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Sample records for proton delivery system

  1. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Wang, N.; Miller, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  2. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Wang, N; Miller, D W; Yang, Y

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm(3) target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy. PMID:21076200

  3. Dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy using beam on-line PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    Proton therapy is one form of radiotherapy in which the irradiation can be concentrated on a tumor using a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair annihilation gamma rays from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reaction of irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the irradiation target using a positron emission tomography (PET) apparatus, and dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy (DGPT) can thereby be achieved using PET images. In the proton treatment room, a beam ON-LINE PET system (BOLPs) was constructed so that a PET apparatus of the planar-type with a high spatial resolution of about 2 mm was mounted with the field of view covering the isocenter of the beam irradiation system. The position and intensity of activity were measured using the BOLPs immediately after the proton irradiation of a gelatinous water target containing {sup 16}O nuclei at different proton irradiation energy levels. The change of the activity-distribution range against the change of the physical range was observed within 2 mm. The experiments of proton irradiation to a rabbit and the imaging of the activity were performed. In addition, the proton beam energy used to irradiate the rabbit was changed. When the beam condition was changed, the difference between the two images acquired from the measurement of the BOLPs was confirmed to clearly identify the proton-irradiated volume.

  4. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda (US)

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Bauman, M.; Lesyna, D.; Miller, D.; Nusbaum, J.; Slater, J.; Johanning, J.; Miranda, J. ); DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Siebers, J. ); Ludewigt, B. )

    1991-11-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented (R. R. Wilson, Radiology {bold 47}, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. {bold 9}, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. {bold 10}, 831 (1983)). One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less then {plus minus}5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7{times}10{sup 9} protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5{times}10{sup 10} protons/spills for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation. The distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak was observed at 27.5-cm depth with an incident proton energy of 235 MeV. The dose at the distal edge falls from 90% to 10% of peak value in 7 mm.

  5. A prototype beam delivery system for the proton medical accelerator at Loma Linda.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Bauman, M; Lesyna, D; Miller, D; Nusbaum, J; Slater, J; Johanning, J; Miranda, J; DeLuca, P M; Siebers, J

    1991-01-01

    A variable energy proton accelerator was commissioned at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory for use in cancer treatment at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. The advantages of precise dose localization by proton therapy, while sparing nearby healthy tissue, are well documented [R. R. Wilson, Radiology 47, 487 (1946); M. Wagner, Med. Phys. 9, 749 (1982); M. Goitein and F. Chen, Med. Phys. 10, 831 (1983)]. One of the components of the proton therapy facility is a beam delivery system capable of delivering precise dose distributions to the target volume in the patient. To this end, a prototype beam delivery system was tested during the accelerator's commissioning period. The beam delivery system consisted of a beam spreading device to produce a large, uniform field, a range modulator to generate a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP), and various beam detectors to measure intensity, beam centering, and dose distributions. The beam delivery system provided a uniform proton dose distribution in a cylindrical volume of 20-cm-diam area and 9-cm depth. The dose variations throughout the target volume were found to be less than +/- 5%. Modifications in the range modulator should reduce this considerably. The central axis dose rate in the region of the SOBP was found to be 0.4 cGy/spill with an incident beam intensity of 6.7 x 10(9) protons/spill. With an accelerator repetition rate of 30 spills/min and expected intensity of 2.5 x 10(10) protons/spill for patient treatment, this system can provide 50 cGy/min for a 20-cm-diam field and 9-cm range modulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1661367

  6. Commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam delivery system at University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Houston

    SciTech Connect

    Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Ciangaru, George; Sawakuchi, Gabriel; Poenisch, Falk; Arjomandy, Bijan; Martin, Craig; Titt, Uwe; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Smith, Alfred R.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To describe a summary of the clinical commissioning of the discrete spot scanning proton beam at the Proton Therapy Center, Houston (PTC-H). Methods: Discrete spot scanning system is composed of a delivery system (Hitachi ProBeat), an electronic medical record (Mosaiq V 1.5), and a treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse V 8.1). Discrete proton pencil beams (spots) are used to deposit dose spot by spot and layer by layer for the proton distal ranges spanning from 4.0 to 30.6 g/cm{sup 2} and over a maximum scan area at the isocenter of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. An arbitrarily chosen reference calibration condition has been selected to define the monitor units (MUs). Using radiochromic film and ion chambers, the authors have measured spot positions, the spot sizes in air, depth dose curves, and profiles for proton beams with various energies in water, and studied the linearity of the dose monitors. In addition to dosimetric measurements and TPS modeling, significant efforts were spent in testing information flow and recovery of the delivery system from treatment interruptions. Results: The main dose monitors have been adjusted such that a specific amount of charge is collected in the monitor chamber corresponding to a single MU, following the IAEA TRS 398 protocol under a specific reference condition. The dose monitor calibration method is based on the absolute dose per MU, which is equivalent to the absolute dose per particle, the approach used by other scanning beam institutions. The full width at half maximum for the spot size in air varies from approximately 1.2 cm for 221.8 MeV to 3.4 cm for 72.5 MeV. The measured versus requested 90% depth dose in water agrees to within 1 mm over ranges of 4.0-30.6 cm. The beam delivery interlocks perform as expected, guarantying the safe and accurate delivery of the planned dose. Conclusions: The dosimetric parameters of the discrete spot scanning proton beam have been measured as part of the clinical commissioning program

  7. Optimization, Characterization and Commissioning of a Novel Uniform Scanning Proton Beam Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascia, Anthony Edward

    Purpose: To develop and characterize the required detectors for uniform scanning optimization and characterization, and to develop the methodology and assess their efficacy for optimizing, characterizing and commissioning a novel proton beam uniform scanning system. Methods and Materials: The Multi Layer Ion Chamber (MLIC), a 1D array of vented parallel plate ion chambers, was developed in-house for measurement of longitudinal profiles. The Matrixx detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) and XOmat V film (Kodak, USA) were characterized for measurement of transverse profiles. The architecture of the uniform scanning system was developed and then optimized and characterized for clinical proton radiotherapy. Results: The MLIC detector significantly increased data collection efficiency without sacrificing data quality. The MLIC was capable of integrating an entire scanned and layer stacked proton field with one measurement, producing results with the equivalent spatial sampling of 1.0mm. The Matrixx detector and modified 1D water phantom jig improved data acquisition efficiency and complemented the film measurements. The proximal, central and distal proton field planes were measured using these methods, yielding better than 3% uniformity. The binary range modulator was programmed, optimized and characterized such that the proton field ranges were separated by approximately 5.0mm modulation width and delivered with an accuracy of 1.0mm in water. Several wobbling magnet scan patterns were evaluated and the raster pattern, spot spacing, scan amplitude and overscan margin were optimized for clinical use. Conclusion: Novel detectors and methods are required for clinically efficient optimization and characterization of proton beam scanning systems. Uniform scanning produces proton beam fields that are suited for clinical proton radiotherapy.

  8. Neutron production from beam-modifying devices in a modern double scattering proton therapy beam delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Newhauser, Wayne D; DeLuca, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    In this work the neutron production in a passive beam delivery system was investigated. Secondary particles including neutrons are created as the proton beam interacts with beam shaping devices in the treatment head. Stray neutron exposure to the whole body may increase the risk that the patient develops a radiogenic cancer years or decades after radiotherapy. We simulated a passive proton beam delivery system with double scattering technology to determine the neutron production and energy distribution at 200 MeV proton energy. Specifically, we studied the neutron absorbed dose per therapeutic absorbed dose, the neutron absorbed dose per source particle and the neutron energy spectrum at various locations around the nozzle. We also investigated the neutron production along the nozzle's central axis. The absorbed doses and neutron spectra were simulated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulations revealed that the range modulation wheel (RMW) is the most intense neutron source of any of the beam spreading devices within the nozzle. This finding suggests that it may be helpful to refine the design of the RMW assembly, e.g., by adding local shielding, to suppress neutron-induced damage to components in the nozzle and to reduce the shielding thickness of the treatment vault. The simulations also revealed that the neutron dose to the patient is predominated by neutrons produced in the field defining collimator assembly, located just upstream of the patient. PMID:19147903

  9. Neutron production from beam-modifying devices in a modern double scattering proton therapy beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Newhauser, Wayne D; Deluca, Paul M

    2009-02-21

    In this work the neutron production in a passive beam delivery system was investigated. Secondary particles including neutrons are created as the proton beam interacts with beam shaping devices in the treatment head. Stray neutron exposure to the whole body may increase the risk that the patient develops a radiogenic cancer years or decades after radiotherapy. We simulated a passive proton beam delivery system with double scattering technology to determine the neutron production and energy distribution at 200 MeV proton energy. Specifically, we studied the neutron absorbed dose per therapeutic absorbed dose, the neutron absorbed dose per source particle and the neutron energy spectrum at various locations around the nozzle. We also investigated the neutron production along the nozzle's central axis. The absorbed doses and neutron spectra were simulated with the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The simulations revealed that the range modulation wheel (RMW) is the most intense neutron source of any of the beam spreading devices within the nozzle. This finding suggests that it may be helpful to refine the design of the RMW assembly, e.g., by adding local shielding, to suppress neutron-induced damage to components in the nozzle and to reduce the shielding thickness of the treatment vault. The simulations also revealed that the neutron dose to the patient is predominated by neutrons produced in the field defining collimator assembly, located just upstream of the patient. PMID:19147903

  10. Measurements of lateral penumbra for uniform scanning proton beams under various beam delivery conditions and comparison to the XiO treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Suresh; Zeidan, Omar; Ramirez, Eric; Rains, Michael; Gao, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanshui

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The main purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the dependency of lateral penumbra (80%–20% distance) of uniform scanning proton beams on various factors such as air gap, proton range, modulation width, compensator thickness, and depth, and (2) compare the lateral penumbra calculated by a treatment planning system (TPS) with measurements.Methods: First, lateral penumbra was measured using solid–water phantom and radiographic films for (a) air gap, ranged from 0 to 35 cm, (b) proton range, ranged from 8 to 30 cm, (c) modulation, ranged from 2 to 10 cm, (d) compensator thickness, ranged from 0 to 20 cm, and (e) depth, ranged from 7 to 15 cm. Second, dose calculations were computed in a virtual water phantom using the XiO TPS with pencil beam algorithm for identical beam conditions and geometrical configurations that were used for the measurements. The calculated lateral penumbra was then compared with the measured one for both the horizontal and vertical scanning magnets of our uniform scanning proton beam delivery system.Results: The results in the current study showed that the lateral penumbra of horizontal scanning magnet was larger (up to 1.4 mm for measurement and up to 1.0 mm for TPS) compared to that of vertical scanning magnet. Both the TPS and measurements showed an almost linear increase in lateral penumbra with increasing air gap as it produced the greatest effect on lateral penumbra. Lateral penumbra was dependent on the depth and proton range. Specifically, the width of lateral penumbra was found to be always lower at shallower depth than at deeper depth within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. The lateral penumbra results were less sensitive to the variation in the thickness of compensator, whereas lateral penumbra was independent of modulation. Overall, the comparison between the results of TPS with that of measurements indicates a good agreement for lateral penumbra, with TPS predicting higher values compared to

  11. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  13. Drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D H; Mauger, J W

    1991-10-01

    New and emerging drug delivery systems for traditional drugs and the products of biotechnology are discussed, and the role of the pharmacist in ensuring the appropriate use of these systems is outlined. Advantages of advanced drug delivery systems over traditional systems are the ability to deliver a drug more selectively to a specific site; easier, more accurate, less frequent dosing; decreased variability in systemic drug concentrations; absorption that is more consistent with the site and mechanism of action; and reductions in toxic metabolites. Four basic strategies govern the mechanisms of advanced drug delivery: physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical. Oral drug delivery systems use natural and synthetic polymers to deliver the product to a specific region in the gastrointestinal tract in a timely manner that minimizes adverse effects and increases drug efficacy. Innovations in injectable and implantable delivery systems include emulsions, particulate delivery systems, micromolecular products and macromolecular drug adducts, and enzymatic-controlled delivery. Options for noninvasive drug delivery include the transdermal, respiratory, intranasal, ophthalmic, lymphatic, rectal, intravaginal, and intrauterine routes as well as topical application. Rapid growth is projected in the drug delivery systems market worldwide in the next five years. Genetic engineering has mandated the development of new strategies to deliver biotechnologically derived protein and peptide drugs and chemoimmunoconjugates. The role of the pharmacist in the era of advanced drug delivery systems will be broad based, including administering drugs, compounding, calculating dosages based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic monitoring, counseling, and research. The advent of advanced drug delivery systems offers pharmacists a new opportunity to assume an active role in patient care. PMID:1772110

  14. A p-Hydroxyphenacyl-Benzothiazole-Chlorambucil Conjugate as a Real-Time-Monitoring Drug-Delivery System Assisted by Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Shrabani; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav K; Biswas, Sandipan; Nandi, Surajit; Gangopadhyay, Moumita; Dey, Satyahari; Anoop, Anakuthil; Pradeep Singh, N D

    2016-03-18

    Among the well-known phototriggers, the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) group has consistently enabled the very fast, efficient, and high-conversion release of active molecules. Despite this unique behavior, the pHP group has been ignored as a delivery agent, particularly in the area of theranostics, because of two major limitations: Its excitation wavelength is below 400 nm, and it is nonfluorescent. We have overcome these limitations by incorporating a 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) appendage capable of rapid excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The ESIPT effect also provided two unique advantages: It assisted the deprotonation of the pHP group for faster release, and it was accompanied by a distinct fluorescence color change upon photorelease. In vitro studies showed that the p-hydroxyphenacyl-benzothiazole-chlorambucil conjugate presents excellent properties, such as real-time monitoring, photoregulated drug delivery, and biocompatibility. PMID:26919455

  15. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    Physical properties of proton interactions in matter give them a theoretical advantage over photons in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, but they are seldom used relative to photons. The primary barriers to wider acceptance of proton therapy are the technical feasibility, size, and price of proton therapy systems. Several aspects of the proton therapy landscape are investigated, and new techniques for treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery are presented. The results of these investigations suggest a means by which proton therapy can be delivered more efficiently, effectively, and to a much larger proportion of eligible patients. An analysis of the existing proton therapy market was performed. Personal interviews with over 30 radiation oncology leaders were conducted with regard to the current and future use of proton therapy. In addition, global proton therapy market projections are presented. The results of these investigations serve as motivation and guidance for the subsequent development of treatment system designs and treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery methods. A major factor impacting the size and cost of proton treatment systems is the maximum energy of the accelerator. Historically, 250 MeV has been the accepted value, but there is minimal quantitative evidence in the literature that supports this standard. A retrospective study of 100 patients is presented that quantifies the maximum proton kinetic energy requirements for cancer treatment, and the impact of those results with regard to treatment system size, cost, and neutron production is discussed. This study is subsequently expanded to include 100 cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and the results are discussed in the context of a proposed dedicated proton SRS treatment system. Finally, novel proton therapy optimization and delivery techniques are presented. Algorithms are developed that optimize treatment plans over beam angle, spot size, spot spacing

  16. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate.

  17. Technological Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Don; And Others

    A section on technological delivery systems, presented as part of the second Australian National Workshop on Distance Education (Perth, 1983), contains four papers on using technological resources to provide educational services to persons in isolated locations. The first paper, by Don Kennedy, covers the use of satellite broadcasting of course…

  18. Terplex Gene Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16243067

  19. Terplex gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-01

    Polymeric gene delivery systems have been developed to overcome problems caused by viral carriers. They are low cytotoxic, have no size limit, are convenient in handling, of low cost and reproducible. A Terplex gene delivery system consisting of plasmid DNA, low density lipoprotein and hydropholized poly-L-lysine was designed and characterized. The plasmid DNA, when formulated with stearyl PLL and LDL, forms a stable and hydrophobicity/charge-balanced Terplex system of optimal size for efficient cellular uptake. DNA is still intact after the Terplex formation. This information is expected to be utilized for the development of improved transfection vector for in vivo gene therapy. Terplex DNA complex showed significantly longer retention in the vascular space than naked DNA. This system was used in the augmentation of myocardial transfection at an infarction site with the VEGF gene. PMID:16240997

  20. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  1. Continuing Professional Education Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, James P.

    This investigation of delivery systems for continuing professional education provides an overview of current operational delivery systems in continuing professional education, drawing on experience as found in the literature. Learning theories and conclusions are woven into the descriptive text. Delivery systems profiled in the paper include the…

  2. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  3. MEMS: Enabled Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Angelica; Sheybani, Roya; Meng, Ellis

    2015-05-01

    Drug delivery systems play a crucial role in the treatment and management of medical conditions. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies have allowed the development of advanced miniaturized devices for medical and biological applications. This Review presents the use of MEMS technologies to produce drug delivery devices detailing the delivery mechanisms, device formats employed, and various biomedical applications. The integration of dosing control systems, examples of commercially available microtechnology-enabled drug delivery devices, remaining challenges, and future outlook are also discussed. PMID:25703045

  4. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  5. Nanovehicular intracellular delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Ales; Davidson, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood-brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list "elementary" phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  6. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barry S.; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotes, protozoans, and plants act as transmembrane heme delivery systems for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes. The complete topology of a representative from each of the three subfamilies was experimentally determined. Key histidinyl residues and a conserved tryptophan-rich region (designated the WWD domain) are positioned at the site of cytochrome c assembly for all three subfamilies. These histidinyl residues were shown to be essential for function in one of the subfamilies, an ABC transporter encoded by helABCD. We believe that a directed heme delivery pathway is vital for the synthesis of cytochromes c, whereby heme iron is protected from oxidation via ligation to histidinyl residues within the delivery proteins. PMID:9560218

  7. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  8. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  9. Commissioning a passive-scattering proton therapy nozzle for accurate SOBP delivery

    PubMed Central

    Engelsman, M.; Lu, H.-M.; Herrup, D.; Bussiere, M.; Kooy, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy centers that currently use passively scattered proton beams do field specific calibrations for a non-negligible fraction of treatment fields, which is time and resource consuming. Our improved understanding of the passive scattering mode of the IBA universal nozzle, especially of the current modulation function, allowed us to re-commission our treatment control system for accurate delivery of SOBPs of any range and modulation, and to predict the output for each of these fields. We moved away from individual field calibrations to a state where continued quality assurance of SOBP field delivery is ensured by limited system-wide measurements that only require one hour per week. This manuscript reports on a protocol for generation of desired SOBPs and prediction of dose output. PMID:19610306

  10. Towards a proton imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civinini, C.; Brianzi, M.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Candiano, G.; Capineri, L.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Marrazzo, L.; Mazzaglia, E.; Menichelli, D.; Pieri, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Talamonti, C.; Tesi, M.; Valentini, S.

    2010-11-01

    Hadron therapy for tumor treatment is nowadays used in several medical centres. The main advantage in using protons or light ions beams is the possibility of tightly shaping the radiation dose to the target volume. Presently the spatial accuracy of the therapy is limited by the uncertainty in stopping power distribution, which is derived, for each treatment, from the photon attenuation coefficients measured by X-ray tomography. A direct measurement of the stopping powers will help in reducing this uncertainty. This can be achieved by using a proton beam and a detection system able to reconstruct a tomography image of the patient. As a first step towards such a system an apparatus able to perform a proton transmission radiography (pCR) has been designed. It consists of a silicon microstrip tracker, measuring proton trajectories, and a YAG:Ce calorimeter to determine the particle residual energy. Proton beam and laboratory tests have been performed on the system components prototypes: the main results will be shown and discussed.

  11. Shortening Delivery Times of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy by Reducing Proton Energy Layers During Treatment Plan Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Water, Steven van de; Kooy, Hanne M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials: We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment planning system “Erasmus-iCycle.” The method consisted of 2 components: (1) minimizing the logarithm of the total spot weight per energy layer; and (2) iteratively excluding low-weighted energy layers. The method was benchmarked by comparing a robust “time-efficient plan” (with energy layer reduction) with a robust “standard clinical plan” (without energy layer reduction) for 5 oropharyngeal cases and 5 prostate cases. Both plans of each patient had equal robust plan quality, because the worst-case dose parameters of the standard clinical plan were used as dose constraints for the time-efficient plan. Worst-case robust optimization was performed, accounting for setup errors of 3 mm and range errors of 3% + 1 mm. We evaluated the number of energy layers and the expected delivery time per fraction, assuming 30 seconds per beam direction, 10 ms per spot, and 400 Giga-protons per minute. The energy switching time was varied from 0.1 to 5 seconds. Results: The number of energy layers was on average reduced by 45% (range, 30%-56%) for the oropharyngeal cases and by 28% (range, 25%-32%) for the prostate cases. When assuming 1, 2, or 5 seconds energy switching time, the average delivery time was shortened from 3.9 to 3.0 minutes (25%), 6.0 to 4.2 minutes (32%), or 12.3 to 7.7 minutes (38%) for the oropharyngeal cases, and from 3.4 to 2.9 minutes (16%), 5.2 to 4.2 minutes (20%), or 10.6 to 8.0 minutes (24%) for the prostate cases. Conclusions: Delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy can be reduced substantially without compromising robust plan quality. Shorter delivery times are likely to reduce treatment uncertainties and costs.

  12. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  13. Delivery methods for LVSD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasner, James H.; Brower, Bernard V.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present formats and delivery methods of Large Volume Streaming Data (LVSD) systems. LVSD systems collect TBs of data per mission with aggregate camera sizes in the 100 Mpixel to several Gpixel range at temporal rates of 2 - 60 Hz. We present options and recommendations for the different stages of LVSD data collection and delivery, to include the raw (multi-camera) data, delivery of processed (stabilized mosaic) data, and delivery of user-defined region of interest windows. Many LVSD systems use JPEG 2000 for the compression of raw and processed data. We explore the use of the JPEG 2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) for interactive client/server delivery to thick-clients (desktops and laptops) and MPEG-2 and H.264 to handheld thin-clients (tablets, cell phones). We also explore the use of 3D JPEG 2000 compression, defined in ISO 15444-2, for storage and delivery as well. The delivery of raw, processed, and region of interest data requires different metadata delivery techniques and metadata content. Beyond the format and delivery of data and metadata we discuss the requirements for a client/server protocol that provides data discovery and retrieval. Finally, we look into the future as LVSD systems perform automated processing to produce "information" from the original data. This information may include tracks of moving targets, changes of the background, snap shots of targets, fusion of multiple sensors, and information about "events" that have happened.

  14. WE-D-17A-03: Improvement of Accuracy of Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Delivery for Liver Tumor by Real-Time Tumor-Monitoring and Gating System: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, T; Shimizu, S; Miyamoto, N; Takao, S; Toramatsu, C; Nihongi, H; Yamada, T; Shirato, H; Fujii, Y; Umezawa, M; Umegaki, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of spot-scanning proton beam delivery for target in motion, a real-time tumor-monitoring and gating system using fluoroscopy images was developed. This study investigates the efficacy of this method for treatment of liver tumors using simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional position of a fiducial marker inserted close to the tumor is calculated in real time and proton beam is gated according to the marker's distance from the planned position (Shirato, 2012). The efficient beam delivery is realized even for the irregular and sporadic motion signals, by employing the multiple-gated irradiations per operation cycle (Umezawa, 2012). For each of two breath-hold CTs (CTV=14.6cc, 63.1cc), dose distributions were calculated with internal margins corresponding to freebreathing (FB) and real-time gating (RG) with a 2-mm gating window. We applied 8 trajectories of liver tumor recorded during the treatment of RTRT in X-ray therapy and 6 initial timings. Dmax/Dmin in CTV, mean liver dose (MLD), and irradiation time to administer 3 Gy (RBE) dose were estimated assuming rigid motion of targets by using in-house simulation tools and VQA treatment planning system (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo). Results: Dmax/Dmin was degraded by less than 5% compared to the prescribed dose with all motion parameters for smaller CTV and less than 7% for larger CTV with one exception. Irradiation time showed only a modest increase if RG was used instead of FB; the average value over motion parameters was 113 (FB) and 138 s (RG) for smaller CTV and 120 (FB) and 207 s (RG) for larger CTV. In RG, it was within 5 min for all but one trajectory. MLD was markedly decreased by 14% and 5–6% for smaller and larger CTVs respectively, if RG was applied. Conclusions: Spot-scanning proton beam was shown to be delivered successfully to liver tumor without much lengthening of treatment time. This research was supported by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan and the Japan Society for

  15. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, Sarah E.; O’Connor, Richard J.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Borland, Ron; Yong, Hua-Hie; Cummings, K. Michael; McNeill, Ann; Thrasher, James F.; Hammond, David; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) initially emerged in 2003 and have since become widely available globally, particularly over the Internet. Purpose Data on ENDS usage patterns are limited. The current paper examines patterns of ENDS awareness, use, and product-associated beliefs among current and former smokers in four countries. Methods Data come from Wave 8 of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey, collected July 2010 to June 2011 and analyzed through June 2012. Respondents included 5939 current and former smokers in Canada (n=1581); the U.S. (n=1520); the United Kingdom (UK; n=1325); and Australia (n=1513). Results Overall, 46.6% were aware of ENDS (U.S.: 73%, UK: 54%, Canada: 40%, Australia: 20%); 7.6% had tried ENDS (16% of those aware of ENDS); and 2.9% were current users (39% of triers). Awareness of ENDS was higher among younger, non-minority smokers with higher incomes who were heavier smokers. Prevalence of trying ENDS was higher among younger, nondaily smokers with a high income and among those who perceived ENDS as less harmful than traditional cigarettes. Current use was higher among both nondaily and heavy (≥20 cigarettes per day) smokers. In all, 79.8% reported using ENDS because they were considered less harmful than traditional cigarettes; 75.4% stated that they used ENDS to help them reduce their smoking; and 85.1% reported using ENDS to help them quit smoking. Conclusions Awareness of ENDS is high, especially in countries where they are legal (i.e., the U.S. and UK). Because trial was associated with nondaily smoking and a desire to quit smoking, ENDS may have potential to serve as a cessation aid. PMID:23415116

  16. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  17. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A.; Robison, Thomas W.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  18. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  19. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  20. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  3. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Michael A.; Beloussov, Alexandre V.; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B.; Salem, Dana

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  4. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy

  5. Development of insulin delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, N I; Siddiqui, Ni; Rahman, S; Nessa, A

    2008-01-01

    Delivery system of insulin is vital for its acceptance and adherence to therapy for achieving the glycemic targets. Enormous developments have occurred in the delivery system of insulin during the last twenty years and each improvement was aimed at two common goals: patients convenience and better glycemic control. Till to date, the various insulin delivery systems are: syringes/vials, injection aids, jet injectors, transmucosal delivery, transdermal delivery, external insulin infusion pump, implantable insulin pumps, insulin pens and insulin inhalers. Syringe/vial is the oldest and conventional method, still widely used and relatively cheaper. Modern plastic syringes are disposable, light weight with microfine needle for patients convenience and comfort. Oral route could be the most acceptable and viable, if the barriers can be overcome and under extensive trial. Insulin pen device is an important milestone in the delivery system of insulin as it is convenient, discrete, painless, attractive, portable with flexible life style and improved quality of life. More than 80% of European diabetic patients are using insulin pen. Future digital pen will have better memory option, blood glucose monitoring system, insulin dose calculator etc. Insulin infusion pump is a good option for the children, busy patients with flexible lifestyle and those who want to avoid multiple daily injections. Pulmonary route of insulin delivery is a promising, effective, non-invasive and acceptable alternative method. Exubera, the world first insulin inhaler was approved by FDA in 28 January 2006. But due to certain limitations, it has been withdrawn from the market in October 2007. The main concern of inhaled insulin are: long term pulmonary safety issues, cost effectiveness and user friendly device. In future, more acceptable and cost effective insulin inhaler will be introduced. Newer avenues are under extensive trial for better future insulin delivery systems. PMID:18285745

  6. Nanoparticulate systems for polynucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Basarkar, Ashwin; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendously influenced gene therapy research in recent years. Nanometer-size systems have been extensively investigated for delivering genes at both local and systemic levels. These systems offer several advantages in terms of tissue penetrability, cellular uptake, systemic circulation, and cell targeting as compared to larger systems. They can protect the polynucleotide from a variety of degradative and destabilizing factors and enhance delivery efficiency to the cells. A variety of polymeric and non-polymeric nanoparticles have been investigated in an effort to maximize the delivery efficiency while minimizing the toxic effects. This article provides a review on the most commonly used nanoparticulate systems for gene delivery. We have discussed frequently used polymers, such as, polyethyleneimine, poly (lactide-co-glycolide), chitosan, as well as non-polymeric materials such as cationic lipids and metallic nanoparticles. The advantages and limitations of each system have been elaborated. PMID:18019834

  7. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases. PMID:24325540

  8. Delivery System, 2003-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This workshop guide for financial aid administrators provides training in the federal student financial aid delivery system. An introduction enables the participant to share some information about his or her responsibilities and to reflect on the relevance of the training to the job. Session 1, "Application Systems," identifies methods of applying…

  9. Advances in Gene Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Suda, Takeshi; Zhang, Guisheng; Liu, Dexi

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of genes into cells, both in vitro and in vivo, is critical for studying gene function and conducting gene therapy. Methods that utilize viral and nonviral vectors, as well as physical approaches, have been explored. Viral vector-mediated gene transfer employs replication-deficient viruses such as retro-virus, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus and herpes simplex virus. A major advantage of viral vectors is their high gene delivery efficiency. The nonviral vectors developed so far include cationic liposomes, cationic polymers, synthetic peptides and naturally occurring compounds. These nonviral vectors appear to be highly effective in gene delivery to cultured cells in vitro but are significantly less effective in vivo. Physical methods utilize mechanical pressure, electric shock or hydrodynamic force to transiently permeate the cell membrane to transfer DNA into target cells. They are simpler than viral- and nonviral-based systems and highly effective for localized gene delivery. The past decade has seen significant efforts to establish the most desirable method for safe, effective and target-specific gene delivery, and good progress has been made. The objectives of this review are to (i) explain the rationale for the design of viral, nonviral and physical methods for gene delivery; (ii) provide a summary on recent advances in gene transfer technology; (iii) discuss advantages and disadvantages of each of the most commonly used gene delivery methods; and (iv) provide future perspectives. PMID:22200988

  10. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery. PMID:23662604

  11. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  12. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180° continuous arc proton therapy and for 180° split arc proton therapy (two 90° arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the proton kinetic

  13. Quantitative analysis of beam delivery parameters and treatment process time for proton beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazumichi; Gillin, Michael T.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Lippy, Denise

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate patient census, equipment clinical availability, maximum daily treatment capacity, use factor for major beam delivery parameters, and treatment process time for actual treatments delivered by proton therapy systems. Methods: The authors have been recording all beam delivery parameters, including delivered dose, energy, range, spread-out Bragg peak widths, gantry angles, and couch angles for every treatment field in an electronic medical record system. We analyzed delivery system downtimes that had been recorded for every equipment failure and associated incidents. These data were used to evaluate the use factor of beam delivery parameters, the size of the patient census, and the equipment clinical availability of the facility. The duration of each treatment session from patient walk-in and to patient walk-out of the treatment room was measured for 82 patients with cancers at various sites. Results: The yearly average equipment clinical availability in the last 3 yrs (June 2007-August 2010) was 97%, which exceeded the target of 95%. Approximately 2200 patients had been treated as of August 2010. The major disease sites were genitourinary (49%), thoracic (25%), central nervous system (22%), and gastrointestinal (2%). Beams have been delivered in approximately 8300 treatment fields. The use factor for six beam delivery parameters was also evaluated. Analysis of the treatment process times indicated that approximately 80% of this time was spent for patient and equipment setup. The other 20% was spent waiting for beam delivery and beam on. The total treatment process time can be expressed by a quadratic polynomial of the number of fields per session. The maximum daily treatment capacity of our facility using the current treatment processes was estimated to be 133 {+-} 35 patients. Conclusions: This analysis shows that the facility has operated at a high performance level and has treated a large number of patients with a variety of diseases. The use

  14. Special Delivery Systems. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    The Special Delivery Systems project developed a curriculum for students with learning disabilities (LD) in an adult basic education program. The curriculum was designed to assist and motivate the students in the educational process. Fourteen students with LD were recruited and screened. The curriculum addressed varied learning styles combined…

  15. PET-based dose delivery verification in proton therapy: a GATE based simulation study of five PET system designs in clinical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Charlotte; Fourrier, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Stute, Simon; Gueth, Pierre; Grevillot, Loïc; Buvat, Irène

    2013-10-01

    PET is a promising technique for in vivo treatment verification in hadrontherapy. Three main PET geometries dedicated to in-beam treatment monitoring have been proposed in the literature: the dual-head PET geometry, the OpenPET geometry and the slanted-closed ring geometry. The aim of this work is to characterize the performance of two of these dedicated PET detectors in realistic clinical conditions. Several configurations of the dual-head PET and OpenPET systems were simulated using GATE v6.2. For the dual-head configuration, two aperture angles (15° and 45°) were studied. For the OpenPET system, two gaps between rings were investigated (110 and 160 mm). A full-ring PET system was also simulated as a reference. After preliminary evaluation of the sensitivity and spatial resolution using a Derenzo phantom, a real small-field head and neck treatment plan was simulated, with and without introducing patient displacements. No wash-out was taken into account. 3D maps of the annihilation photon locations were deduced from the PET data acquired right after the treatment session (5 min acquisition) using a dedicated OS-EM reconstruction algorithm. Detection sensitivity at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) varied from 5.2% (45° dual-head system) to 7.0% (full-ring PET). The dual-head systems had a more uniform efficiency within the FOV than the OpenPET systems. The spatial resolution strongly depended on the location within the FOV for the ϕ = 45° dual-head system and for the two OpenPET systems. All investigated architectures identified the magnitude of mispositioning introduced in the simulations within a 1.5 mm accuracy. The variability on the estimated mispositionings was less than 2 mm for all PET systems.

  16. Sterile Product Packaging and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both conventional and more advanced product container and delivery systems are the focus of this brief article. Six different product container systems will be discussed, plus advances in primary packaging for special delivery systems and needle technology. PMID:26891564

  17. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  18. Planning health care delivery systems.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, M A; Bergwall, D F; Reeves, P N

    1975-01-01

    The increasing concern and interest in the health delivery system in the United States has placed the health system planners in a difficult position. They are inadequately prepared, in many cases, to deal with the management techniques that have been designed for use with system problems. This situation has been compounded by the failure, until recently, of educational programs to train new health professionals in these techniques. Computer simulation is a technique that allows the planners dynamic feedback on his proposed plans. This same technique provides the planning student with a better understanding of the systems planning process. PMID:1115292

  19. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems. PMID:19925443

  20. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy.

  1. Gantries and dose delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meer, David; Psoroulas, Serena

    2015-04-01

    Particle therapy is a field in remarkable development, with the goal of increasing the number of indications which could benefit from such treatments and the access to the therapy. The therapeutic usage of a particle beam defines the technical requirements of all the elements of the therapy chain: we summarize the main characteristics of accelerators, the beam line, the treatment room, the integrated therapy and imaging systems used in particle therapy. Aiming at a higher flexibility in the choice of treatments, an increasing number of centers around the world have chosen to equip their treatment rooms with gantries, rotating beam line structures that allow a complete flexibility in the choice of the treatment angle. We review the current designs. A particle therapy gantry though is a quite expensive structure, and future development will increasingly consider reducing the cost and the footprint. Increasing the number of indications also means development in the delivery techniques and solving some of the issues which traditionally affected particle therapy, for example the precision of the delivery in presence of motion and the large penumbras for low depths. We show the current strategies in these fields, focusing on pencil beam scanning (PBS), and give some hints about future developments.

  2. Integrated delivery systems. Evolving oligopolies.

    PubMed

    Malone, T A

    1998-01-01

    The proliferation of Integrated Delivery Systems (IDSs) in regional health care markets has resulted in the movement of these markets from a monopolistic competitive model of behavior to an oligopoly. An oligopoly is synonymous with competition among the few, as a small number of firms supply a dominant share of an industry's total output. The basic characteristics of a market with competition among the few are: (1) A mutual interdependence among the actions and behaviors of competing firms; (2) competition tends to rely on the differentiation of products; (3) significant barriers to entering the market exist; (4) the demand curve for services may be kinked; and (5) firms can benefit from economies of scale. An understanding of these characteristics is essential to the survival of IDSs as regional managed care markets mature. PMID:10180497

  3. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  4. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  5. Physically facilitating drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Devora, Jorge I; Ambure, Sunny; Shi, Zhi-Dong; Yuan, Yuyu; Sun, Wei; Xu, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Facilitated/modulated drug-delivery systems have emerged as a possible solution for delivery of drugs of interest to pre-allocated sites at predetermined doses for predefined periods of time. Over the past decade, the use of different physical methods and mechanisms to mediate drug release and delivery has grown significantly. This emerging area of research has important implications for development of new therapeutic drugs for efficient treatments. This review aims to introduce and describe different modalities of physically facilitating drug-delivery systems that are currently in use for cancer and other diseases therapy. In particular, delivery methods based on ultrasound, electrical, magnetic and photo modulations are highlighted. Current uses and areas of improvement for these different physically facilitating drug-delivery systems are discussed. Furthermore, the main advantages and drawbacks of these technologies reviewed are compared. The review ends with a speculative viewpoint of how research is expected to evolve in the upcoming years. PMID:22485192

  6. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  7. Development of the Choctaw Health Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Binh N.

    The Choctaw Tribe is the first and only tribe to develop a health delivery system to take over an existing Indian Health Service inpatient facility. The takeover was accomplished in January 1984 under the Indian Self-Determination Act through a contract with the Indian Health Service. The Choctaw Health Delivery System includes a 35-bed general…

  8. Gastroretentive delivery systems: hollow beads.

    PubMed

    Talukder, R; Fassihi, R

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a floatable multiparticulate system with potential for intragastric sustained drug delivery. Cross-linked beads were made by using calcium and low methoxylated pectin (LMP), which is an anionic polysaccharide, and calcium, LMP, and sodium alginate. Beads were dried separately in an air convection type oven at 40 degrees C for 6 hours and in a freeze dryer to evaluate the changes in bead characteristics due to process variability. Riboflavin (B-2), tetracycline (TCN), and Methotrexate (MTX) were used as model drugs for encapsulation. Ionic and nonionic excipients were added to study their effects on the release profiles of the beads. The presence of noncross linking agents in low amounts (less than 2%) did not significantly interfere with release kinetics. For an amphoteric drug like TCN, which has pH dependent solubility, three different pHs (1.5, 5.0, and 8.0) of cross-linking media were used to evaluate the effects of pH on the drug entrapment capacity of the beads. As anticipated, highest entrapment was possible when cross-linking media pH coincided with least drug solubility. Evaluation of the drying process demonstrated that the freeze-dried beads remained buoyant over 12 hours in United States Pharmacopeia (USP) hydrochloride buffer at pH 1.5, whereas the air-dried beads remained submerged throughout the release study. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the presence of air-filled hollow spaces inside the freeze dried beads, which was responsible for the flotation property of the beads. However, the release kinetics from freeze dried beads was independent of hydrodynamic conditions. Calcium-pectinate-alginate beads released their contents at much faster rates than did calcium-pectinate beads (100% in 10 hours vs. 50% in 10 hours). It appears that the nature of cross-linking, drying method, drug solubility, and production approach are all important and provide the opportunity and potential for development of a

  9. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein-Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  10. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  11. Proton beam scattering system optimization for clinical and research applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wroe, A. J.; Schulte, R. W.; Slater, J. D.; Barnes, S.; McAuley, G.; Slater, J. M.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a method for optimizing and constructing a dual scattering system in passively scattered proton therapy. Methods: A beam optics optimization algorithm was developed to optimize the thickness of the first scatterer (S1) and the profile (of both the high-Z material and Lexan) of the second scatterer (S2) to deliver a proton beam matching a given set of parameters, including field diameter, fluence, flatness, and symmetry. A new manufacturing process was also tested that allows the contoured second scattering foil to be created much more economically and quickly using Cerrobend casting. Two application-specific scattering systems were developed and tested using both experimental and Monte Carlo techniques to validate the optimization process described. Results: A scattering system was optimized and constructed to deliver large uniform irradiations of radiobiology samples at low dose rates. This system was successfully built and tested using film and ionization chambers. The system delivered a uniform radiation field of 50 cm diameter (to a dose of {+-}7% of the central axis) while the depth dose profile could be tuned to match the specifications of the particular investigator using modulator wheels and range shifters. A second scattering system for intermediate field size (4 cm < diameter < 10 cm) stereotactic radiosurgery and radiation therapy (SRS and SRT) treatments was also developed and tested using GEANT4. This system improved beam efficiency by over 70% compared with existing scattering systems while maintaining field flatness and depth dose profile. In both cases the proton range uniformity across the radiation field was maintained, further indicating the accuracy of the energy loss formalism in the optimization algorithm. Conclusions: The methods described allow for rapid prototyping of scattering foils to meet the demands of both research and clinical beam delivery applications in proton therapy.

  12. Starch Applications for Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant and economical renewable biopolymers in nature. Starch molecules are high molecular weight polymers of D-glucose linked by α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) glycosidic bonds, forming linear (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) structures. Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches (OSA-starch) are designed by carefully choosing a proper starch source, path and degree of modification. This enables emulsion and micro-encapsulation delivery systems for oil based flavors, micronutrients, fragrance, and pharmaceutical actives. A large percentage of flavors are encapsulated by spray drying in today's industry due to its high throughput. However, spray drying encapsulation faces constant challenges with retention of volatile compounds, oxidation of sensitive compound, and manufacturing yield. Specialty OSA-starches were developed suitable for the complex dynamics in spray drying and to provide high encapsulation efficiency and high microcapsule quality. The OSA starch surface activity, low viscosity and film forming capability contribute to high volatile retention and low active oxidation. OSA starches exhibit superior performance, especially in high solids and high oil load encapsulations compared with other hydrocolloids. The submission is based on research and development of Ingredion

  13. Fibrin Glue as a Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Patrick P.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin glue has been used surgically for decades for hemostasis as well as a sealant. It has also been researched as both a gel for cell delivery and a vehicle for drug delivery. The drug delivery applications for fibrin glue span tissue engineering to chemotherapy and involve several mechanisms for drug matrix interactions and control of release kinetics. Additionally, drugs or factors can be loaded in the gel via impregnation and tethering to the gel through covalent linkages or affinity based systems. This review highlights recent research of fibrin glue as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:20637815

  14. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  15. Delivery system for laser medical instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Cerny, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2003-10-01

    Investigation of the special constructed hollow glass waveguides was realized. Maximum mean power transmitted via this delivery system was 5.8 W (for alexandrite radiation) or 5.1 W (for mid infrared Er.YAG light). Maximum output intensity 173 GW/cm2 was reached for delivery of 55 psec long Nd:YAG pulses.

  16. New Developments in Proton Therapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Charlie Ma, C.-M.

    2009-07-25

    Proton beams can provide better dose conformity to the treatment target compared to commonly used photon and electron beams allowing for dose escalation and/or hypofractionation to increase local tumor control, reduce normal tissue complications and/or treatment time/cost. This paper reviews three novel proton accelerator designs that aim at cost-effective solutions for widespread applications of advanced particle therapy. The basic concepts, the system designs and the potential clinical applications are discussed in detail for superconductor accelerators, dielectric wall accelerators and laser-particle accelerators.

  17. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  18. Alternative delivery systems in rural areas.

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, J B

    1989-01-01

    Alternative delivery systems, such as HMOs, PPOs, and primary care case-management programs, have a long history in rural America despite significant impediments to their development. However, little is known about the effect of these systems on rural communities and their medical care delivery systems. Existing studies, which focus on rural HMOs, are qualitative in nature and generally are directed at identifying factors that facilitate or retard HMO development. Despite their limitations, the studies do raise a variety of issues deserving of quantitative analysis. Research is now needed that (1) investigates the effect of rural alternative delivery systems on the cost and quality of care received by rural residents, (2) assesses the effectiveness of different mechanisms used by these systems to contain costs, (3) estimates the effect of alternative delivery systems on rural providers, (4) determines the extent to which the presence or absence of alternative delivery systems influences physician decisions to locate in rural areas, (5) identifies factors that are important in consumer decisions to enroll or not enroll in a rural alternative delivery system, and (6) analyzes the diffusion patterns of these systems in rural areas. PMID:2645250

  19. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation. PMID:24936306

  20. Delivery systems for intradermal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Jarrahian, C; Zehrung, D; Mitragotri, S; Prausnitz, M R

    2012-01-01

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination can offer improved immunity and simpler logistics of delivery, but its use in medicine is limited by the need for simple, reliable methods of ID delivery. ID injection by the Mantoux technique requires special training and may not reliably target skin, but is nonetheless used currently for BCG and rabies vaccination. Scarification using a bifurcated needle was extensively used for smallpox eradication, but provides variable and inefficient delivery into the skin. Recently, ID vaccination has been simplified by introduction of a simple-to-use hollow microneedle that has been approved for ID injection of influenza vaccine in Europe. Various designs of hollow microneedles have been studied preclinically and in humans. Vaccines can also be injected into skin using needle-free devices, such as jet injection, which is receiving renewed clinical attention for ID vaccination. Projectile delivery using powder and gold particles (i.e., gene gun) have also been used clinically for ID vaccination. Building off the scarification approach, a number of preclinical studies have examined solid microneedle patches for use with vaccine coated onto metal microneedles, encapsulated within dissolving microneedles or added topically to skin after microneedle pretreatment, as well as adapting tattoo guns for ID vaccination. Finally, technologies designed to increase skin permeability in combination with a vaccine patch have been studied through the use of skin abrasion, ultrasound, electroporation, chemical enhancers, and thermal ablation. The prospects for bringing ID vaccination into more widespread clinical practice are encouraging, given the large number of technologies for ID delivery under development. PMID:21472533

  1. WEDDS: The WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J.; Backes, P.

    1999-01-01

    WEDDS, the WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System, is a framework for supporting distributed mission operations by automatically transferring sensitive mission data in a secure and efficient manner to and from remote mission participants over the internet.

  2. Novel drug delivery systems for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavik, E; Kuehn, M H; Kwon, Y H

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by pharmaceutical or surgical means has long been the standard treatment for glaucoma. A number of excellent drugs are available that are effective in reducing IOP. These drugs are typically applied as eye drops. However, patient adherence can be poor, thus reducing the clinical efficacy of the drugs. Several novel delivery systems designed to address the issue of adherence and to ensure consistent reduction of IOP are currently under development. These delivery systems include contact lenses-releasing glaucoma medications, injectables such as biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles, and surgically implanted systems. These new technologies are aimed at increasing clinical efficacy by offering multiple delivery options and are capable of managing IOP for several months. There is also a desire to have complementary neuroprotective approaches for those who continue to show progression, despite IOP reduction. Many potential neuroprotective agents are not suitable for traditional oral or drop formulations. Their potential is dependent on developing suitable delivery systems that can provide the drugs in a sustained, local manner to the retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery systems have the potential to improve patient adherence, reduce side effects, increase efficacy, and ultimately, preserve sight for glaucoma patients. In this review, we discuss benefits and limitations of the current systems of delivery and application, as well as those on the horizon. PMID:21475311

  3. Cyclodextrins in delivery systems: Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rai, Awani K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a family of cyclic oligosaccharides with a hydrophilic outer surface and a lipophilic central cavity. CD molecules are relatively large with a number of hydrogen donors and acceptors and, thus in general, they do not permeate lipophilic membranes. In the pharmaceutical industry, CDs have mainly been used as complexing agents to increase aqueous solubility of poorly soluble drugs and to increase their bioavailability and stability. CDs are used in pharmaceutical applications for numerous purposes, including improving the bioavailability of drugs. Current CD-based therapeutics is described and possible future applications are discussed. CD-containing polymers are reviewed and their use in drug delivery is presented. Of specific interest is the use of CD-containing polymers to provide unique capabilities for the delivery of nucleic acids. Studies in both humans and animals have shown that CDs can be used to improve drug delivery from almost any type of drug formulation. Currently, there are approximately 30 different pharmaceutical products worldwide containing drug/CD complexes in the market. PMID:21814436

  4. Transmucosal delivery systems for calcitonin: a review.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lugo, M; Peppas, N A

    2000-06-01

    The commercial availability of peptides and proteins and their advantages as therapeutic agents have been the basis for tremendous efforts in designing delivery systems for such agents. The protection of these agents from biological fluids and physiological interactions is crucial for the treatment efficacy. One such agent is salmon calcitonin, a 32 amino-acid polypeptide hormone used in the treatment of bone diseases such as Paget's disease, hypercalcemia and osteoporosis. Researchers have studied different routes to deliver salmon calcitonin more effectively, including nasal, oral, vaginal and rectal delivery. These systems are designed to protect the polypeptide from the biological barriers that each delivery route imposes. Oil-based and polymer-based delivery systems are discussed. PMID:10811300

  5. Planetary Regolith Delivery Systems for ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2012-01-01

    The challenges associated with collecting regolith on a planetary surface and delivering it to an in-situ resource utilization system differ significantly from similar activities conducted on Earth. Since system maintenance on a planetary body can be difficult or impossible to do, high reliability and service life are expected of a regolith delivery system. Mission costs impose upper limits on power and mass. The regolith delivery system must provide a leak-tight interface between the near-vacuum planetary surface and the pressurized ISRU system. Regolith delivery in amounts ranging from a few grams to tens of kilograms may be required. Finally, the spent regolith must be removed from the ISRU chamber and returned to the planetary environment via dust tolerant valves capable of operating and sealing over a large temperature range. This paper will describe pneumatic and auger regolith transfer systems that have already been field tested for ISRU, and discuss other systems that await future field testing.

  6. Enolization as an alternative proton delivery pathway in human aromatase (P450 19A1).

    PubMed

    Krámos, Balázs; Oláh, Julianna

    2014-01-16

    Human aromatase catalyzes the last step of estrogen biosynthesis, the aromatization of ring A of androstenedione (ASD) and testosterone leading to estrone and estradiol. The enolization of the substrate molecule has been suggested to play an essential role in this process. In this work using quantum mechanical and hybrid QM/MM calculations, the reaction mechanism of enolization was investigated. It is shown that the energetically unfavorable enolization of andostenedione occurs in a coupled process with the energetically favorable protonation of the ferrous superoxo complex (traditionally called ferric peroxo complex) via a low barrier of about 5 kcal/mol. This mechanism implies an alternative way for protonation of the ferrous superoxo complex to form compound 0, which occurs via the Asp309-water-ASD proton delivery pathway instead of the Asp-water-Thr pathway suggested for other P450 enzymes. It is also shown that Thr310, which is known experimentally to be important for catalysis, plays a key role in the conversion of compound 0 to compound I. PMID:24369956

  7. Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery: A Quantitative Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact caused by the interplay between intrafraction prostate motion and the intermittent delivery of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 10 prostate patients was treated with PBS using a bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. Bilateral intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for comparison. Because beam-on time in PBS was intermittent, the actual beam-on time was determined from treatment logs. Prostate motion was generalized according to real-time Calypso tracking data from our previously reported prospective photon trial. We investigated potential dose deviations by considering the interplay effect resulting from the worst-case scenario motion and the PBS delivery sequence. Results: For both bilateral-field SFUD and IMPT plans, clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 99}% coverage was degraded <2% owing to prostate intrafraction motion when averaged over the course of treatment, but was >10% for the worst fraction. The standard deviation of CTV D{sub 99}% distribution was approximately 1.2%. The CTV coverage of individual fields in SFUD plans degraded as time elapsed after the initial alignment, owing to prostate drift. Intensity-modulated proton therapy and SFUD demonstrated comparable results when bilateral opposed fields were used. Single-field SFUD plans that were repainted twice, which could reduce half of the treatment time, resulted in similar CTV coverage as bilateral-field plans. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion affects the actual delivered dose to CTV; however, when averaged over the course of treatment, CTV D{sub 99}% coverage degraded only approximately 2% even for the worst-case scenario. The IMPT plan results are comparable to those of the SFUD plan, and similar coverage can be achieved if treated by SFUD 1 lateral field per day when rescanning the field twice to shorten the treatment time and mitigate intrafraction motion.

  8. Imaging of prompt gamma rays emitted during delivery of clinical proton beams with a Compton camera: feasibility studies for range verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Avery, Stephen; Mackin, Dennis S.; Beddar, Sam

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of a prototype Compton camera (CC) to measure prompt gamma rays (PG) emitted during delivery of clinical proton pencil beams for prompt gamma imaging (PGI) as a means of providing in vivo verification of the delivered proton radiotherapy beams. A water phantom was irradiated with clinical 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton pencil beams. Up to 500 cGy of dose was delivered per irradiation using clinical beam currents. The prototype CC was placed 15 cm from the beam central axis and PGs from 0.2 MeV up to 6.5 MeV were measured during irradiation. From the measured data (2D) images of the PG emission were reconstructed. (1D) profiles were extracted from the PG images and compared to measured depth dose curves of the delivered proton pencil beams. The CC was able to measure PG emission during delivery of both 114 MeV and 150 MeV proton beams at clinical beam currents. 2D images of the PG emission were reconstructed for single 150 MeV proton pencil beams as well as for a 5   ×   5 cm mono-energetic layer of 114 MeV pencil beams. Shifts in the Bragg peak (BP) range were detectable on the 2D images. 1D profiles extracted from the PG images show that the distal falloff of the PG emission profile lined up well with the distal BP falloff. Shifts as small as 3 mm in the beam range could be detected from the 1D PG profiles with an accuracy of 1.5 mm or better. However, with the current CC prototype, a dose of 400 cGy was required to acquire adequate PG signal for 2D PG image reconstruction. It was possible to measure PG interactions with our prototype CC during delivery of proton pencil beams at clinical dose rates. Images of the PG emission could be reconstructed and shifts in the BP range were detectable. Therefore PGI with a CC for in vivo range verification during proton treatment delivery is feasible. However, improvements in the prototype CC detection efficiency and reconstruction algorithms are necessary

  9. Small Business Innovation Research Award Success Story: Proton Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    This success story describes Proton Energy Systems, a small business that designs and manufactures proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis sytems to produce hydrogen from water. The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has supported much of Proton's technology development through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Awards and other non-SBIR funding.

  10. Development of proton CT imaging system for evaluation of proton range calculation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Sodai; Nishio, Teiji; Matsushita, Keiichiro; Tsuneda, Masato; Aono, Yuki; Kabuki, Shigeto; Sugiura, Akinori; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] In treatment planning of proton therapy, X-ray CT image is generally utilized for proton dose and range calculations in a patient body. However, there is an error of the conversion from CT value to WEL (Water Equivalent Length), and it turns into the error of proton range calculation. Therefore, WEL can be directly derived by use of pixel value on proton CT (pCT) image. The purpose of this study is development of a simple and convenient pCT imaging system for evaluation of proton range calculation accuracy. [Method] PCT imaging system was constructed with a plastic scintillator and a cooled CCD camera, which acquires the image of integrated value of the scintillation light toward the beam direction. Experiment for evaluation of this system with 70-MeV protons provided by NIRS cyclotron was performed. The proton beam was irradiated to objects of water and other substances phantom with complicated shape. The pCT image reconstructed from the experimental data was quantitatively evaluated. [Result] Construction of pCT image of various objects was successful. The value of WEL factor of water was 1.0 +/-0.1. [Conclusion] The simple and convenient pCT imaging system for evaluation of proton range calculation accuracy was developed and was evaluated by experiment using proton beam.

  11. Renewable energy delivery systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2013-12-10

    A system, method and/or apparatus for the delivery of energy at a site, at least a portion of the energy being delivered by at least one or more of a plurality of renewable energy technologies, the system and method including calculating the load required by the site for the period; calculating the amount of renewable energy for the period, including obtaining a capacity and a percentage of the period for the renewable energy to be delivered; comparing the total load to the renewable energy available; and, implementing one or both of additional and alternative renewable energy sources for delivery of energy to the site.

  12. Deep Space Systems Technology Program Future Deliveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvo, Christopher G.; Keuneke, Matthew S.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is in a period of frequent launches of low cost deep space missions with challenging performance needs. The modest budgets of these missions make it impossible for each to develop its own technology, therefore, efficient and effective development and insertion of technology for these missions must be approached at a higher level than has been done in the past. The Deep Space Systems Technology Program (DSST), often referred to as X2000, has been formed to address this need. The program is divided into a series of "Deliveries" that develop and demonstrate a set of spacecraft system capabilities with broad applicability for use by multiple missions. The First Delivery Project, to be completed in 2001, will provide a one MRAD-tolerant flight computer, power switching electronics, efficient radioisotope power source, and a transponder with services at 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz bands. Plans call for a Second Delivery in late 2003 to enable complete deep space systems in the 10 to 50 kg class, and a Third Delivery built around Systems on a Chip (extreme levels of electronic and microsystems integration) around 2006. Formulation of Future Deliveries (past the First Delivery) is ongoing and includes plans for such developments as highly miniaturized digital/analog/power electronics, optical communications, multifunctional structures, miniature lightweight propulsion, advanced thermal control techniques, highly efficient radioisotope power sources, and a unified flight ground software architecture to support the needs of future highly intelligent space systems. All developments are targeted at broad applicability and reuse, and will be commercialized within the US.

  13. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment. PMID:23016644

  14. Assessing the quality of proton PBS treatment delivery using machine log files: comprehensive analysis of clinical treatments delivered at PSI Gantry 2.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, D; Albertini, F; van der Meer, R; Meier, G; Weber, D C; Bolsi, A; Lomax, A

    2016-02-01

    Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy requires the delivery of many thousand proton beams, each modulated for position, energy and monitor units, to provide a highly conformal patient treatment. The quality of the treatment is dependent on the delivery accuracy of each beam and at each fraction. In this work we describe the use of treatment log files, which are a record of the machine parameters for a given field delivery on a given fraction, to investigate the integrity of treatment delivery compared to the nominal planned dose. The dosimetry-relevant log file parameters are used to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution on the patient anatomy, using a TPS-independent dose calculation system. The analysis was performed for patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute on Gantry 2, both for individual fields and per series (or plan), and delivery quality was assessed by determining the percentage of voxels in the log file dose distribution within  +/-  1% of the nominal dose. It was seen that, for all series delivered, the mean pass rate is 96.4%. Furthermore, this work establishes a correlation between the delivery quality of a field and the beam position accuracy. This correlation is evident for all delivered fields regardless of individual patient or plan characteristics. We have also detailed further usefulness of log file analysis within our clinical workflow. In summary, we have highlighted that the integrity of PBS treatment delivery is dependent on daily machine performance and is specifically highly correlated with the accuracy of beam position. We believe this information will be useful for driving machine performance improvements in the PBS field. PMID:26767316

  15. Assessing the quality of proton PBS treatment delivery using machine log files: comprehensive analysis of clinical treatments delivered at PSI Gantry 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, D.; Albertini, F.; van der Meer, R.; Meier, G.; Weber, D. C.; Bolsi, A.; Lomax, A.

    2016-02-01

    Pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy requires the delivery of many thousand proton beams, each modulated for position, energy and monitor units, to provide a highly conformal patient treatment. The quality of the treatment is dependent on the delivery accuracy of each beam and at each fraction. In this work we describe the use of treatment log files, which are a record of the machine parameters for a given field delivery on a given fraction, to investigate the integrity of treatment delivery compared to the nominal planned dose. The dosimetry-relevant log file parameters are used to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution on the patient anatomy, using a TPS-independent dose calculation system. The analysis was performed for patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute on Gantry 2, both for individual fields and per series (or plan), and delivery quality was assessed by determining the percentage of voxels in the log file dose distribution within  +/-  1% of the nominal dose. It was seen that, for all series delivered, the mean pass rate is 96.4%. Furthermore, this work establishes a correlation between the delivery quality of a field and the beam position accuracy. This correlation is evident for all delivered fields regardless of individual patient or plan characteristics. We have also detailed further usefulness of log file analysis within our clinical workflow. In summary, we have highlighted that the integrity of PBS treatment delivery is dependent on daily machine performance and is specifically highly correlated with the accuracy of beam position. We believe this information will be useful for driving machine performance improvements in the PBS field.

  16. [Progression of drug delivery system for glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Lyu, Liu

    2014-12-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by drugs is a major treatment for glaucoma. Clinically, diverse antiglaucoma drugs take effect to decrease the IOP through different mechanisms.However, due to limitations of traditional form of eye drops, the bioavailability of the drug and the patient compliance is lowered, the clinical efficacy is not good and also some toxic and side-effects come out.Otherwise, traditional medication is not suitable for neuroprotective drugs to work on both retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery system has the potential to improve the bioavailability of the drug, prolong the time of drug action, decrease the dosage and frequency of drugs, reduce the side-effects, and improve the patient compliance and efficacy.It is one of the most important studies in glaucoma medication development because it is valuable for patients' neuroprotection.Nowadays, several novel delivery systems have been designed. This review will focus on the progressions of some of the sustained-release antiglaucoma eye drops, polymeric gels, colloidal systems, membrane-controlled drug delivery system, ocular implants, and transscleral drug delivery systems. PMID:25619186

  17. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  18. Drug Delivery Systems: Entering the Mainstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Theresa M.; Cullis, Pieter R.

    2004-03-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDS) such as lipid- or polymer-based nanoparticles can be designed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drugs administered parenterally. Many of the early problems that hindered the clinical applications of particulate DDS have been overcome, with several DDS formulations of anticancer and antifungal drugs now approved for clinical use. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in exploiting the advantages of DDS for in vivo delivery of new drugs derived from proteomics or genomics research and for their use in ligand-targeted therapeutics.

  19. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •The disruption of PREG/PROG hydroxylation activity by T306A showed the participation of Cpd I. •T306A supports the involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion during lyase activity. •The presence of cytochrome b{sub 5} augments C–C lyase activity. •Δ5-Steroids are preferred substrates for CYP17 catalysis. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 CYP17A1 catalyzes a series of reactions that lie at the intersection of corticoid and androgen biosynthesis and thus occupies an essential role in steroid hormone metabolism. This multifunctional enzyme catalyzes the 17α-hydroxylation of Δ4- and Δ5-steroids progesterone and pregnenolone to form the corresponding 17α-hydroxy products through its hydroxylase activity, and a subsequent 17,20-carbon–carbon scission of pregnene-side chain produce the androgens androstenedione (AD) and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). While the former hydroxylation reaction is believed to proceed through a conventional “Compound I” rebound mechanism, it has been suggested that the latter carbon cleavage is initiated by an iron-peroxy intermediate. We report on the role of Thr306 in CYP17 catalysis. Thr306 is a member of the conserved acid/alcohol pair thought to be essential for the efficient delivery of protons required for hydroperoxoanion heterolysis and formation of Compound I in the cytochromes P450. Wild type and T306A CYP17A1 self-assembled in Nanodiscs were used to quantitate turnover and coupling efficiencies of CYP17’s physiological Δ4- and Δ5-substrates. We observed that T306A co-incorporated in Nanodiscs with its redox partner cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, coupled NADPH only by 0.9% and 0.7% compared to the wild type (97% and 22%) during the conversion of pregnenolone and progesterone, respectively, to the corresponding 17-OH products. Despite increased oxidation of pyridine nucleotide, hydroxylase activity was drastically diminished in the T306A mutant, suggesting a high degree of uncoupling in which reducing

  20. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  1. Human Services Course Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soong, Robert K.; And Others

    This paper deals with various teaching methods and techniques currently is use in junior colleges in the Chicago area including traditional as well as innovative methods. The basic assumption is that teaching and learning are both essential aspects of the same system. The human services field is defined as encompassing the basic area of social…

  2. Systemic delivery of artemether by dissolving microneedles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqin; Li, Chun; Zhang, Suohui; Yang, Guozhong; He, Meilin; Gao, Yunhua

    2016-07-11

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs) based transdermal delivery is an attractive drug delivery approach with minimal invasion. However, it is still challenging to load poorly water-soluble drugs in DMNs for systemic delivery. The aim of the study was to develop DMNs loaded with artemether (ARM) as a model drug, to enable efficient drug penetration through skin for systemic absorption and distribution. The micro-conduits created by microneedles were imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the insertion depth was suggested to be about 270μm. The maximum amount of ARM delivered into skin was 72.67±2.69% of the initial dose loaded on DMNs preparation. Pharmacokinetics study in rats indicated a dose-dependent profile of plasma ARM concentrations, after ARM-loaded DMNs treatment. In contrast to intramuscular injection, DMNs application resulted in lower peak plasma levels, but higher plasma ARM concentration at 8h after administration. There were no significant difference in area under the curve and bioavailability between DMNs group and intramuscular group (P>0.05). Pharmacodynamics studies performed in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats showed that ARM-loaded DMNs could reverse paw edema, similar to ARM intramuscular injection. In conclusion, developed DMNs provided a potential minimally invasive route for systemic delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27150946

  3. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  4. Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall. Integrated delivery systems are going through changes that are focusing the provider organizations more on delivering care than managing risk, says Dean C. Coddington, one of the leading researchers into capitated organizations and a senior consultant with McManis Consulting in Denver. PMID:15889632

  5. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  6. Challenges in media delivery systems and servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Viswanathan

    2005-03-01

    Although multimedia compression formats and protocols to stream such content have been around for a long time, there has been limited success in the adoption of open standards for streaming over IP (Internet Protocol) networks. The elements of such an end-to-end system will be introduced outlining the responsibilities of each element. The technical and financial challenges in building a viable multimedia streaming end-to-end system will be analyzed in detail in this paper outlining some solutions and areas for further research. Also, recent migration to IP in the backend video delivery network infrastructures have made it possible to use IP based media streaming solutions in non-IP last mile access networks like cable and wireless networks in addition to the DSL networks. The advantages of using IP streaming solutions in such networks will be outlined. However, there is a different set of challenges posed by such applications. The real time constraints are acute in each element of the media delivery end-to-end system. Meeting these real time constraints in general purpose non real time server systems is quite demanding. Quality of service, resource management, session management, fail-over, reliability, and cost are some important but challenging requirements in such systems. These will also be analyzed with suggested solutions. Content protection and rights management requirements are also very challenging for open standards based multimedia delivery systems. Interoperability unfortunately interferes with security in most of the current day systems. Some approaches to solve the interoperability problems will also be presented. The requirements, challenges, and possible solutions for delivering broadcast, on demand, and interactive video delivery applications for IP based media streaming systems will be analyzed in detail.

  7. Biomaterials for Nanoparticle Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sahdev, Preety; Ochyl, Lukasz J.; Moon, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Subunit vaccination benefits from improved safety over attenuated or inactivated vaccines, but their limited capability to elicit long-lasting, concerted cellular and humoral immune responses is a major challenge. Recent studies have demonstrated that antigen delivery via nanoparticle formulations significantly improve immunogenicity of vaccines due to either intrinsic immunostimulatory properties of the materials or by co-entrapment of molecular adjuvants such as Toll-like receptor agonists. These studies have collectively shown that nanoparticles designed to mimic biophysical and biochemical cues of pathogens offer new exciting opportunities to enhance activation of innate immunity and elicit potent cellular and humoral immunity with minimal cytotoxicity. In this review, we present key research advances that were made within the last 5 years in the field of nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems. In particular, we focus on the impact of biomaterials composition, size, and surface charge of nanoparticles on modulation of particle biodistribution, delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory molecules, trafficking and targeting of antigen presenting cells, and overall immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. This review describes recent progresses in the design of nanoparticle vaccine delivery carriers, including liposomes, lipid-based particles, micelles and nanostructures composed of natural or synthetic polymers, and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles. PMID:24848341

  8. Modeling and optimization of a time-resolved proton radiographic imaging system for proton cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bin

    This dissertation describes a research project to test the clinical utility of a time-resolved proton radiographic (TRPR) imaging system by performing comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations of a physical device coupled with realistic lung cancer patient anatomy defined by 4DCT for proton therapy. A time-resolved proton radiographic imaging system was modeled through Monte Carlo simulations. A particle-tracking feature was employed to evaluate the performance of the proton imaging system, especially in its ability to visualize and quantify proton range variations during respiration. The Most Likely Path (MLP) algorithm was developed to approximate the multiple Coulomb scattering paths of protons for the purpose of image reconstruction. Spatial resolution of ˜ 1 mm and range resolution of 1.3% of the total range were achieved using the MLP algorithm. Time-resolved proton radiographs of five patient cases were reconstructed to track tumor motion and to calculate water equivalent length variations. By comparing with direct 4DCT measurement, the accuracy of tumor tracking was found to be better than 2 mm in five patient cases. Utilizing tumor tracking information to reduce margins to the planning target volume, a gated treatment plan was compared with un-gated treatment plan. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were used to quantify the gain in the quality of treatments. The EUD of the OARs was found to be reduced up to 11% and the corresponding NTCP of organs at risk (OARs) was found to be reduced up to 16.5%. These results suggest that, with image guidance by proton radiography, dose to OARs can be reduced and the corresponding NTCPs can be significantly reduced. The study concludes that the proton imaging system can accurately track the motion of the tumor and detect the WEL variations, leading to potential gains in using image-guided proton radiography for lung cancer treatments.

  9. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  10. SU-E-T-470: Beam Performance of the Radiance 330 Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaryan, H; Nazaryan, V; Wang, F; Flanz, J; Alexandrov, V

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The ProTom Radiance 330 proton radiotherapy system is a fully functional, compact proton radiotherapy system that provides advanced proton delivery capabilities. It supports three-dimensional beam scanning with energy and intensity modulation. A series of measurements have been conducted to characterize the beam performance of the first installation of the system at the McLaren Proton Therapy Center in Flint, Michigan. These measurements were part of the technical commissioning of the system. Select measurements and results are presented. Methods: The Radiance 330 proton beam energy range is 70–250 MeV for treatment, and up to 330 MeV for proton tomography and radiography. Its 3-D scanning capability, together with a small beam emittance and momentum spread, provides a highly efficient beam delivery. During the technical commissioning, treatment plans were created to deliver uniform maps at various energies to perform Gamma Index analysis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were irradiated using the Planned irradiation maps. Bragg Peak chamber was used to test the dynamic range during a scan in one layer for high (250 MeV) and Low (70 MeV) energies. The maximum and minimum range, range adjustment and modulation, distal dose falloff (80%–20%), pencil beam spot size, spot placement accuracy were also measured. The accuracy testing included acquiring images, image registration, receiving correction vectors and applying the corrections to the robotic patient positioner. Results: Gamma Index analysis of the Treatment Planning System (TPS) data vs. Measured data showed more than 90% of points within (3%, 3mm) for the maps created by the TPS. At Isocenter Beam Size (One sigma) < 3mm at highest energy (250 MeV) in air. Beam delivery was within 0.6 mm of the intended target at the entrance and the exit of the beam, through the phantom. Conclusion: The Radiance 330 Beam Performance Measurements have confirmed that the system operates as designed with excellent clinical

  11. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  12. Resistive-wall wake effect in the beam delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Delayen; Juhao Wu; T.O. Raubenheimer; Jiunn-Ming Wang

    2004-08-16

    General formulae for resistive-wall induced beam dilution are presented and then applied to the final beam delivery system of linear colliders. Criteria for the design of final beam delivery systems are discussed.

  13. Recent technologies in pulsatile drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepika; Raturi, Richa; Jain, Vikas; Bansal, Praveen; Singh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery systems (PDDS) have attracted attraction because of their multiple benefits over conventional dosage forms. They deliver the drug at the right time, at the right site of action and in the right amount, which provides more benefit than conventional dosages and increased patient compliance. These systems are designed according to the circadian rhythm of the body, and the drug is released rapidly and completely as a pulse after a lag time. These products follow the sigmoid release profile characterized by a time period. These systems are beneficial for drugs with chronopharmacological behavior, where nocturnal dosing is required, and for drugs that show the first-pass effect. This review covers methods and marketed technologies that have been developed to achieve pulsatile delivery. Marketed technologies, such as PulsincapTM, Diffucaps®, CODAS®, OROS® and PULSYSTM, follow the above mechanism to render a sigmoidal drug release profile. Diseases wherein PDDS are promising include asthma, peptic ulcers, cardiovascular ailments, arthritis and attention deficit syndrome in children and hypercholesterolemia. Pulsatile drug delivery systems have the potential to bring new developments in the therapy of many diseases. PMID:23507727

  14. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  15. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  16. An intramolecular hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability — a model with regard to the proton pathway in bacteriorhodopsin and other systems with collective proton motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Bogumil; Radziejewski, Piotr; Olejnik, Jerzy; Zundel, Georg

    1994-07-01

    3-Diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol was synthesized and studied by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The compound forms a system with two hydrogen bonds which shows large proton polarizability due to collective proton motion. This result supports our earlier suggestion that the first part of the proton pathway in bacteriorhodopsin conducting protons is a hydrogen-bonded chain with large proton polarizability built up by arginine and tyrosine residues. Furthermore, we show that in the monotetrachloroaurate of 3,3'-bis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol and in the tritetrachloroaurates of 3,3',5,5'-tetrakis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol there is proton polarizability due to collective proton motion.

  17. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  18. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

  19. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  20. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems. PMID:26898739

  2. Towards more effective advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Crommelin, Daan J A; Florence, Alexander T

    2013-09-15

    This position paper discusses progress made and to be made with so-called advanced drug delivery systems, particularly but not exclusively those in the nanometre domain. The paper has resulted from discussions with a number of international experts in the field who shared their views on aspects of the subject, from the nomenclature used for such systems, the sometimes overwrought claims made in the era of nanotechnology, the complex nature of targeting delivery systems to specific destinations in vivo, the need for setting standards for the choice and characterisation of cell lines used in in vitro studies, to attention to the manufacturability, stability and analytical profiling of systems and more relevant studies on toxicology. The historical background to the development of many systems is emphasised. So too is the stochastic nature of many of the steps to successful access to and action in targets. A lacuna in the field is the lack of availability of data on a variety of carrier systems using the same models in vitro and in vivo using standard controls. The paper asserts that greater emphasis must also be paid to the effective levels of active attained in target organs, for without such crucial data it will be difficult for many experimental systems to enter the clinic. This means the use of diagnostic/imaging technologies to monitor targeted drug delivery and stratify patient groups, identifying patients with optimum chances for successful therapy. Last, but not least, the critical importance of the development of science bases for regulatory policies, scientific platforms overseeing the field and new paradigms of financing are discussed. PMID:23415662

  3. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative. PMID:22124008

  4. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects. PMID:27483234

  5. Modeling the Delivery Physiology of Distributed Learning Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Gilbert; Rosca, Ioan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses instructional delivery models and their physiology in distributed learning systems. Highlights include building delivery models; types of delivery models, including distributed classroom, self-training on the Web, online training, communities of practice, and performance support systems; and actors (users) involved, including experts,…

  6. Contemporary Proton Therapy Systems Adequately Protect Patients from Exposure to Stray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Giebeler, Annelise; Zhang, Rui; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Yepes, Pablo; Woo, Shiao; Mohan, Radhe

    2009-03-01

    Proton beam therapy has provided safe and effective treatments for a variety of adult cancers. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in utilizing proton therapy for pediatric cancers because it allows better sparing of healthy tissues. Minimizing exposures of normal tissues is especially important in children because they are highly susceptible to consequential late effects, including the development of a radiogenic second cancer, which may occur years or even decades after treatment of the first cancer. While the dosimetric advantage of therapeutic proton beams is well understood, relatively little attention has been paid to the whole-body exposure to stray neutron radiation that is inherent in proton therapy. In this report, we review the physical processes that lead to neutron exposures, discuss the potential for mitigating these exposures using advanced proton beam delivery systems, and present a comparative analysis of predicted second cancer incidence following various external beam therapies. In addition, we discuss uncertainties in the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons for carcinogenesis and the impact that these uncertainties have on second-cancer risk predictions for survivors of adult and childhood cancer who receive proton therapy.

  7. Contemporary Proton Therapy Systems Adequately Protect Patients from Exposure to Stray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Giebeler, Annelise; Zhang Rui; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Woo, Shiao; Mohan, Radhe; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Proton beam therapy has provided safe and effective treatments for a variety of adult cancers. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in utilizing proton therapy for pediatric cancers because it allows better sparing of healthy tissues. Minimizing exposures of normal tissues is especially important in children because they are highly susceptible to consequential late effects, including the development of a radiogenic second cancer, which may occur years or even decades after treatment of the first cancer. While the dosimetric advantage of therapeutic proton beams is well understood, relatively little attention has been paid to the whole-body exposure to stray neutron radiation that is inherent in proton therapy. In this report, we review the physical processes that lead to neutron exposures, discuss the potential for mitigating these exposures using advanced proton beam delivery systems, and present a comparative analysis of predicted second cancer incidence following various external beam therapies. In addition, we discuss uncertainties in the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons for carcinogenesis and the impact that these uncertainties have on second-cancer risk predictions for survivors of adult and childhood cancer who receive proton therapy.

  8. Contemporary Proton Therapy Systems Adequately Protect Patients from Exposure to Stray Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Giebeler, Annelise; Zhang, Rui; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Yepes, Pablo; Woo, Shiao; Mohan, Radhe

    2010-01-01

    Proton beam therapy has provided safe and effective treatments for a variety of adult cancers. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in utilizing proton therapy for pediatric cancers because it allows better sparing of healthy tissues. Minimizing exposures of normal tissues is especially important in children because they are highly susceptible to consequential late effects, including the development of a radiogenic second cancer, which may occur years or even decades after treatment of the first cancer. While the dosimetric advantage of therapeutic proton beams is well understood, relatively little attention has been paid to the whole-body exposure to stray neutron radiation that is inherent in proton therapy. In this report, we review the physical processes that lead to neutron exposures, discuss the potential for mitigating these exposures using advanced proton beam delivery systems, and present a comparative analysis of predicted second cancer incidence following various external beam therapies. In addition, we discuss uncertainties in the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons for carcinogenesis and the impact that these uncertainties have on second-cancer risk predictions for survivors of adult and childhood cancer who receive proton therapy. PMID:20844607

  9. Advances in Systemic siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Qixin; Woodle, Martin C; Lu, Patrick Y; Mixson, A James

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) has transformed basic science research, and the efficacy of siRNA therapeutics toward a variety of diseases is now being evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Despite its potential value, the highly negatively charged siRNA has the classic delivery problem of requiring transport across cell membranes to the cytosol. Consequently, carrier development for siRNA delivery is one of the most important problems to solve before siRNA can achieve widespread clinical use. An assortment of non-viral carriers including liposomes, peptides, polymers, and aptamers are being evaluated for their ability to shepherd siRNA to the target tissue and cross the plasma membrane barrier into the cell. Several promising carriers with low toxicity and increased specificity for disease targets have emerged for siRNA-based therapeutics. This review will discuss non-viral approaches for siRNA therapeutics, with particular focus on synthetic carriers for in vivo systemic delivery of siRNA. PMID:20161621

  10. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparation, higher diffusion and absorption rates. Moreover, it has been reported that the ingredients of microemulsion can effectively overcome the diffusion barrier and penetrate through the stratum corneum of the skin. Hence it becomes promising for both transdermal and dermal drug delivery. However, low viscosity of microemulsion restrains its applicability in pharmaceutical industry. To overcome the above drawback, the low viscous microemulsions were added to viscous gel bases to potentiate its applications as topical drug delivery systems so that various drug related toxic effects and erratic drug absorption can be avoided. The present review deals with the microemulsions, various techniques involved in the development of organic nanoparticles. The review emphasized on microemulsion based systems such as hydrogels and organogels. The physicochemical characteristics, mechanical properties, rheological and stability principles involved in microemulsion based viscous gels were also explored. PMID:25466399

  11. Boson representations of fermion systems: Proton-neutron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambataro, M.

    1988-05-01

    Applications of a procedure recently proposed to construct boson images of fermion Hamiltonians are shown for proton-neutron systems. First the mapping from SD fermion onto sd boson spaces is discussed and a Qπ.Qν interaction investigated. A Hermitian one-body Q boson operator is derived and analytical expressions for its coefficients are obtained. A (Qπ+Qν).(Qπ+Qν) interaction is, then, studied for particle-hole systems and the connections with the SU*(3) dynamical symmetry of the neutron-proton interacting boson model are discussed. Finally, an example of mapping from SDG onto sdg spaces is analyzed. Fermion spectra and E2 matrix elements are well reproduced in the boson spaces.

  12. Simulation of a 36 h solar particle event at LLUMC using a proton beam scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G. B.; Benton, E. R.; Gridley, D. S.; Hickey, T.; Hubbard, J.; Koss, P.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Pecaut, M. J.; Sanders, E.; Shahnazi, K.

    2007-08-01

    A radiation biology experiment was performed in the research room of the proton therapy facility at Loma Linda University Medical Center to simulate the proton exposure produced by a solar particle event. The experiment used two scanning magnets for X and Y deflection of the proton beam and covered a usable target area of nearly 1 m2. The magnet scanning control system consisted of Lab View 6.0 software running on a PC. The goal of this experiment was to study the immune system response of 48 mice simultaneously exposed to 2 Gy of protons that simulated the dose rate and energy spectrum of the September 1989 solar particle event. The 2 Gy dose was delivered to the entrance of the mice cages over 36 h. Both ion chamber and TLD measurements indicated that the dose delivered was within 9% of the intended value. A spot scanning technique using one spot per accelerator cycle (2.2 s) was used to deliver doses as low as 1 μGy per beam spot. Rapid beam termination (less than 5 ms) on each spot was obtained by energizing a quadrupole in the proton synchrotron once the dose limit was reached for each spot. A parallel plate ion chamber placed adjacent to the mice cages provided fluence (or dose) measurements for each beam energy during each hour of the experiment. An intensity modulated spot scanning technique can be used in a variety of ways for radiation biology and a second experiment is being designed with this proton beam scanning system to simultaneously irradiate four groups of mice with different dose rates within the 1 m2 area. Also, large electronic devices being tested for radiation damage have been exposed in this beam without the use of patch fields. The same scanning system has potential application for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) as well. This paper discusses the beam delivery system and dosimetry of the irradiation.

  13. A detection system for very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed proton decay

    SciTech Connect

    Spiridon, A.; Pollacco, E.; Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Pascovici, G.; Riallot, M.; Mols, J. P.; Kebbiri, M.

    2012-11-20

    We have recently developed a gas based detection system called AstroBox, motivated by nuclear astrophysics studies. The goal was to detect very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed p-decay with reduced beta background and improved energy resolution. The detector was tested using the {beta}-delayed proton-emitter 23Al previously studied with a set-up based on thin double-sided Si strip detectors. The proton spectrum obtained with AstroBox showed no beta background down to {approx}80 keV. The low energy (206 keV, 267 keV) proton peaks were positively identified, well separated, and the resolution was improved.

  14. Influence of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy with different dose delivery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yupeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Cao, Wenhua; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The distal edge tracking (DET) technique in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) allows for high energy efficiency, fast and simple delivery, and simple inverse treatment planning; however, it is highly sensitive to uncertainties. In this study, the authors explored the application of DET in IMPT (IMPT-DET) and conducted robust optimization of IMPT-DET to see if the planning technique’s sensitivity to uncertainties was reduced. They also compared conventional and robust optimization of IMPT-DET with three-dimensional IMPT (IMPT-3D) to gain understanding about how plan robustness is achieved. Methods: They compared the robustness of IMPT-DET and IMPT-3D plans to uncertainties by analyzing plans created for a typical prostate cancer case and a base of skull (BOS) cancer case (using data for patients who had undergone proton therapy at our institution). Spots with the highest and second highest energy layers were chosen so that the Bragg peak would be at the distal edge of the targets in IMPT-DET using 36 equally spaced angle beams; in IMPT-3D, 3 beams with angles chosen by a beam angle optimization algorithm were planned. Dose contributions for a number of range and setup uncertainties were calculated, and a worst-case robust optimization was performed. A robust quantification technique was used to evaluate the plans’ sensitivity to uncertainties. Results: With no uncertainties considered, the DET is less robust to uncertainties than is the 3D method but offers better normal tissue protection. With robust optimization to account for range and setup uncertainties, robust optimization can improve the robustness of IMPT plans to uncertainties; however, our findings show the extent of improvement varies. Conclusions: IMPT’s sensitivity to uncertainties can be improved by using robust optimization. They found two possible mechanisms that made improvements possible: (1) a localized single-field uniform dose distribution (LSFUD) mechanism, in which the

  15. Influence of robust optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy with different dose delivery techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Li Yupeng; Li Xiaoqiang; Cao Wenhua; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The distal edge tracking (DET) technique in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) allows for high energy efficiency, fast and simple delivery, and simple inverse treatment planning; however, it is highly sensitive to uncertainties. In this study, the authors explored the application of DET in IMPT (IMPT-DET) and conducted robust optimization of IMPT-DET to see if the planning technique's sensitivity to uncertainties was reduced. They also compared conventional and robust optimization of IMPT-DET with three-dimensional IMPT (IMPT-3D) to gain understanding about how plan robustness is achieved. Methods: They compared the robustness of IMPT-DET and IMPT-3D plans to uncertainties by analyzing plans created for a typical prostate cancer case and a base of skull (BOS) cancer case (using data for patients who had undergone proton therapy at our institution). Spots with the highest and second highest energy layers were chosen so that the Bragg peak would be at the distal edge of the targets in IMPT-DET using 36 equally spaced angle beams; in IMPT-3D, 3 beams with angles chosen by a beam angle optimization algorithm were planned. Dose contributions for a number of range and setup uncertainties were calculated, and a worst-case robust optimization was performed. A robust quantification technique was used to evaluate the plans' sensitivity to uncertainties. Results: With no uncertainties considered, the DET is less robust to uncertainties than is the 3D method but offers better normal tissue protection. With robust optimization to account for range and setup uncertainties, robust optimization can improve the robustness of IMPT plans to uncertainties; however, our findings show the extent of improvement varies. Conclusions: IMPT's sensitivity to uncertainties can be improved by using robust optimization. They found two possible mechanisms that made improvements possible: (1) a localized single-field uniform dose distribution (LSFUD) mechanism, in which the

  16. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  17. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  18. Online Mapping Systems for Climate Data Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, S. T.; Nicholson, C. M.; Bergantino, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    Online, map-based applications have experienced an explosion in popularity over the past decade. The success of these systems is largely due to their ability to provide a spatial framework data exploration, and for the visual context (e.g., satellite images) they offer. Here we detail the development of a new online mapping system for Wyoming that will serve as a portal for the delivery of weather, climate, and water-related data for users across the state. While capitalizing on the success of previous online mapping efforts, this new system also highlights the potential for additional applications and functionality. Known as the Wyoming Internet Map Server (WyoIMS), the system brings together real-time observations and summary products from multiple federal agencies (NOAA-NWS, NRCS, USGS) to provide “one-stop-shopping” for key climatic datasets. Likewise this system is providing a platform for data delivery, archiving, and QC/QA as part of a new statewide hydroclimatic monitoring network. Moving beyond the simple transfer of data, this system also allows users to access information from resources that include state libraries and various databases that contain information related to climate and water resources. Users can, for example, select individual counties, watersheds, irrigation districts, or municipalities and download a wide range of documents and reports specific to those locations. On the whole, WyoIMS has become a catalyst for the development of new climate-related products, and a foundation for decision support with applications in water resources, wildlife management, and agriculture.

  19. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevillot, L.; Stock, M.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients.

  20. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy.

    PubMed

    Grevillot, L; Stock, M; Vatnitsky, S

    2015-10-21

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients. PMID:26418366

  1. Silk Electrogel Based Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianrui

    Gastric cancer has become a global pandemic and there is imperative to develop efficient therapies. Oral dosing strategy is the preferred route to deliver drugs for treating the disease. Recent studies suggested silk electro hydrogel, which is pH sensitive and reversible, has potential as a vehicle to deliver the drug in the stomach environment. The aim of this study is to establish in vitro electrogelation e-gel based silk gel as a gastroretentive drug delivery system. We successfully extended the duration of silk e-gel in artificial gastric juice by mixing silk solution with glycerol at different ratios before the electrogelation. Structural analysis indicated the extended duration was due to the change of beta sheet content. The glycerol mixed silk e-gel had good doxorubicin loading capability and could release doxorubicin in a sustained-release profile. Doxorubicin loaded silk e-gels were applied to human gastric cancer cells. Significant cell viability decrease was observed. We believe that with further characterization as well as functional analysis, the silk e-gel system has the potential to become an effective vehicle for gastric drug delivery applications.

  2. SU-E-T-582: Evaluation of Standard Beam Delivery Devices in Proton Intracranial Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wroe, A; Bush, D; Schulte, R; Patyal, B; Slater, J; Webster, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of standard apertures and range shifters for the treatment of brain metastasis in proton stereotactic radiosurgery. Methods: Five localized brain metastasis patients previously treated using our intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery procedure (i.e. with a custom aperture and bolus), were randomly selected from our patient cohort. The custom aperture and bolus treatment plans were used as the standard of care in this case and comparative treatment plans using the standard aperture and range shifter concept were generated. Gantry/table angle and the number of treatment beams were optimized as part of this study to evaluate the ability of the standard aperture/range shifter system to deliver a comparable treatment to the patient. Conformity index, homogeneity index, isodose volumes and integral dose were all evaluated to determine the degree of conformity of the plans created and for comparison to the custom aperture/bolus treatment modality. Results: The generated treatment plans demonstrated that the standard aperture and range shifter combination could be used to produce comparable conformity index and isodose volumes to the custom aperture/bolus case in four out of the five patients studied. In two of the patients a comparative conformity index was achieved by optimizing the angles of the 3 treatment beams, while in two of the cases 1 or 2 additional beams were required. Additionally, this system exhibited efficiency gains of 60-90% over the custom aperture bolus system in reducing the time necessary for treatment planning, device manufacture and QA. Conclusion: This work demonstrated that largely spherical shape of brain metastasis makes this target well suited to an application of standard apertures, while additionally providing efficiency gains in device manufacture and QA for treatment.

  3. Proton Irradiation Processing of Early Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Taylor, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.

    2015-07-01

    High-flux protons from Young Stellar Objects may result in secondary processing of early solar system solids. Chondrule precursors may be subjected to heating (possibly melting), nuclear transmutation, comminution, and carbon deposition.

  4. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy. PMID:24937778

  5. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang

    2012-02-14

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  6. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  7. A telemedicine health care delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jay H.

    1991-01-01

    The Interactive Telemedicine Systems (ITS) system was specifically developed to address the ever widening gap between our medical care expertise and our medical care delivery system. The frustrating reality is that as our knowledge of how to diagnose and treat medical conditions has continued to advance, the system to deliver that care has remained in an embryonic stage. This has resulted in millions of people being denied their most basic health care needs. Telemedicine utilizes an interactive video system integrated with biomedical telemetry that allows a physician at a base station specialty medical complex or teaching hospital to examine and treat a patient at multiple satellite locations, such as rural hospitals, ambulatory health centers, correctional institutions, facilities caring for the elderly, community hospital emergency departments, or international health facilities. Based on the interactive nature of the system design, the consulting physician at the base station can do a complete history and physical examination, as if the patient at the satellite site was sitting in the physician's office. This system is described.

  8. Oral Dispersible System: A New Approach in Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P. A.; Khan, J. A.; Khan, A.; Safiullah, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dosage form is a mean used for the delivery of drug to a living body. In order to get the desired effect the drug should be delivered to its site of action at such rate and concentration to achieve the maximum therapeutic effect and minimum adverse effect. Since oral route is still widely accepted route but having a common drawback of difficulty in swallowing of tablets and capsules. Therefore a lot of research has been done on novel drug delivery systems. This review is about oral dispersible tablets a novel approach in drug delivery systems that are now a day's more focused in formulation world, and laid a new path that, helped the patients to build their compliance level with the therapy, also reduced the cost and ease the administration especially in case of pediatrics and geriatrics. Quick absorption, rapid onset of action and reduction in drug loss properties are the basic advantages of this dosage form. PMID:27168675

  9. Leadership Dynamics Promoting Systemic Reform for Inclusive Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a multicase study of two systems of schools striving to reform service delivery systems for students with special needs. Considering these systems as institutional actors, the study examines what promotes the understanding and implementation of special education service delivery within a system of schools in a manner that…

  10. Clinical characterization of a proton beam continuous uniform scanning system with dose layer stacking

    PubMed Central

    Farr, J. B.; Mascia, A. E.; Hsi, W.-C.; Allgower, C. E.; Jesseph, F.; Schreuder, A. N.; Wolanski, M.; Nichiporov, D. F.; Anferov, V.

    2008-01-01

    A proton beam delivery system on a gantry with continuous uniform scanning and dose layer stacking at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute has been commissioned and accepted for clinical use. This paper was motivated by a lack of guidance on the testing and characterization for clinical uniform scanning systems. As such, it describes how these tasks were performed with a uniform scanning beam delivery system. This paper reports the methods used and important dosimetric characteristics of radiation fields produced by the system. The commissioning data include the transverse and longitudinal dose distributions, penumbra, and absolute dose values. Using a 208 MeV cyclotron’s proton beam, the system provides field sizes up to 20 and 30 cm in diameter for proton ranges in water up to 27 and 20 cm, respectively. The dose layer stacking method allows for the flexible construction of spread-out Bragg peaks with uniform modulation of up to 15 cm in water, at typical dose rates of 1–3 Gy∕min. For measuring relative dose distributions, multielement ion chamber arrays, small-volume ion chambers, and radiographic films were employed. Measurements during the clinical commissioning of the system have shown that the lateral and longitudinal dose uniformity of 2.5% or better can be achieved for all clinically important field sizes and ranges. The measured transverse penumbra widths offer a slight improvement in comparison to those achieved with a double scattering beam spreading technique at the facility. Absolute dose measurements were done using calibrated ion chambers, thermoluminescent and alanine detectors. Dose intercomparisons conducted using various types of detectors traceable to a national standards laboratory indicate that the measured dosimetry data agree with each other within 5%. PMID:19070228

  11. A proton Computed Tomography system for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipala, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Civinini, C.; Cuttone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Pallotta, S.; Pugliatti, C.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Scaringella, M.; Stancampiano, C.; Talamonti, C.; Tesi, M.; Vanzi, E.; Zani, M.

    2013-02-01

    Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) can improve the accuracy of both patient positioning and dose calculation in proton therapy, enabling to accurately reconstruct the electron density distribution of irradiated tissues. A pCT prototype, equipped with a silicon tracker and a YAG:Ce calorimeter, has been manufactured by an Italian collaboration. First tests under proton beam allowed obtaining good quality tomographic images of a non-homogeneous phantom. Manufacturing of a new large area system with real-time data acquisition is under way.

  12. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  13. A motion maintaining antibiotic delivery system.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Adolph V; Karnes, Jonathan M; Berend, Keith R

    2007-06-01

    Two-stage radical debridement with implant removal, antibiotic therapy, and delayed reimplantation remains the treatment of choice for deep infection in total joint arthroplasty. Studies have shown that articulating vs static spacers better improve functional results, increase patient satisfaction, prevent bone loss, and facilitate reimplantation without increasing risk of infection. Articulating spacers fabricated from cement provide a vehicle for prolonged local delivery of antibiotics. We currently use a mold system for creating antibiotic-laden articulating cement spacers. Disposable femoral and tibial molds are injection-filled with low-viscosity cement vacuum mixed with 3.6 to 4.8 g of tobramycin or gentamicin and 3.0 to 4.0 g of vancomycin per 40-g unit and massaged to fill any voids. After curing, the temporary spacers are removed from the molds, trimmed smooth, and cemented loosely into the joint space. PMID:17570278

  14. Protons and Hydroxide Ions in Aqueous Systems.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Noam; Bakker, Huib J; Campen, R Kramer; Henchman, Richard H; Pohl, Peter; Roke, Sylvie; Thämer, Martin; Hassanali, Ali

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of water's constituent ions, proton and hydroxide, has been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies over the last century. Besides their obvious importance in acid-base chemistry, these ions play an important role in numerous applications ranging from enzyme catalysis to environmental chemistry. Despite a long history of research, many fundamental issues regarding their properties continue to be an active area of research. Here, we provide a review of the experimental and theoretical advances made in the last several decades in understanding the structure, dynamics, and transport of the proton and hydroxide ions in different aqueous environments, ranging from water clusters to the bulk liquid and its interfaces with hydrophobic surfaces. The propensity of these ions to accumulate at hydrophobic surfaces has been a subject of intense debate, and we highlight the open issues and challenges in this area. Biological applications reviewed include proton transport along the hydration layer of various membranes and through channel proteins, problems that are at the core of cellular bioenergetics. PMID:27314430

  15. Muonic bound systems, virtual particles, and proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle questions the self-consistency of theory and experiment in light muonic and electronic bound systems. Here we summarize the current status of virtual particle models as well as Lorentz-violating models that have been proposed in order to explain the discrepancy. Highly charged one-electron ions and muonic bound systems have been used as probes of the strongest electromagnetic fields achievable in the laboratory. The average electric field seen by a muon orbiting a proton is comparable to hydrogenlike uranium and, notably, larger than the electric field in the most advanced strong-laser facilities. Effective interactions due to virtual annihilation inside the proton (lepton pairs) and process-dependent corrections (nonresonant effects) are discussed as possible explanations of the proton size puzzle. The need for more experimental data on related transitions is emphasized.

  16. Implantable microchip: the futuristic controlled drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Kumar Bishwajit; Sumi, Chandra Datta

    2016-01-01

    There is no doubt that controlled and pulsatile drug delivery system is an important challenge in medicine over the conventional drug delivery system in case of therapeutic efficacy. However, the conventional drug delivery systems often offer a limited by their inability to drug delivery which consists of systemic toxicity, narrow therapeutic window, complex dosing schedule for long term treatment etc. Therefore, there has been a search for the drug delivery system that exhibit broad enhancing activity for more drugs with less complication. More recently, some elegant study has noted that, a new type of micro-electrochemical system or MEMS-based drug delivery systems called microchip has been improved to overcome the problems related to conventional drug delivery. Moreover, micro-fabrication technology has enabled to develop the implantable controlled released microchip devices with improved drug administration and patient compliance. In this article, we have presented an overview of the investigations on the feasibility and application of microchip as an advanced drug delivery system. Commercial manufacturing materials and methods, related other research works and current advancement of the microchips for controlled drug delivery have also been summarized. PMID:24758139

  17. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  18. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  19. Importance of novel drug delivery systems in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Devi, V Kusum; Jain, Nimisha; Valli, Kusum S

    2010-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system is a novel approach to drug delivery that addresses the limitations of the traditional drug delivery systems. Our country has a vast knowledge base of Ayurveda whose potential is only being realized in the recent years. However, the drug delivery system used for administering the herbal medicine to the patient is traditional and out-of-date, resulting in reduced efficacy of the drug. If the novel drug delivery technology is applied in herbal medicine, it may help in increasing the efficacy and reducing the side effects of various herbal compounds and herbs. This is the basic idea behind incorporating novel method of drug delivery in herbal medicines. Thus it is important to integrate novel drug delivery system and Indian Ayurvedic medicines to combat more serious diseases. For a long time herbal medicines were not considered for development as novel formulations owing to lack of scientific justification and processing difficulties, such as standardization, extraction and identification of individual drug components in complex polyherbal systems. However, modern phytopharmaceutical research can solve the scientific needs (such as determination of pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, site of action, accurate dose required etc.) of herbal medicines to be incorporated in novel drug delivery system, such as nanoparticles, microemulsions, matrix systems, solid dispersions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and so on. This article summarizes various drug delivery technologies, which can be used for herbal actives together with some examples. PMID:22228938

  20. Proton delivery to ferryl heme in a heme peroxidase: enzymatic use of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Efimov, Igor; Badyal, Sandip K; Metcalfe, Clive L; Macdonald, Isabel; Gumiero, Andrea; Raven, Emma Lloyd; Moody, Peter C E

    2011-10-01

    We test the hypothesized pathway by which protons are passed from the substrate, ascorbate, to the ferryl oxygen in the heme enzyme ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The role of amino acid side chains and bound solvent is demonstrated. We investigated solvent kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) for the wild-type enzyme and several site-directed replacements of the key residues which form the proposed proton path. Kinetic constants for H(2)O(2)-dependent enzyme oxidation to Compound I, k(1), and subsequent reduction of Compound II, k(3), were determined in steady-state assays by variation of both H(2)O(2) and ascorbate concentrations. A high value of the SKIE for wild type APX ((D)k(3) = 4.9) as well as a clear nonlinear dependence on the deuterium composition of the solvent in proton inventory experiments suggest the simultaneous participation of several protons in the transition state for proton transfer. The full SKIE and the proton inventory data were modeled by applying Gross-Butler-Swain-Kresge theory to a proton path inferred from the known structure of APX. The model has been tested by constructing and determining the X-ray structures of the R38K and R38A variants and accounts for their observed SKIEs. This work confirms APX uses two arginine residues in the proton path. Thus, Arg38 and Arg172 have dual roles, both in the formation of the ferryl species and binding of ascorbate respectively and to facilitate proton transfer between the two. PMID:21819069

  1. Proton Solvation and Transport in Aqueous and Biomolecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jessica M. J.; Maupin, C. Mark; Chen, Hanning; Petersen, Matt K.; Xu, Jiancong; Wu, Yujie; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The excess proton in aqueous media plays a pivotal role in many fundamental chemical (e.g., acid-base chemistry) and biological (e.g., bioenergetics and enzyme catalysis) processes. Understanding the hydrated proton is, therefore, crucial for chemistry, biology, and materials sciences. Although well studied for over 200 years, excess proton solvation and transport remains to this day mysterious, surprising, and perhaps even misunderstood. In this feature article various efforts to address this problem through computer modeling and simulation will be described. Applications of computer simulations to a number of important and interesting systems will be presented, highlighting the roles of charge delocalization and Grotthuss shuttling, a phenomenon unique in many ways to the excess proton in water. PMID:17429993

  2. Micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-11-09

    A micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules. The injector is used for collecting and delivering controlled amounts of charged molecule samples for subsequent analysis. The injector delivery system can be scaled to large numbers (>96) for sample delivery to massively parallel high throughput analysis systems. The essence of the injector system is an electric field controllable loading tip including a section of porous material. By applying the appropriate polarity bias potential to the injector tip, charged molecules will migrate into porous material, and by reversing the polarity bias potential the molecules are ejected or forced away from the tip. The invention has application for uptake of charged biological molecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids, polymers, etc.) for delivery to analytical systems, and can be used in automated sample delivery systems.

  3. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  4. New Delivery Systems for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Patten, James J.

    This paper presents an historical perspective on the development of educational delivery systems, and then turns to the challenges of the information age and the issues of developing new delivery systems in this challenging environment. The paper discusses the fragility of power sources and of the networked world; technological weaknesses; freedom…

  5. Ariadne: The Next Generation of Electronic Document Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roes, Hans; Dijkstra, Joost

    1994-01-01

    Describes an approach to electronic document delivery which has evolved at Tilburg University (Netherlands), leading to the development of a system called Ariadne. Highlights include various generations of electronic document delivery systems; standards, including the work of the Group on Electronic Document Interchange; and a description of the…

  6. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  7. Vesicular system: Versatile carrier for transdermal delivery of bioactives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra; Pradhan, Madhulika; Nag, Mukesh; Singh, Manju Rawat

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal route of drug delivery has gained immense interest for pharmaceutical researchers. The major hurdle for diffusion of drugs and bioactives through transdermal route is the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin. Currently, various approaches such as physical approach, chemical approach, and delivery carriers have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of bioactives. This review provides a brief overview of mechanism of drug transport across skin, different lipid vesicular systems, with special emphasis on lipid vesicular systems including transfersomes, liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes, virosomes, and pharmacosomes and their application for the delivery of different bioactives. PMID:24564350

  8. Bioavailability of phytochemicals and its enhancement by drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Vadhanam, Manicka V.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of poor oral bioavailability of cancer chemopreventives have hindered progress in cancer prevention. Novel delivery systems that modulate the pharmacokinetics of existing drugs, such as nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, niosomes, liposomes and implants, could be used to enhance the delivery of chemopreventive agents to target sites. The development of new approaches in prevention and treatment of cancer could encompass new delivery systems for approved and newly investigated compounds. In this review, we discuss some of the delivery approaches that have already made an impact by either delivering a drug to target tissue or increasing its bioavailability by many fold. PMID:23435377

  9. The Controlled Drug Delivery Systems: Past Forward and Future Back

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kinam

    2014-01-01

    The controlled drug delivery technology has progressed over the last six decades. It began in 1952 with the introduction of the first sustained release formulation. The 1st generation (1950-1980) of drug delivery was focused on developing oral and transdermal sustained release systems and establishing the controlled drug release mechanisms. Attention of the 2nd generation (1980-2010) was dedicated to development of zero-order release systems, self-regulated drug delivery systems, long-term depot formulations, and nanotechnology-based delivery systems. The latter part of the 2nd generation was consumed mostly for studying nanoparticle formulations. The Journal of Controlled Release (JCR) has played a pivotal role during the 2nd generation of drug delivery technologies, and it will continue playing a leading role for the next generation. Taking the right path towards the productive 3rd generation of drug delivery technologies requires honest open dialogues without any preconceived ideas of the past. The drug delivery field needs to take a bold approach of designing the future drug delivery formulations first, based on today’s necessities, and produce necessary innovations. The JCR will provide the forum for sharing the new ideas that will shape the 3rd generation of drug delivery technologies. PMID:24794901

  10. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems for Biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hyejung; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-based carrier systems have many advantages over other nanoparticle-based systems. They are biocompatible, biodegradable, facilely tunable, and superparamagnetic and thus controllable by an external magnetic field. These attributes enable their broad biomedical applications. In particular, magnetically-driven carriers are drawing considerable interest as an emerging therapeutic delivery system because of their superior delivery efficiency. Area covered This article reviews the recent advances in use of SPION-based carrier systems to improve the delivery efficiency and target specificity of biotherapeutics. We examine various formulations of SPION-based delivery systems, including SPION micelles, clusters, hydrogels, liposomes, and micro/nanospheres, as well as their specific applications in delivery of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Recently, biotherapeutics including therapeutic cells, proteins and genes have been studied as alternative treatments to various diseases. Despite the advantages of high target specificity and low adverse effects, clinical translation of biotherapeutics has been hindered by the poor stability and low delivery efficiency compared to chemical drugs. Accordingly, biotherapeutic delivery systems that can overcome these limitations are actively pursued. SPION-based materials can be ideal candidates for developing such delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism that enables long-term accumulation/retention at target sites by utilization of a suitable magnet. In addition, synthesis technologies for production of finely-tuned, homogeneous SPIONs have been well developed, which may promise their rapid clinical translation. PMID:23199200

  11. CLIPS: An expert system tool for delivery and training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary; Culbert, Chris; Savely, Robert T.; Lopez, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule-based language. The requirements necessary for an expert system tool which is used for development, delivery, and training are examined. Because of its high portability, low cost, and ease of integration with external systems, CLIPS has great potential as an expert system tool for delivery and training. In addition, its representation flexibility, debugging aids, and performance, along with its other strengths, make it a viable alternative for expert system development.

  12. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Matias J; Costa, Rui R; Mano, João F

    2016-02-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  13. Marine Origin Polysaccharides in Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Matias J.; Costa, Rui R.; Mano, João F.

    2016-01-01

    Oceans are a vast source of natural substances. In them, we find various compounds with wide biotechnological and biomedical applicabilities. The exploitation of the sea as a renewable source of biocompounds can have a positive impact on the development of new systems and devices for biomedical applications. Marine polysaccharides are among the most abundant materials in the seas, which contributes to a decrease of the extraction costs, besides their solubility behavior in aqueous solvents and extraction media, and their interaction with other biocompounds. Polysaccharides such as alginate, carrageenan and fucoidan can be extracted from algae, whereas chitosan and hyaluronan can be obtained from animal sources. Most marine polysaccharides have important biological properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as adhesive and antimicrobial actions. Moreover, they can be modified in order to allow processing them into various shapes and sizes and may exhibit response dependence to external stimuli, such as pH and temperature. Due to these properties, these biomaterials have been studied as raw material for the construction of carrier devices for drugs, including particles, capsules and hydrogels. The devices are designed to achieve a controlled release of therapeutic agents in an attempt to fight against serious diseases, and to be used in advanced therapies, such as gene delivery or regenerative medicine. PMID:26861358

  14. Klystron based high power rf system for proton accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, Manjiri; Shrotriya, Sandip; Sharma, Sonal; Patel, Niranjan; Handu, Verander E-mail: manjiri08@gmail.com

    2011-07-01

    As a part of ADS program a proton accelerator (20 MeV, 30 mA) and its high power RF systems (HPRF) are being developed in BARC. This paper explains design details of this klystron based HPRF system. (author)

  15. Recent Challenges in Insulin Delivery Systems: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tabakha, M. M.; Arida, A. I.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively, a large percentage of world population is affected by diabetes mellitus, out of which approximately 5-10% with type 1 diabetes while the remaining 90% with type 2. Insulin administration is essential for type 1 patients while it is required at later stage by the patients of type 2. Current insulin delivery systems are available as transdermal injections which may be considered as invasive. Several non-invasive approaches for insulin delivery are being pursued by pharmaceutical companies to reduce the pain, and hypoglycemic incidences associated with injections in order to improve patient compliance. While any new insulin delivery system requires health authorities' approval, to provide long term safety profile and insuring patients' acceptance. The inhalation delivery system Exubera® has already become clinically available in the United States and Europe for patients with diabetes as non-invasive delivery system. PMID:20046733

  16. Recent advancements in erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin as delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Ruju; Wang, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been applied to enhance the efficacy of therapeutics and to alleviate negative effects through the controlled delivery of targeting and releasing agents. However, few drug carriers can achieve high targeting efficacy, even when targeting modalities and surface markers are introduced. Immunological problems have also limited their wide applications. Biological drug delivery systems, such as erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin, have been extensively investigated because of their unique properties. In this review, erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin are described as efficient drug delivery systems. Their properties, applications, advantages, and limitations in disease treatment are explained. This review confirms that these systems can be used to facilitate a specific, biocompatible, and smart drug delivery. PMID:27274282

  17. Direct absorbed dose to water determination based on water calorimetry in scanning proton beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, A.; Clasie, B.; Chung, E.; Lu, H. M.; Flanz, J.; Cascio, E.; Engelsman, M.; Paganetti, H.; Seuntjens, J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this manuscript is to describe the direct measurement of absolute absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton radiotherapy beam using a water calorimeter primary standard. Methods: The McGill water calorimeter, which has been validated in photon and electron beams as well as in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, was used to measure the absorbed dose to water in double scattering and scanning proton irradiations. The measurements were made at the Massachusetts General Hospital proton radiotherapy facility. The correction factors in water calorimetry were numerically calculated and various parameters affecting their magnitude and uncertainty were studied. The absorbed dose to water was compared to that obtained using an Exradin T1 Chamber based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on absorbed dose to water amounts to 0.4% and 0.6% in scattered and scanned proton water calorimetry, respectively. This compares to an overall uncertainty of 1.9% for currently accepted IAEA TRS-398 reference absorbed dose measurement protocol. The absorbed dose from water calorimetry agrees with the results from TRS-398 well to within 1-sigma uncertainty. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that a primary absorbed dose standard based on water calorimetry is feasible in scattered and scanned proton beams.

  18. Mucoadhesive and thermogelling systems for vaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Caramella, Carla M; Rossi, Silvia; Ferrari, Franca; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Sandri, Giuseppina

    2015-09-15

    This review focuses on two formulation approaches, mucoadhesion and thermogelling, intended for prolonging residence time on vaginal mucosa of medical devices or drug delivery systems, thus improving their efficacy. The review, after a brief description of the vaginal environment and, in particular, of the vaginal secretions that strongly affect in vivo performance of vaginal formulations, deals with the above delivery systems. As for mucoadhesive systems, conventional formulations (gels, tablets, suppositories and emulsions) and novel drug delivery systems (micro-, nano-particles) intended for vaginal administration to achieve either local or systemic effect are reviewed. As for thermogelling systems, poly(ethylene oxide-propylene oxide-ethylene oxide) copolymer-based and chitosan-based formulations are discussed as thermogelling systems. The methods employed for functional characterization of both mucoadhesive and thermogelling drug delivery systems are also briefly described. PMID:25683694

  19. Eye tracking and gating system for proton therapy of orbital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongho; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Moon, Sung Ho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: A new motion-based gated proton therapy for the treatment of orbital tumors using real-time eye-tracking system was designed and evaluated. Methods: We developed our system by image-pattern matching, using a normalized cross-correlation technique with LabVIEW 8.6 and Vision Assistant 8.6 (National Instruments, Austin, TX). To measure the pixel spacing of an image consistently, four different calibration modes such as the point-detection, the edge-detection, the line-measurement, and the manual measurement mode were suggested and used. After these methods were applied to proton therapy, gating was performed, and radiation dose distributions were evaluated. Results: Moving phantom verification measurements resulted in errors of less than 0.1 mm for given ranges of translation. Dosimetric evaluation of the beam-gating system versus nongated treatment delivery with a moving phantom shows that while there was only 0.83 mm growth in lateral penumbra for gated radiotherapy, there was 4.95 mm growth in lateral penumbra in case of nongated exposure. The analysis from clinical results suggests that the average of eye movements depends distinctively on each patient by showing 0.44 mm, 0.45 mm, and 0.86 mm for three patients, respectively. Conclusions: The developed automatic eye-tracking based beam-gating system enabled us to perform high-precision proton radiotherapy of orbital tumors.

  20. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this

  1. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  2. [Recent trends on clinical development of oral insulin delivery systems].

    PubMed

    Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-12-01

    Great effort for developing effective needle-free insulin delivery technology, especially oral delivery, has been continued in worldwide, indeed, from the era of insulin discovered. Oral administration of insulin would offer not only the potential for improved patient compliance but also improved safety/efficacy in certain instances. Much effort for developing noninvasive delivery systems of insulin has been done, and recently, several promising insulin oral formulations are entered into clinical trials. Delivering insulin in orally was major challenge, but its realization is surely approaching. This review provides an update on recent approaches that have shown promise in insulin oral delivery systems. In addition, the progress of basic research in noninvasive delivery system research for biopharmaceuticals is discussed. PMID:26666165

  3. Designing and assessing a sustainable networked delivery (SND) system: hybrid business-to-consumer book delivery case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junbeum; Xu, Ming; Kahhat, Ramzy; Allenby, Braden; Williams, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We attempted to design and assess an example of a sustainable networked delivery (SND) system: a hybrid business-to-consumer book delivery system. This system is intended to reduce costs, achieve significant reductions in energy consumption, and reduce environmental emissions of critical local pollutants and greenhouse gases. The energy consumption and concomitant emissions of this delivery system compared with existing alternative delivery systems were estimated. We found that regarding energy consumption, an emerging hybrid delivery system which is a sustainable networked delivery system (SND) would consume 47 and 7 times less than the traditional networked delivery system (TND) and e-commerce networked delivery system (END). Regarding concomitant emissions, in the case of CO2, the SND system produced 32 and 7 times fewer emissions than the TND and END systems. Also the SND system offer meaningful economic benefit such as the costs of delivery and packaging, to the online retailer, grocery, and consumer. Our research results show that the SND system has a lot of possibilities to save local transportation energy consumption and delivery costs, and reduce environmental emissions in delivery system. PMID:19209604

  4. Auto-associative amphiphilic polysaccharides as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Leila N; Hendra, Frédéric; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2012-06-01

    Self-assembly of amphiphilic polysaccharides provides a positive outlook for drug delivery systems without the need for solvents or surfactants. Various polymeric amphiphilic polysaccharides undergo intramolecular or intermolecular associations in water. This type of association, promoted by hydrophobic segments, led to the formation of various drug delivery systems such as micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes and hydrogels. Here, we review a selection of the most important amphiphilic polysaccharides used as drug delivery systems and their pharmaceutical applications. Attention focuses on amphiphilic chitosan owing to its unique properties such as excellent biocompatibility, non-toxicity and antimicrobial and bioadhesive properties. PMID:22305936

  5. Delivery system for molten salt oxidation of solid waste

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Squire, Dwight V.; Robinson, Jeffrey A.; House, Palmer A.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a delivery system for safety injecting solid waste particles, including mixed wastes, into a molten salt bath for destruction by the process of molten salt oxidation. The delivery system includes a feeder system and an injector that allow the solid waste stream to be accurately metered, evenly dispersed in the oxidant gas, and maintained at a temperature below incineration temperature while entering the molten salt reactor.

  6. Artificial synapse network on inorganic proton conductor for neuromorphic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Guo, Li Qiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The basic units in our brain are neurons, and each neuron has more than 1,000 synapse connections. Synapse is the basic structure for information transfer in an ever-changing manner, and short-term plasticity allows synapses to perform critical computational functions in neural circuits. Therefore, the major challenge for the hardware implementation of neuromorphic computation is to develop artificial synapse network. Here in-plane lateral-coupled oxide-based artificial synapse network coupled by proton neurotransmitters are self-assembled on glass substrates at room-temperature. A strong lateral modulation is observed due to the proton-related electrical-double-layer effect. Short-term plasticity behaviours, including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering and spatiotemporally correlated signal processing are mimicked. Such laterally coupled oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid artificial synapse network proposed here is interesting for building future neuromorphic systems.

  7. CHAPTER 11. DELIVERY AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water delivery through canals or pipelines usually implies that several farms must somehow share access to the water in terms of flow rate, duration of access, and the return time to access the flow again, called an irrigation schedule, which can be rigid or flexible regarding the rate, duration and...

  8. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  9. Microneedles As a Delivery System for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Hui; Shi, De; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2016-01-01

    Gene delivery systems can be divided to two major types: vector-based (either viral vector or non-viral vector) and physical delivery technologies. Many physical carriers, such as electroporation, gene gun, ultrasound start to be proved to have the potential to enable gene therapy. A relatively new physical delivery technology for gene delivery consists of microneedles (MNs), which has been studied in many fields and for many molecule types and indications. Microneedles can penetrate the stratum corneum, which is the main barrier for drug delivery through the skin with ease of administration and without significant pain. Many different kinds of MNs, such as metal MNs, coated MNs, dissolving MNs have turned out to be promising in gene delivery. In this review, we discussed the potential as well as the challenges of utilizing MNs to deliver nucleic acids for gene therapy. We also proposed that a combination of MNs and other gene delivery approaches may lead to a better delivery system for gene therapy. PMID:27303298

  10. Development of a proton Computed Tomography detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimuddin, Md.; Coutrakon, G.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Erdelyi, B.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Krider, J.; Rukalin, V.; Uzunyan, S. A.; Zutshi, V.; Fordt, R.; Sellberg, G.; Rauch, J. E.; Roman, M.; Rubinov, P.; Wilson, P.

    2016-02-01

    Computer tomography is one of the most promising new methods to image abnormal tissues inside the human body. Tomography is also used to position the patient accurately before radiation therapy. Hadron therapy for treating cancer has become one of the most advantegeous and safe options. In order to fully utilize the advantages of hadron therapy, there is a necessity of performing radiography with hadrons as well. In this paper we present the development of a proton computed tomography system. Our second-generation proton tomography system consists of two upstream and two downstream trackers made up of fibers as active material and a range detector consisting of plastic scintillators. We present details of the detector system, readout electronics, and data acquisition system as well as the commissioning of the entire system. We also present preliminary results from the test beam of the range detector.

  11. Iontophoresis: A Potential Emergence of a Transdermal Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Dhote, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Punit; Mishra, Pradyumna K.; Mahajan, Suresh C.; Mishra, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of drugs into systemic circulation via skin has generated much attention during the last decade. Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin and into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. However, the excellent impervious nature of the skin offers the greatest challenge for successful delivery of drug molecules by utilizing the concepts of iontophoresis. The present review deals with the principles and the recent innovations in the field of iontophoretic drug delivery system together with factors affecting the system. This delivery system utilizes electric current as a driving force for permeation of ionic and non-ionic medications. The rationale behind using this technique is to reversibly alter the barrier properties of skin, which could possibly improve the penetration of drugs such as proteins, peptides and other macromolecules to increase the systemic delivery of high molecular weight compounds with controlled input kinetics and minimum inter-subject variability. Although iontophoresis seems to be an ideal candidate to overcome the limitations associated with the delivery of ionic drugs, further extrapolation of this technique is imperative for translational utility and mass human application. PMID:22396901

  12. Mutations in the environment of the primary quinone facilitate proton delivery to the secondary quinone in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lepiniec, M.; Schiffer, M.; Hanson, D. K.; Sebban, P.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; CNRS

    1999-01-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, we constructed a quadruple mutant that reversed a structural asymmetry that contributes to the functional asymmetry of the two quinone sites. In the photosynthetically incompetent quadruple mutant RQ, two acidic residues near QB, L212Glu and L213Asp, have been mutated to Ala; conversely, in the QA pocket, the symmetry-related residues M246Ala and M247Ala have been mutated to Glu and Asp. We have selected photocompetent phenotypic revertants (designated RQrev3 and RQrev4) that carry compensatory mutations in both the QA and QB pockets. Near QA, the M246Ala {yields} Glu mutation remains in both revertants, but M247Asp is replaced by Tyr in RQrev3 and by Ala in RQrev4. The engineered L212Ala and L213Ala substitutions remain in the QB site of both revertants but are accompanied by an additional electrostatic-type mutation. To probe the respective influences of the mutations occurring near the QA and QB sites on electron and proton transfer, we have constructed two additional types of strains. First, 'half' revertants were constructed that couple the QB site of the revertants with a wild-type QA site. Second, the QA sites of the two revertants were linked with the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala mutations of the QB site. We have studied the electron and proton-transfer kinetics on the first and second flashes in reaction centers from these strains by flash-induced absorption spectroscopy. Our data demonstrate that substantial improvements of the proton-transfer capabilities occur in the strains carrying the M246Ala {yields} Glu + M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutations near QA. Interestingly, this is not observed when only the M246Ala {yields} Glu mutation is present in the QA pocket. We suggest that the M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutation in the QA pocket, or possibly the coupled M246Ala {yields} Glu + M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutations, accelerates the uptake and delivery of protons to the QB anions. The M247Tyr substitution may enable additional pathways for

  13. SU-E-T-303: Spot Scanning Dose Delivery with Rapid Cycling Proton Beams From RCMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C; Liu, H; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A rapid cycling proton beam has several distinct characteristics superior to a slow extraction synchrotron: The beam energy and energy spread, beam intensity and spot size can be varied spot by spot. The feasibility of using a spot scanning beam from a rapidc-ycling-medical-synchrotron (RCMS) at 10 Hz repetition frequency is investigated in this study for its application in proton therapy. Methods: The versatility of the beam is illustrated by two examples in water phantoms: (1) a cylindrical PTV irradiated by a single field and (2) a spherical PTV irradiated by two parallel opposed fields. A uniform dose distribution is to be delivered to the volumes. Geant4 Monte Carlo code is used to validate the dose distributions in each example. Results: Transverse algorithms are developed to produce uniform distributions in each transverseplane in the two examples with a cylindrical and a spherical PTV respectively. Longitudinally, different proton energies are used in successive transverse planes toproduce the SOBP required to cover the PTVs. In general, uniformity of dosedistribution within 3% is obtained for the cylinder and 3.5% for the sphere. The transversealgorithms requires only few hundred beam spots for each plane The algorithms may beapplied to larger volumes by increasing the intensity spot by spot for the same deliverytime of the same dose. The treatment time can be shorter than 1 minute for any fieldconfiguration and tumor shape. Conclusion: The unique beam characteristics of a spot scanning beam from a RCMS at 10 Hz repetitionfrequency are used to design transverse and longitudinal algorithms to produce uniformdistribution for any arbitrary shape and size of targets. The proposed spot scanning beam ismore versatile than existing spot scanning beams in proton therapy with better beamcontrol and lower neutron dose. This work is supported in part by grants from the US Department of Energy under contract; DE-FG02-12ER41800 and the National Science

  14. Micro- and nano-fabricated implantable drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems provide new means for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations over entire treatment durations in order to optimize drug action. This article focuses on new drug administration modalities achieved using implantable drug-delivery systems that are enabled by micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, and microfluidics. Recent advances in drug administration technologies are discussed and remaining challenges are highlighted. PMID:23323562

  15. Data acquisition system for phase-2 KGF proton decay experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Menon, M. G. K.; Ito, N.; Kawakami, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Sreekantan, B. V.; Hayashi, Y.; Miyake, S.

    1985-01-01

    Phase-2 of KGF proton decay experiment using 4000 proportional counters will start operating from middle of 1985. The detection systems, in addition to measuring the time information to an accuracy of 200 n see, also records ionization in the hit counters. It also monitors different characteristics of the counters like pulse height spectrum, pulse width spectrum and counting rate. The acquisition system is discussed.

  16. Silk-based delivery systems of bioactive molecules

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-01

    Silks are biodegradable, biocompatible, self-assemblying proteins that can also be tailored via genetic engineering to contain specific chemical features, offering utility for drug and gene delivery. Silkworm silk has been used in biomedical sutures for decades and has recently achieved Food and Drug Administration approval for expanded biomaterials device utility. With the diversity and control of size, structure and chemistry, modified or recombinant silk proteins can be designed and utilized in various biomedical application, such as for the delivery of bioactive molecules. This review focuses on the biosynthesis and applications of silk-based multi-block copolymer systems and related silk protein drug delivery systems. The utility of these systems for the delivery of small molecule drugs, proteins and genes are reviewed. PMID:20298729

  17. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E. Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-09-15

    lateral penumbra of low-energy SS proton treatments may be greatly reduced with the use of this system at the cost of only a small penalty in delivery time.

  18. A respiratory-gated treatment system for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.-M.; Brett, Robert; Sharp, Gregory; Safai, Soiros; Jiang, Steve; Flanz, Jay; Kooy, Hanne

    2007-08-15

    Proton therapy offers the potential for excellent dose conformity and reduction in integral dose. The superior dose distribution is, however, much more sensitive to changes in radiological depths along the beam path than for photon fields. Respiratory motion can cause such changes for treatments sites like lung, liver, and mediastinum and thus affect the proton dose distribution significantly. We have implemented and commissioned a respiratory-gated system for range-modulated treatment fields. The gating system was designed to ensure that each gate always contains complete modulation cycles so that for any beam segment the delivered dose has the planned depth-dose distribution. Measurements have been made to estimate the time delays for the various components of the system. The total delay between the actual motion and the beam on/off control is in the range of 65-195 ms. Time-resolved dose measurements and film tests were also conducted to examine the overall gating effect.

  19. NuMI proton kicker extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.C.; Krafczyk, G.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    This system extracts up to 9.6 {micro}s of 120 GeV beam every 1.87 seconds for the NuMI beamline neutrino experiments. A pulse forming network consisting of two continuous wound coils and 68 capacitors was designed and built to drive three kicker magnets. The field stability requirement is better than {+-} 1% with a field rise time of 1.52 {micro}s. New kicker magnets were built based on the successful traveling wave magnets built for the Main Injector. Two of these magnets are in series which places a serious constraint on the rise time of the pulser. A forced cooling system using Fluorinert{reg_sign} was designed for the magnet termination resistors to maintain the field flatness and amplitude stability.

  20. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  1. Colloidal drug delivery systems: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview an extensive range of colloidal drug delivery systems with special focus on vesicular and particulates systems that are being used in research or might be potentially useful as carriers systems for drug or active biomolecules or as cell carriers with application in the therapeutic field. We present some important examples of commercially available drug delivery systems with applications in research or in clinical fields. This class of systems is widely used due to excellent drug targeting, sustained and controlled release behavior, higher entrapment efficiency of drug molecules, prevention of drug hydrolysis or enzymatic degradation, and improvement of therapeutic efficacy. These characteristics help in the selection of suitable carrier systems for drug, cell, and gene delivery in different fields. PMID:25955882

  2. Albumin-based nanocomposite spheres for advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Misak, Heath E; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Gopu, Janani S; Man, Ka-Poh; Zacharias, Nora M; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system incorporating human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, magnetite nanoparticles, and therapeutic agent(s) was developed for potential application in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and skin cancer. An oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation (O/OSE) method was modified to produce a drug delivery system with a diameter of 0.5–2 μm. The diameter was mainly controlled by adjusting the viscosity of albumin in the discontinuous phase of the O/OSE method. The drug-release study showed that the release of drug and albumin was mostly dependent on the albumin content of the drug delivery system, which is very similar to the drug occlusion-mesopore model. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that increasing the albumin content in the drug delivery system increased cell viability, possibly due to the improved biocompatibility of the system. Overall, these studies show that the proposed system could be a viable option as a drug delivery system in the treatment of many illnesses, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and skin and breast cancers. PMID:24106002

  3. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  4. In vivo Evaluation of Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System for Oral Delivery of Nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, A. S.; Patel, V. V.; Nivsarkar, M.; Vasu, Kamala K.; Shishoo, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Nevirapine is a highly lipophilic and water insoluble non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Lymphoid tissue constitutes the major reservoir of HIV virus and infected cells in HIV-infected patients. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system, using long chain triglycerides, is a popular carrier of drugs due to their ability to transport lipophilic drugs into the lymphatic circulation. However, HIV/AIDS patients experience a variety of functional and anatomical abnormalities in gastrointestinal tract that result in diarrhoea and nutrient malabsorption. Medium chain triglycerides are readily absorbed from the small bowel under conditions in which the absorption of long chain triglycerides is impaired. Therefore, nevirapine self-emulsifying drug delivery system containing medium chain fatty acid, caprylic acid and a solubilizer, Soluphor® P (2-pyrrolidone) was developed and found to be superior to the marketed conventional suspension with respect to in vitro diffusion and ex vivo intestinal permeability. This self-emulsifying drug delivery system has now been further investigated for in vivo absorption in an animal model. The contribution of caprylic acid and Soluphor® P on in vivo absorption of nevirapine was also studied in the present study. The bioavailability of nevirapine from self-emulsifying drug delivery system, after oral administration, was 2.69 times higher than that of the marketed suspension. The improved bioavailability could be due to absorption of nevirapine via both portal and intestinal lymphatic routes. The study indicates that medium chain or structured triglycerides can be a better option to develop self-emulsifying drug delivery system for lipophilic and extensively metabolised drugs like nevirapine for patients with AIDS-associated malabsorption. PMID:25035533

  5. In vivo Evaluation of Self Emulsifying Drug Delivery System for Oral Delivery of Nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, A S; Patel, V V; Nivsarkar, M; Vasu, Kamala K; Shishoo, C J

    2014-05-01

    Nevirapine is a highly lipophilic and water insoluble non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Lymphoid tissue constitutes the major reservoir of HIV virus and infected cells in HIV-infected patients. Self-emulsifying drug delivery system, using long chain triglycerides, is a popular carrier of drugs due to their ability to transport lipophilic drugs into the lymphatic circulation. However, HIV/AIDS patients experience a variety of functional and anatomical abnormalities in gastrointestinal tract that result in diarrhoea and nutrient malabsorption. Medium chain triglycerides are readily absorbed from the small bowel under conditions in which the absorption of long chain triglycerides is impaired. Therefore, nevirapine self-emulsifying drug delivery system containing medium chain fatty acid, caprylic acid and a solubilizer, Soluphor(®) P (2-pyrrolidone) was developed and found to be superior to the marketed conventional suspension with respect to in vitro diffusion and ex vivo intestinal permeability. This self-emulsifying drug delivery system has now been further investigated for in vivo absorption in an animal model. The contribution of caprylic acid and Soluphor(®) P on in vivo absorption of nevirapine was also studied in the present study. The bioavailability of nevirapine from self-emulsifying drug delivery system, after oral administration, was 2.69 times higher than that of the marketed suspension. The improved bioavailability could be due to absorption of nevirapine via both portal and intestinal lymphatic routes. The study indicates that medium chain or structured triglycerides can be a better option to develop self-emulsifying drug delivery system for lipophilic and extensively metabolised drugs like nevirapine for patients with AIDS-associated malabsorption. PMID:25035533

  6. Vaporization as a smokeless cannabis delivery system: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Vizoso, H P; Shade, S B; Jay, C; Kelly, M E; Benowitz, N L

    2007-11-01

    Although cannabis may have potential therapeutic value, inhalation of a combustion product is an undesirable delivery system. The aim of the study was to investigate vaporization using the Volcano((R)) device as an alternative means of delivery of inhaled Cannabis sativa. Eighteen healthy inpatient subjects enrolled to compare the delivery of cannabinoids by vaporization to marijuana smoked in a standard cigarette. One strength (1.7, 3.4, or 6.8% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) and delivery system was randomly assigned for each of the 6 study days. Plasma concentrations of Delta-9-THC, expired carbon monoxide (CO), physiologic and neuropsychologic effects were the main outcome measures. Peak plasma concentrations and 6-h area under the plasma concentration-time curve of THC were similar. CO levels were reduced with vaporization. No adverse events occurred. Vaporization of cannabis is a safe and effective mode of delivery of THC. Further trials of clinical effectiveness of cannabis could utilize vaporization as a smokeless delivery system. PMID:17429350

  7. Training Delivery Systems for Adult Learners. A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Instructional Development and Services.

    This bibliography focuses on the training needs of adults and the incorporation of the most effective training delivery systems for adults into job training programs. It includes citations exploring current training practices, methods, and philosophies in both the private sector and the educational system; how each system can learn from the…

  8. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  9. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  10. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  11. Hydrocolloid-based nutraceutical delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janaswamy, Srinivas; Youngren, Susanne R.

    2012-07-11

    Nutraceuticals are important due to their inherent health benefits. However, utilization and consumption are limited by their poor water solubility and instability at normal processing and storage conditions. Herein, we propose an elegant and novel approach for the delivery of nutraceuticals in their active form using hydrocolloid matrices that are inexpensive and non-toxic with generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status. Iota-carrageenan and curcumin have been chosen as models of hydrocolloid and nutraceutical compounds, respectively. The iota-carrageenan network maintains a stable organization after encapsulating curcumin molecules, protects them from melting and then releases them in a sustained manner. These findings lay a strong foundation for developing value-added functional and medicinal foods.

  12. Dendrimeric systems and their applications in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Burçin; Pehlivan, Sibel Bozdağ; Unlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  13. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  14. Osmotically controlled drug delivery system with associated drugs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brahma Prakash; Thakur, Navneet; Jain, Nishi P; Banweer, Jitendra; Jain, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems have slight control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the controlled or modified release drug delivery systems. They include dosage forms for oral and transdermal administration as well as injectable and implantable systems. For most of drugs, oral route remains as the most acceptable route of administration. Certain molecules may have low oral bioavailability because of solubility or permeability limitations. Development of an extended release dosage form also requires reasonable absorption throughout the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Among the available techniques to improve the bioavailability of these drugs fabrication of osmotic drug delivery system is the most appropriate one. Osmotic drug delivery systems release the drug with the zero order kinetics which does not depend on the initial concentration and the physiological factors of GIT. This review brings out new technologies, fabrication and recent clinical research in osmotic drug delivery. PMID:21486532

  15. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  16. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  17. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  18. Formulation and evaluation of ondansetron nasal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunsook; Gwak, Hyesun; Chun, Inkoo

    2008-02-12

    This study aimed to formulate and evaluate nasal delivery systems containing ondansetron hydrochloride. In the in vitro study, the permeation rate with the addition of 10% polyethylene glycol 300 (PEG 300) to aqueous solution containing 0.01% benzalkonium chloride (BC) and 10% sulfobutylether beta-cyclodextrin sodium salt (SBCD) was somewhat more rapid up to 1.5h compared to the addition of 10% PG. The permeation flux increased as the drug concentration increased regardless of the vehicles used. The addition of nicotinamide or chitosan to aqueous drug solution (40 mg/ml) with 10% PEG 300 and 0.01% BC rather decreased permeation rate and delayed lag time. Even though cyclodextrins including SBCD or dimethyl-ss-cyclodextrin failed to show permeation enhancing effects of ondansetron hydrochloride, the addition of 10% SBCD to aqueous solution containing 10% PEG 300 and 0.01% BC could be a good candidate for ondansetron nasal delivery systems because of its safety profile, stable storage in refrigerator and solubilizing effect. With the above formulation, the nasal delivery system increased AUC0-2h and Cmax by 2.1 and 1.7 times compared to those of oral delivery, respectively while there was no difference found in AUC0-2h with intravenous administration. Therefore, the nasal delivery system of ondansetron hydrochloride formulated in this study was feasible for nasal administration. PMID:17822864

  19. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes. PMID:21719996

  20. Local arterial wall drug delivery using balloon catheter system.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-09-28

    Balloon-based drug delivery systems allow localized application of drugs to a vascular segment to reduce neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis. Drugs are coated onto balloons using excipients as drug carriers to facilitate adherence and release of drug during balloon inflation. Drug-coated balloon delivery system is characterized by a rapid drug transfer that achieves high drug concentration along the vessel wall surface, intended to correspond to the balloon dilation-induced vascular injury and healing processes. The balloon catheter system allows homogenous drug delivery to the vessel wall, such that the drug release per unit surface area is kept constant along balloons of different lengths. Optimization of the balloon coating matrix is essential for efficient drug transfer and tissue retention until the artery remodels to a normal set point. Challenges in the development of balloon-based drug delivery to the arterial wall include finding suitable excipients for drug formulation to enable drug release to a targeted lesion site effectively, maintain coating integrity during transit, prolong tissue retention and reduce particulate generation. This review highlights various factors involved in the successful design of balloon-based delivery systems, including drug release kinetics, matrix coating transfer, transmural drug partitioning, dissolution rate and release of unbound active drug. PMID:27473765

  1. Fundamental radiological and geometric performance of two types of proton beam modulated discrete scanning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J. B.; Schoenenberg, D.; Dessy, F.; De Wilde, O.; Bietzer, O.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare and contrast the measured fundamental properties of two new types of modulated proton scanning systems. This provides a basis for clinical expectations based on the scanned beam quality and a benchmark for computational models. Because the relatively small beam and fast scanning gave challenges to the characterization, a secondary purpose was to develop and apply new approaches where necessary to do so.Methods: The following performances of the proton scanning systems were investigated: beamlet alignment, static in-air beamlet size and shape, scanned in-air penumbra, scanned fluence map accuracy, geometric alignment of scanning system to isocenter, maximum field size, lateral and longitudinal field uniformity of a 1 l cubic uniform field, output stability over time, gantry angle invariance, monitoring system linearity, and reproducibility. A range of detectors was used: film, ionization chambers, lateral multielement and longitudinal multilayer ionization chambers, and a scintillation screen combined with a digital video camera. Characterization of the scanned fluence maps was performed with a software analysis tool.Results: The resulting measurements and analysis indicated that the two types of delivery systems performed within specification for those aspects investigated. The significant differences were observed between the two types of scanning systems where one type exhibits a smaller spot size and associated penumbra than the other. The differential is minimum at maximum energy and increases inversely with decreasing energy. Additionally, the large spot system showed an increase in dose precision to a static target with layer rescanning whereas the small spot system did not.Conclusions: The measured results from the two types of modulated scanning types of system were consistent with their designs under the conditions tested. The most significant difference between the types of system was their proton

  2. Design of Educational Delivery Systems for Lifelong Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, R. Oliver; Gilbert, Randall L.

    To clarify delivery system concepts, several topics will be addressed: educational needs of lower-income older people, formulation of a design concept, specification of the system's concrete aspects, and research/development implications. As the proportion of persons over age sixty-four grows and sensitivity to unmet lifelong learning needs rises,…

  3. Engaging Faculty in Telecommunications-Based Instructional Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalec, John J.

    In the design and development of telecommunications-based instructional delivery systems, attention to faculty involvement and training is often overlooked until the system is operational. The Waubonsee Telecommunications Instructional Consortium (TIC), in Illinois, is one network that benefited from early faculty input. Even before the first…

  4. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  5. Importance of dual delivery systems for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Farokhi, Mehdi; Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ou, Keng-Liang; Mao, Chuanbin; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2016-03-10

    Bone formation is a complex process that requires concerted function of multiple growth factors. For this, it is essential to design a delivery system with the ability to load multiple growth factors in order to mimic the natural microenvironment for bone tissue formation. However, the short half-lives of growth factors, their relatively large size, slow tissue penetration, and high toxicity suggest that conventional routes of administration are unlikely to be effective. Therefore, it seems that using multiple bioactive factors in different delivery systems can develop new strategies for improving bone tissue regeneration. Combination of these factors along with biomaterials that permit tunable release profiles would help to achieve truly spatiotemporal regulation during delivery. This review summarizes the various dual-control release systems that are used for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26805518

  6. Biologically erodable microspheres as potential oral drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathiowitz, Edith; Jacob, Jules S.; Jong, Yong S.; Carino, Gerardo P.; Chickering, Donald E.; Chaturvedi, Pravin; Santos, Camilla A.; Vijayaraghavan, Kavita; Montgomery, Sean; Bassett, Michael; Morrell, Craig

    1997-03-01

    Biologically adhesive delivery systems offer important advantages1-5 over conventional drug delivery systems6. Here we show that engineered polymer microspheres made of biologically erodable polymers, which display strong adhesive interactions with gastrointestinal mucus and cellular linings, can traverse both the mucosal absorptive epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium covering the lymphoid tissue of Peyer's patches. The polymers maintain contact with intestinal epithelium for extended periods of time and actually penetrate it, through and between cells. Thus, once loaded with compounds of pharmacological interest, the microspheres could be developed as delivery systems to transfer biologically active molecules to the circulation. We show that these microspheres increase the absorption of three model substances of widely different molecular size: dicumarol, insulin and plasmid DNA.

  7. A clinical perspective on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Gilhotra, Ritu M; Ikram, Mohd; Srivastava, Sunny; Gilhotra, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucoadhesion can be defined as a state in which two components, of which one is of biological origin, are held together for extended periods of time by the help of interfacial forces. Among the various transmucosal routes, buccal mucosa has excellent accessibility and relatively immobile mucosa, hence suitable for administration of retentive dosage form. The objective of this paper is to review the works done so far in the field of mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems (MBDDS), with a clinical perspective. Starting with a brief introduction of the mucoadhesive drug delivery systems, oral mucosa, and the theories of mucoadhesion, this article then proceeds to cover the works done so far in the field of MBDDS, categorizing them on the basis of ailments they are meant to cure. Additionally, we focus on the various patents, recent advancements, and challenges as well as the future prospects for mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems. PMID:24683406

  8. Engineering Stent Based Delivery System for Esophageal Cancer Using Docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mohsin; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Knott, Robert; Garg, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Esophageal cancer patients are often diagnosed as "advanced" cases. These patients are subjected to palliative stenting using self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) to maintain oral alimentation. Unfortunately, SEMS get reoccluded due to tumor growth, in and over the stent struts. To investigate potential solutions to this problem, docetaxel (DTX) delivery films were prepared using PurSil AL 20 (PUS), which can be used as a covering material for the SEMS. Drug-polymer miscibility and interactions were studied. Bilayer films were prepared by adhering the blank film to the DTX loaded film in order to maintain the unidirectional delivery to the esophagus. In vitro release and the local DTX delivery were studied using in vitro permeation experiments. It was found that DTX and PUS were physically and chemically compatible. The bilayer films exhibited sustained release (>30 days) and minimal DTX permeation through esophageal tissues in vitro. The rate-determining step for the DTX delivery was calculated. It was found that >0.9 fraction of rate control lies with the esophageal tissues, suggesting that DTX delivery can be sustained for longer periods compared to the in vitro release observed. Thus, the bilayer films can be developed as a localized sustained delivery system in combination with the stent. PMID:25936529

  9. Gastric retentive drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S J; Park, H; Park, K

    1998-01-01

    The development of a long-term oral controlled-release dosage form has been difficult mainly because of the transit of the dosage form through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several approaches to extend gastric residence time have been tried. The most commonly used systems are (1) intragastric floating systems, (2) high-density systems, (3) mucoadhesive systems, (4) magnetic systems, (5) unfoldable, extendible, or swellable systems, and (6) superporous hydrogel systems. The concept of each approach is examined, and improvements that are needed for further development are discussed. Background materials in the GI physiology that are necessary for understanding the concept and usefulness of each approach are also provided. PMID:9699081

  10. Oral drug delivery systems comprising altered geometric configurations for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix(®) multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise(®), which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix(®) as well as "release modules assemblage", which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  11. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  12. The Vacuum-Operated Nutrient Delivery System: hydroponics for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Cox, W M; Dreschel, T W; Chetirkin, P V

    1992-11-01

    A nutrient delivery system that may have applicability for growing plants in microgravity is described. The Vacuum-Operated Nutrient Delivery System (VONDS) draws nutrient solution across roots that are under a partial vacuum at approximately 91 kPa. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Blue Lake 274) plants grown on the VONDS had consistently greater leaf area and higher root, stem, leaf, and pod dry weights than plants grown under nonvacuum control conditions. This study demonstrates the potential applicability of the VONDS for growing plants in microgravity for space biology experimentation and/or crop production. PMID:11537607

  13. Programmable nanomedicine: synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacardo, Dennis B.; Ligler, Frances S.; Gu, Zhen

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in nanomedicine for the cancer therapy have enabled programmable delivery of therapeutics by exploiting the stimuli-responsive properties of nanocarriers. These therapeutic systems were designed with the relevant chemical and physical properties that respond to different triggers for enhanced anticancer efficacy, including the reduced development of drug-resistance, lower therapeutic dose, site-specific transport, and spatiotemporally controlled release. This minireview discusses the current advances in programmable nanocarriers for cancer therapy with particular emphasis on synergistic and sequential drug delivery systems.

  14. Vaccinia virus as a vaccine delivery system for marsupial wildlife.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Fleming, Stephen B; Cowan, Phil E; Scobie, Susie; Whelan, Ellena; Prada, Diana; Mercer, Andrew A; Duckworth, Janine A

    2011-06-20

    Vaccines based on recombinant poxviruses have proved successful in controlling diseases such as rabies and plague in wild eutherian mammals. They have also been trialled experimentally as delivery agents for fertility-control vaccines in rodents and foxes. In some countries, marsupial mammals represent a wildlife disease reservoir or a threat to conservation values but, as yet there has been no bespoke study of efficacy or immunogenicity of a poxvirus-based vaccine delivery system in a marsupial. Here, we report a study of the potential for vaccination using vaccinia virus in the Australian brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula, an introduced pest species in New Zealand. Parent-strain vaccinia virus (Lister) infected 8/8 possums following delivery of virus to the oral cavity and outer nares surfaces (oronasal immunisation), and persisted in the mucosal epithelium around the palatine tonsils for up to 2 weeks post-exposure. A recombinant vaccinia virus construct (VV399, which expresses the Eg95 antigen of the hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus) was shown to infect 10/15 possums after a single-dose oronasal delivery and to also persist. Both parent vaccinia virus and the VV399 construct virus induced peripheral blood lymphocyte reactivity against viral antigens in possums, first apparent at 4 weeks post-exposure and still detectable at 4 months post-exposure. Serum antibody reactivity to Eg95 was recorded in 7/8 possums which received a single dose of the VV399 construct and 7/7 animals which received triple-dose delivery, with titre end-points in the latter case exceeding 1/4000 dilution. This study demonstrates that vaccinia virus will readily infect possums via a delivery means used to deploy wildlife vaccines, and in doing is capable of generating immune reactivity against viral and heterologous antigens. This highlights the future potential of recombinant vaccinia virus as a vaccine delivery system in marsupial wildlife. PMID:21570435

  15. Cyclosporine Amicellar delivery system for dry eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Han; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Junsung; Park, Hee Jun; Sun, Bo Kyung; Hyun, Sang-Min; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to develop stable cyclosporine A (CsA) ophthalmic micelle solutions for dry-eye syndrome and evaluate their physicochemical properties and therapeutic efficacy. Materials and methods CsA-micelle solutions (MS-CsA) were created by a simple method with Cremophor EL, ethanol, and phosphate buffer. We investigated the particle size, pH, and osmolarity. In addition, long-term physical and chemical stability for MS-CsA was observed. To confirm the therapeutic efficacy, tear production in dry eye-induced rabbits was evaluated using the Schirmer tear test (STT). When compared to a commercial product, Restasis, MS-CsA demonstrated improvement in goblet-cell density and conjunctival epithelial morphology, as demonstrated in histological hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results MS-CsA had a smaller particle size (average diameter 14–18 nm) and a narrow size distribution. Physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, osmolarity, and remaining CsA concentration were all within the expected range of 60 days. STT scores significantly improved in MS-CsA treated groups (P<0.05) in comparison to those of the Restasis-treated group. The number of goblet cells for rabbit conjunctivas after the administration of MS-CsA was 94.83±8.38, a significantly higher result than the 65.17±11.51 seen with Restasis. The conjunctival epithelial morphology of dry eye-induced rabbits thinned with loss of goblet cells. However, after 5 days of treatment with drug formulations, rabbit conjunctivas recovered epithelia and showed a relative increase in the number of goblet cells. Conclusion The results of this study indicate the potential use of a novel MS for the ophthalmic delivery of CsA in treating dry eyes. PMID:27382280

  16. SU-E-T-73: Commissioning of a Treatment Planning System for Proton Spot Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Kang, Y; Schultz, L; Nicewonger, D; Herrera, M; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned for clinical use with a fixed beam line proton delivery system. An outline of the data collection, modeling, and verification is provided. Methods: Beam data modeling for proton spot scanning in CMS Xio TPS requires the following measurements: (i) integral depth dose curves (IDDCs); (ii) absolute dose calibration; and (iii) beam spot characteristics. The IDDCs for 18 proton energies were measured using an integrating detector in a single spot field in a water phantom. Absolute scaling of the IDDCs were performed based on ion chamber measurements in mono-energetic 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields in water. Beam spot shapes were measured in air using a flat panel scintillator detector at multiple planes. For beam model verification, more than 45 uniform dose phantom and patient plans were generated. These plans were used to measure range, point dose, and longitudinal and lateral profiles. Tolerances employed for verification are: point dose and longitudinal profiles, ±2%; range, ±1 mm; FWHM for lateral profiles, ±2 mm; and patient plan dose distribution, gamma index of >90% at 3%/3 mm criteria. Results: More than 97% of the point dose measurements out of 115 were within +/-2% with maximum deviation of 3%. 98% of the ranges measured were within 1 mm with maximum deviation of 1.4mm. The normalized depth doses were within 2% at all depths. The maximum error in FWHM of lateral profiles was found to be less than 2mm. For 5 patient plans representing different anatomic sites, a total of 38 planes for 12 beams were analyzed for gamma index with average value of 99% and minimum of 94%. Conclusions: The planning system is successfully commissioned and can be safely deployed for clinical use. Measurements of IDDCs on user beam are highly recommended instead of using standard beam IDDCs.

  17. Beam characteristics in two different proton uniform scanning systems: A side-by-side comparison

    PubMed Central

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Hsi, Wen; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of proton therapy fields produced by two uniform scanning systems that have a number of similar hardware components but employ different techniques of beam spreading. Methods: This work compares two technologically distinct systems implementing a method of uniform scanning and layer stacking that has been developed independently at Indiana University (IU) and by Ion Beam Applications, S. A. (IBA). Clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of fields produced by these systems are studied, such as beam range control, peak-to-entrance ratio (PER), lateral penumbra, field flatness, effective source position, precision of dose delivery at different gantry angles, etc. Results: Under comparable conditions, both systems controlled beam range with an accuracy of 0.5 mm and a precision of 0.1 mm. Compared to IBA, the IU system produced pristine peaks with a slightly higher PER (3.23 and 3.45, respectively) and smaller, symmetrical, lateral in-air penumbra of 1 mm compared to about 1.9/2.4 mm in the inplane/crossplane (IP/CP) directions for IBA. Large field flatness results in the IP/CP directions were similar: 3.0/2.4% for IU and 2.9/2.4% for IBA. The IU system featured a longer virtual source-to-isocenter position, which was the same for the IP and CP directions (237 cm), as opposed to 212/192 cm (IP/CP) for IBA. Dose delivery precision at different gantry angles was higher in the IBA system (0.5%) than in the IU system (1%). Conclusions: Each of the two uniform scanning systems considered in this work shows some attractive performance characteristics while having other features that can be further improved. Overall, radiation field characteristics of both systems meet their clinical specifications and show comparable results. Most of the differences observed between the two systems are clinically insignificant. PMID:22559626

  18. Beam characteristics in two different proton uniform scanning systems: A side-by-side comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Hsi Wen; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To compare clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of proton therapy fields produced by two uniform scanning systems that have a number of similar hardware components but employ different techniques of beam spreading. Methods: This work compares two technologically distinct systems implementing a method of uniform scanning and layer stacking that has been developed independently at Indiana University (IU) and by Ion Beam Applications, S. A. (IBA). Clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of fields produced by these systems are studied, such as beam range control, peak-to-entrance ratio (PER), lateral penumbra, field flatness, effective source position, precision of dose delivery at different gantry angles, etc. Results: Under comparable conditions, both systems controlled beam range with an accuracy of 0.5 mm and a precision of 0.1 mm. Compared to IBA, the IU system produced pristine peaks with a slightly higher PER (3.23 and 3.45, respectively) and smaller, symmetrical, lateral in-air penumbra of 1 mm compared to about 1.9/2.4 mm in the inplane/crossplane (IP/CP) directions for IBA. Large field flatness results in the IP/CP directions were similar: 3.0/2.4% for IU and 2.9/2.4% for IBA. The IU system featured a longer virtual source-to-isocenter position, which was the same for the IP and CP directions (237 cm), as opposed to 212/192 cm (IP/CP) for IBA. Dose delivery precision at different gantry angles was higher in the IBA system (0.5%) than in the IU system (1%). Conclusions: Each of the two uniform scanning systems considered in this work shows some attractive performance characteristics while having other features that can be further improved. Overall, radiation field characteristics of both systems meet their clinical specifications and show comparable results. Most of the differences observed between the two systems are clinically insignificant.

  19. Micro and nanoparticle drug delivery systems for preventing allotransplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James D; Acharya, Abhinav P; Little, Steven R

    2015-09-01

    Despite decades of advances in transplant immunology, tissue damage caused by acute allograft rejection remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the transplant recipient. Moreover, the long-term sequelae of lifelong immunosuppression leaves patients at risk for developing a host of other deleterious conditions. Controlled drug delivery using micro- and nanoparticles (MNPs) is an effective way to deliver higher local doses of a given drug to specific tissues and cells while mitigating systemic effects. Herein, we review several descriptions of MNP immunotherapies aimed at prolonging allograft survival. We also discuss developments in the field of biomimetic drug delivery that use MNP constructs to induce and recruit our bodies' own suppressive immune cells. Finally, we comment on the regulatory pathway associated with these drug delivery systems. Collectively, it is our hope the studies described in this review will help to usher in a new era of immunotherapy in organ transplantation. PMID:25937032

  20. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-07-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. PMID:27297745

  1. A framework for describing health care delivery organizations and systems.

    PubMed

    Piña, Ileana L; Cohen, Perry D; Larson, David B; Marion, Lucy N; Sills, Marion R; Solberg, Leif I; Zerzan, Judy

    2015-04-01

    Describing, evaluating, and conducting research on the questions raised by comparative effectiveness research and characterizing care delivery organizations of all kinds, from independent individual provider units to large integrated health systems, has become imperative. Recognizing this challenge, the Delivery Systems Committee, a subgroup of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Effective Health Care Stakeholders Group, which represents a wide diversity of perspectives on health care, created a draft framework with domains and elements that may be useful in characterizing various sizes and types of care delivery organizations and may contribute to key outcomes of interest. The framework may serve as the door to further studies in areas in which clear definitions and descriptions are lacking. PMID:24922130

  2. Assessment of Alternative Student and Delivery Systems: Assessment of the Current Delivery System. Supplement I to the Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Reston, VA.

    The effects of the current student financial aid delivery system on five major participant groups are examined: federal government, states/guarantee agencies, postsecondary institutions, lenders and secondary markets, and applicants and families. Attention is directed to effects of the current system, including: administrative costs, fund…

  3. Industrial beam delivery system for ultra-short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funck, Max C.; Wedel, Björn; Kayander, Ilya; Niemeyer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    Beam delivery systems are an integral part of industrial laser equipment. Separating laser source and application fiber optic beam delivery is employed wherever great flexibility is required. And today, fiber optic beam delivery of several kW average power is available for continuous wave operation using multimode step index fibers with core diameters of several 100 μm. However, during short-pulse or even ultra-short pulse laser operation step index fibers fail due to high power density levels and nonlinear effects such as self-focusing and induced scattering. Hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCF) are an alternative to traditional fibers featuring light propagation mostly inside a hollow core, enabling high power handling and drastically reduced nonlinear effects. These fibers have become available during the past decade and are used in research but also for fiber laser systems and exhibit a growing popularity. We report on using HC-PCF fibers and their integration into an industrial beam delivery package comparable to today's fiber optic standards and will discuss power handling, beam quality and efficiency as well as future prospects of this technology. In a preliminary industrial beam delivery setup 300 fs pulses at 100 W average power could be delivered.

  4. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  5. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V P Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T

    2011-07-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  6. Transferosomes - A vesicular transdermal delivery system for enhanced drug permeation

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Reshmy; Jose, Shoma; Mukund, V. P. Biju; Vasudevan, Deepa T.

    2011-01-01

    Transdermal administration of drugs is generally limited by the barrier function of the skin. Vesicular systems are one of the most controversial methods for transdermal delivery of active substances. The interest in designing transdermal delivery systems was relaunched after the discovery of elastic vesicles like transferosomes, ethosomes, cubosomes, phytosomes, etc. This paper presents the composition, mechanisms of penetration, manufacturing and characterization methods of transferosomes as transdermal delivery systems of active substances. For a drug to be absorbed and distributed into organs and tissues and eliminated from the body, it must pass through one or more biological membranes/barriers at various locations. Such a movement of drug across the membrane is called as drug transport. For the drugs to be delivered to the body, they should cross the membranous barrier. The concept of these delivery systems was designed in an attempt to concentrate the drug in the tissues of interest, while reducing the amount of drug in the remaining tissues. Hence, surrounding tissues are not affected by the drug. In addition, loss of drug does not happen due to localization of drug, leading to get maximum efficacy of the medication. Therefore, the phospholipid based carrier systems are of considerable interest in this era. PMID:22171309

  7. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  8. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  9. Nanostructured Delivery Systems: Augmenting the Delivery of Antiretroviral Drugs for Better Management of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S; Mustafa, Sanaul

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, HIV-1, the retrovirus associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is globally one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, existing approaches for interventions are not able to suppress the progression of infection due to this virus. Of the many obstacles, viral entry into the mono-nuclear phagocyte system encompassing monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells is a major concern. Viral infection is also responsible for the subsequent distribution of the virus into various tissues throughout the organism. Tremendous progress has been made during the past few years to diagnose and treat patients with HIV/AIDS infection, yet much remains to be done. Recommended treatment involves long-term and multiple drug therapy that causes severe side effects. With almost 12% of the world population suffering from HIV/AIDS, better management of this global threat is highly desired. Nanostructured delivery systems hold promise for improving the situation. Such systems can facilitate the uptake of antiretroviral drugs, causing a considerable improvement in HIV/AIDS therapy. Nanoscale systems have intriguing potential to drastically improve existing HIV/AIDS diagnosis and treatment platforms. Nanosystems constitute a wide range of systems varying from polymeric nanoparticles, to solid-lipid nanoparticles, liposomes, micro- and nanoemulsions, dendrimers, and self-nanoemulsifying systems. Improved bioavailability, solubility, stability, and biocompatibility make them an ideal choice for delivery of antiretroviral drugs. The present review initially describes an updated bird's-eye view account of the literature. Then, we provide a relatively sententious overview on updated patents of recent nanostructured delivery systems for antiretroviral drugs. Finally, we discuss low-cost therapy (such as antioxidants and immune modulators) for the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. PMID:26559551

  10. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.