufficiently developed to ensure that this is the case. The use of one such evaluation standard, the Australian and New Zealand Telehealth Committee (ANZTC) framework, for telehealth evaluation in Australia makes good sense. However, that framework emphasizes economic and technical considerations at the expense of social contexts. Furthermore, there must be questions about the utility of a framework which, it appears, has been used to evaluate only a single telehealth project in Australia. The combination of the economic rationalism of health-care policy and the technological determinism of a tool model of information and communication technologies (ICTs) can result in evaluations that fail to match the complexities of the intersection of health-care and ICTs. Using the ANZTC framework while at the same time focusing on explaining, rather than just describing, the links between interventions and outcomes seems a reasonable compromise. This involves understanding complex socio-technical networks and relationships, and requires investigators to engage with the gulf between private opinions, public statements and actual behaviour. PMID:12661616

  15. Telehealth Regulatory and Legal Considerations: Frequently Asked Questions

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Jana; Brannon, Janice A.

    2011-01-01

    As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions: Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located), before engaging in telehealth?Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations) in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model within the professions of occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology and audiology. PMID:25945185

  16. Post-disaster Gulf Coast Recovery Using Telehealth

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Thomas J.; Eastburn, Sasha L.; Icenogle, Marjorie L.; Slagle, Michelle; Nuriddin, Azizeh H.; Brantley, Katrina M.; Foreman, Rachel D.; Buckner, Ayanna V.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The Gulf Coast continues to struggle with service need far outpacing available resources. Since 2005, the Regional Coordinating Center for Hurricane Response (RCC) at Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, has supported telehealth solutions designed to meet high service needs (e.g., psychiatry) within primary care and other healthcare organizations. The overall RCC vision is to support autonomous, useful, and sustainable telehealth programs towards mitigating unmet disaster-related needs. Subjects and Methods: To assess Gulf Coast telehealth experiences, we conducted semistructured interviews with both regional key informants and national organizations with Gulf Coast recovery interests. Using qualitative-descriptive analysis, interview transcripts were analyzed to identify shared development themes. Results: Thirty-eight key informants were interviewed, representing a 77.6% participation rate among organizations engaged by the RCC. Seven elements critical to telehealth success were identified: Funding, Regulatory, Workflow, Attitudes, Personnel, Technology, and Evaluation. These key informant accounts reveal shared insights with telehealth regarding successes, challenges, and recommendations. Conclusions: The seven elements critical to telehealth success both confirm and organize development principles from a diverse collective of healthcare stakeholders. The structured nature of these insights suggests a generalizable framework upon which other organizations might develop telehealth strategies toward addressing high service needs with limited resources. PMID:23427981

  17. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  18. A product-service system approach to telehealth application design.

    PubMed

    Flores-Vaquero, Paul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Hutabarat, Windo; Turner, Chris

    2016-06-01

    A considerable proportion of current point-of-care devices do not offer a wide enough set of capabilities if they are to function in any telehealth system. There is a need for intermediate devices that lie between healthcare devices and service networks. The development of an application is suggested that allows for a smartphone to take the role of an intermediate device. This research seeks to identify the telehealth service requirements for long-term condition management using a product-service system approach. The use of product-service system has proven to be a suitable methodology for the design and development of telehealth smartphone applications. PMID:25466775

  19. Telehealth: A Rapidly Developing Service Delivery Model For Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the practice of occupational therapy has been increasingly influenced by technological advances in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and associated changes in health care policy. Emergent from this evolution is the application of telehealth to deliver occupational therapy services to a client who is in a different physical location than the provider. This article furnishes an overview of the evidence for telehealth use in occupational therapy, discusses key policy considerations, and provides resources to guide practitioners in the ethical use of telehealth. PMID:25945220

  20. Telehealth: a rapidly developing service delivery model for occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Cason, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the practice of occupational therapy has been increasingly influenced by technological advances in the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and associated changes in health care policy. Emergent from this evolution is the application of telehealth to deliver occupational therapy services to a client who is in a different physical location than the provider. This article furnishes an overview of the evidence for telehealth use in occupational therapy, discusses key policy considerations, and provides resources to guide practitioners in the ethical use of telehealth. PMID:25945220

  1. Positive Clinical Outcomes Are Synergistic With Positive Educational Outcomes When Using Telehealth Consulting in General Practice: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Andrew; Teuss, Grigorijs; Guppy, Michelle; Lafferre, Danielle; Mullan, Judy; Barnett, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of telehealth technology to enable real-time consultations between patients and specialist services (to whom travel may be an impediment to the patient’s care) has recently been encouraged in Australia through financial incentives. However, the uptake has been both fragmented and inconsistent. The potential benefits for patients include access to a broader range of specialist referral services, cost and time saving, and more rapid access to specialist services and a continuum of care through the triangulation of interaction between patient, primary health care providers (general practitioners and nurses), and specialists. Enhanced broadband connectivity and higher-grade encryption present an opportunity to trial the use of telehealth consulting as an intrinsic element of medical education for both medical students and doctors-in-training within rural practices and Aboriginal Medical Services. Objective This paper discusses the reported, and varied, benefits of telehealth consulting arising from a multisite trial in New South Wales, Australia. The purpose of this study is to encourage the use of selected telehealth consultations between patients in a primary care setting with a specialist service as an integral aspect of medical education. Methods The trial closely followed the protocol developed for this complex and multiaspect intervention. This paper discuses one aspect of the research protocol—using telehealth consultations for medical education—in detail. Results Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted. In the quantitative analysis, free-text comments were made on aspects of Telehealth Consulting for the patient, concerning the quality of the interactions, and the time and cost saving, and also on the leaning opportunities. Students commented that their involvement enhanced their learning. All respondents agreed or strongly agreed that that the interpersonal aspects were satisfactory, with some brief comments supporting

  2. 75 FR 2595 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Activity: Comment... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)...

  3. 75 FR 15496 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review...).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  4. Telehealth: the backbone of healthcare financing.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Abu Bakar

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia, like many other countries faces major challenges in meeting increasing demands with limited resources. Changes in demography, life-style diseases, increasing consumer expectations, new medical technologies and rapid economic growth all fuel demand for more healthcare services. There are problems related to the distribution and delivery of healthcare services, and there is inadequate integration of healthcare delivery and continuity of care is a major concern. Resources tend to be concentrated in the very expensive hospital sector, although services would be cost-effectively and conveniently delivered at primary care level. There is no ideal healthcare system, and how healthcare is supported and organized for service delivery influences the country's social, economic and political well-being. Like many other countries, Malaysia is undergoing health reform in meeting these challenges, and is becoming more reliant on telemedicine and telehealth. PMID:15747978

  5. Development of a broadband telehealth system for critical care: process and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Li, Jane; Wilson, Laurence S; Qiao, Rong-Yu; Percival, Terry; Krumm-Heller, Alex; Stapleton, Stuart; Cregan, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    A broadband telehealth system has been developed for supporting critical care services between a major referral hospital and a rural hospital by transmitting very high-quality, realtime multimedia information, including images, audio and real-time video, over an Internet Protocol (IP)-based network. The technical design team took an iterative and user-centred approach toward the system design. Usability tests with scenario analysis were incorporated into the development process to produce a system that operates seamlessly in the critical care environment. Careful analysis of the reliability of the system was incorporated into the clinical protocols for integration into existing work practices. The use of high-quality multimedia data, consideration of human factors early in the design process, and incorporation of proper development approaches were critical for the success of the system design. PMID:17042709

  6. Home-based system for stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William; Deng, Huiqiong; Nuckley, David; Rheude, Brandon; Severson, Amy; Skluzacek, Katie; Spindler, Kristen; Davey, Cynthia; Carey, James

    2011-01-01

    A system was developed for home-based stroke motor rehabilitation of the ankle. A study was conducted to test the hypothesis that moving while concentrating will lead to greater recovery than movement alone. Sixteen post-stroke subjects participated, one half in a tracking training group and the other have in a move group. The tracking training group tracked a target waveform by moving their ankle to control the tracking cursor while the move group moved their ankle approximately the same amount but without target following. Over four weeks subjects completed 3600 trials. The results showed that the Tracking group had more improvement in ankle dorsiflexion compared to the Move group. The remaining assessment criteria showed no significant differences between the groups. PMID:22254683

  7. Tele-Health and neurology: what is possible?

    PubMed

    Timpano, Francesca; Bonanno, Lilla; Bramanti, Alessia; Pirrotta, Fabio; Spadaro, Letteria; Bramanti, Placido; Lanzafame, Pietro

    2013-12-01

    Emerging information and communication technology is changing medical and psychological practice by enabling the provision of services across time and distance, yet there are significant concerns about these applications. Given the emerging nature of trial evidence in teleneurology, our aim is to provide a narrative review, in order to investigate possible oncoming fields of applications that are very important in healthcare practices delivered to patients affected by neurological diseases. We will focus on the use of Tele-Health in neurological practice, highlighting the potential benefits of applying information and communication technology also to psychosocial and educational aspects of neurological diseases treatment. This work is based on PubMed search, manual search of published abstracts/conference proceedings, and consultation with investigators in neurological disease. We refer also to the broader Tele-Health research concerning mental diseases. Tele-Health has obvious advantages in rural areas, where it improves access to health services, obviating the need for patients and healthcare workers to travel and assuring continuance to healthcare services delivery. Even in urban areas, however, Tele-Health can improve access to health services and to information. It may sometimes also be cheaper than conventional practice, even if there is generally limited knowledge of the cost-effectiveness of Tele-Health services compared to conventional methods of delivering health services. PMID:23430169

  8. The Promise of Direct-to-Consumer Telehealth for Disaster Response and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Fischer, Shira; Chari, Ramya

    2016-08-01

    Telehealth has great promise to improve and even revolutionize emergency response and recovery. Yet telehealth in general, and direct-to-consumer (DTC) telehealth in particular, are underutilized in disasters. Direct-to-consumer telehealth services allow patients to request virtual visits with health care providers, in real-time, via phone or video conferencing (online video or mobile phone applications). Although DTC services for routine primary care are growing rapidly, there is no published literature on the potential application of DTC telehealth to disaster response and recovery because these services are so new. This report presents several potential uses of DTC telehealth across multiple disaster phases (acute response, subacute response, and recovery) while noting the logistical, legal, and policy challenges that must be addressed to allow for expanded use. Uscher-Pines L , Fischer S , Chari R . The promise of direct-to-consumer telehealth for disaster response and recovery. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(4):454-456. PMID:27216971

  9. Home-Based Resistance Training: Predictors of Participation and Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jette, Alan M.; Rooks, Dan; Lachman, Margie; Lin, Ting H.; Levenson, Claudia; Heislein, Diane; Giorgetti, Marie M.; Harris, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies factors associated with exercise participation and adherence in a sample of sedentary, functionally limited, community-dwelling adults ages 60 to 94 who participated in a home-based resistance training program (N=102). Results show that psychological factors were most important to adherence to the home-based program. (Author/MKA)

  10. Experience and hopes for telehealth in Tokelau.

    PubMed

    Adam, P

    2000-09-01

    The two key factors affecting healthcare in Tokelau are its small population and its great isolation. Both of these make telehealth a critical issue for the development of health services and it is hard to see how the services can develop to a modern standard without a larger component of telemedicine. The Tokelau islands consist of three roughly equal atolls usually served by 1-2 doctors who deal with all aspects of medical care. There is a small hospital on each atoll and each is staffed by a Nurse manager, two staff nurses and some nurse aides. There is a need for a communication facility for the nurse on the atoll(s) without a doctor to consult with a doctor about medical cases; doctors to consult each other; and for doctors to consult outside specialists about the management of cases. Distance education for health care staff is another perceived need. The current communications systems are still basic and although there is a PeaceSat terminal on each atoll it has largely failed to provide the above communication needs and most is still done by the costly telephone system. Recently ITC has been made a priority for the health department. PMID:11588926

  11. Telehealth on heart failure: results of the Recap project.

    PubMed

    Varon, Carolina; Alao, Morenikeji; Minter, Jan; Stapleton, Michelle; Thomson, Stuart; Jaecques, Siegfried; Rocca, Hans-Peter Bl; Huffel, Sabine V

    2015-09-01

    Telehealth has become a very important tool that allows the monitoring of heart failure patients in a home environment. However, little is known about the effect that such monitoring systems have on patients' compliance, evolution and self-care behaviour. In particular, the effect that the selected user interface has on these factors is unknown. This study aims to investigate this, and to determine some practicalities that must be considered when designing and implementing a telehealth programme for heart failure. To achieve this, daily measurements of blood pressure, pulse, SpO2 and weight were collected from 534 patients suffering from heart failure. In addition, they were asked to fill in the European heart failure self-care behaviour scale questionnaire and the EQ-5D quality of life questionnaire, before and after the monitoring period. Two telehealth systems were used, the Motiva platform provided by Philips and the standalone unit provided by Docobo, the Doc@Home system. Significant differences were found between both systems concerning the compliance and adherence of patients. Moreover, a general, positive effect of telehealth was identified due to the fact that patients showed an increased self-awareness when managing their condition. These findings are supported by behavioural changes and a better understanding of heart failure from the patients' perspective. PMID:25962654

  12. Bridging the Gap: Telehealth in Profoundly Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holderegger, John; Fortune, Jon; Fortune, Barbara

    This report describes the activities and outcomes of a pioneering Telehealth project in which clinical psychologists use state of the art satellite technology to consult with paraprofessionals who live and provide treatment settings to persons with the dual diagnosis of developmental disabilities and mental illnesses. The goal is to provide early…

  13. 42 CFR 414.65 - Payment for telehealth services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for telehealth services. 414.65 Section 414.65 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.65 Payment...

  14. Attitudes toward Telehealth Use among Rural Residents: A Danish Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jens F. L.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rural communities tend to be underserved by medical services. Low access to medical services affects quality of life and may also affect settlement decisions. The use of telehealth has often been mentioned as an alternative way to provide health care services in remote, underserved areas. One prerequisite for successful delivery of health…

  15. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Joanna; Stredler-Brown, Arlene; Greenway, Pat; Kahn, Gary

    2012-01-01

    What might bring the efforts of a physician, a speech-language pathologist, a teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing, and a nurse together? The answer is the innovative use of telepractice to deliver high quality, family-centered early intervention to infants and toddlers with hearing loss. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy…

  16. World Federation Of Occupational Therapists’ Position Statement On Telehealth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to state the World Federation of Occupational Therapists’ (WFOT) position on the use of telehealth for the delivery of occupational therapy services. Telehealth is the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to deliver health-related services when the provider and client are in different physical locations. Additional terms used to describe this service delivery model include: tele-occupational therapy, telerehabilitation, teletherapy, telecare, telemedicine, and telepractice, among other terms. Telehealth may be used by occupational therapy practitioners for evaluation, intervention, monitoring, supervision, and consultation (between remote therapist, client, and/or local health-care provider) as permitted by jurisdictional, institutional, and professional regulations and policies governing the practice of occupational therapy. Occupational therapy services via telehealth should be appropriate to the individuals, groups and cultures served, and contextualized to the occupations and interests of clients. Important considerations related to licensure/registration, collaboration with local occupational therapists, client selection, consent to treat, professional liability insurance, confidentiality, personal and cultural attributes, provider competence/standards of care, reimbursement/payer guidelines, and authentic occupational therapy practice are discussed. PMID:25945221

  17. Telehealth: Families Finding Ways to Connect in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    JFK Partners, at the University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, is currently implementing a study on the use of telehealth (receiving treatment or services using videoconferencing technology, such as Skype) and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and anxiety. The study is an exploratory grant from Health Resources and Services…

  18. Sustainable Rural Telehealth Innovation: A Public Health Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajendra; Mathiassen, Lars; Stachura, Max E; Astapova, Elena V

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine adoption of telehealth in a rural public health district and to explain how the innovation became sustainable. Study Setting Longitudinal, qualitative study (1988–2008) of the largest public health district in Georgia. Study Design Case study design provided deep insights into the innovation's social dynamics. Punctuated equilibrium theory helped present and make sense of the process. We identified antecedent conditions and outcomes, and we distinguished between episodes and encounters based on the disruptive effects of events. Data Collection Twenty-five semistructured interviews with 19 decision makers and professionals, direct observations, published papers, grant proposals, technical specifications, and other written materials. Principal Findings Strong collaboration within the district, with local community, and with external partners energized the process. Well-functioning outreach clinics made telehealth desirable. Local champions cultivated participation and generative capability, and overcame barriers through opportunistic exploitation of technological and financial options. Telehealth usage fluctuated between medical and administrative operations in response to internal needs and contextual dynamics. External agencies provided initial funding and supported later expansion. Conclusions Extensive internal and external collaboration, and a combination of technology push and opportunistic exploitation, can enable sustainable rural telehealth innovation. PMID:20459449

  19. Use of a telehealth system by older adults with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J; Lee, Chin Chin; Arana, Neysari; Nair, Sankaran N; Sharit, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a feasibility study of a home telehealth system that monitored blood pressure and bodyweight. A total of 34 participants with hypertension (10 males and 24 females) had the telemedicine system installed in their homes. Their mean age was 72 years and 94% of them self-identified as Hispanic. The telehealth system transmitted blood pressure and bodyweight data to a server. There was also a messaging function that was used to send a daily reminder to the participants. Participants used the telehealth system for six months. Ten participants were lost to follow up and 24 participants completed the entire study. Participants had strong positive perceptions regarding the usability and usefulness of the telemedicine system. Most of them (92%) found the device easy to use and 96% felt that the training they received prepared them to use the device. The providers indicated that use of the system improved their ability to manage their patients. The results of the study suggest that use of the telehealth system for home monitoring in Hispanic patients with hypertension is feasible. PMID:24803275

  20. World Federation of occupational therapists' position statement on telehealth.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to state the World Federation of Occupational Therapists' (WFOT) position on the use of telehealth for the delivery of occupational therapy services. Telehealth is the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to deliver health-related services when the provider and client are in different physical locations. Additional terms used to describe this service delivery model include: tele-occupational therapy, telerehabilitation, teletherapy, telecare, telemedicine, and telepractice, among other terms. Telehealth may be used by occupational therapy practitioners for evaluation, intervention, monitoring, supervision, and consultation (between remote therapist, client, and/or local health-care provider) as permitted by jurisdictional, institutional, and professional regulations and policies governing the practice of occupational therapy. Occupational therapy services via telehealth should be appropriate to the individuals, groups and cultures served, and contextualized to the occupations and interests of clients. Important considerations related to licensure/registration, collaboration with local occupational therapists, client selection, consent to treat, professional liability insurance, confidentiality, personal and cultural attributes, provider competence/standards of care, reimbursement/payer guidelines, and authentic occupational therapy practice are discussed. PMID:25945221

  1. Asynchronous telehealth: a scoping review of analytic studies

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Amol; Khoja, Shariq; Lorca, Julio; McKibbon, Ann; Rizo, Carlos; Husereau, Donald; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2009-01-01

    Background Asynchronous telehealth captures clinically important digital samples (e.g., still images, video, audio, text files) and relevant data in one location and subsequently transmits these files for interpretation at a remote site by health professionals without requiring the simultaneous presence of the patient involved and his or her health care provider. Its utility in the health care system, however, still remains poorly defined. We conducted this scoping review to determine the impact of asynchronous telehealth on health outcomes, process of care, access to health services, and health resources. Methods A search was performed up to December 2006 of MEDLINE, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, and The Cochrane Library. Studies were included if they contained original data on the use of asynchronous telehealth and were published in English in a peer-reviewed journal. Two independent reviewers screened all articles and extracted data, reaching consensus on the articles and data identified. Data were extracted on general study characteristics, clinical domain, technology, setting, category of outcome, and results. Study quality (internal validity) was assessed using the Jadad scale for randomized controlled trials and the Downs and Black index for non-randomized studies. Summary data were categorized by medical specialty and presented qualitatively. Results The scoping review included 52 original studies from 238 citations identified; of these 52, almost half focused on the use of telehealth in dermatology. Included studies were characterized by diverse designs, interventions, and outcomes. Only 16 studies were judged to be of high quality. Most studies showed beneficial effects in terms of diagnostic accuracy, wait times, referral management, and satisfaction with services. Evidence on the impact of asynchronous telehealth on resource use in dermatology suggests a reduction in the number of, or avoidance of, in

  2. The organising vision for telehealth and telecare: discourse analysis

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Rob; Wherton, Joe; Sugarhood, Paul; Shaw, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective To (1) map how different stakeholders understand telehealth and telecare technologies and (2) explore the implications for development and implementation of telehealth and telecare services. Design Discourse analysis. Sample 68 publications representing diverse perspectives (academic, policy, service, commercial and lay) on telehealth and telecare plus field notes from 10 knowledge-sharing events. Method Following a familiarisation phase (browsing and informal interviews), we studied a systematic sample of texts in detail. Through repeated close reading, we identified assumptions, metaphors, storylines, scenarios, practices and rhetorical positions. We added successive findings to an emerging picture of the whole. Main findings Telehealth and telecare technologies featured prominently in texts on chronic illness and ageing. There was no coherent organising vision. Rather, four conflicting discourses were evident and engaged only minimally with one another's arguments. Modernist discourse presented a futuristic utopian vision in which assistive technologies, implemented at scale, would enable society to meet its moral obligations to older people by creating a safe ‘smart’ home environment where help was always at hand, while generating efficiency savings. Humanist discourse emphasised the uniqueness and moral worth of the individual and tailoring to personal and family context; it considered that technologies were only sometimes fit for purpose and could create as well as solve problems. Political economy discourse envisaged a techno-economic complex of powerful vested interests driving commodification of healthcare and diversion of public funds into private business. Change management discourse recognised the complicatedness of large-scale technology programmes and emphasised good project management and organisational processes. Conclusion Introduction of telehealth and telecare is hampered because different stakeholders hold different assumptions

  3. Home-Based Telemanagement in Advanced COPD: Who Uses it Most? Real-Life Study in Lombardy.

    PubMed

    Vitacca, Michele; Fumagalli, Lia Paola; Borghi, Gabriella; Colombo, Fausto; Castelli, Alberto; Scalvini, Simonetta; Masella, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Current evidence indicates that the benefits of tele-health may not be uniform across all patients. Therefore, to understand what specific variables influence use of home-based telemanagement in COPD, we conducted this retrospective study.  A 6-month home-based telemanagement program (HTP) was offered to 1,074 COPD patients over a 4-year period. Multivarible linear regression analysis was used to identify predictors of HTP use/week (phone calls and specialist consultations) among all variables: clinical (body mass index, co-morbidities, HTP prescription not following an exacerbation, long-term oxygen therapy use, COPD severity, hospital readmissions, exacerbations and death), socio-demographic (sex, age, place of abode), smoking history, arterial blood gases (ABG), and specialist/general practitioner (GP) urgent need. Logistic regression was conducted to predict relapses/hospitalizations risk as well as the disease impact (COPD Assessment Test, CAT) at the end of the program.  Presence of relapses (p < 0.001), ABGs (p < 0.001) and GP request (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with higher HTP-use. Smoking history (OR 1.542 [IC 95% 1.069-2.217], p = 0.020), specialist (OR 2.895 [2.144-3.910], p < 0.001) and GP consultations (OR 6.575 [4.521-9.561], p < 0.001) were the only independent risk factors for relapse. No predictor of hospitalization was found. High final CAT score was inversely related to oxygen therapy use (p = 0.001) and HTP prescription (p < 0.001), and positively related to presence of co-morbidities (p = 0.001) and baseline CAT (p < 0.001).  This HTP in Lombardy shows that relapsers, people requiring several ABGs and urgent GP visits are the patient subgroup most likely to consume telemanagement services (scheduled and unscheduled). We propose a patient 'identikit' to improve prioritization for HTP prescriptions. PMID:26765586

  4. The Church as a Bridge to Deliver Health Resources Via Telehealth

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Obesity; Diet, Food, and Nutrition; Church; Healthcare Disparities; Minority Health; Mobile Health; Telehealth; Community-based Participatory Research; Primary Health Care; Weight Loss Programs; Health Behavior

  5. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Nitha V.; Kumar, A. Sukesh

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature) and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC). Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements. PMID:26884757

  6. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Nitha V; Kumar, A Sukesh

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature) and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC). Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements. PMID:26884757

  7. Exploring challenges to telehealth communication by specialists in poison information.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Erin; Ellington, Lee; Planalp, Sally; Crouch, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The use of the telephone for providing health care is growing. A significant amount of social meaning is derived from visual information, and the absence of visual stimuli provides unique barriers to communication and increases the risks for misunderstandings and distractions. Understanding challenges to telephone communication can provide insight into training opportunities for overcoming these difficulties and improving patient care. The purpose of this research was to explore through focus groups the challenges of phone communication perceived by specialists in poison information. General types of challenges to effective phone communication included developing new communication skills to compensate for lack of visual information, difficulty assessing caller understanding, difficulty managing caller misunderstandings, maintaining distinctive assessments for routine calls, and managing the multifaceted aspects of job stress. The desire for training to enhance telehealth and cultural competency skills was also mentioned, and these findings might provide guidance for the development of training opportunities for telehealth professionals. PMID:21873282

  8. Health care on demand: four telehealth priorities for 2016.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mark E; Kaufman, Kenneth; Clarin, Dan; O'Riordan, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Consumers who are accustomed to on-demand, virtual services are looking for more convenient ways to access health care. Giving patients the opportunity to connect with physicians remotely can promote higher patient satisfaction and engagement. Telehealth options may have a high start-up cost, but that cost is likely well-justified by the potential to enhance quality, outcomes, and customer attraction and satisfaction/retention over the long-term. PMID:26863834

  9. Professional liability risks and risk management for nurses in telehealth.

    PubMed

    McLean, Pat

    2003-01-01

    This paper will identify professional liability risks including licensure and malpractice risks associated with the delivery of professional health care services by nurses through the medium of information and communications technology (ICT). Risk management strategies to address these risks will be presented. In Canada, telehealth is defined as "the use of communications and information technology to deliver health and healthcare services and information over large and small distances" (Industry Canada, 1997). The use of ICT to deliver professional health care services in Canada is growing rapidly. New health care call centres, staffed by registered nurses, have burgeoned in the past 2 years and other health care organizations are now offering similar services. Whereas, in the "good old days", all health care providers were cautioned against giving health care information over the telephone because of the risk of error and possible malpractice suits, this is now an accepted practice. It is important to recognize that the legal risks are as high as they ever were unless they are appropriately managed through a variety of risk management strategies. Self-regulating groups of Canadian health professionals are also struggling with the legal ramifications of telehealth in relation to the locus of accountability of the health professional, when the client lives in a different jurisdiction from the nurse. This presentation will stress the importance of risk management in telehealth delivery. It is vitally important for the protection of the public and of health care professionals that telehealth services are delivered in a way that minimizes the risk of harm and subsequent legal action. PMID:15074758

  10. E-learning and telehealth: measuring your success.

    PubMed

    Kobb, Rita F; Lane, Robert J; Stallings, Deidre

    2008-08-01

    Organizations that provide training for their employees are interested in translating training expenditures into benefits. Even though there are several common methodologies that are used to train employees, finding the right methodology to stimulate learning and develop a competent workforce while reducing fiscal burdens can be challenging. One such method that continues to grow in popularity is e-learning. For the purpose of this discussion, e-learning refers to Internet-based or online training. The Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) Office of Care Coordination (OCC) was established in July 2003 to oversee the national implementation of its telehealth initiatives. As part of this implementation, the OCC created a national center, the Sunshine Training Center, to work directly with the VHA's Employees Education System (EES) to develop a home telehealth Web-based curriculum. After 3 years, the Sunshine Training Center and EES initiated an Impact Evaluation Process. Over five hundred staff completed the online impact survey. This number represented a 74% response rate. Staff responded overwhelmingly in the positive on the benefits of e-learning for building telehealth skills. PMID:18729757

  11. Telehealth application on the rehabilitation of children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Maria Tereza N.; Moura, Sarah Costa D. O.; Gomes, Ludmila Mourão X.; Lima, Ana Henriques; Moreira, Rafaela Silva; Silva, Caroline Duarte; Guimarães, Eliane Marina P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature on the telehealth initiatives in telerehabilitation practices in children and adolescents from zero to 18 years old. Data sources: Randomized and controlled clinical trials published in the past ten years (January 2002 to February 2012) in Medline/PubMed, Medline/BVS, PEDro and Cochrane Library databases. The descriptors "telemedicine", "rehabilitation" and "telehealth" were used in three different languages (English, Portuguese and Spanish). Data synthesis: From the 20 studies found in the literature, nine were included in this review. Most of the studies showed that telerehabilitation is able to produce better results in the treatment when compared to the traditional methods, providing less frequency of symptoms, better disease control, better quality of life and greater adherence to treatment. Conclusions: Telerehabilitation is a viable and effective strategy in the treatment of common diseases in children and adolescents. However, there are few studies on the subject in this age group. Although telehealth is already consolidated worldwide, there are no studies in Brazil that used the telerehabilitation in children and adolescents, which reinforces the need for more research and investments. PMID:24676201

  12. A Phase II Trial of Telehealth Delivery of the Lidcombe Program of Early Stuttering Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Christine; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark; Simpson, Judy M.; Jones, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of telehealth delivery of the Lidcombe Program of Early Stuttering Intervention, compared with a control group, and to determine the number of children who could be regarded as "responders." Method: A speech-language pathologist provided telehealth delivery of the Lidcombe Program…

  13. Pediatric Obesity Management in Rural Clinics in California and the Role of Telehealth in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Romano, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine health care provider needs related to pediatric obesity management in rural California and to explore strategies to improve care through telehealth. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of health care providers who treated children and adolescents at 41 rural clinics with existing telehealth connectivity. Results: Most of the…

  14. Increasing Access to an ASD Imitation Intervention via a Telehealth Parent Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Allison L.; Ingersoll, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic research focused on developing and improving strategies for the dissemination and implementation of effective ASD services is essential. An innovative and promising area of research is the use of telehealth programs to train parents of children with ASD in intervention techniques. A hybrid telehealth program, combining self-directed…

  15. For telehealth to succeed, privacy and security risks must be identified and addressed.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joseph L; McGraw, Deven

    2014-02-01

    The success of telehealth could be undermined if serious privacy and security risks are not addressed. For example, sensors that are located in a patient's home or that interface with the patient's body to detect safety issues or medical emergencies may inadvertently transmit sensitive information about household activities. Similarly, routine data transmissions from an app or medical device, such as an insulin pump, may be shared with third-party advertisers. Without adequate security and privacy protections for underlying telehealth data and systems, providers and patients will lack trust in the use of telehealth solutions. Although some federal and state guidelines for telehealth security and privacy have been established, many gaps remain. No federal agency currently has authority to enact privacy and security requirements to cover the telehealth ecosystem. This article examines privacy risks and security threats to telehealth applications and summarizes the extent to which technical controls and federal law adequately address these risks. We argue for a comprehensive federal regulatory framework for telehealth, developed and enforced by a single federal entity, the Federal Trade Commission, to bolster trust and fully realize the benefits of telehealth. PMID:24493763

  16. 77 FR 50549 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (Telehealth in the Parkinson's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (Telehealth in the Parkinson's... for information needed to improve the care and clinical outcomes of patients with Parkinson's disease... ``Telehealth in the Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC): The Key to...

  17. An Analysis Of State Telehealth Laws And Regulations For Occupational Therapy And Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Calouro, Christine; Kwong, Mei Wa; Gutierrez, Mario

    2014-01-01

    This study conducted a scan of telehealth occupational therapy and physical therapy state laws and regulations. The laws and regulations were analyzed to determine the potential effect they could have on occupational therapists’ and physical therapists’ utilization of telehealth. The results indicate that the majority of occupational therapy and physical therapy boards are silent on telehealth. A handful of physical therapy laws and regulations address “consultation by means of telecommunication,” but do not provide any guidance for practitioners seeking to provide direct telehealth-delivered services to patients. Of the few states that do provide guidance, policy had the potential to provide clarity or inhibit adoption. The findings suggest that as state boards consider crafting telehealth regulations, they should do so in a manner that facilitates, rather than hampers adoption, while upholding their providers to a high standard of care. PMID:25945218

  18. The Process for the Formulation of the International Telehealth Position Statement for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    JACOBS, KAREN; CASON, JANA; MCCULLOUGH, ANN

    2015-01-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) consists of 84 member organizations representing over 420,000 occupational therapists internationally (WFOT, 2014). In 2014, WFOT published the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement on the use of telehealth in occupational therapy. The process for the formulation of the official document involved reviewing WFOT member organizations’ telehealth position statements and data collected from a survey sent to member organizations’ delegates in April 2014. Qualitative data from 39 countries yielded factors to consider in five key areas: licensure/registration requirements, the cost of technology, privacy and security, reimbursement/payment models, and other issues (e.g., need for collaboration/transfer of knowledge, client selection, provider competencies, standard of care). The WFOT Telehealth Position Statement addressed each of these areas. The collaborative effort resulting in the development of the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement serves as a model for other international organizations. PMID:27563380

  19. Telehealth: seven strategies to successfully implement disruptive technology and transform health care.

    PubMed

    Schwamm, Lee H

    2014-02-01

    "Telehealth" refers to the use of electronic services to support a broad range of remote services, such as patient care, education, and monitoring. Telehealth must be integrated into traditional ambulatory and hospital-based practices if it is to achieve its full potential, including addressing the six domains of care quality defined by the Institute of Medicine: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable. Telehealth is a disruptive technology that appears to threaten traditional health care delivery but has the potential to reform and transform the industry by reducing costs and increasing quality and patient satisfaction. This article outlines seven strategies critical to successful telehealth implementation: understanding patients' and providers' expectations, untethering telehealth from traditional revenue expectations, deconstructing the traditional health care encounter, being open to discovery, being mindful of the importance of space, redesigning care to improve value in health care, and being bold and visionary. PMID:24493761

  20. Evaluation of a Telehealth Service for COPD and HF patients: Clinical outcome and patients' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Catherine Russell

    2015-07-01

    NHS Croydon Health Services and NHS Croydon Clinical Commissioning Group have been providing telehealth services for the past 36 months. The aim of this study was to measure the impact of telehealth when implemented as a service within a standard patient care pathway. To measure the clinical outcomes, the number of A&E visits and hospital admissions, recorded on the NHS Secondary Uses Service database, were compared before and after the implementation of the telehealth service. The number of all events despite its cause and the number of events related to the patients' diagnosed condition were collected. To elicit patients' perceptions about the telehealth service, a cross sectional survey of patients registered on the triage manager database was used to explore their perceptions, concerns and general satisfaction with the telehealth service via a 4 point likert scale questionnaire. The data of 48 patients were collected and telehealth reduced the number of both A&E and hospital admission due to all causes by 13% (P = 0.42) and 22% (P = 0.048), respectively. When only the events directly related to the patient's diagnosed condition were considered, a reduction by 36% (P = 0.03) and 28% (P = 0.02) was recorded for A&E visits and hospital admission respectively. 27 patients consented to participate in the survey. Overall, patients were very satisfied with telehealth services. Patients agreed that telehealth had improved their health, it was a convenient form of health care delivery for them and they were more involved in the decisions about their care or treatment. In addition, since being on telehealth, patients' confidence in managing their health increased from somewhat confident to confident. Telehealth, when provided as a service within a standard care pathway, seems to decrease hospital admissions and A&E visits. Good patient satisfaction suggests that the current service is accepted and it could be further expanded to include a larger number of

  1. Home-Based Contingency Management Programs that Teachers Can Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Vincent L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Offers three guidelines to aid teachers in selecting effective contingency management programs, based on degree of positiveness, effectiveness, and costs to teachers and parents. Describes how to use a simple home-based program, which resulted in successful reduction of mild classroom disruptive behavior. (JAC)

  2. Predictors of Home Based Long-Term Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppens, Jean; And Others

    An attempt was made to determine predictors of service need, use, and outcome among chronically impaired adults and aged who were living in the community and using the home-based, long term care services of the Chronic Illness Center (CIC) of the Cuyahoga County Hospitals (Ohio). Randomly selected consumer service records (N=200) were coded for…

  3. A multi-method review of home-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Evans, J M; Qiu, M; MacKinnon, M; Green, E; Peterson, K; Kaizer, L

    2016-09-01

    This study summarises research- and practice-based evidence on home-based chemotherapy, and explores existing delivery models. A three-pronged investigation was conducted consisting of a literature review and synthesis of 54 papers, a review of seven home-based chemotherapy programmes spanning four countries, and two case studies within the Canadian province of Ontario. The results support the provision of home-based chemotherapy as a safe and patient-centred alternative to hospital- and outpatient-based service. This paper consolidates information on home-based chemotherapy programmes including services and drugs offered, patient eligibility criteria, patient views and experiences, delivery structures and processes, and common challenges. Fourteen recommendations are also provided for improving the delivery of chemotherapy in patients' homes by prioritising patient-centredness, provider training and teamwork, safety and quality of care, and programme management. The results of this study can be used to inform the development of an evidence-informed model for the delivery of chemotherapy and related care, such as symptom management, in patients' homes. PMID:26545409

  4. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  5. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  6. Extension and Home-Based Business: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn; Biers, Karen

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Home-Based Entrepreneurship at Oklahoma State University developed from collaborative efforts of extension, government agencies, business associations, and the vo-tech system. It provides education, directories, information services, and other assistance to people interested in establishing businesses in their homes. (SK)

  7. Home-Based Crisis Therapy: A Comparative Outcome Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Charity; And Others

    Substitute care for a child at risk has been been associated with psychological distress in the child and his family and a drain on public finances. To investigate the cost effectiveness and ultimate influence on family intactness of home-based family crisis intervention, 77 low income, inner city families with an adolescent child at risk of…

  8. Home Based Care: Direction for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Marvin E.

    Home based family centered (HBFC) service programs have been developed as alternatives to out-of-home placement. These programs have reported relatively high service success rates at costs signficantly lower than foster home and institutional care while, at the same time, avoiding the social and psychological risks of out-of-home placement.…

  9. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  10. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  11. 45 CFR 1306.33 - Home-based program option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified in 45 CFR 1304.23(b)(2) and provide appropriate snacks and meals to the children during group... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home-based program option. 1306.33 Section 1306.33... PROGRAM HEAD START STAFFING REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAM OPTIONS Head Start Program Options § 1306.33...

  12. Home-Based Educational Curricula for Mothers and Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Nancy; Brion, LaRue

    This package contains five home-based intervention curricula for families with children between 12 and 30 months of age. Three independent curricula (each emphasizing children's language, play or social development) enlist the mother's aid as observer, teacher and researcher, and promote a three-way interaction among mother, child, and…

  13. An Evaluation of Home-Based Respite Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshur, Carole C.

    1982-01-01

    Findings of an evaluation of a pilot home-based respite care program designed to serve 35 severely mentally retarded and disabled persons were reported. Results indicated that respite care services had never been previously received by 51.8% of the families. (Author/SB)

  14. Indoor location-aware medical systems for smart homecare and telehealth monitoring: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Santoso, Fendy; Redmond, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive literature review of current progress in the application of state-of-the-art indoor positioning systems for telecare and telehealth monitoring. This review is the first in the literature that provides a comprehensive discussion on how existing wireless indoor positioning systems can benefit the development of home-based care systems. More specifically, this review provides an in-depth comparative study of how both system users and medical practitioners can get benefit from indoor positioning technologies; e.g. for real-time monitoring of patients suffering chronic cardiovascular conditions, general monitoring of activities of daily living (ADLs), fall detection systems for the elderly as well as indoor navigation systems for those suffering from visual impairments. Furthermore, it also details various aspects worth considering when choosing a certain technology for a specific healthcare application; e.g. the spatial precision demanded by the application, trade-offs between unobtrusiveness and complexity, and issues surrounding compliance and adherence with the use of wearable tags. Beyond the current state-of-the-art, this review also rigorously discusses several research opportunities and the challenges associated with each. PMID:26306639

  15. A Pilot Study to Engage and Counsel HIV-Positive African American Youth Via Telehealth Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Patrick; John, Malcolm; Sheon, Nicolas; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral nonadherence is a strong determinant of virologic failure and is negatively correlated with survival. HIV-positive African American youth have lower antiretroviral adherence and treatment engagement than other populations. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth (remote videoconferencing) medication counseling intervention as an innovative approach to address these disparities. HIV-positive African American youth (18–29 years old) on antiretrovirals were enrolled in a telehealth medication counseling session, followed by a semi-structured qualitative interview to explore likes/dislikes of the format, modality, and content; potential impact on adherence; privacy issues; and interaction quality. Fourteen participants with a mean age of 24 years, who were 86% male, and had a mean self-reported adherence in the past month of 89%, were interviewed. Participants stated that they liked telehealth, would use it if offered in clinic/research settings, and indicated that their privacy was maintained. Participants described telehealth as convenient and efficient, with positive impact on their knowledge. Telehealth provided a modality to interact with providers that participants described as less intimidating than in-person visits. Telehealth is feasible and acceptable for delivering medication counseling to HIV-positive African American youth when conducted in a controlled clinical setting and may improve quality of patient-provider dialogue. Use of telehealth may lead to more disclosure of treatment difficulties, increased patient comfort, and improved health education. PMID:23991691

  16. Experiences of front-line health professionals in the delivery of telehealth: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, Virginia; Sanders, Caroline; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Hendy, Jane; Barlow, James; Knapp, Martin; Rogers, Anne; Bardsley, Martin; Newman, Stanton P

    2014-01-01

    Background Telehealth is an emerging field of clinical practice but current UK health policy has not taken account of the perceptions of front-line healthcare professionals expected to implement it. Aim To investigate telehealth care for people with long-term conditions from the perspective of the front-line health professional. Design and setting A qualitative study in three sites within the UK (Kent, Cornwall, and the London Borough of Newham) and embedded in the Whole Systems Demonstrator evaluation, a large cluster randomised controlled trial of telehealth and telecare for patients with long-term and complex conditions. Method Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 32 front-line health professionals (13 community matrons, 10 telehealth monitoring nurses and 9 GPs) involved in the delivery of telehealth. Data were analysed using a modified grounded theory approach. Results Mixed views were expressed by front-line professionals, which seem to reflect their levels of engagement. It was broadly welcomed by nursing staff as long as it supplemented rather than substituted their role in traditional patient care. GPs held mixed views; some gave a cautious welcome but most saw telehealth as increasing their work burden and potentially undermining their professional autonomy. Conclusion Health care professionals will need to develop a shared understanding of patient self-management through telehealth. This may require a renegotiation of their roles and responsibilities. PMID:24982492

  17. The use of telehealth to assist remote hospital resuscitation and aeromedical retrieval tasking: a 12-month case review.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Kate; Elcock, Mark; Aitken, Peter; Furyk, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the use of telehealth for patients who had suffered a cardiac or respiratory arrest, and were medically coordinated from the Queensland coordination hub at Townsville. We conducted a review of all cardiac or respiratory arrest cases where teleheath had been used prior to aeromedical retrieval. The doctors involved in the cases completed an evaluation form about the use of telehealth during the resuscitation. During the 12-month study period 6460 patients were medically coordinated from Townsville. Telehealth was used 51 times, i.e. for 0.8% of all transfers. Of the 51 uses of telehealth, nine were for patients having a cardiac/respiratory arrest, i.e. 18% of telehealth use at Townsville was for patients undergoing resuscitation following cardiac or respiratory arrest. All eight medical coordinators and three of eight referring doctors responded to the survey. Most medical coordinators stated that telehealth assisted communication and aided assessment. Most medical coordinators and some referring doctors felt that it improved the quality of patient care. The free text comments on telehealth use for remote area resuscitation were generally very supportive. While the telehealth equipment was easy to use, minor audio problems reinforce the need for systems to be wholly reliable. A set of guidelines to aid future telehealth assisted resuscitation was produced. The present study suggests that telehealth use is beneficial during active resuscitation efforts. PMID:22302764

  18. The challenges of a home-based nursing consultation business.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, L

    1999-03-01

    The transition from working in a traditional setting to working at home alone can be challenging for new nurse consultants. Home-based consultants can use a variety of strategies to stay focused and connected, such as having a designated work area, limiting distractions, and networking. Nurse consultants can obtain information about business management from community resources, and computer on-line services offer a means of contacting other small-business owners. Ongoing business evaluations, which include professional accomplishments as well as an examination of income and expenses, help in planning. Home-based nurse consultants can increase the likelihood of business success by setting objectives, working diligently, and networking with others in the business community. PMID:10382409

  19. “Real-World” Practical Evaluation Strategies: A Review of Telehealth Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Caitlin; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, the increasing interest in telehealth and significant technological breakthroughs of the past decade create favorable conditions for the widespread adoption of telehealth services. Therefore, expectations are high that telehealth can help alleviate prevailing challenges in health care delivery. However, in order to translate current research to policy and facilitate adoption by patients and health care providers, there is need for compelling evidence of the effectiveness of telehealth interventions. Such evidence is gathered from rigorously designed research studies, which may not always be practical in many real-world settings. Objective Our aim was to summarize current telehealth evaluation strategies and challenges and to outline practical approaches to conduct evaluation in real-world settings using one of our previously reported telehealth initiatives, the Diabetes Connect program, as a case study. Methods We reviewed commonly used current evaluation frameworks and strategies, as well as best practices based on successful evaluative efforts to date to address commonly encountered challenges in telehealth evaluation. These challenges in telehealth evaluation and commonly used frameworks are described relevant to the evaluation of Diabetes Connect, a 12-month Web-based blood glucose monitoring program. Results Designers of telehealth evaluation frameworks must give careful consideration to the elements of planning, implementation, and impact assessment of interventions. Evaluating performance at each of these phases is critical to the overall success of an intervention. Although impact assessment occurs at the end of a program, our review shows that it should begin at the point of problem definition. Critical to the success of an evaluative strategy is early planning that involves all stakeholders to identify the overall goals of the program and key measures of success at each phase of the program life cycle. This strategy should enable

  20. Geographic Concentration Of Home-Based Medical Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nengliang; Ritchie, Christine; Camacho, Fabian; Leff, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    The United States faces a shortage of providers who care for homebound patients. About 5,000 primary care providers made 1.7 million home visits to Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries in 2013, accounting for 70 percent of all home-based medical visits. Nine percent of these providers performed 44 percent of visits. However, most homebound people live more than thirty miles from a high-volume provider. PMID:27503964

  1. A Pilot Study of Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Delivered via Telehealth Technology

    PubMed Central

    Tuerk, Peter W.; Yoder, Matthew; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Gros, Daniel F.; Acierno, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We present a pilot study of 12 veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD and treated with prolonged exposure therapy (PE) via telehealth technology. A reference sample of 35 combat veterans treated with in-person PE in the same clinic is also included for a comparison. Feasibility and clinical outcomes of interest include: technical performance and practicality of the telehealth equipment, patient safety, treatment completion rates, number of sessions required for termination, and clinical outcomes. Results indicated large statistically significant decreases in self-reported pathology for veterans treated with PE via telehealth technology. Preliminary results support the feasibility and safety of the modality. Suggestions for the implementation of PE via telehealth technology are discussed. PMID:20135675

  2. Telehealth Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Co-Occurring Insomnia and Depression Symptoms in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lichstein, Kenneth L.; Scogin, Forrest; Thomas, S. Justin; DiNapoli, Elizabeth A.; Dillon, Haley R.; McFadden, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Telehealth has proven effective with a wide range of disorders, but there is a paucity of data on the use of telehealth using cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) with late-life insomnia and depression. This pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of using telehealth to treat older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression living in rural Alabama. Method Five patients received 10 sessions of CBT for insomnia and depression. Patients were engaged in treatment via Skype from their primary care physician’s office. Assessments were conducted at baseline, posttreatment, and 2-month follow-up. Results Patients exhibited clinically significant improvement in both insomnia (sleep diaries and Insomnia Severity Index) and depression (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at posttreatment, and these gains were well maintained at 2-month follow-up. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that telehealth may be an effective means of providing treatment to older adults, including underserved populations. PMID:24014056

  3. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... Retaining Nurses at State Homes).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home...

  4. Telehealth etiquette in home healthcare: the key to a successful visit.

    PubMed

    Haney, Tina; Kott, Karen; Fowler, Christianne

    2015-05-01

    The use of telehealth by home healthcare agencies is growing. It has been shown to reduce rehospitalizations by up to 62%, reduce costs, and increase efficiency. Due to the use of telehealth technology, new and unique rules of etiquette must be followed to make both the patient and clinician comfortable and satisfied with the process. Little literature exists regarding telehealth etiquette. This article explores the techniques and methods that home care clinicians should utilize to assure that the telehealth experience is positive and effective. After providing a less successful scenario, steps for success are outlined and a suggested successful conclusion is provided for the scenario. Home care agencies will benefit greatly from expanding their ability to visit patients in different ways. Simple steps need to be taken to assure successful visits that follow the rules for assuring patient comfort, autonomy, and protection. PMID:25943217

  5. 77 FR 13195 - Exempting In-Home Video Telehealth From Copayments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... between VAMCs and VA Centers of Specialized Care, such as those established for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Clinical video telehealth uses...

  6. Developing Initiatives for Home-Based Child Care: Current Research and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Paulsell, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality…

  7. Who is Using Telehealth in Primary Care? Safety Net Clinics and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs).

    PubMed

    Coffman, Megan; Moore, Miranda; Jetty, Anuradha; Klink, Kathleen; Bazemore, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Despite rapid advancements in telehealth services, only 15% of family physicians in a 2014 survey reported using telehealth; use varied widely according to the physician's practice setting or designation. Users were significantly more likely than nonusers to work in federally designated "safety net" clinics and health maintenance organizations (HMOs) but not more likely than nonusers to report working in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) or accountable care organization. PMID:27390373

  8. Implementation of Video Telehealth to Improve Access to Evidence-Based Psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kauth, Michael R.; Hudson, Sonora; Martin, Lindsey A.; Ramsey, David J.; Daily, Lawrence; Rader, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Increasing access to psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a primary focus of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system. Delivery of treatment via video telehealth can expand availability of treatment and be equally effective as in-person treatment. Despite VA efforts, barriers to establishing telehealth services remain, including both provider acceptance and organizational obstacles. Thus, development of specific strategies is needed to implement video telehealth services in complex healthcare systems, like the VA. Materials and Methods: This project was guided by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework and used external facilitation to increase access to psychotherapy via video telehealth. The project was conducted at five VA Medical Centers and their associated community clinics across six states in the South Central United States. Results: Over a 21-month period, 27 video telehealth clinics were established to provide greater access to evidence-based psychotherapies for PTSD. Examination of change scores showed that participating sites averaged a 3.2-fold increase in unique patients and a 6.5-fold increase in psychotherapy sessions via video telehealth for PTSD. Differences between participating and nonparticipating sites in both unique patients and encounters were significant (p=0.041 and p=0.009, respectively). Two groups emerged, separated by degree of engagement in the facilitation intervention. Facilitation was perceived as useful by providers. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study of external facilitation as an implementation strategy for telehealth. Our findings suggest that external facilitation is an effective and acceptable strategy to support providers as they establish clinics and make complex practice changes, such as implementing video telehealth to deliver psychotherapy. PMID:25714664

  9. Conceptualizing Telehealth in Nursing Practice: Advancing a Conceptual Model to Fill a Virtual Gap.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel A; Penner, Jamie L

    2016-03-01

    Increasingly nurses use various telehealth technologies to deliver health care services; however, there has been a lag in research and generation of empirical knowledge to support nursing practice in this expanding field. One challenge to generating knowledge is a gap in development of a comprehensive conceptual model or theoretical framework to illustrate relationships of concepts and phenomena inherent to adoption of a broad range of telehealth technologies to holistic nursing practice. A review of the literature revealed eight published conceptual models, theoretical frameworks, or similar entities applicable to nursing practice. Many of these models focus exclusively on use of telephones and four were generated from qualitative studies, but none comprehensively reflect complexities of bridging nursing process and elements of nursing practice into use of telehealth. The purpose of this article is to present a review of existing conceptual models and frameworks, discuss predominant themes and features of these models, and present a comprehensive conceptual model for telehealth nursing practice synthesized from this literature for consideration and further development. This conceptual model illustrates characteristics of, and relationships between, dimensions of telehealth practice to guide research and knowledge development in provision of holistic person-centered care delivery to individuals by nurses through telehealth technologies. PMID:25858897

  10. A pilot trial of a speech pathology telehealth service for head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Burns, Clare L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Hill, Anne J; Malcolm, Karen; Bassett, Lynell; Kenny, Lizbeth M; Greenup, Phillip

    2012-12-01

    We explored the feasibility of providing access to specialist speech pathology services via telehealth for patients with head and neck cancer. A weekly telehealth clinic was conducted between the speech pathology departments of a tertiary hospital and a regional hospital in Queensland. Over a 5-month period, 50 telehealth sessions were conducted for 18 patients. There were 38 patient consultations, nine case discussions between clinicians and three clinical training sessions relating to the skills needed for specific client management (e.g. voice prosthesis selection). Eight sessions had multidisciplinary involvement. All cases were successfully managed via telehealth. All patients agreed that they were comfortable using telehealth and would be happy to use it again in future. Both clinicians agreed that they could competently assess patients using the telehealth system. There appeared to be financial benefits for the patient, because by receiving specialist intervention at a local facility their travel expenses were lower. There was also the opportunity for workforce training and development through online case discussion and clinical consultation. PMID:23209274

  11. Designing Clinically Valuable Telehealth Resources: Processes to Develop a Community-Based Palliative Care Prototype

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Deidre Diane; Swetenham, Kate; To, Timothy Hong Man; Currow, David Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Changing population demography and patterns of disease are increasing demands on the health system. Telehealth is seen as providing a mechanism to support community-based care, thus reducing pressure on hospital services and supporting consumer preferences for care in the home. Objective This study examined the processes involved in developing a prototype telehealth intervention to support palliative care patients involved with a palliative care service living in the community. Methods The challenges and considerations in developing the palliative care telehealth prototype were reviewed against the Center for eHealth Research (CeHRes) framework, a telehealth development model. The project activities to develop the prototype were specifically mapped against the model’s first four phases: multidisciplinary project management, contextual inquiry, value specification, and design. This project has been developed as part of the Telehealth in the Home: Aged and Palliative Care in South Australia initiative. Results Significant issues were identified and subsequently addressed during concept and prototype development. The CeHRes approach highlighted the implicit diversity in views and opinions among participants and stakeholders and enabled issues to be considered, resolved, and incorporated during design through continuous engagement. Conclusions The CeHRes model provided a mechanism that facilitated “better” solutions in the development of the palliative care prototype by addressing the inherent but potentially unrecognized differences in values and beliefs of participants. This collaboration enabled greater interaction and exchange among participants resulting in a more useful and clinically valuable telehealth prototype. PMID:25189279

  12. Initial Impressions of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Case Managers about Community-Based Telehealth Kiosks

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A.; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W.; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding community-based telehealth. We used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults as a first step in feasibility assessment. Participants included residents (n=6) and community agency case managers (n=3) of a HUD-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide the plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. PMID:20509594

  13. Exploring pharmacy and home-based sexually transmissible infection testing

    PubMed Central

    Habel, Melissa A.; Scheinmann, Roberta; Verdesoto, Elizabeth; Gaydos, Charlotte; Bertisch, Maggie; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of pharmacy and home-based sexually transmissible infection (STI) screening as alternate testing venues among emergency contraception (EC) users. Methods The study included two phases in February 2011–July 2012. In Phase I, customers purchasing EC from eight pharmacies in Manhattan received vouchers for free STI testing at onsite medical clinics. In Phase II, three Facebook ads targeted EC users to connect them with free home-based STI test kits ordered online. Participants completed a self-administered survey. Results Only 38 participants enrolled in Phase I: 90% female, ≤29 years (74%), 45% White non-Hispanic and 75% college graduates; 71% were not tested for STIs in the past year and 68% reported a new partner in the past 3 months. None tested positive for STIs. In Phase II, ads led to >45 000 click-throughs, 382 completed the survey and 290 requested kits; 28% were returned. Phase II participants were younger and less educated than Phase I participants; six tested positive for STIs. Challenges included recruitment, pharmacy staff participation, advertising with discretion and cost. Conclusions This study found low uptake of pharmacy and home-based testing among EC users; however, STI testing in these settings is feasible and the acceptability findings indicate an appeal among younger women for testing in non-traditional settings. Collaborating with and training pharmacy and medical staff are key elements of service provision. Future research should explore how different permutations of expanding screening in non-traditional settings could improve testing uptake and detect additional STI cases. PMID:26409484

  14. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease world-wide is one of great concern to patients and health care agencies alike. Traditionally centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes are offered to individuals after cardiac events to aid recovery and prevent further cardiac illness. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes have been introduced in an attempt to widen access and participation. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes compared with supervised centre-based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health-related quality of life and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Search methods We updated the search of a previous review by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2007, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from 2001 to January 2008. We checked reference lists and sought advice from experts. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared centre-based cardiac rehabilitation (e.g. hospital, gymnasium, sports centre) with home-based programmes, in adults with myocardial infarction, angina, heart failure or who had undergone revascularisation. Data collection and analysis Studies were selected independently by two reviewers, and data extracted by a single reviewer and checked by a second one. Authors were contacted where possible to obtain missing information. Main results Twelve studies (1,938 participants) met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies recruited a lower risk patient following an acute myocardial infarction (MI) and revascularisation. There was no difference in outcomes of home- versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation in mortality risk ratio (RR) was 1.31 (95% confidence interval (C) 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.11 (95% CI −0.35 to 0.13), as well

  15. Center forTelehealth and Cybermedicine Research, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center: a model of a telehealth program within an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Alverson, Dale C; Dion, Denise; Migliorati, Margaret; Rodriguez, Adrian; Byun, Hannah W; Effertz, Glen; Duffy, Veronica; Monge, Benjamin

    2013-05-01

    An overview of the Center for Telehealth and Cybermedicine Research at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center was presented along with several other national and international programs as part of the of a symposium-workshop on telehealth, "Sustaining and Realizing the Promise of Telemedicine," held at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, MI, May 18-19, 2012 and hosted by the University of Michigan Telemedicine Resource Center and its Director, Rashid Bashshur. This article describes our Center, its business plan, and a view to the future. PMID:23317516

  16. Patient and professional user experiences of simple telehealth for hypertension, medication reminders and smoking cessation: a service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Cox, Tracey; O'Connell, Phil; Chambers, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To establish patient and professional user satisfaction with the Advice & Interactive Messaging (AIM) for Health programme delivered using a mobile phone-based, simple telehealth intervention, ‘Florence’. Design A service evaluation using data extracted from Florence and from a professional user electronic survey. Setting 425 primary care practices across 31 Clinical Commissioning Groups in England. Participants 3381 patients registered on 1 of 10 AIM protocols between March 2013 and January 2014 and 77 professional users. Intervention The AIM programme offered 10 clinical protocols, in three broad groups: (1) hypertension diagnosis/monitoring, (2) medication reminders and (3) smoking cessation. Florence sent patients prompts to submit clinical information, educational messages and user satisfaction questions. Patient responses were reviewed by their primary healthcare providers. Primary outcome measures Patients and professional user experiences of using AIM, and within this, Florence. Results Patient activity using Florence was generally good at month 1 for the hypertension protocols (71–80%), but reduced over 2–3 months (31–60%). For the other protocols, patient activity was 0–39% at 3 months. Minimum target days of texting were met for half the hypertension protocols. 1707/2304 (74%) patients sent evaluative texts responded at least once. Among responders, agreement with the adapted friends and family statement generally exceeded preproject aspirations. Professional responders were generally positive or equivocal about the programme. Conclusions Satisfaction with AIM appeared optimal when patients were carefully selected for the protocol; professional users were familiar with the system, the programme addressed a problem with the previous service delivery that was identified by users and users took an active approach to achieve clinical goals. However, there was a significant decrease in patients’ use of Florence over time. Future

  17. Home-based care, technology, and the maintenance of selves.

    PubMed

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons (especially older persons) to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also have important implications for sustaining selfhood in ways that are of value to individuals and those who care for them. I will argue, by appealing to Hilde Lindemann's notion of "holding" persons' identities in place, that technological interventions are not only useful tools for improving and sustaining health and good care at home, but that they may also help to extend our personal identities and relational capacities in ways that are practically and ethically good. Because of these important goods, I will claim that there is a prima facie moral duty to do this "holding" work and that it is best done by family members and loved ones who are well suited to the job because of their history and relationship with the individual that needs to be "held" in place. PMID:25787720

  18. Are telehealth technologies for hypertension care and self-management effective or simply risky and costly?

    PubMed

    McKoy, June; Fitzner, Karen; Margetts, Miranda; Heckinger, Elizabeth; Specker, James; Roth, Laura; Izenberg, Maxwell; Siegel, Molly; McKinney, Shannon; Moss, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is a prevalent chronic disease that requires ongoing management and self-care. The disease affects 31% of American adults and contributed to or caused the deaths of 348,000 Americans in 2008, fewer than 50% of whom effectively self-managed the disease. However, self-management is complex, with patients requiring ongoing support and easy access to care. Telehealth may help foster the knowledge and skills necessary for those with hypertension to engage in successful self-management. This paper considers the applicability, efficacy, associated risks, and cost-effectiveness of telehealth for individuals and populations with hypertension. Telehealth is a broad term, encompassing telemedicine and mobile health that is used for physician-patient interactions, diagnostics, care delivery, education, information sharing, monitoring, and reminders. Telemedicine may have considerable utility for people diagnosed with hypertension who have poor access or social barriers that constrain access, but potential risks exist. Telehealth technology is evolving rapidly, even in the absence of fully proven cost-effectiveness and efficacy. Considering the cost of inpatient and emergency department care for patients with hypertension, telehealth is a highly attractive alternative, but there are risks to consider. Incorporating telehealth, which is increasingly characterized by mobile health, can increase both the capacity of health care providers and the reach of patient support, clinical management, and self-care. Telehealth studies need improvement; long-term outcome data on cardiovascular events must be obtained, and robust risk analyses and economic studies are needed to prospectively evaluate the safety and cost savings for hypertension self-management. PMID:25290443

  19. Between ideals and reality in home-based rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Steihaug, Sissel; Lippestad, Jan-W.; Werner, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Setting and objective The growing elderly population and the rising number of people with chronic diseases indicate an increasing need for rehabilitation. Norwegian municipalities are required by law to offer rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to investigate how rehabilitation work is perceived and carried out by first-line service providers compared with the guidelines issued by Norway’s health authorities. Design and subjects In this action research project, qualitative data were collected through 24 individual interviews and seven group interviews with employees – service providers and managers – in the home-based service of two boroughs in Oslo, Norway. The data were analysed using a systematic text-condensation method. Results The results show that rehabilitation receives little attention in the boroughs and that patients are seldom rehabilitated at home. There is disagreement among professional staff as to what rehabilitation is and should be. The purchaser–provider organization, high speed of service delivery, and scarcity of resources are reported to hamper rehabilitation work. Conclusion and implications A discrepancy exists between the high level of ambitious goals of Norwegian health authorities and the possibilities that practitioners have to achieve them. This situation results in healthcare staff being squeezed by the increasing expectations and demands of the population and the promises and statutory rights coming from politicians and administrators. For the employees in the municipalities to place rehabilitation on the agenda, it is a requirement that authorities understand the clinical aspect of rehabilitation and provide the municipalities with adequate framework conditions for successful rehabilitation work. Key pointsHome-based rehabilitation is documented to be effective, and access to rehabilitation has been established in Norwegian law.The purchaser–provider organization, high rate of speed, and a scarcity of resources in

  20. Serious Games for Home-based Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Raoul; Hiesel, Patrick; Peters, Sebastian; Siewiorek, Daniel P; Smailagic, Asim; Brügge, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    On average, two thousand residents in the United States experience a stroke every day. These circumstances account for $28 billion direct costs annually and given the latest predictions, these costs will more than triple by 2030. In our research, we propose a portfolio of serious games for home-based stroke rehabilitation. The objective of the game approach is to enrich the training experience and establish a higher level of compliance to prescribed exercises, while maintaining a supportive training environment as found in common therapy sessions. Our system provides a collection of mini games based on rehabilitation exercises used in conventional physical therapy, monitors the patient's performance while exercising and provides clinicians with an interface to personalize the training. The clinician can set the current state of rehabilitation and change the playable games over time to drive diversification. While the system still has to be evaluated, an early stage case study with one patient offered positive indications towards this concept. PMID:26152980

  1. User Interaction Design for a Home-Based Telecare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Spyros; Tsiakoulis, Pirros; Chalamandaris, Aimilios; Karabetsos, Sotiris

    This paper presents the design of the user-interaction component of a home-based telecare system for congestive heart failure patients. It provides a short overview of the overall system and offers details on the different interaction types supported by the system. Interacting with the user occurs either as part of a scheduled procedure or as a consequence of identifying or predicting a potentially hazardous deterioration of the patients' health state. The overall logic of the interaction is structured around event-scenario associations, where a scenario consists of concrete actions to be performed, some of which may involve the patient. A key objective in this type of interaction that it is very simple, intuitive and short, involving common everyday objects and familiar media such as speech.

  2. An evaluation of the routine use of amoxicillin as part of the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Indi; Amthor, Rachel E.; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if the inclusion of amoxicillin correlates with better recovery rates in the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use therapeutic food. Methods This retrospective cohort study compared data from the treatment of two groups of children in Malawi aged 6–59 months with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition. The standard protocol group received a 7 day course of amoxicillin at the onset of treatment. The alternate protocol group received no antibiotics. All children were treated with the same ready-to-use therapeutic food. The primary outcome was nutritional recovery, defined as achieving a weight-for-height Z-score > −2 without edema. Results 498 children were treated according to the standard protocol with amoxicillin and 1955 were treated under the alternate protocol without antibiotics. The group of children treated with amoxicillin was slightly older and more stunted at baseline. The recovery rate for children who received amoxicillin was worse at 4 weeks (40% vs. 71%) but similar after up to 12 weeks of therapy (84% vs. 86%), compared to the children treated without antibiotics. Regression modeling indicated that this difference at 4 weeks was most strongly associated with the receipt of amoxicillin. Conclusions This review of two therapeutic feeding programs suggests that children with severe acute malnutrition who were treated without amoxicillin did not have an inferior rate of recovery. Given the limitations of this retrospective analysis, a prospective trial is warranted to determine the effect of antibiotics on recovery from uncomplicated malnutrition with home-based therapy. PMID:20545919

  3. The Diffusion of Telehealth in Rural American Indian Communities: A Retrospective Survey of Key Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Spero M.; Bair, Byron; Dailey, Nancy; Shore, Jay H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Mental health issues are a serious concern for many American Indian Veterans, especially for post-traumatic stress disorder and related psychiatric conditions. Yet, acquiring mental health treatment can be a challenge in Native communities where specialized services are largely unavailable. Consequently, telehealth is increasingly being suggested as a way to expand healthcare access on or near reservation lands. In this study, we wanted to understand the factors affecting the diffusion of telehealth clinics that provided mental health care to rural, American Indian Veterans. Materials and Methods: We surveyed 39 key personnel and stakeholders who were involved in the decision-making process, technological infrastructure, and implementation of three clinics. Using Roger Everett's Diffusion Theory as a framework, we gathered information about specific tasks, factors hindering progress, and personal reactions to telehealth both before and after implementation. Results: Many participants expressed initial concerns about using telehealth; however, most became positive over time. Factors that influenced participants' viewpoint largely included patient and staff feedback and witnessing the fulfillment of a community health need. The use of outside information to support the implementation of the clinics and personal champions also showed considerable influence in the clinics' success. Conclusion: The findings presented here address critical gaps in our understanding of telehealth diffusion and inform research strategies regarding the cultural issues and outcomes related to telemental health services. Information contained in this report serves as a long overdue guide for developing telemental health programs and policies among American Indians, specifically, and rural populations in general. PMID:22082106

  4. Mortality Benefit of a Fourth-Generation Synchronous Telehealth Program for the Management of Chronic Cardiovascular Disease: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Sheng; Yu, Jiun-Yu; Lin, Yen-Hung; Chen, Ying-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Chang; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Chuang, Pao-Yu; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Background We have shown that a fourth-generation telehealth program that analyzes and responds synchronously to data transferred from patients is associated with fewer hospitalizations and lower medical costs. Whether a fourth-generation telehealth program can reduce all-cause mortality has not yet been reported for patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. Objective We conducted a clinical epidemiology study retrospectively to determine whether a fourth-generation telehealth program can reduce all-cause mortality for patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. Methods We enrolled 576 patients who had joined a telehealth program and compared them with 1178 control patients. A Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to analyze the impact of risk predictors on all-cause mortality. The model adjusted for age, sex, and chronic comorbidities. Results There were 53 (9.3%) deaths in the telehealth group and 136 (11.54%) deaths in the control group. We found that the telehealth program violated the proportional hazards assumption by the Schoenfeld residual test. Thus, we fitted a Cox regression model with time-varying covariates. The results showed an estimated hazard ratio (HR) of 0.866 (95% CI 0.837-0.896, P<.001; number needed to treat at 1 year=55.6, 95% CI 43.2-75.7 based on HR of telehealth program) for the telehealth program on all-cause mortality after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. The time-varying interaction term in this analysis showed that the beneficial effect of telehealth would increase over time. Conclusions The results suggest that our fourth-generation telehealth program is associated with less all-cause mortality compared with usual care after adjusting for chronic comorbidities. PMID:27177497

  5. Diabetes Telehealth and Computerized Decision Support Systems: A Sound System with a Human Touch Is Needed

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth holds the promise of improved consistency and fast and equal access to care, and will have great impact on future care. To enhance its quality and safety, computerized decision support systems (CDSS) have been launched. This commentary focuses specifically on the impact of telehealth and CDSS on diabetes patient management. Ideally, clinical information should be linked to evidence based recommendations and guidelines in the CDSS to provide tailored recommendations at the moment of care. However, technical support such as CDSS is not enough. The human touch is essential. A named healthcare provider with access to telehealth and CDSS seems to promise a way of providing both patient-centered and evidence-based care. PMID:20663469

  6. The effect of telehealth systems and satisfaction with health expenditure among patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uei, Shu-Lin; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Kuo, Yu-Ming

    2016-04-29

    Telehealth cost analysis has become a crucial issue for governments in recent years. In this study, we examined cases of metabolic syndrome in Hualien County, Taiwan. This research adopted the framework proposed by Marchand to establish a study process. In addition, descriptive statistics, a t test, analysis of variance, and regression analysis were employed to analyze 100 questionnaires. The results of the t$ test revealed significant differences in medical health expenditure, number of clinical visits for medical treatment, average amount of time spent commuting to clinics, amount of time spent undergoing medical treatment, and average number of people accompanying patients to medical care facilities or assisting with other tasks in the past one month, indicating that offering telehealth care services can reduce health expenditure. The statistical analysis results revealed that customer satisfaction has a positive effect on reducing health expenditure. Therefore, this study proves that telehealth care systems can effectively reduce health expenditure and directly improve customer satisfaction with medical treatment. PMID:27163314

  7. A Pilot Exploration of Speech Sound Disorder Intervention Delivered by Telehealth to School–Age Children

    PubMed Central

    Grogan-Johnson, Susan; Gabel, Rodney M.; Taylor, Jacquelyn; Rowan, Lynne E.; Alvares, Robin; Schenker, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a school-based telehealth service delivery model and reports outcomes made by school-age students with speech sound disorders in a rural Ohio school district. Speech therapy using computer-based speech sound intervention materials was provided either by live interactive videoconferencing (telehealth), or conventional side-by-side intervention. Progress was measured using pre- and post-intervention scores on the Goldman Fristoe Test of Articulation-2 (Goldman & Fristoe, 2002). Students in both service delivery models made significant improvements in speech sound production, with students in the telehealth condition demonstrating greater mastery of their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals. Live interactive videoconferencing thus appears to be a viable method for delivering intervention for speech sound disorders to children in a rural, public school setting. PMID:25945180

  8. The costs and benefits of technology-enabled, home-based cardiac rehabilitation measured in a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Frank; Wade, Victoria

    2014-10-01

    We conducted a cost benefit analysis of a home telehealth-based cardiac rehabilitation programme compared to the standard hospital-based programme. A total of 120 participants were enrolled in a trial, with 60 randomised to the telehealth group and 60 randomised to usual care. Participants in the telehealth group received a mobile phone, Wellness Diary and a Wellness web portal, with daily text messaging. Participants in the usual care group received the standard 6-week hospital-based outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programme, including gym sessions. The cost of delivery by telehealth was slightly lower than for patients attending a rehabilitation service in person. From the provider's perspective, the telehealth intervention could be delivered for $1633 per patient, compared to $1845 for the usual care group. From the participant's perspective, patient travel costs for home rehabilitation were substantially less than for hospital attendance ($80 vs $400). Cardiac rehabilitation by telehealth offers obvious advantages and the option should be available to all patients who are eligible for cardiac rehabilitation. PMID:25400004

  9. Achieving greater consistency in telehealth project evaluations to improve organisational learning.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Anthony; Gray, Kathleen; Borda, Ann; Poultney, Nathan; Basilakis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth pilot projects and trial implementations are numerous but are often not fully evaluated, preventing construction of a sound evidence base and so limiting their adoption. We describe the need for a generic Telehealth project evaluation framework, within which evaluation is undertaken based on existing health systems performance indicators, using appropriately chosen measures. We provide two case studies explaining how this approach could be applied, in Australian and Canadian settings. It is argued that this framework type of approach to evaluation offers better potential for incorporating the learnings from resultant evaluations into business decisions by "learning organisations", through alignment with organisational performance considerations. PMID:25980709

  10. Home-based radiology transcription and a productivity pay plan.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K

    1997-01-01

    Shands Hospital in Gainesville, Fla., decided to evaluate the way it provided transcription services in its radiology department. It identified four goals: increased productivity, decreased operating expense, finding much needed space in the radiology department and increasing employee morale. The department performs 165,000 procedures annually, with 66 radiologists, 29 faculty, and 37 residents and fellows on staff. Six FTEs comprised the transcription pool in the radiology department, with transcription their only duty. Transcriptionists were paid an hourly rate based on their years of service, not their productivity. Evaluation and measurement studies were undertaken by the hospital's management systems engineering department. The transcriptionists' hours were then changed to provide coverage during the periods of heaviest dictation. The productivity level of the transcription staff was also measured and various methods of measurement reviewed. The goal was a pure incentive pay plan that would reward employees for every increase in productivity. The incentive pay plan was phased in over a three-month period. Transcriptionists were paid for work performed, with no base pay beyond minimum wage. The move to home-based transcription was planned. The necessary equipment was identified and various issues specific to working at home were addressed. Approximately six months later, the transcriptionists were set up to work at home. The astounding results achieved are presented: 28% increase in productivity, operational cost savings exceeding $25,000 and a space savings of 238 square feet. PMID:10164979

  11. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  12. Latino Parent Home-Based Practices that Bolster Student Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Jasmine A.

    2011-01-01

    Home-based parental involvement practices (i.e., educational encouragement, monitoring, and support) and their impact on students' academic persistence were investigated with a sample of 137, ninth-grade Latino students in a northeast high school. Structural Equation Modeling results indicate that the relationship between home-based parental…

  13. Entrepreneurial Checklist Tool for Beginning Farm and Home-Based Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafie, A. R.; Nartea, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    Extension educators entertain frequent questions on beginning a farm or starting a home-based business. Retired, unemployed, and displaced workers consider starting a small farm or home-based business. Determining educational needs or individual business aptitude is time consuming. Lengthy and comprehensive skill-based checklists exist for…

  14. Developmental Characteristics of Home-Based Counselors: A Key to Serving At-Risk Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Gerard; Foster, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Home-based counseling is an incredibly demanding intervention, yet little is known about the counselors providing this important service. This study sought to profile ego development, conceptual complexity, and supervision satisfaction for 120 home-based counselors. Counselors scored at moderate levels on measures of both ego development and…

  15. Employees’ views on home-based, after-hours telephone triage by Dutch GP cooperatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dutch out-of-hours (OOH) centers find it difficult to attract sufficient triage staff. They regard home-based triage as an option that might attract employees. Specially trained nurses are supposed to conduct triage by telephone from home for after-hours medical care. The central aim of this research is to investigate the views of employees of OOH centers in The Netherlands on home-based telephone triage in after-hours care. Methods The study is a Q methodology study. Triage nurses, general practitioners (GPs) and managers of OOH centers ranked 36 opinion statements on home-based triage. We interviewed 10 participants to help develop and validate the statements for the Q sort, and 77 participants did the Q sort. Results We identified four views on home-based telephone triage. Two generally favor home-based triage, one highlights some concerns and conditions, and one opposes it out of concern for quality. The four views perceive different sources of credibility for nurse triagists working from home. Conclusion Home-based telephone triage is a controversial issue among triage nurses, GPs and managers of OOH centers. By identifying consensus and dissension among GPs, triagists, managers and regulators, this study generates four perspectives on home-based triage. In addition, it reveals the conditions considered important for home-based triage. PMID:24188407

  16. Home-Based Preschool Education: Leaders' Guide for Inservice Training Filmstrips (Educator 1, 2, 3, 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1973

    This guide is to be used by leaders of inservice training workshops for instructors of parent study groups interested in learning new parenting skills that will foster home-based preschool education. The introduction provides suggestions on how a school might begin a program of school-sponsored, home-based early childhood education. The guidelines…

  17. Developing and validating the French-Canadian version of the practitioner and organizational telehealth readiness assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Emilie; Vincent, Claude; Lehoux, Pascale; Anderson, Donna; Kairy, Dahlia; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Jennett, Penny

    2010-01-01

    Only one telehealth readiness assessment tool, that of Jennett et al., covers all types of telehealth projects, regardless of health-care provision context. However, this instrument is only available in English and has not undergone psychometric evaluation. We developed a French-Canadian version of the Practitioner Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool and the Organizational Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool. Transcultural validity was assessed by nine practitioners and 12 clinical project co-ordinators or administrators. For practitioners and managers, there was no significant difference between the scores of the English and the French versions of the questionnaires. The results showed that the telehealth readiness of co-ordinators or administrators was greater than that of practitioners when the range in scores was taken into account. The French-Canadian versions of the two questionnaires make it possible to assess telehealth readiness among French speakers. However, other studies involving patients will be necessary to validate the Patient-Public Telehealth Readiness Assessment Tool. PMID:20386034

  18. Implementation of a telehealth programme for patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with long-term oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Ortega, Francisco; Parra, Carlos; Gómez-Suárez, Cristina; Jordán, Ana; Pérez, Pablo; Bonachela, Patricia; Leal, Sandra; Barrot, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a pilot study of the effectiveness of home telehealth for patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with long-term oxygen therapy. Patients were randomized into a telehealth group (n = 24) and a control group (n = 21) who received usual care. Patients in the telehealth group measured their vital signs on weekdays and performed spirometry on two days per week. The data were transmitted automatically to a clinical call centre. After four months of monitoring the mean number of accident and emergency department visits in the telehealth group was slightly lower than in the control group (0.29 versus 0.43, P = 0.25). The mean number of hospital admissions was 0.38 in the telehealth group and 0.14 in the control group (P = 0.47). During the study a total of 40 alerts were detected. The clinical triage process detected eight clinical exacerbations which were escalated by the case manager for a specialist consultation. There were clinically important differences in health-related quality of life in both groups. The mean score on the SGRQ was 10.9 versus 4.5 in the control group (P = 0.53). The EuroQol-5D score improved by 0.036 in the telehealth group and by 0.003 in the control group (P = 0.68). Both patients and healthcare professionals showed a high level of satisfaction with the telehealth programme. PMID:23393057

  19. The influence of a telehealth project on healthcare professional recruitment and retention in remote areas in Mali: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Mbemba, Gisèle Irène Claudine; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Hamelin-Brabant, Louise; Simonyan, David A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The telehealth project EQUI-ResHuS (in French, Les TIC pour un accès Équitable aux Ressources Humaines en Santé) aimed to contribute to more equitable access to care and support practice in remote regions in Mali. This study explored the evolution of perceptions concerning telehealth among healthcare professionals in the four district health centres that participated in the EQUI-ResHus project and identified variables influencing their perceptions of telehealth impact on recruitment and retention of health professionals. Methods: One year after a first survey (T1), a second data collection (T2) was carried out among healthcare professionals using a 91-item questionnaire. Questions assessing telehealth use and perceptions and perceived impact on recruitment and retention of healthcare professionals were rated on a 5-point Likert scale. A total of 10 independent variables were considered for the analyses. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to detect differences between T1 and T2, and a bivariate linear regression model for repeated measures was carried out to assess the impact of independent variables on dependent variables. Results: There were no noticeable changes in perceptions related to telehealth influence on recruitment and retention. Only access to information and communication technology significantly differed between T1 and T2 according the Wilcoxon rank test (p = 0.001). Perceived influence of telehealth on recruitment and retention was mostly explained by attitude towards telehealth, perceived effect on recruitment and retention and barriers to recruitment and retention. Conclusion: Based on our results, telehealth was perceived as having a positive influence but mostly indirect influence on healthcare professional recruitment and retention. Also, there were no major changes after 1 year of telehealth use. PMID:27231552

  20. Care Coordination/Home Telehealth: the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management to support the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Darkins, Adam; Ryan, Patricia; Kobb, Rita; Foster, Linda; Edmonson, Ellen; Wakefield, Bonnie; Lancaster, Anne E

    2008-12-01

    Between July 2003 and December 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) introduced a national home telehealth program, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT). Its purpose was to coordinate the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions and avoid their unnecessary admission to long-term institutional care. Demographic changes in the veteran population necessitate VHA increase its noninstitutional care (NIC) services 100% above its 2007 level to provide care for 110,000 NIC patients by 2011. By 2011, CCHT will meet 50% of VHA's anticipated NIC provision. CCHT involves the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management technologies. It helps patients live independently at home. Between 2003 and 2007, the census figure (point prevalence) for VHA CCHT patients increased from 2,000 to 31,570 (1,500% growth). CCHT is now a routine NIC service provided by VHA to support veteran patients with chronic conditions as they age. CCHT patients are predominantly male (95%) and aged 65 years or older. Strict criteria determine patient eligibility for enrollment into the program and VHA internally assesses how well its CCHT programs meet standardized clinical, technology, and managerial requirements. VHA has trained 5,000 staff to provide CCHT. Routine analysis of data obtained for quality and performance purposes from a cohort of 17,025 CCHT patients shows the benefits of a 25% reduction in numbers of bed days of care, 19% reduction in numbers of hospital admissions, and mean satisfaction score rating of 86% after enrolment into the program. The cost of CCHT is $1,600 per patient per annum, substantially less than other NIC programs and nursing home care. VHA's experience is that an enterprise-wide home telehealth implementation is an appropriate and cost-effective way of managing chronic care patients in both urban and rural settings. PMID:19119835

  1. Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Michelle L.; Goehring, Jenny L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger; Valente, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare clinical and research-based cochlear implant (CI) measures using telehealth versus traditional methods. Method: This prospective study used an ABA design (A = laboratory, B = remote site). All measures were made twice per visit for the purpose of assessing within-session variability. Twenty-nine adult…

  2. Telehealth Videoconferencing for Children With Hemophilia and Their Families: A Clinical Project.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kimberly; Hooke, Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Telehealth is the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance health care. It supports quality health care that is accessible, and time- and cost-effective. Telehealth videoconferencing may enhance the care for hemophilia patients who are experiencing a bleed by supporting real-time detailed assessment including appearance, range of motion, and ambulation in addition to the traditional phone methods of verbal description of appearance, pain, and function. The aim of this clinical project was to evaluate the feasibility of using telehealth videoconferencing in children with severe hemophilia in the home setting. Twelve patients with severe hemophilia ages 2to 18 years, who had more than 2 breakthrough bleeds in the past year, and had Internet access with a computer camera were included. The incidence of bleeding was low; however, videoconferencing was effective for 3 patients who completed 4 video appointments. Patients and staff reported that videoconferencing improved communication and satisfaction. Telehealth videoconferencing is a feasible tool for managing bleeding disorders in the home setting. PMID:26510644

  3. Current Clinical Status of Telehealth in Korea: Categories, Scientific Basis, and Obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Hyunah; Lee, Suehyun; Lee, Kye Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Through telehealth, medical services have expanded beyond spatial boundaries and are now available in living spaces outside of hospitals. It can also contribute to patient medical knowledge improvement because patients can access their hospital records and data from home. However, concepts of telehealth are rather vague in Korea. Methods We refer to several clinical reports to determine the current clinical status of and obstacles to telehealth in Korea. Results Patients' health conditions are now reported regularly to doctors remotely, and patients can receive varied assistance. Self-improvement based on minute details that are beyond medical staff's reach is another possible benefit that may be realized with the help of a variety of medical equipment (sensors). The feasibility, clinical effect, and cost-benefit of telehealth have been verified by scientific evidence. Conclusions Patients will be able to improve their treatment adherence by receiving help from various professionals, such as doctors, nurses, nutritionists, and sports therapists. This means that the actual treatment time per patient will increase as well. Ultimately, this will increase the quality of patients' self-administration of care to impede disease progression and prevent complications. PMID:26618030

  4. Telehealth: New Directions and Technology for Health Care Delivery in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Thomas W.

    Advances in technology and health care delivery have included the use of telemedicine and telepsychology for crisis intervention, assessment, treatment, and education of patients. The use of telemedicine and telepsychology is examined for a variety of health care services to rural America. Telehealth has been considered a partial solution to the…

  5. Telehealth interventions to reduce management complications in type 1 diabetes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Balkhi, Amanda M; Reid, Adam M; Westen, Sarah C; Olsen, Brian; Janicke, David M; Geffken, Gary R

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic illness with a high burden of care. While effective interventions and recommendations for diabetes care exist, the intensive nature of diabetes management makes compliance difficult. This is especially true in children and adolescents as they have unique psychosocial and diabetes needs. Despite the development of effective in-person interventions targeting improving self-management and ameliorating psychosocial difficulties there are still a number of barriers to implementing these interventions, namely time, cost, and access. Telehealth interventions allow for the dissemination of these interventions to a broader audience. Self-management and psychosocial telehealth interventions are reviewed with a special emphasis on mobile phone and internet based technology use. While efficacy has been demonstrated in a number of telehealth interventions with improved cost effectiveness over in-person interventions, many challenges remain including high participant attrition and difficulties with receiving reimbursement for services rendered. These and other challenges are discussed with recommendations for researchers and telehealth providers provided. PMID:25897348

  6. The Nature and Requirements of Work in University-Based Telehealth Units: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth units are one of many university administrative units created to foster innovation in universities over the last 40 years. Despite the proliferation of such units, few organizational studies have examined the work undertaken inside of these units. This qualitative study used a sequential two-part research design to understand the…

  7. Telehealth Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adults Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Sue; Packman, Ann; Onslow, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I trial investigated the viability of telehealth delivery of the Camperdown Program with adults who stutter. This program involves speech restructuring. Method: All treatment was conducted remotely with participant-clinician contact occurring by telephone and e-mail. Results: Ten adults completed the program. The group showed…

  8. Telehealth tools for public health, emergency, or disaster preparedness and response: a summary report.

    PubMed

    Alverson, Dale C; Edison, Karen; Flournoy, Larry; Korte, Brenda; Magruder, Charles; Miller, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances in telehealth development and adoption are increasing the spectrum of information and communication technologies that can be applied not only to individual patient care but more broadly to population health as well. Participants in this breakout session were asked to address, from their diverse perspectives, a series of questions relating to the current and potential uses of telehealth applications and networks for public health and emergency/disaster preparedness and response systems. Participants identified several gaps in current understanding and research emphasis. There is a clear need for more and larger outcome studies to assess the impact and cost benefit of telehealth applications in terms of improving public health at the population and community levels. In addition, more research is needed to demonstrate the ability of telehealth tools and technologies to facilitate and extend the reach of major national clinical and public health research initiatives. Perhaps most importantly, the National Institutes of Health should develop and/or strengthen strategic partnerships with other funding agencies with overlapping or complementary interests to accelerate interdisciplinary research in this rapidly evolving but relatively understudied and complex field. PMID:20043703

  9. Home area network for optimizing telehealth services--empirical simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mohib A; Kim, Jinman; Khadra, Mohamed H; Feng, Dagan

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth applications such as Video-over-IP and remote sensor monitoring are rapidly growing in utilisation and it has now expanded to the patient's homes. These Telehealth applications are, however highly delay sensitive and require high quality (and bandwidth priority) in order to provide satisfactory performances. However, at the patient's home area network (HAN) environment, typically there is no Internet traffic management system which highly affects the quality of these applications. As HAN expands its capacity by adding new devices in its network, the need for a network management system become urgent and necessary. In this study, we propose an infrastructure based method to improve Telehealth application quality by managing the quality and distribution of the Internet traffic among the connected devices in a HAN environment. We setup a HAN environment using existing devices readily available at home and tested the setting with typical Telehealth application needs that includes Video-over-IP, VoIP, data and other multimedia traffic. Our simulation results showed that our method is capable of providing better services. Our method indicated that it can provide ~11% lesser packet-loss under 12Mbps background traffic, while increasing 10% of the CPU load for Traffic management. PMID:25570222

  10. Pediatric Tele-Health Consultation to Rural Schools and Clinics in the Pacific Northwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzbacher, Stephen; Mas, Jennifer; Larson, Eric H.; Shurtleff, David B.

    2004-01-01

    The primary telehealth technology described in these articles is interactive video teleconferencing (IVTC), which allows parties at both ends of the communication to see and hear each other. The author have used this application during the past decade for consultation with rural practitioners and schools, and it has become a primary focus of our…

  11. 77 FR 58952 - Exempting In-Home Video Telehealth From Copayments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... Federal Register on March 6, 2012, 77 FR 13195, VA amended 38 CFR 17.108 to eliminate copayments for in-home video telehealth. VA published a companion substantially identical proposed rule at 77 FR 13236 on... described in 77 FR 13195 and 77 FR 13236, the direct final rule became effective on May 7, 2012, because...

  12. Development of Standardized Clinical Training Cases for Diagnosis of Sexual Abuse using a Secure Telehealth Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Lori D.; Thraen, Ioana; Kaplan, Rich; Goede, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The training of physicians, nurse examiners, social workers and other health professional on the evidentiary findings of sexual abuse in children is challenging. Our objective was to develop peer reviewed training cases for medical examiners of child sexual abuse, using a secure web based telehealth application (TeleCAM). Methods:…

  13. Preliminary Findings of a Telehealth Approach to Parent Training in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vismara, Laurie A.; McCormick, Carolyn; Young, Gregory S.; Nadhan, Anna; Monlux, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Telehealth or online communication technologies may lessen the gap between intervention requirements for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the available resources to provide these services. This study used a video conferencing and self-guided website to provide parent training in the homes of children with ASD. The first eight…

  14. Process models for telehealth: an industrial approach to quality management of distant medical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Kangarloo, H.; Dionisio, J. D.; Sinha, U.; Johnson, D.; Taira, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Process modeling is explored as an approach for prospectively managing the quality of a telemedicine/telehealth service. This kind of prospective quality management is more appropriate for dynamic health care environments compared to traditional quality assurance programs. A vector model approach has also been developed to match a process model to the needs of a particular site. Images Figure 4 PMID:10566418

  15. The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth with Cochlear Implant Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Valente, Daniel L.; McCreery, Ryan W.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients. Method: Speech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated…

  16. Developing Next-Generation Telehealth Tools and Technologies: Patients, Systems, and Data Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P.; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth? PMID:20043711

  17. Developing next-generation telehealth tools and technologies: patients, systems, and data perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Michael J; Filart, Rosemarie; Burgess, Lawrence P; Lee, Insup; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2010-01-01

    The major goals of telemedicine today are to develop next-generation telehealth tools and technologies to enhance healthcare delivery to medically underserved populations using telecommunication technology, to increase access to medical specialty services while decreasing healthcare costs, and to provide training of healthcare providers, clinical trainees, and students in health-related fields. Key drivers for these tools and technologies are the need and interest to collaborate among telehealth stakeholders, including patients, patient communities, research funders, researchers, healthcare services providers, professional societies, industry, healthcare management/economists, and healthcare policy makers. In the development, marketing, adoption, and implementation of these tools and technologies, communication, training, cultural sensitivity, and end-user customization are critical pieces to the process. Next-generation tools and technologies are vehicles toward personalized medicine, extending the telemedicine model to include cell phones and Internet-based telecommunications tools for remote and home health management with video assessment, remote bedside monitoring, and patient-specific care tools with event logs, patient electronic profile, and physician note-writing capability. Telehealth is ultimately a system of systems in scale and complexity. To cover the full spectrum of dynamic and evolving needs of end-users, we must appreciate system complexity as telehealth moves toward increasing functionality, integration, interoperability, outreach, and quality of service. Toward that end, our group addressed three overarching questions: (1) What are the high-impact topics? (2) What are the barriers to progress? and (3) What roles can the National Institutes of Health and its various institutes and centers play in fostering the future development of telehealth? PMID:20043711

  18. Bauru School of Dentistry Tele-Health League: an educational strategy applied to research, teaching and extension among applications in tele-health

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Andressa Sharllene Carneiro; RIZZANTE, Fabio Antonio Piola; PICOLINI, Mirela Machado; de CAMPOS, Karis; CORRÊA, Camila de Castro; FRANCO, Elen Caroline; PARDO-FANTON, Cássia de Souza; BLASCA, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; BERRETIN-FELIX, Giédre

    2011-01-01

    Tele-health is more than an innovative alternative; it is an excellent tool that enables access to health and education in health, making it possible to minimize distances, optimize time and reduce costs. Based on these advantages, some Brazilian Universities have used these actions in strategies of education, research and extension, aiming at the application of Tele-health in Brazil. In that way, the Bauru School of Dentistry - University of São Paulo (FOB-USP) has applied the use of information and communication technologies in health by means of a "Tele-Health League" (TL), in order to diagnose, prevent and treat diseases, in addition to educate the population and health services. Objective The present study aims to introduce the characteristics of the Tele-Health League of FOB-USP, as well as the development of its projects. Material and Methods The Tele-Health League consisted as a Diffusion Course approved by the Provost of Culture and Academic Extension of the University of São Paulo. It is composed as a large group enclosing professoriate coordinator, academician principal, contributing professors and league members, those, diversified between undergraduates students, graduated, health employees, technology and information areas. The participant members are evaluated by the presence frequency (minimum of 85%), and by the performance of tests and paperwork about the theoretical content provided. Results In four years of activities, the TLFOB-USP obtained a high satisfaction index (90%), an increased number of vacancies due to the interest to become a member, more commitment of the professors of the University and the accomplishment of association with other Brazilian leagues. It is emphasized that the approval percentage of the course results in approval from approximately half of its members. Also, it is important to identify and repair the causes related to the quitting of some members. Conclusions The results showed that the TLFOB-USP members, adjoining

  19. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    PubMed

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs. PMID:25980714

  20. TElehealth in CHronic disease: mixed-methods study to develop the TECH conceptual model for intervention design and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Clare; O'Cathain, Alicia; Rogers, Anne; Pope, Catherine; Yardley, Lucy; Fahey, Tom; Lewis, Glyn; Large, Shirley; Edwards, Louisa; Rowsell, Alison; Segar, Julia; Brownsell, Simon; Montgomery, Alan A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a conceptual model for effective use of telehealth in the management of chronic health conditions, and to use this to develop and evaluate an intervention for people with two exemplar conditions: raised cardiovascular disease risk and depression. Design The model was based on several strands of evidence: a metareview and realist synthesis of quantitative and qualitative evidence on telehealth for chronic conditions; a qualitative study of patients’ and health professionals’ experience of telehealth; a quantitative survey of patients’ interest in using telehealth; and review of existing models of chronic condition management and evidence-based treatment guidelines. Based on these evidence strands, a model was developed and then refined at a stakeholder workshop. Then a telehealth intervention (‘Healthlines’) was designed by incorporating strategies to address each of the model components. The model also provided a framework for evaluation of this intervention within parallel randomised controlled trials in the two exemplar conditions, and the accompanying process evaluations and economic evaluations. Setting Primary care. Results The TElehealth in CHronic Disease (TECH) model proposes that attention to four components will offer interventions the best chance of success: (1) engagement of patients and health professionals, (2) effective chronic disease management (including subcomponents of self-management, optimisation of treatment, care coordination), (3) partnership between providers and (4) patient, social and health system context. Key intended outcomes are improved health, access to care, patient experience and cost-effective care. Conclusions A conceptual model has been developed based on multiple sources of evidence which articulates how telehealth may best provide benefits for patients with chronic health conditions. It can be used to structure the design and evaluation of telehealth programmes which aim to be acceptable to

  1. The Incidence and Wage Consequences of Home-Based Work in the United States, 1980-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oettinger, Gerald S.

    2011-01-01

    This study documents the rapid growth in home-based wage and salary employment and the sharp decline in the home-based wage penalty in the United States between 1980 and 2000. These twin patterns, observed for both men and women in most occupation groups, suggest that employer costs of providing home-based work arrangements have decreased.…

  2. HOME-BASED THERAPY FOR OEDEMATOUS MALNUTRITION WITH READY-TO-USE THERAPEUTIC FOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Standard recommendations are that children with oedematous malnutrition receive inpatient therapy with a graduated feeding regimen. Aim: To investigate exclusive home-based therapy for children with oedematous malnutrition. METHODS: Children with oedematous malnutrition, good appetite, a...

  3. Telehealth: a perspective approach for visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) control in India.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Gouri Sankar; Kesari, Shreekant; Chatterjee, Nandini; Kumar, Vijay; Das, Pradeep

    2012-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar, is a vector borne disease caused by the protozoan parasite, L. donovani. Poor and neglected populations in Indian sub-continent are particularly affected by this disease. Due to the diversity of epidemiological situations, no single diagnosis, treatment, or control will be suitable for all. Control measures through case findings, treatment, and vector control are seldom used, even where they could be useful. Modern tools like telehealth, using space technology, have now come in handy to address issues of disease surveillance, control checking, and evaluation. The present study focuses on telehealth as a current vector control strategy, perspectives on diagnosis, treatment, and control of visceral leishmaniasis as these deserve more attention and research. PMID:23265372

  4. Telehealth: a perspective approach for visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) control in India

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Gouri Sankar; Kesari, Shreekant; Chatterjee, Nandini; Kumar, Vijay; Das, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar, is a vector borne disease caused by the protozoan parasite, L. donovani. Poor and neglected populations in Indian sub-continent are particularly affected by this disease. Due to the diversity of epidemiological situations, no single diagnosis, treatment, or control will be suitable for all. Control measures through case findings, treatment, and vector control are seldom used, even where they could be useful. Modern tools like telehealth, using space technology, have now come in handy to address issues of disease surveillance, control checking, and evaluation. The present study focuses on telehealth as a current vector control strategy, perspectives on diagnosis, treatment, and control of visceral leishmaniasis as these deserve more attention and research. PMID:23265372

  5. Telehealth for "the digital illiterate"--elderly heart failure patients experiences.

    PubMed

    Lind, Leili; Karlsson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth solutions should be available also for elderly patients with no interest in using, or capacity to use, computers and smartphones. Fourteen elderly, severely ill heart failure patients in home care participated in a telehealth study and used digital pens for daily reporting of their health state--a technology never used before by this patient group. After the study seven patients and two spouses were interviewed face-to-face. A qualitative content analysis of the interview material was performed. The informants had no experience of computers or the Internet and no interest in learning. Still, patients found the digital pen and the health diary form easy to use, thus effortlessly adopting to changes in care provision. They experienced an improved contact with the caregivers and had a sense of increased security despite a multimorbid state. Our study shows that, given that technologies are tailored to specific patient groups, even "the digital illiterate" may use the Internet. PMID:25160205

  6. The Contradictions of Telehealth User Experience in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, Lisa; Bower, Peter; Sanders, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objective As the global burden of chronic disease rises, policy makers are showing a strong interest in adopting telehealth technologies for use in long term condition management, including COPD. However, there remain barriers to its implementation and sustained use. To date, there has been limited qualitative investigation into how users (both patients/carers and staff) perceive and experience the technology. We aimed to systematically review and synthesise the findings from qualitative studies that investigated user perspectives and experiences of telehealth in COPD management, in order to identify factors which may impact on uptake. Method Systematic review and meta-synthesis of published qualitative studies of user (patients, their carers and clinicians) experience of telehealth technologies for the management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. ASSIA, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsychInfo and Web of Knowledge databases were searched up to October 2014. Reference lists of included studies and reference lists of key papers were also searched. Quality appraisal was guided by an adapted version of the CASP qualitative appraisal tool. Findings 705 references (after duplicates removed) were identified and 10 papers, relating to 7 studies were included in the review. Most authors of included studies had identified both positive and negative experiences of telehealth use in the management of COPD. Through a line of argument synthesis we were able to derive new insights from the data to identify three overarching themes that have the ability to either impede or promote positive user experience of telehealth in COPD: the influence on moral dilemmas of help seeking—(enables dependency or self-care); transforming interactions (increases risk or reassurance) and reconfiguration of ‘work’ practices (causes burden or empowerment). Conclusion Findings from this meta-synthesis have implications for the future design and implementation of telehealth services. Future

  7. Using QALYs in telehealth evaluations: a systematic review of methodology and transparency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) is a recognised outcome measure in health economic evaluations. QALY incorporates individual preferences and identifies health gains by combining mortality and morbidity into one single index number. A literature review was conducted to examine and discuss the use of QALYs to measure outcomes in telehealth evaluations. Methods Evaluations were identified via a literature search in all relevant databases. Only economic evaluations measuring both costs and QALYs using primary patient level data of two or more alternatives were included. Results A total of 17 economic evaluations estimating QALYs were identified. All evaluations used validated generic health related-quality of life (HRQoL) instruments to describe health states. They used accepted methods for transforming the quality scores into utility values. The methodology used varied between the evaluations. The evaluations used four different preference measures (EQ-5D, SF-6D, QWB and HUI3), and utility scores were elicited from the general population. Most studies reported the methodology used in calculating QALYs. The evaluations were less transparent in reporting utility weights at different time points and variability around utilities and QALYs. Few made adjustments for differences in baseline utilities. The QALYs gained in the reviewed evaluations varied from 0.001 to 0.118 in implying a small but positive effect of telehealth intervention on patient’s health. The evaluations reported mixed cost-effectiveness results. Conclusion The use of QALYs in telehealth evaluations has increased over the last few years. Different methodologies and utility measures have been used to calculate QALYs. A more harmonised methodology and utility measure is needed to ensure comparability across telehealth evaluations. PMID:25086443

  8. Sustained Effects of a Nurse Coaching Intervention via Telehealth to Improve Health Behavior Change in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Heather; Ward, Deborah; Dharmar, Madan; Tang-Feldman, Yajarayma; Berglund, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Diabetes educators and self-management programs are scarce in rural communities, where diabetes is the third highest-ranking health concern. The goal of this study was to evaluate the benefits of nurse telehealth coaching for persons with diabetes living in rural communities through a person-centered approach using motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. Materials and Methods: A randomized experimental study design was used to assign participants to receive either nurse telehealth coaching for five sessions (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Outcomes were measured in both groups using the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), SF-12, and satisfaction surveys. Mean scores for each outcome were compared at baseline and at the 9-month follow-up for both groups using a Student's t test. We also evaluated the change from baseline by estimating the difference in differences (pre- and postintervention) using regression methods. Results: Among the 101 participants included in the analysis, 51 received nurse telehealth coaching, and 50 received usual care. We found significantly higher self-efficacy scores in the intervention group compared with the control group based on the DES at 9 months (4.03 versus 3.64, respectively; p<0.05) and the difference in difference estimation (0.42; p<0.05). Conclusions: The nurse MI/telehealth coaching model used in this study shows promise as an effective intervention for diabetes self-management in rural communities. The sustained effect on outcomes observed in the intervention group suggests that this model could be a feasible intervention for long-term behavioral change among persons living with chronic disease in rural communities. PMID:25061688

  9. Video-based telehealth in Australian primary health care: current use and future potential.

    PubMed

    Raven, Melissa; Butler, Caryn; Bywood, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Many Australians have limited access to health-care services due to a range of barriers, including geographic distance and restricted mobility, which telehealth can potentially address. This paper reviews the current and potential use of video consultation in primary health care in Australia, drawing on international literature. There is substantial evidence of high patient satisfaction, but many studies have methodological limitations. Overall, evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is weak. There is reasonable evidence for diagnosis, home care and specialist consultations by GPs with patients present. Two telehealth initiatives using video consultation are briefly presented. Both provide evidence that video consultation has a valuable role to play, but does not obviate the need for face-to-face consultations. Video consultation challenges traditional professional roles, particularly those of nurses, and can improve health workers' skills and job satisfaction. More fundamentally, telehealth challenges the traditional distinction between primary and secondary care. This can be a source of resistance but may ultimately be one of its strengths. Appropriately targeted video consultation has much potential to improve the delivery of primary health care in Australia, particularly in rural and remote regions. PMID:24134865

  10. Achievements and challenges on policies for allied health professionals who use telehealth in the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hailey, D; Foerster, V; Nakagawa, B; Wapshall, T M; Murtagh, J A; Smitten, J; Steblecki, J A; Wong, G

    2005-01-01

    We formulated policies and procedures for allied health professionals (AHPs) who provide services using telehealth in Nunavut, Canada's newest Arctic territory. These are a supplement to the clinical policies and procedures already established for Nunavut physicians and nurses. The services were in the areas of audiology, dietetics/nutrition, midwifery, occupational therapy, ophthalmic services, pharmacy, physiotherapy, psychology, respiratory therapy, social work and speech therapy. Documents specific to each of the services were developed, drawing on information from Government of Nunavut data, Nunavut healthcare providers and links made through the Internet. Topics included the scope and limitations of telehealth services, staff responsibilities, training and reporting, professional standards and cultural considerations. We also considered generic policies covering common issues such as jurisdiction, licensing and liability. The policies and procedures for AHPs will enhance and expand the successes already achieved with telehealth in Nunavut. The challenges are to balance the preferred approaches to service provision with the realities of health care and communications in an Arctic setting. PMID:16375792

  11. Satisfaction With Telehealth for Cancer Support Groups in Rural American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda H.; Haozous, Emily; Towle, Cara; Revels, Laura; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    A descriptive study was conducted to determine the information needs of American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) cancer survivors and assess satisfaction with and acceptability of telehealth support group services for cancer survivors in AI and AN rural communities. AI and AN cancer survivors were asked to complete the Telehealth Satisfaction Survey and two open-ended questions, one regarding information needs and one seeking comments and suggestions about cancer support group meetings. Thirty-two surveys were returned. Information about nutrition during treatment and treatment-related side effects were the most sought after topics. Participants valued the opportunity to interact with other AI and AN cancer survivors who also lived in remote locations and the usefulness of the information presented. The link with geographically distant survivors was valuable to participants as they felt they were no longer alone in their cancer experiences. Determining survivors’ information needs provides meaningful topics for future support group education. Telehealth is a viable way to facilitate cancer support groups to AI and AN cancer survivors in rural communities. PMID:21112853

  12. Virtual worlds and avatars as the new frontier of telehealth care.

    PubMed

    Morie, J; Haynes, E; Chance, E; Purohit, D

    2012-01-01

    We are entering a new age where people routinely visit, inhabit, play in and learn within virtual worlds (VWs). One in eight people worldwide are VW participants, according to the latest 2011 figures from KZERO [1]. VWs are also emerging as a new and advanced form of telehealth care delivery. In addition to existing telehealth care advantages; VWs feature three powerful affordances that can benefit a wide range of physical and psychological issues. First, the highly social nature of VWs encourages social networking and the formation of essential support groups. Secondly, the type of spaces that have been proven in the physical world to promote psychological health and well-being can be virtually recreated. Finally, research suggests that embodied avatar representation within VWs can affect users psychologically and physically. These three aspects of VWs can be leveraged for enhanced patient-client interactions, spaces that promote healing and positive responses, and avatar activities that transfer real benefits from the virtual to the physical world. This paper explains the mounting evidence behind these claims and provides examples of VWs as an innovative and compelling form of telehealth care destined to become commonplace in the future. PMID:22954822

  13. Development of a Telehealth Intervention for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Studts, Jamie L.; Bumpous, Jeffrey M.; Gregg, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Liz; Keeney, Cynthia; Scharfenberger, Jennifer A.; Pfeifer, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Treatment for head and neck cancer precipitates a myriad of distressing symptoms. Patients may be isolated both physically and socially and may lack the self-efficacy to report problems and participate as partners in their care. The goal of this project was to design a telehealth intervention to address such isolation, develop patient self-efficacy, and improve symptom management during the treatment experience. Participatory action research and a review of the literature were used to develop electronically administered symptom management algorithms addressing all major symptoms experienced by patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers. Daily questions and related messages were then programmed into an easy-to-use telehealth messaging device, the Health Buddy®. Clinician and patient acceptance, feasibility, and technology issues were measured. Using participatory action research is an effective means for developing electronic algorithms acceptable to both clinicians and patients. The use of a simple tele-messaging device as an adjunct to symptom management is feasible, affordable, and acceptable to patients. This telehealth intervention provides support and education to patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers. PMID:19199847

  14. Environmental aspects of health care in the Grampian NHS region and the place of telehealth

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Richard; Tait, Alex; Croft, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information about the composition of the carbon footprint of the NHS in the Grampian health region, and in Scotland generally, is not available at present. Based on the limited information available, our best guess is that travel emissions in Grampian are substantial, perhaps 49,000 tonnes CO2 per year. This is equivalent to 233 million km of car travel per year. A well-established telemedicine network in the Grampian region, which saves over 2000 patient journeys a year from community hospitals, avoids about 260,000 km travel per year, or about 59 tonnes CO2 per year. Therefore using telehealth as it has been used historically (primarily to facilitate hospital-to-hospital interactions) seems unlikely to have a major environmental impact – although of course there may be other good reasons for persevering with conventional telehealth. On the other hand, telehealth might be useful in reducing staff travel and to a lesser extent, visitor travel. It looks particularly promising for reducing outpatient travel, where substantial carbon savings might be made by reconfiguring the way that certain services are provided. PMID:20511579

  15. Environmental aspects of health care in the Grampian NHS region and the place of telehealth.

    PubMed

    Wootton, Richard; Tait, Alex; Croft, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information about the composition of the carbon footprint of the NHS in the Grampian health region, and in Scotland generally, is not available at present. Based on the limited information available, our best guess is that travel emissions in Grampian are substantial, perhaps 49,000 tonnes CO(2) per year. This is equivalent to 233 million km of car travel per year. A well-established telemedicine network in the Grampian region, which saves over 2000 patient journeys a year from community hospitals, avoids about 260,000 km travel per year, or about 59 tonnes CO(2) per year. Therefore using telehealth as it has been used historically (primarily to facilitate hospital-to-hospital interactions) seems unlikely to have a major environmental impact--although of course there may be other good reasons for persevering with conventional telehealth. On the other hand, telehealth might be useful in reducing staff travel and to a lesser extent, visitor travel. It looks particularly promising for reducing outpatient travel, where substantial carbon savings might be made by reconfiguring the way that certain services are provided. PMID:20511579

  16. A review of paediatric telehealth for pre- and post-operative surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony C; Garner, Lisa; Caffery, Liam J; McBride, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    The Queensland Telepaediatric Service (QTS) was established in the year 2000 to deliver a broad range of paediatric specialist health services from the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Brisbane, mainly via videoconference. During a 13-year study period, the QTS facilitated 18,949 video consultations, comprising Mental Health (42%), Medicine (30%), Surgery (21%) and Other (8%). We reviewed the surgical services provided through the QTS. There were 3880 video consultations with a paediatric surgeon. Most of these (91%) used fixed videoconferencing units, 8% were delivered via mobile units (robots) and 1% were delivered using Skype. Surgical consultations were provided by telehealth to 106 sites: 89% in Queensland and the rest to other states. The main surgical specialties were burns (50%), ear, nose and throat (19%), general surgery (21%), orthopaedics (9%) and vascular anomalies (2%). During a 12-month audit period, there were 224 teleconsultations in general surgery; the most common reason for referral was for undescended testes (17%). During the study period there was a significant growth in all surgical telehealth activity: linear regression showed an annual increase of 17 cases per year (P < 0.02). In the last four years of the study, there was a substantial growth in the general surgical component, although there was also a reduction in the burns component. Telehealth has potential for other specialist consultations which require periodic assessment and review. PMID:25400001

  17. Using telehealth to augment an intensive case monitoring program in veterans with schizophrenia and suicidal ideation: A pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kasckow, John; Zickmund, Susan; Gurklis, John; Luther, James; Fox, Lauren; Taylor, Melissa; Richmond, Ira; Haas, Gretchen L

    2016-01-01

    Veterans with schizophrenia admitted for suicidal ideation were recruited into a post-discharge program consisting of Intensive Case Monitoring (ICM) with daily monitoring with the Health Buddy (HB; experimental group) or ICM alone (control group). This study tested the feasibility of the telehealth monitoring intervention in this population. Secondly, we determined whether augmentation of ICM with our intervention for 3 months would result in a reduction in suicidal ideation. Twenty of 25 telehealth participants could set up the device. Monthly adherence for telehealth participants was > 80%. A qualitative analysis of endpoint surveys revealed that the majority of participants had positive responses. In both groups, there were improvements in Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS) scores at endpoint relative to baseline. No group differences were present with survival analysis when using remission (i.e., BSS score = 0) as the outcome; however, in a subgroup with a history of suicide attempt, there was a trend (p = .093) for a higher rate of remission for those in the HB condition. In conclusion, telehealth monitoring for this population appears to be feasible for those who are able to start using the system. The pilot data obtained should help investigators design better telehealth interventions for this population. PMID:27137970

  18. Using telehealth to augment an intensive case monitoring program in veterans with schizophrenia and suicidal ideation: A pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Kasckow, John; Zickmund, Susan; Gurklis, John; Luther, James; Fox, Lauren; Taylor, Melissa; Richmond, Ira; Haas, Gretchen L

    2016-05-30

    Veterans with schizophrenia admitted for suicidal ideation were recruited into a post-discharge program consisting of Intensive Case Monitoring (ICM) with daily monitoring with the Health Buddy (HB; experimental group) or ICM alone (control group). This study tested the feasibility of the telehealth monitoring intervention in this population. Secondly, we determined whether augmentation of ICM with our intervention for 3 months would result in a reduction in suicidal ideation. Twenty of 25 telehealth participants could set up the device. Monthly adherence for telehealth participants was > 80%. A qualitative analysis of endpoint surveys revealed that the majority of participants had positive responses. In both groups, there were improvements in Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS) scores at endpoint relative to baseline. No group differences were present with survival analysis when using remission (i.e., BSS score = 0) as the outcome; however, in a subgroup with a history of suicide attempt, there was a trend (p = .093) for a higher rate of remission for those in the HB condition. In conclusion, telehealth monitoring for this population appears to be feasible for those who are able to start using the system. The pilot data obtained should help investigators design better telehealth interventions for this population. PMID:27137970

  19. House Calls: The Impact of Home-Based Care for Older Adults With Alzheimer's and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kasey; Bachman, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with Alzheimer's/dementia have high health care costs; they may benefit from home-based care, but few have home visits. This article describes a home-based care program for frail elders, including those with Alzheimer's/dementia. Descriptive statistics are provided for Medicare-enrolled program participants and matched controls with Alzheimer's/dementia on expenditures along six services: skilled nursing facility, inpatient acute, physician, home health, hospice, and social services. Cases with dementia were significantly more likely to have home health and hospice expenditures than controls, suggesting potential for the program to improve end-of-life care. Very few cases or controls had any social service expenditures. Social workers should advocate for the expanded role of home-based care for older adults with dementia and for increased Medicare reimbursement of social work services. PMID:26186425

  20. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families. PMID:17694890

  1. Heart rate dynamics after controlled training followed by a home-based exercise program.

    PubMed

    Hautala, Arto J; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Kiviniemi, Antti; Laukkanen, Raija T; Nissilä, Seppo; Huikuri, Heikki V; Tulppo, Mikko P

    2004-07-01

    Daily aerobic training results in autonomic control of the heart toward vagal dominance. The constancy of vagal dominance after controlled training followed by a home-based training program in accordance with contemporary guidelines is not known. We set out here to study whether the vagal dominance induced by 8 weeks of controlled aerobic training is preserved after a 10-month home-based training program. For the controlled study, healthy men were randomized as training (n=18) and control subjects (n=6). The training was started by a supervised 8-week period with six training sessions a week [45 (15) min each] at an intensity of 70-80% of maximum heart rate, followed by a home-based training program for 10 months in accordance with the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations. Cardiovascular autonomic function was assessed by analyzing HR variability over a 24-h period and separately during the night hours (midnight-6 a.m.). Maximal running performance improved during the controlled training 16 (7)% (range 4-31%, P<0.001) and remained 8 (8)% (range -3 to 23%, P<0.001) above the baseline level after the home-based training program. At night, the vagally mediated high-frequency (HF) power of R-R intervals increased during the controlled training from 6.7 (1.3) to 7.3 (1.1) ln ms2 ( P<0.001) and remained higher than the baseline after the home-based training [7.0 (1.3) ln ms2, P<0.05]. The changes in running performance correlated with the changes in HF power at night (r=0.41, P<0.05) and over 24 h (r=0.44, P<0.05) after the home-based training program. Similarly, the changes in body mass index correlated with the changes in HF power over 24 h (r=-0.44, P<0.05) after the home-based training program. The high vagal outflow to the heart after the home-based training is associated with good physical performance and body mass control. PMID:15083365

  2. Predictors and processes associated with home-based family therapists' professional quality of life.

    PubMed

    Macchi, C R; Johnson, Matthew D; Durtschi, Jared A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined whether home-based family therapists' (HBFT) workload and clinical experience were associated with therapists' professional quality of life directly and indirectly through self-care activities and frequency of clinical supervision. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling with a sample of 225 home-based therapists. Results suggested that therapists' workload and HBFT experience significantly predicted therapists' professional quality of life. These associations between therapists' workload and HBFT experience were partially mediated through participation in self-care and frequency of clinical supervision. Implications for improving therapists' quality of life are discussed as a function of therapists' workload, clinical experience, self-care, and supervision. PMID:24749929

  3. Teledermatology protocol for screening of Skin Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Maria Fernanda; Amorim, Bruna Dücker Bastos; Wagner, Harley Miguel; Nunes, Daniel Holthausen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Telemedicine refers to the use of technology as improvement of healthcare delivery to places where distance becomes an obstacle. Its use represents a great potential for dermatology, a specialty whose visual analysis phase is essential in diagnosis. OBJECTIVES To analyze the compatibility index of skin cancer diagnoses between primary care and teledermatology, and to validate a protocol for standardization of digital imaging to obtain the reports in teledermatology. METHODS An observational cross-sectional study developed through the census of 333 examination requests, received between January/2012 and July/2012, in the Center for Telemedicine and Telehealth of SES-SC. We used a protocol for photographic lesion standardization, consisting of three steps (panoramic photo, close-up with ruler and dermoscopy). After collection, the data were sent to a virtual site on the Internet, and recorded with the use of an electronic health record containing the images, the skin phototype and demographic characteristics. RESULTS The level of compatibility between the diagnosis of skin cancer in Santa Catarina's primary care and the diagnosis proposed by teledermatology was 19.02%. Proportionally, it was 21.21% for BCC, 44.44% for SCC and 6.98% for MM. The protocol was statistically significant (p <0.05), with an OR of 38.77. CONCLUSION The rate of diagnostic compatibility of skin cancer was low and the use of the protocol optimized the chance of validating requests for examination. PMID:25830990

  4. Recurrent Vascular Headache: Home-Based Behavioral Treatment versus Abortive Pharmacological Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of a home-based behavioral intervention (relaxation and thermal biofeedback training) with an abortive pharmacological intervention (with compliance training) for treating recurrent migraine and migraine/tension headaches. Both interventions yielded reductions in headache activity, psychosomatic symptoms, and daily life…

  5. Individualised home-based rehabilitation after stroke in eastern Finland--the client's perspective.

    PubMed

    Reunanen, Merja A T; Järvikoski, Aila; Talvitie, Ulla; Pyöriä, Outi; Härkäpää, Kristiina

    2016-01-01

    Reintegration into society is one of the main purposes of post-stroke rehabilitation. The experiences of clients returning home after a stroke have been studied before. There is, however, little knowledge about activities carried out during home-based rehabilitation interventions and about the involvement of clients in the process. This study focused on clients' experiences of a 3-month individualised, home-based rehabilitation programme supervised by a multidisciplinary team. The data were collected in 2009-2010, and it was based on interviews with 14 clients (48-83 years of age) conducted approximately 7 months after stroke. In the thematic analysis, five main topics describing the goals and functions of the home-based rehabilitation were identified as follows: (i) learning strategies for solving problems in daily activities at home and in the community; (ii) receiving exercise coaching; (iii) exploring community services and facilities; (iv) having a dialogue with professionals; and (v) engaging in activities aimed at returning to work. Implementing rehabilitation activities in the home environment seemed to enhance the participants' active involvement and their ability to evaluate themselves and to set goals for their recovery. Work was an important goal for clients of working age, but work-related tasks were not sufficiently integrated with home-based rehabilitation. A challenge for local communities is to provide health promotion and recreation services that are also suitable for persons with limited functioning. PMID:25676161

  6. Home-Based School Teachers in Afghanistan: Teaching for Tarbia and Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Jackie; Winthrop, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Teachers in community-based or home-based schools in Afghanistan play a critical role in extending access to education to children who are unable to access the government schools, especially girls. These teachers--men and women--are nominated by the community to teach, without necessarily having teaching experience or even completing their own…

  7. Perceptions of Personal Well-Being among Youth Accessing Residential or Intensive Home-Based Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyde, Michele; Watkins, Hanna; Ashbourne, Graham; Lazure, Kelly; Carter, Jeff; Penney, Randy; White, Sara; Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of youth accessing residential treatment or intensive home-based treatment are varied. Understanding youth's perceptions of their well-being may inform service. The purpose of this report was to explore perceptions of youth's mental health, life satisfaction, and outlook for the future. Youth reported ongoing struggles with mental…

  8. A Pilot Study on the Impact of a Home-Based Parenting Intervention: Parents Plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Ellie; Holland, Sally; Jerzembek, Gabi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study undertaken in order to explore the impact of a home-based parenting intervention (Parents Plus), on parents and families. Parents Plus is part of a Welsh Early Years strategy called Flying Start and aims to promote positive parent-child interactions. This article explores the medium-term to long-term impact of…

  9. An Evaluation of Migrant Head Start Programs. Preliminary Report on Home Base Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes (J.A.) Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The report provides Indian and Migrant Program Division managers and specialists in each of the 5 Head Start component areas with a comprehensive picture of the 43 home base learning centers operating between October 1978 and May 1979, with a total enrollment of 3,108 migrant children. Using data collected from the Head Start and center directors,…

  10. Developing Student Knowledge and Skills for Home-Based Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Susan F.; Tracy, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Providing social work services for clients in their homes is often a distinguishing feature of social work practice. The home environment affects the intervention process at each stage of contact with a family. Home-based practice requires specific skills to deal with clients' presenting concerns as well as safety, boundary, confidentiality, and…

  11. Home Start: How a Home-Based Preschool Program Raised Black Achievements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ralph

    This presentation discusses longitudinal results of a home-based program for low SES black and white children whose parents received weekly visits designed to chart children's individualized enrichment when they were from 2 to 5 years of age. The program drew upon school and community resource personnel when appropriate, to provide parents with…

  12. School- And Home-Based Drug Prevention: Environmental, Parent, and Child Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Hall, Lynne A.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Myers, April V.; Bonnel, Galadriel

    2007-01-01

    The study purpose was to test the effect of a school- and home-based alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) prevention program on reducing environmental, parent, and child risk factors for ATOD use. The design was a three-group pretest-posttest with interviews at baseline and 1 and 6 months post-intervention. The sample was 126 parents and their…

  13. Dutch Home-Based Pre-Reading Intervention with Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2009-01-01

    Children (5 and 6 years old, n = 30) at familial risk of dyslexia received a home-based intervention that focused on phoneme awareness and letter knowledge in the year prior to formal reading instruction. The children were compared to a no-training at-risk control group (n = 27), which was selected a year earlier. After training, we found a small…

  14. Home-based therapy for severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Severe acute malnutrition is a devastating condition afflicting children under 5 years in many developing countries, but concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper examines the development of home-based lipid-nutrient therapeutic foods for the treatment of acute malnutrition in sub-Saharan Afric...

  15. Home-Based Comprehensive Assessment of Rural Elderly Persons: The CARE Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravens, David D.; Mehr, David R.; Campbell, James D.; Armer, Jane; Kruse, Robin L.; Rubenstein, Laurence Z.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Home-based comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) has been effective in urban areas but has had little study in rural areas. CGA involves medical history taking, a physical exam, and evaluation of functional status, mental status, cognitive status, gait and balance, medications, vision, extent of social supports, and home safety. We…

  16. Treatment Integrity in a Home-Based Pre-Reading Intervention Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan; Veldkamp, Esther

    2006-01-01

    Treatment integrity is an underexposed issue in the phonological awareness intervention research. The current study assessed the integrity of treatment of the families (N = 32) participating in the experimental condition of a home-based pre-reading intervention study. The participating kindergartners were all genetically at risk for developing…

  17. A Home-Based Orientation and Mobility Program for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joffee, E.

    1988-01-01

    A home-based orientation and mobility program was developed for blind/visually impaired infants and toddlers. Three stages in functional mobility were identified focusing on the development of gross motor skills, related conceptual activities, auditory awareness, orientation skills, and mobility skills. The program included parent education and a…

  18. Rural Alberta Home-Based Businesses: A Profile of Workshop Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capjack, M. Linda; Fetterman, Nelma I.

    1992-01-01

    Of 252 rural Alberta attendees of home-based business workshops, 60 were in business. Of these, 65 percent produced sewing, textile, or food-related products; 73 percent contributed less than 5 percent of family income; 72 percent worked at home because a hobby became profitable; and the majority were married women over 40. (SK)

  19. Small and Home-Based Businesses: Measures of Success and the Contribution of Local Development Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lara; Whitacre, Brian; Shideler, Dave; Muske, Glenn; Woods, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Small and home-based businesses have long been identified by Extension educators as an important component of economic development, particularly in rural areas. The services available to these businesses can take many forms, including management training, accessibility of local funding, providing incubation facilities, or setting up mentoring…

  20. Early Home-Based Intervention in the Netherlands for Children at Familial Risk of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Otterloo, Sandra G.; van der Leij, Aryan; Henrichs, Lotte F.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch children at higher familial risk of reading disability received a home-based intervention programme before formal reading instruction started to investigate whether this would reduce the risk of dyslexia. The experimental group (n = 23) received a specific training in phoneme awareness and letter knowledge. A control group (n = 25) received…

  1. THE VALUE OF HOME-BASED COLLECTION OF BIOSPECIMENS IN REPRODUCTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Value of Home-Based Collection of Biospecimens in Reproductive Epidemiology
    John C. Rockett1, Germaine M. Buck2, Courtney D. Johnson2 and Sally D. Perreault1
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Rese...

  2. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  3. Parent Perspective on the Home-Based Interim Alternative Educational Setting: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perspectives of parents of expelled disabled students placed in home-based interim alternative educational settings (IAES). The study consisted of three parent participants whose disabled children, by virtue of their violations of the school district's discipline policy, were…

  4. The Social Context of Mother-Infant Relations: A Study of Home Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.

    This paper describes the results of a longitudinal study which compared the effects of three types of home-based, parent-oriented, infant education curricula. One curriculum stressed language, another stressed play, and a third stressed social development. Mothers and children from 108 middle and working class families received home visits…

  5. Telehealth and Occupational Therapy: Integral to the Triple Aim of Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Cason, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Programs and concepts included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 are expected to transform health care in the United States from a volume-based health system to a value-based health system with increased emphasis on prevention and health promotion. The Triple Aim, a framework set forth by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, focuses on improving the health care experience, the health of populations, and the affordability of care. This article describes telehealth as an integral component in achieving the Triple Aim of health care and discusses implications for occupational therapy practitioners. PMID:26122676

  6. A Patient-Centric, Provider-Assisted Diabetes Telehealth Self-management Intervention for Urban Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Ernest L; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Callender, Clive

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of an online diabetes self-management intervention for a sample of inner-city African Americans with diabetes. Study participants were randomly assigned to the treatment (26) and control (21) conditions. The results indicate that treatment group participants were more likely to achieve positive outcomes in terms of lowered hemoglobin A1c and body mass index measurements than were control group members. These findings support the development of telehealth interventions to promote effective chronic disease management in medically underserved communities. PMID:21307985

  7. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  8. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  9. The Role of Clinical and Geographic Factors in the Use of Hospital versus Home-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brual, Janette; Gravely, Shannon; Suskin, Neville; Stewart, Donna E.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is most often provided in a hospital setting. Home-based models of care have been developed to overcome geographic, among other, barriers in patients at a lower risk. This study assessed whether clinical and geographic factors were related to the use of either a hospital-based or a home-based program. Secondary analysis…

  10. Long-term evaluation of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Grosbois, Jean Marie; Gicquello, Alice; Langlois, Carole; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Bart, Frédéric; Wallaert, Benoit; Chenivesse, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Personalized, global pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) management of patients with COPD is effective, regardless of the place in which this rehabilitation is provided. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to study the long-term outcome of exercise capacity and quality of life during management of patients with COPD treated by home-based PR. Methods Home-based PR was administered to 211 patients with COPD (mean age, 62.3±11.1 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 41.5%±17.7%). Home-based PR was chosen because of the distance of the patient’s home from the PR center and the patient’s preference. Each patient was individually managed by a team member once a week for 8 weeks with unsupervised continuation of physical exercises on the other days of the week according to an individual action plan. Exercise conditioning, therapeutic patient education, and self-management were included in the PR program. The home assessment comprised evaluation of the patient’s exercise capacity by a 6-minute stepper test, Timed Up and Go test, ten times sit-to-stand test, Hospital Anxiety and Depression score, and quality of life (Visual Simplified Respiratory Questionnaire, VQ11, Maugeri Respiratory Failure 28). Results No incidents or accidents were observed during the course of home-based PR. The 6-minute stepper test was significantly improved after completion of the program, at 6 months and 12 months, whereas the Timed Up and Go and ten times sit-to-stand test were improved after PR and at 6 months but not at 12 months. Hospital Anxiety and Depression and quality of life scores improved after PR, and this improvement persisted at 6 months and 12 months. Conclusion Home-based PR for unselected patients with COPD is effective in the short term, and this effectiveness is maintained in the medium term (6 months) and long term (12 months). Home-based PR is an alternative to outpatient management provided all activities, such as exercise

  11. Outcomes of a Telehealth Intervention for Homebound Older Adults with Heart or Chronic Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie; McGinty, Jean; Bardelli, Ellen; Davitt, Joan; Ten Have, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Telehealth care is emerging as a viable intervention model to treat complex chronic conditions, such as heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to engage older adults in self-care disease management. Design and Methods: We report on a randomized controlled trial examining the impact of a multifaceted…

  12. Telehealth Delivery of Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Anxiety: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Susan L.; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Wolff, Brian; Reaven, Judy A.

    2016-01-01

    Youth with autism spectrum disorders frequently experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Empirically supported psychosocial interventions exist, yet access is limited, especially for families in rural areas. Telehealth (i.e. videoconferencing) has potential to reduce barriers to access to care; however, little is known about the feasibility or…

  13. Telehealth: Telecommunications Technology in Health Care and Health Education in Canada. New Technologies in Canadian Education Series. Paper 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervinskas, Jenny

    This examination of the use of telecommunications systems in the health care field in Canada notes that the use of such systems to assist in the delivery of health care at a distance is critical to the remote and isolated regions of the country. The report begins by reviewing the development of 'telemedicine' or 'telehealth' systems using various…

  14. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  15. Development and Implementation of a Telehealth-Enhanced Intervention for Pain and Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Wyant, Sheryl; Theodore, Brian R.; Meins, Alexa R.; Rue, Tessa; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Managing chronic pain effectively is often challenging for health care providers and patients. Telehealth technologies can bridge geographic distance and improve patients' quality of care in communities where access to pain specialists has previously been unavailable. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain) designed to address the need for pain specialist consultation regarding pain and symptom management issues in non-academic medical centers. We describe the theoretical foundation and development of a multifaceted intervention using a cluster randomized clinical trial design. Health care providers and their patients with chronic pain are enrolled in the study. Patient participants receive the intervention (report of symptoms and receipt of a pain graph) weekly for 8 weeks and are contacted at 12 weeks for completion of post-intervention follow-up measures. Their providers attend Telepain sessions which involve a didactic presentation on an evidence-based topic related to pain management followed by patient case presentations and discussion by community clinicians. Symptom management recommendations for each patient case are made by a panel of pain specialists representing internal medicine, addiction medicine, rehabilitation medicine, anesthesiology, psychiatry, and nursing. The outcomes assessed in this randomized trial focus on pain intensity, pain's interference on function and sleep, and anxiety, depression, and cost-effectiveness. Some of the challenges and lessons that we have learned early in implementing the TelePain intervention are also reported. PMID:24846620

  16. Development and implementation of a telehealth-enhanced intervention for pain and symptom management.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Wyant, Sheryl; Theodore, Brian R; Meins, Alexa R; Rue, Tessa; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2014-07-01

    Managing chronic pain effectively is often challenging for health care providers and patients. Telehealth technologies can bridge geographic distance and improve patients' quality of care in communities where access to pain specialists has previously been unavailable. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain) designed to address the need for pain specialist consultation regarding pain and symptom management issues in non-academic medical centers. We describe the theoretical foundation and development of a multifaceted intervention using a cluster randomized clinical trial design. Health care providers and their patients with chronic pain are enrolled in the study. Patient participants receive the intervention (report of symptoms and receipt of a pain graph) weekly for 8 weeks and are contacted at 12 weeks for completion of post-intervention follow-up measures. Their providers attend TelePain sessions which involve a didactic presentation on an evidence-based topic related to pain management followed by patient case presentations and discussion by community clinicians. Symptom management recommendations for each patient case are made by a panel of pain specialists representing internal medicine, addiction medicine, rehabilitation medicine, anesthesiology, psychiatry, and nursing. The outcomes assessed in this randomized trial focus on pain intensity, pain's interference on function and sleep, and anxiety, depression, and cost-effectiveness. Some of the challenges and lessons that we have learned early in implementing the TelePain intervention are also reported. PMID:24846620

  17. Embedded DSP-based telehealth radar system for remote in-door fall detection.

    PubMed

    Garripoli, Carmine; Mercuri, Marco; Karsmakers, Peter; Jack Soh, Ping; Crupi, Giovanni; Vandenbosch, Guy A E; Pace, Calogero; Leroux, Paul; Schreurs, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Telehealth systems and applications are extensively investigated nowadays to enhance the quality-of-care and, in particular, to detect emergency situations and to monitor the well-being of elderly people, allowing them to stay at home independently as long as possible. In this paper, an embedded telehealth system for continuous, automatic, and remote monitoring of real-time fall emergencies is presented and discussed. The system, consisting of a radar sensor and base station, represents a cost-effective and efficient healthcare solution. The implementation of the fall detection data processing technique, based on the least-square support vector machines, through a digital signal processor and the management of the communication between radar sensor and base station are detailed. Experimental tests, for a total of 65 mimicked fall incidents, recorded with 16 human subjects (14 men and two women) that have been monitored for 320 min, have been used to validate the proposed system under real circumstances. The subjects' weight is between 55 and 90 kg with heights between 1.65 and 1.82 m, while their age is between 25 and 39 years. The experimental results have shown a sensitivity to detect the fall events in real time of 100% without reporting false positives. The tests have been performed in an area where the radar's operation was not limited by practical situations, namely, signal power, coverage of the antennas, and presence of obstacles between the subject and the antennas. PMID:25291803

  18. Validation of Minimum Data of Archetyped Telehealth Clinical Report for Monitoring Prenatal Care.

    PubMed

    Santos Alves, Danielle; Times, Valéria Cesário; de Araújo Novaes, Magdala

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the validation of minimum data sets from international information standards have drawn the attention of the academic community to the identification of necessary requirements for the development of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). The primary motivation of such studies is the development of systems using archetypes. The aim of this study was to validate the minimum data set that should be used when constructing an archetyped EHR for prenatal care applications in telehealth. In order to achieve this, a data validation tool was built and used by nine expert obstetricians. The statistical analysis employed was the percentage of agreement and the content validity index. The study was conducted in three steps: 1) Literature review, 2)Instrument development, and 3) Validation of the minimum data set. Of the 179 evaluated pieces of data, 157 of them were validated to be included in the archetyped record of the first prenatal consultation, while 56 of them were allocated for the subsequent consultation record. The benefit of this research is the standardization (data validation for an archetyped system) of prenatal care, with the perspective of employing, both nationally and internationally, an archtyped telehealth system. PMID:26262011

  19. Creating an Ethnodrama to Catalyze Dialogue in Home-Based Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Speechley, Mark; DeForge, Ryan T; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Marlatt, Nicole M; Gutmanis, Iris

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the development of a theater script derived from a critical ethnographic study that followed people living with dementia--and their family and professional caregivers--over an 18-month period. Analysis of the ethnographic data yielded four themes that characterized home-based dementia care relationships: managing care resources, making care decisions, evaluating care practices, and reifying care norms. The research team expanded to include a colleague with playwright experience, who used these themes to write a script. A theater director was included to cast and direct the play, and finally, a videography company filmed the actors on a realistic set. To contribute to the qualitative health research and the research-based theater knowledge translation literatures, this article describes and explains the creative decisions taken as part of our effort to disseminate research focused on home-based dementia care in a way that catalyzes and fosters critical (actionable) dialogue. PMID:26468252

  20. Investment in home-based maternal, newborn and child health records improves immunization coverage in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Osaki, K; Hattori, T; Kosen, Soewarta; Singgih, Budihardja

    2009-08-01

    Indonesia Demographic and Health Surveys show that the ownership of home-based immunization records among children aged 12-23 months increased from 30.8% in 1997 and 30.7% in 2002-3 to 37% in 2007. In 2002-3, 70.9% of children who owned records had received all vaccines by the time of the survey, whereas 42.9% of children who did not own records had been fully immunized. An Indonesian ministerial decree of 2004 stated that the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (MCH handbook) was to be the only home-based record of maternal, newborn and child health. The increased immunization coverage seen would be a reflection of MCH handbook implementation, through raising awareness of immunization among community and health personnel and children's parents or guardians and allowing more accurate measurement of immunization coverage. PMID:19375141

  1. The Critical Role of Social Workers in Home Based Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Gettenberg, Gabrielle; Ross, Helena; Kopke, Victoria; Soriano, Theresa; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The growing homebound population has many complex biomedical and psychosocial needs and requires a team based approach to care (Smith, Ornstein, Soriano, Muller, & Boal, 2006). The [XX] Visiting Doctors Program (MSVD), a large interdisciplinary home based primary care program in [XX], has a vibrant social work program that is integrated into the routine care of homebound patients. We describe the assessment process used by MSVD social workers, highlight examples of successful social work care, and discuss why social workers’ individualized care plans are essential for keeping patients with chronic illness living safely in the community. Despite barriers to widespread implementation, such social work involvement within similar home based clinical programs is essential in the interdisciplinary care of our most needy patients. PMID:24717182

  2. Effect of home-based well-rounded exercise in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Tomoko; Islam, Mohammod M; Koizumi, Daisuke; Rogers, Michael E; Rogers, Nicole L; Takeshima, Nobuo

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a home-based well-rounded exercise program (WREP) in older adults. Forty sedentary community-dwelling older adults were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n = 23; aged 62-80 yr, average: 69.2 ± 5.2; 12 men and 11 women) or a control group (n = 17; aged 63-85 yr, average: 70.1 ± 6.6; 5 men and 12 women). The exercise group performed a 12-wk WREP which included aerobic exercise (walking) on about 3 days·wk(-1) for 37 min·day(-1); elastic band-based resistance exercises for the major muscle groups on about 3 days·wk(-1) for 26 min; and flexibility exercises (stretching) on about 4 days·wk(-1) for 19 min·day(-1). General physical characteristics, functional strength (Arm Curl [AC], Chair Stand [CS]), dynamic balance and agility (Up & Go [UG]), flexibility (Back Scratch [BS], Sit & Reach [SR]), and endurance (12-min walk [12-MW]) were measured. Following the 12-wk home-based WREP, improvements were observed in AC, CS, UG, BS, SR and 12-MW for the exercise group but not for the control group. These results suggest that the home-based WREP can improve overall fitness in older adults. Key PointsWalking, elastic band exercise and stretching were prescribed as a Well-Rounded Exercise Program for older adults.By combining aerobic, resistance and flexibility exercises, a Well-Rounded Exercise Program was effective for improving endurance, functional strength, dynamic balance and agility, and flexibility.Community-based exercise classes motivated older adults to perform home-based exercises. PMID:24501569

  3. Effect of home based HIV counselling and testing intervention in rural South Africa: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Tabana, Hanani; Jackson, Debra; Naik, Reshma; Zembe, Wanga; Lombard, Carl; Swanevelder, Sonja; Fox, Matthew P; Thorson, Anna; Ekström, Anna Mia; Chopra, Mickey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of home based HIV counselling and testing on the prevalence of HIV testing and reported behavioural changes in a rural subdistrict of South Africa. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 16 communities (clusters) in uMzimkhulu subdistrict, KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. Participants 4154 people aged 14 years or more who participated in a community survey. Intervention Lay counsellors conducted door to door outreach and offered home based HIV counselling and testing to all consenting adults and adolescents aged 14-17 years with guardian consent. Control clusters received standard care, which consisted of HIV counselling and testing services at local clinics. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was prevalence of testing for HIV. Other outcomes were HIV awareness, stigma, sexual behaviour, vulnerability to violence, and access to care. Results Overall, 69% of participants in the home based HIV counselling and testing arm versus 47% in the control arm were tested for HIV during the study period (prevalence ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.81). More couples in the intervention arm had counselling and testing together than in the control arm (2.24, 1.49 to 3.03). The intervention had broader effects beyond HIV testing, with a 55% reduction in multiple partners (0.45, 0.33 to 0.62) and a stronger effect among those who had an HIV test (0.37, 0.24 to 0.58) and a 45% reduction in casual sexual partners (0.55, 0.42 to 0.73). Conclusions Home based HIV counselling and testing increased the prevalence of HIV testing in a rural setting with high levels of stigma. Benefits also included higher uptake of couple counselling and testing and reduced sexual risk behaviour. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31271935. PMID:23766483

  4. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    PubMed

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa. PMID:25875880

  5. Muscle Strength Enhancement Following Home-Based Virtual Cycling Training in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Liaw, Mei-Yun; Chung, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yao

    2012-01-01

    This study is the first well-designed randomized controlled trial to assess the effects of a novel home-based virtual cycling training (hVCT) program for improving muscle strength in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-eight ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to an hVCT group (n = 13) or a…

  6. Older Adult Perceptions of Participation in Group- and Home-Based Falls Prevention Exercise.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lauren M; Hill, K D; Day, Lesley; Clemson, Lindy; Finch, Caroline; Haines, Terry

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes why older adults begin, continue, and discontinue group- and home-based falls prevention exercise and benefits and barriers to participation. Telephone surveys were used to collect data for 394 respondents. Most respondents reported not participating in group- (66%) or home-based (78%) falls prevention exercise recently. Reasons for starting group-based falls prevention exercise include health benefits (23-39%), health professional recommendation (13-19%), and social interaction (4-16%). They discontinued because the program finished (44%) or due to poor health (20%). Commonly reported benefits were social interaction (41-67%) and health (15-31%). Disliking groups was the main barrier (2-14%). Home-based falls prevention exercise was started for rehabilitation (46-63%) or upon health professional recommendation (22-48%) and stopped due to recovery (30%). Improvement in health (18-46%) was the main benefit. These findings could assist health professionals in prescribing group-based falls prevention exercise by considering characteristics of older adults who perceive social interaction to be beneficial. PMID:26539657

  7. Home-based Exercise among Cancer Survivors: Adherence and its Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Bernardine M.; Rabin, Carolyn; Dunsiger, Shira

    2010-01-01

    Objective Evidence of the benefits of exercise for those treated for cancer has led to several exercise interventions for this population. Some have questioned whether cancer patients offered a home-based intervention adhere to the exercise prescribed. Method We examined exercise adherence in a randomized controlled trial of a 12-week, home-based exercise trial for breast cancer patients. Three adherence outcomes were examined: minutes of exercise participation during each week of the intervention, number of steps taken during planned exercise during each intervention week, and whether the participant met her weekly exercise goal. Predictors of adherence (e.g., demographic and medical variables, Transtheoretical Model variables, history of exercise) were examined. Results Findings indicate that participants significantly increased their minutes of exercise and steps taken during planned exercise from the first to the last week of the intervention. The percentage of participants achieving exercise goals was highest in the first few weeks of the intervention. Exercise self-efficacy significantly predicted each adherence outcome. Baseline PA predicted mean exercise session steps over the 12 weeks. Conclusion Adherence to a home-based exercise intervention for breast cancer patients changes over time and may be related to baseline levels of self-efficacy for exercise. PMID:19242921

  8. Home-based asthma self-management education for inner city children.

    PubMed

    Butz, Arlene M; Syron, Laura; Johnson, Betty; Spaulding, Joanne; Walker, Melissa; Bollinger, Mary Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Optimal home self-management in young children with asthma includes accurate symptom identification followed by timely and appropriate treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate a home-based asthma educational intervention targeting symptom identification for parents of children with asthma. Two hundred twenty-one children with asthma were enrolled into an ongoing home-based clinical trial and randomized into either a standard asthma education (SAE) or a symptom/nebulizer education intervention (SNEI). Data included home visit records and parent's self-report on questionnaires. Symptom identification and self-management skills significantly improved from preintervention to postintervention for parents in both groups with the exception of checking medications for expiration dates and the frequency of cleaning nebulizer device and equipment. However, significantly more parents of children in the SNEI group reported treating cough symptoms as compared with the SAE group (p = 0.05). Of concern is that only 38% of all parents reported having an asthma action plan in the home. A targeted home-based asthma education intervention can be effective for improving symptom identification and appropriate use of medications in children with asthma. Home asthma educational programs should address accurate symptom identification and a demonstration of asthma medication delivery devices. PMID:15982192

  9. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Parks, R.C.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garcia, R.J.; Funkhouser, D.R.

    1999-04-07

    Telemedicine technology is rapidly evolving. Whereas early telemedicine consultations relied primarily on video conferencing, consultations today may utilize video conferencing, medical peripherals, store-and-forward capabilities, electronic patient record management software, and/or a host of other emerging technologies. These remote care systems rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process, in its many forms. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, the remote care market today is still immature. Most telemedicine systems are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver entire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. We propose a secure, object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes plug-and-play interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a lego-like fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. The architecture will support various ongoing standards work in the medical device arena.

  10. A Proposed Information Architecture for Telehealth System Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Funkhouser, D.R.; Gallagher, L.K.; Garica, R.J.; Parks, R.C.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    We propose an object-oriented information architecture for telemedicine systems that promotes secure `plug-and-play' interaction between system components through standardized interfaces, communication protocols, messaging formats, and data definitions. In this architecture, each component functions as a black box, and components plug together in a ''lego-like'' fashion to achieve the desired device or system functionality. Introduction Telemedicine systems today rely increasingly on distributed, collaborative information technology during the care delivery process. While these leading-edge systems are bellwethers for highly advanced telemedicine, most are custom-designed and do not interoperate with other commercial offerings. Users are limited to a set of functionality that a single vendor provides and must often pay high prices to obtain this functionality, since vendors in this marketplace must deliver en- tire systems in order to compete. Besides increasing corporate research and development costs, this inhibits the ability of the user to make intelligent purchasing decisions regarding best-of-breed technologies. This paper proposes a reference architecture for plug-and-play telemedicine systems that addresses these issues.

  11. Self-reported impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers in Mutale Municipality, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Netshandama, Vhonani O.; Mudau, Makondelela J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The establishment of home-based care (HBC) programmes in developing countries has resulted in a shift of burden from hospitals to communities where palliative care is provided by voluntary home-based caregivers. Aim The study investigated the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. Setting The study was conducted at HBC organisations located in Mutale Municipality of Limpopo Province, South Africa. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional descriptive survey design was applied to investigate the impact of caregiving on voluntary home-based caregivers. The sample was comprised of (N = 190) home-based caregivers. Home-based caregivers provide care to people in need of care in their homes, such as orphans, the elderly and those suffering from chronic illnesses such as tuberculosis, HIV and/or AIDS, cancer and stroke. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data which were analysed descriptively using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software, Version 20. Results The results showed that 101 (53.2%) participants were worried about their financial security because they were not registered as workers, whilst 74 (39.0%) participants were always worried about getting infection from their clients because they often do not have protective equipment. Conclusion Voluntary home-based caregivers have an important role in the provision of palliative care to people in their own homes, and therefore, the negative caregiving impact on the lives of caregivers may compromise the provision of quality palliative care. PMID:27380854

  12. Space medicine innovation and telehealth concept implementation for medical care during exploration-class missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Annie; Sullivan, Patrick; Beaudry, Catherine; Kuyumjian, Raffi; Comtois, Jean-Marc

    2012-12-01

    Medical care on the International Space Station (ISS) is provided using real-time communication with limited medical data transmission. In the occurrence of an off-nominal medical event, the medical care paradigm employed is 'stabilization and transportation', involving real-time management from ground and immediate return to Earth in the event that the medical contingency could not be resolved in due time in space. In preparation for future missions beyond Low-Earth orbit (LEO), medical concepts of operations are being developed to ensure adequate support for the new mission profiles: increased distance, duration and communication delays, as well as impossibility of emergency returns and limitations in terms of medical equipment availability. The current ISS paradigm of medical care would no longer be adequate due to these new constraints. The Operational Space Medicine group at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is looking towards synergies between terrestrial and space medicine concepts for the delivery of medical care to deal with the new challenges of human space exploration as well as to provide benefits to the Canadian population. Remote and rural communities on Earth are, in fact, facing similar problems such as isolation, remoteness to tertiary care centers, resource scarcity, difficult (and expensive) emergency transfers, limited access to physicians and specialists and limited training of medical and nursing staff. There are a number of researchers and organizations, outside the space communities, working in the area of telehealth. They are designing and implementing terrestrial telehealth programs using real-time and store-and-forward techniques to provide isolated populations access to medical care. The cross-fertilization of space-Earth research could provide support for increased spin-off and spin-in effects and stimulate telehealth and space medicine innovations to engage in the new era of human space exploration. This paper will discuss the benefits

  13. Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Anna; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Taylor, Rod S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of home based and supervised centre based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Design Systematic review. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, without language restriction, searched from 2001 to January 2008. Review methods Reference lists checked and advice sought from authors. Included randomised controlled trials that compared centre based cardiac rehabilitation with home based programmes in adults with acute myocardial infarction, angina, or heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of the identified trials and extracted data independently. Authors were contacted when possible to obtain missing information. Results 12 studies (1938 participants) were included. Most studies recruited patients with a low risk of further events after myocardial infarction or revascularisation. No difference was seen between home based and centre based cardiac rehabilitation in terms of mortality (relative risk 1.31, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity (standardised mean difference −0.11, −0.35 to 0.13), modifiable risk factors (weighted mean difference systolic blood pressure (0.58 mm Hg, −3.29 mm Hg to 4.44 mm Hg), total cholesterol (−0.13 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.05 mmol/l), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.15 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.01 mmol/l), or relative risk for proportion of smokers at follow-up (0.98, 0.73 to 1.31)), or health related quality of life, with the exception of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.06, −0.11 to −0.02) mmol/l). In the home based participants, there was evidence of superior adherence. No consistent difference was seen in the healthcare costs of the two forms

  14. Important features of home-based support services for older Australians and their informal carers.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Nikki; Gill, Liz; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Cameron, Ian D; Patterson, Jan; Crotty, Maria; Ratcliffe, Julie

    2015-11-01

    In Australia, newly initiated, publicly subsidised 'Home-Care Packages' designed to assist older people (≥ 65 years of age) living in their own home must now be offered on a 'consumer-directed care' (CDC) basis by service providers. However, CDC models have largely developed in the absence of evidence on users' views and preferences. The aim of this study was to determine what features (attributes) of consumer-directed, home-based support services are important to older people and their informal carers to inform the design of a discrete choice experiment (DCE). Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted in December 2012-November 2013 with 17 older people receiving home-based support services and 10 informal carers from 5 providers located in South Australia and New South Wales. Salient service characteristics important to participants were determined using thematic and constant comparative analysis and formulated into attributes and attribute levels for presentation within a DCE. Initially, eight broad themes were identified: information and knowledge, choice and control, self-managed continuum, effective co-ordination, effective communication, responsiveness and flexibility, continuity and planning. Attributes were formulated for the DCE by combining overlapping themes such as effective communication and co-ordination, and the self-managed continuum and planning into single attributes. Six salient service features that characterise consumer preferences for the provision of home-based support service models were identified: choice of provider, choice of support worker, flexibility in care activities provided, contact with the service co-ordinator, managing the budget and saving unspent funds. Best practice indicates that qualitative research with individuals who represent the population of interest should guide attribute selection for a DCE and this is the first study to employ such methods in aged care service provision. Further development of

  15. Effects of home-based respiratory muscle training in children and adolescents with chronic lung disease* **

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Iván; Zenteno, Daniel; Manterola, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory muscle weakness is a functional repercussion of chronic lung disease (CLD). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of home-based respiratory muscle training (RMT) in children and adolescents with CLD or neuromuscular disease (NMD). METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study involving children and adolescents with CLD or NMD. Before and after 6 months of home-based RMT, we measured respiratory muscle strength (MIP and MEP), PEF, and peak cough flow (PCF). We made statistical comparisons between the pre-RMT and post-RMT values, as well as evaluating the correlation between the duration and effect of RMT. RESULTS: The study included 29 patients, with a mean age of 12 years (range, 5-17 years), of whom 18 (62.1%) were male. The CLD group comprised 11 patients (37.9%), and the NMD group comprised 18 (62.1%). The mean duration of the RMT was 60 weeks (range, 46-90 weeks) in the CLD group and 39 weeks (range, 24-89 weeks) in the NMD group. In comparison with the pre-RMT values, the post-RMT values for MIP and MEP were significantly higher in both groups, whereas those for PEF and PCF were significantly higher only in the NMD group. We found no correlation between the duration and the effect of RMT. CONCLUSIONS: Home-based RMT appears to be an effective strategy for increasing respiratory muscle strength in children and adolescents with CLD or NMD, although it increased the ability to cough effectively only in those with NMD. PMID:25610503

  16. Emotional Disclosure Through Journal Writing: Telehealth Intervention for Maternal Stress and Mother-Child Relationships.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Rondalyn V; Smith, Gigi

    2015-11-01

    This study examines emotional disclosure through the activity of journaling as a means of coping with maternal stress associated with parenting a child with disruptive behaviors. Through a randomized control and pre-test post-test study design of an online journal writing intervention, change to maternal stress and quality of mother-child relationship for children with ASD, ADHD and SPD was addressed. Behavioral symptoms were found to be the primary source of parenting stress for mothers and a significant relationship between child characteristics and maternal stress was identified. Emotional disclosure through the online journal writing program (especially in the presence of high disclosure of negative emotions) was shown to reduce maternal stress and improve the quality of mother-child relationship. These findings suggest cost-effective telehealth interventions may support maternal health. Important clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25503483

  17. Dutch nurses' willingness to use home telehealth: implications for practice and education.

    PubMed

    van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M; Barakat, Ansam; Best, Ryan; Boot, Walter R; Charness, Neil; Kort, Helianthe S M

    2015-04-01

    Home telehealth (HT) refers to the use of videoconferencing to provide care to patients remotely and can help older adults age in place. However, these technologies are unlikely to impact care unless health care providers are motivated to use them. Education may play a key role in increasing motivation to use and competence regarding HT. To help guide the development of nursing education to facilitate adoption and use, the current study examined predictors of Dutch nurses' willingness to use HT, based on a survey of 67 Dutch nurses with and 126 without HT experience. Nurses' willingness to use this technology was predicted by HT's (a) perceived usefulness to the client, (b) effort expectancy, (c) social influence, and (d) cost expectations. These observed relationships are anticipated to help with the development of effective educational programs to increase HT use and, therefore, improve older adults' quality of life. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(4), 47-56.]. PMID:25486115

  18. A Hybrid Process Fidelity Assessment in a Home-based Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    WILDE, MARY H.; LIEBEL, DIANNE; FAIRBANKS, EILEEN; WILSON, PAULA; LASH, MARGARET; SHAH, SHIVANI; McDONALD, MARGARET V.; BRASCH, JUDITH; ZHANG, FENG; SCHEID, EILEEN; McMAHON, JAMES M.

    2016-01-01

    A process fidelity assessment was conducted as a nested study within a home-based randomized clinical trial teaching self-management to 101 long-term indwelling urinary catheter users in the treatment group. Our hybrid model combined external assessments (outside observations and tape recordings) with internal evaluation methods (through study nurse forms and notes) for a comprehensive process fidelity assessment. Barriers, patient-related issues, and nurse perspectives were identified demonstrating the complexity in home care intervention research. The complementary and synergistic approaches provided in depth information about the context of the delivery and the impact of the intervention on study outcomes. PMID:25894688

  19. A home-based nutrition and physical activity intervention for grandparents raising grandchildren: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kicklighter, Jana R; Whitley, Deborah M; Kelley, Susan J; Lynch, Judith E; Melton, Tamara S

    2009-04-01

    Five African American grandparents raising their grandchildren participated in a home-based nutrition and physical activity intervention. The primary goals were to increase grandparents' knowledge and skills in selecting and preparing healthy foods and to increase the grandparents' and grandchildren's physical activity levels. Results revealed that grandparents' concerns regarding their chronic diseases and desire to prevent health problems in their grandchildren served as motivators. Following the intervention, grandparents scored higher on nutrition and physical activity knowledge and their self-efficacy improved, although most health status indicators remained unchanged. Self-reported changes included walking more, reading food labels, and switching to a healthier type of fat. PMID:21184365

  20. [Assisted peritoneal dialysis: home-based renal replacement therapy for the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Wiesholzer, Martin

    2013-06-01

    The number of elderly patients with end stage renal disease is constantly increasing. Conventional hämodiaylsis as the mainstay of renal replacement therapy is often poorly tolerated by frail eldery patients with multiple comorbidities. Although many of these patients would prefer a home based dialysis treatment, the number of elderly patients using peritoneal dialysis (PD) is still low. Impaired physical and cognitive function often generates insurmountable barriers for self care peritoneal dialysis. Assisted peritoneal dialysis can overcome many of these barriers and give elderly patients the ability of a renal replacement therapy in their own homes respecting their needs. PMID:23797681

  1. Communications protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming (Inventor); Baras, John S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved communications protocol which increases the efficiency of transmission in return channels on a multi-channel slotted Alohas system by incorporating advanced error correction algorithms, selective retransmission protocols and the use of reserved channels to satisfy the retransmission requests.

  2. Telehealth Technologies and Applications for Terrorism Response: A Report of the 2002 Coastal North Carolina Domestic Preparedness Training Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Scott C.; Murphy, Timothy A.; Blanarovich, Adrian; Workman, Florence T.; Rosenthal, David A.; Carbone, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Effective response to natural or man-made disasters (i.e., terrorism) is predicated on the ability to communicate among the many organizations involved. Disaster response exercises enable disaster planners and responders to test procedures and technologies and incorporate the lessons learned from past disasters or exercises. On May 31 and June 1, 2002, one such exercise event took place at the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base in Jacksonville, North Carolina. During the exercise, East Carolina University tested: (1) in-place Telehealth networks and (2) rapidly deployable communications, networking, and data collection technologies such as satellite communications, local wireless networking, on-scene video, and clinical and environmental data acquisition and telemetry. Exercise participants included local, county, state, and military emergency medical services (EMS), emergency management, specialized response units, and local fire and police units. The technologies and operations concepts tested at the exercise and recommendations for using telehealth to improve disaster response are described. PMID:12595406

  3. Medical and economic benefits of telehealth in low- and middle-income countries: results of a study in four district hospitals in Mali

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of telehealth on 1) the diagnosis, and management in obstetrics and cardiology, 2) health care costs from patients’ perspectives, 3) attendance at health centres located in remote areas of Mali. Methods The impact of telehealth on health care utilization, quality, and costs was assessed using a five-point Likert-scale based questionnaire consisting of three dimensions. It was completed by health care professionals in four district hospitals. The role of telehealth on attendance at health centres was also assessed based on data collected from the consultations logs before and during the project, between project sites and control sites. Referrals specific to the activities of the research study were also evaluated using a questionnaire to measure the real share of telehealth tools in increasing attendance at project sites. Finally, the cost savings achieved was estimated using the transport and lodging costs incurred if patients were to travel to the capital city for the same tests or care. Results The telehealth activities contributed to improving medical diagnoses in cardiology and obstetrics (92.6%) and the patients’ management system on site (96.2%). The attendance records at health centres increased from 8 to 35% at all project sites during the study period. Patients from project sites saved an average of 12380 XOF (CFA Francs) or 25 USD (American dollar) and a maximum of 35000 XOF or 70 USD compared to patients from neighbouring sites, who must go to the capital city to receive the same care. Conclusion We conclude that in Mali, enhanced training in ultrasound / electrocardiography and the introduction of telehealth have improved the health system in remote areas and resulted in high levels of appropriate diagnosis and patient management in the areas of obstetrics and cardiology. Telehealth can also significantly reduce the cost to the patient. PMID:25080312

  4. Telehealth delivery of cognitive-behavioral intervention to youth with autism spectrum disorder and anxiety: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Susan L; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Wolff, Brian; Reaven, Judy A

    2015-01-01

    Youth with autism spectrum disorders frequently experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Empirically supported psychosocial interventions exist, yet access is limited, especially for families in rural areas. Telehealth (i.e. videoconferencing) has potential to reduce barriers to access to care; however, little is known about the feasibility or efficacy of directly intervening with youth with autism spectrum disorders through this modality. This study details the pilot testing of a telehealth version of an empirically supported intervention targeting anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders. The primary focus of this study is on feasibility, with evaluation of outcomes as a starting point for future randomized trials. In all, 33 families of youth with autism spectrum disorders and significant anxiety symptoms participated in this study (Telehealth Facing Your Fears (FYF) Intervention: n = 17; Wait-list control: n = 16). Youth of all functioning levels were included. Acceptability was strong; however, the usability of the technology was problematic for some families and impeded some sessions significantly. Fidelity of the telehealth version to the critical elements of the original, in vivo version was excellent. More work is needed to improve delivery of exposure practices and parent coaching. Preliminary efficacy analyses are promising, with improvements observed in youth anxiety over time (relative to a comparison group waiting for live intervention) and parent sense of competence (within group). Clearly, stronger designs are necessary to evaluate efficacy sufficiently; however, this study does provide support for further investigation of clinic-to-home videoconferencing as a direct intervention tool for youth with autism spectrum disorders and their parents. PMID:25896267

  5. Telehealth delivery of cognitive-behavioral intervention to youth with autism spectrum disorder and anxiety: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Susan L; Blakeley-Smith, Audrey; Wolff, Brian; Reaven, Judy A

    2016-02-01

    Youth with autism spectrum disorders frequently experience significant symptoms of anxiety. Empirically supported psychosocial interventions exist, yet access is limited, especially for families in rural areas. Telehealth (i.e. videoconferencing) has potential to reduce barriers to access to care; however, little is known about the feasibility or efficacy of directly intervening with youth with autism spectrum disorders through this modality. This study details the pilot testing of a telehealth version of an empirically supported intervention targeting anxiety in youth with autism spectrum disorders. The primary focus of this study is on feasibility, with evaluation of outcomes as a starting point for future randomized trials. In all, 33 families of youth with autism spectrum disorders and significant anxiety symptoms participated in this study (Telehealth Facing Your Fears (FYF) Intervention: n = 17; Wait-list control: n = 16). Youth of all functioning levels were included. Acceptability was strong; however, the usability of the technology was problematic for some families and impeded some sessions significantly. Fidelity of the telehealth version to the critical elements of the original, in vivo version was excellent. More work is needed to improve delivery of exposure practices and parent coaching. Preliminary efficacy analyses are promising, with improvements observed in youth anxiety over time (relative to a comparison group waiting for live intervention) and parent sense of competence (within group). Clearly, stronger designs are necessary to evaluate efficacy sufficiently; however, this study does provide support for further investigation of clinic-to-home videoconferencing as a direct intervention tool for youth with autism spectrum disorders and their parents. PMID:25896267

  6. Mobile Phone Based System Opportunities to Home-based Managing of Chemotherapy Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Somayeh; Mohammadzadeh, Zeinab; Safdari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Applying mobile base systems in cancer care especially in chemotherapy management have remarkable growing in recent decades. Because chemotherapy side effects have significant influences on patient’s lives, therefore it is necessary to take ways to control them. This research has studied some experiences of using mobile phone based systems to home-based monitor of chemotherapy side effects in cancer. Methods: In this literature review study, search was conducted with keywords like cancer, chemotherapy, mobile phone, information technology, side effects and self managing, in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 2005. Results: Today, because of the growing trend of the cancer, we need methods and innovations such as information technology to manage and control it. Mobile phone based systems are the solutions that help to provide quick access to monitor chemotherapy side effects for cancer patients at home. Investigated studies demonstrate that using of mobile phones in chemotherapy management have positive results and led to patients and clinicians satisfactions. Conclusion: This study shows that the mobile phone system for home-based monitoring chemotherapy side effects works well. In result, knowledge of cancer self-management and the rate of patient’s effective participation in care process improved. PMID:27482134

  7. A computerized recognition system for the home-based physiotherapy exercises using an RGBD camera.

    PubMed

    Ar, Ilktan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-11-01

    Computerized recognition of the home based physiotherapy exercises has many benefits and it has attracted considerable interest among the computer vision community. However, most methods in the literature view this task as a special case of motion recognition. In contrast, we propose to employ the three main components of a physiotherapy exercise (the motion patterns, the stance knowledge, and the exercise object) as different recognition tasks and embed them separately into the recognition system. The low level information about each component is gathered using machine learning methods. Then, we use a generative Bayesian network to recognize the exercise types by combining the information from these sources at an abstract level, which takes the advantage of domain knowledge for a more robust system. Finally, a novel postprocessing step is employed to estimate the exercise repetitions counts. The performance evaluation of the system is conducted with a new dataset which contains RGB (red, green, and blue) and depth videos of home-based exercise sessions for commonly applied shoulder and knee exercises. The proposed system works without any body-part segmentation, bodypart tracking, joint detection, and temporal segmentation methods. In the end, favorable exercise recognition rates and encouraging results on the estimation of repetition counts are obtained. PMID:24860037

  8. Home-Based Mental Health Services for Older Adults: A Review of Ten Model Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective is to provide information on successful programs providing home-based services to mentally ill elderly in order to assist other communities wishing to establish such programs. Participants The ten programs described in this article were selected by peer review from applications for an award given by the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry and were participants in an invitational conference. Results Eight of the programs were components of a community agency while two were components of a medical school department of psychiatry. Six of the programs focused primarily on individuals with anxiety and depression and employed a range of individual psychotherapies. The other four accepted patients with any psychiatric diagnosis including dementia and included medication management as part of their services. The numbers served by the ten programs ranged from about 50 to 300 new cases per year, and the staffing ranged from 2 to 13 often with a combination of full and part time. The annual budget for the ten programs ranged from $30,000 to $1,250,000. Budget sources usually included some combination of public funds, philanthropy, and fee-for-service income. Conclusions Despite the logistic and fiscal challenges of providing home-based services to mentally ill older adults there are many long-standing successful programs that can serve as models for communities wishing to establish similar programs. A great opportunity exists for a unified outcome research endeavor as well as expansion into many more communities. PMID:23567412

  9. HOME-BASED SELF-DELIVERED MIRROR THERAPY FOR PHANTOM PAIN: A PILOT STUDY*

    PubMed Central

    Darnall, Beth D.; Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of self-delivered home-based mirror therapy for phantom pain. Design Uncontrolled prospective treatment outcome pilot study. Participants Forty community-dwelling adults with unilateral amputation and phantom pain >3 on a 0–10 numeric rating scale enrolled either during a one-time study visit (n = 30) or remotely (n = 10). Methods Participants received an explanation of mirror therapy and were asked to self-treat for 25 min daily. Participants completed and posted back sets of outcomes questionnaires at months 1 and 2 post-treatment. Main outcome was mean phantom pain intensity at post-treatment. Results A significant reduction in mean phantom pain intensity was found at month 1 (n = 31, p = 0.0002) and at month 2 (n = 26, p = 0.002). The overall median percentage reduction at month 2 was 15.4%. Subjects with high education (>16 years) compared with low education (<16 years) (37.5% vs 4.1%) had greater reduction in pain intensity (p = 0.01). Conclusion These findings support the feasibility and efficacy of home-based self-delivered mirror therapy; this low-cost treatment may defray medical costs, therapy visits, and the patient travel burden for people with motivation and a high level of education. More research is needed to determine methods of cost-effective support for people with lower levels of education. PMID:22378591

  10. Outcomes of a home-based pulmonary maintenance program for individuals with COPD: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Marie; Moyle, Wendy; Griffiths, Susan; Shields, Louise

    This preliminary pilot study explores sustained benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) attending a 12-month home-based pulmonary maintenance program. The incidence of COPD is high and ageing populations will see this continue and possibly increase. PR programs are effective, however, benefits may dissipate if the program is not continued. The maintenance program involved: strength retraining exercises; collaborative goal setting; regular telephone calls; and home visits. Around half of the 29 participants remained in contact with the program for 12 months and 21 completed final or 6-month assessment. Most participants maintained: respiratory functioning; quality of life; and self-efficacy, with some showing improvements. Outcomes provide knowledge for improving patient care through a home-based strategy to maintain benefits of PR programs. Results suggest that in light of likely decline in benefits 6-12 months after PR, the maintenance program contributed to sustained benefits for COPD individuals and also provide information to aid investigators planning the design of similar larger research with this population. PMID:20230175

  11. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    López-Liria, Remedios; Padilla-Góngora, David; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-de la Cruz, Sagrario; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients' functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left) or clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P < 0.001) from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale), the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices), balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective. PMID:25961017

  12. The outcome of combining home based and clinic based amblyopia therapy among preschool children.

    PubMed

    Rokiah, O; Knight, V F; Duratul, A H

    2013-06-01

    This study determined the outcome of combining home based and clinic based amblyopia therapy among preschool children. A total of 479 preschool children were randomly selected for vision screening. Amblyopic therapy was prescribed to children whose visual acuity (VA) could not be improved to <0.1 LogMAR after a 6 week adaptation period with glasses. Intensive near work activities were conducted daily at home for 12 weeks, monitored by parents while weekly therapy was conducted at the optometry clinic by an optometrist. Six preschool children were diagnosed with refractive amblyopia, spherical equivalent (SE) was -11.25D to +0.75D. Significant improvement was found in the VA of right eye, t(6) = 3.07, left eye t(6) = 3.07 and both eyes t(6) = 3.42) p<0.05, at the end of the 12 week therapy. Combining home based and clinic based amblyopia therapy among preschool children showed a positive improvement in VA after 12 weeks of therapy. PMID:23749015

  13. Feasibility and Acceptance of a Telehealth Intervention to Promote Symptom Management during Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara A; Keeney, Cynthia; Studts, Jamie L; Khayat, Mamdouh; Bumpous, Jeffrey; Pfeifer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancers have a myriad of distressing symptoms and treatment side effects which significantly alter communication and lower quality of life. Telehealth technology has demonstrated promise in improving patient-provider communication by delivering supportive educational content and guidance to patients in their homes. A telehealth intervention using a simple telemessaging device was developed to provide daily education, guidance, and encouragement for patients undergoing initial treatment of head and neck cancer. The goal of this article is to report the feasibility and acceptance of the intervention using both quantitative and qualitative measures. No eligible patients declined participation based on technology issues. Participants completed the intervention over 86% of the expected days of use. Direct nursing contact was seldom needed during the study period. Satisfaction with the technology and the intervention was very high. In this study a telehealth intervention was shown to be feasible, well accepted, and regularly used by patients experiencing extreme symptom burden and declining quality of life as a result of aggressive treatment for head and neck cancer. PMID:21499540

  14. Integrating Social Capital Theory, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Technology Acceptance Model to Explore a Behavioral Model of Telehealth Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Telehealth has become an increasingly applied solution to delivering health care to rural and underserved areas by remote health care professionals. This study integrated social capital theory, social cognitive theory, and the technology acceptance model (TAM) to develop a comprehensive behavioral model for analyzing the relationships among social capital factors (social capital theory), technological factors (TAM), and system self-efficacy (social cognitive theory) in telehealth. The proposed framework was validated with 365 respondents from Nantou County, located in Central Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the proposed model. The finding indicates that elderly residents generally reported positive perceptions toward the telehealth system. Generally, the findings show that social capital factors (social trust, institutional trust, and social participation) significantly positively affect the technological factors (perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness respectively), which influenced usage intention. This study also confirmed that system self-efficacy was the salient antecedent of perceived ease of use. In addition, regarding the samples, the proposed model fitted considerably well. The proposed integrative psychosocial-technological model may serve as a theoretical basis for future research and can also offer empirical foresight to practitioners and researchers in the health departments of governments, hospitals, and rural communities. PMID:24810577

  15. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel FM; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter MA

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland–Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of −0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis. PMID:27578972

  16. Daily home-based spirometry during withdrawal of inhaled corticosteroid in severe to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Tetzlaff, Kay; Watz, Henrik; Wouters, Emiel Fm; Disse, Bernd; Finnigan, Helen; Magnussen, Helgo; Calverley, Peter Ma

    2016-01-01

    The WISDOM study (NCT00975195) reported a change in lung function following withdrawal of fluticasone propionate in patients with severe to very severe COPD treated with tiotropium and salmeterol. However, little is known about the validity of home-based spirometry measurements of lung function in COPD. Therefore, as part of this study, following suitable training, patients recorded daily home-based spirometry measurements in addition to undergoing periodic in-clinic spirometric testing throughout the study duration. We subsequently determined the validity of home-based spirometry for detecting changes in lung function by comparing in-clinic and home-based forced expiratory volume in 1 second in patients who underwent stepwise fluticasone propionate withdrawal over 12 weeks versus patients remaining on fluticasone propionate for 52 weeks. Bland-Altman analysis of these data confirmed good agreement between in-clinic and home-based measurements, both across all visits and at the individual visits at study weeks 6, 12, 18, and 52. There was a measurable difference between the forced expiratory volume in 1 second values recorded at home and in the clinic (mean difference of -0.05 L), which may be due to suboptimal patient effort in performing unsupervised recordings. However, this difference remained consistent over time. Overall, these data demonstrate that home-based and in-clinic spirometric measurements were equally valid and reliable for assessing lung function in patients with COPD, and suggest that home-based spirometry may be a useful tool to facilitate analysis of changes in lung function on a day-to-day basis. PMID:27578972

  17. Identifying Early Dehydration Risk With Home-Based Sensors During Radiation Treatment: A Feasibility Study on Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems that enable remote monitoring of patients’ symptoms and other health-related outcomes may optimize cancer care outside of the clinic setting. CYCORE (CYberinfrastructure for COmparative effectiveness REsearch) is a software-based prototype for a user-friendly cyberinfrastructure supporting the comprehensive collection and analyses of data from multiple domains using a suite of home-based and mobile sensors. This study evaluated the feasibility of using CYCORE to address early at-home identification of dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Methods Head and neck cancer patients used home-based sensors to capture weight, blood pressure, pulse, and patient-reported outcomes for two 5-day periods during radiation therapy. Data were sent to the radiation oncologist of each head and neck cancer patient, who viewed them online via a Web-based interface. Feasibility outcomes included study completion rate, acceptability and perceived usefulness of the intervention, and adherence to the monitoring protocol. We also evaluated whether sensor data could identify dehydration-related events. Results Fifty patients consented to participate, and 48 (96%) completed the study. More than 90% of patients rated their ease, self-efficacy, and satisfaction regarding use of the sensor suite as extremely favorable, with minimal concerns expressed regarding data privacy issues. Patients highly valued the ability to have immediate access to objective, self-monitoring data related to personal risk for dehydration. Clinician assessments indicated a high degree of satisfaction with the ease of using the CYCORE system and the resulting ability to monitor their patients remotely. Conclusion Implementing CYCORE in a clinical oncology care setting is feasible and highly acceptable to both patients and providers. PMID:24395986

  18. Effects of Home-Based Interval Walking Training on Thigh Muscle Strength and Aerobic Capacity in Female Total Hip Arthroplasty Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Yutaka; Mizushima, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Morikawa, Mayuko; Masuki, Shizue; Nose, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Due to the reduced physical activity of patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA), there are no home-based exercise training regimens for preventing muscle atrophy and aerobic capacity impairment in these patients. We examined whether interval walking training (IWT) could prevented these issues. Twenty-eight female patients (∼60 years of age) who had undergone THA more than 2 months prior were randomly divided into IWT (n = 14) and control (CNT, n = 14) groups. The IWT subjects trained at a target of 60 min of fast walking at >70% peak aerobic capacity for walking (O2peak) per wk for 12 wk, while those in the CNT maintained their previous sedentary life during the same period. We measured the energy expenditure of the daily physical activity, except during sleeping and bathing, every minute and every day during the intervention. We also measured the isometric knee extension (FEXT) and flexion (FFLX) forces, O2peak, and anaerobic threshold during the graded cycling exercise (O2AT) before and after the intervention. All subjects, except for one in IWT, completed the protocol. FFLX increased by 23% on the operated side (P = 0.003) and 14% on the non-operated side of IWT (P = 0.006), while it only increased on the operated side of CNT (P = 0.03). The O2peak and O2AT in IWT increased by 8% (P = 0.08) and 13% (P = 0.002), respectively, and these changes were significantly higher in the IWT than in CNT group (both, P<0.05). In conclusion, IWT might be an effective home-based training regimen for preventing the muscle atrophy from reduced daily physical activity in THA patients. Trial Registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000013172 PMID:25268505

  19. Being Human: A Qualitative Interview Study Exploring Why a Telehealth Intervention for Management of Chronic Conditions Had a Modest Effect

    PubMed Central

    Drabble, Sarah J; Foster, Alexis; Horspool, Kimberley; Edwards, Louisa; Thomas, Clare; Salisbury, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence of benefit for telehealth for chronic conditions is mixed. Two linked randomized controlled trials tested the Healthlines Service for 2 chronic conditions: depression and high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This new telehealth service consisted of regular telephone calls from nonclinical, trained health advisers who followed standardized scripts generated by interactive software. Advisors facilitated self-management by supporting participants to use Web-based resources and helped to optimize medication, improve treatment adherence, and encourage healthier lifestyles. Participants were recruited from primary care. The trials identified moderate (for depression) or partial (for CVD risk) effectiveness of the Healthlines Service. Objective An embedded qualitative study was undertaken to help explain the results of the 2 trials by exploring mechanisms of action, context, and implementation of the intervention. Methods Qualitative interview study of 21 staff providing usual health care or involved in the intervention and 24 patients receiving the intervention. Results Interviewees described improved outcomes in some patients, which they attributed to the intervention, describing how components of the model on which the intervention was based helped to achieve benefits. Implementation of the intervention occurred largely as planned. However, contextual issues in patients’ lives and some problems with implementation may have reduced the size of effect of the intervention. For depression, patients’ lives and preferences affected engagement with the intervention: these largely working-age patients had busy and complex lives, which affected their ability to engage, and some patients preferred a therapist-based approach to the cognitive behavioral therapy on offer. For CVD risk, patients’ motivations adversely affected the intervention whereby some patients joined the trial for general health improvement or from altruism, rather than

  20. Cost-effectiveness of telehealth for patients with raised cardiovascular disease risk: evidence from the Healthlines randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Padraig; Edwards, Louisa; Thomas, Clare; Gaunt, Daisy; Foster, Alexis; Large, Shirley; Montgomery, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the cost-effectiveness of a telehealth intervention for primary care patients with raised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Design A prospective within-trial patient-level economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial. Setting Patients recruited through primary care, and intervention delivered via telehealth service. Participants Adults with a 10-year CVD risk ≥20%, as measured by the QRISK2 algorithm, with at least 1 modifiable risk factor. Intervention A series of up to 13 scripted, theory-led telehealth encounters with healthcare advisors, who supported participants to make behaviour change, use online resources, optimise medication and improve adherence. Participants in the control arm received usual care. Primary and secondary outcome measures Cost-effectiveness measured by net monetary benefit at the end of 12 months of follow-up, calculated from incremental cost and incremental quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Productivity impacts, participant out-of-pocket expenditure and the clinical outcome were presented in a cost-consequences framework. Results 641 participants were randomised—325 to receive the telehealth intervention in addition to usual care and 316 to receive only usual care. 18% of participants had missing data on either costs, utilities or both. Multiple imputation was used for the base case results. The intervention was associated with incremental mean per-patient National Health Service (NHS) costs of £138 (95% CI 66 to 211) and an incremental QALY gain of 0.012 (95% CI −0.001 to 0.026). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was £10 859. Net monetary benefit at a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20 000 per QALY was £116 (95% CI −58 to 291), and the probability that the intervention was cost-effective at this threshold value was 0.77. Similar results were obtained from a complete case analysis. Conclusions There is evidence to suggest that the Healthlines telehealth

  1. Analyzing the Interprofessional Working of a Home-Based Primary Care Team.

    PubMed

    Smith-Carrier, Tracy; Neysmith, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Increasingly, interprofessional teams are responsible for providing integrated health care services. Effective teams, however, are not the result of chance but require careful planning and ongoing attention to team processes. Based on a case study involving interviews, participant observation, and a survey, we identified key attributes for effective interprofessional working (IPW) within a home-based primary care (HBPC) setting. Recognizing the importance of a theoretical model that reflects the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness research, we employed the integrated team effectiveness model to analyze our findings. The results indicated that a shared vision, common goals, respect, and trust among team members – as well as processes for ongoing communication, effective leadership, and mechanisms for conflict resolution – are vital in the development of a high-functioning IPW team. The ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding the context of service provision (clients' homes), as well the negotiation of external relationships in the HBPC field, require further investigation. PMID:26261888

  2. Assessing the importance of gender roles in couples' home-based sexual health services in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Jessica D; Muntifering, Carie J; Chauwa, Felluna K; Taulo, Frank; Tsui, Amy O; Hindin, Michelle J

    2010-12-01

    To more effectively address individuals' and couples' sexual and reproductive health needs, innovative service delivery strategies are being explored. These strategies are logistically and ethically complicated, considering prevailing gender inequalities in many contexts. We conducted an exploratory study to assess the acceptability of couples' home-based sexual health services in Malawi. We collected qualitative data from six focus group discussions and 10 husband-wife indepth interviews to gain a more thorough understanding of how gender norms influence acceptability of couples' sexual health services. Findings reveal that women are expected to defer to their husbands and may avoid conflict through covert contraceptive use and non-disclosure of HIV status. Many men felt that accessing sexual health services is stigmatizing, causing some to avoid services or to rely on informal information sources. Gender norms and attitudes toward existing services differentially impact men and women in this setting, influencing the perceived benefits of couples' sexual health services. PMID:21812199

  3. Indian experience of home based mothers card: ICMR task force study.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S; Joshi, S; Kumar, V; Patwary, A; Pratinidhi, A; Saxena, V B; Maitra, K; Singh, K K; Saxena, N C; Saxena, B N

    1991-01-01

    To improve the quality of MCH services, a Home Based Mothers Card (HBMC) prepared and recommended by World Health Organization was adapted to Indian situation, and introduced in 1.5 lakh population of rural area covered by 6 participating centres under the aegis of Indian Council of Medical Research. Two thousand four hundred and forty six mothers were given this card and were followed up for a period of 2 years. Only 89.2 percent retrieval of the cards was possible after a period of 18 months. Screening of the population for "at risk" women monitoring and referral could be undertaken with the help of this card. Improved antenatal, and referral services were observed during the study period. The card (HBMC) was acceptable to the mothers as well as to the health workers, as a tool for improving the quality and coverage of MCH services being rendered at the Primary Health Centre. PMID:1818874

  4. Early home-based intervention in the Netherlands for children at familial risk of dyslexia.

    PubMed

    van Otterloo, Sandra G; van der Leij, Aryan; Henrichs, Lotte F

    2009-08-01

    Dutch children at higher familial risk of reading disability received a home-based intervention programme before formal reading instruction started to investigate whether this would reduce the risk of dyslexia. The experimental group (n=23) received a specific training in phoneme awareness and letter knowledge. A control group (n=25) received a non-specific training in morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Both interventions were designed to take 10 min a day, 5 days a week for 10 weeks. Most parents were sufficiently able to work with the programme properly. At post-test the experimental group had gained more on phoneme awareness than the control group. The control group gained more on one of the morphology measures. On average, these specific training results did not lead to significant group differences in first-grade reading and spelling measures. However, fewer experimental children scored below 10th percentile on word recognition. PMID:18819166

  5. Evaluation of A Novel Information-Sharing Instrument for Home-Based Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Koichiro; Shimada, Masanari; Kadoya, Shinichi; Endo, Naoki; Ishiguro, Kaname; Takashima, Rumi; Amemiya, Yoko; Fujikawa, Yasunaga; Ikezaki, Tomoaki; Takeuchi, Miyako; Kitazawa, Hidenori; Iida, Hiroyuki; Koseki, Shiro; Morita, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Koji; Kashii, Tatsuhiko; Murakami, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the feasibility and usefulness of a novel region-based pathway: the Regional Referral Clinical Pathway for Home-Based Palliative Care. Method: This was a feasibility study to evaluate the frequency of variances and the perceived usefulness of pathway using in-depth interviews. All patients with cancer referred to the palliative care team between 2011 and 2013 and received home care services were enrolled. Result: A total of 44 patients were analyzed, and pathway was completed in all the patients. The target outcome was achieved in 61.4% while some variances occurred in 54.5%. Nine categories were identified as the usefulness of the pathway, such as reviewing and sharing information and promoting communication, education, motivation, and relationships. Conclusion: This novel pathway is feasible and seems to be useful. PMID:24814723

  6. An Efficacy Trial of Carescapes: Home-Based Child-Care Practices and Children's Social Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rusby, Julie C; Jones, Laura B; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2016-07-01

    This study reported findings from a longitudinal randomized controlled trial of Carescapes, a professional development program for home-based child-care providers in promoting children's social competence. Participants included 134 child-care providers and 310 children, ages 3-5 years, in Oregon. The Carescapes intervention group made significant improvements in observed caregiver responsiveness and monitoring, and showed decreased caregiver-reported child problem behavior and improved parent-reported peer relationships compared to the control group. Increased caregiver-reported cooperation skills were found for the intervention group at follow-up. No differences in condition were found for kindergarten teacher-reported social-behavioral, classroom, and academic skills. Moderation effects on children's behavior and peer relations were found for child age and exposure to the intervention child care. PMID:27174665

  7. Treatment Engagement: Building Therapeutic Alliance in Home-Based Treatment with Adolescents and their Families

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Bender, Kimberly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Client engagement is an essential yet challenging ingredient in effective therapy. Engaged clients are more likely to bond with therapists and counselors, endorse treatment goals, participate to a greater degree, remain in treatment longer, and report higher levels of satisfaction. This study explored the process of engaging high-risk youth and their parents in a unique home-based family therapy intervention. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 families who completed family therapy sessions that included a core component aimed at increasing treatment engagement. Parents’ and youths’ perceptions of engagement suggest the importance of developing therapeutic alliance with therapists, who facilitated building a shared alliance among family members. Implications for improving client engagement are discussed within the context of alliance building with the therapist and among family members. PMID:20556209

  8. Home based therapy for severe malnutrition with ready-to-use food

    PubMed Central

    Manary, M; Ndkeha, M; Ashorn, P; Maleta, K; Briend, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment of severe malnutrition in Malawi often utilises prolonged inpatient care, and after discharge results in high rates of relapse. Aims: To test the hypothesis that the recovery rate, defined as catch-up growth such that weight-for-height z score >0 (WHZ, based on initial height) for ready-to-use food (RTUF) is greater than two other home based dietary regimens in the treatment of malnutrition. Methods: HIV negative children >1 year old discharged from the nutrition unit in Blantyre, Malawi were systematically allocated to one of three dietary regimens: RTUF, RTUF supplement, or blended maize/soy flour. RTUF and maize/soy flour provided 730 kJ/kg/day, while the RTUF supplement provided a fixed amount of energy, 2100 kJ/day. Children were followed fortnightly. Children completed the study when they reached WHZ >0, relapsed, or died. Outcomes were compared using a time-event model. Results: A total of 282 children were enrolled. Children receiving RTUF were more likely to reach WHZ >0 than those receiving RTUF supplement or maize/soy flour (95% v 78%, RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.3). The average weight gain was 5.2 g/kg/day in the RTUF group compared to 3.1 g/kg/day for the maize/soy and RTUF supplement groups. Six months later, 96% of all children that reached WHZ >0 were not wasted. Conclusions: Home based therapy of malnutrition with RTUF was successful; further operational work is needed to implement this promising therapy. PMID:15155403

  9. Cost Analysis of a Home-Based Nurse Care Coordination Program

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Karen Dorman; Stetzer, Frank; Adams, Scott J; Bub, Linda Denison; Schlidt, Andrea; Colorafi, Karen Jiggins

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a home-based care coordination program focused on medication self-management would affect the cost of care to the Medicare program and whether the addition of technology, a medication-dispensing machine, would further reduce cost. Design Randomized, controlled, three-arm longitudinal study. Setting Participant homes in a large Midwestern urban area. Participants Older adults identified as having difficulty managing their medications at discharge from Medicare Home Health Care (N = 414). Intervention A team consisting of advanced practice nurses (APNs) and registered nurses (RNs) coordinated care for two groups: home-based nurse care coordination (NCC) plus a pill organizer group and NCC plus a medication-dispensing machine group. Measurements To measure cost, participant claims data from 2005 to 2011 were retrieved from Medicare Part A and B Standard Analytical Files. Results Ordinary least squares regression with covariate adjustment was used to estimate monthly dollar savings. Total Medicare costs were $447 per month lower in the NCC plus pill organizer group (P = .11) than in a control group that received usual care. For participants in the study at least 3 months, total Medicare costs were $491 lower per month in the NCC plus pill organizer group (P = .06) than in the control group. The cost of the NCC plus pill organizer intervention was $151 per month, yielding a net savings of $296 per month or $3,552 per year. The cost of the NCC plus medication-dispensing machine intervention was $251 per month, and total Medicare costs were $409 higher per month than in the NCC plus pill organizer group. Conclusion Nurse care coordination plus a pill organizer is a cost-effective intervention for frail elderly Medicare beneficiaries. The addition of the medication machine did not enhance the cost effectiveness of the intervention. PMID:25482242

  10. Predictors of caregiver burden across the home-based palliative care trajectory in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Guerriere, Denise; Husain, Amna; Zagorski, Brandon; Marshall, Denise; Seow, Hsien; Brazil, Kevin; Kennedy, Julia; Burns, Sheri; Brooks, Heather; Coyte, Peter C

    2016-07-01

    Family caregivers of patients enrolled in home-based palliative care programmes provide unpaid care and assistance with daily activities to terminally ill family members. Caregivers often experience caregiver burden, which is an important predictor of anxiety and depression that can extend into bereavement. We conducted a longitudinal, prospective cohort study to comprehensively assess modifiable and non-modifiable patient and caregiver factors that account for caregiver burden over the palliative care trajectory. Caregivers (n = 327) of patients with malignant neoplasm were recruited from two dedicated home-based palliative care programmes in Southern Ontario, Canada from 1 July 2010 to 31 August 2012. Data were obtained from bi-weekly telephone interviews with caregivers from study admission until death, and from palliative care programme and home-care agency databases. Information collected comprised patient and caregiver demographics, utilisation of privately and publicly financed resources, patient clinical status and caregiver burden. The average age of the caregivers was 59.0 years (SD: 13.2), and almost 70% were female. Caregiver burden increased over time in a non-linear fashion from study admission to patient death. Increased monthly unpaid care-giving time costs, monthly public personal support worker costs, emergency department visits and low patient functional status were associated with higher caregiver burden. Greater use of hospice care was associated with lower burden. Female caregivers tended to report more burden compared to men as death approached, and burden was higher when patients were male. Low patient functional status was the strongest predictor of burden. Understanding the influence of modifiable and non-modifiable factors on the experience of burden over the palliative trajectory is essential for the development and targeting of programmes and policies to support family caregivers and reduce burden. Supporting caregivers can have

  11. Bayesian Spatial NBDA for Diffusion Data with Home-Base Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Glenna F.; Laland, Kevin N.; Hoppitt, William; Nightingale, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA) is a statistical method that allows the researcher to identify and quantify a social influence on the spread of behaviour through a population. Hitherto, NBDA analyses have not directly modelled spatial population structure. Here we present a spatial extension of NBDA, applicable to diffusion data where the spatial locations of individuals in the population, or of their home bases or nest sites, are available. The method is based on the estimation of inter-individual associations (for association matrix construction) from the mean inter-point distances as represented on a spatial point pattern of individuals, nests or home bases. We illustrate the method using a simulated dataset, and show how environmental covariates (such as that obtained from a satellite image, or from direct observations in the study area) can also be included in the analysis. The analysis is conducted in a Bayesian framework, which has the advantage that prior knowledge of the rate at which the individuals acquire a given task can be incorporated into the analysis. This method is especially valuable for studies for which detailed spatially structured data, but no other association data, is available. Technological advances are making the collection of such data in the wild more feasible: for example, bio-logging facilitates the collection of a wide range of variables from animal populations in the wild. We provide an R package, spatialnbda, which is hosted on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). This package facilitates the construction of association matrices with the spatial x and y coordinates as the input arguments, and spatial NBDA analyses. PMID:26135317

  12. Bayesian Spatial NBDA for Diffusion Data with Home-Base Coordinates.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Glenna F; Laland, Kevin N; Hoppitt, William; Nightingale, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based diffusion analysis (NBDA) is a statistical method that allows the researcher to identify and quantify a social influence on the spread of behaviour through a population. Hitherto, NBDA analyses have not directly modelled spatial population structure. Here we present a spatial extension of NBDA, applicable to diffusion data where the spatial locations of individuals in the population, or of their home bases or nest sites, are available. The method is based on the estimation of inter-individual associations (for association matrix construction) from the mean inter-point distances as represented on a spatial point pattern of individuals, nests or home bases. We illustrate the method using a simulated dataset, and show how environmental covariates (such as that obtained from a satellite image, or from direct observations in the study area) can also be included in the analysis. The analysis is conducted in a Bayesian framework, which has the advantage that prior knowledge of the rate at which the individuals acquire a given task can be incorporated into the analysis. This method is especially valuable for studies for which detailed spatially structured data, but no other association data, is available. Technological advances are making the collection of such data in the wild more feasible: for example, bio-logging facilitates the collection of a wide range of variables from animal populations in the wild. We provide an R package, spatialnbda, which is hosted on the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN). This package facilitates the construction of association matrices with the spatial x and y coordinates as the input arguments, and spatial NBDA analyses. PMID:26135317

  13. Home-based rehabilitation interventions for adults living with HIV: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Cobbing, Saul; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Myezwa, Hellen

    2016-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation (HBR) has been shown to improve the lives of people living with a wide range of chronic diseases in resource-rich settings. This may also be a particularly effective strategy in resource-poor settings, where access to institution-based rehabilitation is limited. This review aimed to summarise and discuss the evidence related to the effectiveness of home-based rehabilitation (HBR) interventions designed specifically for adults living with HIV. A scoping review methodology was employed, involving systematic search techniques and appraisal of appropriate evidence. English-language journal articles that assessed the quality of life or functional ability outcomes of HBR interventions for adults living with HIV were considered for this review. Out of an initial 1 135 publications retrieved from the search of databases, six articles met this review's inclusion criteria. While this review highlights the scarcity of empirical evidence related to HBR interventions for adults living with HIV, the findings of these six articles are that HBR is a safe management option that may confer a number of physical and psychological benefits for this population. Future research on HBR interventions should include a wider range of assessment measures, including cost-benefit analyses and specific tools designed to assess the functional ability and participation in activities of daily living of participants involved in these programmes. In particular, more research on HBR is required in resource-poor environments, such as sub-Saharan Africa where HIV is endemic, to assess whether this is a feasible strategy that is both effective and practical in the areas that may need it most. PMID:27002360

  14. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image. PMID:24056750

  15. Transaction Cost Analysis of In-Clinic Versus Telehealth Consultations for Chronic Pain: Preliminary Evidence for Rapid and Affordable Access to Interdisciplinary Collaborative Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, Brian R.; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Methods Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient’s case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Results Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. Conclusions U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. PMID:25616057

  16. MS-QI: A Modulation Spectrum-Based ECG Quality Index for Telehealth Applications.

    PubMed

    Tobon V, Diana P; Falk, Tiago H; Maier, Martin

    2016-08-01

    As telehealth applications emerge, the need for accurate and reliable biosignal quality indices has increased. One typical modality used in remote patient monitoring is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which is inherently susceptible to several different noise sources, including environmental (e.g., powerline interference), experimental (e.g., movement artifacts), and physiological (e.g., muscle and breathing artifacts). Accurate measurement of ECG quality can allow for automated decision support systems to make intelligent decisions about patient conditions. This is particularly true for in-home monitoring applications, where the patient is mobile and the ECG signal can be severely corrupted by movement artifacts. In this paper, we propose an innovative ECG quality index based on the so-called modulation spectral signal representation. The representation quantifies the rate of change of ECG spectral components, which are shown to be different from the rate of change of typical ECG noise sources. The proposed modulation spectral-based quality index, MS-QI, was tested on 1) synthetic ECG signals corrupted by varying levels of noise, 2) single-lead recorded data using the Hexoskin garment during three activity levels (sitting, walking, running), 3) 12-lead recorded data using conventional ECG machines (Computing in Cardiology 2011 dataset), and 4) two-lead ambulatory ECG recorded from arrhythmia patients (MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database). Experimental results showed the proposed index outperforming two conventional benchmark quality measures, particularly in the scenarios involving recorded data in real-world environments. PMID:25203983

  17. Applying Evidence-Based Medicine in Telehealth: An Interactive Pattern Recognition Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Llatas, Carlos; Meneu, Teresa; Traver, Vicente; Benedi, José-Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Born in the early nineteen nineties, evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a paradigm intended to promote the integration of biomedical evidence into the physicians daily practice. This paradigm requires the continuous study of diseases to provide the best scientific knowledge for supporting physicians in their diagnosis and treatments in a close way. Within this paradigm, usually, health experts create and publish clinical guidelines, which provide holistic guidance for the care for a certain disease. The creation of these clinical guidelines requires hard iterative processes in which each iteration supposes scientific progress in the knowledge of the disease. To perform this guidance through telehealth, the use of formal clinical guidelines will allow the building of care processes that can be interpreted and executed directly by computers. In addition, the formalization of clinical guidelines allows for the possibility to build automatic methods, using pattern recognition techniques, to estimate the proper models, as well as the mathematical models for optimizing the iterative cycle for the continuous improvement of the guidelines. However, to ensure the efficiency of the system, it is necessary to build a probabilistic model of the problem. In this paper, an interactive pattern recognition approach to support professionals in evidence-based medicine is formalized. PMID:24185841

  18. Migration of a telehealth program to a e-education health program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Montano, L. F.; Amaro, L.; Aleman, B.

    It's presented the result of the experience of Telehealth in Mexico, inside a National program, in one Public Health Institution, which along nine years of using, has been fulfilled a retrospective and prospective analysis of future application, emphasising on the specification of characteristics of the application sites, with impact measures: Cost/Opportunity , Cost/Benefit , and Cost/Efficiency . Anticipating inversion and reorganization of the net when being convenient, as well as situate the distance medical attention, beyond the institutional technologic platforms. A fanlight of possibilities is already opened to e-education programs that support the preventive medicine, the self-care, and the distance medical education in all medical attention levels, enlarging it covering not only to doctors, paramedical and nurses but also to general population, making it more equable and covering the minorities like rural population, handicaps, and indigene population overall in development ways countries and identifying the impact measurements in the evaluation of the enabling given to; doctors, teachers, students and open population. Also is proposed a Latin American E-Education Net for Health.

  19. Assessing children's speech intelligibility and oral structures, and functions via an Internet-based telehealth system.

    PubMed

    Waite, Monique C; Theodoros, Deborah G; Russell, Trevor G; Cahill, Louise M

    2012-06-01

    We examined the validity and reliability of an Internet-based telehealth system for screening speech intelligibility and oro-motor structure, and function in children with speech disorders. Twenty children aged 4-9 years were assessed by a clinician in the conventional, face-to-face (FTF) manner; simultaneously, they were assessed by a second clinician via the videoconferencing system using a 128-kbit/s Internet connection. Speech intelligibility in conversation was rated and an informal assessment of oro-motor structure and function was conducted. There was a high level of agreement between the online and FTF speech intelligibility ratings, with 70% exact agreement and 100% close agreement (within ± point on a 5-point scale). The weighted kappa statistic revealed very good agreement between raters (kappa = 0.86). Data for online and FTF ratings of oro-motor function revealed overall exact agreement of 73%, close agreement of 96%, moderate or good strength of agreement for six variables (kappa = 0.48-0.74), and poor to fair agreement for six variables (kappa = 0.12-0.36). Intra- and inter-rater reliability measures (ICCs) were similar between the online and FTF assessments. Low levels of agreement for some oro-motor variables highlighted the subjectivity of this assessment. However, the overall results support the validity and reliability of Internet-based screening of speech intelligibility and oro-motor function in children with speech disorders. PMID:22604277

  20. A security framework for nationwide health information exchange based on telehealth strategy.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, B B; Haiqi, Ahmed; Zaidan, A A; Abdulnabi, Mohamed; Kiah, M L Mat; Muzamel, Hussaen

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the situation of health information exchange (HIE) in the context of a nationwide network. It aims to create a security framework that can be implemented to ensure the safe transmission of health information across the boundaries of care providers in Malaysia and other countries. First, a critique of the major elements of nationwide health information networks is presented from the perspective of security, along with such topics as the importance of HIE, issues, and main approaches. Second, a systematic evaluation is conducted on the security solutions that can be utilized in the proposed nationwide network. Finally, a secure framework for health information transmission is proposed within a central cloud-based model, which is compatible with the Malaysian telehealth strategy. The outcome of this analysis indicates that a complete security framework for a global structure of HIE is yet to be defined and implemented. Our proposed framework represents such an endeavor and suggests specific techniques to achieve this goal. PMID:25732083

  1. Telehealth in audiology: the need and potential to reach underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Clark, Jackie L; Koekemoer, Dirk; Hall, James W; Krumm, Mark; Ferrari, Deborah V; McPherson, Bradley; Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Mars, Maurice; Russo, Iêda; Barajas, Jose J

    2010-03-01

    Permanent hearing loss is a leading global health care burden, with 1 in 10 people affected to a mild or greater degree. A shortage of trained healthcare professionals and associated infrastructure and resource limitations mean that hearing health services are unavailable to the majority of the world population. Utilizing information and communication technology in hearing health care, or tele-audiology, combined with automation offer unique opportunities for improved clinical care, widespread access to services, and more cost-effective and sustainable hearing health care. Tele-audiology demonstrates significant potential in areas such as education and training of hearing health care professionals, paraprofessionals, parents, and adults with hearing disorders; screening for auditory disorders; diagnosis of hearing loss; and intervention services. Global connectivity is rapidly growing with increasingly widespread distribution into underserved communities where audiological services may be facilitated through telehealth models. Although many questions related to aspects such as quality control, licensure, jurisdictional responsibility, certification and reimbursement still need to be addressed; no alternative strategy can currently offer the same potential reach for impacting the global burden of hearing loss in the near and foreseeable future. PMID:20151929

  2. [The Telehealth Network of the Americas and its role in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Bill, Guillermo; Crisci, Carlos D; Canet, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    The need to guarantee equitable access to health regardless of geographic, economic, or technological barriers motivated the Member States of the Organization of American States to create the Telehealth Network of the Americas, coordinated by the Inter-American Telecommunication Committee. The Network focuses on the use of new information and communications technology applied to health, based on the values of respect, equity, and solidarity and mandated by the philosophy of primary health. Its members include government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, university forums, hospital federations, and telecommunications companies, and it has already extended its reach to other continents and to different fields in which telemedicine is being used. Among its first achievements, it has implemented an innovative tool to be used in cases of disaster or limited geographic access. This mobile telemedicine station is housed in a portable case that includes a computer, various digital devices (otoscope, ophthalmoscope, microscope, dermatoscope), a high-resolution digital camera, an X-ray film viewer, and a satellite antenna. With this tool, it is possible to provide specialized support for rural physicians and primary health care workers located far from large urban centers. PMID:25211574

  3. Web versus app: compliance of patients in a telehealth diabetes management programme using two different technologies.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Günter; Eckmann, Harald; Hayn, Dieter; Kreiner, Karl; Kastner, Peter; Lovell, Nigel

    2012-12-01

    Patients with diabetes were enrolled into a telemonitoring programme. They were offered the choice of collecting their health data either by using Near Field Communication (NFC) enabled mobile phones equipped with a dedicated application (App), or by means of a web-browser based user interface (Web). At the end of the study, each patient was categorized as belonging to either the App or Web group, based on the proportion of data they had transmitted using each method. Of the 403 patients, there were 291 in the App group and 112 in the Web group. The two groups were similar in their demographics, except for gender distribution where 68% of men preferred using the App method in contrast to 95% for women (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a steady decline of the compliance rate for both groups, at a similar rate during the first year. It also showed a more rapid decline of the compliance rate thereafter for the Web group, which resulted in a significantly higher rate for the App group over the whole observation period (P = 0.03). We conclude that different types of data acquisition technologies may have an important effect on patients' willingness to participate in telehealth programmes in the long-term. PMID:23209270

  4. Home telehealth and hospital readmissions: a retrospective OASIS-C data analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Tanna R; Hawkins, Shelley Y; Perkins, Katherine E; Hamilton, Elissa; Nelson, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Technology holds potential to improve the quality of healthcare delivery. The use of remote patient monitoring, or telehealth (TH), has been widely adopted by many home care agencies to facilitate early identification of disease exacerbation, particularly for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure. TH has been successfully used to improve symptom detection and potentially reduce rehospitalization rates. Quantifying program effectiveness through data analysis is a critical step for program improvement, resource allocation, and future strategic planning. Using the Outcome and Assessment Information Set-C database, a retrospective analysis was conducted examining 22 months of heart failure patient data from one home care agency in southern California. Seventy patients receiving TH were compared to patients who received usual home care nursing services. No major differences in baseline socio-demographics were found between the 2 groups. While receiving home healthcare services, the non-TH patients had a 21% all-cause hospital readmission rate, compared to the home TH patients with a 10% all-cause readmission rate. Statistical differences were found between groups on the variables of fall risk, vision, smoking, shortness of breath, the ability to bathe and take oral meds, along with having been discharged from a skilled nursing facility in the last 2 weeks. These results indicate that aggregate data analysis is useful in providing insight into program effectiveness. This study suggests TH programs have the potential to reduce the burden associated with rehospitalizations in the heart failure population. PMID:25654342

  5. Proximal Variables in Families of Children Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine and Enrolled in a Center- or Home-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinehart, L. H. B.; Dice, J. L.; Dobbins, D. R.; Claussen, A. H.; Bono, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined proximal variables in families of children prenatally exposed to cocaine and enrolled in a large-scale intervention program. Fifty-six high-risk families of children enrolled in the center-based (n = 30) or home-based (n = 26) intervention of the Linda Ray Intervention Program were interviewed. Four proximal variables…

  6. Mobile and home-based vendors' contributions to the retail food environment in rural South Texas Mexican-origin settlements.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Zulema; Dean, Wesley R; Sharkey, Joseph R

    2012-10-01

    A growing concern with high rates of obesity and overweight among immigrant minority populations in the US has focused attention on the availability and accessibility to healthy foods in such communities. Small-scale vending in rural, impoverished and underserved areas, however, is generally overlooked; yet, this type of informal activity and source for food is particularly important in such environs, or "food desserts," where traditional forms of work and mainstream food outlets are limited or even absent. This exploratory study investigates two types of small-scale food vending that take place in rural colonias, or Mexican-origin settlements along the South Texas border with Mexico: mobile and home-based. Using a convenience sample of 23 vendors who live and work in Texas colonias, this study identifies the characteristics associated with mobile and home-based food vendors and their businesses and its contributions to the rural food environment. Findings reveal that mobile and home-based vending provides a variety of food and beverage options to colonia residents, and suggests that home-based vendors contribute a greater assortment of food options, including some healthier food items, than mobile food vendors, which offer and sell a limited range of products. Findings may contribute to the development of innovative policy solutions and interventions aimed at increasing healthy food options or reducing health disparities in immigrant communities. PMID:22531289

  7. Evaluation of the routine use of amoxicillin as part of the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the inclusion of amoxicillin correlates with better recovery rates in the home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition with ready-to-use therapeutic food. This retrospective cohort study compared data from the treatment of two groups of children in Malawi aged 6-59 months w...

  8. Home-Based Child Development Interventions for Preschool Children from Socially Disadvantaged Families. Campbell Systematic Reviews. 2012:1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sarah; Maguire, Lisa K.; Macdonald, Geraldine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the effects of home-based programmes aimed specifically at improving developmental outcomes for preschool children from socially disadvantaged families. The authors searched the following databases between 7 October and 12 October 2010: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2010,…

  9. Home-Based Preventive Parenting Intervention for at-Risk Infants and Their Families: An Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Rodríguez, Gabriela M.; Blake, Clair A.; Rosa-Olivares, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and initial outcome of a home-based adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for at-risk infants with externalizing behavior problems. Seven 12- to 15-month-old infants and their families were recruited at a large pediatric primary care clinic to participate in a home-based parenting intervention to prevent subsequent externalizing behavior problems. Home-based assessments were conducted at baseline, postintervention, and a 4- to 6-month follow-up. Six of the 7 (86%) families completed the intervention, and all completers reported high satisfaction with the intervention. All of the mothers demonstrated significant improvements and statistically reliable changes in their interactions with their infant, and most reported clinically significant and statistically reliable changes in infant behavior problems. The current study provides preliminary support for the use of this brief, home-based parenting intervention in addressing behavior problems as early as possible to improve access to an intervention for at-risk infants and their families. Successes and challenges with the development and implementation of this intervention are discussed along with directions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:25414568

  10. Caregiver-Delivered Home-Based Instruction Using Simultaneous Prompting for Teaching Home Skills to Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batu, Sema

    2008-01-01

    It is very important for individuals with all kinds of developmental disabilities to learn skills in order to be independent at home. The purposes of the study were twofold; (1) to examine the effectiveness of caregiver-delivered home-based instruction using simultaneous prompting to children with moderate developmental disabilities on teaching…

  11. The Impact of Perceived Stress, Social Support, and Home-Based Physical Activity on Mental Health among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwag, Kyung Hwa; Martin, Peter; Russell, Daniel; Franke, Warren; Kohut, Marian

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived stress, social support, and home-based physical activity affected older adults' fatigue, loneliness, and depression. We also explored whether social support and physical activity mediated the relationships between stress and mental health problems. The data of 163 older participants were analyzed in this…

  12. ¡Miranos! (Look at Us! We Are Healthy!): Home-Based and Parent Peer-Led Childhood Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Erica T; Parra-Medina, Deborah; He, Meizi; Trummer, Virginia; Yin, Zenong

    2016-09-01

    Parent interventions for childhood obesity prevention have traditionally experienced low participation rates or used passive methods such as newsletters. In contrast, the ¡Miranos! intervention home-based activities included parent-led face-to-face meetings delivered after school, take-home bags with educational materials, and scavenger hunt games to deliver health information to Head Start families regarding nutrition, physical activity, and healthy growth promotion for their preschooler. This study employed a quasi-experimental design with three intervention centers (two that received only center-based activities and one that received center- and home-based activities) and one comparison center. Data were collected on participating Head Start children and their parents/guardians and included parent attendance, parent health message recall through intercept interviews, parent knowledge through pre- and posttests, and family supportive behaviors and child health behaviors through a parent questionnaire. Parents/guardians that received both center- and home-based activities significantly increased knowledge scores (t = 2.50, degrees of freedom = 123, p < .05) and family supportive behaviors from baseline to follow-up (t = 2.12, degrees of freedom = 122, p < .05). This study demonstrates the effects home-based interventions can have when coupled with center-based activities and implemented in the center at the end of the school day. PMID:26895848

  13. Do home-based exercise interventions improve outcomes for frail older people? Findings from a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sally E; Young, John B; Forster, Anne; Iliffe, Steve J

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and long-term care admission. Objectives To evaluate whether home-based exercise interventions improve outcomes for frail older people. Data sources We searched systematically for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs, with literature searching to February 2010. Study selection All trials that evaluated home-based exercise interventions for frail older people were eligible. Primary outcomes were mobility, quality of life and daily living activities. Secondary outcomes included long-term care admission and hospitalisation. Results Six RCTs involving 987 participants met the inclusion criteria. Four trials were considered of high quality. One high quality trial reported improved disability in those with moderate but not severe frailty. Meta-analysis of long-term care admission rates identified a trend towards reduced risk. Inconsistent effects on other primary and secondary outcomes were reported in the other studies. Conclusions There is preliminary evidence that home-based exercise interventions may improve disability in older people with moderate, but not severe, frailty. There is considerable uncertainty regarding effects on important outcomes including quality of life and long-term care admission. Home-based exercises are a potentially simple, safe and widely applicable intervention to prevent dependency decline for frail older people.

  14. Addition of home-based cognitive retraining to treatment as usual in first episode schizophrenia patients: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shantala; Rao, Shobini L.; Raguram, Ahalya; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We examined the effectiveness of a 2-month-long home-based cognitive retraining program together with treatment as usual (TAU; psychoeducation and drug therapy) on neuropsychological functions, psychopathology, and global functioning in patients with first episode schizophrenia (FES) as well as on psychological health and perception of level of family distress in their caregivers. Materials and Methods: Forty-five FES patients were randomly assigned to either treatment group receiving home-based cognitive retraining along with TAU (n=22) or to control group receiving TAU alone (n=23). Patients and caregivers received psychoeducation. Patients and one of their caregivers were assessed for the above parameters at baseline, post-assessment (2 months) and at 6-months follow-up assessment. Results: Of the 45 patients recruited, 12 in the treatment group and 11 in the control group completed post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Addition of home-based cognitive retraining along with TAU led to significant improvement in neuropsychological functions of divided attention, concept formation and set-shifting ability, and planning. Effect sizes were large, although the sample size was small. Conclusions: Home-based cognitive retraining program has shown promise. However, further studies examining this program on a larger cohort with rigorous design involving independent raters are suggested. PMID:22556432

  15. Predictors of Home-Based Child Care Providers' Participation in Professional Development Workshops and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura B.; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith; Arthun, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about factors that influence home-based child care providers' participation in professional development. Factors that predict participation in activities that are designed to promote the utilization and maintenance of skills taught are of particular interest. Objective: Our aim was to examine factors in the…

  16. A Case for Increasing Empirical Attention to Head Start's Home-Based Program: An Exploration of Routine Collaborative Goal Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Patricia H.; Lehtinen, Jaana; Bracaliello, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting among home visitors and family members is a mandate for Head Start's home-based program. Yet, a dearth of research is available for advancing evidence-based practices for setting and monitoring home visiting goals or for understanding how family characteristics or program features are associated with them. With the…

  17. A Correlational Study of Telework Frequency, Information Communication Technology, and Job Satisfaction of Home-Based Teleworkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster-Trotman, Shana P.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, 33.7 million Americans teleworked from home. The Telework Enhancement Act (S. 707) and the Telework Improvements Act (H.R. 1722) of 2009 were designed to increase the number of teleworkers. The research problem addressed was the lack of understanding of factors that influence home-based teleworkers' job satisfaction. Job dissatisfaction…

  18. Characteristics of Families at Risk of Problems in Parenting: Findings from a Home-Based Secondary Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowal, Loretta W.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study of the effects of the Good Start program, which provides home-based intervention to families at risk of child maltreatment. Finds that families appear to improve over the course of treatment. Notes signs that indicate which families are most likely to improve. (SAK)

  19. A Mobile Cloud-Based Parkinson’s Disease Assessment System for Home-Based Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder of the central nervous system, and affects more than 6.3 million people in the world. The characteristic motor features include tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and impaired postural stability. Current therapy based on augmentation or replacement of dopamine is designed to improve patients’ motor performance but often leads to levodopa-induced adverse effects, such as dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Clinicians must regularly monitor patients in order to identify these effects and other declines in motor function as soon as possible. Current clinical assessment for Parkinson’s is subjective and mostly conducted by brief observations made during patient visits. Changes in patients’ motor function between visits are hard to track and clinicians are not able to make the most informed decisions about the course of therapy without frequent visits. Frequent clinic visits increase the physical and economic burden on patients and their families. Objective In this project, we sought to design, develop, and evaluate a prototype mobile cloud-based mHealth app, “PD Dr”, which collects quantitative and objective information about PD and would enable home-based assessment and monitoring of major PD symptoms. Methods We designed and developed a mobile app on the Android platform to collect PD-related motion data using the smartphone 3D accelerometer and to send the data to a cloud service for storage, data processing, and PD symptoms severity estimation. To evaluate this system, data from the system were collected from 40 patients with PD and compared with experts’ rating on standardized rating scales. Results The evaluation showed that PD Dr could effectively capture important motion features that differentiate PD severity and identify critical symptoms. For hand resting tremor detection, the sensitivity was .77 and accuracy was .82. For gait difficulty detection, the sensitivity was .89

  20. A Prospective Cluster-Randomized Trial of Telehealth Coaching to Promote Bone Health and Nutrition in Deployed Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    Findings from previous studies suggest that inadequate consumption of calcium and vitamin D and a decrease in exercise while deployed can be detrimental to bone health. This study enrolled 234 soldiers randomized to receive one-time nutrition and exercise education pre-deployment (n = 149), or telehealth coaching (n = 85), throughout the deployment cycle. Results suggest that online educational efforts may enhance sports activity, bone turnover, and vitamin D status. Improving vitamin D status and remaining active while deployed appears to sustain healthy bone density in young soldiers. Early and aggressive educational outreach to young adults may prevent chronic musculoskeletal conditions and disabling osteoporosis later in life.

  1. Developing Dementia Prevention Trials: Baseline Report of the Home-Based Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Mary; Egelko, Susan; Donohue, Michael; Ferris, Steven; Kaye, Jeffrey; Hayes, Tamara L.; Mundt, James C.; Sun, C.K.; Paparello, Silvia; Aisen, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the baseline experience of the multi-center, Home Based Assessment (HBA) study, designed to develop methods for dementia prevention trials using novel technologies for test administration and data collection. Non-demented individuals ≥ 75 years old were recruited and evaluated in-person using established clinical trial outcomes of cognition and function, and randomized to one of 3 assessment methodologies: 1) mail-in questionnaire/live telephone interviews (MIP); 2) automated telephone with interactive voice recognition (IVR); and 3) internet-based computer Kiosk (KIO). Brief versions of cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes, were adapted to each methodology and administered at baseline and repeatedly over a 4-year period. “Efficiency” measures assessed the time from screening to baseline, and staff time required for each methodology. 713 individuals signed consent and were screened; 640 met eligibility and were randomized to one of 3 assessment arms and 581 completed baseline. Drop out, time from screening to baseline and total staff time were highest among those assigned to KIO. However efficiency measures were driven by non-recurring start-up activities suggesting that differences may be mitigated over a long trial. Performance among HBA instruments collected via different technologies will be compared to established outcomes over this 4 year study. PMID:23151596

  2. Rehabilitation outcome in home-based versus supervised exercise programs for chronically dizzy patients.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chern, Chang-Ming; Hsu, Li-Chi; Chen, Chih-Chun; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercise between supervised and home-based programs in young and senior age groups of patients with chronic dizziness. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Dynamic gait index (DGI), Tinetti fall risk performance scales and Timed "Up and Go" test (TUG) were administered to patients on their initial and follow-up visits for forty-one patients suffering from chronic dizziness. Twenty-eight patients received three 30-min vestibular training exercise sessions per week. Thirteen patients who could not visit our clinic on regular basis were instructed to do the same set of exercises at home, with the same duration and frequency. All scales were evaluated again on their follow-up visits 2 months later. Patients in both groups showed statistically significant improvement in DHI and Tinetti scales. A higher percentage of patients in the supervised-exercise-program (SP) group showed clinically significant outcome improvements. Age was not a predictive factor for rehabilitation outcome. We concluded that for all ages of chronically dizzy patients, 2 months of VR can reduce handicap, improve balance function and a consequent improvement of life quality. Health care professionals need to be educated about the importance of rehabilitation program for treatment of chronic dizziness. PMID:20022390

  3. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment From Smart Home-Based Behavior Data.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behavior in the home and predicting clinical scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a clinical assessment using activity behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident's daily behavior and predict the corresponding clinical scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident's daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years. We obtain a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive scores and a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. These prediction results suggest that it is feasible to predict clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis. PMID:26292348

  4. Home-based alcohol prevention program for parents and children: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mares, S H W; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A; Verdurmen, J; Schulten, I; Engels, R C M E

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based alcohol prevention program to delay initiation of alcohol use in children. Methods In 2011, a total of 1349 sixth-grade children (M=12.15, SD=0.47) and their mothers who could read and write Dutch were recruited from primary schools in the northern part of the Netherlands. They participated in a cluster randomized controlled trial with two conditions; (1) intervention group (5 modules which families received by mail every 4weeks over 5months), (2) control group (a factsheet information brochure). An independent statistician allocated the schools to the conditions (allocation ratio (1:1)). Participants and data-analyst were blind to randomization. The primary outcome was alcohol initiation. Results Of the participants, 680 were randomized to the intervention and 669 to the control condition. In the intervention condition (N=540) 5.4% of the children drank alcohol compared to 7.1% in the control condition (N=601). The difference was not significant (OR=.99, 95% CI=.96-1.02, p=52). Conclusion The present study showed no effects of 'In control: No alcohol!' on alcohol initiation. A critical evaluation of program design and content, and future studies in different target groups, are suggested. The trial is registered at trialregister.nl, number NTR2474. PMID:27143498

  5. Effectiveness of Home-Based Pencil Push-ups (HBPP) for Patients with Symptomatic Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Min

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report the effectiveness of home-based pencil push-ups (HBPP) therapy for patients with symptomatic convergence insufficiency. Methods Data was collected prospectively on 16 patients who were diagnosed with convergence insufficiency beginning in January 2009. The study group was composed of ten male and six female patients. The duration of symptoms, refractive error, distant and near deviation angles, and near point of convergence (NPC) prior to and after 12 weeks of HBPP therapy were measured in all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 19.3 years. The mean deviation angle of exophoria was 3 prism diopters (PD) at distant and 11.2 PD at near. The mean value of NPC prior to HBPP therapy was 36.3 cm; however, the near point of accommodation was within the normal range. After 12 weeks of HBPP therapy, the mean deviation angle of exophoria decreased to orthophoric at distant and 4 PD at near. The mean value of NPC decreased to 14.4 cm. Conclusions Twelve weeks of HBPP therapy appears to be an easy, cost-free and effective therapy for patients with symptomatic convergence insufficiency. PMID:21655044

  6. A Feasibility Study of Home-Based Contingency Management with Adolescent Smokers of Rural Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Brady; Harris, Millie; Slone, Stacey A.; Shelton, Brent J.; Dallery, Jesse; Stoops, William; Lewis, Russell

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking among adolescents remains a significant public health concern. This problem is compounded in regions such as rural Appalachia where rates of smoking are consistently higher than national averages and access to treatments is limited. The current research evaluated a home-based contingency management program completed over the Internet with adolescent smokers recruited from rural Appalachia. Participants (N = 62) submitted three video recordings per day showing their breath carbon monoxide (CO) levels using a handheld CO monitor. Participants were assigned to either an active treatment condition (AT: n = 31) in which reductions in breath CO were reinforced or a control treatment condition (CT: n = 31) in which providing timely video recordings were reinforced with no requirement to reduce breath CO. Results revealed that participants in the AT condition reduced their breath CO levels significantly more so during treatment than participants in the CT condition. Within-group comparisons revealed that participants in both conditions significantly reduced their breath CO, self-reported smoking, and nicotine dependence ratings during treatment. However, only participants in the AT condition significantly reduced urinary cotinine levels during treatment, and only participants in this condition maintained all reductions until six-week post treatment. Participants in the CT condition only maintained self-reported smoking reductions until post-treatment assessments. These results support the feasibility and initial efficacy of this incentive-based approach to smoking cessation with adolescent smokers living in rural locations. PMID:26280592

  7. The role of integrated home-based care in patient adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neil; Silva, Angela Caulyt Santos da; Passos, Luciana Neves

    2005-01-01

    Non-adherence is one of the primary obstacles to successful antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ patients worldwide. In Brazil, the Domiciliary Therapeutic Assistance is a multidisciplinary and integrated home-based assistance program provided for HIV+ patients confined in their homes due to physical deficiency. This study investigated ADT's ability to monitor and promote appropriate adherence to ARV therapy. Fifty-six individuals were recruited from three study groups: Group 1 -- patients currently in the ADT program, Group 2 -- 21 patients previously treated by the ADT program, and Group 3 -- 20 patients who have always been treated using conventional ambulatory care. Using multivariable self-reporting to evaluate adherence, patients in the ADT program had significantly better adherence than patients in ambulatory care (F = 6.66, p = 0.003). This effect was independent of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as medical history. Patients in the ADT program also showed a trend towards greater therapeutic success than ambulatory patients. These results suggest the incorporation of characteristics of ADT in conventional ambulatory care as a strategy to increase adherence to ARV therapy. PMID:15895176

  8. Treating chronic food refusal in young children: home-based parent training.

    PubMed Central

    Werle, M A; Murphy, T B; Budd, K S

    1993-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of behavioral parent training program on parent and child feeding-related behaviors in the home. We trained mothers to initiate regular offerings of previously rejected (target) foods and to provide contingent attention (i.e., specific prompts, positive reinforcement) to increase their child's acceptance of nonpreferred foods. For 1 subject, we also directed training at increasing self-eating. Results of a nonconcurrent multiple baseline design across 3 mother-child dyads demonstrated that, with training, all mothers increased offerings of target foods and use of specific prompts, and 2 mothers increased levels of positive attention. In turn, children increased their acceptance of target foods and self-eating, thus demonstrating the functional effects of parent training on in-home meal times. Temporary increases in food refusals occurred when treatment was initiated but declined as treatment continued. We discuss the results in terms of the potential benefits and limitations of a home-based treatment model. PMID:8307827

  9. ECG telemonitoring during home-based cardiac rehabilitation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Jasionowska, Anna; Banaszak-Bednarczyk, Maria; Gwilkowska, Joanna; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2012-06-01

    We assessed ECGs recorded during home-based telemonitored cardiac rehabilitation (HTCR) in stable patients with heart-failure. The study included 75 patients with heart failure (NYHA II, III), with a mean age of 56 years. They participated in an eight-week programme of home cardiac rehabilitation which was telemonitored with a device which recorded 16-s fragments of their ECG. These fragments were transmitted via mobile phone to a monitoring centre. The times of the automatic ECG recordings were pre-set and coordinated with the cardiac rehabilitation. Patients were able to make additional recordings when they felt unwell using a tele-event-Holter ECG facility. During the study, 5757 HTCR sessions were recorded and 11,534 transmitted ECG fragments were evaluated. Most ECGs originated from the automatic recordings. Singular supraventricular and ventricular premature beats and ventricular couplets were detected in 16%, 69% and 16% of patients, respectively. Twenty ECGs were recorded when patients felt unwell: non sustained ventricular tachycardia occurred in three patients and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation episode in two patients. Heart failure patients undergoing HTCR did not develop any arrhythmia which required a change of the procedure, confirming it was safe. Cardiac rehabilitation at home was improved by utilizing the tele-event-Holter ECG facility. PMID:22604276

  10. Economic Value of Dispensing Home-Based Preoperative Chlorhexidine Bathing Cloths to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Rachel R.; Stuckey, Dianna R.; Norman, Bryan A.; Duggan, Andrew P.; Bacon, Kristina M.; Connor, Diana L.; Lee, Ingi; Muder, Robert R.; Lee, Bruce Y.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the economic value of dispensing preoperative home-based chlorhexidine bathing cloth kits to orthopedic patients to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). METHODS A stochastic decision-analytic computer simulation model was developed from the hospital’s perspective depicting the decision of whether to dispense the kits preoperatively to orthopedic patients. We varied patient age, cloth cost, SSI-attributable excess length of stay, cost per bed-day, patient compliance with the regimen, and cloth antimicrobial efficacy to determine which variables were the most significant drivers of the model’s outcomes. RESULTS When all other variables remained at baseline and cloth efficacy was at least 50%, patient compliance only had to be half of baseline (baseline mean, 15.3%; range, 8.23%–20.0%) for chlorhexidine cloths to remain the dominant strategy (ie, less costly and providing better health outcomes). When cloth efficacy fell to 10%, 1.5 times the baseline bathing compliance also afforded dominance of the preoperative bath. CONCLUSIONS The results of our study favor the routine distribution of bathing kits. Even with low patient compliance and cloth efficacy values, distribution of bathing kits is an economically beneficial strategy for the prevention of SSI. PMID:21515977

  11. Can Home-Based HIV Rapid Testing Reduce HIV Disparities Among African Americans in Miami?

    PubMed

    Kenya, Sonjia; Okoro, Ikenna S; Wallace, Kiera; Ricciardi, Michael; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Prado, Guillermo

    2016-09-01

    Sixty percent of African Americans have had an HIV test, yet this population disproportionately contributes to AIDS mortality, suggesting that testing is not occurring early enough to achieve optimal outcomes. OraQuick, the first Food and Drug Administration-approved home-based HIV rapid test (HBHRT) could potentially increase testing rates. We assessed whether community health workers (CHWs) paired with HBRHT could improve HIV screening and health care access among African Americans in Miami, Florida. In October-November 2013, 60 African Americans were enrolled and randomized to the experimental condition, which received CHW assistance to complete HBHRT, or the control condition, which were instructed to complete HBHRT independently. Intervention participants were significantly (p ≤ .05) more likely than control participants to complete HBHRT and, if positive, get linked to HIV care (100% vs. 83%) χ(2) (1, N = 60) = 5.46, p ≤ .02. We concluded that CHW-assisted HBHRT may be a promising strategy to improve HIV testing and care among African Americans. PMID:27091604

  12. A feasibility study of home-based contingency management with adolescent smokers of rural Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Brady; Harris, Millie; Slone, Stacey A; Shelton, Brent J; Dallery, Jesse; Stoops, William; Lewis, Russell

    2015-12-01

    Cigarette smoking among adolescents remains a significant public health concern. This problem is compounded in regions such as rural Appalachia where rates of smoking are consistently higher than national averages and access to treatments is limited. The current research evaluated a home-based contingency management program completed over the Internet with adolescent smokers recruited from rural Appalachia. Participants (N = 62) submitted 3 video recordings per day showing their breath carbon monoxide (CO) levels using a handheld CO monitor. Participants were assigned to either an active treatment condition (AT; n = 31) in which reductions in breath CO were reinforced or a control treatment condition (CT; n = 31) in which providing timely video recordings were reinforced with no requirement to reduce breath CO. Results revealed that participants in the AT condition reduced their breath CO levels significantly more so during treatment than participants in the CT condition. Within-group comparisons revealed that participants in both conditions significantly reduced their breath CO, self-reported smoking, and nicotine dependence ratings during treatment. However, only participants in the AT condition significantly reduced urinary cotinine levels during treatment, and only participants in this condition maintained all reductions until 6-week post treatment. Participants in the CT condition only maintained self-reported smoking reductions until posttreatment assessments. These results support the feasibility and initial efficacy of this incentive-based approach to smoking cessation with adolescent smokers living in rural locations. PMID:26280592

  13. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bree; Krein, Sarah L; Bentley, Douglas R; Hughes, Maria E; Giardino, Nicholas D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1) online mediated social support, (2) objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3) structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions. PMID:24805901

  14. Childhood burns in Ghana: epidemiological characteristics and home-based treatment.

    PubMed

    Forjuoh, S N; Guyer, B; Smith, G S

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to study the epidemiological characteristics and home-based treatment of childhood burns in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Children aged 0-5 years with a burn history were identified through a community-based, multisite survey. A standard questionnaire was administered to mothers of 630 of these children to elicit information on their sociodemographic characteristics and the circumstances of the burn event. Ninety-two per cent of the burns occurred in the home, particularly in the kitchen (51 per cent) and the house yard (36 per cent), with most of them happening in the late morning and around the evening meal. The main causes of the burns were scalds (45 per cent), contact with a hot object (34 per cent) and flame (20 per cent). 'Cool' water was applied to the burned area in 30 per cent of cases. Otherwise, treatment with a traditional preparation was the most popular first-aid choice. Since a considerable proportion of burns happened between meals when children 'play with fire' in the house yard, the provision of alternative play activities and community play areas may reduce the incidence of burns to these children. Secondly, we recommend that education on first-aid management of burns be intensified, with special emphasis on alternatives to the use of traditional preparations. PMID:7718113

  15. Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes: Home-Based, Unobtrusive, and Continuous Assessment of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Shoshana A.; Mattek, Nora; Hayes, Tamara L.; Dodge, Hiroko; Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B.; Wild, Katherine; Boise, Linda; Zitzelberger, Tracy A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To describe a longitudinal community cohort study, Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Changes, that has deployed an unobtrusive home-based assessment platform in many seniors homes in the existing community. Methods. Several types of sensors have been installed in the homes of 265 elderly persons for an average of 33 months. Metrics assessed by the sensors include total daily activity, time out of home, and walking speed. Participants were given a computer as well as training, and computer usage was monitored. Participants are assessed annually with health and function questionnaires, physical examinations, and neuropsychological testing. Results. Mean age was 83.3 years, mean years of education was 15.5, and 73% of cohort were women. During a 4-week snapshot, participants left their home twice a day on average for a total of 208 min per day. Mean in-home walking speed was 61.0 cm/s. Participants spent 43% of days on the computer averaging 76 min per day. Discussion. These results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of engaging seniors in a large-scale deployment of in-home activity assessment technology and the successful collection of these activity metrics. We plan to use this platform to determine if continuous unobtrusive monitoring may detect incident cognitive decline. PMID:21743050

  16. Effect of an IT-supported home-based exercise programme on metabolic syndrome in India.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Jeyasundar; Swaminathan, Narasimman; Pereira, Natasha; Henderson, Keiran; Brodie, David

    2014-05-14

    Summary We studied the effectiveness of a home-based exercise programme with information technology (IT) support in people with metabolic syndrome in India. Ninety-four participants with metabolic syndrome (mean age 50 years) were randomized into two groups. Both groups received a 12-week home exercise programme and Group 2 received additional IT support for health education. Before and after the exercise programme, participants were measured for arterial stiffness using applanation tonometry, exercise capacity using an incremental shuttle walk test and quality of life (QoL) using the SF-36 questionnaire. Sixty-one participants completed the post intervention tests. There was a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure, mean pressure and aortic systolic pressure in both groups. Pulse wave velocity, aortic pulse pressure and aortic diastolic pressure showed significant reductions only in Group 2. There were no significant changes in QoL measures, except vitality in Group 2. There was significant improvement in fasting blood glucose in Group 2, cholesterol in Group 1 and triglycerides in both groups. The participants' exercise capacity did not change significantly, although the mean duration of regular exercise was 7.2 weeks for Group 1 and 10.0 weeks for Group 2 (P = 0.019). Metabolic syndrome was reversed in 16% of the participants in both groups. IT support, through mobile text messages and phone calls, may be helpful in metabolic syndrome. Longer-term studies are now required. PMID:24829259

  17. Increasing live donor kidney transplantation: a randomized controlled trial of a home-based educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Rodrigue, J R; Cornell, D L; Lin, J K; Kaplan, B; Howard, R J

    2007-02-01

    With the shortage of deceased donor kidneys and the superior clinical outcomes possible with live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT), more patients should seriously consider LDKT. However, little is known about how best to educate patients and their family members about LDKT. We evaluated the effectiveness of a home-based (HB) educational program in increasing LDKT. Patients were randomized to clinic-based (CB) education alone (CB, n = 69) or CB plus HB education (CB+HB, n = 63). Compared to CB, more patients in the CB+HB group had living donor inquiries (63.8% vs. 82.5%, p = 0.019) and evaluations (34.8% vs. 60.3%, p = 0.005) and LDKTs (30.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 0.013). Assignment to the CB+HB group, White race, more LDKT knowledge, higher willingness to discuss LDKT with others, and fewer LDKT concerns were predictors of having LDKT (p-values < 0.05). Both groups demonstrated an increase in LDKT knowledge after the CB education, but CB+HB led to an additional increase in LDKT knowledge (p < 0.0001) and in willingness to discuss LDKT with others (p < 0.0001), and a decrease in LDKT concerns (p < 0.0001). Results indicate that an HB outreach program is more effective in increasing LDKT rates than CB education alone. PMID:17173659

  18. Evaluation of bluetooth low power for physiological monitoring in a home based cardiac rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Timothy; Ding, Hang; D'Souza, Matthew; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in Australia, and places large burdens on the healthcare system. To assist patients with CVDs in recovering from cardiac events and mediating cardiac risk factors, a home based cardiac rehabilitation program, known as the Care Assessment Platform (CAP), was developed. In the CAP program, patients are required to manually enter health information into their mobile phones on a daily basis. The manual operation is often subject to human errors and is inconvenient for some elderly patients. To improve this, an automated wireless solution has been desired. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the feasibility of implementing the newly released Bluetooth 4.0 (BT4.0) for the CAP program, and practically evaluate BT4.0 communications between a developed mobile application and some emulated healthcare devices. The study demonstrated that BT4.0 addresses usability, interoperability and security for healthcare applications, reduces the power consumption in wireless communication, and improves the flexibility of interface for software development. This evaluation study provides an essential mobile BT4.0 framework to incorporate a large range of healthcare devices for clinical assessment and intervention in the CAP program, and hence it is useful for similar development and research work of other mobile healthcare solutions. PMID:22797030

  19. Delayed effectiveness of home-based interventions in reducing childhood diarrhea, Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Luby, Stephen P; Agboatwalla, Mubina; Hoekstra, Robert M; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Billhimer, Ward; Keswick, Bruce H

    2004-10-01

    We introduced home drinking water disinfection and handwashing with soap in Karachi squatter settlements to evaluate their effect on diarrhea. In April 2000, 150 households received soap, 76 received dilute bleach and a water storage vessel, and 76 were enrolled as controls. In 2000, among households wealthy enough to own a refrigerator, children in households that received bleach and a vessel had a 73% lower incidence of diarrhea than controls; those that received soap had a 56% lower incidence. There was no reduction in diarrhea in intervention households without a refrigerator. In 2001, households that received bleach and a vessel had a 71% lower incidence of diarrhea and children in households that received soap had a 35% lower incidence than controls. In 2001, the interventions were equally effective in households that had a refrigerator and those that did not. Both of these home-based interventions were ultimately effective in preventing diarrhea, but only households of slightly higher socioeconomic status changed their behavior quickly enough to benefit during the first summer. PMID:15516637

  20. Rational Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachin, Christian

    Security research continues to provide a plethora of new protocols and mechanisms; these solutions patch either existing vulnerabilities found in practical systems or solve hypothetical security problems in the sense that the problem is often conceived at the same time when the first solution is proposed. Yet only a very small fraction of this research is relevant to ordinary users in the sense that they are willing to actually deploy the technology.

  1. A large-scale operational study of home-based therapy with ready-to-use therapeutic food in childhood malnutriton in Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Home-based therapy with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) for the treatment of malnutrition has better outcomes in the research setting than standard therapy. This study examined outcomes of malnourished children aged 6-60 months enrolled in operational home-based therapy with RUTF. Children enro...

  2. Linking Home-Based Child Care and State-Funded Preschool: The Community Connections Preschool Program (Illinois Action for Children). Evaluation Phase 1-Implementation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forry, Nicole; Anderson, Rachel; Zaslow, Martha; Chrisler, Alison; Banghart, Patti; Kreader, J. Lee

    2011-01-01

    The Community Connections preschool program (herein referred to as Community Connections) was developed to help prepare children in home-based child care for success in school and in life. It has three goals: (1) to make state prekindergarten classroom experiences available to children in home-based care, (2) to extend classroom learning…

  3. Effects of Home-Based Constraint-Induced Therapy versus Dose-Matched Control Intervention on Functional Outcomes and Caregiver Well-Being in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Keh-chung; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Chen, Chia-ling; Chang, Kai-chieh; Lin, Yu-chan; Chen, Yi-ju

    2011-01-01

    This study compared home-based constraint-induced therapy (CIT) with a dose-matched home-based control intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The differences in unilateral and bilateral motor performance, daily functions, and quality of parental well-being (i.e., the stress level of their parents) were evaluated. The study included 21…

  4. Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation for Long-Term Denervated Human Muscle: History, Basics, Results and Perspectives of the Vienna Rehabilitation Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    We will here discuss the following points related to Home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation (h-b FES) as treatment for patients with permanently denervated muscles in their legs: 1. Upper (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN) damage to the lower spinal cord; 2. Muscle atrophy/hypertrophy versus processes of degeneration, regeneration, and recovery; 3. Recovery of twitch- and tetanic-contractility by h-b FES; 4. Clinical effects of h-b FES using the protocol of the “Vienna School”; 5. Limitations and perspectives. Arguments in favor of using the Vienna protocol include: 1. Increased muscle size in both legs; 2. Improved tetanic force production after 3-5 months of percutaneous stimulation using long stimulus pulses (> 100 msec) of high amplitude (> 80 mAmp), tolerated only in patients with no pain sensibility; 3. Histological and electron microscopic evidence that two years of h-b FES return muscle fibers to a state typical of two weeks denervated muscles with respect to atrophy, disrupted myofibrillar structure, and disorganized Excitation-Contraction Coupling (E-CC) structures; 4. The excitability never recovers to that typical of normal or reinnervated muscles where pulses less than 1 msec in duration and 25 mAmp in intensity excite axons and thereby muscle fibres. It is important to motivate these patients for chronic stimulation throughout life, preferably standing up against the load of the body weight rather than sitting. Only younger and low weight patients can expect to be able to stand-up and do some steps more or less independently. Some patients like to maintain the h-b FES training for decades. Limitations of the procedure are obvious, in part related to the use of multiple, large surface electrodes and the amount of time patients are willing to use for such muscle training. PMID:26913127

  5. Sensitivity and Specificity of Self-Reported Olfactory Function in a Home-Based Study of Independent-Living, Healthy Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Shristi; Hoffman, Howard J.; Chapo, Audrey K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 2011–14 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey chemosensory protocol asks adults to self-rate their orthonasal (via nostrils) and retronasal (via mouth) smell abilities for subsequent odor identification testing. From data collected with a similar protocol, we aimed to identify a self-reported olfactory index that showed the best sensitivity (correctly identifying dysfunction) and specificity (correctly indentifying normosmia) with measured olfaction. Methods In home-based testing, 121 independent-living older women (age 73±7 years) reported their olfactory function by interviewer-administered survey. Olfactory function was measured orthonasally via composite (odor threshold, identification task) or identification task alone. Results Only 16 % of women self-rated “below average” smell function. More women perceived loss of smell (38 %) or flavor (30 %) with aging. The rate of measured dysfunction was 30 % by composite (threshold and identification) and 21.5 % by identification task, the latter misclassifying some mild dysfunction as normosmia. An index of self-rated smell function and perceived loss yielded the most favorable sensitivity (65 %) and specificity (77 %) to measured function. Self-rated olfaction showed better agreement with severe measured dysfunction; mild dysfunction was less noticed. Conclusions Self-reported indices that query about current and perceived changes in smell and flavor with aging showed better sensitivity estimates than those previously reported. Specificity was somewhat lower—some older adults may correctly perceive loss unidentified in a single assessment, or have a retronasal impairment that was undetected by an orthonasal measure. Implications Our findings should inform self-rated measures that screen for severe olfactory dysfunction in clinical/community settings where testing is not routine. PMID:25866597

  6. A telehealth program for self-management of COPD exacerbations and promotion of an active lifestyle: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Monique; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul; Hermens, Hermie; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the use of and satisfaction with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) telehealth program applied in both primary and secondary care. The program consisted of four modules: 1) activity coach for ambulant activity monitoring and real-time coaching of daily activity behavior, 2) web-based exercise program for home exercising, 3) self-management of COPD exacerbations via a triage diary on the web portal, including self-treatment of exacerbations, and 4) teleconsultation. Twenty-nine COPD patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (telehealth program for 9 months) or the control group (usual care). Page hits on the web portal showed the use of the program, and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire showed satisfaction with received care. The telehealth program with decision support showed good satisfaction (mean 26.4, maximum score 32). The program was accessed on 86% of the treatment days, especially the diary. Patient adherence with the exercise scheme was low (21%). Health care providers seem to play an important role in patients' adherence to telehealth in usual care. Future research should focus on full-scale implementation in daily care and investigating technological advances, like gaming, to increase adherence. PMID:25246781

  7. Comparison of a Self-Directed and Therapist-Assisted Telehealth Parent-Mediated Intervention for Children with ASD: A Pilot RCT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Wainer, Allison L.; Berger, Natalie I.; Pickard, Katherine E.; Bonter, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    This pilot RCT compared the effect of a self-directed and therapist-assisted telehealth-based parent-mediated intervention for young children with ASD. Families were randomly assigned to a self-directed or therapist-assisted program. Parents in both groups improved their intervention fidelity, self-efficacy, stress, and positive perceptions of…

  8. Home-Based and Facility-Based Directly Observed Therapy of Tuberculosis Treatment under Programmatic Conditions in Urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hella, Jerry; Maroa, Thomas; Kisandu, Shadrack; Chiryamkubi, Magreth; Said, Khadija; Mhalu, Grace; Mkopi, Abdallah; Mutayoba, Beatrice; Reither, Klaus; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decentralization of Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) for tuberculosis (TB) to the community (home-based DOT) has improved the coverage of TB treatment and reduced the burden to the health care facilities (facility-based DOT). We aimed to compare TB treatment outcomes in home-based and facility-based DOT under programmatic conditions in an urban setting with a high TB burden. Methodology A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult TB patients (≥15 years) routinely notified between 2010 and 2013 in two representative TB sub-districts in the Temeke district, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We assessed differences in treatment outcomes by calculating Risk Ratios (RRs). We used logistic regression to assess the association between DOT and treatment outcomes. Results Data of 4,835 adult TB patients were analyzed, with a median age of 35 years, 2,943 (60.9%) were men and TB/HIV co-infection prevalence of 39.9%. A total of 3,593 (74.3%) patients were treated under home-based DOT. Patients on home-based DOT were more likely to die compared to patients on facility-based DOT (RR 2.04, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI]: 1.52–2.73), and more likely to complete TB treatment (RR 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.23), but less likely to have a successful treatment outcome (RR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.92–0.97). Home-based DOT was preferred by women (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 1.55, 95% CI: 1.34–1.80, p<0.001), older people (aOR 1.01 for each year increase, 95% CI: 1.00–1.02, p = 0.001) and patients with extra-pulmonary TB (aOR 1.45, 95% CI: 1.16–1.81, p = 0.001), but less frequently by patients on a retreatment regimen (aOR 0.12, 95% CI: 0.08–0.19, p<0.001). Conclusions/significance TB patients under home-based DOT had more frequently risk factors of death such as older age, HIV infection and sputum smear-negative TB, and had higher mortality compared to patients under facility-based DOT. Further operational research is needed to monitor the implementation of DOT under

  9. The value of telehealth in the early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ghassan A; Crooks, Michael; Morice, Alyn H

    2016-06-01

    We aim to establish the value of telemonitoring in the early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. We followed up patients undergoing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease telemonitoring for 4 months. We studied changes in the telemonitored data in the week prior to admission or to community chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. A total of 183 patients were studied. In all, 30 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related hospital admissions and 68 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease community exacerbations were recorded. Changes in telehealth parameters occurred in 80 per cent (24/30) of admissions and 82 per cent (56/68) of community exacerbations. Although changes in telehealth data occurred in the majority of exacerbations, most individual symptoms was present in less than half the exacerbations and almost 20 per cent of exacerbations were not preceded by any change in telemonitoring data. Cough created significantly more alerts by those treated in the community (p = 0.008), whereas a drop in oxygen saturation created significantly more alerts pre-hospitalisation (p = 0.049). We conclude that further work is required to develop methods of identifying impending chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations with greater sensitivity and specificity. PMID:25564494

  10. Efficacy of home-based kinesthesia, balance & agility exercise training among persons with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Matthew W; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  11. Reducing Children's Susceptibility to Alcohol Use: Effects of a Home-Based Parenting Program.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christine; Ennett, Susan T; Reyes, H Luz McNaughton; Hayes, Kim A; Dickinson, Denise M; Choi, Seulki; Bowling, J Michael

    2016-07-01

    This 4-year efficacy trial tested whether a home-based, self-administered parenting program could have a long-term effect on children's cognitive susceptibility to alcohol use, and it tested hypothesized moderators and mediators of any such program effect. Using a two-group randomized controlled design, 1076 children (540 treatment; 536 control; mean age of 9.2 years at baseline) completed telephone interviews prior to randomization and follow-up interviews 12, 24, 36, and 48 months post-baseline. Mothers of children randomized to treatment received a 5-month-long parenting program during year 1, followed by two 1-month-long boosters in years 2 and 3. Exposure to the program was significantly inversely associated with susceptibility to alcohol use 48 months post-baseline (b = -0.03, p = .04), with no variation in program effects by parental alcohol use or mother's race/ethnicity or education, suggesting broad public health relevance of the parenting program. Path analyses of simple indirect effects through each hypothesized mediator showed that program exposure positively influenced parental communication to counter pro-drinking influences in the family and media domains and parental rule setting 36 months post-baseline; these variables, in turn, predicted reduced susceptibility to alcohol use 48 months post-baseline. Parallel (multiple) mediation analysis showed that the program had a significant indirect effect on susceptibility through parental rule setting. Together, the findings indicate that internalization of protective alcohol-related expectancies and intentions is possible among children whose mothers provide early exposure to alcohol-specific socialization. Additional research is needed to link alcohol-specific socialization during childhood with adolescent drinking outcomes. PMID:27154767

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of a Community-Integrated Home Based Depression Intervention in Older African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Pizzi, Laura T.; Jutkowitz, Eric; Frick, Kevin D.; Suh, Dong-Churl; Prioli, Katherine M.; Gitlin, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To test the cost-effectiveness of a home-based depression program, Beat the Blues (BTB). Design We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis as part of a previously reported randomized controlled trial that tested BTB versus a wait-list control group. Setting Community-dwelling older African American adults. Participants African Americans who were ≥55 years of age, English speaking, cognitively intact (MMSE ≥24), and had depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥5) (N=129). Intervention Participants randomly assigned to BTB received up to 10 home visits over a period of 4 months by licensed social workers who provided care management, referral/linkage, stress reduction, depression education, and behavioral activation to help participants achieve self-identified goals. Measurements Incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of BTB versus wait-list controls during the 4-month study period. The primary ICER was defined as cost/quality-adjusted life year using the EQ-5D and secondarily using the HUI-3. Additional ICERs were calculated using clinical measures (cost per depression improvement, cost per depression remission). Costs included BTB intervention, depression-related healthcare visits and medications, caregiver time, and social services. Results BTB cost per participant per month was $146. Base case ICERs were $64,896 per QALY (EQ-5D) and $36,875 per QALY (HUI-3). Incremental cost per depression improvement was $2,906 and per remission was $3,507. Univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses yielded cost/QALY range of $20,500-$76,500. Conclusion Based on the range of cost effectiveness values resulting from this study, BTB is a cost-effective treatment for managing depressive symptoms in older African Americans that compares favorably with the cost effectiveness of previously tested approaches. PMID:25516025

  13. The Effect of Home-based Daily Journal Writing in Korean Adolescents with Smartphone Addiction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits of smartphones, many adverse effects have emerged. However, to date, there was no particular approach to treat or prevent smartphone addiction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of a home-based daily journal of smartphone use (HDJ-S) in Korean adolescents. Three hundred thirty five middle school students participated in this study. The severity of smartphone addiction was measured using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. The ability to control smartphone use was evaluated with the Motive Scale for Smartphone Regulation. We used the Parents’ Concerns for Children’s Smartphone Activities Scale to measure parental monitoring and supervision of adolescents’ smartphone activities. The Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale classified subjects into high risk and non-high risk for smartphone addiction, according to total scores. Forty six participants (14%) were high risk for smartphone addiction. The high risk group performed the HDJ-S for two weeks, and the same scales were subsequently assessed. After performing the HDJ-S, the total scores of the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale decreased significantly in the high risk group (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the total scores of the Parents’ Concerns for Children’s Smartphone Activities Scale in the high risk group between baseline and following two weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). The HDJ-S was effective for adolescents with smartphone addiction and increased the parents’ concerns for their children’s smartphone activities. We suggested that HDJ-S would be considered as a treatment and prevention for smartphone addiction. PMID:27134499

  14. Frequency and Type of Use of a Home-Based, Internet Intervention for Adolescent Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Christi A.; Rock, Emily; Meis, Tracy M.; Decker, Paul A.; Colligan, Robert C.; Pingree, Suzanne; Dornelas, Ellen A.; Offord, Kenneth P.; Boberg, Eric W.; Gustafson, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The Internet offers a potential medium for delivering smoking cessation treatment to adolescents. However, few Internet-based cessation programs for adolescents have been evaluated. We describe adolescent use of a home-based Internet intervention to stop smoking (Stomp Out Smokes; SOS) and explore baseline characteristics associated with SOS use. Methods Participants were 70 adolescent smokers aged 12–18 years (50% female, 90% Caucasian) randomized to receive the SOS intervention for 24 weeks as part of a larger clinical trial. SOS comprised 40 components of which 8 were primarily interactive (e.g., discussion support group, ask an expert, quit plan) and 32 were primarily informational (e.g., managing withdrawal, medications to stop smoking). SOS use data were captured electronically, including total logins to the site, and type of SOS components used defined by page hits on the interactive and information components. Results A total of 7,708 SOS Web site pages (6825 interactive and 883 informational) were accessed over the 24 weeks. The highest proportion of page hits was for the discussion support group (35%) and quit plan (30%). Interactive pages were significantly more likely to be used than informational pages (median 65 vs. 6, p<0.001). Males accessed fewer interactive pages compared to females (p=0.04). No other baseline characteristics were univariately associated with total logins or use of informational or interactive pages. Conclusions Adolescent smokers most often utilized a discussion support group and other interactive Internet based cessation components. Future studies designed to increase adolescent use, and efficacy of, Internet based cessation programs are warranted. PMID:17950163

  15. The Effect of Home-based Daily Journal Writing in Korean Adolescents with Smartphone Addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuk; Seo, Min Jae; Choi, Tae Young

    2016-05-01

    Despite the benefits of smartphones, many adverse effects have emerged. However, to date, there was no particular approach to treat or prevent smartphone addiction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of a home-based daily journal of smartphone use (HDJ-S) in Korean adolescents. Three hundred thirty five middle school students participated in this study. The severity of smartphone addiction was measured using the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. The ability to control smartphone use was evaluated with the Motive Scale for Smartphone Regulation. We used the Parents' Concerns for Children's Smartphone Activities Scale to measure parental monitoring and supervision of adolescents' smartphone activities. The Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale classified subjects into high risk and non-high risk for smartphone addiction, according to total scores. Forty six participants (14%) were high risk for smartphone addiction. The high risk group performed the HDJ-S for two weeks, and the same scales were subsequently assessed. After performing the HDJ-S, the total scores of the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale decreased significantly in the high risk group (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the total scores of the Parents' Concerns for Children's Smartphone Activities Scale in the high risk group between baseline and following two weeks of treatment (P < 0.05). The HDJ-S was effective for adolescents with smartphone addiction and increased the parents' concerns for their children's smartphone activities. We suggested that HDJ-S would be considered as a treatment and prevention for smartphone addiction. PMID:27134499

  16. Cost-Effectiveness of a Home Based Intervention for Secondary Prevention of Readmission with Chronic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Joshua; Carrington, Melinda; Chan, Yih-Kai; Pollicino, Christine; Dubrowin, Natalie; Stewart, Simon; Scuffham, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to consider the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led, home-based intervention (HBI) in cardiac patients with private health insurance compared to usual post-discharge care. A within trial analysis of the Young @ Heart multicentre, randomized controlled trial along with a micro-simulation decision analytical model was conducted to estimate the incremental costs and quality adjusted life years associated with the home based intervention compared to usual care. For the micro-simulation model, future costs, from the perspective of the funder, and effects are estimated over a twenty-year time horizon. An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio, along with Incremental Net Monetary Benefit, is evaluated using a willingness to pay threshold of $50,000 per quality adjusted life year. Sub-group analyses are conducted for men and women across three age groups separately. Costs and benefits that arise in the future are discounted at five percent per annum. Overall, home based intervention for secondary prevention in patients with chronic heart disease identified in the Australian private health care sector is not cost-effective. The estimated within trial incremental net monetary benefit is -$3,116 [95% CI: -11,145, $4,914]; indicating that the costs outweigh the benefits. However, for males and in particular males aged 75 years and above, home based intervention indicated a potential to reduce health care costs when compared to usual care (within trial: -$10,416 [95% CI: -$26,745, $5,913]; modelled analysis: -$1,980 [95% CI: -$22,843, $14,863]). This work provides a crucial impetus for future research to understand for whom disease management programs are likely to benefit most. PMID:26657844

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of a Home Based Intervention for Secondary Prevention of Readmission with Chronic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Joshua; Carrington, Melinda; Chan, Yih-Kai; Pollicino, Christine; Dubrowin, Natalie; Stewart, Simon; Scuffham, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to consider the cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led, home-based intervention (HBI) in cardiac patients with private health insurance compared to usual post-discharge care. A within trial analysis of the Young @ Heart multicentre, randomized controlled trial along with a micro-simulation decision analytical model was conducted to estimate the incremental costs and quality adjusted life years associated with the home based intervention compared to usual care. For the micro-simulation model, future costs, from the perspective of the funder, and effects are estimated over a twenty-year time horizon. An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio, along with Incremental Net Monetary Benefit, is evaluated using a willingness to pay threshold of $50,000 per quality adjusted life year. Sub-group analyses are conducted for men and women across three age groups separately. Costs and benefits that arise in the future are discounted at five percent per annum. Overall, home based intervention for secondary prevention in patients with chronic heart disease identified in the Australian private health care sector is not cost-effective. The estimated within trial incremental net monetary benefit is -$3,116 [95%CI: -11,145, $4,914]; indicating that the costs outweigh the benefits. However, for males and in particular males aged 75 years and above, home based intervention indicated a potential to reduce health care costs when compared to usual care (within trial: -$10,416 [95%CI: -$26,745, $5,913]; modelled analysis: -$1,980 [95%CI: -$22,843, $14,863]). This work provides a crucial impetus for future research to understand for whom disease management programs are likely to benefit most. PMID:26657844

  18. Home-based care for people living with HIV/AIDS in Plateau State, Nigeria: findings from qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Agbonyitor, M

    2009-01-01

    As health-care services in Nigeria and other African countries are becoming overstrained with patients, home-based care has increasingly been touted as a possible solution. The faith-based organisation, Gospel Health and Development Services, provides a home-based care programme for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) residing in Plateau State, Nigeria. This paper assesses the challenges that PLWHA in the programme faced while maintaining their health and livelihoods. The frustrations that volunteers endured in performing their work are also described, as well as the benefits and weaknesses of the programme from the perspective of PLWHA and their volunteer caregivers. Focus groups and interviews were done with 30 PLWHA and 22 volunteers to learn about their experiences with the home-based care programme and possible areas for its improvement. From these discussions three major challenges facing PLWHA emerged: discrimination towards PLWHA; the lack of money, food, and transport to health-care centres; and the desire for closer antiretroviral drug access. PMID:19437217

  19. Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling Enhances Quality of Life in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: With advances in medicine and increased survival rates, the focus of health care after spinal cord injury (SCI) has evolved from extending life to increasing independence and quality of life (QOL). Because enhancing QOL is an ultimate goal of the rehabilitation process, research involving the improvement of QOL is of great importance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling (FES-LEC) program on the QOL of persons with SCI. Design: Eleven veterans with posttraumatic C4-T11 AIS A-C SCI participated in 8 weeks of 3 times weekly home-based FES-LEC. QOL was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Tests were completed by all participants prior to and after the 8-week FES-LEC program. Results: There were significant increases in the physical and environmental domain QOL scores. There were nominal nonsignificant increases in the psychological and social domain QOL scores. Conclusions: The results of this study provide evidence that home-based FES-LEC 3 times per week for 8 weeks has the potential to result in QOL improvements. PMID:24244097

  20. Self-Administered, Home-Based SMART (Sensorimotor Active Rehabilitation Training) Arm Training: A Single-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Kathryn S; Neibling, Bridee A; Barker, Ruth N

    2015-01-01

    This single-case, mixed-method study explored the feasibility of self-administered, home-based SMART (sensorimotor active rehabilitation training) Arm training for a 57-yr-old man with severe upper-limb disability after a right frontoparietal hemorrhagic stroke 9 mo earlier. Over 4 wk of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training, the participant completed 2,100 repetitions unassisted. His wife provided support for equipment set-up and training progressions. Clinically meaningful improvements in arm impairment (strength), activity (arm and hand tasks), and participation (use of arm in everyday tasks) occurred after training (at 4 wk) and at follow-up (at 16 wk). Areas for refinement of SMART Arm training derived from thematic analysis of the participant's and researchers' journals focused on enabling independence, ensuring home and user friendliness, maintaining the motivation to persevere, progressing toward everyday tasks, and integrating practice into daily routine. These findings suggest that further investigation of self-administered, home-based SMART Arm training is warranted for people with stroke who have severe upper-limb disability. PMID:26114456

  1. Efficacy of Home-Based Kinesthesia, Balance & Agility Exercise Training Among Persons with Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Matthew W.; Tamulevicius, Nauris; Semple, Stuart J.; Krkeljas, Zarko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a home-based kinesthesia, balance and agility (KBA) exercise program to improve symptoms among persons age ≥ 50 years with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-four persons were randomly assigned to 8-weeks, 3 times per week KBA, resistance training (RT), KBA + RT, or Control. KBA utilized walking agility exercises and single-leg static and dynamic balancing. RT used elastic resistance bands for open chain lower extremity exercises. KBA + RT performed selected exercises from each technique. Control applied inert lotion daily. Outcomes included the OA specific WOMAC Index of Pain, Stiffness, and Physical Function (PF), community activity level, exercise self-efficacy, self-report knee stability, and 15m get up & go walk (GUG). Thirty-three participants [70.7 (SD 8.5) years] completed the trial. Analysis of variance comparing baseline, mid-point, and follow-up measures revealed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in WOMAC scores among KBA, RT, KBA + RT, and Control, with no differences between groups. However, Control WOMAC improvements peaked at mid-point, whereas improvement in the exercise conditions continued at 8-weeks. There were no significant changes in community activity level. Only Control improved exercise self-efficacy. Knee stability was improved in RT and Control. GUG improved in RT and KBA+RT. These results indicate that KBA, RT, or a combination of the two administered as home exercise programs are effective in improving symptoms and quality of life among persons with knee OA. Control results indicate a strong placebo effect in the short term. A combination of KBA and RT should be considered as part of the rehabilitation program, but KBA or RT alone may be appropriate for some patients. Studies with more statistical power are needed to confirm or refute these results. Patient presentation, preferences, costs, and convenience should be considered when choosing an exercise rehabilitation approach

  2. GOLIAH: A Gaming Platform for Home-Based Intervention in Autism – Principles and Design

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Valentina; Narzisi, Antonio; Jouen, Anne-Lise; Tilmont, Elodie; Hommel, Stephane; Jamal, Wasifa; Xavier, Jean; Billeci, Lucia; Maharatna, Koushik; Wald, Mike; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cohen, David; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    parents–child relationship. This pilot study shows the feasibility of using the developed gaming platform for home-based intensive intervention. However, the overall capability of the platform in delivering intervention needs to be assessed in a bigger open trial. PMID:27199777

  3. Fragmented implementation of maternal and child health home-based records in Vietnam: need for integration

    PubMed Central

    Aiga, Hirotsugu; Nguyen, Vinh Duc; Nguyen, Cuong Dinh; Nguyen, Tho Thi Thi; Nguyen, Lien Thi Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Background Home-based records (HBRs) are globally implemented as the effective tools that encourage pregnant women and mothers to timely and adequately utilise maternal and child health (MCH) services. While availability and utilisation of nationally representative HBRs have been assessed in several earlier studies, the reality of a number of HBRs subnationally implemented in a less coordinated manner has been neither reported nor analysed. Objectives This study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of HBRs for MCH and the level of fragmentation of and overlapping between different HBRs for MCH in Vietnam. The study further attempts to identify health workers’ and mothers’ perceptions towards HBR operations and utilisations. Design A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the provincial health departments of 28 selected provinces. A copy of each HBR available was collected from them. A total of 20 semi-structured interviews with health workers and mothers were conducted at rural communities in four of 28 selected provinces. Results Whereas HBRs developed exclusively for maternal health and exclusively for child health were available in four provinces (14%) and in 28 provinces (100%), respectively, those for both maternal health and child health were available in nine provinces (32%). The mean number of HBRs in 28 provinces (=5.75) indicates over-availability of HBRs. All 119 minimum required items for recording found in three different HBRs under nationwide scale-up were also included in the Maternal and Child Health Handbook being piloted for nationwide scaling-up. Implementation of multiple HBRs is likely to confuse not only health workers by requiring them to record the same data on several HBRs but also mothers about which HBR they should refer to and rely on at home. Conclusions To enable both health workers and pregnant women to focus on only one type of HBR, province-specific HBRs for maternal and/or child health need to be nationally standardised

  4. GOLIAH: A Gaming Platform for Home-Based Intervention in Autism - Principles and Design.

    PubMed

    Bono, Valentina; Narzisi, Antonio; Jouen, Anne-Lise; Tilmont, Elodie; Hommel, Stephane; Jamal, Wasifa; Xavier, Jean; Billeci, Lucia; Maharatna, Koushik; Wald, Mike; Chetouani, Mohamed; Cohen, David; Muratori, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    -child relationship. This pilot study shows the feasibility of using the developed gaming platform for home-based intensive intervention. However, the overall capability of the platform in delivering intervention needs to be assessed in a bigger open trial. PMID:27199777

  5. Development and feasibility of a home-based education model for families of children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) commonly have cognitive deficits, even among toddlers. Much medical literature emphasizes disease-based factors to account for these deficits. However, the social environment plays a large role in child development. To address the specific needs of early childhood, a monthly hospital-based education program was initiated to educate parents about child development. Education sessions were poorly attended (20-25%) and deemed unsuccessful. This study describes the development and implementation of a home-based education service to teach parents about SCD, developmental milestones and positive parenting techniques. Methods This was a prospective, single-arm intervention to study the feasibility of a home-based caregiver education program for families with infants and toddlers with SCD. Parents of children aged 0-3 years with SCD from one Midwestern hospital were approached to participate in a home-based program. The program followed the Born to Learn™ curriculum provided through the Parents as Teachers™ National Center. Reminder calls or texts were provided the day before each visit. Results of the first twenty-six months of the program are presented. Results A total of 62% (56 of 91) of families approached agreed to participate; all were African American. The majority of caregivers were single mothers with a high school education or less and whose children had Medicaid for health coverage. The phenotypes of SCD represented in this sample were similar to those in the general SCD population. Over 26 months, 39 families received at least one home visit. Parents of infants (younger than 8 months) were more likely to participate in the home-based education program than parents of older children, (Fisher’s exact test, p < .001). Conclusions For participating families, home-based visits were a feasible method for reinforcing clinic education. About 43% of eligible families participated in the education, a two

  6. Home-based music therapy - a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by providing home-based music therapy (HBMT) programs. This article reviews and summarizes the settings and conditions of HBMT for the first time. Methods The following databases were used to find articles on home-based music therapy: AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX. The search terms were "home-based music therapy" and "mobile music therapy". Included articles were analyzed with respect to participants as well as conditions and settings of HBMT. Furthermore, the date of publication, main outcomes, and the design and quality of the studies were investigated. Results A total of 20 international publications, 11 clinical studies and nine reports from practice, mainly from the United States (n = 8), were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Six studies had a randomized controlled design and included a total of 507 patients. The vast majority of clients of HBMT are elderly patients living at home and people who need hospice and palliative care. Although settings were heterogeneous, music listening programs played a predominant role with the aim to reduce symptoms like depression and pain, or to improve quality of life and the relationship between patients and caregivers as primary endpoints. Conclusions We were able to show that HBMT is an innovative service for future healthcare delivery. It fits with the changing healthcare system and its conditions but also meets the therapeutic needs of the increasing number of elderly and severely impaired people. Apart from

  7. Supporting work practices through telehealth: impact on nurses in peripheral regions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Canada, workforce shortages in the health care sector constrain the ability of the health care system to meet the needs of its population and of its health care professionals. This issue is of particular importance in peripheral regions of Quebec, where significant inequalities in workforce distribution between regions has lead to acute nursing shortages and increased workloads. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are innovative solutions that can be used to develop strategies to optimise the use of available resources and to design new nursing work practices. However, current knowledge is still limited about the real impact of ICTs on nursing recruitment and retention. Our aim is to better understand how work practice reorganization, supported by ICTs, and particularly by telehealth, may influence professional, educational, and organizational factors relating to Quebec nurses, notably those working in peripheral regions. Methods/Design First, we will conduct a descriptive study on the issue of nursing recruitment. Stratified sampling will be used to select approximately twenty innovative projects relating to the reorganization of work practices based upon ICTs. Semi-structured interviews with key informants will determine professional, educational, and organizational recruitment factors. The results will be used to create a questionnaire which, using a convenience sampling method, will be mailed to 600 third year students and recent graduates of two Quebec university nursing faculties. Descriptive, correlation, and hierarchical regression analyses will be performed to identify factors influencing nursing graduates' intentions to practice in peripheral regions. Secondly, we will conduct five case studies pertaining to the issue of nursing retention. Five ICT projects in semi-urban, rural, and isolated regions have been identified. Qualitative data will be collected through field observation and approximately fifty semi

  8. What is the potential for social networks and support to enhance future telehealth interventions for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia: a critical interpretive synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Digital technologies are increasingly directed at improved monitoring, management and treatment of mental health. However, their potential contribution to social networks and self-management support for people diagnosed with a serious mental illness has rarely been considered. This review and meta-synthesis aimed to examine the processes of engagement and perceived relevance and appropriateness of telehealth interventions for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The review addresses three key questions. How is the use of digital communications technologies framed in the professional psychiatric literature? How might the recognised benefits of telehealth translate to people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia? What is the user perspective concerning Internet information and communication technologies? Methods A critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) of published findings from quantitative and qualitative studies of telehealth interventions for people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Results Most studies were of an exploratory nature. The professional discourse about the use of different technologies was overlain by concerns with surveillance and control, focusing on the Internet as a potential site of risk and danger. The critical synthesis of findings showed that the key focus of the available studies was on the delivery of existing traditional approaches (e.g. improving medications adherence, provision of medical information about the condition, symptom monitoring and cognitive behavioural therapy). Even though it was clear that the Internet has considerable potential in terms of accessing and utilising lay support, the potential of communication technologies in mobilising of resources for personal self-management or peer support was a relatively absent or hidden a focus of the available studies. Conclusions Based on an interpretive synthesis of available studies, people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or psychosis use the Internet primarily for

  9. Integrating Telehealth Care-Generated Data With the Family Practice Electronic Medical Record: Qualitative Exploration of the Views of Primary Care Staff

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Background Telehealth care is increasingly being employed in the management of long-term illness. Current systems are largely managed via “stand-alone” websites, which require additional log-ons for clinicians to view their patients’ symptom records and physiological measurements leading to frustrating delays and sometimes failure to engage with the record. However, there are challenges to the full integration of patient-acquired data into family physicians’ electronic medical records (EMR) in terms of reliability, how such data can best be summarized and presented to avoid overload to the clinicians, and how clarity of responsibility is managed when multiple agencies are involved. Objective We aimed to explore the views of primary care clinicians on the acceptability, clinical utility, and, in particular, the benefits and risks of integrating patient-generated telehealth care data into the family practice EMR and to explore how these data should be summarized and presented in order to facilitate use in routine care. Methods In our qualitative study, we carried out semi-structured interviews with clinicians with experience of and naïve to telehealth care following demonstration of pilot software, which illustrated various methods by which data could be incorporated into the EMR. Results We interviewed 20 clinicians and found 2 overarching themes of “workload” and “safety”. Although clinicians were largely positive about integrating telehealth care data into the EMR, they were concerned about the potential increased workload and safety issues, particularly in respect to error due to data overload. They suggested these issues could be mitigated by good system design that summarized and presented data such that they facilitated seamless integration with clinicians’ current routine processes for managing data flows, and ensured clear lines of communication and responsibility between multiple professionals involved in patients’ care. Conclusions

  10. Acceptability of self-conducted home-based HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Brazil: data from an on-line survey

    PubMed Central

    Lippman, Sheri A.; Périssé, André R. S.; Veloso, Valdiléa G.; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Buchbinder, Susan; Sineath, R. Craig; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian HIV/AIDS epidemic is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM), however HIV testing rates among MSM are not commensurate with their risk. Strategies to expand early diagnosis may include use of self-conducted home-based testing kits, which are now available for purchase in the US. In April 2011 we conducted a survey with Brazilian MSM using Facebook to assess HIV testing preferences and acceptability of home-based testing. Among 356 previously tested, HIV-negative MSM, 47% reported a preference for home-based testing, 27% preferred clinic-based testing, and 26% had no preference. Less frequent testers and those who had considered testing but failed to test were more likely to prefer home-based testing. Close to 90% reported that they would use self-test kits; 62% and 54% said they would use home-based testing to make choices about unprotected sex with regular and new partners, respectively. Concerns included difficulty to understand the tests (32%) and receiving results alone (23%). Overall, home-based testing may appeal to MSM and result in increased testing frequency. Research on feasibility and utilization of self-tests in practice is needed. PMID:24896048

  11. Design and Implementation of a Home-Based Exercise Program Post-Hip Fracture: The Baltimore Hip Studies Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Yahiro, Janet A.; Resnick, Barbara; Orwig, Denise; Hicks, Gregory; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objectives are to describe for the first time a home-based exercise intervention for frail elderly hip fracture patients and to describe the feasibility of this exercise program. Design A home-based exercise program was used in a randomized controlled trial in which the authors investigated exercise intervention versus no exercise intervention in patients after hip fracture. Setting This program was implemented at the patients’ own home or place of residence after discharge. Participants Women 65 years of age or older were recruited within 15 days of hip fracture. Eligible patients were those with a nonpathologic fracture who were admitted within 72 hours of injury, had surgical repair of the hip fracture, and met medical inclusion criteria. Participants initially were randomized to exercise groups and then assigned to exercise trainers. Intervention The exercise contained strength training and aerobic components. Participants were expected to exercise 5 days per week by performing a combination of supervised and independently performed exercise sessions. Intensity and duration were increased gradually by trainers in a standardized way. The frequency of the supervised sessions decreased as participants became more independent. Treatment fidelity visits ensured that the intervention was being delivered as intended across trainers and across participants. Main Outcome Measurement This work describes the feasibility and challenges of administering an intensive home-based exercise program in this population of older adults. Results Of those patients randomized to exercise, 82% were followed by a trainer and almost all advanced to higher levels in both aerobic and strength programs. Overall, participants received an average of 44 (78.5%) of the prescribed visits by the trainer. Conclusions This study showed that it was possible to engage a frail older population of post-hip fracture patients in a program of aerobic and strength training exercise with a

  12. Evaluation of Candidate Measures for Home-Based Screening of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Taiwanese Bus Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Hua; Huang, Ren-Jing; Lai, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Shen-Wen; Chung, Ai-Hui; Kuo, Teng-Yao; Chang, Ching-Haur; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleepiness-at-the-wheel has been identified as a major cause of highway accidents. The aim of our study is identifying the candidate measures for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing in Taiwanese bus drivers, instead of polysomnography. Methods: Overnight polysomnography accompanied with simultaneous measurements of alternative screening devices (pulse oximetry, ApneaLink, and Actigraphy), heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and questionnaires were completed by 151 eligible participants who were long-haul bus drivers with a duty period of more than 12 h a day and duty shifting. Results: 63.6% of professional bus drivers were diagnosed as having sleep disordered breathing and had a higher body mass index, neck circumference, systolic blood pressure, arousal index and desaturation index than those professional bus drivers without evidence of sleep disordered breathing. Simple home-based candidate measures: (1) Pulse oximetry, oxygen-desaturation indices by ≥3% and 4% (r = 0.87∼0.92); (2) Pulse oximetry, pulse-rising indices by ≥7% and 8% from a baseline (r = 0.61∼0.89); and (3) ApneaLink airflow detection, apnea-hypopnea indices (r = 0.70∼0.70), based on recording-time or Actigraphy-corrected total sleep time were all significantly correlated with, and had high agreement with, corresponding polysomnographic apnea-hypopnea indices [(1) 94.5%∼96.6%, (2) 93.8%∼97.2%, (3) 91.1%∼91.3%, respectively]. Conversely, no validities of SDB screening were found in the multi-variables apnea prediction questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, night-sleep heart rate variability, wake-up systolic blood pressure and anthropometric variables. Conclusions: The indices of pulse oximetry and apnea flow detection are eligible criteria for home-based screening of sleep disordered breathing, specifically for professional drivers. PMID:24803198

  13. Free love: a case study of church-run home-based caregivers in a high vulnerability setting.

    PubMed

    Root, Robin; van Wyngaard, Arnau

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of religious health assets (RHA) and its relevance to HIV/AIDS. This manuscript describes the experiences of caregivers with a church-run home-based care organisation in Swaziland, site of the world's highest HIV prevalence (42%). In light of reduced antiretroviral treatment rollout in some areas of Africa, strengthening mechanisms of treatment support with HIV prevention has never been more critical. One modality may be community home-based care (CHBC), a core feature of the World Bank's Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program for Africa. Yet, these entities, and the frontline activities of local congregations, remain underexplored. Part of a larger anthropological study of religion and HIV/AIDS in Swaziland, this manuscript draws on 20 semi-structured caregiver interviews to discern patterns in motivations; perceived client needs; care practices; and meanings of religiosity. Thirteen participants were care coordinators who oversaw approximately 455 caregivers across nearly half of the 22 communities served. Grounded theory analysis suggested that caregivers facilitated vital decisions around HIV testing, HIV disclosure, treatment uptake/adherence, as well as reduced HIV stigma. Also salient was the importance of a Christian ethos, in the form of 'talk' and 'love', as critical culturally situated care practices. Having expanded to an estimated 600 caregivers and 2500 home-based clients between 2006 and 2009, Participants' reports intimated their roles as agents of broader social transformation. This article contributes to the expanding study of RHA and challenges authoritative global public health strategies that have largely marginalised local religious aspects of HIV/AIDS. Future applied research examining how 'home' and 'church' may be vital public health settings outside of, but integral to, formal health services and HIV programming is warranted. PMID:21728893

  14. A randomized controlled trial of telephone-mentoring with home-based walking preceding rehabilitation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Cameron-Tucker, Helen Laura; Wood-Baker, Richard; Joseph, Lyn; Walters, Julia A; Schüz, Natalie; Walters, E Haydn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With the limited reach of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) and low levels of daily physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a need exists to increase daily exercise. This study evaluated telephone health-mentoring targeting home-based walking (tele-rehab) compared to usual waiting time (usual care) followed by group PR. Patients and methods People with COPD were randomized to tele-rehab (intervention) or usual care (controls). Tele-rehab delivered by trained nurse health-mentors supported participants’ home-based walking over 8–12 weeks. PR, delivered to both groups simultaneously, included 8 weeks of once-weekly education and self-management skills, with separate supervised exercise. Data were collected at three time-points: baseline (TP1), before (TP2), and after (TP3) PR. The primary outcome was change in physical capacity measured by 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) with two tests performed at each time-point. Secondary outcomes included changes in self-reported home-based walking, health-related quality of life, and health behaviors. Results Of 65 recruits, 25 withdrew before completing PR. Forty attended a median of 6 (4) education sessions. Seventeen attended supervised exercise (5±2 sessions). Between TP1 and TP2, there was a statistically significant increase in the median 6MWD of 12 (39.1) m in controls, but no change in the tele-rehab group. There were no significant changes in 6MWD between other time-points or groups, or significant change in any secondary outcomes. Participants attending supervised exercise showed a nonsignificant improvement in 6MWD, 12.3 (71) m, while others showed no change, 0 (33) m. The mean 6MWD was significantly greater, but not clinically meaningful, for the second test compared to the first at all time-points. Conclusion Telephone-mentoring for home-based walking demonstrated no benefit to exercise capacity. Two 6-minute walking tests at each time-point may not be necessary. Supervised exercise

  15. Privacy and information security risks in a technology platform for home-based chronic disease rehabilitation and education

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Privacy and information security are important for all healthcare services, including home-based services. We have designed and implemented a prototype technology platform for providing home-based healthcare services. It supports a personal electronic health diary and enables secure and reliable communication and interaction with peers and healthcare personnel. The platform runs on a small computer with a dedicated remote control. It is connected to the patient’s TV and to a broadband Internet. The platform has been tested with home-based rehabilitation and education programs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes. As part of our work, a risk assessment of privacy and security aspects has been performed, to reveal actual risks and to ensure adequate information security in this technical platform. Methods Risk assessment was performed in an iterative manner during the development process. Thus, security solutions have been incorporated into the design from an early stage instead of being included as an add-on to a nearly completed system. We have adapted existing risk management methods to our own environment, thus creating our own method. Our method conforms to ISO’s standard for information security risk management. Results A total of approximately 50 threats and possible unwanted incidents were identified and analysed. Among the threats to the four information security aspects: confidentiality, integrity, availability, and quality; confidentiality threats were identified as most serious, with one threat given an unacceptable level of High risk. This is because health-related personal information is regarded as sensitive. Availability threats were analysed as low risk, as the aim of the home programmes is to provide education and rehabilitation services; not for use in acute situations or for continuous health monitoring. Conclusions Most of the identified threats are applicable for healthcare services intended for patients or

  16. Home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation improves exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Coquart, Jérémy B; Grosbois, Jean-Marie; Olivier, Cecile; Bart, Frederic; Castres, Ingrid; Wallaert, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, observational study of a routine clinical practice reports the feasibility and efficiency of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), including transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) or usual endurance physical exercise (UEPE), on exercise tolerance, anxiety/depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with COPD. Methods Seventy-one patients with COPD participated in home-based PR with NMES (Group NMES [GNMES]), while 117 patients participated in home-based PR with the UEPEs (Group UEPE [GUEPE]). NMES was applied for 30 minutes twice a day, every day. The endurance exercises in GUEPE began with a minimum 10-minute session at least 5 days a week, with the goal being 30–45 minutes per session. Three upper and lower limb muscle strengthening exercises lasting 10–15 minutes were also proposed to both the groups for daily practice. Moreover, PR in both the groups included a weekly 90-minute session based on an educational needs assessment. The sessions comprised endurance physical exercise for GUEPE, NMES for GNMES, resumption of physical daily living activities, therapeutic patient education, and psychosocial support to facilitate health behavior changes. Before and after PR, functional mobility and physical exercise capacity, anxiety, depression, and HRQoL were evaluated at home. Results The study revealed that NMES significantly improved functional mobility (−18.8% in GNMES and −20.6% in GUEPE), exercise capacity (+20.8% in GNMES and +21.8% in GUEPE), depression (−15.8% in GNMES and −30.1% in GUEPE), and overall HRQoL (−7.0% in GNMES and −18.5% in GUEPE) in the patients with COPD, regardless of the group (GNMES or GUEPE) or severity of airflow obstruction. Moreover, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to these data (P>0.05). Conclusion Home-based PR including self-monitored NMES seems feasible and effective for severely disabled COPD patients

  17. Pilot Testing of Triage Coding System in Home-based Palliative Care Using Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Dhiliwal, Sunil; Salins, Naveen; Deodhar, Jayitha; Rao, Raghavendra; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Home-based palliative care is an essential model of palliative care that aims to provide continuity of care at patient's own home in an effective and timely manner. This study was a pilot test of triage coding system in home-based palliative care using Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) scale. Methods: Objective of the study was to evaluate if the triage coding system in home-based palliative care: (a) Facilitated timely intervention, (b) improved symptom control, and (c) avoided hospital deaths. Homecare services were coded as high (Group 1 - ESAS scores ≥7), medium (Group 2 - ESAS scores 4–6), and low (Group 3 - ESAS scores 0–3) priority based on ESAS scores. In high priority group, patients received home visit in 0–3 working days; medium priority group, patients received home visit in 0–10 working days; and low priority group, patients received home visit in 0–15 working days. The triage duration of home visit was arbitrarily decided based on the previous retrospective audit and consensus of the experts involved in prioritization and triaging in home care. Results: “High priority” patients were visited in 2.63 ± 0.75 days; “medium priority” patients were visited in 7.00 ± 1.5 days, and “low priority” patients were visited in 10.54 ± 2.7 days. High and medium priority groups had a statistically significant improvement in most of the ESAS symptoms following palliative home care intervention. Intergroup comparison showed that improvement in symptoms was the highest in high priority group compared to medium and low priority group. There was an 8.5% increase in home and hospice deaths following the introduction of triage coding system. There was a significant decrease in deaths in the hospital in Group 1 (6.3%) (χ2 = 27.3, P < 0.001) compared to Group 2 (28.6%) and Group 3 (15.4%). Group 2 had more hospital deaths. Interval duration from triaging to first intervention was a significant predictor of survival with odds

  18. Augmentation of special-needs services and information to students and teachers "ASSIST"--a telehealth innovation providing school-based medical interventions.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas E

    2004-10-01

    An innovative school-based telehealth technology was introduced in Hawaii with the purposes of: (1) evaluating students for medical/developmental conditions with educational implications, (2) providing a professionally-monitored Internet-based system of learning/development, and (3) delivering medically-based physical and occupational therapy at the students school. Electronically recorded satisfaction surveys from parents, teachers, and providers revealed significant improvement in all three areas. PMID:15570717

  19. Telehealth for patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease: pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    O’Cathain, Alicia; Thomas, Clare; Edwards, Louisa; Gaunt, Daisy; Dixon, Padraig; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Nicholl, Jon; Large, Shirley; Yardley, Lucy; Fahey, Tom; Foster, Alexis; Garner, Katy; Horspool, Kimberley; Man, Mei-See; Rogers, Anne; Pope, Catherine; Montgomery, Alan A

    2016-01-01

    ), mean diastolic −2.8 (−4.0 to −1.6 mm Hg); weight −1.0 kg (−1.8 to −0.3 kg), and body mass index −0.4 ( −0.6 to −0.1) but not cholesterol −0.1 (−0.2 to 0.0), smoking status (adjusted odds ratio 0.4, 0.2 to 1.0), or overall cardiovascular risk as a continuous measure (−0.4, −1.2 to 0.3)). The intervention was associated with improvements in diet, physical activity, drug adherence, and satisfaction with access to care, treatment received, and care coordination. One serious related adverse event occurred, when a participant was admitted to hospital with low blood pressure. Conclusions This evidence based telehealth approach was associated with small clinical benefits for a minority of people with high cardiovascular risk, and there was no overall improvement in average risk. The Healthlines service was, however, associated with improvements in some risk behaviours, and in perceptions of support and access to care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 27508731. PMID:27252245

  20. Delta Coherence Protocols: The Home Update Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.; Reynolds, P.F.; de Supinoki, B.

    2000-07-21

    We describe a new class of directory coherence protocols called delta coherence protocols that use network guarantees to support a new and highly concurrent approach to maintain a consistent shared memory. Delta coherence protocols are more concurrent than other coherence protocols in that they allow processes to pipeline memory accesses without violating sequential consistency; support multiple concurrent readers and writers to the same cache block; and allow processes to access multiple shared variables atomically without invalidating the copies held by other processes or otherwise obtaining exclusive access to the referenced variables. Delta protocols include both update and invalidate protocols. In this paper we describe the simplest, most basic delta protocol, an update protocol called the home update protocol. Delta protocols are based on isotach network guarantees. An isotach network maintains a logical time system that allows each process to predict and control the logical time at which its messages are received. Processes use isotach guarantees to control the logical time at which their requests on shared memory appear to be executed. We prove the home update protocol is correct using logical time to reason about the order in which requests are executed.

  1. Personalized home-based interval exercise training may improve cardiorespiratory fitness in cancer patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wood, W A; Phillips, B; Smith-Ryan, A E; Wilson, D; Deal, A M; Bailey, C; Meeneghan, M; Reeve, B B; Basch, E M; Bennett, A V; Shea, T C; Battaglini, C L

    2016-07-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients before autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of five, 3 min intervals of walking, jogging or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 min of low-intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least three times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient's scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 min walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (P=0.12) and 6MWD (P=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7 ml/kg min (P=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 m (P=0.006). Home-based IET can be performed before HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  2. Feasibility of a Home-based Speed of Processing Training Program in Middle-aged and Older Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Shameka L.; Fazeli, Pariya; Vance, David E.

    2015-01-01

    There has been much optimism over the positive impact of cART on life expectancy for people with HIV; however, those aging with HIV fear potential day-to-day challenges associated with the development of cognitive deficits. The presence of cognitive deficits has generated major safety concerns as it has been shown to impact driving, mobility, and employment. Given the efficacy of a computerized speed of processing training program administered in the laboratory to older adults and adults with HIV, this study was designed to determine the feasibility of a home-based speed of processing training program in improving cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults with HIV. In this within-subjects pre-post experimental design, twenty middle-aged and older adults (i.e., age 40+) with HIV were administered a brief neuropsychological assessment to gauge their baseline cognitive function before participating in a 10-hour home-based computerized cognitive remediation training program. In addition to self-reported cognitive gains, a six-week posttest indicated significant improvements on the Useful Field of View (UFOV®), a measure of speed of processing and possible transfer to the Timed Instrumental Activities of Daily Living test, a measure of everyday functioning. These findings show that speed of processing training can successfully improve cognitive function in this vulnerable population even when administered in remote settings such as the privacy of one's home. PMID:26153789

  3. Adherence to a home-based exercise program and incidence of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Shinji, S; Shigeru, M; Ryusei, U; Mitsuru, M; Shigehiro, K

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between adherence to a home-based exercise program and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated 102 patients with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 75 years, and followed them prospectively for 17.2 months. Before enrollment, all patients received a traditional exercise prescription. The exercise program consisted of a daily walking exercise at home for 20 - 30 minutes. Self-reported adherence to the exercise program and the incidence of CVD were confirmed by information obtained from telephone interviews. There were 38 dropouts among the patients in the exercise program. Dropouts were significantly younger than completers. The rate of obesity was significantly higher among the dropouts than among the completers. No differences were observed between the two groups for gender, history of CVD and other clinical characteristics. During the follow-up, we documented 8 new cases of CVD. The incidence of CVD during the follow-up was 1.56 percent among the program completers and 18.4 percent among the dropouts. Adherence to the home-based exercise was inversely related to the incidence of CVD (p < 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and other covariates. In conclusion, adherence to an exercise program is associated with a reduced incidence of CVD among patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:17436204

  4. Integrated, Home-based Treatment for MDR-TB and HIV in Rural South Africa: An Alternate Model of Care

    PubMed Central

    Brust, James C.M.; Shah, N. Sarita; Scott, Michelle; Chaiyachati, Krisda; Lygizos, Melissa; van der Merwe, Theo L.; Bamber, Sheila; Radebe, Zanele; Loveday, Marian; Moll, Anthony P.; Margot, Bruce; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Treatment outcomes for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in South Africa have suffered as centralized, inpatient treatment programs struggle to cope with rising prevalence and HIV co-infection rates. A new treatment model is needed to expand treatment capacity and improve MDR-TB and HIV outcomes. We describe the design and preliminary results of an integrated, home-based MDR-TB/HIV treatment program created in rural KwaZulu-Natal. In 2008, a decentralized center was established to provide outpatient MDR-TB and HIV treatment. Nurses, community health workers, and family supporters have been trained to administer injections, provide adherence support, and monitor adverse reactions in patients’ homes. Physicians assess clinical response, adherence, and adverse reaction severity to MDR-TB and HIV therapy at monthly follow-up visits. Treatment outcomes are assessed by monthly cultures and CD4 and viral load every 6 months. Eighty patients initiated MDR-TB therapy from 2/2008–4/2010; 66 were HIV co-infected. Retention has been high (only 5% defaults, 93% of visits attended) and preliminary outcomes have been favorable (77% cured/still on treatment, 82% undetectable viral load). Few patients have required escalation of care (9%), had severe adverse events (8%), or died (6%). Integrated, home-based treatment for MDR-TB and HIV is a promising treatment model to expand capacity and achieve improved outcomes in rural, resource-poor, and high-HIV prevalent settings. PMID:22668560

  5. Feasibility of a Home-Based Speed of Processing Training Program in Middle-Aged and Older Adults With HIV.

    PubMed

    Cody, Shameka L; Fazeli, Pariya L; Vance, David E

    2015-08-01

    There has been much optimism over the positive impact of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on life expectancy for people with HIV; however, those aging with HIV fear potential day-to-day challenges associated with the development of cognitive deficits. The presence of cognitive deficits has generated major safety concerns because it has been shown to impact driving, mobility, and employment. Given the efficacy of a computerized speed of processing training program administered in the laboratory to older adults and adults with HIV, this study was designed to determine the feasibility of using a home-based speed of processing training program to improve cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults with HIV. In this within-subject pre-post experimental design, 20 middle-aged and older adults (i.e., age of 40+ years) with HIV were administered a brief neuropsychological assessment to gauge their baseline cognitive function before participating in a 10-hour home-based computerized cognitive remediation training program. In addition to self-reported cognitive gains, a 6-week posttest indicated significant improvements on the Useful Field of View, a measure of speed of processing and possible transfer to the Timed Instrumental Activities of Daily Living test, a measure of everyday functioning. These findings show that speed of processing training can successfully improve cognitive function in this vulnerable population even when administered in remote settings such as the privacy of one's home. PMID:26153789

  6. Parent and caregiver perspectives on home-based newborn care in low-income settings: protocol for a systematic review of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Alessandra N; Felker-Kantor, Erica; Kaji, Aiko; Saldanha, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Newborn health and survival are closely linked to essential newborn care provided within the first days and weeks of an infant's life by parents and caregivers at home and within the community. Newborn care practices are often socially and culturally determined and have been explored in qualitative and formative research related to improving neonatal survival. We aim to provide a comprehensive review of qualitative studies on parent and caregiver experiences of newborn care practices with a view to identifying barriers and facilitators that may impact on newborn health. The rationale is that providing this information will be useful for intervention design and programme scale up for newborn survival. Methods and analysis We will systematically review qualitative studies reporting on newborn care practices. The Enhancing Transparency in Reporting the Synthesis of Qualitative Research (ENTREQ) statement will be used for reporting the stages of the review and dissemination. The search period will include all studies published from 2006 to 2016. Study selection will incorporate the ENTREQ and Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and quality assessment will be completed using Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) guidelines. Pending the identification of sufficient data of good quality, we will conduct a full synthesis of the studies identified by the review. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conference presentation and directly to organisations involved in newborn health. Formal ethical approval from the author's institution is not required, as no primary data or identifying data will be collected. Trial registration number CRD42016035674. PMID:27531737

  7. Effectiveness of a Telehealth Service Delivery Model for Treating Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Community-Based Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kathleen; Stoep, Ann Vander; Zhou, Chuan; McCarty, Carolyn A.; Katon, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of a telehealth service delivery model for the treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that provided pharmacological treatment and caregiver behavior training. Method The Children’s ADHD Telemental Health Treatment Study (CATTS) was a randomized controlled trial with 223 children referred by 88 primary care providers (PCPs) in 7 communities. Children randomized to the experimental telehealth service model received 6 sessions over 22 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy, delivered by child psychiatrists through videoconferencing, and caregiver behavior training, provided in person by community therapists who were supervised remotely. Children randomized to the control service delivery model received treatment with their PCPs augmented with a telepsychiatry consultation. Outcomes were diagnostic criteria for ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and role performance on the Vanderbilt ADHD Rating Scale (VADRS) completed by caregivers (VADRS-Caregivers) and teachers (VADRS-Teachers) and impairment on the Columbia Impairment Scale-Parent Version (CIS-P). Measures were completed at 5 assessments over 25 weeks. Results Children in both service models improved. Children assigned to the telehealth service model improved significantly more than children in the augmented primary care arm for VADRS-Caregiver criteria for inattention (χ2[4]=19.47, p<.001), hyperactivity (χ2[4]=11.91, p=0.02), combined ADHD (χ2[4]=14.90, p=0.005), ODD (χ2[4]=10.05, p=0.04), and VADRS-Caregiver role performance (χ2 [4]=12.40, p=0.01) and CIS-P impairment (χ2[4]=20.52, p<.001). For the VADRS-Teacher diagnostic criteria, children in the telehealth service model had significantly more improvement in hyperactivity (χ2[4]=11.28, p=0.02) and combined ADHD (χ2[4]=9.72, p=0.045). Conclusion The CATTS trial demonstrated the effectiveness of a telehealth service model to treat ADHD in communities with limited access to

  8. The seven Cs of the high acceptability of home-based VCT: results from a mixed methods approach in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Marte; Sandøy, Ingvild F; Michelo, Charles; Fylkesnes, Knut; Mwangala, Sheila; Blystad, Astrid

    2013-11-01

    HIV testing and counselling is a critical gateway to prevention and treatment. Yet, coverage remains insufficient, few couples are tested together and gender differences in access exist. We used an embedded mixed methods approach to investigate possible explanations for the high acceptance of home-based voluntary HIV counselling and testing (HB-VCT) in a pair-matched cluster-randomized trial in Zambia. A baseline survey included 1694 individuals in 36 clusters. Adults in 18 intervention clusters were offered HB-VCT by lay counsellors. Standard testing services were available in both trial arms. After the completion of the intervention, a follow-up survey was conducted in all trial clusters. In addition, 21 in-depth interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted with home-based VCT clients in the intervention arm. Informants favoured the convenience, confidentiality and credibility of HB-VCT. Counsellors were perceived as trustworthy owing to their closeness and conduct, and the consent process was experienced as convincing. Couple testing was selected by 70% of cohabiting couples and was experienced as beneficial by both genders. Levels of first-time testing (68% vs. 29%, p < 0.0001) and re-testing (94% vs. 74%, p < 0.0001) were higher in the intervention than in the control arm. Acceptance of HIV testing and counselling is dependent on stigma, trust and gender. The confidentiality of home-based VCT was essential for overcoming stigma-related barriers, and the selection of local counsellors was important to ensure trust in the services. The high level of couple counselling within HB-VCT may contribute to closing the gender gap in HIV testing, and has benefits for both genders and potentially for prevention of HIV transmission. The study demonstrates the feasibility of achieving high test coverage with an opt-in consent approach. The embedded qualitative component confirmed the high satisfaction with HB-VCT reported in the quantitative survey and was

  9. User preferences and usability of iVitality: optimizing an innovative online research platform for home-based health monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Osch, Mara; Rövekamp, AJM; Bergman-Agteres, Stephanie N; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Ooms, Sharon J; Mooijaart, Simon P; Vermeulen, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background The iVitality online research platform has been developed to gain insight into the relationship between early risk factors (ie, poorly controlled hypertension, physical or mental inactivity) and onset and possibly prevention of dementia. iVitality consists of a website, a smartphone application, and sensors that can monitor these indicators at home. Before iVitality can be implemented, it should fit the needs and preferences of users, ie, offspring of patients with dementia. This study aimed to explore users’ motivation to participate in home-based health monitoring research, to formulate requirements based on users’ preferences to optimize iVitality, and to test usability of the smartphone application of iVitality. Methods We recruited 13 participants (aged 42–64 years, 85% female), who were offspring of patients with dementia. A user-centered methodology consisting of four iterative phases was used. Three semistructured interviews provided insight into motivation and acceptance of using iVitality (phase 1). A focus group with six participants elaborated on expectations and preferences regarding iVitality (phase 2). Findings from phase 1 and 2 were triangulated by two semistructured interviews (phase 3). Four participants assessed the usability of the smartphone application (phase 4) using a think aloud procedure and a questionnaire measuring ease and efficiency of use (scale 1–7; higher scores indicated better usability). Results All participants were highly motivated to contribute to dementia research. However, the frequency of home-based health monitoring should not be too high. Participants preferred to receive feedback about their measurements and information regarding the relationship between these measurements and dementia. Despite minor technical errors, iVitality was considered easy and efficient to use (mean score 5.50, standard deviation 1.71). Conclusion Offspring of patients with dementia are motivated to contribute to home-based

  10. Cardiac status assessment with a multi-signal device for improved home-based congestive heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Muehlsteff, Jens; Carvalho, Paulo; Henriques, Jorge; Paiva, Rui P; Reiter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-Art disease management for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) patients is still based on easy-to-acquire measures such as heart rate (HR), weight and blood pressure (BP). However, these measures respond late to changes of the patient health status and provide limited information to personalize and adapt medication therapy. This paper describes our concept called "Cardiac Status Assessment" we have been investigating within the European project "HeartCycle" towards next-generation home-based disease management of CHF. In our concept we analyze non-invasive surrogate measures of the cardio-vascular function in particular systolic time intervals and pulse wave characteristics to estimate Cardiac Output (CO) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR) both are established clinical measures. We discuss the underlying concept, a developed measurement system and first results. PMID:22254450

  11. The team approach to home-based primary care: restructuring care to meet individual, program, and system needs.

    PubMed

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Soriano, Theresa A; Hernandez, Cameron R; DeCherrie, Linda V; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address individual, program, and system needs, a portion of a large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice was restructured into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. The Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care through practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  12. The Team Approach to Home-Based Primary Care: Restructuring Care to Meet Patient, Program, and System Needs

    PubMed Central

    Reckrey, Jennifer M.; Soriano, Theresa A.; Hernandez, Cameron R.; DeCherrie, Linda V.; Chavez, Silvia; Zhang, Meng; Ornstein, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Team-based models of care are an important way to meet the complex medical and psychosocial needs of the homebound. As part of a quality improvement project to address patient, program, and system needs, we restructured a portion of our large, physician-led academic home-based primary care practice into a team-based model. With support from an office-based nurse practitioner, a dedicated social worker, and a dedicated administrative assistant, physicians were able to care for a larger number of patients. Hospitalizations, readmissions, and patient satisfaction remained the same while physician panel size increased and physician satisfaction improved. Our Team Approach is an innovative way to improve interdisciplinary, team-based care though practice restructuring and serves as an example of how other practices can approach the complex task of caring for the homebound. PMID:25645568

  13. An international randomized study of a home-based self-management program for severe COPD: the COMET

    PubMed Central

    Bourbeau, Jean; Casan, Pere; Tognella, Silvia; Haidl, Peter; Texereau, Joëlle B; Kessler, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most hospitalizations and costs related to COPD are due to exacerbations and insufficient disease management. The COPD patient Management European Trial (COMET) is investigating a home-based multicomponent COPD self-management program designed to reduce exacerbations and hospital admissions. Design Multicenter parallel randomized controlled, open-label superiority trial. Setting Thirty-three hospitals in four European countries. Participants A total of 345 patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease III/IV COPD. Intervention The program includes extensive patient coaching by health care professionals to improve self-management (eg, develop skills to better manage their disease), an e-health platform for reporting frequent health status updates, rapid intervention when necessary, and oxygen therapy monitoring. Comparator is the usual management as per the center’s routine practice. Main outcome measures Yearly number of hospital days for acute care, exacerbation number, quality of life, deaths, and costs. PMID:27418817

  14. Occupational Safety, Health, and Well-being Among Home-based Workers in the Informal Economy of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nankongnab, Noppanun; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Markkanen, Pia; Kongtip, Pornpimol; Woskie, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a summary of the issues related to occupational safety and health and well-being among workers in the informal economy of Thailand, with a special emphasis on home-based workers. The reviewed literature includes documents and information sources developed by the International Labour Organization, the National Statistical Office of Thailand, peer-reviewed scientific publications, and master's theses conducted in Thailand. This work is part of a needs and opportunities analysis carried out by the Center for Work, Environment, Nutrition and Development--a partnership between Mahidol University and University of Massachusetts Lowell to identify the gaps in knowledge and research to support government policy development in the area of occupational and environmental health for workers in the informal economy. PMID:26059416

  15. ERMHAN: A Context-Aware Service Platform to Support Continuous Care Networks for Home-Based Assistance

    PubMed Central

    Paganelli, Federica; Spinicci, Emilio; Giuli, Dino

    2008-01-01

    Continuous care models for chronic diseases pose several technology-oriented challenges for home-based continuous care, where assistance services rely on a close collaboration among different stakeholders such as health operators, patient relatives, and social community members. Here we describe Emilia Romagna Mobile Health Assistance Network (ERMHAN) a multichannel context-aware service platform designed to support care networks in cooperating and sharing information with the goal of improving patient quality of life. In order to meet extensibility and flexibility requirements, this platform has been developed through ontology-based context-aware computing and a service oriented approach. We also provide some preliminary results of performance analysis and user survey activity. PMID:18695739

  16. Confidentiality or continuity? Family caregivers' experiences with care for HIV/AIDS patients in home-based care in Lesotho.

    PubMed

    Makoae, Mokhantso G; Jubber, Ken

    2008-04-01

    In the context of poor access to antiretroviral therapies in sub-Saharan Africa, the minimum treatment package intended to treat opportunistic infections common with HIV infection is inadequate but appealing, since it presumes universal coverage of medical care for patients living with HIV and AIDS. The overall objective of this study was to analyse the challenges which family caregivers encountered in home-based care when they tried to access medical treatment for home-based AIDS patients in the context of confidentiality and limited medical care. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews with a sample of 21 family caregivers -16 females and 5 males aged between 23 and 85 years was conducted with the assistance of health personnel in two hospitals in Lesotho. Using the concept of continuity of care, this article discusses the experiences of family caregivers about home care, including their experiences of adherence to confidentiality by health care professionals and non-disclosure of AIDS as the context of illness, the circumstances under which the caregivers initiated caregiving and sought medical care, and how these factors could be stressors in caregiving. There was continuity of care where the caregivers obtained hospital support. However, when confidentiality was adhered to the caregivers were frustrated by lack of information, disrupted treatment, exclusion of their perspectives in medical care, failure to secure hospitalisation, ambiguous goals and non-responsiveness, so that continuity of care was jeopardised. Thus it can be concluded that professional-assisted disclosure benefited the patients because it facilitated continuity of care through the caregivers. PMID:18496618

  17. Educating Hispanic Women About Breast Cancer Prevention: Evaluation of a Home-Based Promotora-Led Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Espinoza, Noah; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Thompson, Beti

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Trained community health promoters (i.e., promotoras) conducted home-based group educational interventions (home health parties) to educate Hispanic women from the Lower Yakima Valley of Washington state about breast cancer and mammography screening. Methods Women aged 40–79 participating in the parties completed baseline and follow-up surveys 6 months postintervention (n = 70). Changes in general cancer knowledge, breast cancer screening practices, and intentions to be screened among participants from baseline to follow-up were measured using McNemar's test for marginal homogeneity to evaluate the effectiveness of the parties. Results The average age of the sample was 50.0 years (standard deviation [SD] 10.0), 84% reported less than an eighth grade education, and 54% were covered by the state's Basic Health Care Plan. Significant changes between baseline and follow-up were observed with respect to (1) believing that risk of cancer could not be reduced (41% vs. 15%, respectively, p = 0.001), (2) ever having a mammogram (83% vs. 91%, p = 0.014), (3) discussing a mammogram with a doctor (37% vs. 67%, p < 0.001), and (4) intending to have a mammogram within the next few months among women who did not report having a mammogram between baseline and follow-up (61% vs. 81%, p = 0.046). Conclusions Participation in home-based group educational interventions delivered by promotoras may be associated with improved breast cancer screening practices among Hispanic women. PMID:20849288

  18. Safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise program in patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bankolé, Landry-Cyrille; Millet, Guillaume Y.; Temesi, John; Bachasson, Damien; Ravelojaona, Marion; Wuyam, Bernard; Verges, Samuel; Ponsot, Elodie; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Kadi, Fawzi; Féasson, Léonard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous randomized controlled trials investigating exercise training programs in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) patients are scarce and of short duration only. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of a 6-month home-based exercise training program on fitness, muscle, and motor function in FSHD patients. Methods: Sixteen FSHD patients were randomly assigned to training (TG) and control (CG) groups (both n = 8) in a home-based exercise intervention. Training consisted of cycling 3 times weekly for 35 minutes (combination of strength, high-intensity interval, and low-intensity aerobic) at home for 24 weeks. Patients in CG also performed an identical training program (CTG) after 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) measured every 6 weeks. The principal secondary outcomes were maximal quadriceps strength (MVC) and local quadriceps endurance every 12 weeks. Other outcome measures included maximal aerobic power (MAP) and experienced fatigue every 6 weeks, 6-minute walking distance every 12 weeks, and muscle characteristics from vastus lateralis biopsies taken pre- and postintervention. Results: The compliance rate was 91% in TG. Significant improvements with training were observed in the VO2 peak (+19%, P = 0.002) and MAP by week 6 and further to week 24. Muscle endurance, MVC, and 6-minute walking distance increased and experienced fatigue decreased. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area and citrate synthase activity increased by 34% (P = 0.008) and 46% (P = 0.003), respectively. Dystrophic pathophysiologic patterns were not exacerbated. Similar improvements were experienced by TG and CTG. Conclusions: A combined strength and interval cycling exercise-training program compatible with patients’ daily professional and social activities leads to significant functional benefits without compromising muscle tissue. PMID:27495097

  19. 3D False Color Computed Tomography for Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Permanent Denervated Human Muscles Submitted to Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Edmunds, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT) protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES). Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191) at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU) values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10]), loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40]), and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]). The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as evidenced by the

  20. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Home-Based HIV Counselling and Testing Intervention versus the Standard (Facility Based) HIV Testing Strategy in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tabana, Hanani; Nkonki, Lungiswa; Hongoro, Charles; Doherty, Tanya; Ekström, Anna Mia; Naik, Reshma; Zembe-Mkabile, Wanga; Jackson, Debra; Thorson, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is growing evidence concerning the acceptability and feasibility of home-based HIV testing. However, less is known about the cost-effectiveness of the approach yet it is a critical component to guide decisions about scaling up access to HIV testing. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of a home-based HIV testing intervention in rural South Africa. Methods Two alternatives: clinic and home-based HIV counselling and testing were compared. Costs were analysed from a provider’s perspective for the period of January to December 2010. The outcome, HIV counselling and testing (HCT) uptake was obtained from the Good Start home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) cluster randomised control trial undertaken in KwaZulu-Natal province. Cost-effectiveness was estimated for a target population of 22,099 versus 23,864 people for intervention and control communities respectively. Average costs were calculated as the cost per client tested, while cost-effectiveness was calculated as the cost per additional client tested through HBHCT. Results Based on effectiveness of 37% in the intervention (HBHCT) arm compared to 16% in control arm, home based testing costs US$29 compared to US$38 per person for clinic HCT. The incremental cost effectiveness per client tested using HBHCT was $19. Conclusions HBHCT was less costly and more effective. Home-based HCT could present a cost-effective alternative for rural ‘hard to reach’ populations depending on affordability by the health system, and should be considered as part of community outreach programs. PMID:26275059

  1. “It is always HIV/AIDS and TB”: Home-based carers’ perspectives on epilepsy in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Keikelame, Mpoe Johannah; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The study highlights the complex cultural religious factors affecting epilepsy and a need for integrated home-based care services. Two focus group discussions exploring home-based carers’ (HBCs) perspectives on epilepsy were conducted using a semi-structured focus group interview guide, which was based on Kleinman's explanatory model framework. The audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was done. The three main themes were epilepsy names and metaphors, religious beliefs about the cause and treatment of epilepsy, and HBCs’ perceived roles and strategies for engaging in epilepsy care. Findings provide some insights for research, policy, and practice. PMID:27258583

  2. Telehealth for Persons with Severe Functional Disabilities and their Caregivers: Facilitating Self-care Management in the Home Setting

    PubMed Central

    Forducey, Pamela G.; Glueckauf, Robert L.; Bergquist, Thomas; Maheu, Marlene M.; Yutsis, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Persons with severe functional disabilities are the highest users of health care services. Caring for the needs of this population represents a significant percentage of our national health care costs. A growing body of research has demonstrated the efficacy of self-management strategies and caregiver engagement for effective long-term care for individuals with chronic medical conditions. Economic forces over the past decade have led to new challenges and resulted in major changes in health care delivery resulting in shortened length of inpatient stays and greater limits on the length of outpatient treatment. Telehealth is an innovative method for health care delivery and a means of meeting this new challenge. This paper highlights the findings of three pilot studies on the use of telecommunications technologies in promoting self-care management and enhancing health care outcomes in persons with severe disabilities and their family caregivers. The importance of matching technology to the needs of this population, lessons learned from these investigations, and future directions for research are addressed. PMID:22662729

  3. Interpersonal Communication and Smoking Cessation in the Context of an Incentive-Based Program: Survey Evidence From a Telehealth Intervention in a Low-Income Population.

    PubMed

    Parks, Michael J; Slater, Jonathan S; Rothman, Alexander J; Nelson, Christina L

    2016-01-01

    The tobacco epidemic disproportionately affects low-income populations, and telehealth is an evidence-based strategy for extending tobacco cessation services to underserved populations. A public health priority is to establish incentive-based interventions at the population level in order to promote long-term smoking cessation in low-income populations. Yet randomized clinical trials show that financial incentives tend to encourage only short-term steps of cessation, not continuous smoking abstinence. One potential mechanism for increasing long-term cessation is interpersonal communication (IPC) in response to population-level interventions. However, more research is needed on IPC and its influence on health behavior change, particularly in the context of incentive-based, population-level programs. This study used survey data gathered after a population-level telehealth intervention that offered $20 incentives to low-income smokers for being connected to Minnesota's free quitline in order to examine how perceived incentive importance and IPC about the incentive-based program relate to both short-term and long-term health behavior change. Results showed that IPC was strongly associated with initial quitline utilization and continuous smoking abstinence as measured by 30-day point prevalence rates at 7-month follow-up. Perceived incentive importance had weak associations with both measures of cessation, and all associations were nonsignificant in models adjusting for IPC. These results were found in descriptive analyses, logistic regression models, and Heckman probit models that adjusted for participant recruitment. In sum, a behavioral telehealth intervention targeting low-income smokers that offered a financial incentive inspired IPC, and this social response was strongly related to utilization of intervention services as well as continuous smoking abstinence. PMID:26166678

  4. Interpersonal Communication and Smoking Cessation in the Context of an Incentive-Based Program: Survey Evidence From a Telehealth Intervention in a Low-Income Population

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Michael J.; Slater, Jonathan S.; Rothman, Alexander J.; Nelson, Christina L.

    2016-01-01

    The tobacco epidemic disproportionately affects low-income populations, and telehealth is an evidence-based strategy for extending tobacco cessation services to underserved populations. A public health priority is to establish incentive-based interventions at the population level in order to promote long-term smoking cessation in low-income populations. Yet randomized clinical trials show that financial incentives tend to encourage only short-term steps of cessation, not continuous smoking abstinence. One potential mechanism for increasing long-term cessation is interpersonal communication (IPC) in response to population-level interventions. However, more research is needed on IPC and its influence on health behavior change, particularly in the context of incentive-based, population-level programs. This study used survey data gathered after a population-level telehealth intervention that offered $20 incentives to low-income smokers for being connected to Minnesota’s free quitline in order to examine how perceived incentive importance and IPC about the incentive-based program relate to both short-term and long-term health behavior change. Results showed that IPC was strongly associated with initial quitline utilization and continuous smoking abstinence as measured by 30-day point prevalence rates at 7-month follow-up. Perceived incentive importance had weak associations with both measures of cessation, and all associations were nonsignificant in models adjusting for IPC. These results were found in descriptive analyses, logistic regression models, and Heckman probit models that adjusted for participant recruitment. In sum, a behavioral telehealth intervention targeting low-income smokers that offered a financial incentive inspired IPC, and this social response was strongly related to utilization of intervention services as well as continuous smoking abstinence. PMID:26166678

  5. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  6. Determining the Reach of a Home-Based Physical Activity Program for Older Adults within the Context of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harden, Samantha M.; Fanning, Jason T.; Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Estabrooks, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the reach of physical activity (PA) programs is challenging due to inconsistent reporting across studies. The purpose of this study was to document multiple indicators of program reach for a 6-month, Digital Versatile Disc (DVD)-delivered home-based PA program. Radio, newspaper and direct mailing advertisements were tracked to…

  7. COMPARISON OF HOME-BASED THERAPY WITH READY-TO-USE THERAPEUTIC FOOD WITH STANDARD THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF MALNOURISHED MALAWIAN CHILDREN: A CONTROLLED, CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS TRIAL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Childhood malnutrition is common in Malawi, and the standard treatment, which follows international guidelines, results in poor recovery rates. Higher recovery rates have been seen in pilot studies of home-based therapy with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF). The objective was to compare the rec...

  8. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Denise Moreno; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H; Betterton, Eric A

    2015-09-01

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered "hard-to-reach" by government-led programs. PMID:26371028

  9. The Impact of Home-Based Child Care Provider Unionization on the Cost, Type, and Availability of Subsidized Child Care in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindal, Todd; West, Martin R.; Willett, John B.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In February 2005, Illinois became the first U.S. state to grant home-based child care providers (HBCPs) the right to form a labor union in order to bargain collectively with the state government. This policy inspired similar efforts across the country and represents a potentially important direction for child care policy. To date, the implications…

  10. Parental Satisfaction with a Home-Based Intervention for Developmentally Delayed Children in Switzerland: A Survey over a 10-year Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Favez, Nicolas; Metral, Eric; Govaerts, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of parental satisfaction with services provided to their child by an Early Intervention Service in Geneva, Switzerland. The Service offers psycho-educational home-based interventions for developmentally delayed children. Parents whose child used the service between 1991 and 2001 filled out a questionnaire with Likert…

  11. A Novel, Self-Guided, Home-Based Intervention to Improve Condom Use among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emetu, Roberta E.; Marshall, Alexandra; Sanders, Stephanie A.; Yarber, William L.; Milhausen, Robin R.; Crosby, Richard A.; Graham, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study tested the efficacy of a brief, novel, theory-driven, self-guided, home-based intervention designed to promote condom use among young men who have sex with men (YMSM). Participants: Thirty YMSM were recruited from a large public US midwestern university during spring of 2012. Methods: The intervention was tested using a…

  12. Facilitating the Career Development of Home-Based Adults: The Home/Community-Based Career Education Model. Final Report. Volume I. The Model: Its Nature, Context, and Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guilfoy, Vivian M.; Grothe, Mardell S.

    This first volume of a three-volume final report describes the activities of a 3-year project to design, develop, and implement a comprehensive delivery system to meet the career-related information, guidance, and referral needs of home-based adults, those 16 and older neither working nor attending school on a full-time basis. The volume begins…

  13. The Relationship between Early Learning Rates and Treatment Outcome for Children with Autism Receiving Intensive Home-Based Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Mary Jane; Delmolino, Lara

    2006-01-01

    The present study suggests that initial learning rates of young children with autism receiving early, intensive, home-based behavioral intervention are moderately correlated with outcome variables after four years of treatment. 20 children with autism who had Childhood Autism Rating Scale scores between 37.5 and 58 and Vineland Adaptive Behavior…

  14. Does Family Make a Difference? Mid-Term Effects of a School/Home-Based Intervention Program to Enhance Reading Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villiger, Caroline; Niggli, Alois; Wandeler, Christian; Kutzelmann, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a school/home-based intervention program designed to enhance the reading motivation and comprehension of Swiss fourth graders (N = 713). In order to identify the specific contribution of the home environment, the program was implemented in one group "without" (N = 244) and in one group "with" (N = 225) parental…

  15. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Two Early Intervention Programs for Young Children with Autism: Centre-Based with Parent Program and Home-Based

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jacqueline; Williams, Katrina; Carter, Mark; Evans, David; Parmenter, Trevor; Silove, Natalie; Clark, Trevor; Warren, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This study compares outcomes of early intervention programs for young children with autism; an individualised home-based program (HB), a small group centre-based program for children combined with a parent training and support group (CB) and a non-treatment comparison group (WL). Outcome measures of interest include social and communication skill…

  16. Longitudinal comparison of a physiotherapist-led, home-based and group-based program for increasing physical activity in community-dwelling middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Freene, Nicole; Waddington, Gordon; Davey, Rachel; Cochrane, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared the longer-term effects of physical activity interventions. Here we compare a 6-month physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program to a community group exercise program over 2 years. Healthy, sedentary community-dwelling 50-65 year olds were recruited to a non-randomised community group exercise program (G, n = 93) or a physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program (HB, n = 65). Outcomes included 'sufficient' physical activity (Active Australia Survey), minutes of moderate-vigorous physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M), aerobic capacity (2-min step-test), quality of life (SF-12v2), blood pressure, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio and body mass index. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Using intention-to-treat analysis, both interventions resulted in significant and sustainable increases in the number of participants achieving 'sufficient' physical activity (HB 22 v. 41%, G 22 v. 47%, P ≤ 0.001) and decreases in waist circumference (HB 90 v. 89 cm, G 93 v. 91 cm, P < 0.001) over 2 years. The home-based program was less costly (HB A$47 v. G $84 per participant) but less effective in achieving the benefits at 2 years. The physiotherapist-led, home-based physical activity program may be a low-cost alternative to increase physical activity levels for those not interested in, or unable to attend, a group exercise program. PMID:26509205

  17. Home-Based Businesses: Implications for the Rural Economy of the South. The Rural South: Preparing for the Challenges of the 21st Century, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela J.; Muske, Glenn

    In the face of changing agriculture, an aging population, and the outflow of citizens seeking livable wages, rural Southern communities are challenged with how to enhance their economies to insure long-term business viability. Home-based businesses are an effective aspect of rural economic development. They allow flexibility and choice of work…

  18. Home-Based Parental Involvement in Young Children's Education: Examining the Effects of Maternal Education across U.S. Ethnic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suizzo, Marie-Anne; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the contributions of maternal education and ethnicity to three dimensions of home-based parental involvement in young children's education and development: parental expectations about educational attainment, children's activities at home and outside the home, and family routines. Controlling for family background variables…

  19. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Ramírez, Denise; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D.; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A.; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered “hard-to-reach” by government-led programs. PMID:26371028

  20. Monitoring the adequacy of catch-up growth among moderately malnourished children receiving home-based therapy using mid-upper arm circumference in Southern Malawi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year more children die from moderate than severe malnutrition. Home-based therapy (HBT) using Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) has proven to successfully treat uncomplicated childhood malnutrition on an outpatient basis. This study attempts to discern if Mid-upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) ...

  1. Safety and feasibility of a home-based six week resistance training program in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), among the most common chronic diseases of childhood, can be associated with attenuated physical activity levels, reduced fitness, decreased functionality and pain. This pilot study aimed to determine the safety, feasibility and effect of a six week resistance training program in children with JIA. Methods Youth (8-18 years) with JIA participated in a home-based resistance training program. Participants reported pain on an electronic diary once a day for one week prior to training, then once a day on non-exercise days and three times a day (before-exercise, after-exercise, and end-of-day) on exercise days for the subsequent six weeks of training. Secondary outcome measures included inflammation (assessed by ultrasound), muscle size (assessed by ultrasound), muscle strength (assessed by dynamometer) and functional ability (assessed by childhood health assessment questionnaire), measured at baseline and post-training. Participants were also instructed to wear an accelerometer one week prior to training to estimate baseline physical activity levels. Statistical analyses included safety (pain changes and any adverse events), feasibility (adherence to program and modifications made to exercises) and effect of program (differences in secondary measures pre and post training). An alpha level of p < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results Seven participants completed an average of 12.7 ± 3.4 (range 8-17) exercise sessions out of a possible 18 (70.6%). No adverse events were reported and pain did not increase over the seven weeks. Secondary measures revealed a significant increase in vastus lateralis thickness from pre to post training (p < 0.05). End-of-day pain intensity was correlated to end-of-day stiffness, fatigue and mood (r = .864, r = .581, r = -.637, respectively, p < 0.001). Pain intensity was also correlated with ratings of perceived exertion of the exercise (r = 0.324, p < 0

  2. A Home-Based Educational Intervention Improves Patient Activation Measures and Diabetes Health Indicators among Zuni Indians

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vallabh O.; Carroll, Casey; Mals, Ryan; Ghahate, Donica; Bobelu, Jeanette; Sandy, Phillip; Colleran, Kathleen; Schrader, Ronald; Faber, Thomas; Burge, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction One in three people will be diagnosed with diabetes by 2050, and the proportion will likely be higher among Native Americans. Diabetes control is currently suboptimal in underserved populations despite a plethora of new therapies. Patient empowerment is a key determinant of diabetes control, but such empowerment can be difficult to achieve due to resource limitation and cultural, language and health literacy barriers. We describe a home-based educational intervention using Community Health Representatives (CHRs), leading to improvement in Patient Activation Measures scores and clinical indicators of diabetes control. Methods Sixty participants with type 2 diabetes (T2D) completed a baseline evaluation including physical exam, Point of Care (POC) testing, and the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) survey. Participants then underwent a one hour group didactic session led by Community Health Representatives (CHRs) who subsequently carried out monthly home-based educational interventions to encourage healthy lifestyles, including diet, exercise, and alcohol and cigarette avoidance until follow up at 6 months, when clinical phenotyping and the PAM survey were repeated. Results PAM scores were increased by at least one level in 35 (58%) participants, while 24 participants who started at higher baseline score did not change. Six months after intervention, mean levels of A1C decreased by 0.7 ± 1.2%; fasting blood glucose decreased by 24.0 ± 38.0 mg/dl; BMI decreased by 1.5 ± 2.1 kg/m2; total cholesterol decreased by 12.0± 28.0 mg/dl; and triglycerides decreased by 52.0 ± 71.0 mg/dl. All of these changes were statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion This six month, CHR led and community-oriented educational intervention helps inform standards of practice for the management of diabetes, engages diabetic populations in their own care, and reduces health disparities for the underserved population of Zuni Indians. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  3. Effect of home-based Kegel exercises on quality of life in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cavkaytar, S; Kokanali, M K; Topcu, H O; Aksakal, O S; Doğanay, M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of home-based Kegel exercises in women with stress and mixed urinary incontinence. A total of 90 women with urodynamically proven urinary stress (SUI) and mixed (MUI) incontinence awaiting anti-incontinence surgery were recruited in the urogynaecology clinic of Ankara Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Research and Education Hospital. Of these, 18 women were excluded due to low compliance and the remaining 72 were divided into two groups according to urodynamic diagnosis (SUI group, n = 38; MUI group, n = 34). Age, BMI, menopausal status and medical history of the women were recorded. The women took Kegel exercise, consisting of 10 sets of contractions/day; each set included 10 repetitions, for at least 8 weeks. To evaluate the pelvic floor muscle strength, the modified Oxford grading system was used before and after Kegel exercising. The Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7); Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6) and the Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) questions were compared before and after 8 weeks of Kegel exercising. The age, BMI, gravidity, menopausal status, macrosomic fetus history, hypertension and asthma were similar between the groups. There were statistically significant lower scores in both IIQ-7 and UDI-6 before and after Kegel exercises within each group (p < 0.001). The mean change of the IIQ-7 and UDI-6 score was statistically significantly higher in the SUI group than in the MUI group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.003, respectively). Results of the Oxford scale were also statistically significantly higher after Kegel exercises within each group (p = < 0.001). In total, 68.4% of the women in the SUI group and 41.2% of the women in the MUI group reported improvements which were statistically significant (p = 0.02). We conclude that home-based Kegel exercises, with no supervision, have been found effective in women with SUI and MUI. The improvement was more prominent in women with SUI. PMID

  4. Effectiveness and Limitations of Unsupervised Home-Based Balance Rehabilitation with Nintendo Wii in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Corona, Federica; Leban, Bruno; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Balance training represents a critical part of the rehabilitation process of individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since impaired postural control is a distinctive symptom of the disease. In recent years, the use of the Nintendo Wii system has become widespread among rehabilitation specialists for this purpose, but few studies have verified the effectiveness of such an approach using quantitative measures of balance. In this study, we analyzed the postural sway features of a cohort of twenty-seven individuals with MS before and after 5 weeks of unsupervised home-based balance training with the Wii system. Center of pressure (COP) time-series were recorded using a pressure platform and processed to calculate sway area, COP path length, displacements, and velocities in mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Although the results show a significant reduction in sway area, COP displacements, and velocity, such improvements are essentially restricted to the ML direction, as the Wii platform appears to properly stimulate the postural control system in the frontal plane but not in the sagittal one. Available Wii games, although somewhat beneficial, appear not fully suitable for rehabilitation in MS owing to scarce flexibility and adaptability to MS needs and thus specific software should be developed. PMID:26583146

  5. A 4-Week Home-Based Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program During Radiation Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M.; Peppone, Luke; Darling, Tom V.; Palesh, Oxana; Heckler, Charles E.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    During radiation therapy, cancer patients may report cancer-related fatigue (CRF), which impairs aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, and, ultimately, quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this pilot clinical trial was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a home-based aerobic and progressive resistance exercise intervention for aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, CRF, and QOL. Daily steps walked (DSW), daily minutes of resistance exercise (MRE), and number of resistance exercise days (RED) were assessed to evaluate intervention adherence. Breast and prostate cancer patients (n = 38) beginning radiation therapy were randomized to undergo 4 weeks of exercise or no exercise. Participants in the exercise group demonstrated good adherence to the exercise intervention, with significantly more DSW, MRE, and RED at post intervention and 3 month follow-up than controls. Participants in the exercise intervention exhibited significantly higher QOL and significantly lower CRF post intervention and at 3-month follow-up than controls. Results of this pilot study provide positive preliminary evidence that exercise during radiation may be beneficial for cancer patients. PMID:19831159

  6. [Trial of information sharing for home-based patient care using Cybozu Live , a cloud-based groupware].

    PubMed

    Asahina, Kan

    2011-12-01

    Home-based patient care involves several different care services of specialties, so that it is crucial to share patient information effectively among the caregivers. To overcome the problems with conventional means for storing and sharing information, we introduced Cybozu Live , a cloud-based groupware provided for free of charge. As a result, the amount of information shared increased while telephone and facsimile transactions dramatically decreased. A questionnaire survey revealed that the caregivers generally appreciated the use of this groupware; they felt that more information was needed for tasks while the load of using telephone and facsimile is minimal. We found the followings through our experiences: 1 ) Simply sharing information can largely contribute to supporting patients and their families; 2 ) Awareness of patients, families and caregivers is more important in the homecare information sharing than are numerical data; 3 ) Effective information sharing creates a sense of togetherness of the team beyond mere co-operation among the staff; 4 ) Effective information sharing provides learning opportunities for caregivers; and 5 ) An appropriate tool such as Cybozu Live is needed for effective information sharing. PMID:22189308

  7. Stigma, burden, social support, and willingness to care among caregivers of PLWHA in home-based care in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh; Chaudoir, Stephenie R; Escobar, Maria C; Kalichman, Seth

    2011-07-01

    Despite its benefits for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), home-based care (HBC) may have negative effects on caregivers. Caregivers experience high levels of burden and may be targets of HIV-related prejudice and discrimination. In this cross-sectional survey of 358 caregivers from five hospices across KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, 49 (13.7%) caregivers personally experienced discrimination as a result of caring for PLWHA. One hundred and seventy (47.5%) marked one or more items on the HIV stigma scale. Eighty-eight percent had low to moderate levels of caregiver burden. People with higher level of burden and higher income were more likely to hold stigmatizing beliefs. Caregivers with the following characteristics: support from a nurse, support from community careworker, HIV stigmatizing beliefs, and personal experience of discrimination as result of caring for PLWHA and low caregiver burden, had more than twice the odds of wanting to care for another PLWA in the future. Overall, caregivers in HBC experience low level of severe caregiver burden. The support offered to caregivers from the hospice and relatively low levels of discrimination encourage expansion of HBC programs for PLWHA. PMID:21400316

  8. Narratives of Violence, Pathology, and Empowerment: Mental Health Needs Assessment of Home-Based Female Sex Workers in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Srishti; Marcus, Marina; Verdeli, Helen

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the narratives of psychological distress and resilience among a group of female sex workers who use residential spaces to attend to clients in rural India. The narratives reflect the lived experiences of these women. They describe the women's reasons for opting into sex work; guilt, shame, and stigma related to their sex worker status; experiences with intimate partner and domestic violence; health-related problems; communication with their family members about their sex worker status; mental health referral practices among the women; and elements of resilience and strength that they experience within themselves and within their community of fellow sex workers. The article also offers elements of our own experiences of recruiting the women to participate in the focus group, training local outreach workers in conducting focus group discussions, and forging a collaboration with a local community-based organization to highlight important barriers, challenges, and strategies for planning a group-based discussion to explore the mental health needs of home-based sex workers. PMID:27463830

  9. Home-based administration of Sayana® Press: review and assessment of needs in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Keith, Bonnie; Wood, Siri; Tifft, Sara; Hutchings, Jane

    2014-05-01

    A new presentation of the subcutaneous (SC) injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) increases the possibilities for home and self-administration of this popular contraceptive method. Sayana® Press is DMPA-SC in the prefilled Uniject™ injection system and consists of one dose that provides 3 months of contraceptive protection. Studies indicate that lay caregiver and self-injection of various medications, including other injectable presentations of DMPA-SC, are acceptable and effective. Introduction of Sayana® Press in developing countries could extend injectable contraceptive delivery safely and effectively beyond the clinic and, eventually, into the home, allowing lay caregiver or self-administration. Research needs for low-resource settings include assessing the acceptability and feasibility of self-injection with Sayana® Press. Feasibility studies necessary for implementing a sustainable home-based delivery program include assessment of training, health systems, policies, infrastructure needs and programmatic considerations to optimize women's ability to manage their self-injection schedule. PMID:24813924

  10. Implementation processes associated with a home-based phonological awareness intervention for children with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Skibbe, Lori E; Justice, Laura M; Bowles, Ryan P

    2011-04-01

    The implementation processes associated with a home-based phonological awareness intervention were observed for mothers and their 4-year-old children with specific language impairment (SLI). Mother-child dyads (n = 13) read books four times per week over 12 weeks; each book contained nine embedded phonological awareness (PA) tasks. Four hundred and ninety-eight book reading sessions were coded for three variables of interest: maternal support of concept development, quantity of maternal instructional support, and accuracy of children's responses to the PA tasks. Using growth curve modelling, results indicate that maternal support of concept development decreased over the course of the 12-week program, and the quantity of maternal supports changed considerably reflecting intra-individual differences among mothers. Both support of concept development and quantity of support decreased over the course of a given week. In addition, children's responses to the phonological awareness tasks significantly increased over the 12-week intervention. Overall, mothers did not provide support that consistently supported children's learning over time, and the increases in children's correct responses, although significant, were less than anticipated given the length of the intervention. These findings indicate that mothers may need additional supports when implementing emergent literacy programs with their children. PMID:21480808

  11. Feasibility of caregiver-directed home-based hand-arm bimanual intensive training: A brief report

    PubMed Central

    Ferre, Claudio L.; Brandão, Marina B.; Hung, Ya-Ching; Carmel, Jason B.; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine feasibility of a home-based, intensive bimanual intervention with children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy. Methods Eleven children (aged 29–54 months) received 90 hours of home hand-arm bimanual intensive therapy (H-HABIT) provided by their trained caregivers. Parenting stress levels and compliance were monitored using the Parenting Stress Index and daily logs. Quality of bimanual performance and changes in performance/satisfaction of functional goals were assessed using the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), respectively, at two pretreatment baseline sessions and two posttreatment sessions (immediate and six months). Results Ten children completed the study with caregivers completing on average 85.6 hours of H-HABIT. Daily logs indicated high caregiver compliance. Stress levels remained stable across the intervention. Children demonstrated significant improvements in the AHA and COPM. Conclusion H-HABIT is a feasible intervention for improving hand function and merits further investigation in a randomized-control trial. PMID:25180530

  12. Home-based nursing interventions improve knowledge of disease and management in patients with heart failure 1

    PubMed Central

    Azzolin, Karina de Oliveira; Lemos, Dayanna Machado; Lucena, Amália de Fátima; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess patient knowledge of heart failure by home-based measurement of two NOC Nursing Outcomes over a six-month period and correlate mean outcome indicator scores with mean scores of a heart failure Knowledge Questionnaire. METHODS: in this before-and-after study, patients with heart failure received four home visits over a six-month period after hospital discharge. At each home visit, nursing interventions were implemented, NOC outcomes were assessed, and the Knowledge Questionnaire was administered. RESULTS: overall, 23 patients received home visits. Mean indicator scores for the outcome Knowledge: Medication were 2.27±0.14 at home visit 1 and 3.55±0.16 at home visit 4 (P<0.001); and, for the outcome Knowledge: Treatment Regimen, 2.33±0.13 at home visit 1 and 3.59±0.14 at home visit 4 (P<0.001). The correlation between the Knowledge Questionnaire and the Nursing Outcomes Classification scores was strong at home visit 1 (r=0.7, P<0.01), but weak and non significant at visit 4. CONCLUSION: the results show improved patient knowledge of heart failure and a strong correlation between Nursing Outcomes Classification indicator scores and Knowledge Questionnaire scores. The NOC Nursing Outcomes proved effective as knowledge assessment measures when compared with the validated instrument. PMID:25806630

  13. Effectiveness and Limitations of Unsupervised Home-Based Balance Rehabilitation with Nintendo Wii in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Corona, Federica; Leban, Bruno; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Balance training represents a critical part of the rehabilitation process of individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS) since impaired postural control is a distinctive symptom of the disease. In recent years, the use of the Nintendo Wii system has become widespread among rehabilitation specialists for this purpose, but few studies have verified the effectiveness of such an approach using quantitative measures of balance. In this study, we analyzed the postural sway features of a cohort of twenty-seven individuals with MS before and after 5 weeks of unsupervised home-based balance training with the Wii system. Center of pressure (COP) time-series were recorded using a pressure platform and processed to calculate sway area, COP path length, displacements, and velocities in mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions. Although the results show a significant reduction in sway area, COP displacements, and velocity, such improvements are essentially restricted to the ML direction, as the Wii platform appears to properly stimulate the postural control system in the frontal plane but not in the sagittal one. Available Wii games, although somewhat beneficial, appear not fully suitable for rehabilitation in MS owing to scarce flexibility and adaptability to MS needs and thus specific software should be developed. PMID:26583146

  14. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... do when I don't have access to physical therapy? While VEDA does not recommend doing vestibular exercises ... already existing ringing Fluid discharge from your ears Pain and ... try a general low-impact and balance-strengthening fitness program. The more ...

  15. Overcoming Clinical Inertia: A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Telehealth Remote Monitoring Intervention Using Paired Glucose Testing in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Blozis, Shelley A; Young, Heather M; Nesbitt, Thomas S; Quinn, Charlene C

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a worldwide challenge. Practice guidelines promote structured self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for informing health care providers about glycemic control and providing patient feedback to increase knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavior change. Paired glucose testing—pairs of glucose results obtained before and after a meal or physical activity—is a method of structured SMBG. However, frequent access to glucose data to interpret values and recommend actions is challenging. A complete feedback loop—data collection and interpretation combined with feedback to modify treatment—has been associated with improved outcomes, yet there remains limited integration of SMBG feedback in diabetes management. Incorporating telehealth remote monitoring and asynchronous electronic health record (EHR) feedback from certified diabetes educators (CDEs)—specialists in glucose pattern management—employ the complete feedback loop to improve outcomes. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate a telehealth remote monitoring intervention using paired glucose testing and asynchronous data analysis in adults with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim was change in glycated hemoglobin (A1c)—a measure of overall glucose management—between groups after 6 months. The secondary aims were change in self-reported Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA), Diabetes Empowerment Scale, and Diabetes Knowledge Test. Methods A 2-group randomized clinical trial was conducted comparing usual care to telehealth remote monitoring with paired glucose testing and asynchronous virtual visits. Participants were aged 30-70 years, not using insulin with A1c levels between 7.5% and 10.9% (58-96 mmol/mol). The telehealth remote monitoring tablet computer transmitted glucose data and facilitated a complete feedback loop to educate participants, analyze actionable glucose data, and provide feedback. Data from paired glucose testing were analyzed

  16. Health and economic benefits of scaling up a home-based neonatal care package in rural India: a modelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Arindam; Colson, Abigail R; Verma, Amit; Megiddo, Itamar; Ashok, Ashvin; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-06-01

    Approximately 900 000 newborn children die every year in India, accounting for 28% of neonatal deaths globally. In 2011, India introduced a home-based newborn care (HBNC) package to be delivered by community health workers across rural areas. We estimate the disease and economic burden that could be averted by scaling up the HBNC in rural India using IndiaSim, an agent-based simulation model, to examine two interventions. In the first intervention, the existing community health worker network begins providing HBNC for rural households without access to home- or facility-based newborn care, as introduced by India's recent programme. In the second intervention, we consider increased coverage of HBNC across India so that total coverage of neonatal care (HBNC or otherwise) in the rural areas of each state reaches at least 90%. We find that compared with a baseline of no coverage, providing the care package through the existing network of community health workers could avert 48 [95% uncertainty range (UR) 34-63] incident cases of severe neonatal morbidity and 5 (95% UR 4-7) related deaths, save $4411 (95% UR $3088-$5735) in out-of-pocket treatment costs, and provide $285 (95% UR $200-$371) in value of insurance per 1000 live births in rural India. Increasing the coverage of HBNC to 90% will avert an additional 9 (95% UR 7-12) incident cases, 1 death (95% UR 0.72-1.33), and $613 (95% UR $430-$797) in out-of-pocket expenditures, and provide $55 (95% UR $39-$72) in incremental value of insurance per 1000 live births. Intervention benefits are greater for lower socioeconomic groups and in the poorer states of Chhattisgarh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, Assam and Uttar Pradesh. PMID:26561440

  17. A national survey of home-based care kits for palliative HIV/AIDS care in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mabude, Z A; Beksinska, M E; Ramkissoon, A; Wood, S; Folsom, M

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess home-based care (HBC) kits and programs in South Africa to evaluate the feasibility of scaling up kit production and distribution. South African HBC organizations received structured questionnaires; key informant interviews and a literature review were completed to assess systems for production, distribution and supply of HBC kits. Meetings with stakeholders were held in two Provinces to share and analyze the study findings. The study team distributed questionnaires to 466 organizations and conducted interviews with representatives from 45 organizations, the Provincial Department of Health (DoH) and manufacturers of kits. All identifiable HBC organizations in South Africa were included in the survey. As a result 215 HBC organizations returned questionnaires; including non-governmental organizations (56%), community-based organizations (32%) and organizations affiliated with government health departments. Two types of kits were available: a home kit and a professional kit. The demand for HBC kits exceeded availability, kit contents and availability varied considerably and the supply chain was irregular. Kit production and distribution systems were fragmented. Replenishment of kit items was problematic. End-users are mostly caregivers who have not received adequate training on their use. The study shows that substantial work has been done by HBC organizations in South Africa to respond to the need for palliative care supplies within resource constraints. The growing demand for kits exceeds the supply. There is a need to improve the supply chain management of HBC kits, strengthen referral systems and links between community-based organizations and government departments, expand training opportunities for care givers, and develop monitoring and evaluation systems. PMID:18608083

  18. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Clinic and Home-Based Behavioral Intervention to Decrease Obesity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Lori J.; Spear, Stephanie; Boles, Richard; Kuhl, Elizabeth; Ratcliff, Megan; Scharf, Cindy; Bolling, Christopher; Rausch, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a 6-month clinic and home-based behavioral intervention (Learning about Activity and Understanding Nutrition for Child Health; LAUNCH) to reduce obesity in preschool children ≥95th BMI percentile compared to enhanced standard of care (Pediatrician Counseling; PC). LAUNCH was a family-based behavioral intervention that taught parents to use child behavior management strategies to increase healthy eating and activity for their children and themselves. PC presented the same diet and activity recommendations, but was delivered in a one-time PC session. Eighteen children aged 2–5 years (mean 4.71 ± 1.01) with an average BMI percentile of 98 (±1.60) and an overweight parent were randomized to LAUNCH or PC. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months (end of LAUNCH treatment) and 12 months (6 months following LAUNCH treatment). LAUNCH showed a significantly greater decrease on the primary outcomes of child at month 6 (post-treatment) BMI z (−0.59 ± 0.17), BMI percentile (−2.4 ± 1.0), and weight gain (−2.7 kg ± 1.2) than PC and this difference was maintained at follow-up (month 12). LAUNCH parents also had a significantly greater weight loss (−5.5 kg ± 0.9) at month 6 and 12 (−8.0 kg ± 3.5) than PC parents. Based on the data from this small sample, an intensive intervention that includes child behavior management strategies to improve healthy eating and activity appears more promising in reducing preschool obesity than a low intensity intervention that is typical of treatment that could be delivered in primary care. PMID:20395948

  19. The contribution of home-based technology to older people's quality of life in extra care housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background British government policy for older people focuses on a vision of active ageing and independent living. In the face of diminishing personal capacities, the use of appropriate home-based technology (HBT) devices could potentially meet a wide range of needs and consequently improve many aspects of older people's quality of life such as physical health, psychosocial well-being, social relationships, and their physical or living environment. This study aimed to examine the use of HBT devices and the correlation between use of such devices and quality of life among older people living in extra-care housing (ECH). Methods A structured questionnaire was administered for this study. Using purposive sampling 160 older people living in extra-care housing schemes were selected from 23 schemes in England. A face-to-face interview was conducted in each participant's living unit. In order to measure quality of life, the SEIQoL-Adapted and CASP-19 were used. Results Although most basic appliances and emergency call systems were used in the living units, communally provided facilities such as personal computers, washing machines, and assisted bathing equipment in the schemes were not well utilised. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for confounders including age, sex, marital status, living arrangement and mobility use indicated a coefficient of 1.17 with 95% CI (0.05, 2.29) and p = 0.04 [SEIQoL-Adapted] and 2.83 with 95% CI (1.17, 4.50) and p = 0.001 [CASP-19]. Conclusions The findings of the present study will be value to those who are developing new form of specialised housing for older people with functional limitations and, in particular, guiding investments in technological aids. The results of the present study also indicate that the home is an essential site for developing residential technologies. PMID:22040111

  20. Effect of Home-Based Telemonitoring Using Mobile Phone Technology on the Outcome of Heart Failure Patients After an Episode of Acute Decompensation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Daniel; Kastner, Peter; Kollmann, Alexander; Hallas, Andreas; Auer, Johann; Krappinger, Heinz; Schuchlenz, Herwig; Stark, Gerhard; Grander, Wilhelm; Jakl, Gabriele; Schreier, Guenter

    2009-01-01

    Background Telemonitoring of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) is an emerging concept to detect early warning signs of impending acute decompensation in order to prevent hospitalization. Objective The goal of the MOBIle TELemonitoring in Heart Failure Patients Study (MOBITEL) was to evaluate the impact of home-based telemonitoring using Internet and mobile phone technology on the outcome of heart failure patients after an episode of acute decompensation. Methods Patients were randomly allocated to pharmacological treatment (control group) or to pharmacological treatment with telemedical surveillance for 6 months (tele group). Patients randomized into the tele group were equipped with mobile phone–based patient terminals for data acquisition and data transmission to the monitoring center. Study physicians had continuous access to the data via a secure Web portal. If transmitted values went outside individually adjustable borders, study physicians were sent an email alert. Primary endpoint was hospitalization for worsening CHF or death from cardiovascular cause. Results The study was stopped after randomization of 120 patients (85 male, 35 female); median age was 66 years (IQR 62-72). The control group comprised 54 patients (39 male, 15 female) with a median age of 67 years (IQR 61-72), and the tele group included 54 patients (40 male, 14 female) with a median age of 65 years (IQR 62-72). There was no significant difference between groups with regard to baseline characteristics. Twelve tele group patients were unable to begin data transmission due to the inability of these patients to properly operate the mobile phone (“never beginners”). Four patients did not finish the study due to personal reasons. Intention-to-treat analysis at study end indicated that 18 control group patients (33%) reached the primary endpoint (1 death, 17 hospitalizations), compared with 11 tele group patients (17%, 0 deaths, 11 hospitalizations; relative risk reduction 50%, 95

  1. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  2. Adverse events in an integrated, home-based treatment program for MDR-TB and HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Brust, James C.M.; Shah, N. Sarita; van der Merwe, Theo L.; Bamber, Sheila; Ning, Yuming; Heo, Moonseong; Moll, Anthony P.; Loveday, Marian; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2013-01-01

    Most patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in South Africa are HIV-infected, but the safety and tolerability of co-treatment is unknown. We reviewed all adverse events (AEs) for MDR-TB patients in a home-based treatment program in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Of 91 MDR-TB patients, 74 (81%) were HIV-positive and receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). AEs were common but most were mild and did not require therapy modification. The most common severe AEs were hypothyroidism (36%) and psychosis (5%). Patients receiving concurrent ART did not experience AEs more frequently than those on MDR-TB therapy alone. Concurrent treatment for MDR-TB/HIV can be safely administered in a home-based care setting. PMID:23254152

  3. Reliable broadcast protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, T. A.; Birman, Kenneth P.

    1989-01-01

    A number of broadcast protocols that are reliable subject to a variety of ordering and delivery guarantees are considered. Developing applications that are distributed over a number of sites and/or must tolerate the failures of some of them becomes a considerably simpler task when such protocols are available for communication. Without such protocols the kinds of distributed applications that can reasonably be built will have a very limited scope. As the trend towards distribution and decentralization continues, it will not be surprising if reliable broadcast protocols have the same role in distributed operating systems of the future that message passing mechanisms have in the operating systems of today. On the other hand, the problems of engineering such a system remain large. For example, deciding which protocol is the most appropriate to use in a certain situation or how to balance the latency-communication-storage costs is not an easy question.

  4. Montreal protocol: Business opportunites

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed by 24 countries in 1987, establishing measures for controlling the production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances. This publication begins with some background information on ozone depletion and the history of the Protocol. It then describes aspects of the Protocol`s Multilateral Fund, created to assist developing countries to meet Protocol deadlines: Its administration, structure, and how projects are initiated. Names, addresses, and phone/fax numbers of Fund contacts are provided. Canadian projects under the Fund are then reviewed and opportunities for Canadian environmental companies are noted. Finally, information sheets are presented which summarize Fund-related Canadian bilateral projects undertaken to date.

  5. Clinic-based training in comparison to home-based training after first-time lumbar disc surgery: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Christin; Linton, Steven J; Bergkvist, Leif; Nilsson, Olle; Cornefjord, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The effectiveness of physiotherapy after first-time lumbar disc surgery is still largely unknown. Studies in this field are heterogeneous and behavioural treatment principles have only been evaluated in one earlier study. The aim of this randomised study was to compare clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach to a home-based training programme regarding back disability, activity level, behavioural aspects, pain and global health measures. A total of 59 lumbar disc patients without any previous spine surgery or comorbidity participated in the study. Clinic-based physiotherapy with a behavioural approach was compared to home-based training 3 and 12 months after surgery. Additionally, the home training group was followed up 3 months after surgery by a structured telephone interview evaluating adherence to the exercise programme. Outcome measures were: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), physical activity level, kinesiophobia, coping, pain, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Treatment compliance was high in both groups. There were no differences between the two groups regarding back pain disability measured by ODI 3 and 12 months after surgery. However, back pain reduction and increase in quality of life were significantly higher in the home-based training group. The patients in the clinic-based training group had significantly higher activity levels 12 months after surgery and were significantly more satisfied with physiotherapy care 3 months after surgery compared to the home-based training group. Rehabilitation after first-time lumbar disc surgery can be based on home training as long as the patients receive both careful instructions from a physiotherapist and strategies for active pain coping, and have access to the physiotherapist if questions regarding training arise. This might be a convenient treatment arrangement for most patients. PMID:19020904

  6. Managing Everyday Life: A Qualitative Study of Patients’ Experiences of a Web-Based Ulcer Record for Home-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Trondsen, Marianne V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic skin ulcers are a significant challenge for patients and health service resources, and ulcer treatment often requires the competence of a specialist. Although e-health interventions are increasingly valued for ulcer care by giving access to specialists at a distance, there is limited research on patients’ use of e-health services for home-based ulcer treatment. This article reports an exploratory qualitative study of the first Norwegian web-based counselling service for home-based ulcer treatment, established in 2011 by the University Hospital of North Norway (UNN). Community nurses, general practitioners (GPs) and patients are offered access to a web-based record system to optimize ulcer care. The web-based ulcer record enables the exchange and storage of digital photos and clinical information, by the use of which, an ulcer team at UNN, consisting of specialized nurses and dermatologists, is accessible within 24 h. This article explores patients’ experiences of using the web-based record for their home-based ulcer treatment without assistance from community nurses. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of four patients who had used the record. The main outcomes identified were: autonomy and flexibility; safety and trust; involvement and control; and motivation and hope. These aspects improved the patients’ everyday life during long-term ulcer care and can be understood as stimulating patient empowerment.

  7. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program.

    PubMed

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children's asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013-2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children's asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants' pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term. PMID:27618087

  8. A systematic review of measures of self-reported adherence to unsupervised home-based rehabilitation exercise programmes, and their psychometric properties

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Jessica C; Dean, Sarah G; Siegert, Richard J; Howe, Tracey E; Goodwin, Victoria A

    2014-01-01

    Background Adherence is an important factor contributing to the effectiveness of exercise-based rehabilitation. However, there appears to be a lack of reliable, validated measures to assess self-reported adherence to prescribed but unsupervised home-based rehabilitation exercises. Objectives A systematic review was conducted to establish what measures were available and to evaluate their psychometric properties. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO CINAHL (June 2013) and the Cochrane library were searched (September 2013). Reference lists from articles meeting the inclusion criteria were checked to ensure all relevant papers were included. Study selection To be included articles had to be available in English; use a self-report measure of adherence in relation to a prescribed but unsupervised home-based exercise or physical rehabilitation programme; involve participants over the age of 18. All health conditions and clinical populations were included. Data extraction Descriptive data reported were collated on a data extraction sheet. The measures were evaluated in terms of eight psychometric quality criteria. Results 58 studies were included, reporting 61 different measures including 29 questionnaires, 29 logs, two visual analogue scales and one tally counter. Only two measures scored positively for one psychometric property (content validity). The majority of measures had no reported validity or reliability testing. Conclusions The results expose a gap in the literature for well-developed measures that capture self-reported adherence to prescribed but unsupervised home-based rehabilitation exercises. PMID:24972606

  9. Impact of a home-based walking intervention on outcomes of sleep quality, emotional distress, and fatigue in patients undergoing treatment for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jennifer A; Griffith, Kathleen A; Shang, Jingjing; Thompson, Carol B; Hedlin, Haley; Stewart, Kerry J; DeWeese, Theodore; Mock, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Exercise use among patients with cancer has been shown to have many benefits and few notable risks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a home-based walking intervention during cancer treatment on sleep quality, emotional distress, and fatigue. Methods. A total of 138 patients with prostate (55.6%), breast (32.5%), and other solid tumors (11.9%) were randomized to a home-based walking intervention or usual care. Exercise dose was assessed using a five-item subscale of the Cooper Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study Physical Activity Questionnaire. Primary outcomes of sleep quality, distress, and fatigue were compared between the two study arms. Results. The exercise group (n = 68) reported more vigor (p = .03) than control group participants (n = 58). In dose response models, greater participation in aerobic exercise was associated with 11% less fatigue (p < .001), 7.5% more vigor (p = .001), and 3% less emotional distress (p = .03), after controlling for intervention group assignment, age, and baseline exercise and fatigue levels. Conclusion. Patients who exercised during cancer treatment experienced less emotional distress than those who were less active. Increasing exercise was also associated with less fatigue and more vigor. Home-based walking is a simple, sustainable strategy that may be helpful in improving a number of symptoms encountered by patients undergoing active treatment for cancer. PMID:23568000

  10. Reliable multicast protocol specifications protocol operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Montgomery, Todd; Whetten, Brian

    1995-01-01

    This appendix contains the complete state tables for Reliable Multicast Protocol (RMP) Normal Operation, Multi-RPC Extensions, Membership Change Extensions, and Reformation Extensions. First the event types are presented. Afterwards, each RMP operation state, normal and extended, is presented individually and its events shown. Events in the RMP specification are one of several things: (1) arriving packets, (2) expired alarms, (3) user events, (4) exceptional conditions.

  11. HIV/AIDS and access to water: A case study of home-based care in Ngamiland, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Kgathi, D. L.

    This case study investigates access to potable water in HIV/AIDS related home-based care households in five rural communities in Ngamiland, Botswana. Primary data collected from five villages consisted of two parts. The first survey collected household data on demographic and rural livelihood features and impacts of HIV/AIDS. A total of 129 households were selected using a two-stage stratified random sampling method. In the second survey, a total of 39 family primary and community care givers of continuously ill, bed-ridden or non-bed-ridden HIV/AIDS patients were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questions, was used to collect household data. In addition to using the questionnaire, data were also collected through participant observation, informal interviews and secondary sources. The study revealed that there are several sources of water for communities in Ngamiland such as off-plot, outdoor (communal) and on-plot outdoor and/or indoor (private) water connections, as well as other sources such as bowsed water, well-points, boreholes and open perennial/ephemeral water from river channels and pans. There was a serious problem of unreliable water supply caused by, among other things, the breakdown of diesel-powered water pumps, high frequency of HIV/AIDS related absenteeism, and the failure of timely delivery of diesel fuel. Some villages experienced chronic supply disruptions while others experienced seasonal or occasional water shortages. Strategies for coping with unreliability of water supply included economizing on water, reserve storage, buying water, and collection from river/dug wells or other alternative sources such as rain harvesting tanks in government institutions. The unreliability of water supply resulted in an increase in the use of water of poor quality and other practices of poor hygiene as well as a high opportunity cost of water collection. In such instances, bathing of patients was cut from twice daily to once or

  12. Adverse events among high-risk participants in a home-based walking study: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, David E; Larkin, Angela R; Lowery, Julie C; Holleman, Robert G; Richardson, Caroline R

    2007-01-01

    Background For high-risk individuals and their healthcare providers, finding the right balance between promoting physical activity and minimizing the risk of adverse events can be difficult. More information on the prevalence and influence of adverse events is needed to improve providers' ability to prescribe effective and safe exercise programs for their patients. Methods This study describes the type and severity of adverse events reported by participants with cardiovascular disease or at-risk for cardiovascular disease that occurred during an unsupervised, home-based walking study. This multi-site, randomized controlled trial tested the feasibility of a diet and lifestyle activity intervention over 1.5 years. At month 13, 274 eligible participants (male veterans) were recruited who were ambulatory, BMI > 28, and reporting one or more cardiovascular disease risk factors. All participants attended five, face-to-face dietitian-delivered counseling sessions during the six-month intervention. Participants were randomized to three study arms: 1) time-based walking goals, 2) simple pedometer-based walking goals, and 3) enhanced pedometer-based walking goals with Internet-mediated feedback. Two physicians verified adverse event symptom coding. Results Enrolled participants had an average of five medical comorbidities. During 1110 person months of observation, 87 of 274 participants reported 121 adverse events. One serious study-related adverse event (atrial fibrillation) was reported; the individual resumed study participation within three days. Non-serious, study related adverse events made up 12% of all symptoms – predominantly minor musculoskeletal events. Serious, non-study related adverse events represented 32% of all symptoms while non-serious, non-study related adverse events made up 56% of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease events represented over half of the non-study related adverse event symptoms followed by musculoskeletal complaints. Adverse events caused

  13. Home-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Care Through Videoconferencing for Depression: A Randomized Controlled Follow-Up Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rössler, Wulf

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a tremendous opportunity for innovative mental health care solutions such as psychiatric care through videoconferencing to increase the number of people who have access to quality care. However, studies are needed to generate empirical evidence on the use of psychiatric outpatient care via videoconferencing, particularly in low- and middle-income countries and clinically unsupervised settings. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of home-based treatment for mild depression through psychiatric consultations via videoconferencing. Methods A randomized controlled trial with a 6- and 12-month follow-up including adults with mild depression treated in an ambulatory setting was conducted. In total, 107 participants were randomly allocated to the videoconferencing intervention group (n=53) or the face-to-face group (F2F; n=54). The groups did not differ with respect to demographic characteristics at baseline. The F2F group completed monthly follow-up consultations in person. The videoconferencing group received monthly follow-up consultations with a psychiatrist through videoconferencing at home. At baseline and after 6 and 12 months, in-person assessments were conducted with all participants. Clinical outcomes (severity of depression, mental health status, medication course, and relapses), satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic relationship, treatment adherence (appointment compliance and dropouts), and medication adherence were assessed. Results The severity of depression decreased significantly over the 12-month follow-up in both the groups. There was a significant difference between groups regarding treatment outcomes throughout the follow-up period, with better results in the videoconferencing group. There were 4 relapses in the F2F group and only 1 in the videoconferencing group. No significant differences between groups regarding mental health status, satisfaction with treatment, therapeutic

  14. Home-based neonatal care by community health workers for preventing mortality in neonates in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gogia, S; Sachdev, H P S

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by community health workers (CHWs) for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality in resource-limited settings with poor access to health facility-based care. The authors conducted a systematic review, including meta-analysis and meta-regression of controlled trials. The data sources included electronic databases, with a hand search of reviews, abstracts and proceedings of conferences to search for randomized, or cluster randomized, controlled trials evaluating the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality. Among the included trials, all from South Asian countries, information on neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality was available in five, one and three trials, respectively. The intervention package comprised three components, namely, home visits during pregnancy (four trials), home-based preventive and/or curative neonatal care (all trials) and community mobilization efforts (four trials). Intervention was associated with a reduced risk of mortality during the neonatal (random effects model relative risk (RR) 0.75; 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 0.61 to 0.92, P=0.005; I(2)=82.2%, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence) and perinatal periods (random effects model RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.94, P=0.009; I(2)=79.6%, P=0.007 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence). In one trial, a significant decline in infant mortality (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.94) was documented. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested a greater effect with a higher baseline neonatal mortality rate. The authors concluded that home-based neonatal care is associated with a reduction in neonatal and perinatal mortality in South Asian settings with high neonatal-mortality rates and poor access to health facility-based care. Adoption of a policy of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs is justified in such settings

  15. Oral health related quality of life in pregnant and post partum women in two social network domains; predominantly home-based and work-based networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals connected to supportive social networks have better general and oral health quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess whether there were differences in oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) between women connected to either predominantly home-based and work-based social networks. Methods A follow-up prevalence study was conducted on 1403 pregnant and post-partum women (mean age of 25.2 ± 6.3 years) living in two cities in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Women were participants in an established cohort followed from pregnancy (baseline) to post-partum period (follow-up). All participants were allocated to two groups; 1. work-based social network group - employed women with paid work, and, 2. home-based social network group - women with no paid work, housewives or unemployed women. Measures of social support and social network were used as well as questions on sociodemographic characteristics and OHRQoL and health related behaviors. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to obtain OR of relationships between occupational contexts, affectionate support and positive social interaction on the one hand, and oral health quality of life, using the Oral Health Impacts Profile (OHIP) measure, adjusted for age, ethnicity, family income, schooling, marital status and social class. Results There was a modifying effect of positive social interaction on the odds of occupational context on OHRQoL. The odds of having a poorer OHIP score, ≥4, was significantly higher for women with home-based social networks and moderate levels of positive social interactions [OR 1.64 (95% CI: 1.08-2.48)], and for women with home-based social networks and low levels of positive social interactions [OR 2.15 (95% CI: 1.40-3.30)] compared with women with work-based social networks and high levels of positive social interactions. Black ethnicity was associated with OHIP scores ≥4 [OR 1.73 (95% CI: 1.23-2.42)]. Conclusions Pregnant and post

  16. Home-based neonatal care by community health workers for preventing mortality in neonates in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, S; Sachdev, H P S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by community health workers (CHWs) for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality in resource-limited settings with poor access to health facility-based care. The authors conducted a systematic review, including meta-analysis and meta-regression of controlled trials. The data sources included electronic databases, with a hand search of reviews, abstracts and proceedings of conferences to search for randomized, or cluster randomized, controlled trials evaluating the effect of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs for preventing neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality. Among the included trials, all from South Asian countries, information on neonatal, infant and perinatal mortality was available in five, one and three trials, respectively. The intervention package comprised three components, namely, home visits during pregnancy (four trials), home-based preventive and/or curative neonatal care (all trials) and community mobilization efforts (four trials). Intervention was associated with a reduced risk of mortality during the neonatal (random effects model relative risk (RR) 0.75; 95% confidence intervals (CIs) 0.61 to 0.92, P=0.005; I2=82.2%, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence) and perinatal periods (random effects model RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.94, P=0.009; I2=79.6%, P=0.007 for heterogeneity; high-quality evidence). In one trial, a significant decline in infant mortality (RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.77 to 0.94) was documented. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses suggested a greater effect with a higher baseline neonatal mortality rate. The authors concluded that home-based neonatal care is associated with a reduction in neonatal and perinatal mortality in South Asian settings with high neonatal-mortality rates and poor access to health facility-based care. Adoption of a policy of home-based neonatal care provided by CHWs is justified in such settings

  17. Quantum deniable authentication protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei-Min; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yu-Guang

    2014-07-01

    The proposed quantum identity authentication schemes only involved authentication between two communicators, but communications with deniability capability are often desired in electronic applications such as online negotiation and electronic voting. In this paper, we proposed a quantum deniable authentication protocol. According to the property of unitary transformation and quantum one-way function, this protocol can provide that only the specified receiver can identify the true source of a given message and the specified receiver cannot prove the source of the message to a third party by a transcript simulation algorithm. Moreover, the quantum key distribution and quantum encryption algorithm guarantee the unconditional security of this scheme. Security analysis results show that this protocol satisfies the basic security requirements of deniable authentication protocol such as completeness and deniability and can withstand the forgery attack, impersonation attack, inter-resend attack.

  18. Comparison of a Self-Directed and Therapist-Assisted Telehealth Parent-Mediated Intervention for Children with ASD: A Pilot RCT.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Wainer, Allison L; Berger, Natalie I; Pickard, Katherine E; Bonter, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    This pilot RCT compared the effect of a self-directed and therapist-assisted telehealth-based parent-mediated intervention for young children with ASD. Families were randomly assigned to a self-directed or therapist-assisted program. Parents in both groups improved their intervention fidelity, self-efficacy, stress, and positive perceptions of their child; however, the therapist-assisted group had greater gains in parent fidelity and positive perceptions of child. Children in both groups improved on language measures, with a trend towards greater gains during a parent-child interaction for the therapist-assisted group. Only the children in the therapist-assisted group improved in social skills. Both models show promise for delivering parent-mediated intervention; however, therapist assistance provided an added benefit for some outcomes. A full-scale comparative efficacy trial is warranted. PMID:26922192

  19. Linkage to care following a home-based HIV counselling and testing intervention in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Reshma; Doherty, Tanya; Jackson, Debra; Tabana, Hanani; Swanevelder, Sonja; Thea, Donald M; Feeley, Frank G; Fox, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Efforts to increase awareness of HIV status have led to growing interest in community-based models of HIV testing. Maximizing the benefits of such programmes requires timely linkage to care and treatment. Thus, an understanding of linkage and its potential barriers is imperative for scale-up. Methods This study was conducted in rural South Africa. HIV-positive clients (n=492) identified through home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) were followed up to assess linkage to care, defined as obtaining a CD4 count. Among 359 eligible clients, we calculated the proportion that linked to care within three months. For 226 clients with available data, we calculated the median CD4. To determine factors associated with the rate of linkage, Cox regression was performed on a subsample of 196 clients with additional data on socio-demographic factors and personal characteristics. Results We found that 62.1% (95% CI: 55.7 to 68.5%) of clients from the primary sample (n=359) linked to care within three months of HBHCT. Among those who linked, the median CD4 count was 341 cells/mm3 (interquartile range [IQR] 224 to 542 cells/mm3). In the subsample of 196 clients, factors predictive of increased linkage included the following: believing that drugs/supplies were available at the health facility (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.78; 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.96); experiencing three or more depression symptoms (aHR 2.09; 95% CI: 1.24 to 3.53); being a caregiver for four or more people (aHR 1.93; 95% CI: 1.07 to 3.47); and knowing someone who died of HIV/AIDS (aHR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.13 to 2.49). Factors predictive of decreased linkage included the following: younger age – 15 to 24 years (aHR 0.50; 95% CI: 0.28 to 0.91); living with two or more adults (aHR 0.52; 95% CI: 0.35 to 0.77); not believing or being unsure about the test results (aHR 0.48; 95% CI: 0.30 to 0.77); difficulty finding time to seek health care (aHR 0.40; 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.67); believing that antiretroviral

  20. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Functional Recovery Following Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Nancy K.; Harris, Bette Ann; Bean, Jonathan F.; Heeren, Timothy; Goodyear, Christine; Zawacki, Stacey; Heislein, Diane M.; Mustafa, Jabed; Pardasaney, Poonam; Giorgetti, Marie; Holt, Nicole; Goehring, Lori; Jette, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    .1 [SD, 7.9] at 6 months; control group: 56 [SD, 7.1] at baseline, 56.6 [SD, 8.1] at 6 months; and between-group difference, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.2 to 2.4], P = .03; and mean AM-PAC daily activity scores for intervention group: 57.4 [SD, 13.7] at baseline, 61.3 [SD, 15.7] at 6 months; control group: 58.2 [SD, 15.2] at baseline, 58.6 [SD, 15.3] at 6 months; and between-group difference, 3.5 [95% CI, 0.9 to 6.0], P = .03). In multiple imputation analyses, between-group differences remained significant for SPPB and AM-PAC daily activity, but not for mobility. Significant between-group differences persisted at 9 months for all functional measures with and without imputation. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients who had completed standard rehabilitation after hip fracture, the use of a home-based functionally oriented exercise program resulted in modest improvement in physical function at 6 months after randomization. The clinical importance of these findings remains to be determined. PMID:24549550

  1. The process associated with motivation of a home-based Wii Fit exercise program among sedentary African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hon K.; Breland, Hazel L.; Vogtle, Laura K.; Holthaus, Katy; Kamen, Diane L.; Sword, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the process associated with the motivation for playing Wii Fit among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Individual in-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 14 sedentary African American women with SLE to explore their experiences and reflect on their motivation for playing Wii Fit after completing a 10-week home-based Wii Fit exercise program. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify categories related to participants’ motivation. Three authors independently sorted, organized and coded transcript text into categories, then combined the categories into themes and subthemes. Results In addition to the two themes (Ethical principal of keeping a commitment, and Don’t want to let anyone down) generic to home-based exercise trials, we identified five themes (Enjoyment, Health Benefits, Sense of Accomplishment, Convenience, and Personalized) that revealed why the participants were motivated to play the Wii Fit. Enjoyment had three subthemes: Interactive, Challenging, and Competitive with an embedded social element. However, several participants commented they were not able to do many activities, master certain games, or figure out how to play some; as a result, they were bored with the limited selection of activities that they could do. Conclusions The motivational elements of the Wii Fit may contribute to improved exercise motivation and adherence in select sedentary African American women with SLE. Results provide a better understanding on the important elements to incorporate in the development of sustainable home-based exercise programs with interactive health video games for this population. PMID:23260612

  2. Comparison Between Effects of Home Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs Versus Usual Care on the Patients’ Health Related Quality of Life After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Salavati, Mohsen; Falahinia, Gholamhossein; Vardanjani, Ali Esmaeili; Rafiei, Hossein; Moosavi, Saeid; Torkamani, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation with usual care on the patients’ Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) after coronary artery bypass graft in patients with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical conducted from March 2013 to June 2013, 110 patients with CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I, were received usual care and patients in group II, in addition to the usual care were received home-based cardiac rehabilitation programs. The 27-item MacNew Heart Disease HRQoL questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient’s HRQoL under and over 2 months after intervention. Results: At the time of 0, mean score of HRQoL was 67.86±7.5 and 64.76±8.4 in patients in group I and group II, respectively (P> 0.05). Although mean score of HRQoL in all patients in both groups increased two month after intervention, but this increase in patients in group II were higher than patients in group I (154.93±4.6 vs 134.20±8.2). This difference were statistically significant (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Quality of Life (QoL) can be considered as a quality indicator of health care systems. Results of present study showed that home-based cardiac rehabilitation program improved patients HRQoL after CABG surgery. PMID:26573042

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Home-Based Exercise for Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women during and after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Marylin J.; Cho, Maria H.; Miaskowski, Christine; Painter, Patricia L.; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Duda, John; Krasnoff, Joanne; Bank, Kayee A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated an individualized home-based exercise prescription during and after cancer treatment. Objective The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise training intervention, the PRO-SELF FATIGUE CONTROL PROGRAM on the management of cancer related fatigue. Interventions/Methods Participants (N=119) were randomized into one of three groups: Group 1 (EE) received the exercise prescription throughout the study; Group 2 (CE) received their exercise prescription after completing cancer treatment; Group 3 (CC) received usual care. Patients completed the Piper Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, and Worst Pain Intensity Scale. Results All groups reported mild fatigue levels, sleep disturbance and mild pain, but not depression. Using multilevel regression analysis significant linear and quadratic trends were found for change in fatigue and pain (i.e., scores increased, then decreased over time). No group differences were found in the changing scores over time. A significant quadratic effect for the trajectory of sleep disturbance was found, but no group differences were detected over time. No significant time or group effects were found for depression. Conclusions Our home-based exercise intervention had no effect on fatigue or related symptoms associated with cancer treatment. The optimal timing of exercise remains to be determined. Implications for practice Clinicians need to be aware that some physical activity is better than none, and there is no harm in exercise as tolerated during cancer treatment. Further analysis is needed to examine the adherence to exercise. More frequent assessments of fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and pain may capture the effect of exercise. PMID:20467301

  4. Optimal protocols for nonlocality distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeyer, Peter; Rashid, Jibran

    2010-10-15

    Forster et al. recently showed that weak nonlocality can be amplified by giving the first protocol that distills a class of nonlocal boxes (NLBs) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 120401 (2009)] We first show that their protocol is optimal among all nonadaptive protocols. We next consider adaptive protocols. We show that the depth-2 protocol of Allcock et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 062107 (2009)] performs better than previously known adaptive depth-2 protocols for all symmetric NLBs. We present a depth-3 protocol that extends the known region of distillable NLBs. We give examples of NLBs for which each of the Forster et al., the Allcock et al., and our protocols perform best. The understanding we develop is that there is no single optimal protocol for NLB distillation. The choice of which protocol to use depends on the noise parameters for the NLB.

  5. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and associated factors among HIV infected children in Ethiopia: unannounced home-based pill count versus caregivers’ report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The introduction of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) has brought a remarkable reduction in HIV-related mortality and morbidity both in adults and children living with HIV/AIDS. Adherence to ART is the key to the successful treatment of patients as well as containment of drug resistance. Studies based on caregivers’ report have shown that adherence to ART among children is generally good. However, subjective methods such as caregivers’ report are known to overestimate the level of adherence. This study determined the rate of adherence and its predictors using unannounced home-based pill count and compared the result with caregivers’ report in a tertiary referral hospital in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between December 1, 2011 and January 30, 2012. The study participants were 210 children on ART and their caregivers attending pediatric ART clinic of Tikur Anbessa Hospital (TAH), Addis Ababa University. Caregivers were interviewed at the ART clinic using a structured questionnaire. Then, unannounced home-based pill count was done 7 days after the interview. Results Caregiver-reported adherence in the past 7 days prior to interview was 93.3%. Estimated adherence using unannounced home-based pill count was found, however, to be 34.8%. On multivariate logistic regression model, children with married [aOR = 7.85 (95% CI: 2.11,29.13)] and widowed/divorced [aOR = 7.14 (95% CI: 2.00,25.46)] caregivers, those who were not aware of their HIV sero-status [aOR = 2.35 (95% CI:1.09, 5.06)], and those with baseline WHO clinical stage III/IV [OR = 3.18 (95% CI: 1.21, 8.40] were more likely to adhere to their ART treatment. On the other hand, children on d4T/3Tc/EFV combination [OR = 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.53)] were less likely to adhere to their treatment. Caregivers’ forgetfulness and child refusal to take medication were reported as the major reasons for missing doses. Conclusion The level of adherence based on

  6. Effects and costs of home-based training with telemonitoring guidance in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation: The FIT@Home study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical training has beneficial effects on exercise capacity, quality of life and mortality in patients after a cardiac event or intervention and is therefore a core component of cardiac rehabilitation. However, cardiac rehabilitation uptake is low and effects tend to decrease after the initial rehabilitation period. Home-based training has the potential to increase cardiac rehabilitation uptake, and was shown to be safe and effective in improving short-term exercise capacity. Long-term effects on physical fitness and activity, however, are disappointing. Therefore, we propose a novel strategy using telemonitoring guidance based on objective training data acquired during exercise at home. In this way, we aim to improve self-management skills like self-efficacy and action planning for independent exercise and, consequently, improve long-term effectiveness with respect to physical fitness and physical activity. In addition, we aim to compare costs of this strategy with centre-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial compares a 12-week telemonitoring guided home-based training program with a regular, 12-week centre-based training program of equal duration and training intensity in low to moderate risk patients entering cardiac rehabilitation after an acute coronary syndrome or cardiac intervention. The home-based group receives three supervised training sessions before they commence training with a heart rate monitor in their home environment. Participants are instructed to train at 70-85% of their maximal heart rate for 45–60 minutes, twice a week. Patients receive individual coaching by telephone once a week, based on measured heart rate data that are shared through the internet. Primary endpoints are physical fitness and physical activity, assessed at baseline, after 12 weeks and after one year. Physical fitness is expressed as peak oxygen uptake, assessed by symptom limited exercise testing with gas exchange

  7. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  8. A universal data access and protocol integration mechanism for smart home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Pengfei; Yang, Qi; Zhang, Xuan

    2013-03-01

    With the lack of standardized or completely missing communication interfaces in home electronics, there is no perfect solution to address every aspect in smart homes based on existing protocols and technologies. In addition, the central control unit (CCU) of smart home system working point-to-point between the multiple application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces leads to its complicated architecture and unpleasant performance. A flexible data access and protocol integration mechanism is required. The current paper offers a universal, comprehensive data access and protocol integration mechanism for a smart home. The universal mechanism works as a middleware adapter with unified agreements of the communication interfaces and protocols, offers an abstraction of the application level from the hardware specific and decoupling the hardware interface modules from the application level. Further abstraction for the application interfaces and the underlying hardware interfaces are executed based on adaption layer to provide unified interfaces for more flexible user applications and hardware protocol integration. This new universal mechanism fundamentally changes the architecture of the smart home and in some way meets the practical requirement of smart homes more flexible and desirable.

  9. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  10. Structured Home-Based Exercise Versus Invasive Treatment: A Mission Impossible? A Pilot Randomized Study in Elderly Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Nicola; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Ficarra, Valentina; Basaglia, Nino; Manfredini, Roberto; Zamboni, Paolo; Mascoli, Francesco; Manfredini, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    We compared the effects of an original structured home-based exercise program and revascularization in elderly patients with peripheral arterial disease over a 4-month period. Twenty-seven participants (n = 21; age = 68 ± 7 years) with moderate to severe claudication were randomized into (1) a test in-train out group (Ti-To; n = 18) that performed a home-based walking program prescribed and controlled at the hospital or (2) a revascularization group (Rev; n = 9) that underwent an endovascular and/or surgical procedure. The primary end point was quality of life as evaluated by the physical component summary (PCS) score of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included initial claudication distance (ICD) and absolute claudication distance (ACD), 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) and pain-free walk distance (PFWD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and cost per walking meter gained. The PCS score significantly increased for both treatments at follow-up without a significant intergroup difference, as did ICD, ACD, and PFWD. The 6MWD and ABI significantly improved in the Rev group, and the Ti-To group exhibited a markedly lower cost per meter gained. The comparable effects of the 2 treatments need to be confirmed in a larger, randomized controlled trial. PMID:26635335

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Hospitalization and Home-Based Care Strategies for People Living with HIV/AIDS: The Case of Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Hove-Musekwa, Senelani D.; Mambili-Mamboundou, Hermane

    2014-01-01

    The model of care of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) has shifted from hospital care to community home-based care (CHBC) because of shortage of space in hospitals and lack of resources. We evaluate the costs and benefits of home-based care and other HIV/AIDS intervention strategies in Zimbabwe, using an interdisciplinary approach which weaves together the techniques of an epidemic transmission model and economic evaluation concepts. The intervention strategies considered are voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), VCT combined with hospitalization (H), VCT combined with CHBC, and all the interventions implemented concurrently. The results of the study indicate that implementing all the strategies concurrently is the most cost-effective, a result which also agrees with the epidemiological model. Our results also show that the effectiveness of a strategy in the epidemiological model does not necessarily imply cost-effectiveness of the strategy and behaviour change, modelled by the parameters p and m, that accompanied the strategies, influencing both the cost-effectiveness of an intervention strategy and dynamics of the epidemic. This study shows that interdisciplinary collaborations can help in improving the accuracy of predictions of the course and cost of the epidemic and help policy makers in implementing the correct strategies.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Hospitalization and Home-Based Care Strategies for People Living with HIV/AIDS: The Case of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Hove-Musekwa, Senelani D; Nyabadza, Farai; Mambili-Mamboundou, Hermane; Chiyaka, Christinah; Mukandavire, Zindoga

    2014-01-01

    The model of care of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) has shifted from hospital care to community home-based care (CHBC) because of shortage of space in hospitals and lack of resources. We evaluate the costs and benefits of home-based care and other HIV/AIDS intervention strategies in Zimbabwe, using an interdisciplinary approach which weaves together the techniques of an epidemic transmission model and economic evaluation concepts. The intervention strategies considered are voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), VCT combined with hospitalization (H), VCT combined with CHBC, and all the interventions implemented concurrently. The results of the study indicate that implementing all the strategies concurrently is the most cost-effective, a result which also agrees with the epidemiological model. Our results also show that the effectiveness of a strategy in the epidemiological model does not necessarily imply cost-effectiveness of the strategy and behaviour change, modelled by the parameters p and m, that accompanied the strategies, influencing both the cost-effectiveness of an intervention strategy and dynamics of the epidemic. This study shows that interdisciplinary collaborations can help in improving the accuracy of predictions of the course and cost of the epidemic and help policy makers in implementing the correct strategies. PMID:27437475

  13. The uniqueness of elderly care: registered nurses' experience as preceptors during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2014-04-01

    The expected shortage of registered nurses with an advanced degree as specialists in geriatric care or gerontology is imminent. Previous studies report that clinical practice where student nurses are supervised by registered nurses has a direct impact on how students perceive nursing as a profession and future career choice. Considering the anticipated need for well-educated and specialised nurses it is therefore, relevant as well as necessary to describe clinical learning with a focus on preceptorship in geriatric nursing care. This paper is a report of a study describing registered nurses' experience of precepting undergraduate student nurses during clinical practice in nursing homes and home-based care. A qualitative design, based on seven focus group interviews, was employed with 30 registered nurses with preceptor experience from nursing homes and home-based care for the elderly. Our findings present three precepting strategies that are unique to elderly care: preparing students for end of life care, facilitating a respectful approach to the older person and promoting creativity and independent work. The findings are discussed using a socio-cultural perspective and illustrate how communities of elderly practice can be valuable learning environments. PMID:23954003

  14. Caregiver Perceptions of Children who have Complex Communication Needs Following a Home-based Intervention Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Rural Kenya: An Intervention Note

    PubMed Central

    Gona, Joseph K.; Newton, Charles R.; Hartley, Sally

    2014-01-01

    A high level of unmet communication need exists amongst children with developmental disabilities in sub-Saharan Africa. This study investigated preliminary evidence of the impact associated with a home-based, caregiver-implemented intervention employing AAC methods, with nine children in rural Kenya who have complex communication needs. The intervention used mainly locally-sourced low-tech materials, and was designed to make use of the child's strengths and the caregiver's natural expertise. A pretest-posttest design was used in the study. Data were gathered using an adapted version of the Communication Profile, which was based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to data from the first two sections of the Communication Profile-Adapted. Qualitative analysis was conducted on the final section. The data provided evidence of statistically significant positive changes in caregiver perceptions of communication at the levels of Body Structure and Function, and Activities for Communication. Also, analysis of the Participation for Communication section revealed some expansion to the children's social activities. The potential impact of the home-based intervention would benefit from investigation on a larger scale. Limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:25379627

  15. Self-reported adherence to a home-based exercise program among patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with minimal disease activity.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Conigliaro, Paola; Santoro, Matteo; Lucchetti, Ramona; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    More than half of all patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) exhibit progressive erosive arthritis, associated with severe functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Biologics have been suggested to be more effective in inducing minimal disease activity" (MDA) than disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Behavioral patient education appears to be more effective in encouraging patients to increase their physical activity (PA) levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of home-based exercises program on disease activity and quality of life in MDA-PsA patients treated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and DMARD therapy. We observed a self-reported adherence rate to home-based exercise of 76.6% and data showed the impact of the exercise program on self-reported health and mental assessment. A positive relationship between patient and therapist is crucial, influencing the quality of the performance, the emotional support, and increasing motivation in PsA patients. PMID:25381979

  16. Generalized teleportation protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Goren; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2006-04-15

    A generalized teleportation protocol (GTP) for N qubits is presented, where the teleportation channels are nonmaximally entangled and all the free parameters of the protocol are considered: Alice's measurement basis, her sets of acceptable results, and Bob's unitary operations. The full range of fidelity (F) of the teleported state and the probability of success (P{sub suc}) to obtain a given fidelity are achieved by changing these free parameters. A channel efficiency bound is found, where one can determine how to divide it between F and P{sub suc}. A one-qubit formulation is presented and then expanded to N qubits. A proposed experimental setup that implements the GTP is given using linear optics.

  17. Protocols for distributive scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Stephen F.; Fox, Barry

    1993-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space operations and the inclusion of interorganizational and international groups in the planning and control of space missions lead to requirements for greater communication, coordination, and cooperation among mission schedulers. These schedulers must jointly allocate scarce shared resources among the various operational and mission oriented activities while adhering to all constraints. This scheduling environment is complicated by such factors as the presence of varying perspectives and conflicting objectives among the schedulers, the need for different schedulers to work in parallel, and limited communication among schedulers. Smooth interaction among schedulers requires the use of protocols that govern such issues as resource sharing, authority to update the schedule, and communication of updates. This paper addresses the development and characteristics of such protocols and their use in a distributed scheduling environment that incorporates computer-aided scheduling tools. An example problem is drawn from the domain of space shuttle mission planning.

  18. Robust Optimization of Biological Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Patrick; Davis, Ronald W.

    2015-01-01

    When conducting high-throughput biological experiments, it is often necessary to develop a protocol that is both inexpensive and robust. Standard approaches are either not cost-effective or arrive at an optimized protocol that is sensitive to experimental variations. We show here a novel approach that directly minimizes the cost of the protocol while ensuring the protocol is robust to experimental variation. Our approach uses a risk-averse conditional value-at-risk criterion in a robust parameter design framework. We demonstrate this approach on a polymerase chain reaction protocol and show that our improved protocol is less expensive than the standard protocol and more robust than a protocol optimized without consideration of experimental variation. PMID:26417115

  19. Satellite Communications Using Commercial Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Griner, James H.; Dimond, Robert; Frantz, Brian D.; Kachmar, Brian; Shell, Dan

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been working with industry, academia, and other government agencies in assessing commercial communications protocols for satellite and space-based applications. In addition, NASA Glenn has been developing and advocating new satellite-friendly modifications to existing communications protocol standards. This paper summarizes recent research into the applicability of various commercial standard protocols for use over satellite and space- based communications networks as well as expectations for future protocol development. It serves as a reference point from which the detailed work can be readily accessed. Areas that will be addressed include asynchronous-transfer-mode quality of service; completed and ongoing work of the Internet Engineering Task Force; data-link-layer protocol development for unidirectional link routing; and protocols for aeronautical applications, including mobile Internet protocol routing for wireless/mobile hosts and the aeronautical telecommunications network protocol.

  20. Mars Communication Protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, G. J.; Greenberg, E.

    2000-01-01

    Over the next decade, international plans and commitments are underway to develop an infrastructure at Mars to support future exploration of the red planet. The purpose of this infrastructure is to provide reliable global communication and navigation coverage for on-approach, landed, roving, and in-flight assets at Mars. The claim is that this infrastructure will: 1) eliminate the need of these assets to carry Direct to Earth (DTE) communications equipment, 2) significantly increase data return and connectivity, 3) enable small mission exploration of Mars without DTE equipment, 4) provide precision navigation i.e., 10 to 100m position resolution, 5) supply timing reference accurate to 10ms. This paper in particular focuses on two CCSDS recommendations for that infrastructure: CCSDS Proximity-1 Space Link Protocol and CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). A key aspect of Mars exploration will be the ability of future missions to interoperate. These protocols establish a framework for interoperability by providing standard communication, navigation, and timing services. In addition, these services include strategies to recover gracefully from communication interruptions and interference while ensuring backward compatibility with previous missions from previous phases of exploration.