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Sample records for proton drip line

  1. First Penning Trap Mass Measurements beyond the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mukherjee, M.; Rahaman, S.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Di, Z.; Plass, W. R.; Eliseev, S.; Vorobjev, G.; Habs, D.

    2008-01-11

    The masses of six neutron-deficient rare holmium and thulium isotopes close to the proton drip line were determined with the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. For the first time the masses of the proton-unbound isotopes {sup 144,145}Ho and {sup 147,148}Tm were directly measured. The proton separation energies were derived from the measured mass values and compared to predictions from mass formulas. The new values of the proton separation energies are used to determine the location of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium more accurately.

  2. {beta}-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xing, Y.-B.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Xu, F.-R.; Wang, K.

    2005-05-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of {beta}-delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N{approx}Z by utilizing the p-{gamma} coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half-lives for {sup 85}Mo, {sup 92}Rh, as well as the predicted 'waiting point' nuclei {sup 89}Ru and {sup 93}Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moeller et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997)]. These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp process. (2) The experimental assignments of spin and parity for the drip-line nuclei {sup 142}Ho and {sup 128}Pm could not be well predicted by any of the nuclear models. Nevertheless, the configuration-constrained nuclear potential-energy surfaces calculated by means of a Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method could reproduce the assignments. (3) The ALICE code overestimated by one or two orders of magnitude the production-reaction cross sections of the nine studied rare-earth nuclei, while the HIVAP code overestimated them by approximately one order of magnitude.

  3. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  4. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  5. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  6. Theoretical studies of proton emission from drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Ring, P.

    2011-11-30

    In this work, we discuss proton radioactivity from spherical nuclei in a modern perspective, based on a fully self--consistent relativistic density functional calculation with fundamental interactions.

  7. Structure Of Rare-Earth Nuclei Around The Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rykaczewski, K.P.; Gross, C.J.; Yu, C.H.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Bingham, C.R.; Danchev, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Tantawy, M.N.; Batchelder, J.C.; Karny, M.; Krolas, W.; Fong, D.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.; Winger, J.A.; Ginter, T.N.; Stolz, A.; Hagino, K.

    2005-04-05

    Decay studies on rare earth nuclei around the proton drip line have been performed by means of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility in Oak Ridge. The proton emission from the odd-odd N=77 isotone 146Tm was reinvestigated, resulting in the assignment of the 1.01 MeV proton line to the decay of a short-lived 146Tm state. A new proton radioactivity of 144Tm was identified. The decays of isomeric levels in the N=77 isotones, 140Eu, 142Tb and 144Ho were remeasured using {gamma} and electron detectors. The analysis of the structure of studied nuclei, which accounts for the coupling between the protons and neutrons and for core excitations, is presented.

  8. Predicting narrow states in the spectrum of a nucleus beyond the proton drip line.

    PubMed

    Canton, L; Pisent, G; Svenne, J P; Amos, K; Karataglidis, S

    2006-02-24

    Properties of particle-unstable nuclei lying beyond the proton drip line can be ascertained by considering the (usually known) properties of its mirror neutron-rich system. We have used a multichannel algebraic scattering theory to map the known properties of the neutron-14C system to those of the proton-14O one from which we deduce that the particle-unstable 15F will have a spectrum of two low-lying broad resonances of positive parity and, at higher excitation, three narrow negative-parity ones. A key feature is to use coupling to Pauli-hindered states in the target. PMID:16606079

  9. New Isotopes and Proton Emitters-Crossing the Drip Line in the Vicinity of 100Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeliković, I.; Lewitowicz, M.; Gernhäuser, R.; Krücken, R.; Nishimura, S.; Sakurai, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Baba, H.; Blank, B.; Blazhev, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Browne, F.; de France, G.; Doornenbal, P.; Faestermann, T.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Giovinazzo, J.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Ilieva, S.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jungclaus, A.; Kameda, D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Lorusso, G.; Lubos, D.; Moschner, K.; Murai, D.; Nishizuka, I.; Park, J.; Patel, Z.; Rajabali, M.; Rice, S.; Schaffner, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Steiger, K.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Several new isotopes, 96In, 94Cd, 92Ag, and 90Pd, have been identified at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The study of proton drip-line nuclei in the vicinity of 93Ag and 89Rh with half-lives in the submicrosecond range. The systematics of the half-lives of odd-Z nuclei with Tz=-1 /2 toward 99Sn shows a stabilizing effect of the Z =50 shell closure. Production cross sections for nuclei in the vicinity of 100Sn measured at different energies and target thicknesses were compared to the cross sections calculated by epax taking into account contributions of secondary reactions in the primary target.

  10. New Isotopes and Proton Emitters-Crossing the Drip Line in the Vicinity of ^{100}Sn.

    PubMed

    Čeliković, I; Lewitowicz, M; Gernhäuser, R; Krücken, R; Nishimura, S; Sakurai, H; Ahn, D S; Baba, H; Blank, B; Blazhev, A; Boutachkov, P; Browne, F; de France, G; Doornenbal, P; Faestermann, T; Fang, Y; Fukuda, N; Giovinazzo, J; Goel, N; Górska, M; Ilieva, S; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Jungclaus, A; Kameda, D; Kim, Y-K; Kwon, Y K; Kojouharov, I; Kubo, T; Kurz, N; Lorusso, G; Lubos, D; Moschner, K; Murai, D; Nishizuka, I; Park, J; Patel, Z; Rajabali, M; Rice, S; Schaffner, H; Shimizu, Y; Sinclair, L; Söderström, P-A; Steiger, K; Sumikama, T; Suzuki, H; Takeda, H; Wang, Z; Watanabe, H; Wu, J; Xu, Z

    2016-04-22

    Several new isotopes, ^{96}In, ^{94}Cd, ^{92}Ag, and ^{90}Pd, have been identified at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The study of proton drip-line nuclei in the vicinity of ^{100}Sn led to the discovery of new proton emitters ^{93}Ag and ^{89}Rh with half-lives in the submicrosecond range. The systematics of the half-lives of odd-Z nuclei with T_{z}=-1/2 toward ^{99}Sn shows a stabilizing effect of the Z=50 shell closure. Production cross sections for nuclei in the vicinity of ^{100}Sn measured at different energies and target thicknesses were compared to the cross sections calculated by epax taking into account contributions of secondary reactions in the primary target. PMID:27152796

  11. Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} decay of deformed nuclei near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, F.; Hamamoto, I.; Zhang, X.Z. |

    1995-11-01

    Using a quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) based on deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions, the distribution of the Gamow-Teller (GT) {beta}{sup +} decay strength is estimated for the HF local minima of even-even deformed nuclei near the proton drip line in the region of 28{lt}{ital Z}{lt}66. The distribution often depends sensitively on the nuclear shape (namely, oblate or prolate). In the region of {ital Z}{lt}50 the possibility of observing {beta}-delayed proton emission depends sensitively on the excess of {ital Z} over {ital Z}={ital N}. In the region of {ital Z}{gt}50 almost the entire estimated GT strength is found to lie below the ground states of the even-even mother nuclei, and the observation of the total GT strength by {beta}-delayed charged-particle(s) emission will be of essential importance.

  12. GAMMASPHERE+FMA : a journey beyond the proton drip-line.

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Ressler, J. J.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davinson, T.; Ding, K. Y.; Fotiades, N.; Garg, U.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.; Shergur, J.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2000-11-30

    The majority of experiments performed during the 2-year long stay of GAMMAS-PHERE at the Argonne National Laboratory aimed to study proton-rich nuclei far from the line of stability at and beyond the proton drip-line. A high reaction channel selectivity was required to assign in-beam {gamma}-ray transitions to weakly populated exotic nuclei in the presence of background from strong reaction channels. In many of the experiments this was achieved by using the Argonne fragment mass analyzer to separate heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction products from scattered beam and disperse them according to their mass-over-charge-state ratio. For medium mass and heavy a and proton emitters the Recoil-Decay Tagging method was implemented. In-beam {gamma}-ray transitions were observed in several proton emitters between Z=50 and Z=82. Among others, rotational bands were assigned to {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu. A quadruple deformation of {beta}=0.25(4) was deduced for the ground state in {sup 141}Ho from the extracted dynamic moment of inertia. Based on observed band crossings and signature splittings the 7/2{sup {minus}} [523] and 1/2{sup +}[411] configurations were proposed for the ground state and the isomeric state, respectively. Comparison with particle-rotor calculations indicates, however, that {sup 141}Ho may have significant hexadecapole deformation and could be triaxial.

  13. Systematics of isomeric configurations in N=77 odd-Z isotones near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawy, M.N.; Danchev, M.; Hartley, D.J.; Mazzocchi, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Gross, C.J.; Shapira, D.; Yu, C.-H.; Batchelder, J.C.; Krolas, W.; Fong, D.; Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Ginter, T.N.; Stolz, A.; Hagino, K.; Karny, M.

    2006-02-15

    The systematics of the {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}s{sub 1/2} isomeric configurations was studied for the odd-Z N=77 isotones near the proton drip line. The isomeric decays in {sup 140}Eu, {sup 142}Tb, {sup 144}Ho, and {sup 146}Tm were measured by means of x-ray, {gamma}-ray, and charged particle spectroscopy at the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The spin and parity of I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} and 5{sup -} were deduced for the isomers in {sup 140}Eu and {sup 142}Tb. New decay schemes were established, and the half-lives of the 8{sup +} isomers were measured to be 302(4) ns for {sup 140m2}Eu and 25(1) {mu}s for {sup 142m2}Tb. No evidence for the expected 1{sup +} ground-state was found in the {sup 144}Ho decay data. The proton-emission from {sup 146}Tm was restudied. Five proton transitions were assigned to two proton-emitting states. The half-lives of 198(3) ms and 68(3) ms and the spin and parity values of I{sup {pi}}=10{sup +} and 5{sup -} were established for {sup 146m}Tm and {sup 146gs}Tm, respectively. For the first time for an odd-odd nucleus, the interpretation of the observed decay properties and structure of the proton-emitting states was made by accounting for deformation and proton and neutron coupling to the core excitations. A complex wave-function structure was obtained, with dominating components of {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}h{sub 11/2} for the 10{sup +} isomer and {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}s{sub 1/2} for the 5{sup -} ground state.

  14. Isomer Studies for Nuclei near the Proton Drip Line in the Mass 130-160 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A. M.; Varley, B. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P.; Rahkila, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A. P.; Nyman, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Grahn, T.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.

    2007-11-30

    This report details the status of an experimental research programme which has studied isomeric states in the mass 130-160 region of the nuclear chart. Several new isomers have been established and characterised near the proton drip line using a recoil isomer tagging technique at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The latest experiments have been performed with a modified setup where the standard GREAT focal-plane double-sided silicon-strip detector was changed to a dual multi-wire proportional-counter arrangement. This new setup has improved capability for short-lived isomer studies where high focal-plane rates can be tolerated. The results of key recent experiments for nuclei situated above ({sup 153}Yb,{sup 152}Tm) and below ({sup 136}Pm,{sup 142}Tb) the N = 82 shell gap were presented along with an interpretation for the isomers. Finally, the future prospects of the technique, using an isomer-tagged differential-plunger setup, were discussed. This technique will be capable of establishing the deformation of the states above the isomers and will aid in the process of assigning underlying single-particle configurations to the isomeric states.

  15. Studies of light exotic nuclei in the vicinity of neutron and proton drip lines at FLNR JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Krupko, S. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Fomichev, A. S.; Chudoba, V.

    2016-04-01

    Defining the limits of the existence of the nuclear structure is one of fundamental problems of natural science, requiring the advancement of studies towards the sites of maximum neutron- and proton-excess nuclei, to the borders of nuclear stability, and further, to the regions of nuclear instability. In such regions, nuclear systems exist only as resonant states in continuous spectra with characteristic 'nuclear' lifetimes. This work is done most effectively with experimental setups providing radioactive ion beams (RIBs). This review discusses the approaches in this field of research developed during the last 20 years at the ACCULINNA fragment separator in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The methodology developed is based on the comprehensive study of correlations among the reaction fragments emitted in the decays of nuclear-unstable systems which are populated in direct reactions induced by RIBs with intermediate (20 – 60 MeV per nucleon) energies. This allows us to acquire detailed knowledge about exotic nuclear systems close to and beyond nuclear drip lines. We discuss exotic forms of nuclear dynamics appearing in the vicinity of nuclear drip lines and relevant results of their theoretical analysis. Also discussed are existing facilities and prospective projects aimed at nuclear structure studies with RIBs at JINR.

  16. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  17. Exotic structures near the drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M. M.; Saldanha, A. A.; Sharma, J. K.

    2011-10-28

    In our recent study of the isotope shifts of Kr isotopes near rp-process path in the framework of the RMF theory, we have found that due to large shell gaps in the deformed space, several N = Z nuclei exhibit the double magicity of protons and neutrons. These nuclei are known to contribute to large abundances in the rp-process nucleosynthesis and have been shown to be the waiting-point nuclei. In another study of the shell effects at N = 126 near the neutron drip line, we have found that nuclei exhibit additional stability beyond the neutron drip line.

  18. Proton emission from the deformed odd-odd nuclei near drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patial, M.; Arumugam, P.; Jain, A. K.; Maglione, E.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Proton emission from odd-odd nuclei is studied within the two quasiparticle plus rotor model which includes the non-adiabatic effects and the residual interaction between valence proton and neutron. Justification of the formalism is discussed through corroboration of our results with the experimental spectrum of 180Ta. Exact calculations are performed to get the proton emission halflives. Our results for the proton emitter 130Eu leads to the assignment of spin and parity Jπ = 1+ for the ground state. The role of Coriolis and residual neutron-proton interactions on the proton emission halflives and their interplay are also discussed.

  19. Investigations of proton-neutron correlations close to the drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Delion, D. S.; Wyss, R.; Liotta, R. J.; Cederwall, Bo; Johnson, A.; Sandzelius, M.

    2010-08-15

    Proton-neutron correlations in nuclei above the Z=50 shell closure are investigated with the aim of understanding the behavior of the 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states in Te and Xe isotopes, which remain at a rather constant energy as one approaches the shell closure at N=50. Our calculations reveal that standard quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations, involving a quadrupole-quadrupole (QQ) interaction with constant strengths, cannot explain this feature. It is found that to reproduce the experimental data within this model one has to include a variable proton-neutron interaction. It turns out that an increased proton-neutron QQ interaction increases the collectivity (i.e., B(E2) values) when approaching the N=50 region, whereas an increased proton-neutron pairing interaction decreases the collectivity. We thus conclude that the ratio between the B(E2) value and 2{sup +} energy is a ''fingerprint'' of proton-neutron collectivity and it should be determined in future experiments concerning light Te isotopes. Based on this criterion, we conclude that the available experimental data indicate an enhanced proton-neutron pairing interaction by approaching doubly magic Z=N=20 and Z=N=28 regions.

  20. The structure and shape of exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Arumugam, P.; Maglione, E.

    2008-11-11

    Proton emission from deformed nuclei with triaxial symmetry is discussed within the non-adiabatic quasi-particle approach. As an example, we consider decay from {sup 161}Re, where we were able to reproduce the experimental half-life with a noticeable {gamma} deformation.

  1. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  2. Spectroscopy of 26F to Probe Proton-Neutron Forces Close to the Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Gaute; Sorlin, O.; Borcea, C.; Brown, B. A.; Grevy, S.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Jansen, G. R.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    A long-lived J 4 1 isomer, T1=2 2:2 1 ms, has been discovered at 643.4(1) keV in the weakly bound 26 9 F nucleus. It was populated at Grand Acce le rateur National d Ions Lourds in the fragmentation of a 36S beam. It decays by an internal transition to the J 1 1 ground state [82(14)%], by decay to 26Ne, or -delayed neutron emission to 25Ne. From the -decay studies of the J 1 1 and J 4 1 states, new excited states have been discovered in 25;26Ne. Gathering the measured binding energies of the J 1 1 4 1 multiplet in 26 9 F, we find that the proton-neutron 0d5=20d3=2 effective force used in shell-model calculations should be reduced to properly account for the weak binding of 26 9 F. Microscopic coupled cluster theory calculations using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory are in very good agreement with the energy of the low-lying 1 1 , 2 1 , 4 1 states in 26F. Including three-body forces and coupling to the continuum effects improve the agreement between experiment and theory as compared to the use of two-body forces only.

  3. Spectroscopy of 26F to probe proton-neutron forces close to the drip line.

    PubMed

    Lepailleur, A; Sorlin, O; Caceres, L; Bastin, B; Borcea, C; Borcea, R; Brown, B A; Gaudefroy, L; Grévy, S; Grinyer, G F; Hagen, G; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Jansen, G R; Llidoo, O; Negoita, F; de Oliveira, F; Porquet, M-G; Rotaru, F; Saint-Laurent, M-G; Sohler, D; Stanoiu, M; Thomas, J C

    2013-02-22

    A long-lived J(π) = 4(1)(+) isomer, T(1/2) = 2.2(1) ms, has been discovered at 643.4(1) keV in the weakly bound (9)(26)F nucleus. It was populated at Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds in the fragmentation of a (36)S beam. It decays by an internal transition to the J(π) = 1(1)(+) ground state [82(14)%], by β decay to (26)Ne, or β-delayed neutron emission to (25)Ne. From the β-decay studies of the J(π) =1(1)(+) and J(π) = 4(1)(+) states, new excited states have been discovered in (25,26)Ne. Gathering the measured binding energies of the J(π) = 1(1)(+) -4(1)(+) multiplet in (9)(26)F, we find that the proton-neutron π0d(5/2)ν0d(3/2) effective force used in shell-model calculations should be reduced to properly account for the weak binding of (9)(26)F. Microscopic coupled cluster theory calculations using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory are in very good agreement with the energy of the low-lying 1(1)(+), 2(1)(+), 4(1)(+) states in (26)F. Including three-body forces and coupling to the continuum effects improve the agreement between experiment and theory as compared to the use of two-body forces only. PMID:23473138

  4. Neutron Drip-Line Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, E. Minaya; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, C.; George, S.; Kellerbauer, A.; Boehm, Ch.; Neidherr, D.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Pearson, J. M.

    2009-08-26

    The development of microscopic mass models is a crucial ingredient for the understanding of how most of the elements of our world were fabricated. Confidence in drip-line predictions of such models requires their comparison with new mass data for nuclides far from stability. We combine theory and experiment using results that are state of the art: the latest mass measurements from the Penning-trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE are used to confront the predictions of the latest Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) microscopic mass models. In addition, we compare the new data to predictions of other types of mass models and the extrapolative behavior of the various models is analyzed to highlight topographical trends along the shores of the nuclear chart.

  5. Collective properties of drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, I.; Sagawa, H.

    1996-12-31

    Performing the spherical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions and, then, using RPA solved in the coordinate space with the Green`s function method, the authors have studied the effect of the unique shell structure as well as the very low particle threshold on collective modes in drip line nuclei. In this method a proper strength function in the continuum is obtained, though the spreading width of collective modes is not included. They have examined also one-particle resonant states in the obtained HF potential. Unperturbed particle-hole (p-h) response functions are carefully studied, which contain all basic information on the exotic behaviour of the RPA strength function in drip line nuclei.

  6. Model to Design Drip Hose Lateral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Rafael; Cury Saad, João Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Introduction The design criterion for non-pressure compensating drip hose is normally to have 10% of flow variation (Δq) in the lateral line, corresponding to 20% of head pressure variation (ΔH). Longer lateral lines in drip irrigation systems using conventional drippers provide cost reduction, but it is necessary to obtain to the uniformity of irrigation [1]. The use of Δq higher levels can provide longer lateral lines. [4] proposes the use of a 30% Δq and he found that this value resulted in distribution uniformity over 80%. [1] considered it is possible to extend the lateral line length using two emitters spacing in different section. He assumed that the spacing changing point would be at 40% of the total length, because this is approximately the location of the average flow according with [2]. [3] found that, for practical purposes, the average pressure is located at 40% of the length of the lateral line and that until this point it has already consumed 75% of total pressure head loss (hf ). In this case, the challenge for designers is getting longer lateral lines with high values of uniformity. Objective The objective of this study was to develop a model to design longer lateral lines using non-pressure compensating drip hose. Using the developed model, the hypotheses to be evaluated were: a) the use of two different spacing between emitters in the same lateral line allows longer length; b) it is possible to get longer lateral lines using high values of pressure variation in the lateral lines since the distribution uniformity stays below allowable limits. Methodology A computer program was developed in Delphi® based on the model developed and it is able to design lateral lines in level using non-pressure compensating drip hose. The input data are: desired distribution uniformity (DU); initial and final pressure in the lateral line; coefficients of relationship between emitter discharge and pressure head; hose internal diameter; pipe cross-sectional area

  7. Special features of single-particle proton spectra of nickel, zinc, and germanium isotopes in the vicinity of the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalova, O. V. Ermakova, T. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I.

    2015-10-15

    The single-particle proton spectra of the neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 50,52}Ni, {sup 56,58,60,62}Zn, and {sup 60,62,64}Ge were calculated on the basis of the dispersive optical model whose parameters were extrapolated from the region of stable isotopes. The resulting parameter values lead to agreement between the total number of protons in bound states and the charge number Z of the respective nucleus. The results of the calculations are indicative of a weakly magic character of the {sup 58}Zn nucleus, which has a traditional magic number of N = 28 and a nearly magic number of Z = 30, and the {sup 64}Ge nucleus, for which N = Z = 32.

  8. Discovery of 40Mg and 42Al suggests neutron drip-line slant towards heavier isotopes.

    PubMed

    Baumann, T; Amthor, A M; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Folden, C M; Gade, A; Ginter, T N; Hausmann, M; Matos, M; Morrissey, D J; Portillo, M; Schiller, A; Sherrill, B M; Stolz, A; Tarasov, O B; Thoennessen, M

    2007-10-25

    A fundamental question in nuclear physics is what combinations of neutrons and protons can make up a nucleus. Many hundreds of exotic neutron-rich isotopes have never been observed; the limit of how many neutrons a given number of protons can bind is unknown for all but the lightest elements, owing to the delicate interplay between single particle and collective quantum effects in the nucleus. This limit, known as the neutron drip line, provides a benchmark for models of the atomic nucleus. Here we report a significant advance in the determination of this limit: the discovery of two new neutron-rich isotopes--40Mg and 42Al--that are predicted to be drip-line nuclei. In the past, several attempts to observe 40Mg were unsuccessful; moreover, the observation of 42Al provides an experimental indication that the neutron drip line may be located further towards heavier isotopes in this mass region than is currently believed. In stable nuclei, attractive pairing forces enhance the stability of isotopes with even numbers of protons and neutrons. In contrast, the present work shows that nuclei at the drip line gain stability from an unpaired proton, which narrows the shell gaps and provides the opportunity to bind many more neutrons. PMID:17960237

  9. Spectroscopy of 28Na : Shell evolution toward the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepailleur, A.; Wimmer, K.; Mutschler, A.; Sorlin, O.; Thomas, J. C.; Bader, V.; Bancroft, C.; Barofsky, D.; Bastin, B.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Bildstein, V.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Brown, B. A.; Caceres, L.; Gade, A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Grévy, S.; Grinyer, G. F.; Iwasaki, H.; Khan, E.; Kröll, T.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Llidoo, O.; Lloyd, J.; Lunderberg, E.; Negoita, F.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Perdikakis, G.; Recchia, F.; Redpath, T.; Roger, T.; Rotaru, F.; Saenz, S.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Smalley, D.; Sohler, D.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroberg, S. R.; Vandebrouck, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Westerberg, A.

    2015-11-01

    Excited states have been studied in 28Na using the β -decay of implanted 28Ne ions at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds/LISE as well as the in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory/S800 facility. New states of positive (Jπ=3+,4+ ) and negative (Jπ=1--5- ) parity are proposed. The former arise from the coupling between 0 d5 /2 protons and 0 d3 /2 neutrons, while the latter are attributable to couplings of 0 d5 /2 protons with 1 p3 /2 or 0 f7 /2 neutrons. While the relative energies between the Jπ=1+-4+ states are well reproduced with the USDA interaction in the N =17 isotones, a progressive shift in the ground-state binding energy (by about 500 keV) is observed between 26F and 30Al . This points to a possible change in the proton-neutron 0 d5 /2 -0 d3 /2 effective interaction when moving from stability to the drip line. The presence of Jπ=1--4- negative-parity states around 1.5 MeV as well as of a candidate for a Jπ=5- state around 2.5 MeV give further support to the collapse of the N =20 gap and to the inversion between the neutron 0 f7 /2 and 1 p3 /2 levels below Z =12 . These features are discussed in the framework of shell-model and energy-density-functional calculations, leading to predicted negative-parity states in the low-energy spectra of the 26F and 25O nuclei.

  10. Decay studies of nuclei near the proton drip line: /sup 35/Ca, /sup 31/Ar, /sup 69/Br, /sup 65/As

    SciTech Connect

    Reiff, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    Studies of new beta-delayed two-proton emitters and a search for ground state proton radioactivity in medium mass nuclei were performed using various experimental techniques in conjunction with several detection systems. A helium-jet transport system and three-element silicon telescopes were used to discover the existence and detect the decay of the first T/sub Z/ = /minus/5/2 nuclide, /sup 35/Ca. Two-proton emission from the T = 5/2 isobaric analog state in /sup 35/K at an excitation energy of 9.053 /plus minus/ 0.045 MeV, fed by the superallowed beta decay of /sup 35/Ca, resulted in transitions to both the ground state and first excited state of /sup 33/Cl. The corresponding two-proton sum energies were 4.089 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV and 3.287 /plus minus/ 0.030 MeV. Measurements of the individual proton energies indicated the prevalence of a sequential decay mechanism. Using the isobaric multiplet mass equation, the mass excess of /sup 35/Ca was calculated to be 4.453 /plus minus/ 0.060 MeV. In order to study whose half-lives were too short for the helium-jet system, an in-beam recoil catcher wheel was constructed. The wheel speed can be varied to study nuclides whose half-lives range from 100 /mu/s to /approximately/250 ms. The first new decay observed with the wheel system and traditional /Delta/E-E telescopes was the beta-delayed two-proton emission from /sup 31/Ar. The two-proton sum energy of /approximately/7.5 MeV corresponds to a transition from the isobaric analog state in /sup 31/Cl to the ground state of /sup 29/P. The search for proton radioactivity required the development of low energy, particle identification detector telescopes. These telescopes, comprised of a gas /Delta/E and silicon E, were used in conjunction with the in-beam recoil catcher wheel to search for ground state proton emission from /sup 69/Br and /sup 65/As. 90 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Breakup Reactions of Neutron Drip Line Nuclei Near N=20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Coulomb breakup at intermediate energies is a useful experimental tool for investigating the microscopic structure of neutron drip-line nuclei. Here, results from the inclusive Coulomb breakup experiment of 31Ne on a lead target at RIBF(RI Beam Factory) at RIKEN are presented. The experiment was performed as one of day-one campaign experiments at RIBF, using a 48Ca primary beam at 345 MeV/nucleon. A unique feature of a halo nucleus is the enhanced electric dipole strength of the order of 1 W.u.(Weisskopf unit) at very low excitation energies around 1 MeV (soft E1 excitation). Owing to high sensitivity of the Coulomb breakup to the soft E1 excitation, a measurement of inclusive Coulomb breakup cross section can be used to identify the halo structure of a certain drip-line nucleus. We have indeed observed a strong enhancement of the Coulomb breakup cross section of 540(70) mb for 31Ne on Pb at 230 MeV/nucleon, nearly as high as that for the known halo nucleus 19C, thereby giving evidence of the halo structure in 31Ne. The finding of a new halo structure for such a heavy system, compared to the known halo nuclei, is the first step for the understanding of halo phenomena along the neutron drip line towards heavier nuclei. We discuss also the change of shell structure in 31Ne, as a nucleus in the island of inversion.

  12. The nuclear shell model toward the drip lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Sieja, K.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the 'islands of inversion' that occur when approaching the neutron drip line around the magic numbers N=20, N=28 and N=40 in the framework of the interacting shell model in very large valence spaces. We explain these configuration inversions (and the associated shape transitions) as the result of the competition between the spherical mean field (monopole) that favors magicity and the correlations (multipole) that favor deformed intruder states. We also show that the N=20 and N=28 islands are in reality a single one, which for the magnesium isotopes is limited by N=18 and N=32.

  13. Dispersive optical potential for nuclei with N and Z values changing toward the nucleon drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalova, O. V. Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I.

    2015-01-15

    A method for constructing dispersive optical potentials is proposed for calculating single-particle energies in isotopic chains of spherical and nearly spherical nuclei up to nucleon drip lines. The potential of this method is demonstrated by calculating the neutron and proton single-particle energies in calcium, nickel, and zirconium isotopes. The results agree well with experimental data available for stable isotopes. Predictive calculations of single-particle spectra are performed for isotopes lying far from the beta-stability valley. A comparison of the results with the energies of nucleon separation from nuclei of mass number A and A+1 revealed features of the single-particle spectrum that are characteristic of nuclei containing classical and nonclassical magic numbers of nucleons.

  14. Nucleus 26O: A Barely Unbound System beyond the Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, R.; Minakata, R.; Ogoshi, S.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Aumann, T.; Baba, H.; Delaunay, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Gibelin, J.; Hwang, J. W.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kanno, D.; Kim, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Leblond, S.; Lee, J.; Marqués, F. M.; Motobayashi, T.; Murai, D.; Murakami, T.; Muto, K.; Nakashima, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Navin, A.; Nishi, S.; Otsu, H.; Sato, H.; Satou, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takeda, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Togano, Y.; Tuff, A. G.; Vandebrouck, M.; Yoneda, K.

    2016-03-01

    The unbound nucleus 26O has been investigated using invariant-mass spectroscopy following one-proton removal reaction from a 27F beam at 201 MeV /nucleon . The decay products, 2424 and two neutrons, were detected in coincidence using the newly commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 26O ground-state resonance was found to lie only 18 ±3 (stat )±4 (syst ) keV above threshold. In addition, a higher lying level, which is most likely the first 2+ state, was observed for the first time at 1.28-0.08+0.11 MeV above threshold. Comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that three-nucleon forces, p f -shell intruder configurations, and the continuum are key elements to understanding the structure of the most neutron-rich oxygen isotopes beyond the drip line.

  15. Nucleus ^{26}O: A Barely Unbound System beyond the Drip Line.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, R; Minakata, R; Ogoshi, S; Orr, N A; Achouri, N L; Aumann, T; Baba, H; Delaunay, F; Doornenbal, P; Fukuda, N; Gibelin, J; Hwang, J W; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Kameda, D; Kanno, D; Kim, S; Kobayashi, N; Kobayashi, T; Kubo, T; Leblond, S; Lee, J; Marqués, F M; Motobayashi, T; Murai, D; Murakami, T; Muto, K; Nakashima, T; Nakatsuka, N; Navin, A; Nishi, S; Otsu, H; Sato, H; Satou, Y; Shimizu, Y; Suzuki, H; Takahashi, K; Takeda, H; Takeuchi, S; Togano, Y; Tuff, A G; Vandebrouck, M; Yoneda, K

    2016-03-11

    The unbound nucleus ^{26}O has been investigated using invariant-mass spectroscopy following one-proton removal reaction from a ^{27}F beam at 201  MeV/nucleon. The decay products, ^{24}O and two neutrons, were detected in coincidence using the newly commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The ^{26}O ground-state resonance was found to lie only 18±3(stat)±4(syst)  keV above threshold. In addition, a higher lying level, which is most likely the first 2^{+} state, was observed for the first time at 1.28_{-0.08}^{+0.11}  MeV above threshold. Comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that three-nucleon forces, pf-shell intruder configurations, and the continuum are key elements to understanding the structure of the most neutron-rich oxygen isotopes beyond the drip line. PMID:27015476

  16. Odd-even staggering in neutron drip line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, S. A.; Qi, Chong

    2016-07-01

    We have done systematic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations in coordinate space on the one-quasi-particle energies and binding energy odd-even staggering (OES) in semi-magic nuclei with the zero-range volume, mixed and surface pairing forces in order to explore the influence of their density dependence. The odd-N isotopes are calculated within the blocking scheme. The strengths for the pairing forces are determined in two schemes by fitting locally to reproduce pairing gap in 120Sn and globally to all available data on the OES of semi-magic nuclei with Z ≥ 8. In the former calculations, there is a noticeable difference between the neutron mean gaps in neutron-rich O, Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes calculated with the surface pairing and those with the mixed and volume pairing. The difference gets much smaller if the globally optimized pairing strengths are employed. The heavier Pb isotopes show the opposite trend. Moreover, large differences between the mean gap and the OES may be expected in both calculations when one goes towards the neutron drip line.

  17. Neutron drip line and the equation of state of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kei; Koura, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    We investigate how the neutron drip line is related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy by using a macroscopic nuclear model that allows us to calculate nuclear masses in a way that is dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron drip line obtained from these masses is shown to appreciably shift to a neutron-rich side in a nuclear chart as the density derivative of the symmetry energy increases. Such a shift is clearly seen for light nuclei, a feature coming mainly from the surface property of neutron-rich nuclei.

  18. Optimizing fumigation efficiency by doubling drip line number and using low permeability film in raised-bed production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern California strawberries are planted in raised-beds covered by polyethylene (PE) film and typically are irrigated with two drip lines placed near the bed surface. To control soil-borne pests, fumigants are commonly applied through the drip lines prior to transplanting strawberries, but effic...

  19. Probing the maximally deformed light rare-earth region around the drip-line nucleus 130Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, M.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gros, S.; McGuirk, B. M.; Scraggs, H. C.; Turk, G.; Rossé, B.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Schmitt, Ch; Stézowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph; DeFrance, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Prévost, A.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G.

    2006-07-01

    The neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei of the A~130 region are of particular interest since highly deformed prolate ground states are expected. Indeed these nuclei are predicted to show maximal ground-state deformations of β2 ~ 0.40 (axis ratio of 3:2), comparable to the deformation deduced for superdeformed cerium isotopes at high spin. A fusion-evaporation experiment was performed with radioactive ion beams at GANIL in October 2004 which had the goal to reach very proton-rich exotic nuclei located near the proton drip-line. A radioactive 76Kr beam, delivered by the SPIRAL facility, was used to bombard a thin 58Ni target. Emitted γ-rays were detected by the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer which was, for the first time, coupled with both the DIAMANT charged-particle array and the VAMOS spectrometer.

  20. Drip Line Flushing with Chlorine May Not Be Effective in Reducing Bacterial Loads in Irrigation Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Mary Theresa; Marine, Sasha C; Everts, Kathryne L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2016-06-01

    Irrigation water distribution systems are used to supply water to produce crops, but the system may also provide a protected environment for the growth of human pathogens present in irrigation water. In this study, the effects of drip tape installation depth and sanitization on the microbial quality of irrigation groundwater were evaluated. Drip tape lines were installed on the soil surface or 5 or 10 cm below the soil surface. Water samples were collected from the irrigation source and the end of each drip line every 2 weeks over an 11-week period, and the levels of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, aerobic mesophilic bacteria, and enterococci were quantified. Half of the lines installed at each depth were flushed with sodium hypochlorite for 1 h during week 6 to achieve a residual of 10 ppm at the end of the line. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.01) effect of drip tape installation depth and sanitizer application on the recovery of E. coli, with increased levels measured at the 5-cm depth and in nonsanitized lines, although the levels were at the limit of detection, potentially confounding the results. There was no significant effect of drip tape depth on total coliforms, aerobic mesophiles, or enterococci. In contrast, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in the recovery of total coliforms was recorded from the ends of lines that received chlorine. This may be indicative of shedding of cells owing to degradation of biofilms that formed on the inner walls of the lines. These findings emphasize the need to better understand conditions that may lead to corrosion and increases in bacterial loads inside drip lines during flushing. Recommendations to growers should suggest collecting groundwater samples for testing at the end of drip lines rather than at the source. Guidelines on flushing drip lines with chlorine may need to include water pH monitoring, a parameter that influences the corrosive properties of chlorine. PMID:27296607

  1. Establishment of HIV-1 model cell line GHOST(3) with stable DRiP78 and NHERF1 knockdown

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Lin; HUANG, Xu-He; ZHOU, Ping-Ping; YU, Guo-Long; YAN, Jin; QIN, Bing; YAN, Xin-Ge; DIAO, Li-Mei; LIN, Peng; KUANG, Yi-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 are indispensable co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into host cells. In our previous study, we identified that dopamine receptor-interacting protein 78 (DRiP78) and Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) are the CXCR4 and CCR5 homo- or hetero-dimer-interacting proteins. DRiP78 and NHERF1 are able to influence the co-receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking. Over-expression of NHERF1 affects the ligands or HIV-1 gp120-induced CCR5 internalization and HIV-1 production. It is reasonable to speculate that DRiP78 and NHERF1, as well as the signaling pathways involved in viral replication, would probably affect HIV-1 replication through regulating the co-receptors. In this present study, we designed two short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the DRiP78 and NHERF1, respectively, and constructed the pLenti6/BLOCK-iT-DEST lentiviral plasmids expressing DRiP78 or NHERF1 shRNA. The packaged lentiviruses were used to transduce the widely-applied HIV-1 model cell line GHOST(3). Then, cells with stable knockdown were established through selecting transduced cells with Blasticidin. This study, for the first time, reported the establishment of the GHOST(3) with DRiP78 and NHERF1 knockdown, which is the first stable cell line with HIV-1 co-receptor-interacting molecular defects. PMID:26018859

  2. Production of drip-line nuclei at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Atsumi

    2014-09-01

    Production cross-sections and secondary-beam yields of very neutron rich nuclei near neutron drip-line at 200--250 MeV/u have been investigated at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). RIBF is the next generation RI beam facility, which can produce a variety of exotic nuclei with high intensity. The measurement of production yields of 19B, 22C, which are located on the neutron drip-line, and neighboring isotopes was made on the occasion of the Coulomb and nuclear breakup experiments of these halo nuclei at SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyzer for MUlti-particle from RAdioIsotope beams) facility at RIBF. We used 345 MeV/u 48Ca beam as primary beam, which impinged on 30 mm-thick Be target, to obtain secondary beams by projectile fragmentation. The projectile fragments were then separated through Superconducting RI beam separator BigRIPS, and were identified by measuring time of flight (TOF), energy loss (ΔE), and magnetic rigidity (Bρ) by the standard detectors at 2nd stage of BigRIPS. We thus obtained production cross-sections and yields of carbon and boron isotopes. The production cross-sections and yields extracted were compared with the simulation code LISE using EPAX. We discuss these results and comparisons in this poster presentation.

  3. Pygmy dipole mode in deformed neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the low-lying isovector-dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich {sup 36,38,40}Mg close to the drip line by means of the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the local pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying bump structure above the neutron emission-threshold energy develops when the drip line is approached, and that the isovector dipole strength at E{sub x}<10 MeV exhausts about 6.0% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule in {sup 40}Mg. We obtained the collective dipole modes at around 8-10 MeV in Mg isotopes, that consist of many two-quasiparticle excitations of the neutron. The transition density clearly shows an oscillation of the neutron skin against the isoscalar core. We found significant coupling effects between the dipole and octupole excitation modes due to the nuclear deformation. It is also found that the responses for the compressional dipole and isoscalar octupole excitations are much enhanced in the lower energy region.

  4. Neutron drip line in odd and even mass calcium and nickel nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Gangopadhyay, G.

    2005-10-01

    Neutron-rich Ca and Ni nuclei have been studied in a spherical relativistic mean-field formalism in coordinate space. A δ interaction has been adopted to treat the pairing correlations for the neutrons. Odd nuclei have been treated in the blocking approximation. The effect of the positive-energy continuum and the role of pairing in the stability of nuclei have been investigated by use of the resonant-BCS approach. In Ca isotopes, N=50 is no longer a magic number, whereas in Ni nuclei, a new magic number emerges at N=70. There is a remarkable difference in the relative positions of the drip lines for odd and even isotopes. In Ca isotopes, the last bound even and odd nuclei are found to be 72Ca and 59Ca, respectively. In Ni isotopes, the corresponding nuclei are 98Ni and 97Ni, respectively. The origin of this difference in relative positions of the drip line in even and odd isotopes in the two chains is traced to the difference in the single-particle level structures and consequent modification in the magic numbers in the two elements. Pairing interaction is seen to play a major role. The effect of the width of the resonance states on pairing has also been investigated.

  5. Evolution of pre-collective nuclei: Structural signatures near the drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that the phenomenology of single-magic and near-magic nuclei has universal characteristics analogous to those of collective nuclei and that, moreover, this phenomenology attaches smoothly to that describing collective nuclei. This has led to a number of new signatures of structure as well as to a new, tripartite, classification of nuclear structure that embraces the gamut of structures from magic, through pre-collective, to fully collective and rotational nuclei. Aside from the natural appeal of simple global correlations of collective observables, these results have particular significance for soon-to-be accessible exotic nuclei near the drip lines since they rely on only the simplest-to-obtain data, in particular, the energies of just the first two excited states, E(4{sub 1}{sup +}) and E(2{sub 1}{sup +}), of even-even nuclei, and the B(E2:2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +}) value. Indeed, without the need for more extensive level schemes, these basic data alone can reveal information about the goodness of seniority, about the validity of pair-addition mode relationships of adjacent even-even nuclei, about underlying shell structure (validity of magic numbers) and even about the shell model potential itself (e.g., the strengths of the l{center_dot} and l{sup 2} terms).

  6. Properties of drip-line nuclei with an m-scheme cluster-orbital shell model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, Hiroshi; Katō, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2011-09-01

    In the drip-line region of oxygen isotopes, an abrupt increase of the r.m.s.radius of 23O is observed from the analysis of the reaction cross section. We develop an m-scheme approach of COSM and perform calculations for oxygen isotopes. We examine the interaction dependence to the calculated energies and r.m.s.radii. Further, the relation between the density and nucleon-nucleon interaction is discussed.

  7. Study of drip-line nuclei with a core plus multi-valence nucleon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, H.; Myo, T.; Katō, K.; Ikeda, K.

    2005-09-01

    We study neutron- and proton-rich nuclei with an extended cluster-orbital shell model (COSM) approach, which we call Neo-COSM. The binding energies and r.m.s. radii of oxygen isotopes are reproduced. For N = 8 isotones, the tendency of the abrupt increase of the r.m.s. radii is qualitatively improved.

  8. Beyond the neutron drip line: The unbound oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesar, C.; Simonis, J.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, M.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Heinz, A.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Holt, J. D.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Maroussov, V.; Menéndez, J.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Perea, A.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Schwenk, A.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zoric, M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-09-01

    The very neutron-rich oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unbound states are populated in an experiment performed at the R3B-LAND setup at GSI via proton-knockout reactions from 26F and 27F at relativistic energies around 442 and 414 MeV/nucleon, respectively. From the kinematically complete measurement of the decay into 24O plus one or two neutrons, the 25O ground-state energy and width are determined, and upper limits for the 26O ground-state energy and lifetime are extracted. In addition, the results provide indications for an excited state in 26O at around 4 MeV. The experimental findings are compared to theoretical shell-model calculations based on chiral two- and three-nucleon (3N) forces, including for the first time residual 3N forces, which are shown to be amplified as valence neutrons are added.

  9. Linking Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure on the Way to the Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, Willem

    2012-10-01

    The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied on data from the (e,e'p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The dispersive optical model (DOM), originally conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. The DOM provides the starting point to provide a framework in which nuclear reactions and structure data can be analyzed consistently to provide unambiguous spectroscopic information including its asymmetry dependence. Recent extensions of this approach include the treatment of non-locality to describe experimental data like the nuclear charge density based on information of the spectral density below the Fermi energy, the application of the DOM ingredients to the description of transfer reactions, a comparison of the microscopic content of the nucleon self-energy based on Faddeev-RPA calculations emphasizing long-range correlations with DOM potentials, and a study of the relation between a self-energy which includes the effect of short-range correlations with DOM potentials. The most recent Dom implementation currently in progress abandons the constraint of local potentials completely to allow an accurate description of various properties of the nuclear ground state.

  10. Solar gamma-ray lines and interplanetary solar protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, M.

    1985-03-01

    Solar gamma-ray lines and protons were simultaneously observed for six flares on April 1, 4, and 27, 1981, May 13, 1981, February 1, 1982, and June 6, 1982 by the Hinotori and Himawari satellites. The flare list is presented, and the time histories of gamma-rays and protons are shown. The relationship between the gamma-ray line fluences and peak proton fluxes for these flares does not reveal an apparent correlation between them. The present results imply that the protons producing gamma-ray lines in the flare region, and protons observed near the earth, do not always belong to the same population, and favor the downward streaming model for the gamma-ray line production.

  11. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  12. 7 CFR 2902.60 - Turbine drip oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine drip oils. 2902.60 Section 2902.60... Items § 2902.60 Turbine drip oils. (a) Definition. Products that are lubricants for use in drip lubrication systems for water well line shaft bearings, water turbine bearings for irrigation pumps, and...

  13. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  14. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  15. Surface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, surface drip irrigation has been used to irrigation high value vegetable crops. In recent years, surface drip of row crops has been increasing throughout the United States. Surface drip irrigation can precisely deliver water and nutrients to the crop root zone. This article provides ...

  16. Beam optics of the 2 MeV proton injection line at the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    Simulations of the beam optics of the LLUMC proton accelerator injection line have been modeled using the computer codes Parmila [Los Alamos Nat'l Lab, Internal Report LA-UR-98-4478, Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group, Los Alamos, NM] and Trace 3D [Distributed by AccelSoft Inc, P.O. Box 2813. Del Mar, CA 92014, United States]. These simulations give reasonable agreement with the known accelerator dispersion, beam energy spread and optimal debuncher setting. The purpose of this paper is to understand the beam losses and show where improvements can be made, if required, in the future. It has previously been found [G. Coutrakon et al., J. Med. Phys. 20 (11) (1994) 1691] that most intensity losses in the synchrotron can be ascribed to the narrow energy acceptance of the synchrotron. While the present intensity of the accelerator is quite adequate for patient treatments, future plans to treat larger fields will make higher intensity more desirable. A simulation has been performed which adds a second debuncher, or energy compactor, which shows a reduction in energy spread by a factor of two yielding a factor of two increase in the available intensity. The present intensity of 2.5 × 1010 protons per pulse with 34% of the injected intensity captured in the ring can possibly be improved to 5 × 1010 protons per pulse by capturing 68% of the injected beam intensity. These results are discussed in this paper.

  17. Probing the Collective Degrees of Freedom at the Proton Drip Line in the Extremely Neutron Deficient {sup 172}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sandzelius, M.; Cederwall, B.; Hadinia, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Ganioglu, E.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Excited states in the extremely neutron-deficient isotope {sup 172}Hg have been established for the first time. The {sup 96}Ru({sup 78}Kr,2n) reaction was employed to populate excited states in {sup 172}Hg with a cross section {sigma}{approx_equal} 15 nb. The highly selective Recoil-Decay Tagging (RDT) technique was used to obtain clean in-beam {gamma}-ray spectra for {sup 172}Hg. The yrast ground-state band has tentatively been established up to I = 6h-bar. The data have been interpreted within the framework of total Routhian surface and quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations. In addition to the well-known features of shape coexistence previously observed in light Hg isotopes, the systematic trends in the energy of the yrast 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states in the chain of Hg isotopes indicate a pronounced vibrational collectivity which is reduced in strength, but at the same time shows a higher degree of harmonicity, as the neutron number decreases below the neutron midshell.

  18. Irrigation and fertigation with drip and alternative micro irrigation systems in northern highbush blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of nitrogen (N) fertigation using conventional drip and alternative micro irrigation systems were evaluated in six cultivars of northern highbush blueberry. The drip system consisted of two laterals of drip tubing, with 2 L/h in-line emitters (point source) spaced every 0.45 m, on each s...

  19. Search for Two-Proton Emitters at FRS-GSI

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuetzner, M.

    2000-12-31

    A project of studying proton drip-line nuclei in vicinity of {sup 48}Ni, running at GSI Darmstadt, is shortly reviewed. Prospects for spectroscopy studies on {sup 45}Fe, presently identified as the best candidate for the 2p radioactivity, are briefly discussed.

  20. Atlas Breached Waste Package and Drip Shield Experiments: Breached Drip Shield Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Z. P. Walton

    2003-05-28

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) represents one system in the performance of the Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository to isolate and prevent the transport of radionuclides from the site to the accessible environment. Breached Waste Package and Drip Shield Experiments (BWPDSE) were performed at the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Support Facility in North Las Vegas, NV in the A-1 lowbay between May 2, 2002 and July 25, 2002. Data collected from the BWPDSE will be used to support the flux splitting model used in Analysis and Modeling Report ANL-WIS-PA-000001 REV 00 ICN 03 ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2001a). Tests were conducted by dripping water from heights representing the drift crown or wall on a full-scale section of a drip shield with both smooth and rough surfaces. The drip shields had machined square breaches that represent the general corrosion breaches or nodes in the ''WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip Shield Degradation'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000d). Tests conducted during the BWPDSE included: initial tests to determine the splash radius distances and spread factor from the line of drip impact, single patch tests to determine the amount of water collected in target breaches from splashing or rivulet flow, multiple patch tests to determine the amount of water collected in several breaches from both splashing and rivulet flow, and bounding flow rate tests. Supplemental data were collected to provide additional information for rivulet spread, pan evaporation in the test chamber, and water temperatures of the input water and drip shield surface water. The primary flow mechanism observed on both smooth and rough surfaces was rivulet flow, not film flow. Lateral rivulet spread distances were, in general, wider on the smooth drip shield surface than on the rough drip shield surface. There were substantial differences between the mechanisms of rivulet formation and movement on

  1. THEORY OF PROTON EMITTERS

    SciTech Connect

    P. TALOU

    2000-08-01

    Modern theoretical methods used to interpret recent experimental data on ground-state proton emission near the proton drip line are reviewed. Most of them are stationary and are aimed to compute proton decay widths {Gamma}{sub p} only. Comparison is made between these approaches before being compared to experimental data. Our time-dependent approach based on the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) for initial quasi-stationary single-proton states is then introduced. It is shown that much deeper insights into the physics of this clean multidimensional quantum tunneling effect can be accessed, and that in addition to {Gamma}{sub p}, other physical quantities could be tested experimentally, offering new stringent tests on nuclear physics models away from the valley of {beta}-stability. Finally, the necessity of using the TDSE approach in more complex, dynamical, problems is demonstrated.

  2. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  3. Limits of observable proton-emitting nuclei between the N=82 and Z=82 shell closures

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.

    2011-01-15

    The regular systematic behavior of Q{sub p} values is analyzed to provide a basis for estimating Q values for as yet unknown proton and {alpha} decays. These estimates are used in predicting partial half-lives for proton and {alpha}-particle emission from states in Ta, Re, Ir, and Au nuclei beyond the proton drip line. The implications of these predictions for further experimental study in this region are discussed.

  4. Improvements to the on-line mass separator, RAMA, and the beta-delayed charged-particle emission of proton-rich sd shell nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ognibene, T.J.

    1996-03-01

    To overcome the extreme difficulties encountered in the experimental decay studies of proton drip line nuclei, several techniques have been utilized, including a helium-jet transport system, particle identification detectors and mass separation. Improvements to the ion source/extraction region of the He-jet coupled on-line Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer (RAMA) and its target/ion source coupling resulted in significant increases in RAMA efficiencies and its mass resolution, as well as reductions in the overall transit time. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, the decays of {sup 31}Cl, {sup 27}P and {sup 28}P, with half-lives of 150 msec, 260 msec and 270.3 msec, respectively, were examined using a he-jet and low-energy gas {Delta}E-gas {Delta}E-silicon E detector telescopes. Total beta-delayed proton branches of 0.3% and 0.07% in {sup 31}Cl and {sub 27}P, respectively, were estimated. Several proton peaks that had been previously assigned to the decay of {sup 31}Cl were shown to be from the decay of {sup 25}Si. In {sup 27}P, two proton groups at 459 {+-} 14 keV and 610 {+-} 11 keV, with intensities of 7 {+-} 3% and 92 {+-} 4% relative to the main (100%) group were discovered. The Gamow-Teller component of the preceding beta-decay of each observed proton transition was compared to results from shell model calculations. Finally, a new proton transition was identified, following the {beta}-decay of {sup 28}P, at 1,444 {+-} 12 keV with a 1.7 {+-} 0.5% relative intensity to the 100% group. Using similar low-energy detector telescopes and the mass separator TISOL at TRIUMF, the 109 msec and 173 msec activities, {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar, were studied. A new proton group with energy 729 {+-} 15 keV was observed following the beta-decay of {sup 17}Ne. Several discrepancies between earlier works as to the energies, intensities and assignments of several proton transitions from {sup 17}Ne and {sup 33}Ar were resolved.

  5. Dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy using beam on-line PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    Proton therapy is one form of radiotherapy in which the irradiation can be concentrated on a tumor using a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair annihilation gamma rays from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reaction of irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the irradiation target using a positron emission tomography (PET) apparatus, and dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy (DGPT) can thereby be achieved using PET images. In the proton treatment room, a beam ON-LINE PET system (BOLPs) was constructed so that a PET apparatus of the planar-type with a high spatial resolution of about 2 mm was mounted with the field of view covering the isocenter of the beam irradiation system. The position and intensity of activity were measured using the BOLPs immediately after the proton irradiation of a gelatinous water target containing {sup 16}O nuclei at different proton irradiation energy levels. The change of the activity-distribution range against the change of the physical range was observed within 2 mm. The experiments of proton irradiation to a rabbit and the imaging of the activity were performed. In addition, the proton beam energy used to irradiate the rabbit was changed. When the beam condition was changed, the difference between the two images acquired from the measurement of the BOLPs was confirmed to clearly identify the proton-irradiated volume.

  6. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  7. Static and dynamic aspect of covariant density functional theory in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2007-11-30

    Proton rich nuclei are investigated in the framework of Covariant Density Functional Theory (CDFT). The Relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (RHB) model is used to study the proton drip line in the region of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The dynamical behavior of nuclei with a large proton excess is studied within the Relativistic Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (RQRPA). Low lying El-strength is observed and it is shown that it corresponds to an oscillation of the proton skin against the isospin saturated neutron-proton core. This mode is in full analogy to the neutron pygmy resonances found in many nuclei with neutron excess.

  8. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  9. Status of the proton and electron transfer lines for the AWAKE Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. S.; Bauche, J.; Biskup, B.; Bracco, C.; Doebert, S.; Goddard, B.; Gschwendtner, E.; Jensen, L. K.; Jones, O. R.; Mazzoni, S.; Meddahi, M.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Velotti, F. M.; Vorozhtsov, A.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE project at CERN is planned to study proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration with an externally injected electron beam. Therefore two transfer lines are being designed in order to provide the proton beam from the SPS and the electron beam from an RF gun to the plasma cell. The commissioning of the proton line will take place in 2016 for the first phase of the experiment, which is focused on the self-modulation of a 12 cm long proton bunch in the plasma. The electron line will be added for the second phase of AWAKE in 2017, when the wakefield will be probed with an electron beam of 10-20 MeV/c. The challenge for these transfer lines lies in the parallel operation of the proton, electron and laser beam used to ionize the plasma and seed the self-modulation. These beams, of different characteristics, need to be synchronized and positioned for optimized injection conditions into the wakefield. This task requires great flexibility in the transfer line optics. The status of these designs will be presented in this paper.

  10. Line Narrowing in Solid-State Proton NMR with Acquisition Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, B. M.; Tong, Tat-Hung; Dollase, Thilo; Magnuson, Matthew L.

    Organic solids have extensive proton-proton dipolar interactions, and their 1H NMR linewidths are very large even with magic-angle spinning at moderate speeds. Recently it has been shown that substantial narrowing of the proton linewidths of organic solids can be achieved by using single-pulse excitation with acquisition delay or spin echo [S. Ding and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson. A111, 212 (1994); 115, 141 (1995); 117, 171 (1995)]. This interesting line-narrowing phenomenon has been further examined through the study of several amino acids, their deuterated analogs, and some aromatic compounds. The results confirm that narrow proton peaks are observed with long acquisition delay, and the peaks appear in the appropriate chemical-shift ranges for organic protons (0-10 ppm with respect to tetramethylsilane). However, except for some special cases, the observed peaks cannot be assigned to individual types of protons based on chemical-shift considerations only. To explore the reason for the line narrowing, the effect of acquisition delay on the 19F linewidth of CaF 2was also studied and compared with that on the 1H linewidths of organic solids. It is suggested that the broad proton peak in an organic solid is a superposition of numerous transitions. These transitions have different linewidths, and the narrow peaks in the spectrum remain observable with long acquisition delays.

  11. Importance of Coriolis interaction and pseudo-spin doublets in deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Lidia S.; Costa Lopes, M.; Maglione, Enrico

    2006-04-26

    Theoretical aspects in the calculation of the half lives for proton decay from deformed nuclei lying beyond the proton drip line are discussed. The presence of pseudo-spin doublets close to the Fermi energy depends strongly on the parameterization of the single particle mean field. The calculation of the decay widths from these states, is very sensitive to the Coriolis coupling, and the pairing residual interaction cannot be ignored in these studies, for a correct interpretation of data.

  12. Drip irrigation research update at NPRL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drip irrigation research has been conducted since 1998 at NPRL. Systems include deep subsurface drip irrigation (SSDI), surface drip irrigation (SDI), and shallow subsurface drip irrigation (S3DI). Results have shown that SDI and S3DI are more economical to install than SSDI. SDI systems have more r...

  13. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  14. Design summary of the magnet support structures for the proton storage ring injection line upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Ledford, J.E.; Smith, B.G.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes the technical engineering and design issues associated with the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) Injection Line upgrade of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The main focus is on the engineering design calculations of several magnet support structures. The general procedure based upon a set number of design criteria is outlined, followed by a case-by-case summary of the engineering design analyses, reutilization or fabrication callouts and design safety factors.

  15. Fine structure in proton radioactivity: An accurate tool to ascertain the breaking of axial symmetry in {sup 145}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, P.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2008-10-15

    With a proper formalism for proton emission from triaxially deformed nuclei, we perform exact calculations of decay widths for the decays to ground and first excited 2{sup +} states in the daughter nucleus. Our results for rotational spectrum, decay width and fine structure in the case of the nucleus {sup 145}Tm lead for the first time to an accurate identification of triaxial deformation using proton emission. This work also puts in evidence the advantage of proton emission over the conventional probes to study nuclear structure at the proton drip-line.

  16. Identification of excited structures in proton unbound nuclei 173,175,177Au: shape co-existence and intruder bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K.; Ahmad, I.; Amro, H.; Cizewski, J. A.; Danchev, M.; Davids, C. N.; Hartley, D. J.; Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Ma, W. C.; Poli, G. L.; Ressler, J.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. B.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2001-07-01

    Excited states in the proton-unbound 173,175,177Au nuclei were identified for the first time. Level structures associated with three different shapes were observed in 175Au. While the yrast lines of 175Au and 177Au consist of a prolate band built upon the intruder 1/2+[660] (i13/2) proton orbital, no sign of collectivity was observed in the lighter 173Au isotope. Implications for the deformation associated with these structures are discussed with a focus on shape co-existence in the vicinity of the proton-drip line.

  17. Exotic modes of excitation in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Paar, N.

    2011-11-30

    The framework of relativistic energy density functional has been applied in description of excitation phenomena in nuclei close to the proton drip line. In particular, low-lying dipole excitations have been studied using relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation, based on effective Lagrangians with density dependent meson nucleon couplings. In the isovector dipole channel, the occurrence of pronounced low-lying dipole peaks is predicted, corresponding to the proton pygmy dipole resonance. Since this exotic mode still awaits its experimental confirmation, systematic calculations have been conducted within a pool of neutron deficient nuclei, in order to identify the best possible candidates for measurements.

  18. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  19. Direct mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes of Ge, As, Se, and Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G. F.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Audi, G.; Mittig, W.; Chartier, M.; Orr, N. A.; Lichtenthaler, R.; Angelique, J. C.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cunsolo, A.; Donzaud, C.; Foti, A.; Gillibert, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Lukyanov, S.; MacCormick, M.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Sherrill, B. M.; Stephan, C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Tassan-Got, L.; Vieira, D. J.; Villari, A. C.; Wouters, J. M.

    2002-04-01

    The masses of neutron-deficient nuclei close to the proton drip line are an important input for the rapid proton-capture process modeling above 56Ni. The measurement of the masses of proton-rich nuclei with 32<=Z<=35 has been made using a direct time-of-flight technique. The masses of the nuclides 66As,68Se, and 71Br are reported for the first time, with mass excesses of -51 500(680), -53 620(1000), and -57 060(570) keV being found. The masses agree well in most cases with the Audi-Wapstra systematics.

  20. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: on-line trace gas analysis at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Jordan, A.; Holzinger, R.; Prazeller, P.; Vogel, W.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-11-01

    A system for trace gas analysis using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been developed which allows for on-line measurements of components with concentrations as low as 1 ppb. The method is based on reactions of H3O+ ions, which perform non-dissociative proton transfer to most of the common organic trace constituents but do not react with any of the components present in clean air. Examples of analysis of breath taken from smokers and non-smokers as well as from patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, and of air in buildings as well as of ambient air taken at a road crossing demonstrate the wide range of applicability of this method. An enhanced level of acetonitrile in the breath is a most suitable indicator that a person is a smoker. Enhanced levels of propanol strongly indicate that a person has a severe liver deficiency.

  1. A new medium energy beam transport line for the proton injector of AGS-RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.; Briscoe, B.; Fite, J.; LoDestro, V.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2010-09-12

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a 750 keV medium energy beam transport line between the 201 MHz 750 keV proton RFQ and the 200 MeV Alvarez DTL is being modified to get a better transmission of the beam. Within a tight space, high field gradient quadrupoles (65 Tm) and newly designed steering magnets (6.5 mm in length) will be installed considering the cross-talk effects. Also a new half wave length 200 MHz buncher is being prepared. The beam commissioning will be done in this year. To enhance the performance of the proton linacs, the MEBT is being modified. New quadrupole magnets, steering magnets and a half wave length buncher as shown in Figure 7 will be installed and be commissioned soon.

  2. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Markowska, M.; Jex, C. N.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.; Acworth, R. I.; Baker, A.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ18O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  3. Evaporative cooling of speleothem drip water.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, M O; Rau, G C; Andersen, M S; Roshan, H; Rutlidge, H; Marjo, C E; Markowska, M; Jex, C N; Graham, P W; Mariethoz, G; Acworth, R I; Baker, A

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the first use of concurrent high-precision temperature and drip rate monitoring to explore what controls the temperature of speleothem forming drip water. Two contrasting sites, one with fast transient and one with slow constant dripping, in a temperate semi-arid location (Wellington, NSW, Australia), exhibit drip water temperatures which deviate significantly from the cave air temperature. We confirm the hypothesis that evaporative cooling is the dominant, but so far unattributed, control causing significant disequilibrium between drip water and host rock/air temperatures. The amount of cooling is dependent on the drip rate, relative humidity and ventilation. Our results have implications for the interpretation of temperature-sensitive, speleothem climate proxies such as δ(18)O, cave microecology and the use of heat as a tracer in karst. Understanding the processes controlling the temperature of speleothem-forming cave drip waters is vital for assessing the reliability of such deposits as archives of climate change. PMID:24895139

  4. Advances in Tagging Methods for Lifetimes of Isomeric- and Proton-Unbound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2008-11-11

    This paper summarises the programme of Recoil-isomer tagging that has been performed over the last ten years at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The nuclei studied lie in the mass 130-140 region of the Segre chart very close to the proton drip line. The evolution of the isomer character is seen to change from K-isomers, at N = 74, to shape-isomers in the gamma soft N = 77 nuclei to seniority-isomers around N = 82. The influence of the proton drip line on the N = 74 isomers and possible critical-point symmetries in the N = 77 nuclei are discussed and the latest results presented. Developments of the isomer-tagging technique, using large beam currents with a dual Multi-Wire Proportional Counter setup, and an Isomer-tagged Differential-Plunger setup are discussed along with a future programme of work at Jyvaeskylae.

  5. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.; Ciavola, G.

    2014-02-01

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  6. Improved design of proton source and low energy beam transport line for European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, L. Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Cheymol, B.; Ponton, A.; Galatà, A.; Patti, G.; Gozzo, A.; Lega, L.

    2014-02-15

    The design update of the European Spallation Source (ESS) accelerator is almost complete and the construction of the prototype of the microwave discharge ion source able to provide a proton beam current larger than 70 mA to the 3.6 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) started. The source named PS-ESS (Proton Source for ESS) was designed with a flexible magnetic system and an extraction system able to merge conservative solutions with significant advances. The ESS injector has taken advantage of recent theoretical updates and new plasma diagnostics tools developed at INFN-LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). The design strategy considers the PS-ESS and the low energy beam transport line as a whole, where the proton beam behaves like an almost neutralized non-thermalized plasma. Innovative solutions have been used as hereinafter described. Thermo-mechanical optimization has been performed to withstand the chopped beam and the misaligned focused beam over the RFQ input collimator; the results are reported here.

  7. Two-proton radioactivity of 45Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Grigorenko, L.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, Mustafa; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2009-01-01

    In an experiment at the SISSI-LISE3 facility of GANIL, the decay of the proton drip line nucleus 45Fe has been studied. Fragment-implantation events have been correlated with radioactive decay events in a 16x16 pixel silicon-strip detector. The decay-energy spectrum of 45Fe implants shows a distinct peak at (1.14+/-0.04) MeV with a half-life of T(1/2)=(4.7(+3.4)(-1.4)) ms. None of the events in this peak is in coincidence with beta particles. For a longer correlation interval, daughter decays of the two-proton daughter 43Cr can be observed after 45Fe implantation. The decay energy for 45Fe agrees nicely with several theoretical predictions for two-proton radioactivity.

  8. First experimental results of motion mitigation by continuous line scanning of protons.

    PubMed

    Schätti, A; Meer, D; Lomax, A J

    2014-10-01

    Mitigation of organ motion in active, scanning proton therapy is a challenge. One of the easiest methods to implement is re-scanning, where a treatment plan is applied several times with accordingly smaller weights. As a consequence, motion effects are averaged out. For discrete spot scanning, a major drawback of this method is the treatment time, which increases linearly with the number of re-scans. Continuous line scanning, on the other hand, eliminates the dead time between the positioning of each beam, and in this work, continuous line scanning has been investigated experimentally from the point of view of dose, penumbral width and its effectiveness for re-scanning. As shown by measurements in a homogeneous phantom, dose distributions delivered by continuous line scanning were comparable with those of discrete spot scanning for both geometric and realistic targets, with only a modest degradation of lateral penumbra in the direction of scanning. In addition, delivered dose levels have also been found to agree well between discrete and line scanning. With continuous line scanning, however, more re-scans could be applied without the artefacts seen in discrete spot scanning, with motions of up to 1 cm peak-to-peak amplitude being mitigated by 10 re-scans. For larger motion, in the interest of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue re-scanning should be combined with other motion mitigation techniques such as gating or breath-hold. PMID:25197938

  9. First experimental results of motion mitigation by continuous line scanning of protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schätti, A.; Meer, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2014-10-01

    Mitigation of organ motion in active, scanning proton therapy is a challenge. One of the easiest methods to implement is re-scanning, where a treatment plan is applied several times with accordingly smaller weights. As a consequence, motion effects are averaged out. For discrete spot scanning, a major drawback of this method is the treatment time, which increases linearly with the number of re-scans. Continuous line scanning, on the other hand, eliminates the dead time between the positioning of each beam, and in this work, continuous line scanning has been investigated experimentally from the point of view of dose, penumbral width and its effectiveness for re-scanning. As shown by measurements in a homogeneous phantom, dose distributions delivered by continuous line scanning were comparable with those of discrete spot scanning for both geometric and realistic targets, with only a modest degradation of lateral penumbra in the direction of scanning. In addition, delivered dose levels have also been found to agree well between discrete and line scanning. With continuous line scanning, however, more re-scans could be applied without the artefacts seen in discrete spot scanning, with motions of up to 1 cm peak-to-peak amplitude being mitigated by 10 re-scans. For larger motion, in the interest of reducing the volume of irradiated normal tissue re-scanning should be combined with other motion mitigation techniques such as gating or breath-hold.

  10. Nuclear astrophysics at the east drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fujikawa, H.; Amadio, G.; Baba, H.; Fukuchi, T.; Shimoura, S.; Michimasa, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Gono, Y.; Odahara, A.; Kato, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lee, C. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Fülöp, Zs.; Guimar Aes, V.; Lichtenthaler, R.

    2006-03-01

    In the first half of the paper, the nuclear astrophysics activities in Japan, especially in experimental studies are briefly overviewed. A variety of beams have been developed and used for nuclear astrophysics experiments in Japan. The activities include the RI beam facilities at low energies by the in-flight method at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo and by the ISOL-based method at the JAERI tandem facility, and the RI beam facility at intermediate energies at RIKEN. Other activities include a study of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction exclusively at the tandem accelerator at the Kyushu University, and studies at the neutron facility at Tokyo Institute of Technology and at the photon facility at AIST (Sanso-ken). Research opportunities in the future at RIBF, J-PARC, and SPRING8 are also discussed. A discussion on the research activities at CNS has been specifically extended in the latter half, including various possibilities in collaboration at the RI beam factory at RIKEN.

  11. Nuclear structure at particle drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J. |; Hamamoto, I. |; Nazarewicz, W. ||; Sheikh, J.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewed.

  12. Lithium isotopes beyond the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyutina, Yu.; Johansson, H. T.; Adrich, P.; Aksouh, F.; Aumann, T.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Emling, H.; Forssén, C.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Geissel, H.; Hellström, M.; Ickert, G.; Jones, K. L.; Jonson, B.; Kliemkiewicz, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Lantz, M.; LeBleis, T.; Lindahl, A. O.; Mahata, K.; Matos, M.; Meister, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Palit, R.; Pantea, M.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Walus, W.; Weick, H.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2008-09-01

    The unbound isotopes 10Li, 12Li and 13Li have been observed after nucleon-knockout reactions at relativistic energies with 11Li and 14Be beams impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The channels 9Li + n, 11Li + n and 11Li + 2 n were analysed in the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI. The 10Li data confirm earlier findings, while the 12Li and 13Li nuclei were observed for the first time. The 11Li + n relative-energy spectrum shows that the ground state of 12Li can be described as a virtual s-state with a scattering length of -13.7(1.6) fm. A broad energy spectrum was found for the 11Li + 2 n channel. Based on the assumption that the relative-energy spectrum is dominated by a correlated background presumably stemming from initial correlations in the 14Be ground-state, evidence for a 13Li resonance at 1.47(31) MeV above the 11Li + 2 n threshold with a width around 2 MeV has been found.

  13. A beam optics study of the biomedical beam line at a proton therapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Chong Cheoul; Kim, Jong-Won

    2007-10-01

    A biomedical beam line has been designed for the experimental area of a proton therapy facility to deliver mm to sub-mm size beams in the energy range of 20-50 MeV using the TRANSPORT/TURTLE beam optics codes and a newly-written program. The proton therapy facility is equipped with a 230 MeV fixed-energy cyclotron and an energy selection system based on a degrader and slits, so that beam currents available for therapy decrease at lower energies in the therapeutic beam energy range of 70-230 MeV. The new beam line system is composed of an energy-degrader, two slits, and three quadrupole magnets. The minimum beam sizes achievable at the focal point are estimated for the two energies of 50 and 20 MeV. The focused FWHM beam size is approximately 0.3 mm with an expected beam current of 20 pA when the beam energy is reduced to 50 MeV from 100 MeV, and roughly 0.8 mm with a current of 10 pA for a 20 MeV beam.

  14. Preface for DRIP X proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landesman (Chairman), Jean-Pierre; Montgomery (Co-Chairman), Paul C.

    2004-07-01

    This issue of the “European Physical Journal Applied Physics” contains the papers presented at the Tenth International Conference on Defects: Recognition, Imaging and Physics in Semiconductors (DRIP X), held in Batz-sur-Mer, France, from 29th September to 2nd October, 2003. The conference gathered 150 scientists from academic institutions and industry of 20 countries from around the world, showing the pertinence of the biennial series of DRIP conferences. A much appreciated aspect of DRIP X was the variety of the different backgrounds of the participants, leading to much fruitful exchange and stimulating discussion. Following the spirit of previous DRIP conferences, the main concern of DRIP X was the methodology and the physics of measurement procedures, together with specific developments in instrumentation, and their relationship with the structural, optical and electrical properties of semiconductor defects. The topics covered related to the different methods and techniques used for the recognition and imaging of defects in semiconductor materials (Si, III-V's including nitrides, SiC, IV-IV's, II-VI's, organic compounds, ...) and in semiconductor devices ranging from defects in the raw materials at the wafer level, through process-induced defects and defects that appear during operation (burn-in, aging tests, ...). One of the highlights of the social events of DRIP X was the awards ceremony as part of the celebrations for the Tenth meeting of DRIP. The founders of the DRIP series, Professor Jean-Pierre Fillard and Professor Tomoya Ogawa were both invited to be permanent members of the International Steering Committee and awarded with appropriately engraved trophies to mark the occasion. With help form Tomoya Ogawa, Jean-Pierre Fillard organized the first DRIP conference in 1985 in La Grande Motte, France. The amusing and thought provoking slide presentation by Jean-Pierre Fillard went a great way to remind us of the history of this conference series and to

  15. Commissioning of a compact laser-based proton beam line for high intensity bunches around 10Â MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Kroll, F.; Blažević, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Roth, M.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the first results of experiments with a new laser-based proton beam line at the GSI accelerator facility in Darmstadt. It delivers high current bunches at proton energies around 9.6 MeV, containing more than 109 particles in less than 10 ns and with tunable energy spread down to 2.7% (ΔE/E0 at FWHM). A target normal sheath acceleration stage serves as a proton source and a pulsed solenoid provides for beam collimation and energy selection. Finally a synchronous radio frequency (rf) field is applied via a rf cavity for energy compression at a synchronous phase of -90 deg. The proton bunch is characterized at the end of the very compact beam line, only 3 m behind the laser matter interaction point, which defines the particle source.

  16. Preface for DRIP X proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landesman (Chairman), Jean-Pierre; Montgomery (Co-Chairman), Paul C.

    2004-07-01

    This issue of the “European Physical Journal Applied Physics” contains the papers presented at the Tenth International Conference on Defects: Recognition, Imaging and Physics in Semiconductors (DRIP X), held in Batz-sur-Mer, France, from 29th September to 2nd October, 2003. The conference gathered 150 scientists from academic institutions and industry of 20 countries from around the world, showing the pertinence of the biennial series of DRIP conferences. A much appreciated aspect of DRIP X was the variety of the different backgrounds of the participants, leading to much fruitful exchange and stimulating discussion. Following the spirit of previous DRIP conferences, the main concern of DRIP X was the methodology and the physics of measurement procedures, together with specific developments in instrumentation, and their relationship with the structural, optical and electrical properties of semiconductor defects. The topics covered related to the different methods and techniques used for the recognition and imaging of defects in semiconductor materials (Si, III-V's including nitrides, SiC, IV-IV's, II-VI's, organic compounds, ...) and in semiconductor devices ranging from defects in the raw materials at the wafer level, through process-induced defects and defects that appear during operation (burn-in, aging tests, ...). One of the highlights of the social events of DRIP X was the awards ceremony as part of the celebrations for the Tenth meeting of DRIP. The founders of the DRIP series, Professor Jean-Pierre Fillard and Professor Tomoya Ogawa were both invited to be permanent members of the International Steering Committee and awarded with appropriately engraved trophies to mark the occasion. With help form Tomoya Ogawa, Jean-Pierre Fillard organized the first DRIP conference in 1985 in La Grande Motte, France. The amusing and thought provoking slide presentation by Jean-Pierre Fillard went a great way to remind us of the history of this conference series and to

  17. Removal of power-line harmonics from proton magnetic resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, Anatoly; Valla, Pierre

    2003-08-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) method is based on the resonance behaviour of proton magnetic moments in the geomagnetic field. The main distinction between MRS and other geophysical methods is that it measures the magnetic resonance signal directly from groundwater molecules, making it a selective tool sensitive to groundwater. As the signal generated by the protons is very small, the method is also sensitive to electromagnetic interference (noise) and this is one of the major limitations for practical application. The frequency of the magnetic resonance signal (the Larmor frequency) is directly proportional to the magnitude of the geomagnetic field and varies between 800 and 2800 Hz around the globe. Whilst natural noise within this frequency range is generally not very large (excepting magnetic storms or other temporary disturbances), the level of cultural noise (electrical power lines, generators, etc.) may be very high. In order to improve performance, three existing filtering techniques were adapted to processing MRS measurements: block subtraction, sinusoid subtraction and notch filtering. The first two are subtraction techniques capable of suppressing stationary power-line noise without distorting or attenuating the signal of interest, both involve subtracting an estimate of the harmonic component but differ in the way the component is estimated. The block subtraction method consists of ascertaining the power-line noise (or "noise block") from a record of the noise alone, and then subtracting this block from a record containing both the noise and the signal. The sinusoid subtraction method is based on the calculation of the amplitude, frequency and phase of power-line harmonics using noise records. The notch filtering method does not require knowledge of the power-line harmonic parameters but it may cause distortion of the measured signal. During the study, it was found that, in the investigated frequency range, the electromagnetic noise produced by

  18. Beam Transport of 4 GeV Protons from AGS to the Proton Interrogation Target of the Neutrino Line (Z_line) and Effect of the Air on the Transported Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; Ahrens, L.; Pile, P.; Thieberger, P.; Murray, M.M.

    2008-10-01

    As part of the preparation for the Proton Interrogation Experiment, we have calculated the beam optics for the transport of 4 GeV protons, from the AGS extraction point, to the 'Cross-Section Target Wheel 1' and to the 'Proton Interrogation Target'. In this technical note we present three possible beam-transports each corresponding to a particular Fast Extracted Beam W B setup of the AGS. In addition we present results on the effect of the atmospheric air, (which fills the drift space of the last 100 [m] of the transport line), on the size of the beam, at two locations along the drift space, one location at the middle of the drift space and the other at the end where the 'Proton Interrogation Target' is placed. All the beam transports mentioned above require the removal of the WD1 dipole magnet, which is the first magnet of the W-line, because it acts as a limiting beam aperture, and the magnet is not used in the beam transport. An alternative solution of a beam transport, which does not require the removal of the WD1 magnet, is also presented. In this solution, which models the transport line using the TURTLE computer code[7], the vertical beam sizes at the location of the WD1 magnet is minimized to allow 'lossless' beam transport at the location of the WD1 magnet. A similar solution, but using a MAD model of the line, is also presented.

  19. Drip water isotopes in semi-arid karst: Implications for speleothem paleoclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuthbert, Mark O.; Baker, Andy; Jex, Catherine N.; Graham, Peter W.; Treble, Pauline C.; Andersen, Martin S.; Ian Acworth, R.

    2014-06-01

    We report the results of the first multi-year monitoring and modelling study of the isotopic composition of drip waters in a semi-arid karst terrane. High temporal resolution drip rate monitoring combined with monthly isotope drip water and rainfall sampling at Cathedral Cave, Australia, demonstrates that drip water discharge to the cave occurs irregularly, and only after occasional long duration and high volume rainfall events, where the soil moisture deficit and evapotranspiration is overcome. All drip waters have a water isotopic composition that is heavier than the weighted mean annual precipitation, some fall along the local meteoric water line, others trend towards an evaporation water line. It is hypothesised that, in addition to the initial rainfall composition, evaporation of unsaturated zone water, as well as the time between infiltration events, are the dominant processes that determine infiltration water isotopic composition. We test this hypothesis using a soil moisture balance and isotope model. Our research reports, for the first time, the potential role of sub-surface evaporation in altering drip water isotopic composition, and its implications for the interpretation of speleothem δO18 records from arid and semi-arid regions.

  20. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  1. Cell and membrane lipid analysis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Le Moyec, L; Tatoud, R; Eugène, M; Gauvillé, C; Primot, I; Charlemagne, D; Calvo, F

    1992-10-01

    The lipid composition of five human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, ZR-75-1, SKBR3 and MDA-MB231) was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in whole cells and membrane-enriched fractions. The proportions of the three main lipid resonances in 1D spectra were different for each cell line. These resonances included mobile methyl and methylene functions from fatty acids of triglycerides and phospholipids and N-trimethyl from choline of phospholipids. T47D and ZR-75-1 cells presented a high methylene/methyl ratio (6.02 +/- 0.35 and 6.28 +/- 0.90). This ratio was significantly lower for SKBR3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells (2.76 +/- 0.22, 2.27 +/- 0.57 and 1.39 +/- 0.39). The N-trimethyl/methyl ratio was high for MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells (1.38 +/- 0.54 and 0.86 +/- 0.32), but lower for MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells (0.49 +/- 0.11, 0.16 +/- 0.07 and 0.07 +/- 0.03). 2D COSY spectra confirmed these different proportions in mobile lipids. From 1D spectra obtained on membrane preparations, T47D and ZR-75-1 were the only cell lines to retain a signal from mobile methylene functions. These differences might be related to the heterogeneity found for several parameters of these cells (tumorigenicity, growth rate, hormone receptors); an extended number of cases from fresh samples might enable clinical correlations. PMID:1329906

  2. Landscape of two-proton radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Olsen, E; Pfützner, M; Birge, N; Brown, M; Nazarewicz, W; Perhac, A

    2013-05-31

    Ground-state two-proton (2p) radioactivity is a decay mode found in isotopes of elements with even atomic numbers located beyond the two-proton drip line. So far, this exotic process has been experimentally observed in a few light- and medium-mass nuclides with Z≤30. In this study, using state-of-the-art nuclear density functional theory, we globally analyze 2p radioactivity and for the first time identify 2p-decay candidates in elements heavier than strontium. We predict a few cases where the competition between 2p emission and α decay may be observed. In nuclei above lead, the α-decay mode is found to be dominating and no measurable candidates for the 2p radioactivity are expected. PMID:23767715

  3. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  4. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (<1%) after each beam, due mainly to the neutron exposure of SSPM that increased the dark-count noise. This minor effect was corrected offline with a shifting 350-650 keV energy window for each dataset. The results show a fast converging of activity-ranges measured by the prototype PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  5. The application of biosensors for drip loss analysis and glycolytic potential evaluation.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Wiesław; Sionek, Barbara; Jaworska, Danuta; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glucose and lactate measured by biosensors in drip loss (strip method) with muscle glycolytic potential and their compounds. On the samples taken from Longissimus dorsi of 24 pigs (pure Neckar hybrid line) the following meat quality traits were determined: pH at 24h, meat color according to CIE L(⁎)a(⁎)b(⁎) system and drip loss. The highest correlations were found between glucose in drip loss and glycogen (r=0.84) or glycolytic potential (r=0.81) in muscle. A significant positive relationship between lactate measured in muscle by enzymatic method and by biosensor in drip loss was established (r=0.76). Glycogen, glucose, lactate and glycolytic potential with meat quality traits as ultimate pH, lightness, b(⁎) value and drip loss were significantly related. Results of multiple regression between glucose as well as lactate measured in muscle drip loss with muscle glycolytic potential showed the possibility of its prediction (r=0.87 with Pα≤0.001). PMID:26930360

  6. 7 CFR 3201.60 - Turbine drip oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine drip oils. 3201.60 Section 3201.60... Designated Items § 3201.60 Turbine drip oils. (a) Definition. Products that are lubricants for use in drip... with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased turbine drip oils. By...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.60 - Turbine drip oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine drip oils. 3201.60 Section 3201.60... Designated Items § 3201.60 Turbine drip oils. (a) Definition. Products that are lubricants for use in drip... with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased turbine drip oils. By...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.60 - Turbine drip oils.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine drip oils. 3201.60 Section 3201.60... Designated Items § 3201.60 Turbine drip oils. (a) Definition. Products that are lubricants for use in drip... with this part, will give a procurement preference for qualifying biobased turbine drip oils. By...

  9. The conceptual design of a new transfer line from booster to recycler for the Fermilab Proton plan phase 2 campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Upon the termination of the Fermilab Collider program, the current Recycler anti-proton storage ring (RR) will be converted to a proton pre-injector for the Main Injector (MI) synchrotron. This is scheduled to increase the beam power for the 120 GeV Neutrino program to upwards of 700KW. A transport line that can provide direct injection from the Booster to the Recycler while preserving direct injection from the Booster into the Main Injector and the 8 GeV Booster Neutrino program will be discussed, and its concept design will be presented.

  10. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, C; Boye, D; Lomax, A J

    2013-12-21

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At PSI, our new Gantry is equipped with a Beams Eye View (BEV) imaging system which will be able to acquire 2D x-ray images in fluoroscopy mode during treatment delivery. However, besides precisely tracking motion from BEVs, it is also essential to obtain information on the 3D motion vector throughout the whole region of interest, and any sparsely acquired surrogate motion is generally not sufficient to describe the deformable behaviour of the whole volume in three dimensions. In this study, we propose a method by which 3D deformable motions can be estimated from surrogate motions obtained using this monoscopic imaging system. The method assumes that example motions over a number of breathing cycles can be acquired before treatment for each patient using 4DMRI. In this study, for each of 11 different subjects, 100 continuous breathing cycles have been extracted from extended 4DMRI studies in the liver and then subject specific motion models have been built using principle component analysis (PCA). To simulate treatment conditions, a different set of 30 continuous breathing cycles from the same subjects have then been used to generate a set of simulated 4DCT data sets (so-called 4DCT(MRI) data sets), from which time-resolved digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated using the BEV geometry for three treatment fields respectively. From these DRRs, surrogate motions from fiducial markers or the diaphragm have been used as a predictor to estimate 3D motions in the liver region for each subject. The prediction results have been directly compared to the 'ground truth' motions extracted from the same 30 breath cycles of the originating 4DMRI data set. Averaged over

  11. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A.; Tanner, C.; Boye, D.; Lomax, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At PSI, our new Gantry is equipped with a Beams Eye View (BEV) imaging system which will be able to acquire 2D x-ray images in fluoroscopy mode during treatment delivery. However, besides precisely tracking motion from BEVs, it is also essential to obtain information on the 3D motion vector throughout the whole region of interest, and any sparsely acquired surrogate motion is generally not sufficient to describe the deformable behaviour of the whole volume in three dimensions. In this study, we propose a method by which 3D deformable motions can be estimated from surrogate motions obtained using this monoscopic imaging system. The method assumes that example motions over a number of breathing cycles can be acquired before treatment for each patient using 4DMRI. In this study, for each of 11 different subjects, 100 continuous breathing cycles have been extracted from extended 4DMRI studies in the liver and then subject specific motion models have been built using principle component analysis (PCA). To simulate treatment conditions, a different set of 30 continuous breathing cycles from the same subjects have then been used to generate a set of simulated 4DCT data sets (so-called 4DCT(MRI) data sets), from which time-resolved digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were calculated using the BEV geometry for three treatment fields respectively. From these DRRs, surrogate motions from fiducial markers or the diaphragm have been used as a predictor to estimate 3D motions in the liver region for each subject. The prediction results have been directly compared to the ‘ground truth’ motions extracted from the same 30 breath cycles of the originating 4DMRI data set. Averaged

  12. Surfacing of domestic wastewater applied to soil through drip tubing and reduction in numbers of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Franti, J M; Weaver, R W; McInnes, K J

    2002-09-01

    Drip tubing is a technology that is increasing in use. The effectiveness of such systems in distributing the wastewater uniformly through the soil matrix, providing adequate removal of bacteria from wastewater, and keeping wastewater from reaching the soil surface has not been adequately evaluated. Experiments were conducted at two sites that had used drip tubing for approximately 3 years. This 3-year-old drip tubing and newly installed tubing were used in this investigation. A solution containing Brilliant Blue FCF dye and Escherichia coli, at an approximate concentration of 1 x 10(6) cells ml(-1), was applied to the sites through drip emitters. Reduction i n Escherichia coli populations reaching the soil surface was generally less than 10%. The route of travel for the solution reaching the soil surface was consistently along preferential flow paths and not uniformly through the soil matrix. Instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing installed at 15 cm was nearly 50%. Increasing burial of the drip tubing from 15 to 30 cm nearly eliminated water surfacing. A 31 per emitter dose of water, immediately following drip line installation later increased instances of water reaching the soil surface for drip tubing buried at 30 cm. The volume of water applied per dose had little effect on the number of times water reached the soil surface. Inherent soil structural characteristics limited the drip tubing's ability to uniformly distribute water and adsorb bacteria. Drip tubing installation to 30 cm may be an important practice to reduce public health hazards from the likelihood of wastewater surfacing. PMID:12361375

  13. On-line measurements of proton beam current from a PET cyclotron using a thin aluminum foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghithan, S.; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Simões, H.; Alves, F.; Crespo, P.

    2013-07-01

    The number of cyclotrons capable of accelerating protons to about 20 MeV is increasing throughout the world. Originally aiming at the production of positron emission tomography (PET) radionuclides, some of these facilities are equipped with several beam lines suitable for scientific research. Radiobiology, radiophysiology, and other dosimetric studies can be performed using these beam lines. In this work, we measured the Bragg peak of the protons from a PET cyclotron using a stacked target consisting of several aluminum foils interleaved with polyethylene sheets, readout by in-house made transimpedance electronics. The measured Bragg peak is consistent with simulations performed using the SRIM/TRIM simulation toolkit. Furthermore, we report on experimental results aiming at measuring proton beam currents down to 10 pA using a thin aluminum foil (20-μm-thick). The aluminum was chosen for this task because it is radiation hard, it has low density and low radiation activity, and finally because it is easily available at negligible cost. This method allows for calculating the dose delivered to a target during an irradiation with high efficiency, and with minimal proton energy loss and scattering.

  14. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough. PMID:26581078

  15. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough. PMID:26581078

  16. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ristić-Fira, Aleksandra M; Korićanac, Lela B; Žakula, Jelena J; Valastro, Lucia M; Iannolo, Gioacchin; Privitera, Giuseppe; Cuttone, Giacomo; Petrović, Ivan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM) or dacarbazine (DTIC). Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days) and protons (7 days) coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application. PMID:19358719

  17. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  18. Water and nitrogen requirements of subsurface drip irrigated pomegranate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip irrigation is a well-developed practice for both annual and perennial crops. The use of subsurface drip is a well-established practice in many annual row crops, e.g. tomatoes, strawberries, lettuce. However, the use of subsurface drip on perennial crops has been slow to develop. With th...

  19. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic variations between adjacent drips in three caves at increasing elevation in a temperate coastal rainforest, Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beddows, Patricia A.; Mandić, Magda; Ford, Derek C.; Schwarcz, Henry P.

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of speleothem paleoenvironmental records requires understanding of spatial-temporal variations in vadose drip water chemistry and isotopic composition. This study reports on intra- and inter-cave differences in δD, δ18O and electrical conductivity, using 18 monthly water samples from three adjacent drips (<20 m apart) in each of three caves at increasing elevation (0, 550, and 740 m ASL) on very steep ground at the head of Tahsis Inlet fjord on the Pacific coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. All drips showed isotopic seasonal signals, despite varied patterns of drip hydrology. There was overlap in isotopic ranges (at 1 SD) between all three caves, in contrast with the expected δ18O depletion of -0.15 to -0.5‰/100 m of ascent observed in standard precipitation. The isotopic seasonality was approximated with sine curves, and compared to a GNIP data set from Victoria ∼300 km to the south. The δD and δ18O drip isotopes lagged the Victoria record by 155 ± 26 days and 165 ± 50 days respectively. The longest lag was at the slowest drip (sea level), while the shortest lag (87 days for δ18O, 550 m ASL) implies a short residence time, paradoxically from the drip with the highest mean electrical conductivity. Vadose residence time was less than one climatic year, reflecting a combination of negligible matrix porosity in the host rock and super-humid climatic conditions. Beneath the epikarst, drip hydrology was evidently by simple piston flow. Phase-shifted drip isotope records showed excellent agreement with sea level mean monthly air temperatures at the Tahsis meteorological station over the study period. The δD and δ18O drip amplitudes were damped on average 74% and 73% respectively compared to the Victoria data. The drips at 740 m ASL are tightly aligned to the global mean meteoric water line (GMWL) and 18O-depleted; the drips at 550 m ASL and at sea level plot along the GMWL, or between it and the Victoria LMWL, with the exception

  20. Irrigation strategies using subsurface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is practiced on approximately 60,000 ha in the Texas High Plains region of the USA. Adoption of SDI continues to increase in the region. This has been attributed to record drought in Texas and the US Southwest in recent years, declining irrigation well yields, and ev...

  1. Geant4 simulations of proton beam transport through a carbon or beryllium degrader and following a beam line.

    PubMed

    van Goethem, M J; van der Meer, R; Reist, H W; Schippers, J M

    2009-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit were performed for the carbon wedge degrader used in the beam line at the Center of Proton Therapy of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The simulations are part of the beam line studies for the development and understanding of the GANTRY2 and OPTIS2 treatment facilities at PSI, but can also be applied to other beam lines. The simulated stopping power, momentum distributions at the degrader exit and beam line transmission have been compared to accurate benchmark measurements. Because the beam transport through magnetic elements is not easily modeled using Geant4a connection to the TURTLE beam line simulation program was made. After adjusting the mean ionization potential of the carbon degrader material from 78 eV to 95 eV, we found an accurate match between simulations and benchmark measurements, so that the simulation model could be validated. We found that the degrader does not completely erase the initial beam phase space even at low degraded beam energies. Using the validation results, we present a study of the usability of beryllium as a degrader material (mean ionization potential 63.7 eV). We found an improvement in the transmission of 30-45%, depending on the degraded beam energy, the higher value for the lower energies. PMID:19741273

  2. Discrepancy in proton flux extrapolation along field lines in the middle Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic electrons and protons in Jupiter's outer magnetosphere were observed to be modulated with the 10 hour rotation period of the planet. This modulation was due to the concentration of particles at the magnetic equator: the non-alignment of Jupiter's spin and rotation axes caused Pioneer-10 to oscillate between +20 deg and -19 deg magnetic latitude and hence, between regions of stronger and weaker fluxes. The relationship between electron and proton fluxes observed off the magnetic equator was countered with measurements at the equatorial crossing radii of the same flux tubes by applying Liouville's theorem with the assumption that particles move conserving their magnetic moments. A magnetic model which matches the intensity and direction of the magnetic field along the Pioneer 10 trajectory was used for determining the positions of the equatorial crossings. Energetic electrons compared in this way appear to be consistently described. Protons, on the other hand, show much weaker fluxes at the off-equatorial points than would be predicted by this simple application of Liouville's theorem.

  3. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  4. Aperture studies for the AP2 anti-proton Line at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Reichel, Ina; Zisman, Michael; Placidi, Massimo

    2003-12-05

    The AP2 beamline transports anti-protons from the production target to the Debuncher ring. For many years the observed aperture has been smaller than that estimated from linear, on-energy optics. We have investigated possible reasons for the aperture restriction and have identified several possible sources, including residual vertical dispersion from alignment errors and chromatic effects due to very large chromatic lattice functions. We discuss the possible sources, suggest some remedies, and propose specific studies, where needed, to evaluate suspected problems.

  5. 3D dose verification with polymer gel detectors of brain-spine match line for proton pencil beam cranio-spinal: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, S.; Cardin, A.; Lin, L.; Kirk, M.; Kassaee, A.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended as a preliminary study to demonstrate the quality assurance benefits from polymer gel detectors for proton pencil beam cranio-spinal treatments. A stable gel type was selected for protons to suppress the LET dependence at the end of the Bragg peak. The depth dose distributions in the gels were examined with regard of its dose dependences and compared to baseline measurements. The preliminary experimental results indicate polymer gel detectors may be able to verify dose in three dimensions along match line for proton therapy treatments.

  6. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  7. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using a Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Technique Without Match Line Changes for Field Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Haibo Ding, Xuanfeng; Kirk, Maura; Liu, Haoyang; Zhai, Huifang; Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Lustig, Robert A.; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan; McDonough, James

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To propose and validate a craniospinal irradiation approach using a proton pencil beam scanning technique that overcomes the complexity of the planning associated with feathering match lines. Methods and Materials: Ten craniospinal irradiation patients had treatment planned with gradient dose optimization using the proton pencil beam scanning technique. The robustness of the plans was evaluated by shifting the isocenter of each treatment field by ±3 mm in the longitudinal direction and was compared with the original nonshifted plan with metrics of conformity number, homogeneity index, and maximal cord doses. An anthropomorphic phantom study using film measurements was carried out on a plan with 5-cm junction length. To mimic setup errors in the phantom study, fields were recalculated with isocenter shifts of 1, 3, 5, and 10 mm longitudinally, and compared with the original plans and measurements. Results: Uniform dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved using the gradient optimization approach with averaged junction lengths of 6.7 ± 0.5 cm. The average conformity number and homogeneity index equaled 0.78 ± 0.03 and 1.09 ± 0.01, respectively. Setup errors of 3 mm per field (6 mm in worst-case scenario) caused on average 4.6% lower conformity number 2.5% higher homogeneity index and maximal cord dose of 4216.1 ± 98.2 cGy. When the junction length was 5 cm or longer, setup errors of 6 mm resulted in up to 12% dosimetric deviation. Consistent results were reached between film measurements and planned dose profiles in the junction area. Conclusions: Longitudinal setup errors directly reduce the dosimetric accuracy of the proton craniospinal irradiation treatment with matched proton pencil beam scanning fields. The reported technique creates a slow dose gradient in the junction area, which makes the treatment more robust to longitudinal setup errors compared to conventional feathering methods.

  8. Study of the T = 5/2 states in 9Li (analogs of the lowest states in 9He) as a test of nuclear structure theory for drip line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Vladilen; Rogachev, G. V.; Alcorta, M.; Davids, B.; Hooker, J.; Jayatissa, H.; Koshchiy, E.; Nelson, A.; Roeder, B.; Uberseder, E.; Tribble, R. E.

    2014-09-01

    About 20 years ago, a group of Hahn-Meitner Institute made precision measurements of a multi nucleon transfer reaction to populate the lowest states in 9He. They found [1,2] a state of 9He(1/2-) at 1.27 +/- 0.10 MeV above the 8He + n threshold with Γ = 0.10 +/- 0.06 MeV. Since then, many groups tried to obtain detailed information on 9He mainly using rare isotope beams. However, the energy resolution and counting statistics was never sufficient to test the data [1,2] (see a review in [3]). Additionally an MSU group [4] found a virtual s-wave state within 0.2 MeV of the 8He + n threshold which they claimed to be the ground state of 9He. The theoretical calculations demonstrate rare unanimity. A variety of approaches including the recent [5] ab initio calculations predict a broad state, approximately ten times broader than given in Refs. [1,2]. So it can be that our understanding of nuclear structure at the border of nuclear stability is seriously deficient. To date, it looks like all straightforward ways to obtain spectroscopic information on 9He were tested. So, we populated T = 5/2 states in 9Li (analogs of 9He) in 8He + p resonance elastic scattering using the TTIK method [5,6]. The measurements were performed using 4 MeV/A 8He beam provided by TRIUMF facilities. The scattering chamber was filled with CH4 gas. The proton recoils were detected by an array of position sensitive proportional counters and silicon detectors. The experimental equipment was tested using 3.5 and 7 MeV/A 12C beams of Cyclotron Institute at TAMU.

  9. Stability of proton-rich nuclei in the upper {ital sd} shell and lower {ital pf} shell

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, B.J.

    1996-09-01

    The decay properties of proton-rich nuclei with {ital Z}=19{endash}30 are investigated using measured binding energies of the analog neutron-rich nuclei and Coulomb energy shifts deduced from a parametrization of measured Coulomb displacement energies. Predicted binding energies and separation energies are compared where possible with previous calculations; in most cases the calculations agree within the quoted uncertainties. The positions of the one-proton and diproton drip lines are determined from the calculated separation energies. It is suggested that good candidates for the observation of correlated two-proton emission are {sup 34}Ca, {sup 38,39}Ti, {sup 45}Fe, {sup 48}Ni, and {sup 54}Zn. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Effect of Fumigation on Rotylenchulus reniformis Population Density Through Subsurface Drip Irrigation Located Every Other Furrow

    PubMed Central

    Porter, D. O.; Archer, D.; Mullinix, B. G.

    2008-01-01

    Plots naturally infested with Rotylenchulus reniformis were sampled in the spring of 2006 and 2007 at depths of 15 and 30 cm in the bed, furrow over the drip tape, and “dry” furrow, and at approximately 40 to 45 cm depth in the bed and dry furrow. Then, 1,3-dichloropropene (Telone EC) was injected into the subsurface drip irrigation at 46 kg a.i./ha, and 3 to 4 weeks later the plots were resampled and assayed for nematodes. The transformed values for nematode population density (IvLRr) before fumigation were higher at 30 and 40 cm depths than at a 15 cm depth. IvLRr before fumigation was higher in the soil over the drip lines than in the bed or dry furrow and was higher in the bed than the dry furrow. IvLRr was higher in the plots to be fumigated than the plots that were not to be fumigated for all depths and locations except at a 15 cm depth over the drip lines, where the values were similar. However, after fumigation, IvLRr was lower over the drip lines at a 30 cm depth in plots that were fumigated compared to samples in a similar location and depth that were not fumigated. There were no other location/depth combinations where the fumigation reduced IvLRr below that in the nonfumigated plots. Yield in 2006, which was a very hot and dry year, was predicted adequately (R2 = 0.67) by a linear model based on the preplant population density of R. reniformis, with a very steep slope (-2.8 kg lint/ha per R. reniformis/100 cm3 soil). However, no relationship between nematode density and yield was seen in 2007, which had cooler weather for most of the season. Yield was not significantly improved by fumigation through the drip irrigation system in either year compared to plots treated only with aldicarb (0.84 kg a.i./ha), indicating that the level of control with fumigation did not kill enough R. reniformis to be successful. PMID:19440261

  11. On-Line Analysis of Organic Compounds in Diesel Exhaust Using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.V.; Jobson, B.T.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, diesel exhaust (DE) was measured in real time using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) to determine the effect of an after-treatment catalyst on gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DE after-treatment catalysts are being designed to reduce the pollutants in exhaust, which contains both particulate matter and gas phase constituents. The PTR-MS can make in-situ real time measurements of hydrocarbons in the air, from concentrations in the parts per million by volume (ppmV) down to the low part per trillion by volume (pptV) range. Spectrum scans were performed at varied engine loads from mass range m/z (mass to charge ratio) = 20 to 200. This showed the relative abundance of gas phase VOCs produced as the engine ran between idle mode and 80% of its maximum load. The mass spectrum was complex and appeared to be composed of aromatic species ionized by PTR (M+1) through the anticipated proton transfer reactions as well as unexpected alkane fragments, evidenced by a strong 14n+1 ion pattern showing intense peaks at m/z = 43, 57, and 71. A number of protonated M+1 masses could be identified. These compounds displayed M+2 peaks consistent with known 13C isotopic abundance. As the engine load increased, the concentrations of over 90% of the species decreased. An attached smoke meter showed that soot concentrations increased over the same conditions. In addition, the decrease in the concentration of compounds with a larger molecular weight (m/z>100) was greater than the rate that the smaller compounds experienced. This appears to be due to the affinity of VOCs, larger masses in particular, to adhere to soot particles. Further PTR-MS measurements of VOCs on soot confirmed this by producing a mass spectrum comprised of masses predominantly over 100 amu. On-line analysis of diesel exhaust by PTR-MS is a practical tool for quantifying selected organic species in diesel exhaust and should prove useful for developing better diesel exhaust

  12. Effects of drip irrigation configuration and rate on yield and fruit quality of young highbush blueberry plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 4-year study was conducted to determine the effects of drip configuration and irrigation rate on yield and fruit quality in a new planting of highbush blueberry in British Columbia, Canada. Plants were grown in a silt loam soil on raised beds and were non-irrigated or irrigated using one line of d...

  13. Measured and simulated transport of 1.9 MeV laser-accelerated proton bunches through an integrated test beam line at 1 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Hori, T.; Bolton, P. R.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Yogo, A.; Mori, M.; Orimo, S.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Daido, H.; Kondo, K.; Souda, H.; Tongu, H.; Noda, A.; Iseki, Y.; Nagafuchi, T.; Maeda, K.; Hanawa, K.; Yoshiyuki, T.; Shirai, T.

    2010-07-01

    A laser-driven repetition-rated 1.9 MeV proton beam line composed of permanent quadrupole magnets (PMQs), a radio frequency (rf) phase rotation cavity, and a tunable monochromator is developed to evaluate and to test the simulation of laser-accelerated proton beam transport through an integrated system for the first time. In addition, the proton spectral modulation and focusing behavior of the rf phase rotation cavity device is monitored with input from a PMQ triplet. In the 1.9 MeV region we observe very weak proton defocusing by the phase rotation cavity. The final transmitted bunch duration and transverse profile are well predicted by the PARMILA particle transport code. The transmitted proton beam duration of 6 ns corresponds to an energy spread near 5% for which the transport efficiency is simulated to be 10%. The predictive capability of PARMILA suggests that it can be useful in the design of future higher energy transport beam lines as part of an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system.

  14. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-16

    The repository design includes a drip shield (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168489]) that provides protection for the waste package both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation, general corrosion, and localized corrosion of the drip shield plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. This document is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The models developed in this report are used by the waste package degradation analyses for TSPA-LA and serve as a basis to determine the performance of the drip shield. The drip shield may suffer from other forms of failure such as the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) or stress corrosion cracking (SCC), or both. Stress corrosion cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]). Hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield material is discussed in ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169847]).

  15. Subsurface drip irrigation: Status of the technology in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) although a much smaller fraction of the microirrigated land area than surface drip irrigation, is growing at a much faster rate, and is the subject of considerable research and educational efforts in the United States. This paper will discuss the growth in SDI, high...

  16. Surface drip irrigation (SDI): Status of the technology in 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), although a much smaller fraction of the microirrigated land area than surface drip irrigation, is growing at a much faster rate and is the subject of considerable research and educational efforts in the United States. This paper will discuss the growth in SDI, highl...

  17. Study of bromium-69 ground state proton emission and effects on the rp-process selenium-68 waiting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Andrew Michael

    The rp-process determines the characteristic properties of the tail in X-ray burst lightcurves and the nucleosynthesis occurring during such events. In high temperature, hydrogen-rich environments the rp-process results from the breakout of the hot CNO cycle leading to a series of fast proton captures and b-decays involving nuclei along the proton drip-line up to masses possibly as heavy as Te. Type I X-ray bursts are thought to be key sites for this process. To realistically model the rp-process in these systems experimental data such as masses, lifetimes, and proton capture rates along the proton drip-line are required. Such data are currently lacking for many of these nuclei. The 68 Se waiting point is of particular interest, where a long beta-decay half-life coupled with inhibited proton capture restricts the amount of material that is processed beyond mass 68 in the rp-process. However, the reaction rate for the 2p-capture process 68 Se+p [arrow right] 69 Br+p [arrow right] 70 Kr depends exponentially on the 69 Br proton separation energy and may bypass the waiting point. This separation energy is poorly constrained. The first direct measurement of the proton separation energy for the proton unbound nucleus 69 Br has been performed. The newly developed MSU High Resolution Array (HiRA) and a MicroChannel Plate (MCP) beam tracking system were used for the first time together with the existing 5800 spectrograph at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). The experiment was designed to reconstruct the decays of proton unbound nuclei, specifically 69 Br, by detecting the decay protons using HiRA in coincidence with a heavy residue, e.g. 68 Se, which is decay protons using HiRA in coincidence with a heavy residue, e.g. 68 Se, which is measured in the large acceptance 5800 magnetic spectrograph. We find that the proton separation energy of 69 Br is S p = [Special characters omitted.] keV. In addition, the influence of this new measurement on the rp

  18. Peanut Response to Crop Rotation, Drip Tube Lateral Spacing, and Irrigation Rates with Deep Subsurface Drip Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long term crop yield with various crop rotations irrigated with subsurface drip irrigation (SSDI) is not known for US southeast. A SSDI system was installed in 1998 on a Tifton loamy sand (Fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic Plinthic Kandiudults) with five crop rotations, two drip tube lateral spacings,...

  19. DripFume: A Visual Basic Program For Simulating Distribution And Atmospheric Volatilization Of Soil Fumigants Applied Through Drip Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Windows-based graphical user interface program (DripFume) was developed in MS Visual Basic (VB) to utilize a two-dimensional multi-phase finite element pesticide transport model to simulate distribution and emission of volatile fumigant chemicals when applied through drip irrigation or shank injec...

  20. Gamow-Teller Transitions in Proton Rich Exotic pf-shell Nuclei Deduced from Mirror Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Blank, B.; Brentano, P. von; Zell, K. O.; Berg, G. P. A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Rubio, B.; Shimbara, Y.

    2010-08-12

    The rp-process nucleosynthesis proceeds through nuclei near the proton drip-line, in which Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions starting from unstable pf-shell nuclei play important roles. In the {beta}-decay study of these nuclei, half-lives can be measured rather accurately. On the other hand, in the high-resolution ({sup 3}He, t) charge-exchange reactions on mirror nuclei, individual GT transitions can be studied up to high excitations. For the accurate study of the GT transition strengths in the A = 52, T = 2, system, we compare and combine the {beta}-decay study of the proton-rich nucleus {sup 52}Ni and the {sup 52}Cr({sup 3}He, t) measurement assuming the isospin symmetry of the T{sub z} = {+-}2{yields}{+-}1 transitions.

  1. Subsurface drip irrigation in different planting spacing of sugarcane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, R. C. M.; Barbosa, E. A. A.; Arruda, F. B.; Silva, T. J. A.; Sakai, E.; Landell, M. G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficits conditions. The SDI provides better water use efficiency, due to the water and nutrients application in root zone plants. However, it is important to investigate the long-term effect of irrigation in the yield and technological quality in different ecological condition cultivation. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of SDI in sugarcane cultivated in different planting spacings on technological quality, yield and theoretical recoverable sugar during four cycles of sugarcane cultivation. The experiment was carried out at Colorado Mill, Guaíra, São Paulo State in Brazil, in a clay soil. The experiment was installed in randomized blocks, with six replications. The treatments were three different planting spacings (S1 - 1.5 m between rows; S2 - 1.8 m between rows and S3 - planting in double line of 0.5 m x 1.3 m between planting rows) which were subdivided in irrigated and non-irrigated plots. In S1 and S2 treatments were installed one drip line in each plant row and in treatment S3 one drip line was installed between the rows with smaller spacing (0.5 m). The RB855536 genotype was used and the planting date occurred in May, 25th 2005. The analyzed parameters were: percentage of soluble solids (brix), percent apparent sucrose juice (Pol), total recoverable sugar (ATR), yield and theoretically recoverable sugar (RTR). Four years of yield (plant cane and first, second and third ratoon) were analyzed. Data were submitted to variance analysis and the averages compared by Duncan test at 5% probability. Two months before the first harvest a yield estimate was realized. According to the observed results the irrigated plants provided increase of about 20 % compared to non irrigated plants. However there was a great tipping of plants specially in irrigated plots. The

  2. Evaluation of the annealing effect of proton-exchanged LiTaO3 optical waveguides by the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Masahito; Kushibiki, Jun-ichi

    2002-09-01

    We established an experimental procedure and collected basic data to evaluate the annealing process and effects for proton-exchanged LiTaO3 optical waveguides using the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization (LFB-UMC) system in a frequency range of 100 to 300 MHz. Twelve Z-cut LiTaO3 substrates were proton-exchanged at 260 degC for 14 min in a pyrophosphoric acid solution and annealed at 420 degC for various periods from 10 sec to 24 h. The leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) velocities were decreased by the proton exchange, and were then increased and recovered by annealing in all propagation directions as the annealing time increased. The Y-axis propagation is most useful for an evaluation. The LSAW velocities decrease with an increase of the product fH, obtained from the frequency dependences and proton-diffused layer depths analyzed by secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Gradients of the fH dependences of the LSAW velocities become gentler with increases in the annealing time, corresponding to the concentrations and distributions of hydrogen and lithium ions in the proton-diffused layers. The relationships among the LSAW velocities, proton-diffused layer depths, relative concentrations of hydrogen ions at the specimen surfaces, and the annealing times were experimentally obtained. The measurement resolutions of the LFB-UMC system at 225 MHz to the proton-diffused layer depth, the relative concentration of hydrogen ions, and the typical annealing time for 1 min were estimated to be 4 nm, 0.2%, and 0.6 sec.

  3. Masses and proton separation energies obtained from Q{sub a} and Q{sub p} measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Brown, L. T.; Carpenter, L. F.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Penttila, H. T.; Seweryniak, D.

    2000-10-20

    For many nuclei beyond the proton drip line in the Z>72, N>82 region, both proton and a emission are energetically allowed. In the case of some proton emitters, there are {alpha}-decay chains emanating from both parent and daughter nuclei. This means that if the mass excess of one member of an {alpha}-decay chain is known, then the mass excesses for all members of both chains can be obtained. In addition, proton separation energies may be derived for nuclei in the {alpha}-decay chain of the proton emitter. The method of time- and space-correlations also allows the identification of isomeric states in these nuclei. As an example, a large number of mass excesses and proton separation energies for ground and metastable states have been derived from Q{sub a} and Q{sub p} values obtained from the proton emitters {sup 165,166,167}Ir, {sup 171}Au, {sup 177}Tl, and their daughters.

  4. Longevity of Shallow Subsurface Drip Irrigation Tubing Under Three Tillage Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow Sub-Surface drip irrigation (S3DI) has drip tubing buried about 2-in below the soil surface. It is unknown how long drip tubing would be viable at this shallow soil depth using strip- or no-tillage systems. The objectives were to determine drip tube longevity, resultant crop yield, and parti...

  5. Structure and reactions of drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    Secondary radioactive beams produced at intermediate-energy heavy-ion accelerators have in a short time span added a new dimension to the research on nuclear species at the limits of particle stability, and new detection techniques have made it possible to study reactions caused by incident beams of as little as one particle per second. Imminent developments such as the M.S.U. Coupled-Cyclotron Facility are expected to extend the range and to permit the observation of many previously inaccessible species. For a perspective on the progress in this area one only needs to go about fifteen years back to a time when it had just become possible to study the radioactivity of rare nuclear species such as {sup 11}Li. In presenting early experiments with secondary beams produced in fragmentation James Symons said {open_quotes}... In the introduction to this paper we questioned the applicability of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators to this field. Our experience at the Bevalac leads us to believe that this question does indeed have a positive answer. If the physics interest justifies it, then high-energy heavy-ion beams can certainly be expected to play a role in the study of nuclei at the limits of stability.{close_quotes} At the time, very few, if any, realized how prophetic this remark was. In the present paper the interpretation of the longitudinal-momentum distributions from the nuclear fragmentation of single-nucleon halos is discussed. It is pointed out that these measurements, at least for the cases studied so far, directly reflect the halo wave function, and that there is no direct contribution from the reaction mechanism. This is an important difference from the radial momentum distributions, for which diffractive processes play an important role. The author discusses stripping reactions of {sup 11}Be and {sup 8}B on light nuclei yielding {sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be.

  6. Structure beyond the neutron drip-line:. 9He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kalanee, T.; Gibelin, J.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Force, C.; Gaudefroy, L.; Gillibert, A.; Guillot, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Keeley, N.; Krupko, S.; Lapoux, V.; Mittig, W.; Mougeot, X.; Nalpas, L.; Orr, N. A.; Pollacco, E.; Rusek, K.; Roger, T.; Savajols, H.; de Séréville, N.; Sidorchuk, S.; Suzuki, D.; Strojek, I.

    2013-09-01

    In order to solve the nature of 9He ground state, additional information on this unbound nucleus with extreme N/Z ratio was needed. The present study was performed via the (d,p) reaction, a standard tool for determination of neutron single-particle distribution.

  7. 13. Roadway and place of a thousand drips looking ESE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Roadway and place of a thousand drips looking ESE. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  8. Measurements of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in interactions of protons and {alpha} particles with N, O, Ne, and Si

    SciTech Connect

    Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.; Kiener, J.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Tatischeff, V.; Deloncle, I.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Hamadache, C.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Dalouzy, J.-C.; Grancey, F. de; Oliveira, F. de; Dayras, F.; Sereville, N. de; Pellegriti, M.-G.; Lamia, L.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2011-02-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne, and Si and {alpha}-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong {gamma}-ray lines of {sup 16}O produced in proton and {alpha}-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O, and Ne and a thick foil for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for {alpha} particles were delivered by the Institut de Physique Nucleaire-Orsay tandem accelerator. The {gamma} rays were detected with four high-purity Ge detectors in the angular range 30 deg. to 135 deg. We extracted 36 cross-section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for {alpha}-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible, usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular, the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code talys with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei {sup 14}N, {sup 20,22}Ne, and {sup 28}Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear {gamma}-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  9. Development of water Čerenkov detector for on-line proton rejection in Ξ- hypernuclear spectroscopy via the (K- ,K+) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogami, T.; Amano, N.; Kanatsuki, S.; Nagae, T.; Takenaka, K.

    2016-05-01

    The missing mass spectroscopy of Ξ- hypernuclei with the (K- ,K+) reaction is planned to be performed at the J-PARC K1.8 beam line by using a new magnetic spectrometer, Strangeness -2 Spectrometer (S-2S). A Čerenkov detector with a radiation medium of pure water (refractive index of 1.33) is designed to be used for on-line proton rejection for a momentum range of 1.2-1.6 GeV/c in S-2S. Prototype water Čerenkov detectors were developed and tested with positron beams and cosmic rays to estimate their proton-rejection capability. We achieved an average number of photoelectrons of greater than 200 with the latest prototype for cosmic rays, which was stable during an expected beam time of one month. The performance of the prototype in the cosmic-ray test was well reproduced with a Monte Carlo simulation in which some input parameters were adjusted. Based on the Monte Carlo simulation, we expect to achieve > 90 % proton-rejection efficiency while maintaining > 95 %K+ survival ratio in the whole S-2S acceptance. The performance satisfies the requirements to conduct the spectroscopic study of Ξ- hypernuclei at J-PARC.

  10. In-flight proton breakup of 73Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. M.; Anderson, C.; Barney, J.; Estee, J.; Lynch, W. G.; Manfredi, J.; Setiawan, H.; Showalter, R. H.; Sweany, S.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Brown, K. W.; Elson, J. M.; Pruitt, C.; Sobotka, L. G.; Chajecki, Z.; Lee, J.

    2015-10-01

    Properties of nuclei beyond the proton drip-line are important for mass models, astrophysics, and nuclear structure. Weakly-bound or proton-unbound nuclei near the rp process waiting-points, in particular, play a critical role in constraining calculations and observations of type I x-ray bursts. The relatively slow β-decay of 72Kr, for instance, may be bypassed significantly by 2p-capture reactions through 73Rb. This process, however, depends sensitively on the 73Rb proton separation energy, Sp. While recent measurements of 65As and 69Br have reduced uncertainties in the reaction sequence, the 72Kr waiting point still remains largely unconstrained. We have performed an experiment at NSCL to measure, using invariant-mass spectroscopy, the decay of 73Rb --> p+72Kr in an attempt to determine Sp (73Rb) . Preliminary results from our recent 73Rb decay experiment will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, Contract No. DE-FG02-94ER40848.

  11. Chaotic rhythms of a dripping faucet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Leidecker, Henning; Cahalan, Gabriel D.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was conducted which showed that a leaky faucet can offer valuable insights on predicting fluid flow. In this experiment, a flow control and drop detector were connected to the printer port of an IBM PC, which computed and saved the time intervals using a program for droptime compiled with Turbo C. It is noted that the time intervals change from periodic to doubly periodic as the flow rate is increased and then to various forms of chaos, interrupted by windows of periodicity. A number of two- and three-dimensional plots are displayed and discussed. Attention is focused on one of the simpler plots which is approximately parabolic, where each successive time interval is a quadratic function of the preceding interval, with a steepness which depends upon the flow rate. It is shown that a single past analog can predict a dripping faucet with reasonable accuracy 7-10 drops ahead. While such methods are more difficult to apply in higher-dimensional systems, this experiment aids in understanding how fluid flow may be predicted even under conditions of unstable flows caused by increase in velocity.

  12. Quantitative evaluation of fabrication processes of proton-exchanged layers in LiTaO3 optoelectronic devices by the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibiki, J.; Miyashita, M.

    2001-02-01

    Experimental investigations are conducted in order to collect basic data for evaluating proton-exchanged LiTaO3 optical waveguides and their fabrication processes and systems using the line-focus-beam ultrasonic material characterization system, in the frequency range 100-300 MHz. Seven Z-cut LiTaO3 substrates are proton exchanged at several process temperatures (220-280 °C) and times (5-30 min) in a pyrophosphoric acid solution. Leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) velocities, measured for all specimens, decrease for all propagation directions. The decrease rate is at maximum in the Y-axis propagation direction, in which the measurement sensitivity to the process conditions is highest. The fH dependences of LSAW velocities, obtained from frequency dependences of LSAW velocities and proton-exchanged layer depths analyzed by secondary-ion mass spectrometry, have almost constant gradients of -0.78 (m/s)/(Hz m). Normalized depth distributions of the elastic properties of proton-exchanged layers are nearly equal; only the depths differ. Also, the relationships among LSAW velocities, layer depths, process times, process temperatures, and diffusion coefficients are experimentally obtained. Homogeneity evaluation of a proton-exchanged, 2-in., Z-cut LiTaO3 wafer processed at 260 °C for 14 min is demonstrated, resulting in a maximum LSAW velocity variation of 1.3 m/s. This corresponds to a depth variation of 7.4 nm and a temperature variation of 0.8 °C for the whole surface.

  13. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  14. Drip shield Structural Response to Rock Fall

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Ceylan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this calculation is to determine areas over the drip shield (DS) top plate and side-walls where the residual stress values exceed 50% of Ti-7 yield strength. These areas will also be referred to as the damaged areas throughout this document. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of the damaged areas based on a chosen set of stress components. This calculation is intended for use in support of the preliminary design activities for the license application design of the DS. This calculation is associated with the DS design and was performed by the Waste Package and Components. AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The DS is classified as a safety category item. Therefore, this calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design of the type of DS considered in this calculation and provides the potential dimensions and materials for the DS design. The finite element (FE) calculation was performed by using the commercially available LS-DYNA Version (V)960 (Software Tracking Number [STN] 10300-960.1106-00, Ref. 7) FE code. The results of this calculation were evaluated using residual first principal stress. Subsequent analysis of areas determined by residual stresses have been reported in the results section of this document. The finite element mesh adequacy was determined based on the maximum stress intensity and maximum first principal stress. The current work processes and procedures for the control of the electronic management of data for this activity were conducted in accordance with AP-3.13Q, ''Design Control'' (Section 5.1.2).

  15. Blood drop size in passive dripping from weapons.

    PubMed

    Kabaliuk, N; Jermy, M C; Morison, K; Stotesbury, T; Taylor, M C; Williams, E

    2013-05-10

    Passive dripping, the slow dripping of blood under gravity, is responsible for some bloodstains found at crime scenes, particularly drip trails left by a person moving through the scene. Previous work by other authors has established relationships, under ideal conditions, between the size of the stain, the number of spines and satellite stains, the roughness of the surface, the size of the blood droplet and the height from which it falls. To apply these relationships to infer the height of fall requires independent knowledge of the size of the droplet. This work aims to measure the size of droplets falling from objects representative of hand-held weapons. Pig blood was used, with density, surface tension and viscosity controlled to fall within the normal range for human blood. Distilled water was also tested as a reference. Drips were formed from stainless steel objects with different roughnesses including cylinders of diameter between 10 and 100 mm, and flat plates. Small radius objects including a knife and a wrench were also tested. High speed images of the falling drops were captured. The primary blood drop size ranged from 4.15±0.11 mm up to 6.15±0.15 mm (depending on the object), with the smaller values from sharper objects. The primary drop size correlated only weakly with surface roughness, over the roughness range studied. The number of accompanying droplets increased with the object size, but no significant correlation with surface texture was observed. Dripping of blood produced slightly smaller drops, with more accompanying droplets, than dripping water. PMID:23597743

  16. 40 CFR 265.441 - Assessment of existing drip pad integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. 265.441 Section 265.441 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 265.441 Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. (a)...

  17. 40 CFR 264.571 - Assessment of existing drip pad integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. 264.571 Section 264.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 264.571 Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. (a) For each...

  18. 40 CFR 265.441 - Assessment of existing drip pad integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. 265.441 Section 265.441 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 265.441 Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 264.571 - Assessment of existing drip pad integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. 264.571 Section 264.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 264.571 Assessment of existing drip pad integrity. (a) For each...

  20. 40 CFR 265.442 - Design and installation of new drip pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pads. 265.442 Section 265.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 265.442 Design and installation of new drip pads. Owners and operators of new drip pads must ensure that the pads are designed, installed, and operated in...

  1. 40 CFR 264.572 - Design and installation of new drip pads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... pads. 264.572 Section 264.572 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Drip Pads § 264.572 Design and installation of new drip pads. Owners and operators of new drip pads must ensure that the pads are designed, installed, and operated in accordance with...

  2. Measuring the spectrum of mutation induced by nitrogen ions and protons in the human-hamster hybrid cell line A(L)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, S. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Ueno, A.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed to charged particles, including protons, alpha particles and heavier ions, during space flights. Therefore, studying the biological effectiveness of these sparsely and densely ionizing radiations is important to understanding the potential health effects for astronauts. We evaluated the mutagenic effectiveness of sparsely ionizing 55 MeV protons and densely ionizing 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions using cells of two human-hamster cell lines, A(L) and A(L)C. We have previously characterized a spectrum of mutations, including megabase deletions, in human chromosome 11, the sole human chromosome in the human-hamster hybrid cell lines A(L)C and A(L). CD59(-) mutants have lost expression of a human cell surface antigen encoded by the CD59 gene located at 11p13. Deletion of genes located on the tip of the short arm of 11 (11p15.5) is lethal to the A(L) hybrid, so that CD59 mutants that lose the entire chromosome 11 die and escape detection. In contrast, deletion of the 11p15.5 region is not lethal in the hybrid A(L)C, allowing for the detection of chromosome loss or other chromosomal mutations involving 11p15.5. The 55 MeV protons and 32 MeV/nucleon nitrogen ions were each about 10 times more mutagenic per unit dose at the CD59 locus in A(L)C cells than in A(L) cells. In the case of nitrogen ions, the mutations observed in A(L)C cells were predominantly due to chromosome loss events or 11p deletions, often containing a breakpoint in the pericentromeric region. The increase in the CD59(-) mutant fraction for A(L)C cells exposed to protons was associated with either translocation of portions of 11q onto a hamster chromosome, or discontinuous or "skipping" mutations. We demonstrate here that A(L)C cells are a powerful tool that will aid in the understanding of the mutagenic effects of different types of ionizing radiation.

  3. PROCESSES INFLUENCING VARIABILITY IN CAVE DRIP WATER TEMPERATURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have investigated five months of epikarst storage drip water temperatures along with surface air temperature and rainfall at a small waterfall in Cave Spring Caverns, Kentucky. Falling from about 4 m, water temperatures are measured within seconds of entering the cave passage with two minute, and...

  4. Delivery of Chemical and Microbial Pesticides from Drip Irrigation Emitters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Applying pesticides uniformly to the target area with drip irrigation systems is essential for achieving effectiveness of efficient insect or disease control and the sustainability of a safe environment. The uniformity and recovery rate of water soluble and insoluble materials of chemical and micro...

  5. Nitrogen Effects on Onion Yield Under Drip and Furrow Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) is a high cash value crop with a very shallow root system that is frequently irrigated and fertilized with high N rates to maximize yield. Converting from furrow-irrigated to drip-irrigated onion production may reduce N fertilizer needs, water inputs, and NO3-N leaching poten...

  6. Forage subsurface drip irrigation using treated swine effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system was initiated to evaluate the use of treated swine effluent on a bermuda grass forage crop. The SDI system was installed in Duplin County, North Carolina, at the location of an innovative swine wastewater treatment system. The effluent from the...

  7. Validated Analytical Model of a Pressure Compensation Drip Irrigation Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshery, Pulkit; Wang, Ruo-Qian; Taylor, Katherine; Tran, Davis; Winter, Amos

    2015-11-01

    This work is focused on analytically characterizing the behavior of pressure-compensating drip emitters in order to design low-cost, low-power irrigation solutions appropriate for off-grid communities in developing countries. There are 2.5 billion small acreage farmers worldwide who rely solely on their land for sustenance. Drip, compared to flood, irrigation leads to up to 70% reduction in water consumption while increasing yields by 90% - important in countries like India which are quickly running out of water. To design a low-power drip system, there is a need to decrease the pumping pressure requirement at the emitters, as pumping power is the product of pressure and flow rate. To efficiently design such an emitter, the relationship between the fluid-structure interactions that occur in an emitter need to be understood. In this study, a 2D analytical model that captures the behavior of a common drip emitter was developed and validated through experiments. The effects of independently changing the channel depth, channel width, channel length and land height on the performance were studied. The model and the key parametric insights presented have the potential to be optimized in order to guide the design of low-pressure, clog-resistant, pressure-compensating emitters.

  8. Deep subsurface drip irrigation for cotton in the southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L) yield with various irrigation rates and crop rotations irrigated with subsurface drip irrigation (SSDI) is not known for the US Southeast. A SSDI system was installed in Southwest GA (1998) and maintained for 10 years. The soil was a Tifton loamy sand (Fine-lo...

  9. Effect of dripline flushing on subsurface drip irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The velocity of dripline flushing in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems affects system design, cost, management, performance, and longevity. A 30-day field study was conducted at Kansas State University to analyze the effect of four targeted flushing velocities (0.23, 0.30, 0.46, and 0.61 m/s)...

  10. Effects of dripline flushing on subsurface drip irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The velocity of dripline flushing in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems affects system design, cost, management, performance, and longevity. A 30-day field study was conducted at Kansas State University to analyze the effect of four targeted flushing velocities (0.23, 0.30, 0.46, and 0.61 m/s)...

  11. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  12. Spectroscopic determination of hypochlorous acid, in chloride brine solutions, featuring 5 MeV proton beam line experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Thomas; Paviet-Hartmann, Patricia; Wetteland, Christopher; Lu, Ningping

    2003-04-01

    The irradiation effects of 4.9 MeV protons on salt repository related brines are investigated spectrophotometrically. The induced formation of hypochlorous acid is determined up to doses of 11 kGy in 3.7 M MgCl 2·6H 2O and in a multicomponent brine of high concentration: Brine G. The build-up of hypochlorous acid to a steady-state concentration is found to be independent on the chloride concentration. The ultimate objective of this experiment is the estimation of the G value for HOCl in which meaningful predictions of long-term redox conditions in a nuclear repository strongly depend on. This paper describes our first steps towards the determination of HOCl.

  13. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  14. Improved Laboratory Values of the H{sub 2} Lyman and Werner Lines for Constraining Time Variation of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Salumbides, E. J.; Khramov, A.; Wolf, A. L.; Eikema, K. S. E.; Ubachs, W.; Bailly, D.; Vervloet, M.

    2008-11-28

    Two distinct high-accuracy laboratory spectroscopic investigations of the H{sub 2} molecule are reported. Anchor lines in the EF{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}-X{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} system are calibrated by two-photon deep-UV Doppler-free spectroscopy, while independent Fourier-transform spectroscopic measurements are performed that yield accurate spacings in the B{sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-EF{sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +} and I{sup 1}{pi}{sub g}-C{sup 1}{pi}{sub u} systems. From combination differences accurate transition wavelengths for the B-X Lyman and the C-X Werner lines can be determined with accuracies better than {approx}5x10{sup -9}, representing a major improvement over existing values. This metrology provides a practically exact database to extract a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio based on H{sub 2} lines in high-redshift objects. Moreover, it forms a rationale for equipping a future class of telescopes, carrying 30-40 m dishes, with novel spectrometers of higher resolving powers.

  15. Spectroscopy of proton-unbound nuclei by tracking their decay products in-flight: One- and two- proton decays of F15, Ne16, and Na19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukha, I.; Sümmerer, K.; Acosta, L.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Egorova, I. A.; Espino, J. M.; Fomichev, A.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Geissel, H.; Gómez-Camacho, J.; Grigorenko, L.; Hofmann, J.; Kiselev, O.; Korsheninnikov, A.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Litvinova, E.; Martel, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ott, W.; Pfützner, M.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Roeckl, E.; Stanoiu, M.; Timofeyuk, N. K.; Weick, H.; Woods, P. J.

    2010-11-01

    A powerful method of investigating proton-unbound nuclear states by tracking their decay products in flight is discussed in detail. To verify the method, four known levels in F15, Ne16, and Na19 were investigated by measuring the angular correlations between protons and the respective heavy-ion fragments stemming from the precursor decays in flight. The parent nuclei of interest were produced in nuclear reactions of one-neutron removal from Ne17 and Mg20 projectiles at energies of 410-450 A MeV. The trajectories of the respective decay products, O14 + p + p and Ne18 + p + p, were measured by applying a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of the fragments, which provided information on energies and widths of the parent states. In addition for reproducing properties of known states, evidence for hitherto unknown excited states in F15 and Ne16 was found. This tracking technique has an advantage in studies of exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip line measuring the resonance energies and widths with a high precision although by using low-intensity beams and very thick targets.

  16. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  17. Controls on cave drip water temperature and implications for speleothem-based paleoclimate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Andersen, Martin S.; Baker, Andy; Rutlidge, Helen; Markowska, Monika; Roshan, Hamid; Marjo, Christopher E.; Graham, Peter W.; Acworth, R. Ian

    2015-11-01

    While several studies explore cave climate and thermal regimes, little is known about the controls on cave drip water temperature. Yet water temperature significantly influences biogeochemical processes associated with cave drips. To identify the processes that control the cave drip water temperature, we measured the temperatures at multiple locations along a speleothem flow path and drip sources (stalactites) concurrently with the drip rates in Cathedral Cave, Wellington, Australia. We monitored long-term drip water temperature, drip rates, surface and cave climate and in-cave evaporation rates and conducted 3 infiltration experiments with different flow, temperature and isotopic conditions. Our results show that the drip water temperature is controlled by multiple superimposed heat transport mechanisms that act upon the infiltrating water in the epikarst, the water film after it enters the cave and before it becomes a drip. The two main heat sources/sinks for drip water are the cave air and the surrounding rock. The subsurface temperature is coupled to the surface temperature by conduction through the soil and rock mass, but the cave climate is also coupled to the surface climate by venting. On a regional scale, drip temperatures are mainly driven by the annual ground surface temperature signal but damped with depth and shifted in time compared to the surface. On a local scale, the drip water temperature can differ significantly from cave air and speleothem temperature due to the latent heat exchange of evaporation and localised water film convection. The main controls are ground surface temperature, subsurface depth, air density induced ventilation, distance from entry and drip rate. We present a conceptual model that explains drip water temperature signals and provide signal driven guidance on best type and location for speleothem sampling. We anticipate that our results will significantly improve the understanding of temperature-dependent paleoclimate signals

  18. Stable isotopes in cave drip waters from the semi-arid southern Portugal: implication for paleoenvironment reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga-Pires, Cristina; Hélie, Jean-François; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2014-05-01

    Paleo-environmental studies rely on proxies for which present day conditions need to be documented. Here, we present results from a nearly two years sampling program of waters in precipitation, aquifers and cave drip waters in the semi arid region of Southern Portugal where a Mediterranean type climate prevails. Isotopic compositions of precipitations at Faro, from 1978 until 2001, are available through the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP) database of the International Atomic Energy Agency. In addition, we measured oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions of water samples collected in 2011 and 2012 at one meteorological station located 20 km apart from the cave. In the cave itself, four different dripping locations were surveyed. Finally, five wells from the aquifer flowing underneath the cave were also sampled. Whereas local meteoric water line obtained from GNIP data shows an important contribution of local evaporating waters, precipitation data from this project rather points out to a drier moisture source, exhibiting a deuterium excess of close to 16.5 oȦquifer isotopic compositions show very small variations during the 2 yr sampling period, with mean values of -4.53±0.06 o (VSMOW) and 23.39±0.81 o (VSMOW) for δ18O and δ2H, respectively. On the other hand, drip waters isotopic compositions are dependent of the sampling site, although varying linearly (δ2H~13.3*δ18O + 38.1, R2=0.74, p

  19. Responses of canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach (Prunus persica) trees to alternate partial root zone drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Daozhi; Kang, Shaozhong; Zhang, Jianhua

    2005-08-01

    We investigated canopy transpiration and canopy conductance of peach trees under three irrigation patterns: fixed 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (FPRDI), alternate 1/2 partial root zone drip irrigation (APRDI) and full root zone drip irrigation (FDI). Canopy transpiration was measured using heat pulse sensors, and canopy conductance was calculated using the Jarvis model and the inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Results showed that the transpiration rate and canopy conductance in FPRDI and APRDI were smaller than those in FDI. More significantly, the total irrigation amount was greatly reduced, by 34.7% and 39.6%, respectively for APRDI and FPRDI in the PRDI (partial root zone drip irrigation) treatment period. The daily transpiration was linearly related to the reference evapotranspiration in the three treatments, but daily transpiration of FDI is more than that of APRDI and FPRDI under the same evaporation demand, suggesting a restriction of transpiration water loss in the APRDI and FPRDI trees. FDI needed a higher soil water content to carry the same amount of transpiration as the APRDI and FPRDI trees, suggesting the hydraulic conductance of roots of APRDI and FPRDI trees was enhanced, and the roots had a greater water uptake than in FDI when the average soil water content in the root zone was the same. By a comparison between the transpiration rates predicted by the Penman-Monteith equation and the measured canopy transpiration rates for 60 days during the experimental period, an excellent correlation along the 1:1 line was found for all the treatments (R2 > 0.80), proving the reliability of the methodology.

  20. Seasonal variations of cave conditions and drip water stable isotopes from a monitoring study of Raccoon Mountain Caverns, Tennessee, and its implications in interpreting speleothem record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzclaw, C. L.; Gordon, R. D.; Feng, W.; Allard, J.

    2015-12-01

    A two-year monitoring study at Raccoon Mountain Caverns near Chattanooga, Tennessee was carried out in an attempt to establish quantitative relationships between climate signals and drip water stable isotopes for interpreting speleothem paleoclimate records from the cave. Eight field trips were made from Jan. 2014 to Jun. 2015, during which cave meteorological conditions (RH, temperature and cave air CO2 concentration) and drip rate were measured for 5 sites inside the cave. 63 cave drip and pool water samples were collected and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (δ18O and δD values). Cave air temperature varied throughout the study period, the temporal variations ranged at different sites from 2 to 8.4 °C (the greatest variation was observed at sites that are closer to the entrance or surface). These are significantly less than outside temperatures range of 24 °C, but more than observed in other monitored caves. Elevated cave-air CO2 concentration (3200 ppm) and slow drip rate during the summer indicated slowed or stalled growth of calcite. The overall range of δ18O values were -7.1‰ to -4.5‰. A δD vs δ18O diagram yields a slope of 6.1, which falls within the normal range of 6-8 for local Meteoric Water Line. The value is slightly above Global Meteoric Water Line, indicating lack of evaporative effect. Throughout the study period, the δ18O values varied from 0.6 ‰ at some sites to 1.9‰ at others. The largest changes were likely due to the close proximity of collection sites to the surface precipitation. Spatially, for samples collected at each cave trip, different sites displayed variations of δ18O values from 0‰ to 1.7‰. The difference could be attributed to different type of drip sites with varying types of flow paths rainwater takes to the drip sites. The significant seasonal shift of drip water δ18O values and growth conditions indicate importance of consideration of seasonality in interpreting speleothem δ18O record

  1. WAPDEG Analysis of Waste Package and Drip shield Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    K. Mon

    2004-09-29

    As directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), an analysis of the degradation of the engineered barrier system (EBS) drip shields and waste packages at the Yucca Mountain repository is developed. The purpose of this activity is to provide the TSPA with inputs and methodologies used to evaluate waste package and drip shield degradation as a function of exposure time under exposure conditions anticipated in the repository. This analysis provides information useful to satisfy ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) requirements. Several features, events, and processes (FEPs) are also discussed (Section 6.2, Table 15). The previous revision of this report was prepared as a model report in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Due to changes in the role of this report since the site recommendation, it no longer contains model development. This revision is prepared as a scientific analysis in accordance with AP-SIII.9Q, ''Scientific Analyses'' and uses models previously validated in (1) ''Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169985]); (2) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169984]); and (3) ''General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Drip Shield'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169845]). The integrated waste package degradation (IWPD) analysis presented in this report treats several implementation-related issues, such as defining the number and size of patches per waste package that undergo stress corrosion cracking; recasting the weld flaw analysis in a form as implemented in the Closure Weld Defects (CWD) software; and, general corrosion rate manipulations (e.g., change of scale in Section 6.3.4). The weld flaw portion of this report takes input from an engineering calculation (BSC 2004

  2. Complex dynamics of 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 studied by proton spin-lattice NMR relaxation and second moment of NMR line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Latanowicz, L.; Medycki, W.; Świergiel, J.; Natkaniec, I.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of a solid 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 in phase I is studied on the basis of the proton T1 (24.7 MHz and 15 MHz) relaxation time measurements and the proton second moment of NMR line, M2. The measurements of the T1 were performed for temperatures from 20 to 167 K, while those of the second moment M2 from 23 to 220 K. The phase I was accurately prepared. The obtained second moment, M2 values were correlated with those based on T1 relaxation time measurements. The proton spin pairs of the methyl groups perform a complex motion being a resultant of two components characterized by the correlation times τ3T and τ3H, referring to the tunneling and over the barrier jumps in a triple potential. For τ3H the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for τ3T - the Schrödinger one. The jumps over the barrier causes a minimum in T1 (24.7 MHz) at temperature about 35 K. The high temperatures slope of this minimum permits evaluation of the activation energy as EH=2.0 kJ/mol. The relaxation time T1 is temperature independent in the lowest temperature regime. This indicates that tunnelling correlation time assumes a constant value of about 1.3·10-10 s according to the Schrödinger equation (τ3T ≈ τ03T e B√{EH } at lowest temperatures). The tunneling jumps of methyl protons reduce M2 from the rigid lattice value 22.6 G2 to the value 5.7 G2 at zero Kelvin temperature. The second reduction to the value 1.41 G2 at 4.5-7 K is due to C3 jumps over the barrier. According to the Schrödinger equation the tunnelling jumps ceases above Ttun temperature where the thermal energy is equal to the activation energy. The Ttun equals 43.8 K (from T1 data fit, EH=2.0 kJ/mol) or 35 K (from M2 data fit, EH=1.47 kJ/mol). The second moment assumes again the value 5.7 G2 above Ttun temperature. The tunneling splitting, ωT, was estimated equal 2.47 GHz as best fit parameter from the T1 fit. The symmetrical T1 minimum indicates the same value of ωT for the all

  3. Bioenergy from Coastal bermudagrass receiving subsurface drip irrigation with advance-treated swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Keri B; Stone, Kenneth C; Hunt, Patrick G; Ro, Kyoung S; Vanotti, Matias B; Burns, Joseph C

    2009-07-01

    Coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) may be a potentially important source of bio-based energy in the southern US due to its vast acreage. It is often produced as part of a waste management plan with varying nutrient composition and energy characteristics on fields irrigated with livestock wastewater. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of subsurface drip irrigation with treated swine wastewater on both the quantity and quality of bermudagrass bioenergy. The treated wastewater was recycled from an advanced treatment system and used for irrigation of bermudagrass in two crop seasons. The experiment had nine water and drip line spacing treatments arrayed in a randomized complete block-design with four replicates. The bermudagrass was analyzed for calorific and mineral contents. Bermudagrass energy yields for 2004 and 2005 ranged from 127.4 to 251.4MJ ha(-1). Compared to irrigation with commercial nitrogen fertilizer, the least biomass energy density was associated with bermudagrass receiving treated swine wastewater. Yet, in 2004 the wastewater irrigated bermudagrass had greater hay yields leading to greater energy yield per ha. This decrease in energy density of wastewater irrigated bermudagrass was associated with increased concentrations of K, Ca, and Na. After thermal conversion, these compounds are known to remain in the ash portion thereby decreasing the energy density. Nonetheless, the loss of energy density using treated effluent via SDI may be offset by the positive influence of these three elements for their catalytic properties in downstream thermal conversion processes such as promoting a lesser char yield and greater combustible gas formation. PMID:19289275

  4. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  5. Peanut Yield, Market Grade, and Economics with Two Surface Drip Lateral Spacings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip irrigation laterals were spaced next to crop rows and in alternate row middles to document crop yield, market grade and gross/partial economic returns for this type of irrigation system compared with non-irrigation practices. A surface drip irrigation system was installed at two sites o...

  6. Peanut Yield, Grade, and Economics with Two Surface Drip Lateral Orientations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip irrigation laterals were spaced next to crop rows and in alternate row middles to document crop yield, grade and gross/partial economic returns for this type of irrigation system compared with non-irrigation practices. A subsurface drip irrigation system was installed at two sites on a ...

  7. Peanut, Cotton, and Corn Yield and Partial Net Income with Two Surface Drip Lateral Spacings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface drip irrigation laterals were spaced next to crop rows (0.91 m) and in alternate row middles (1.83 m) to document crop yield and partial net economic returns compared with non-irrigated peanut (Arachis hypogaea), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and corn (Zea mays). A drip irrigation system was ...

  8. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacing effects on soil water redistribution, corn yield, and water productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emitter spacings of 0.3 to 0.6 m are commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of corn on the deep, silt loam soils of the United States Great Plains. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacings of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m were examined for the resulting differences in soil water redistribut...

  9. Cotton response to crop row offset and orientation to subsurface drip irrigation laterals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent increase in the use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) for cotton production in the Texas High Plains has resulted in questions concerning drip lateral position and orientation relative to crop rows. Field experiments were conducted at Halfway, Texas to evaluate traditional SDI installat...

  10. Corn yield and economic return with nitrogen applied through drip tubing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two year project was established to determine corn (Zea mays, L) yield response to subsurface (SSDI) and surface (SDI) drip irrigation systems at various nitrogen fertilizer rates. Nitrogen was applied through the drip system at two nitrogen levels in three split applications. Supplemental dry N ...

  11. On-line measurements of nitro organic compounds emitted from automobiles by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry: Laboratory experiments and a field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Fujitani, Y.; Fushimi, A.; Sato, K.; Sekimoto, K.; Yamada, H.; Hori, S.; Shimono, A.; Hikida, T.

    2011-12-01

    On-line measurements of nitro organic compounds in automobile exhaust were carried out by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) with a chassis dynamometer. Diesel vehicles with oxidation catalyst system (diesel vehicle A) and with diesel PM-NOx reduction system ((diesel vehicle B) and a gasoline vehicle were used as a test vehicle. In the case of the diesel vehicle A, the emissions of nitromethane, nitrophenol (NPh), C7-, C8-, C9-, and C10-nitrophenols, and dihydroxynitrobenzenes (DHNB) were observed in the diesel exhaust from the experiment under the constant driving at 60 km hr-1. Temporal variations of mixing ratios for nitromethane, NPh, and DHNB along with related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured during a transient driving cycle. The time-resolved measurement revealed that the nitromethane emission was strongly correlated with the emissions of CO, benzene, and acetone, which are relatively quickly produced in acceleration processes and appeared as sharp peaks. On the other hand, the NPh emission was moderately correlated with the emissions of acetic acid and phenol, which peaks were broad. The emission of nitromethane was observed from the exhaust of the diesel vehicle B but the emission of other nitro organic compounds was not observed. This suggests that the emission of nitro organic compounds besides nitromethane may depend on the diesel exhaust aftertreatment devices. The emission of nitromethane was also observed from the exhaust of the gasoline vehicle with cold start. An in-situ measurement of nitro organic compounds and their related VOCs was carried out at the crossing of an urban city, Kawasaki. Nitromethane was observed at the crossing and we found that the concentration of nitrometane varied rapidly. During the measurement, the maximum of the concentration of nitrometane reached 5 ppbv. Not only nitrophenols but also nitroaromatics were sometimes detected in the field measurement.

  12. Drip Irrigation Aided Phytoremediation for Removal of TCE from Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2003-04-24

    Groundwater in D-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and by-products resulting from discharges of this organic solvent during past disposal practices. This contaminated groundwater occurs primarily at depths of 9 meters to 15 meters below ground surface, well below the depths that are typically penetrated by plant roots. The process investigated in this study involved pumping water from the contaminated aquifer and discharging the water into overlying test plots two inches below the surface using drip irrigation. The field treatability study was conducted from 8/31/00 to 4/18/02 using six 0.08 hectare test plots, two each containing pines, cottonwoods, and no vegetation (controls). The primary objective was to determine the overall effectiveness of the process for TCE removal and to determine the principal biotic and abiotic pathways for its removal. Results demonstrated that the process provides a viable method to remove TCE-contaminated groundwater. The data clearly showed that the presence of trees reduced volatilization of TCE from the drip irrigation system to the atmosphere. Influent groundwater TCE concentrations averaging 89 mg/L were reduced to non-detectable levels (less than 5 mg/L) within the upper two feet of soil (rhizosphere).

  13. The Schwarzschild Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Haramein, Nassim

    2010-11-24

    We review our model of a proton that obeys the Schwarzschild condition. We find that only a very small percentage ({approx}10{sup -39}%) of the vacuum fluctuations available within a proton volume need be cohered and converted to mass-energy in order for the proton to meet the Schwarzschild condition. This proportion is equivalent to that between gravitation and the strong force where gravitation is thought to be {approx}10{sup -38} to 10{sup -40} weaker than the strong force. Gravitational attraction between two contiguous Schwarzschild protons can accommodate both nucleon and quark confinement. We calculate that two contiguous Schwarzschild protons would rotate at c and have a period of 10{sup -23} s and a frequency of 10{sup 22} Hz which is characteristic of the strong force interaction time and a close approximation of the gamma emission typically associated with nuclear decay. We include a scaling law and find that the Schwarzschild proton data point lies near the least squares trend line for organized matter. Using a semi-classical model, we find that a proton charge orbiting at a proton radius at c generates a good approximation to the measured anomalous magnetic moment.

  14. The soil-water flow system beneath a cotton field in arid north-west China, serviced by mulched drip irrigation using brackish water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianwen; Jin, Menggui; Huang, Jinou; Yuan, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    A field experiment was carried out in southern Xinjiang, China, to reveal soil-water flow pattern beneath a combined plastic-mulch (film) and drip-irrigation system using brackish water. The soil-water flow system (SWFS) was characterized from soil surface to the water table based on observed spatio-temporal distribution of total soil-water potential, water content and electric conductivity. Root suction provided a strong inner sink. The results indicated that SWFS determined the soil salinity and moisture distribution. Drip-irrigation events could leach excess salts from the root zone and provide soil conditions with a tolerable salinity level that supports the growth of cotton. High-salinity strips were formed along the wetting front and at the bare soil surface. Hydrogeology conditions, irrigation regime, climate, plant growth and use of mulch would affect potential sources and sinks, boundary conditions and the size of the SWFS. At depth 0-60 cm, the soil salinity at the end of the irrigation season was 1.9 times that at the beginning. Beneath the mulch cover, the soil-water content in the `wide rows' zone (55 cm between the two rows with no drip line) was higher than that in the `narrow rows' zone (15 cm between the two rows with a drip line) due to the strong root-water uptake. The downward water flow below the divergent curved surface of zero flux before irrigation, and the water-table fluctuation with irrigation events, indicated that excessive irrigation occurred.

  15. Applying the Active Heating Pulse DFOT Method to Drip Irrigation. Characterization of a wetting bulb in drip emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez-Buelga, J.; Rodriguez-Sinobas, L.; María Gil-Rodríguez, M.; Sayde, C.; Selker, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature Measurement (DFOT) method for estimating temperature variation along a cable of fiber optic has been largely reported in multiple environmental applications. Recently , its usage has been combined with an active heating pulses technique- measurement of the temperature increase when a certain amount of tension is applied to the stainless jacket surrounding the fiber optic cable-in order to estimate soil water content in field and laboratory conditions with great accuracy . Thus, a methodology potentially capable of monitoring spatial variability and accurately estimates soil water content is created. This study presents a direct application of the Active Heated DFOT method for measuring soil water distribution and wetting bulb of a single drip emitter. In order to do so, three concentric helixes of fiber optics were placed in a hexagonal column of Plexiglas of 0.5 m base radius and 0.6 m height. After being filled up with air-dried loamy soil of controlled bulk density, a pressure compensating drip emitter of 2 L/h discharge was placed on top of the soil column. For an irrigation time of 5 hours and 40 min, 21 heating pulses of 2 minutes and 20W/m, were applied. In addition, soil samples after each heat pulse were also collected. Results showed the potential of this method for monitoring soil water behavior during irrigation and also its capability to estimate soil water content with accuracy.

  16. Plant development and yield of four sugarcane varieties irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system in Campinas, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, André Luiz Barros de O.; Célia de Matos Pires, Regina; Yukitaka Pessinati Ohashi, Augusto; Vasconcelos Ribeiro, Rafael; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Aparecida Creste Dias de Souza, Silvana

    2013-04-01

    The biofuel production is a growing concern on modern society due to the agricultural sustainability, in which both food and energy supply should be taken into account. The agroclimatic zoning indicates that sugarcane expansion in Brazil can only take place in marginal lands, where water deficit occurs and irrigation is necessary. The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficit conditions or to attain high yield and to increase longevity of plants. In this context it is necessary to investigate responses of different varieties to water supply. The aim of this work was to evaluate the plant development and yield of four sugarcane varieties irrigated by a subsurface drip irrigation system in Campinas, Brazil in the 1st cane ratoon cycle. The field experiment was carried out in Campinas SP Brazil, with IACSP95-5000, IACSP94-2094, IACSP94-2101 and SP79-1011 cultivars in the 1st cane ratoon cycle, from January (after the harvest of cane plant cycle) to October (harvest the 1st cane ratoon cycle). The plant spacing was 1.5 m between rows. Each cultivar was planted in an area of 0.4 hectares. The irrigation was done by a subsuperficial drip system with one drip line in each plant row installed at 0.25 m deep. During the 1st cane ratoon cycle the parameters were analysed on the 33rd, 123rd, 185th and 277th day. The analysed parameters were: plant yield (m), leaf area index (LAI) and yield (tons per hectare). According to the results from the second sampling (123rd day) the varieties IACSP95-5000 and IACSP94-2101 showed higher plant height when compared to the other varieties. However, from the third sampling (185th day) on the IACSP95-5000 variety grew considerably taller than the other varieties. The varieties SP79-1011and IACSP94-2101 presented lower values of LAI throughout the crop cycle when compared to other varieties. But on the

  17. Hundreds of automatic drip counters reveal infiltration water discharge characteristics in Australian caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A.; Treble, P. C.; Coleborn, K.; Mahmud, K.; Markowska, M.; Flemons, I.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the timing and character of cave drip water discharge is crucial for our understanding of speleothem climate proxies. Since 2010, we have established a long-term, national monitoring program of drip water infiltration onto cave stalagmites using automated Stalagmate© loggers. Five karst regions, from semi-arid to sub-tropical climates, have been instrumented. Over 200 loggers (between 10 and 40 per cave) have collected data on the timing and amount of drip water infiltration, from sites of contrasting limestone geology. Here, we present results demonstrating the timing and characteristics of drip water discharge from 2010 to present. At the semi-arid Cathedral Cave, with a range of depths from 0-40 m, there is a decreasing frequency of recharge events with depth below ground surface. High-intensity, long-duration rainfall events are confirmed to be the primary driver of infiltration events at semi-arid sites, whereas annual rainfall amount is the primary driver at a Mediterranean climate site with high primary porosity. Inter-annual variability in the frequency and relative amount of drip water infiltration is compared to climate forcing variables such as the ENSO and surface temperature. Our cave observatory system helps improve our understanding of the drip water recharge process, drip-water related speleothem proxy records, and provides a baseline monitoring network for diffuse groundwater recharge during a period of climate change.

  18. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  19. Chaotic Dynamics of Driven Flux Drops: A Superconducting ``Dripping Faucet''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Stuart B.; Stan, Gheorghe

    2008-02-01

    When a current is applied to a type-I superconducting strip containing a narrow channel across its width, magnetic flux spots nucleate at the edge and are then driven along the channel by the current. These flux “drops” are reminiscent of water drops dripping from a faucet, a model system for studying low-dimensional chaos. We use a novel high-bandwidth Hall probe to detect in real time the motion of individual flux spots moving along the channel. Analyzing the time series consisting of the intervals between successive flux drops, we find distinct regions of chaotic behavior characterized by positive Lyapunov exponents, indicating that there is a close analogy between the dynamics of the superconducting and water drop systems.

  20. Chronic Cough, Reflux, Postnasal Drip Syndrome, and the Otolaryngologist

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Deborah C.; Karkos, Petros D.; Vaughan, Casey; Johnston, James; Dwivedi, Raghav C.; Atkinson, Helen; Kortequee, Shah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Chronic cough is a multifactorial symptom that requires multidisciplinary approach. Over the last years, general practitioners refer increasingly more chronic cough patients directly to the otolaryngologist. The aim of this paper is to highlight the issues in diagnosis and management of chronic cough patients from the otolaryngologist perspective. Design. Literature review. Results. Gastroesophageal reflux and postnasal drip syndrome remain one of the most common causes of chronic cough. Better diagnostic modalities, noninvasive tests, and high technology radiological and endoscopic innovations have made diagnosis of these difficult-to-treat patients relatively easier. Multidisciplinary assessment has also meant that at least some of these cases can be dealt with confidently in one stop clinics. Conclusions. As the number of referrals of chronic cough patients to an Ear Nose Throat Clinic increases, the otolaryngologist plays a pivotal role in managing these difficult cases. PMID:22577385

  1. The Hydrodynamics of Urination: to drip or jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan; Yang, Patricia; Choo, Jerome; Hu, David

    2013-11-01

    The release of waste products is fundamental to all life. How are fluids released from the body quickly and efficiently? In a combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate the hydrodynamics of urination across five orders of magnitude in animal mass. Using high-speed videography and flow-rate measurement at the Atlanta Zoo, we report discrete regimes for urination style. We observe dripping by small mammals such as rats and jetting by large mammals such as elephants. We discover urination duration is independent of animal size among animals that use jetting. We rationalize urination styles, along with the constant-time scaling, by consideration of the relative magnitudes of the driving forces, gravity and bladder pressure, and the corresponding viscous losses within the urethra. This study may give insight into why certain animals are more prone to diseases of the urinary tract, and how the urinary system evolved under the laws of fluid mechanics.

  2. Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian A.

    2012-02-01

    (abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 < z <3.7 in VLT/UVES spectra. From these absorbers we find 2.2 sigma evidence for angular variations in alpha under a dipole+monopole model. Combined with previous Keck/HIRES observations, we find 4.1 sigma evidence for angular (and therefore spatial) variations in alpha, with maximal increase of alpha occurring in the direction RA=(17.3 +/- 1.0) hr, dec=(-61 +/- 10) deg. Under a model where the observed effect is proportional to the lookback-time distance the significance increases to 4.2 sigma. Dipole models fitted to the VLT and Keck samples and models fitted to z<1.6 and z>1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectively. A second spectrum of Q0528-250 provides an additional constraint of (Delta mu)/mu=(0.2 +/- 3.2_stat +/- 1.9_sys) x 10^(-6). The weighted mean of these values yields (Delta mu)/mu=(1.7 +/- 2.4) x 10^(-6), the most precise constraint on evolution in mu at z>1.

  3. Predicting deep percolation with eddy covariance under mulch drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Guanghui; Tian, Fuqiang; Hu, Hongchang

    2016-04-01

    Water is essential for the agricultural development and ecological sustainability of the arid and semi-arid oasis with rare precipitation input and high evaporation demand. Deep percolation (DP) defined as excess irrigation water percolating below the plant root zone will reduce irrigation water use efficiency (WUE). But the DP was often ignored in mulch drip irrigation (MDI) which has reached the area of 1.6 million hectares in Xinjiang, the northwest of China. In this study DP experiments were conducted at an agricultural experiment station located within an irrigation district in the Tarim River Basin for four cotton growing periods. First it was detected the irrigation water infiltrated into the soil layers below 100cm and the groundwater level responded to the irrigation events well. Then DP below 100cm soil layers was calculated using the soil water balance method with the aid of eddy covariance (with the energy balance closure of 0.72). The negative DP (groundwater contribution to the crop-water use through capillary rising) at the seedling and harvesting stages can reach 77mm and has a good negative correlation with the groundwater level and positive correlation with potential evaporation. During the drip irrigation stage approximately 45% of the irrigation became DP and resulted in the low irrigation WUE of 0.6. The DP can be 164mm to 270mm per year which was positive linearly correlated to irrigation depth and negative linear correlated to irrigation interval. It is better to establish the irrigation schedule with small irrigation depth and given frequently to reduce deep percolation and meet crop needs.

  4. Remote-Sensing-Based Evaluation of Relative Consumptive Use Between Flood- and Drip-Irrigated Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Baquero, G. F.; Jordan, D. L.; Whittaker, A. T.; Allen, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Governments and water authorities are compelled to evaluate the impacts of agricultural irrigation on economic development and sustainability as water supply shortages continue to increase in many communities. One of the strategies commonly used to reduce such impacts is the conversion of traditional irrigation methods towards more water-efficient practices. As part of a larger effort by the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission to understand the environmental and economic impact of converting from flood irrigation to drip irrigation, this study evaluates the water-saving effectiveness of drip irrigation in Deming, New Mexico, using a remote-sensing-based technique combined with ground data collection. The remote-sensing-based technique used relative temperature differences as a proxy for water use to show relative differences in crop consumptive use between flood- and drip-irrigated fields. Temperature analysis showed that, on average, drip-irrigated fields were cooler than flood-irrigated fields, indicating higher water use. The higher consumption of water by drip-irrigated fields was supported by a determination of evapotranspiration (ET) from all fields using the METRIC Landsat-based surface energy balance model. METRIC analysis yielded higher instantaneous ET for drip-irrigated fields when compared to flood-irrigated fields and confirmed that drip-irrigated fields consumed more water than flood-irrigated fields planted with the same crop. More water use generally results in more biomass and hence higher crop yield, and this too was confirmed by greater relative Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for the drip irrigated fields. Results from this study confirm previous estimates regarding the impacts of increased efficiency of drip irrigation on higher water consumption in the area (Ward and Pulido-Velazquez, 2008). The higher water consumption occurs with drip because, with the limited water supplies and regulated maximum limits on pumping amounts, the

  5. What determines the calcium concentration of speleothem-forming drip waters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andy; Flemons, Ingrid; Andersen, Martin S.; Coleborn, Katie; Treble, Pauline C.

    2016-08-01

    Cave drip water calcium ion concentration is a primary determinant of speleothem deposition and growth rate. The factors that determine drip water calcium ion concentrations are the soil and vadose zone CO2 concentrations, and the hydrogeochemical evolution of the water from soil to cave. Here, we use a systematic literature review of cave drip water calcium concentrations, combined with PHREEQC equilibrium modelling, to investigate the global relationship between calcium concentration and surface climate. Our results are discussed in the context of understanding the climatic and environmental controls on drip water calcium concentration, speleothem growth rates and proxies of past climate and environmental change. We use an empirical, global soil CO2 concentration-temperature relationship to derive PHREEQC modelled cave drip water calcium concentrations. The global mean modelled drip water calcium concentration is close to that observed, but it over-predicts at high and low temperatures, and significantly under-predicts at temperate conditions. We hypothesise that closed system hydrochemical evolution due to water saturation is an important control on carbonate dissolution at colder temperatures. Under warmer conditions, for example temperate climates with a dry and hot or warm summer, seasonally-limited water availability can lead to: < 100% soil cover; water-limitations on microbial and root respiration; wildfire; and prior calcite precipitation, all of which limit drip water calcium concentrations. In temperate climates with no dry season, higher CO2 concentrations than modelled from soil values are necessary to explain the observed drip water calcium values, which we propose is from an additional source of CO2 from microbial activity and root respiration in the vadose zone during open system hydrochemical evolution.

  6. Seasonal variations of 14C and δ13C for cave drip waters in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Masayo; Kato, Tomomi; Horikawa, Keiji; Nakamura, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Speleothem 14C has recently emerged as a potentially powerful proxy for hydrology changes in comparison with atmospheric 14C calibration curve, rather than as a direct dating tool, apart from a time marker using bomb peak of 14C. Some possible causes for the relationship between speleothem 14C content (or dead carbon fraction: DCF) and karst hydrology have been proposed, such as changes in temperature, precipitation, drip water flow dynamics, cave air ventilation, soil air pCO2. In this study, we investigated seasonal variation in 14C and δ13C of drip water in Ryugashi Cave, Shizuoka Prefecture, central Japan, to examine the causes of the 14C and δ13C variations in a speleothem. The results show that different 14C concentrations and δ13C values of drip water from the Ryugashi Cave, were exhibited at different sites of the Caves No. 1, No. 3, and No. 4, which have different temperature, air pCO2, and flow paths. Further, the 14C and δ13C of drip waters showed seasonal variations at all sites, which were lower in fall and winter, and higher in spring and summer, though the extent of the variations was different among the sites. The 14C in drip waters tended to be correlated with the drip rates: 14C tended to be higher in drip waters with higher drip rates, and also correlated with rainfall amount around the Ryugashi Cave, especially for the drip waters in Cave No. 3, which are considered to have simpler flow paths. The increase in rainfall amount could bring the increase in drip rate of drip water, and then the decrease in interaction between solution and karst, resulting in 14C increase (DCF decrease) in drip water. Accordingly, the reconstruction of precipitation could be performed using 14C variation in a speleothem formed by drip water with simple flow dynamics.

  7. Organic characterisation of cave drip water by LC-OCD and fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutlidge, Helen; Andersen, Martin S.; Baker, Andy; Chinu, Khorshed J.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Jex, Catherine N.; Marjo, Christopher E.; Markowska, Monika; Rau, Gabriel C.

    2015-10-01

    Cathedral Cave, Wellington, Australia, is a natural laboratory for studying water movement and geochemical processes in the unsaturated zone by using artificial irrigation to activate drip sites within the cave. Water sampled from two drip sites activated by irrigations carried out in summer 2014 was analysed for dissolved inorganic ions and fluorescent organic matter. The analysis allowed the development of a conceptual flow path model for each drip site. DOM analysis was further complemented by liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), applied for the first time to karst drip waters, allowing the characterisation of six organic matter fractions. The differences in organic matter fractions at each drip site are interpreted as a signature of the proposed flow paths. LC-OCD was also compared with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of the fluorescence and good correlations were observed for high molecular weight organic matter. Strong positive correlations were also observed for high molecular weight matter and Cu and Ni. This is suggestive of colloidal transport of Cu and Ni by organic matter with high molecular weight, while small molecular weight colloids were not efficient transporters. LC-OCD uniquely provides information on non-fluorescent organic matter and can be used to further quantify drip water organic matter composition.

  8. [Simulation of soil water dynamics in triploid Populus tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Ben-Ye; Jia, Li-Ming; Wang, Ye; Li, Guang-De

    2011-01-01

    Based on the observed data of triploid Populus tomentosa root distribution, a one-dimensional root water uptake model was proposed. Taking the root water uptake into account, the soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation was simulated by using HYDRUS model, and the results were validated with field experiment. Besides, the HYDRUS model was used to study the effects of various irrigation technique parameters on soil wetting patterns. The RMAE for the simulated soil water content by the end of irrigation and approximately 24 h later was 7.8% and 6.0%, and the RMSE was 0.036 and 0.026 cm3 x cm(-3), respectively, illustrating that the HYDRUS model performed well in simulating the short-term soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under drip irrigation, and the root water uptake model was reasonable. Comparing with 2 and 4 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and continuous irrigation, both the 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and the pulsed irrigation with water applied intermittently in 30 min periods could increase the volume of wetted soil and reduce deep percolation. It was concluded that the combination of 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and pulsed irrigation should be the first choice when applying drip irrigation to triploid P. tomentosa root zone at the experiment site. PMID:21548283

  9. Role of Landau quantization on the neutron-drip transition in magnetar crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.; Stoyanov, Zh. K.; Mihailov, L. M.; Mutafchieva, Y. D.; Pavlov, R. L.; Velchev, Ch. J.

    2015-06-01

    The role of a strong magnetic field on the neutron-drip transition in the crust of a magnetar is studied. The composition of the crust and the neutron-drip threshold are determined numerically for different magnetic field strengths using the experimental atomic mass measurements from the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation complemented with theoretical masses calculated from the Brussels-Montreal Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov nuclear mass model HFB-24. The equilibrium nucleus at the neutron-drip point is found to be independent of the magnetic field strength. As demonstrated analytically, the neutron-drip density and pressure increase almost linearly with the magnetic field strength in the strongly quantizing regime for which electrons lie in the lowest Landau level. For weaker magnetic fields, the neutron-drip density exhibits typical quantum oscillations. In this case, the neutron-drip density can be either increased by about 14 % or decreased by 25 % depending on the magnetic field strength. These variations are shown to be almost universal, independently of the nuclear mass model employed. These results may have important implications for the physical interpretation of timing irregularities and quasiperiodic oscillations detected in soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous x-ray pulsars, as well as for the cooling of strongly magnetized neutron stars.

  10. 2D Source area prediction based on physical characteristics of a regular, passive blood drip stain.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nabanita; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Violent criminal acts are often accompanied by dynamic blood shedding events. Bloodstain pattern analysis particularly deals with estimation of the dynamic blood shedding events from the static bloodstain patterns that have been left at the scene. Of all the stain patterns present at a crime scene, drip stain patterns are common stain patterns one would expect to document at a violent crime scene. The paper documents statistically significant correlations between different physical parameters, such as fall height, total number of spines associated with each stain. Statistical significant correlation between the angle of impact and the total number of spines associated with each stain pattern has been established in this work. The paper propounds that the breadth of a regular drip stain is particularly significant in making predictions empirically as also statistically about the surface area from which blood has dripped leading to the formation of a particular drip stain. A data model has been developed using machine learning techniques to predict the range of surface radius from which blood has dripped and lead to the formation of a particular drip stain (Accuracy: 97.53%, Sensitivity=0.9481, Specificity=1). PMID:27295073

  11. Cross sections for production of the 15.10 MeV and other astrophysically significant gamma-ray lines through excitation and spallation of sup 12 C and sup 16 O with protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, F. L.; Werntz, C. W.; Crannell, C. J.; Trombka, J. I.; Chang, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The ratio of the flux of 15.10-MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.438-MeV gamma rays resulting from excitation of the corresponding states in C-12 as a sensitive measure of the spectrum of the exciting particles produced in solar flares and other cosmic sources. These gamma rays are produced predominantly by interactions with C-12 and O-16, both of which are relatively abundant in the solar photosphere. Gamma ray production cross sections for proton interactions have been reported previously for all important channels except for the production of 15.10-MeV gamma rays from O-16. The first reported measurement of the 15.10-MeV gamma ray production cross section from p + O-16 is presented here. The University of Maryland cyclotron was employed to produce 40-, 65-, and 86-MeV protons which interacted with CH2 and BeO targets. The resultant gamma ray spectra were measured with a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector at 70, 90, 110, 125, and 140 degrees relative to the direction of the incident beam for each proton energy. Other gamma ray lines resulting from direct excitation and spallation reactions with C-12 and 0-16 were observed as well, and their gamma ray production cross sections described.

  12. Impact dynamics of porcine drip bloodstains on fabrics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elisabeth M P; Dodds, Margaret; Taylor, Michael C; Li, Jingyao; Michielsen, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    As a passive blood drop impacts a hard surface, it is observed to collapse and spread laterally, then retract and settle. During the spreading phase, the edge of the drop may rise forming a crown extending into spines and breaking up into secondary drops. When a similar drop falls onto a textile surface these same processes may occur, but the process of blood wicking into the fabric complicates stain formation. These processes are described within for passive drip stains collected under controlled conditions using anticoagulated porcine blood. Three stages of this impact process were identified and could be separated into distinct time zones: (1) spreading (time t≤2.5ms) and (2) retraction (2.5≤t≤12ms) on the surface with potential splashing at the periphery, and (3) wicking (30ms ≤t≤30min) of the blood into the fabric. Although wetting and wicking may also occur for t<30ms, the vast majority of wetting and wicking occur after this time and thus the short-time wicking can be ignored. In addition, the number of satellite stains correlates with the surface roughness with the number of satellites for jersey knit>plain-woven>cardboard. Conversely, the size of the satellite stains correlates with the amount of wicking in the fabric with the satellite stain size for plain-woven>jersey knit>cardboard. PMID:26970869

  13. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon

    2003-06-24

    The recommended waste package (WP) design is described in BSC (2001a). The design includes a double-wall WP underneath a protective drip shield (DS) (BSC 2003a). The purpose of the process-level models developed in this report is to model dry oxidation (DOX), general corrosion (GC) and localized corrosion (LC) of the DS plate material, which is made of Ti Grade 7. The DS design also includes structural supports fabricated from Ti Grade 24. Degradation of Ti Grade 24 is not considered in this report. The DS provides protection for the waste package outer barrier (WPOB) both as a barrier to seepage water contact and a physical barrier to potential rockfall. This Model Report (MR) serves as a feed to the Integrated Waste Package Degradation Model (IWPD) analyses, and was developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (BSC 2002a). The models contained in this report serve as a basis to determine whether or not the performance requirements for the DS can be met.

  14. The Dripping Handrail Model: Transient Chaos in Accretion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Karl; Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We define and study a simple dynamical model for accretion systems, the "dripping handrail" (DHR). The time evolution of this spatially extended system is a mixture of periodic and apparently random (but actually deterministic) behavior. The nature of this mixture depends on the values of its physical parameters - the accretion rate, diffusion coefficient, and density threshold. The aperiodic component is a special kind of deterministic chaos called transient chaos. The model can simultaneously exhibit both the quasiperiodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) that characterize the power spectra of fluctuations of several classes of accretion systems in astronomy. For this reason, our model may be relevant to many such astrophysical systems, including binary stars with accretion onto a compact object - white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole - as well as active galactic nuclei. We describe the systematics of the DHR's temporal behavior, by exploring its physical parameter space using several diagnostics: power spectra, wavelet "scalegrams," and Lyapunov exponents. In addition, we note that for large accretion rates the DHR has periodic modes; the effective pulse shapes for these modes - evaluated by folding the time series at the known period - bear a resemblance to the similarly- determined shapes for some x-ray pulsars. The pulsing observed in some of these systems may be such periodic-mode accretion, and not due to pure rotation as in the standard pulsar model.

  15. Linkage between canopy water storage and drop size distributions of leaf drips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanko, Kazuki; Watanabe, Ai; Hotta, Norifumi; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2013-04-01

    Differences in drop size distribution (DSD) of leaf drips among tree species have been estimated and physically interpreted to clarify the leaf drip generation process. Leaf drip generation experiments for nine species were conducted in an indoor location without foliage vibration using an automatic mist spray. Broad-leaved species produced a similar DSD among species whose leaves had a matte surface and a second similar DSD among species whose leaves had a coated surface. The matte broad leaves produced a larger and wider range of DSDs than the coated broad leaves. Coated coniferous needles had a wider range of DSDs than the coated broad leaves and different DSDs were observed for different species. The species with shorter dense needles generated a larger DSD. The leaf drip diameter was calculated through the estimation of a state of equilibrium of a hanging drop on the leaves based on physical theory. The calculations indicated that the maximum diameter of leaf drips was determined by the contact angle, and the range of DSDs was determined by the variation in contact length and the contact diameter at the hanging points. The results revealed that leaf drip DSD changed due to variations in leaf hydrophobicity, leaf roughness, leaf geometry and leaf inclination among the different tree species. This study allows the modelization of throughfall DSD. Furthermore, it indicates the possibility of interpreting canopy water processes from canopy water storage to drainage through the contact angle and leaf drip DSD. The part of this study is published in Nanko et al. (2013, Agric. Forest. Meteorol. 169, 74-84).

  16. Unsaturated zone hydrology and cave drip discharge water response: Implications for speleothem paleoclimate record variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowska, Monika; Baker, Andy; Treble, Pauline C.; Andersen, Martin S.; Hankin, Stuart; Jex, Catherine N.; Tadros, Carol V.; Roach, Regina

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency, spatially-dense discharge monitoring was conducted over fifteen months to characterise unsaturated zone flow at Harrie Wood Cave (HWC), in the Snowy Mountains, Yarrangobilly (SE Australia). The cave was formed in the Late Silurian Yarrangobilly Limestone, a fractured rock associated with very low primary porosity due to past diagenesis. Over our monitoring period we simultaneously measured rainfall, soil moisture saturation and drip discharge rate at fourteen sites to characterise infiltration-discharge relationships. All drip discharge sites exhibited non-Gaussian distributions, indicating long periods where low discharge predominates, punctuated by short infrequent periods of high discharge. However, there was significant variability in discharge between sites and consequently no spatial correlation in the cave. We investigated the depth-discharge relationship at HWC and found a moderate relationship between depth and drip discharge lag (response) times to soil moisture content, but only weak relationships between depth and mean and maximum discharge. This highlights that the karst architecture plays an important role in controlling drip discharge dynamics. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Agglomerative Hierarchal Clustering (AHC) were used to classify similar drip types, revealing five unique drip regimes. Two-phase flow and non-linear response to recharge behaviour were observed, suggesting secondary porosity is controlling unsaturated zone flow in mature limestone environments with low primary porosity. Using the data presented here, the first coupled conceptual and box hydrological flow model was developed. This study highlights the heterogeneous nature of hydrological flow in karst and the need to understand unsaturated zone hydrology at the individual drip discharge level, to inform speleothem studies for high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction.

  17. Controls on oxygen isotope variability in precipitation and drip water at eight caves in the monsoon regions of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wuhui; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Luo, Weijun; Li, Tingyong; Tian, Lijun; Zeng, Guangneng; Zhang, Dezhong; Bai, Yijun; Li, Jilong; Tao, Tao; Zhang, Pingzhong; Tan, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Cave monitoring is important to fully understand the climatic significance of stalagmite δ18O records. Most previous studies focus on one cave, or several caves in one area. A large regional-scale investigation on the isotopic composition of precipitation and drip water is scarce. To investigate the regional-scale climate forcing on the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation in the monsoon regions of China (MRC) and how the isotopic signals are transmitted to various drip sites, a three-year-long (2011-2014) on-site rainfall and drip water monitoring program has been carried out with approximately monthly sampling at 37 drip sites in eight caves in the MRC. Neither rainfall amount nor air temperature are the predominant controls on the oxygen isotopic composition of monthly precipitation. The rain in the wet season (May to October), with relatively low δ18O values, is sourced from tropical air masses, whereas the rainfall in the dry season (November to April), with relatively high δ18O values, is mostly sourced from continental air masses. Additionally, the weighted summer rainwater δ18O values decrease from coastal southwest China to inland northeast China, which suggests that the moisture of monsoon rainfall in China originates mainly from Indian Ocean, and transports to the north along the southwest-northeast path. 28 of the 37 drip sites are constant drips with little discernable variation in drip water δ18O through the whole study period. For most of the constant drips, the mean value of each drip water δ18O is nearly identical to or slightly higher than the three-year weighted mean value of the corresponding local rainwater δ18O, indicating these drips may be mainly recharged by none-evaporated or slightly evaporated, well-mixed older water stored in the vadose zone. 7 of all the 37 drip sites are seasonal drips, for which, although the amplitude of drip water δ18O is narrower than that of rainfall, the monthly response of drip water δ18O to

  18. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  19. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  20. Research on droplet formation and dripping behavior during the electroslag remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu-long; Dong, Yan-wu; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Cao, Hai-bo; Hou, Dong; Feng, Qian-long

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of droplet formation and dripping behavior would be useful in the efficient removal of impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions from liquid metals. In the present work, we developed a transparent experimental apparatus to study the mechanisms of droplet formation and the effects of filling ratio on droplet behavior during the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. A high-speed camera was used to clearly observe, at small time scales, the droplet formation and dripping phenomenon at the slag/metal interface during a stable ESR process. The results illustrate that a two-stage process for droplet formation and dripping occurs during the ESR process and that the droplet diameter exhibits a parabolic distribution with increasing filling ratio because of the different shape and thermal state of the electrode tip. This work also confirms that a relatively large filling ratio reduces electricity consumption and improves ingot quality.

  1. Resonance phenomena: From compound nucleus decay to proton radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.

    2016-03-01

    The role of resonances in exotic nuclei is investigated. This encompasses one and two nucleon emitters for ground-state nuclei beyond the drip lines to compound nuclei formed at higher excitation energies which, in some cases, can decay to produce these ground-state emitters. The role of barrier penetration and configuration mixing are both considered in explaining the long lifetimes observed in narrow resonances. Finally, two experimental techniques for studying exotic resonances are presented.

  2. Comparison of lettuce diseases and yield under subsurface drip and furrow irrigation.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, K V; Hubbard, J C; Schulbach, K F

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Subsurface drip and furrow irrigation were compared on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cvs. Salinas and Misty Day for yield and incidence and severity of three important diseases of lettuce in the Salinas Valley, CA. Experiments were conducted between 1993 and 1995 during the spring and fall seasons. The diseases examined included lettuce drop (Sclerotinia minor), downy mildew (Bremia lactucae), and corky root (Rhizomonas suberifaciens). Replicated plots of subsurface drip and furrow irrigation were arranged in a randomized complete-block design. All plants were inoculated with S. minor at the initiation of the experiment during the 1993 spring season. Plots were not inoculated for downy mildew and corky root during any season nor were the plots reinoculated with S. minor. During each season, all plots were sprinkler irrigated until thinning, and subsequently, the irrigation treatments were begun. The furrow plots were irrigated once per week, and the drip plots received water twice per week. The distribution of soil moisture at two soil depths (0 to 5 and 6 to 15 cm) at 5, 10, and 15 cm distance on either side of the bed center in two diagonal directions was significantly lower in drip-irrigated compared with furrow-irrigated plots. Plots were evaluated for lettuce drop incidence and downy mildew incidence and severity at weekly intervals until harvest. Corky root severity and yield components were determined at maturity. Lettuce drop incidence and corky root severity were significantly lower and yields were higher in plots under subsurface drip irrigation compared with furrow irrigation, regardless of the cultivar, except during the 1994 fall season. Incidence and severity of downy mildew were not significantly different between the two irrigation methods throughout the study. The differential microclimates created by the two irrigation treatments did not affect downy mildew infection, presumably because the mesoclimate is usually favorable in the Salinas

  3. Streamflow, Fog, and Fog-Drip in the California Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaske, S. R.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    The onshore movement of marine fog from coastal waters is a common occurrence during summer months along much of the contiguous U.S. Pacific Coast. Because the fog-season tends to occur during the precipitation-free dry-season, any additional input of moisture or reduction in loss of moisture through evapotranspiration provided by marine layer can be an important factor in localized hydrologic systems. In an effort to quantify some of the effects of fog on the regional dry-season hydrology, a study site within the Santa Cruz Mountains of central California was established. The fog-laden coastside and predominately fog-free San Francisco Bay-side of the study area provided an excellent opportunity to assess the impacts of the presence and absence of fog on ecohydrological processes. Streamflow, fog-drip, soil moisture, and weather conditions were measured from May-September. Bayside streams were found to be almost all intermittent, with much higher rates of baseflow recession compared to the predominately perennial coastside streams. Fog-drip was essentially nonexistent on the bayside, while highly variable amounts were recorded on the coastside. Maximum rates and seasonal totals of drip were found within stands of mature conifers (Sequoia sempervirens and Pseudotsuga menziesii) along exposed, often windy ridgelines. Rates of up to 19 in (48 cm)/month of fog-drip were recorded. Consequently, frequent infiltration events to depths of at least 9 in (23 cm) were also documented. Over the course of the study soil moisture levels at high fog-drip locations either increased, or were roughly equivalent to initial spring conditions from the onset of data collection. Increases of flow in coastside streams, under otherwise receding conditions, were found to coincide with fog and fog-drip events. These results indicate that the presence of fog can significantly affect dry-season hydrologic conditions of some coastal locations.

  4. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: part II. geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Waters with low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios (SARs) present a challenge to irrigation because they degrade soil structure and infiltration capacity. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, such low salinity (electrical conductivity, EC 2.1 mS cm-1) and high-SAR (54) waters are co-produced with coal-bed methane and some are used for subsurface drip irrigation(SDI). The SDI system studied mixes sulfuric acid with irrigation water and applies water year-round via drip tubing buried 92 cm deep. After six years of irrigation, SAR values between 0 and 30 cm depth (0.5-1.2) are only slightly increased over non-irrigated soils (0.1-0.5). Only 8-15% of added Na has accumulated above the drip tubing. Sodicity has increased in soil surrounding the drip tubing, and geochemical simulations show that two pathways can generate sodic conditions. In soil between 45-cm depth and the drip tubing, Na from the irrigation water accumulates as evapotranspiration concentrates solutes. SAR values >12, measured by 1:1 water-soil extracts, are caused by concentration of solutes by factors up to 13. Low-EC (-1) is caused by rain and snowmelt flushing the soil and displacing ions in soil solution. Soil below the drip tubing experiences lower solute concentration factors (1-1.65) due to excess irrigation water and also contains relatively abundant native gypsum (2.4 ± 1.7 wt.%). Geochemical simulations show gypsum dissolution decreases soil-water SAR to 14 and decreasing EC in soil water to 3.2 mS cm-1. Increased sodicity in the subsurface, rather than the surface, indicates that deep SDI can be a viable means of irrigating with sodic waters.

  5. Evolution of the East African rift: Drip magmatism, lithospheric thinning and mafic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Tanya; Nelson, Wendy R.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.

    2016-07-01

    The origin of the Ethiopian-Yemeni Oligocene flood basalt province is widely interpreted as representing mafic volcanism associated with the Afar mantle plume head, with minor contributions from the lithospheric mantle. We reinterpret the geochemical compositions of primitive Oligocene basalts and picrites as requiring a far more significant contribution from the metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle than has been recognized previously. This region displays the fingerprints of mantle plume and lithospheric drip magmatism as predicted from numerical models. Metasomatized mantle lithosphere is not dynamically stable, and heating above the upwelling Afar plume caused metasomatized lithosphere with a significant pyroxenite component to drip into the asthenosphere and melt. This process generated the HT2 lavas observed today in restricted portions of Ethiopia and Yemen now separated by the Red Sea, suggesting a fundamental link between drip magmatism and the onset of rifting. Coeval HT1 and LT lavas, in contrast, were not generated by drip melting but instead originated from shallower, dominantly anhydrous peridotite. Looking more broadly across the East African Rift System in time and space, geochemical data support small volume volcanic events in Turkana (N. Kenya), Chyulu Hills (S. Kenya) and the Virunga province (Western Rift) to be derived ultimately from drip melting. The removal of the gravitationally unstable, metasomatized portion of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle via dripping is correlated in each case with periods of rapid uplift. The combined influence of thermo-mechanically thinned lithosphere and the Afar plume together thus controlled the locus of continental rift initiation between Africa and Arabia and provide dynamic support for the Ethiopian plateau.

  6. Distribution and leaching of methyl iodide in soil following emulated shank and drip application.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Zheng, Wei; Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R

    2004-01-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is a promising alternative to methyl bromide in soil fumigation. The pest-control efficacy and ground water contamination risks of MeI as a fumigant are highly related to its gas-phase distribution and leaching after soil application. In this study, the distribution and leaching of MeI in soil following shank injection and subsurface drip application were investigated. Methyl iodide (200 kg ha(-1)) was directly injected or drip-applied at a 20-cm depth into Arlington sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, thermic Haplic Durixeralfs) columns (12-cm i.d., 70-cm height) tarped with virtually impermeable film. Concentration profiles of MeI in the soil air were monitored for 7 d. Methyl iodide diffused rapidly after soil application, and reached a 70-cm depth within 2 h. Relative to shank injection, drip application inhibited diffusion, resulting in significantly lower concentration profiles in the soil air. Seven days after MeI application, fumigated soil was uncapped, aerated for 7 d, and leached with water. Leaching of MeI was significant from the soil columns under both application methods, with concentrations of >10 mug L(-1) in the early leachate. The leaching was greater following shank injection than drip application, with an overall potential of 33 g ha(-1) for shank injection and 19 g ha(-1) for drip application. Persistent residues of MeI remaining in soils after leaching were 50 to 240 ng kg(-1), and the contents were slightly higher following shank injection than drip application. The results suggest that fumigation with MeI may pose a risk of ground water contamination in vulnerable areas. PMID:15537937

  7. Soil Water Content on Drip Irrigated Cotton: Comparison of Measured and Calculated Values Obtained with the Hydrus 2-D Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop irrigation with subsurface drip (SDI) is increasing in the semiarid Texas High Plains (THO). However, information on drip-tape positioning and irrigation strategies on the wetted soil area (WSA) is needed to optimize rainwater harvesting under well capacities of < 7 mm/d. Time and resources nec...

  8. Sensing water from subsurface drip irrigation laterals: In situ sensors, weighing lysimeters and COSMOS under vegetated and bare conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of soil water dynamics in the root zone under subsurface drip irrigated (SDI) is complicated by the three dimensional nature of water fluxes from drip emitters plus the fluxes, if any, of water from precipitation. In addition, soil water sensing systems may differ in their operating...

  9. Improving fumigation efficiency by increasing drip-tape number and using low permeability film in raised-bed production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drip fumigation is commonly used for controlling soilborne pests in raised-bed strawberry production systems in California. However, the high emission loss and poor pest control indicate that the current fumigation practice with two drip tapes and polyethylene film (PE) covering need to be improved....

  10. Aggregate stability in citrus plantations. The impact of drip irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Arcenegui, V.

    2012-04-01

    Soil aggregate stability is a key property for soil and water conservation, and a synthetic parameter to quantify the soil degradation. Aggregation is relevant in soils where vegetation cover is scarce (Cerdà, 1996). Most of the research carried out to determine the soil aggregate stability was done in forest soils (Mataix-Solera et al., 2011) and little is done on farms (Cerdà, 2000). The research have show the effect of vegetation cover on soil aggregate stability (Cerdà, 1998) but little is known when vegetation is scarce, rare or not found such it can be seeing in agriculture soils. Then, aggregation is the main factor to control the soil losses and to improve the water availability. Moreover, agriculture management can improve the soil aggregate characteristics and the first step in this direction should be to quantify the aggregate stability. There is no information about the aggregate stability of soils under citrus production, although the research did show that the soil losses in the farms with citrus plantations is very high (Cerdà et al., 2009), and that aggregation should play a key role as the soils are bare due to the widespread use of herbicides. From 2009 to 2011, samples were collected in summer and winter in a chemically managed farm in Montesa, Eastern Iberian Peninsula. Ten irrigated patches and ten non-irrigated patches were selected to compare the effect of the drip irrigation on the soil aggregate stability. The Ten Drop Impacts (TDI) and the Counting the number of drops (CND) tests were applied at 200 aggregates (10 samples x 10 aggregates x 2 sites) in winter and summer in 2009, 2010 and 2011. The results show that the irrigated patches had TDI values that ranged from 43 to 56 % and that the non-irrigated reached values of 41 to 54 %. The CND samples ranged from 29 to 38 drops in the non-irrigated patches to 32 to 42 drop-impacts in the irrigated soil patches. No trends were found from winter to summer during the three years time period

  11. Proton Therapy Verification with PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuping; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to uncertainties introduced during treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of proton induced positron emitter distributions is the only practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of proton therapy. This article reviews the current status of proton therapy verification with PET imaging. The different data detecting systems (in-beam, in-room and off-line PET), calculation methods for the prediction of proton induced PET activity distributions, and approaches for data evaluation are discussed. PMID:24312147

  12. MHC class I-presented peptides and the DRiP hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Kenneth L.; Farfán-Arribas, Diego J.; Colbert, Jeff D.; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins, enabling immune surveillance by CD8+ T cells and the elimination of virally infected and cancerous cells. It has been argued that the dominant source of MHC class I-presented peptides is through proteasomal degradation of newly synthesized defective proteins, termed defective ribosomal products (DRiPs). Here, we critically examine the DRiP hypothesis and discuss recent studies indicating that antigenic peptides are generated from the entire proteome and not just from failures in protein synthesis or folding. PMID:24566257

  13. Bound and unbound nuclear systems at the drip lines: a one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschini, L.; Pérez-Bernal, F.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    We construct a one-dimensional toy model to describe the main features of Borromean nuclei at the continuum threshold. The model consists of a core and two valence neutrons, unbound in the mean potential, that are bound by a residual point contact density-dependent interaction. Different discretization procedures are used (harmonic oscillator and transformed harmonic oscillator bases, or use of large rigid wall box). Resulting energies and wave functions, as well as inelastic transition intensities, are compared within the different discretization techniques, as well as with the exact results in the case of one particle and with the results of the di-neutron cluster model in the two particles case. Despite its simplicity, this model includes the main physical features of the structure of Borromean nuclei in an intuitive and computationally affordable framework, and will be extended to direct reaction calculations.

  14. Systematic structure of the neutron drip-line {sup 22}C nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    In the present work we systematically discuss the nuclear structure of the the heaviest particle-bound carbon isotope, {sup 22}C. The ground state wave function of the carbon isotope is calculated using the {sup 20}C core plus two-valence neutron based on a phenomenological mean-field MF potential. We apply the deduced wave function to provide the nuclear matter density which is necessary in the calculations of the total reaction cross section. Calculations show that there is a reasonable good description of the experimental binding energy BE and root-mean square RMS radius. The exotic structure and configuration of the ground state carbon isotope is explained and a consistent explanation on the two-neutron halo (Borromean) nucleus is given.

  15. Low-lying continuum states of drip-line oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukiyama, Koshiroh; Otsuka, Takaharu; Fujimoto, Rintaro

    2015-09-01

    Low-lying continuum states of exotic oxygen isotopes with A=23-26 are studied, by introducing the continuum-coupled shell model (CCSM) characterized by an infinite wall placed very far away and by an interaction for continuum coupling constructed in a close relation to the realistic shell-model Hamiltonian. Neutron-emission spectra from exotic oxygen isotopes are calculated by the doorway-state approach in heavy-ion multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The results agree with experiment remarkably well, providing evidence that the continuum effects are stronger than ˜ 1 MeV, consistent with the shell evolution in exotic nuclei. The peaks in the neutron spectra are understood as doorway-state resonances. The results by this CCSM doorway-state approach are compared with calculations on neutron-scattering resonance peaks made within the CCSM phase-shift approach and also with those obtained in the Gamow shell model, by taking the same Hamiltonian.

  16. Resonances and continuum states of drip-line nuclei using the complex scaling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myo, Takayuki; Katō, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    Resonances and continuum states of He isotopes are investigated using the cluster orbital shell model (COSM) with the complex scaling method (CSM). We discuss the following subjects: 1) Spectroscopic factors of the unbound nucleus 7He into the 6He-n components and their relation to the one-neutron removal strengths of 7He. The importance of the 6He(2+) resonance is shown. 2) Structure of five-body 0+ resonance of 8He from the viewpoint of the two-neutron pair coupling. The monopole strengths into five-body unbound states are also investigated. It is found that the sequential breakup process of 8He → 7He+n → 6He+n+n is dominant in the monopole excitation, while the contribution of 8He(0+2) is negligible.

  17. 49 CFR 192.361 - Service lines: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... used for backfill must be free of materials that could damage the pipe or its coating. (c) Grading for... service line must be graded so as to drain into the main or into drips at the low points in the service... locating the pipe that complies with § 192.321(e)....

  18. 49 CFR 192.361 - Service lines: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... used for backfill must be free of materials that could damage the pipe or its coating. (c) Grading for... service line must be graded so as to drain into the main or into drips at the low points in the service... locating the pipe that complies with § 192.321(e)....

  19. 49 CFR 192.361 - Service lines: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... used for backfill must be free of materials that could damage the pipe or its coating. (c) Grading for... service line must be graded so as to drain into the main or into drips at the low points in the service... locating the pipe that complies with § 192.321(e)....

  20. Integrated analysis for a carbon- and water-constrained future: an assessment of drip irrigation in a lettuce production system in eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Maraseni, T N; Mushtaq, S; Reardon-Smith, K

    2012-11-30

    The Australian Government is meeting the challenge of water scarcity and climate change through significant on-farm infrastructure investment to increase water use efficiency and productivity, and secure longer term water supplies. However, it is likely that on-farm infrastructure investment will alter energy consumption and therefore generate considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, suggesting potential conflicts in terms of mitigation and adaptation policies. In particular, the introduction of a price on carbon may influence the extent to which new irrigation technologies are adopted. This study evaluated trade-offs between water savings, GHG emissions and economic gain associated with the conversion of a sprinkler (hand shift) irrigation system to a drip (trickle) irrigation system for a lettuce production system in the Lockyer Valley, one of the major vegetable producing regions in Australia. Surprisingly, instead of trade-offs, this study found positive synergies - a win-win situation. The conversion of the old hand-shift sprinkler irrigation system to a drip irrigation system resulted in significant water savings of almost 2 ML/ha, as well as an overall reduction in GHG emissions. Economic modelling, at a carbon price of $ 30/t CO(2)e, indicated that there was a net benefit of adoption of the drip irrigation system of about $ 4620/ML/year. We suggest priority should be given, in the implementation of on-farm infrastructure investment policy, to replacing older inefficient and energy-intensive sprinkler irrigation systems such as hand shift and roll-line. The findings of the study support the use of an integrated approach to avoid possible conflicts in designing national climate change mitigation and adaptation policies, both of which are being developed in Australia. PMID:22935628

  1. Understanding the Deep Earth: Slabs, Drips, Plumes and More - An On the Cutting Edge Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. L.; Mogk, D. W.; McDaris, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Exciting new science is emerging from the study of the deep Earth using a variety of approaches: observational instrumentation (e.g. EarthScope’s USArray; IRIS), analysis of rocks (xenoliths, isotopic tracers), experimental methods (COMPRES facilities), and modeling (physical and computational, e.g. CIG program). New images and models of active faults, subducting plates, mantle drips, and rising plumes are spurring a new excitement about deep Earth processes and connections between Earth’s internal systems, the plate tectonic system, and the physiography of Earth’s surface. The integration of these lines of research presents unique opportunities and also challenges in geoscience education. How can we best teach about the architecture, composition, and processes of Earth where it is hidden from direct observation. How can we make deep Earth science relevant and meaningful to students across the geoscience curriculum? And how can we use the exciting new discoveries about Earth processes to attract new students into science? To explore the intersection of research and teaching about the deep Earth, a virtual workshop was convened in February 2010 for experts in deep Earth research and undergraduate geoscience education. The six-day workshop consisted of online plenary talks, large and small group discussions, asynchronous contributions using threaded listservs and web-based work spaces, as well as development and review of new classroom and laboratory activities. The workshop goals were to: 1) help participants stay current about data, tools, services, and research related to the deep earth, 2) address the "big science questions" related to deep earth (e.g. plumes, slabs, drips, post-perovskite, etc.) and explore exciting new scientific approaches, 3) to consider ways to effectively teach about "what can't be seen", at least not directly, and 4) develop and review classroom teaching activities for undergraduate education using these data, tools, services, and

  2. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  3. Moisture absorption early postmortem predicts ultimate drip loss in fresh pork.

    PubMed

    Kapper, C; Walukonis, C J; Scheffler, T L; Scheffler, J M; Don, C; Morgan, M T; Forrest, J C; Gerrard, D E

    2014-02-01

    Water-holding capacity is the ability of meat to hold moisture and is subject to postmortem metabolism. The objective of this study was to characterize the loss of moisture from muscle postmortem and investigate whether these losses are useful in predicting the ultimate drip loss of fresh pork. Cotton-rayon absorptive-based devices were inserted in the longissimus dorsi muscles of pork carcasses (n = 51) postmortem and removed at various intervals for 24h. Greatest moisture absorption was observed at 105 min post exsanguination. Drip loss varied (0.6-15.3%) across carcasses. Individual absorption at 75 min correlated (r = 0.33) with final drip loss. Correlations improved using individual absorption values at 90 min (r = 0.48) and accumulated absorption values at 150 min (r = 0.41). Results show that significant moisture is lost from muscle tissue early postmortem and suggest that capture of this moisture may be useful in predicting final drip loss of fresh meat. PMID:24225387

  4. Distribution of chemical and microbial pesticides delivered through drip irrigation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific information is needed on distribution uniformity and mobility of environmental-friendly pest control agents through drip irrigation system and in the soil to help improve soil insect control efficiency. The uniformity and recovery rate of water soluble and insoluble materials of chemical ...

  5. D-Area Drip Irrigation/Phytoremediation Project: SRTC Report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2001-09-11

    The overall objective of this project is to evaluate a novel drip irrigation-phytoremediation process for remediating volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater in D-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is expected to be less expensive and more beneficial to the environment than alternative TCE remediation technologies.

  6. The Water Use of Cotton Irrigated with Sub-Sruface Drip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Texas High Plains (THP), producers are constantly searching for water conservation methods. With a semiarid climate, declining aquifer levels and negligible aquifer recharge, the use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) is therefore increasing each year. However, information on the best manage...

  7. Water Requirements of Young Blueberry Plants Irrigated by Sprinklers, Microsprays, and Drip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was done to determine the effects of irrigation method on water use by young northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. 'Elliott'). Plants were irrigated by overhead sprinkler, microspray, or drip at 50, 100, and 150% of the estimated crop evapotranspiration (ETc) requirement. Du...

  8. Reducing water inputs with subsurface drip irrigation may improve alfalfa nutritive value

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigated alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an important forage crop for western Kansas dairy producers. Concerns over decreasing groundwater supplies have prompted the need to develop more efficient methods of irrigation. We investigated the effects of a subsurface drip irrigation system at three lev...

  9. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) research at USDA-ARS in Bushland, TX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers in the Texas High Plains have recently adopted subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) at unprecedented rates in response to drought, declining water resources from the Ogallala Aquifer, and increasing energy costs to pump groundwater. However, SDI has much greater capital and maintenance require...

  10. Shallow subsurface drip irrigation (S3DI) for small irregular-shaped fields in the southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted using S3DI on cotton (Gossypium hirsutum, L.), corn (Zea mays, L.), and peanut (Arachis hypogeae, L.) rotations to investigate yield potential and economic sustainability of this irrigation system. Drip tubing was installed in alternate row middles, strip tillage was used ...