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Sample records for proton microprobe study

  1. Proton microprobe studies of the mineralization process in selected organic matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Cichocki, T.; Divoux, S.; Gonsior, B.; Höfert, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Strzalkowski, A.; Sych, M.

    1990-04-01

    The application of the proton-induced X-ray emission method in combination with a proton microprobe (micro-PIXE) to studies of the mineralization process in selected organic matrices is presented. The flat-bone mineralization of the skull of 17-19 days pregnancy mouse embryos is described in detail. The section thickness as well as concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Zn and Br were determined using the raster- or line-scan irradiation mode. On the basis of Ca and P contents the amount of inorganic phase was determined for each sample under investigation, while the Ca/P ratio was used for the identification of the chemical compounds within inorganic material. In the embryonal bones we observed almost stoichiometric hydroxyapatite; however, in the intramembranaceous ossification of the young (17 day) animals, octacalcium phosphate was identified. At the given age of the embryo the amount of minerals is much higher in the femur bone than in flat bone. The micro-PIXE method furthermore turned out to be sensitive enough to study the mineralization accompanying malignant tumors. We have also observed the involvement of some trace elements in the development of the mineralization process. The last two observations are unattainable by histological staining.

  2. Accumulation of calcium and loss of potassium in the hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia: a proton microprobe study

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, E.; Inamura, K.; Themner, K.; Malmqvist, K.G.; Siesjoe, B.K.

    1988-08-01

    This study explored (a) whether postischemic accumulation of calcium in hippocampal neurons precedes or occurs pari passu with light microscopical signs of delayed neuronal necrosis, and (b) whether calcium initially accumulates in dendritic domains, presumed to have a high density of agonist-operated calcium channels. Transient ischemia of 10-min duration was induced in rats, and the animals were studied after 1, 2, 3, and 4 days of recovery. We measured total calcium and potassium contents in the stratum oriens, pyramidale, radiatum, and moleculare of the CA1 and CA3 sectors, using particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) in the proton microprobe mode. The results showed significant accumulation of calcium and loss of potassium after 3 and 4 days of recovery in the CA1 sector, which developed neuronal necrosis, but not in the CA3 sector, which showed only occasional damage. In a few animals, calcium accumulation (and loss of potassium) was observed with no or only mild visible damage, but in the majority of animals the accumulation of calcium correlated to signs of neuronal necrosis. Since calcium accumulation was similar in all strata examined, the results failed to reveal preferential accumulation in dendritic or somal regions. Based on our results and those of Dux et al., we emphasize the possibility that delayed neuronal death is, at least in part, caused by increased calcium cycling of plasma membranes and gradual calcium overload of mitochondria.

  3. Elemental mapping of biological samples using a scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.

    1988-03-01

    Elemental mapping using a scanning proton microprobe (SPM) can be a powerful technique for probing trace elements in biology, allowing complex interfaces to be studied in detail, identifying contamination and artefacts present in the specimen, and in certain circumstances obtaining indirect chemical information. Examples used to illustrate the advantages of the technique include the elemental mapping of growing pollen tubes, honey bee brain section, a mouse macrophage cell, human liver section exhibiting primary biliary cirrhosis, and the attack by a mildew fungus on a pea leaf.

  4. Submicron elemental mapping with the oxford scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Watt, F.; Chapman, J. R.

    1987-03-01

    Following recent modifications to the Oxford scanning proton microprobe (SPM) a beam spot diameter of 0.5 μm has been achieved at a beam current of 20-30 pA of 4 MeV protons. This has been confirmed by scanning both a copper test grid and microcrystals of barium sulphate. The potential of using high spatial resolutions in microbiology has been explored by scanning a single mouse cell.

  5. The Oxford scanning proton microprobe: A medical diagnostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.; Takacs, J.; Vaux, D. J. T.

    1984-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterised by progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, cholestasis, and high levels of copper within the liver. The Oxford 1 μm scanning proton microprobe (SPM) has been used to construct elemental maps of a 7 μm section of diseased liver at several different magnifications. The results of these investigations have shown that the copper is distributed in small deposits ( < 5 μm) at specific locations in the liver. Further there appears to be a 1:1 atomic correlation between copper and sulphur, indicating the presence of an inorganic salt or a protein with approximately equal numbers of copper and sulphur atoms.

  6. Application of the Karlsruhe proton microprobe to medical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, D.; Rokita, E.

    1984-04-01

    The Karlsruhe nuclear microprobe was used in the investigation of healthy and malign tissue of animals and men. Target preparation tests showed that cryofixation of the tissue before cutting with a microtome and succeeding lyophilization of the slices gave reliable results. The slices were mounted on backing foils of Formvar the thickness of which varied between 30 and 50 {μg}/{cm 2}. For irradiation we tested various patterns generated by the 3 MeV proton beam by sweeping in one or two dimensions. Most of the data were collected in line-scan mode, where 256 equidistant irradiation dots of 3 × 10 μm 2 formed a line of 750 μm length at beam currents of 250 pA. The target thickness was determined simultaneously by proton elastic scattering in all cases. Radial concentration profiles of degenerated human arteries (atherosclerosis) showed a remarkable increase of Ca, partly correlated with local maxima of the Zn content, when compared with non-degenerated capillaries. Microtome cuts across a Morris Hepatoma 7777 cancer grown in a rat leg were investigated to correlate the concentration shifts of some trace elements in malign tissue with single cells.

  7. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  8. Trace elemental analysis of bituminuos coals using the Heidelberg proton microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, J.R.; Kneis, H.; Martin, B.; Nobiling, R.; Traxel, K.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Trace elements in coal can occur as components of either the organic constituents (macerals) or the inorganic constituents (minerals). Studies of the concentrations and distribution of the trace elements are vital to understanding the geochemical millieu in which the coal was formed and in evaluating the attempts to recover rare but technologically valuable metals. In addition, information on the trace element concentrations is important in predicting the environmental impact of burning particular coals, as many countries move toward greater utilization of coal reserves for energy production. Traditionally, the optical and the electron microscopes and more recently the electron microprobe have been used in studying the components of coal. The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) microprobe offers a new complementary approach with an order of magnitude or more better minimum detection limit. We present the first measurements with a PIXE microprobe of the trace element concentrations of bituminous coal samples. Elemental analyses of the coal macerals-vitrinite, exinite, and inertinite-are discussed for three coal samples from the Eastern U.S.A., three samples from the Western U.S.A., and one sample from the Peoples Republic of China. ?? 1981.

  9. PROTON MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF TRACE-ELEMENT VARIATIONS IN VITRINITES IN THE SAME AND DIFFERENT COAL BEDS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minkin, J.A.; Chao, E.C.T.; Blank, Herma; Dulong, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    The PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) microprobe can be used for nondestructive, in-situ analyses of areas as small as those analyzed by the electron microprobe, and has a sensitivity of detection as much as two orders of magnitude better than the electron microprobe. Preliminary studies demonstrated that PIXE provides a capability for quantitative determination of elemental concentrations in individual coal maceral grains with a detection limit of 1-10 ppm for most elements analyzed. Encouraged by the earlier results, we carried out the analyses reported below to examine trace element variations laterally (over a km range) as well as vertically (cm to m) in the I and J coal beds in the Upper Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale in central Utah, and to compare the data with the data from two samples of eastern coals of Pennsylvanian age.

  10. First direct-write lithography results on the Guelph high resolution proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. P.; de Kerckhove, D.

    2011-10-01

    The recently completed high-resolution proton microprobe at the University of Guelph is Canada's first one-micron nuclear microprobe, which represents the country's state-of-the-art technology for various nuclear microprobe applications, e.g. direct-write microlithography. Its probe-forming system is comprised of a triplet Oxford Micro beams magnetic quadrupole lenses, along with high-precision objective slits. High energy protons coming off a 3 MV particle accelerator can achieve a nominal resolution of one micro and a beam current of several hundred of picoamperes when arriving at the target. This proton probe is ideal for the use of direct-write lithography with the incorporation of a magnetic scanning system and motorized sample stage. Preliminary lithography results have been obtained using spin-coated PMMA photoresist as specimen. The beam spot size, beam range and straggling inside the substrate and the exposure conditions are investigated by using scanning electron microscopy. This facility is the first in Canada to perform focused direct-write ion beam lithography, which is ideal for modification and machining of polymer and semiconductor materials for biological, microfluidic and ultimate lab-on-chip applications.

  11. PIXE profiling, imaging and analysis using the NAC proton microprobe: Unraveling mantle eclogites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Achterbergh, Esmé; Ryan, Chris G.; Gurney, John J.; Le Roex, Anton P.

    1995-09-01

    The National Accelerator Centre (NAC) proton microprobe has been carefully calibrated by the analysis of pure element, primary steel and geological standards. The results obtained are generally accurate to within 5%. For routine analyses (6-8 min), detection limits in the X-ray energy region 7-20 keV, range from 1.5 to 5 ppm. Previous workers have suggested the use of a (H 2) + beam for semi-quantitative analysis and imaging as higher beam brightness is obtainable with this beam at NAC. However, insufficient suppression of electrons introduces significant analytical error. Only a 3 MeV H + beam has been used for the quantitative analysis reported in this work. A rare suite of xenoliths, consisting of interlayered kyanite-bearing and kyanite-free eclogite, from the Roberts Victor kimberlite, Northern Cape, South Africa, was prepared as polished thin-sections and analyzed by the proton microprobe as a pilot study of trace element signatures in its component minerals (garnet, clinopyroxene and kyanite). The analysis of these eclogites identified significant chemical differences between the minerals of the kyanite-bearing and kyanite-free eclogite. Two clear groupings were distinguished well outside statistical error for Mn, Zn and Zr in garnet, and Mn, Ga, Sr and Ba in the clinopyroxene. Furthermore, clear chemical gradients in the elements Mn, Fe, Zn, Y and Zr were identified in single garnets at the contact between the two eclogite types. True elemental imaging revealed a heterogeneous distribution of the elements Sr and Ba in the clinopyroxene; the presence of Ba is interpreted to indicate the introduction of foreign material. A compositional dependence of the partitioning of Zn between garnet and clinopyroxene was also identified. The data do not contradict a previous hypothesis that the kyanite eclogite zones are the metamorphic products of a plagioclase-rich crystal protolith, but they do challenge the proposal that the layering is a primary feature of the rock

  12. Development of a bio-PIXE setup at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Uzonyi, I.; Simon, A.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    On the growing need of an accurate, quantitative method for the analysis of thin biological tissues down to the cell level, a measurement setup and data evaluating system has been developed at the Debrecen scanning proton microprobe facility, using its unique capability of the PIXE-PIXE technique. Quantitative elemental concentrations and true elemental maps from C to U can be produced in the case of thin (10-50 μm), inhomogeneous samples of organic matrix with a 2 μm lateral resolution. The method is based on the combined application of on-axis STIM and PIXE-PIXE ion beam analytical techniques. STIM spectra and maps are used to determine the morphology and the area density of the samples. PIXE spectra and maps of an ultra thin windowed and a conventional Be-windowed Si(Li) X-ray detectors are used to quantify concentrations and distributions of elements in the C to Fe (light and medium) and S to U (medium and heavy) atomic number regions, separately. For cross-checking the validation of the obtained data in a few cases RBS technique was used simultaneously. The application of the new bio-PIXE method is shown through an example, the study of the penetration and clearance of ultra-fine particles containing heavy metals (TiO2) of physical bodycare cosmetics in different layers of skin within the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project.

  13. Scanning proton microprobe analysis applied to wood and bark samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lövestam, N. E. G.; Johansson, E.-M.; Johansson, S. A. E.; Pallon, J.

    1990-04-01

    In this study the feasibility of applying scanning micro-PIXE to analysis of wood and bark samples is demonstrated. Elemental mapping of the analysed sections show the patterns of Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Some of these patterns can be related to the annual tree ring structure. It is observed that the variation of elements having an environmental character can be rather large within a single tree ring, thus illuminating possible difficulties when using tree ring sections as a pollution monitor. The variations in elemental concentrations when crossing from bark to wood are also shown to be smooth for some elements but rather abrupt for others.

  14. Microprobe and oxygen fugacity study of armalcolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friel, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The stability of synthetic armalcolite was determined as a function of oxygen fugacity with particular regard to the oxidation state of iron and titanium. The equilibrium pseudobrookite (armalcolite) composition was measured at 1200 C under various conditions of oxidation typical of the lunar environment. These data, when compared with published descriptions of mare basalts, provide information about the conditions of crystallization of armalcolite-bearing lunar rocks. Some information about the crystal chemistry of armalcolite was obtained from X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses of synthetic armalcolite and Zr-armalcolite. Further data were gathered from a comparison of the Mossbauer spectra of a phase pure stoichiometric armalcolite and one containing appreciable amounts of trivalent titanium.

  15. High resolution imaging and elemental analysis of PAGE electrophoretograms by scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Kocsonya, A.; Kovács, I.; Hopff, D.; Lüthje, S.; Niecke, M.

    2009-06-01

    Metal content of metalloproteins can be detected and even quantified by the PIXE-PAGE method. In this technique the proteins are separated by thin layer electrophoresis (by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in most cases) and the properly dried gel sections are analyzed by PIXE using "band-shaped" proton milli-beam. This PIXE-PAGE method was adapted for our scanning proton microprobe. The microPIXE-PAGE version provides two-dimensional elemental mapping of the protein bands. In addition, the fast continuous scanning reduces the risk of the thermal deterioration of the sample and the X-ray contribution from dust-impurities can be filtered out in the data evaluation process.

  16. The new external beam facility of the Oxford scanning proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Abraham, M. H.; Marsh, M. A.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a high spatial resolution external beam facility on one of the beamlines of the Oxford scanning proton microprobe tandem accelerator. Using a magnetic quadrupole doublet to focus the beam through the Kapton exit window a beam diameter of <50 μm full width at half maximum (fwhm) can be achieved on a sample located at 4 mm from the exit window. The facility is equipped with two Si-Li X-ray detectors for proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of light and trace elements respectively, a surface barrier detector for Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analysis and a HP-Ge detector for γ-ray detection. The mechanical and beam-optical design of the system is described.

  17. Mapping the Earth's mantle in 4D using the proton microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Win, T. T.

    1995-09-01

    The CSIRO proton microprobe is used to study the trace element chemistry of garnet and chromite grains recovered from kimberlites and other volcanic rocks, both to develop new diamond exploration methods and to further understanding of the makeup and evolution of the earth's upper mantle. Analysis of the partitioning of trace and major elements between garnet and chromite and their coexisting phases in mantle rocks has led to the development of two single-mineral thermometers and a barometer. Trace Ni in Cr-pyrope garnet is used to determine the equilibration temperature ( TNi) of each garnet grain. This is the temperature of the garnet in its source rock before it was entrained in the erupting magma. Similarly, trace Zn in chromite yields an estimate ( TZn) of its equilibration temperature. To relate these temperature to depth in the lithosphere a measure of pressure ( PCr) has been developed that estimates pressure directly from Cr-pyrope garnet composition and TNi. This breakthrough enables the information on rock composition and metasomatic processes held in the trace and major element chemistry of each garnet to be located in P and T and thus placed in its stratigraphic context. Y, Ga and Cr provide information on mantle depletion by partial melting. Zr, Y and Ti provide clues to metasomatic processes such as infiltration of asthenospheric melts. Together the result is both an improved diamond exploration tool and a method of mapping the 3D structure, lithology and metasomatic processes in the lithosphere. With the added knowledge of the date of each intrusion, these methods permit the construction of 4D maps of the lithosphere, charting variation in mantle composition both laterally, with depth and through time.

  18. Volatility in the lunar crust: Trace element analyses of lunar minerals by PIXE proton microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, M. D.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    In situ determination of mineral compositions using microbeam techniques can characterize magma compositions through mineral-melt partitioning, and be used to investigate fine-grained or rare phases which cannot be extracted for analysis. Abundances of Fe, Mn, Sr, Ga, Zr, Y, Nb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Se, and Sb were determined for various mineral phases in a small number of lunar highlands rocks using the PIXE proton microprobe. Sr/Ga ratios of plagioclase and Mn/Zn ratios of mafic silicates show that the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-suite cumulates are depleted in volatile lithophile elements to about the same degree compared with chondrites and the Earth. This links the entire lunar crust to common processes or source compositions. In contrast, secondary sulfides in Descartes breccia clasts are enriched in chalcophile elements such as Cu, Zn, Ni, Se, and Sb, and represent a potential resource in the lunar highlands.

  19. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  20. Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) for Hydrogen Profiling in High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Pascal; Sayir, Ali; Berger, Marie-Helene

    2004-01-01

    The interaction between hydrogen and various high temperature protonic conductors (HTPC) has not been clearly understood due to poor densification and unreacted secondary phases. the melt-processing technique is used in producing fully dense simple SrCe(0.9)Y (0.10) O(3-delta) and complex Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskites that can not be achieved by solid-state sintering. the possibilities of ion beam analysis have been investigated to quantify hydrogen distribution in HTPC perovskites subjected to water heat treatment. Nuclear microprobe technique is based on the interactions of a focused ion beam of MeV light ions (H-1, H-2, He-3, He-4,.) with the sample to be analyzed to determine local elemental concentrations at the cubic micrometer scale, the elastic recoil detection analysis technique (ERDA) has been carried out using He-4(+) microbeams and detecting the resulting recoil protons. Mappings of longitudinal sections of water treated SrCeO3 and Sr(Ca(1/3)Nb(2/3))O3 perovskites have been achieved, the water treatment strongly alters the surface of simple SrCe(0.9)Y(0.10)O(3-delta) perovskite. From Rutherford Back Scattering measurements (RBS), both Ce depletion and surface re-deposition is evidenced. the ERDA investigations on water treated Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) perovskite did not exhibit any spatial difference for the hydrogen incorporation from the surface to the centre. the amount of hydrogen incorporation for Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2+x)O(9-delta) was low and required further development of two less conventional techniques, ERDA in forward geometry and forward elastic diffusion H-1(p,p) H-1 with coincidence detection.

  1. A High Resolution Microprobe Study of EETA79001 Lithology C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Cohen, B. A.; Donovan, J. J.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    2010-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite EETA79001 has received substantial attention for possibly containing a component of Martian soil in its impact glass (Lithology C) [1]. The composition of Martian soil can illuminate near-surface processes such as impact gardening [2] and hydrothermal and volcanic activity [3,4]. Impact melts in meteorites represent our most direct samples of Martian regolith. We present the initial findings from a high-resolution electron microprobe study of Lithology C from Martian meteorite EETA79001. As this study develops we aim to extract details of a potential soil composition and to examine Martian surface processes using elemental ratios and correlations.

  2. Correlated petrographic, electron microprobe, and ion microprobe studies of selected primitive and processed phase assemblages in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, Arden L.

    1993-01-01

    During the past three years we have received support to continue our research in elucidating the formation and alteration histories of selected meteoritic materials by a combination of petrographic, trace element, and isotopic analyses employing optical and scanning electron microscopes and electron and ion microprobes. The awarded research funds enabled the P.I. to attend the annual LPSC, the co-I to devote approximately 15 percent of his time to the research proposed in the grant, and partial support for a visiting summer post-doctoral fellow to conduct electron microprobe analyses of meteoritic samples in our laboratory. The research funds, along with support from the NASA Education Initiative awarded to P.I. G. Wasserburg, enabled the co-I to continue a mentoring program with inner-city minority youth. The support enabled us to achieve significant results in the five projects that we proposed (in addition to the Education Initiative), namely: studies of the accretional and post-accretional alteration and thermal histories in CV meteorites, characterization of periclase-bearing Fremdlinge in CV meteorites, characterization of Ni-Pt-Ge-Te-rich Fremdlinge in CV meteorites in an attempt to determine the constraints they place on the petrogenetic and thermal histories of their host CAI's, correlated electron and ion microprobe studies of silicate and phosphate inclusions in the Colomera meteorite in an attempt to determine the petrogenesis of the IE iron meteorites, and development of improved instrumental and correction procedures for improved accuracy of analysis of meteoritic materials with the electron microprobe. This grant supported, in part or whole, 18 publications so far by our research team, with at least three more papers anticipated. The list of these publications is included. The details of the research results are briefly summarized.

  3. Raman microprobe spectroscopic studies of solid DNA-CTMA films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaney, Perry P.; Ahmad, Faizan; Grote, James G.

    2008-08-01

    Extensive studies have been carried out on developing the new biopolymer, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) derived from salmon, that has been complexed with a surfactant to make it water insoluble for application to bioelectronic and biophotonic devices. One of the key issues associated with the properties and behavior of solid films of this material is the extreme size of the >8 MDa molecular weight of the virgin, as-received material. Reduction of this molecular weight by factors of up to 40 is achieved by high power sonication. To support the various measurements that have been made to confirm that the sonicated material is still double strand DNA and to look for other effects of sonication, Raman studies were carried out to compare the spectra over a wide range of molecular weights and to develop baseline data that can be used in intercolation studies where various dopants are added to change the electrical, mechanical or optical properties. Raman microprobe spectra from solid, dry thin films of DNA with molecular weights ranging from 200 kDa to >8 MDa complexed with cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTMA) are reported and compared to the as-received spectrum and to published DNA spectra in aqueous solutions. In addition, microscopy and measurements on macro-molecular structures of DNA-CTMA are reported.

  4. Proton microprobe and X-ray fluorescence investigations of nickel distribution in serpentine flora from South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.; Balkwill, K.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Annegarn, H. J.

    1994-05-01

    Certain plant species growing on serpentinite soils are hyperaccumulative of Ni. The ability to tolerate high Ni levels may have useful environmental and economic implications. However, the processes of Ni accumulation and tolerance are not well understood. The proton microprobe of the Schonland Research Centre was used in the PIXE mode to map the lateral and cross-sectional distribution of Ni and other elements in the tissue of species from the family Asteraceae, growing on serpentine outcrops in the Barberton district, south-eastern Transvaal. Elemental maps showed that the highest Ni enrichment was in the epidermis. Energy dispersive XRF fluorescence analysis was used for qualitative rapid scanning to select suitable metal-rich plants and for quantitative bulk analyses.

  5. Fiber optic microprobes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Kassaee, Alireza; Taleei, Reza; Dolney, Derek; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beams including profiles and range. The fiber optic probe, embedded in tissue-mimicking plastics, was irradiated with a clinical proton beam and the luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. By using a linear fitting algorithm we extracted the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to obtain the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with a standard ion chamber. We observed a quenching effect in the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as an under-responding of the signal due to the high linear energy transfer of the beam. However, the beam profiles measurements were not affected by the quenching effect indicating that the fiber probes can be used for high-resolution measurements of proton beams profile.

  6. Nuclear microprobe analysis of solar proton implantation profiles in lunar rock surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, M. C.; Padawer, G. M.; D'Agostino, M. D.; Kamykowski, E.; Brandt, W.; Young, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the results of hydrogen (proton) depth profile concentration analyses conducted on selected Apollo 16 rocks. A modeling of solar particle implantation profiles in lunar rocks is shown to trace the evolvement of these profiles under the combined influence of diffusion of atomic particles implanted in the rock, and rock surface erosion. It is also demonstrated that such diffusion may have a significant effect on the shape of the implantation profiles in certain rock materials.

  7. Experimental study on the mechanical interaction between silicon neural microprobes and rat dura mater during insertion.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Z; Németh, A; Márton, G; Ulbert, I; Pongrácz, A

    2015-02-01

    In vivo insertion experiments are essential to optimize novel neural implants. Our work focuses on the interaction between intact dura mater of rats and as-fabricated single-shaft silicon microprobes realized by deep reactive ion etching. Implantation parameters like penetration force and dimpling through intact dura mater were studied as a function of insertion speed, microprobe cross-section, tip angle and animal age. To reduce tissue resistance, we proposed a unique tip sharpening technique, which was also evaluated in in vivo insertion tests. By doubling the insertion speed (between 1.2 and 10.5 mm/min), an increase of 10-35% in penetration forces was measured. When decreasing the cross-section of the microprobes, penetration forces and dimpling was reduced by as much as 30-50% at constant insertion speeds. Force was noticed to gradually decrease by decreasing tip angles. Measured penetration forces through dura mater were reduced even down to 11±3 mN compared to unsharpened (49±13 mN) probes by utilizing our unique tip sharpening technique, which is very close to exerted penetration force in the case of retracted dura (5±1.5 mN). Our findings imply that age remarkably alters the elasticity of intact dura mater. The decreasing stiffness of dura mater results in a significant rise in penetration force and decrease in dimpling. Our work is the first in vivo comparative study on microelectrode penetration through intact and retracted dura mater. PMID:25631267

  8. Study of microstructure and silicon segregation in cast iron using color etching and electron microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vazehrad, S.; Diószegi, A.

    2015-06-15

    An investigation on silicon segregation of lamellar, compacted and nodular graphite iron was carried out by applying a selective, immersion color etching and a modified electron microprobe to study the microstructure. The color etched micrographs of the investigated cast irons by revealing the austenite phase have provided data about the chronology and mechanism of microstructure formation. Moreover, electron microprobe has provided two dimensional segregation maps of silicon. A good agreement was found between the segregation profile of silicon in the color etched microstructure and the silicon maps achieved by electron microprobe analysis. However, quantitative silicon investigation was found to be more accurate than color etching results to study the size of the eutectic colonies. - Highlights: • Sensitivity of a color etchant to silicon segregation is quantitatively demonstrated. • Si segregation measurement by EMPA approved the results achieved by color etching. • Color etched micrographs provided data about solidification mechanism in cast irons. • Austenite grain boundaries were identified by measuring the local Si concentration.

  9. An Electron Microprobe Study of Synthetic Aluminosilicate Garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Geiger, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The aluminosilicate garnets represent an important mineral group. Common end-members are given by E3Al2Si3O12, where E=Fe2+ (almandine), Mn2+ (spessartine), Mg (pyrope), and Ca (grossular). End-members have been synthesized, but their exact compositions and stoichiometries are generally unknown. Synthetic aluminosilicate garnet can possibly contain minor Fe3+, Mn3+, F- and OH- and possibly vacancies. Slight atomic disorder over the 3 different cation sites may also occur. Natural crystals are considerably more complex. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) provides a method to determine garnet chemistry and stoichiometry. However, accurate determinations are not always a simple matter and uncertainties exist. We have started a study on well-characterized synthetic aluminosilicate garnets in order to i) determine more exactly their compositions and stoichiometries and ii) better understand possible complications in EPMA. Synthetic almandine, spessartine, pyrope, and grossular samples were synthesized under varying conditions both hydrothermally and dry and with different starting materials. A closed thermodynamic system was present and the bulk starting material composition represented the exact stoichiometric end-member garnet that was desired. IR, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopy in some cases and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the samples. Synthetic pyrope has been investigated with a SX51 with simple oxide/silicate standards (Fo90 olivine for Mg, wollastonite for Si, and both Al2O3 and kyanite for Al). Previously observed problems were reproduced: low stoichiometry for Al and high for Si and Mg. Fournelle (2007, AGU Fall Mtg) noted chemical peak shifts for Al and Mg Ka in garnets; this effect was eliminated here by proper peaking. Earlier suggestions for issues with mass absorption coefficients were not seen, and Probe for EPMA software demonstrated there was not much difference between the most recent FFAST values vs. the older Heinrich values

  10. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  11. Hydrogen incorporation into high temperature protonic conductors: Nuclear microprobe microanalysis by means of 1H(p, p) 1H scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Gallien, J.-P.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Berger, M.-H.; Sayir, A.

    2006-08-01

    Protonic conductivity of some solid state materials at an intermediate temperature range (400-600 °C), referred as high temperature protonic conductor (HTPC), suggests their application as electrolytes in electrochemical cells, batteries, sensors, etc. Among them, some perovskites can be protonic and electronic conductors. Several obstacles remain to achieve the full potential of these ceramic membranes, among them the lack of measurement techniques and of an unambiguous model for conductivity. A precise understanding of the transport mechanisms requires local profiling of hydrogen concentrations within the microstructure of the ceramic. We have used the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratoire Pierre SÜE to investigate quantitatively the spatial distribution of hydrogen after water heat treatment of textured perovskites, SrCe0.9Y0.1O3-δ and Sr3Ca1+xNb2-xO9-δ, x = 0.18, synthesized according to a melt-process developed at NASA GRC. A not very common method has been developed for hydrogen measurements in thin samples, 1H(p, p)1H elastic recoil coincidence spectrometry (ERCS). Early experiments have evidenced hydrogen concentration enhancement within grain boundaries.

  12. The use of the RBI nuclear microprobe in conservation process studies of a church portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuović, Ž.; Fazinić, S.; Jakšić, M.; Krstić, D.; Mudronja, D.

    2005-04-01

    The southern portal of the St. Marko church in Zagreb, Croatia, is currently under the process of conservation. The conservation treatments on calcareous sandstone consist of (i) removal of harmful sulfates (gypsum) from the surface of the material by saturated solution of ammonium carbonate; and (ii) treatment of the material surface with a 10% solution of barium hydroxide in order to convert the remaining dissolvable sulfates into non-dissolvable compounds and to strengthen the material surface. The nuclear microprobe has been used to measure the level of gypsum induced damage, and quality of conservation. More specifically, the surface quantity and depth concentration profiles of sulfur have been determined in several samples taken from the portal before and after the treatment with the solution of ammonium carbonate. To test the quality of treatment by the barium hydroxide solution, the depth concentration of barium in the samples has been determined after the treatment. Both sulfur and barium concentration levels have been determined by scanning the focused proton beam over the samples, detecting PIXE spectra and creating elemental distribution maps. Beside portal samples, the efficiency of the barium hydroxide treatment was tested on sandstone samples from nearby stone pit assumed to be the origin of material used for portal construction.

  13. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  14. Study of ancient Islamic gilded pieces combining PIXE-RBS on external microprobe with sem images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ynsa, M. D.; Chamón, J.; Gutiérrez, P. C.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Enguita, O.; Pardo, A. I.; Arroyo, M.; Barrio, J.; Ferretti, M.; Climent-Font, A.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous metallic objects with very aesthetic and technological qualities have been recovered by archaeological excavations. Adequate processes of restoration and conservation treatments require the accurate determination of the elemental composition and distribution within the objects, as well as the identification of the nature and distribution of the corrosion products. Ideally the identification method should cause no alteration in the sample. In this work, different archaeological pieces with a gilded look have been characterized using simultaneously PIXE and RBS at the CMAM external microprobe in order to study the gilding metalworking done in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. The gold layer thickness and its elemental concentrations of Ag, Au and Hg were determined by both techniques and compared with the scanning electron microscopy images obtained for some fragments of pieces.

  15. Microprobe PIXE study of Ni-Ge interactions in lateral diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilukusha, D.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Nemutudi, R.; Habanyama, A.; Comrie, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry on the nuclear microprobe (μRBS) is often used in studies of lateral diffusion couples. RBS requires that the positions of the interacting species on the periodic table are not too close in terms of atomic number and therefore do not produce excessive RBS peak overlap. In order to satisfactorily characterize systems that have atomic numbers which are close, it is necessary to find techniques which can complement μRBS. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) could be applied in the lateral diffusion couple study of a system with relatively close atomic numbers. This was with a view that it may eventually be adopted to study systems where the atomic numbers are too close for RBS analysis. The system studied here was the Ni-Ge binary system. Since RBS is an established technique for studying lateral diffusion couples, we used it as a standard for comparison. The PIXE results showed a maximum error of 12% with reference to the RBS standard. In order to achieve the most effective use of PIXE in lateral diffusion couple studies we recommend the use of the technique in such a way as to obtain depth information and the use of relatively thick sample layers.

  16. A combination of size-resolved particle samplers and XRF microprobe technique for single particle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    It is important to understand the properties of individual airborne particulates that are determined by the processes of various physicochemical reactions occurring in their generation, transformation, and transport. This study describes the application of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe technique to the analysis of size-resolved individual particles as well as the results of an experimental study on the comparison of three different particle collection instruments for single particle analysis: a two-stage filter pack, a low pressure Andersen impactor (LPAI), and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Though LPAI and MOUDI are relatively suitable for multisize-segregated particles sampling compared with the two-stage filter pack sampler, they can easily form particle clusters and finally these particle clusters impede single particle analysis. Even though more particle mass can be collected without overloading on the substrate using MOUDI, by stage rotating, particles are still deposited and form clusters on the concentric circles. When particles are forming a spot (or other shapes of particle cluster), single particle analysis using the XRF micro-beam technique is restricted to individual particles deposited at the edge of the spot. Thus, the sampling duration time depending on the sampler stage should be adjusted for single particle study.

  17. Studies of solid DNA-CTMA films using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faizan; Yaney, Perry

    2008-10-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on the development of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) - based electrical and electro-optical devices using purified DNA originally derived from salmon waste. However, the molecular weight of the virgin, as received DNA is greater than 8000 kDa, whereas the electrical and electro-optical properties are optimum at lower molecular weights. High power sonication is used to reduce the molecular weight of the obtained DNA to levels as low as 200 kDa, in which higher power and longer exposure produces lower mean molecular weight. The DNA is then complexed with cetyltrimethl-ammonium chloride (CTMA) to make it water insoluble. To support the various measurements that have been made to confirm that the sonicated material is still double strand DNA and to look for other effects of sonication, Raman studies were carried out to compare the spectra over a wide range of molecular weights and to develop baseline data that can be used in correlation studies when various dopants are added to change the electrical, mechanical or optical properties. Raman microprobe spectra from solid, dry thin films of DNA with molecular weights ranging from 200 kDa to >8 MDa complexed with cetyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTMA) are presented and correlated with the as-received spectrum, the CTMA spectrum and with published DNA spectra in aqueous solutions.

  18. Nuclear microprobe study of TiO 2-penetration in the epidermis of human skin xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Zs.; Szikszai, Z.; Gontier, E.; Moretto, P.; Surlève-Bazeille, J.-E.; Kiss, B.; Juhász, I.; Hunyadi, J.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2005-04-01

    Titanium-dioxide is a widely used physical photoprotective component of various cosmetic products. However, very few experiments have been carried out on its penetration through the human epidermal barrier and its possible biological effects in vivo and in vitro. In the frame of the NANODERM EU5 project, the penetration of TiO2-nanoparticles through the epidermis of human foreskin grafts transplanted into SCID mice was investigated in the Debrecen and Bordeaux nuclear microprobe laboratories using combined IBA techniques. Transmission electron microscope studies of the same samples were also carried out in the DMPFCS laboratory. The skin grafts were treated with a hydrophobic emulsion containing micronised TiO2-nanoparticles in occlusion, for different time periods. Quantitative elemental concentrations and distributions have been determined in 14-16 μm thick freeze-dried sections obtained from quick frozen punch biopsies using STIM, PIXE and RBS analytical methods. Using both microscopic methods, we have observed nanoparticles having penetrated into the corneocyte layers of stratum corneum by direct visualisation in TEM and via their chemical fingerprint in PIXE. The human skin xenograft has proved to be a model particularly well adapted to such penetration studies.

  19. Application of a nuclear microprobe to the study of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coote, Graeme E.; Vickridge, Ian C.

    1988-03-01

    The mineral fraction of calcified tissue is largely calcium hydroxyapatite (bones and teeth) or calcium carbonate (shells and fish otoliths). Apatite has such a strong affinity for fluoride ions that the F/Ca ratio can vary markedly with position in a bone or tooth, depending on the amount of fluoride present at the time of calcification or partial recrystallization. New biological information can be obtained by introducing extra fluoride into the diet of an animal and using a microprobe later to scan sections of bones or teeth. In suitable burial sites extra fluoride is introduced after death, and the new distribution may have applications in forensic science and archaeology. Fish otoliths are also of interest since a new carbonate layer is formed each day and the distribution of trace elements may record some aspects of the fish's life history. Results from the following studies are presented: fluorine distributions in the teeth of sheep which ingested extra fluoride for known periods; distributions of calcium and fluorine in femurs of rats which drank water high in fluoride for periods from 2 to 15 weeks; calcium and fluorine distributions in artificially-prepared lesions in tooth enamel; diffusion profiles in archaeological human teeth and animal bones; patterns in the strontium/calcium ratio in sectioned otoliths of several species of fish.

  20. Fabrication and surface-modification of implantable microprobes for neuroscience studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Nguyen, C. M.; Chiao, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    In this work implantable micro-probes for central nervous system (CNS) studies were developed on silicon and polyimide substrates. The probes which contained micro-electrode arrays with different surface modifications were designed for implantation in the CNS. The electrode surfaces were modified with nano-scale structures that could greatly increase the active surface area in order to enhance the electrochemical current outputs while maintaining micro-scale dimensions of the electrodes and probes. The electrodes were made of gold or platinum, and designed with different sizes. The silicon probes were modified by silicon nanowires fabricated with the vapor–liquid–solid mechanism at high temperatures. With polyimide substrates, the nanostructure modification was carried out by applying concentrated gold or silver colloid solutions onto the micro-electrodes at room temperature. The surfaces of electrodes before and after modification were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The silicon nanowire-modified surface was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Experiments were carried out to investigate the improvement in sensing performance. The modified electrodes were tested with H2O2, electrochemical L-glutamate and dopamine. Comparisons between electrodes with and without nanostructure modification were conducted showing that the modifications have enhanced the signal outputs of the electrochemical neurotransmitter sensors.

  1. The BioCAT Microprobe for X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging, MicroXAFS and Microdiffraction Studies on Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Barrea, R.A.; Gore, D.; Kondrashkina, E.; Weng, T.; Heurich, R.; Vukonich, M.; Orgel, J.; Davidson, M.; Collingwood, J.F.; Mikhaylova, A.; Irving, T.C.

    2007-07-31

    Microbeam capabilities have been recently added to the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team (BioCAT) beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source to allow x-ray elemental mapping, micro x-ray absorption fine structure and microdiffraction studies on biological samples. The microprobe setup comprises a pair of platinum coated silicon KB mirrors; a sample holder mounted in a high precision positioner (100 nm accuracy); fluorescence detectors including a Si drift detector, Fe and Zn Bent Laue analyzers and a Ge detector; and a CCD detector for micro-diffraction experiments. The energy range of the microprobe is from 3.5 keV up to 17 keV. The fast scanning capabilities of the Bio-CAT beamline facilitate rapid acquisition of x-ray elemental images and micro-XAFS spectra. This paper reports the results of commissioning the KB mirror system and its performance in initial x-ray fluorescence mapping and micro-diffraction studies.

  2. Proton micro-probe analysis of framboidal pyrite and associated maceral types in a Devonian black shale

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, U.M.; Robl, T.L. . Center for Applied Energy Research); Robertson, J.D. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-01-01

    Framboids are spherical, raspberry-like aggregates of pyrite which are typically associated with organic matter in black shales. Because framboids are often intimately intergrown with macerals of the kerogen in black shales the objectives of this study were to: (1) Select tramboidal pyrite with close spatial relationship to distinct maceral types; (2) Determine the trace-element variations within different maceral types and that of framboidal pyrite occurring adjacent to those macerals and; (3) Examine whether the S/Fe ratios of the tramboids vary based on different maceral-type association. This study investigates a Devonian-Mississippian black shale from East-Central Kentucky. The organic-rich matrix consists predominantly of bituminite, alginite and to lesser extent of vitrinite. Most framboids range between < 1[mu]m and 27 [mu]m in size and typically occur as clusters which are engulfed by lamellar flowing vitrinite, indicating that the framboids were already present before compaction. 161 PIXE-analyses were performed in both macerals and framboids. To understand the likelihood of framboid precursors in macerals the authors checked the constancy of the S, Fe and trace-element content in the immediate vicinity of the framboid particle. Moreover, the authors analyzed traverses through framboids associated with the three different maceral types. The S/Fe ratio of the framboids is always that of stoichiometric pyrite. The combined results suggest that the framboids may have formed independent of the sulfur and trace-element concentration among the macerals. Globular, partly translucent grains were observed to have great resemblances in size and trace-element contents compared to those of framboids. The S/Fe ratio of these grains was typically well in excess of 2.0 suggesting that the transparent matrix may have been a sulfur-rich phase that possibly serves as precursor for the framboids.

  3. Electron-microprobe study of chromitites associated with alpine ultramafic complexes and some genetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Electron-microprobe and petrographic studies of alpine chromite deposits from around the world demonstrate that they are bimodal with respect to the chromic oxide content of their chromite. The two modes occur at 54 ? 4 and 37 ? 3 weight per cent chromic oxide corresponding to chromite designated as high-chromium and high-aluminum chromite respectively. The high-chromium chromite occurs exclusively with highly magnesian olivine (Fo92-97) and some interstitial diopside. The high-aluminum chromite is associated with more ferrous olivine (Fo88-92), diopside, enstatite, and feldspar. The plot of the mole ratios Cr/(Cr+Al+Fe3+) vs. Mg/(Mg+Fe2+) usually presented for alpine chromite is shown to have a high-chromium, high-iron to low-chromium, low-iron trend contrary to that shown by stratiform chromite. This trend is characteristic of alpine type chromite and is termed the alpine trend. However, a trend similar to that for startiform chromite is discernable on the graph for the high-chromium chromite data. This latter trend is well-developed at Red Mountain, Seldovia, Alaska. Analysis of the iron-magnesium distribution coefficient, Kd=(Fe/Mg)ol/(Fe/Mg)ch, between olivine and chromite shows that Kd for the high-chromium chromite from all ultramafic complexes has essentially the same constant value of .05 while the distribution coefficient for the high-aluminum chromite varies with composition of the chromite. These distribution coefficients are also characteristic of alpine-type chromites. The constant value for Kd for the high-chromium chromite and associated high-magnesium olivine in all alpine complexes suggests that they all crystallized under similar physico-chemical conditions. The two types of massive chromite and their associations of silicate minerals suggest the possibility of two populations with different origins. Recrystallization textures associated with the high-aluminum chromite together with field relationships between the gabbro and the chromite pods

  4. The laser microprobe mass analysis technique in the studies of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Orsulakova, A; Morgenstern, C; Kaufmann, R; D'Haese, M

    1982-01-01

    Laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) has been used to investigate cation and anion concentration in shock frozen, freeze-dried and plastic embedded inner ear tissue. Dissected inner ear specimens were prepared in various media of known ionic compositions and the influence on the K/Na ratio was measured in the lateral cochlea wall (spiral ligament, stria vascularis). For control purposes of the various procedures employed, muscle specimens (external standard) were processed in parallel. It was found that there is a good correlation between the K/Na ratio and the preservation of the tissue fine structure by comparing the results in tissues with different degrees of freezing damage. PMID:6764025

  5. Ion Microprobe Studies of Iodine Contents in Silicate Glasses and in Semarkona Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Sahijpal, S.; Swindle, T. D.; Musselwhite, D. S.; Grossman, J. N.

    1993-07-01

    Isotopic studies of electronegative elements (e.g. H, C, O, S, I, etc.) by the ion microprobe is best done in the negative secondary mode as the negative ion yields for these elements are much higher compared to their positive ion yields. However, analysis of non-conducting solids (e.g., silicates) in the negative secondary mode is beset with the problem of sample charging. In addition, for heavy elements like iodine, the problem of molecular interferences is also difficult to resolve. We have used a normal incidence electron gun, that generates a cloud of low energy electron near the sample surface, to overcome the problem of sample charging. The problem of molecular interferences was effectively removed by the energy filtering technique, commonly used for trace element studies [1]. Since the normal energy filtering procedure that involves introduction of appropriate offset to the sample high voltage cannot be followed in the negative secondary mode, we have introduced offset to the electrostatic analyzer (ESA) voltage, to achieve the required energy filtering. A silicon sample was analyzed to calibrate ESA voltage offset with sample voltage offset. We have initially analyzed silicon samples and a set of silicate glasses doped with iodine (0.1 to 1.5% by weight) to check for optimum conditions for measurement of low iodine concentration (

  6. An Ion Microprobe Study of Fractionated Sulfur Isotopes in Hydrothermal Sulfides of the Kaidun Meteorite Breccia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Riciputi, L. R.; Paterson, B. A.

    1996-03-01

    The Kaidun breccia contains diverse clasts of enstatite and carbonaceous chondrite, identified by their petrography and oxygen isotopic compositions. One distinctive lithology, classified as CM1 to reflect its CM parentage and highly altered state, contains texturally unusual pyrrhotite needles wrapped in sheaths of phyllosilicate, as well as aggregates and crosscutting veins of pentlandite. The unique textures and associated alteration minerals (serpentine, saponite, melanite garnet, framboidal magnetite) indicate that these sulfides formed in a precursor parent body by reactions with hydrothermal fluids at temperatures as high as 450 degrees C . The alteration conditions recorded by these clasts are extreme in comparison to other carbonaceous chondrites, and coated, jackstraw pyrrhotites are unknown from other meteorites. Thus, it is important to document the reaction products as completely as possible. Here we report the results of in situ analyses of sulfur isotopes in Kaidun pyrrhotite and pentlandite, obtained using a Cameca ims-4f ion microprobe.

  7. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Mas, J. F.; McConnell, J. W.; Yu, C.-H.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R. C.; Woods, P. J.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S. H.; Weintraub, W.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; MacDonald, B. D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.

    1998-12-21

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  8. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  10. Electron microprobe study of lunar and planetary zoned plagioclase feldspars: An analytical and experimental study of zoning in plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. K.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    Natural and experimentally grown zoned plagioclase feldspars were examined by electron microprobe. The analyses revealed discontinuous, sector, and oscillary chemical zoning superimposed on continuous normal or reverse zoning trends. Postulated mechanisms for the origin of zoning are based on either physical changes external to the magma (P, T, H2O saturation) or kinetic changes internal to the magma (diffusion, supersaturation, growth rate). Comparison of microprobe data on natural zoned plagioclase with zoned plagioclase grown in controlled experiments show that it may be possible to distinguish zonal development resulting from physio-chemical changes to the bulk magma from local kinetic control on the growth of individual crystals.

  11. Using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobes in the study of metal homeostasis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis. PMID:19182222

  12. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M; Lanzirotti, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  13. Sulfide formation in reservoir carbonates of the Devonian Nisku Formation, Alberta, Canada: An ion microprobe study

    SciTech Connect

    Riciputi, L.R.; Cole, D.R.; Machel, H.G.

    1996-01-01

    The processes affecting sulfur during diagenesis in carbonates have been investigated by ion microprobe analysis of {sigma} {sup 34}S values of pyrite, marcasite, and anhydrite from the Devonian Nisku Formation in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Pyrite and marcasite from three Nisku wells have {sigma}{sup 34}S ranging between -35 and +20{per_thousand}. The {sigma}{sup 34}S values increase b6y up to 50{per_thousand} with increasing well depth in two different Nisku wells, and {sigma}{sup 34}S also increases by up to 15{per_thousand} as grain size increases form 40 to over 100 {mu}m in individual samples. The appearance of native sulfur is accompanied by an increase of up to 30{per_thousand} in pyrite {sigma}{sup 34}S values. Bulk and ion probe analyses of anhydrite are relatively uniform ({sigma}{sup 34}S = +22 to +30{per_thousand} CDT). The predominately low {sigma}{sup 34}S values of Nisku sulfides indicate bacterial sulfate reduction. Textural relations indicate that Fe-sulfide formation in Nisku carbonates may have occurred by two different mechanisms. Much of the sulfide has {sigma}{sup 34}S values that suggest that it was associated with bacterial sulfate reduction, although most Fe-sulfides did not form until after pervasive matrix dolomitization (depths of 300-1000 m). Other sulfide may have formed later, during deep ({approximately}4km) burial via thermochemical sulfate reduction. The range in {sigma}{sup 34}S values in a single thin section and correlations between pyrite morphology and isotopic values suggest that sulfate reduction was a very localized process, and that the sulfate reduction environment varied considerably on a small scale. 61 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Impact history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite: Electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS study of sulfides and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronikov, A. V.; Andronikova, I. E.; Hill, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    Electron microprobe and LA-ICP-MS study of sulfides and metals from two fragments of the LL5 Chelyabinsk meteorite were conducted. The fragments are impact breccias, one fragment contains both chondritic and shock vein lithologies, and the other contains shock-darkened chondritic clasts and vesicular impact melts. The chondritic lithology and shock veins display very similar opaque mineral compositions. The mineral compositions in the impact-melt breccias are distinctly different. The brecciated state of the Chelyabinsk meteorite suggests strong involvement of shock-related processes during the evolution of the parent body. Multiple heavy impact events occurred on the parent asteroid and on the Chelyabinsk meteoroid itself over the time period from ca. 4.5 Ga until ca. 1.2 Ma. The shock veins were produced in situ on the parent body. The impact-melt breccias could have formed because of the dramatic impact to the parent LL-chondrite body that could be partly disintegrated. The fragment containing shock-darkened chondritic clasts and vesicular impact melt lithologies preserves a record of melting, volatilization, partial degassing, and quenching of the molten material. The abundance and size (up to 1 mm) of the vesicles suggest that the impact melt must have been buried at some depth after formation. After impact and subsequent melting occurred, the impact-induced pressure on the shallow asteroid interior was released that caused "boiling" of volatiles and generation of S-rich bubbles. Such an impact excavated down to depths of the body generating multiple fragments with complicated histories. These fragments reaccumulated into a gravitational aggregate and formed the parental meteoroid for the Chelyabinsk meteorite.

  15. Petrology of Apollo 14 regolith breccias and ion microprobe studies of glass beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Hughes, S. S.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Mineral chemistries, glass chemistries, and bulk compositions of Apollo 14 regolith beccias are used to study the regolith evolution at the Apollo 14 site and on the moon in general. Major changes in the regolith since the formation of the breccias include an increase in maturity, an increase in glasses with the Fra Mauro basalt composition, and decreases in feldspathic and mare glasses. The results suggest the presence of a source with a larger non-KREEPy highland plutonic component than other breccias.

  16. Broad Beam and Ion Microprobe Studies of Single-Event Upsets in High Speed 0.18micron Silicon Germanium Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors and Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Pickel, Jim; Carts, Martin A.; Irwin, TIm; Niu, Guofu; Cressler, John; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Fritz, Karl; Riggs, Pam

    2003-01-01

    SiGe based technology is widely recognized for its tremendous potential to impact the high speed microelectronic industry, and therefore the space industry, by monolithic incorporation of low power complementary logic with extremely high speed SiGe Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (HBT) logic. A variety of studies have examined the ionizing dose, displacement damage and single event characteristics, and are reported. Accessibility to SiGe through an increasing number of manufacturers adds to the importance of understanding its intrinsic radiation characteristics, and in particular the single event effect (SEE) characteristics of the high bandwidth HBT based circuits. IBM is now manufacturing in its 3rd generation of their commercial SiGe processes, and access is currently available to the first two generations (known as and 6HP) through the MOSIS shared mask services with anticipated future release of the latest (7HP) process. The 5 HP process is described and is characterized by a emitter spacing of 0.5 micron and a cutoff frequency ff of 50 GHz, whereas the fully scaled 7HP HBT employs a 0.18 micron emitter and has an fT of 120 GHz. Previous investigations have the examined SEE response of 5 HP HBT circuits through both circuit testing and modeling. Charge collection modeling studies in the 5 H P process have also been conducted, but to date no measurements have been reported of charge collection in any SiGe HBT structures. Nor have circuit models for charge collection been developed in any version other than the 5 HP HBT structure. Our investigation reports the first indications of both charge collection and circuit response in IBM s 7HP-based SiGe process. We compare broad beam heavy ion SEU test results in a fully function Pseudo-Random Number (PRN) sequence generator up to frequencies of 12 Gbps versus effective LET, and also report proton test results in the same circuit. In addition, we examine the charge collection characteristics of individual 7HP HBT

  17. JSC Mars-1 Martian Soil Simulant: Melting Experiments and Electron Microprobe Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, P.; Sebille, L.; Boles, W.; Chadwell, M.; Schwarz, L.

    2003-01-01

    JSC Mars-1 has been developed as a Martian regolith simulant, and is the <1 mm size fraction of a palagonitic tephra (a glassy volcanic ash altered at low temperatures) from Pu'u Nene cinder cone on the Island of Hawaii. The Mars-1 simulant forms the basis for numerous terrestrial studies which aim to evaluate the suitability of Martian soil for materials processing. Martian soil may be sintered to form building materials for construction, and also melted or reacted to extract metals for various uses, as well as oxygen for life support.

  18. Synchrotron x-ray and electron micro-probe study of contaminated dredged sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitevin, A.; Lerouge, C.; Wille, G.; Bataillard, P.; Hennet, L.

    2012-04-01

    Sediments originating from periodic dredging of waterways were traditionally disposed of in storage sites without any precautions or treatments. There may be some environmental concerns especially when the dredged material comes from historically contaminated areas such as the North French coal basin. This study aims to characterize the metal mobility (mainly Zn and Pb) in deposited dredged sediments by combining chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The sediments consist of a silty fraction (~ 40 %: dominant quartz, minor feldspar), carbonates and a clay fraction (illite dominant, illite-smectite mixed layer, kaolinite). This mineralogical heterogeneity and the observed grain-size distribution (70 to 80 % wt of the total sediment is <50µm) lead to a need to use microbeam techniques to identify Zn and Pb carriers. Electron probe micro-analyse (EPMA) combined with microbeam x-ray fluorescence (µXRF) at Synchrotron sources were used to identify Zn and Pb carriers. In particular Zn and Pb distributions in thin-section samples were determined by µ-XRF elemental mappings. EPMA was used to determine the distribution of light elements for which the energy of the emission lines is below 4 keV (Si, S, P…). The presence of reduced (sulphides) and oxidized (sulphates, oxihydroxides) phases strongly suggests that the redox state is one of the major parameters controlling the metal mobility. Therefore x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performed to study the oxidation state in both bulk samples and on selected regions of interest in thin section samples. Preliminary chemical analyses In this work, the potential effects of the sample preparation on phase's structure and redox state were also studied and will be presented. In particular measurements using x-ray absorption spectroscopy were carried out on air dried or lyophilised powders and on samples stored in a cryogenic environment after sampling. For the latter, we studied the evolution of the iron

  19. X-ray microprobe studies of Hungarian background and urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, S.; Sandor, S. . Central Research Inst. for Physics); Xhoffer, C.; Van Grieken, R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Jones, K.W. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. )

    1991-10-01

    In order to determine the polluting atmospheric sources in urban and background areas source apportionment of the air particulate matter is necessary. Hitherto these studies were mostly based on bulk composition measurements of the aerosol. Source profiles, i.e. the concentrations of several elements for air particulate matter originating from one source, can be deduced from the receptor data using a number of multivariate techniques among which the chemical mass balance. The application is limited by the large number of observations that must be made for each of the variables. Often an elaborated sample preparation is necessary for fractionating the sample into several sub samples, according to the density, particle diameter or other relevant properties. Often this may results in poorly resolved source profiles. The aim of the present work is to find the relative abundance of the particle types originating from two different background monitoring stations in the middle of the Great Hungarian Plain. In urban areas most pollutants originate from traffic and municipal waste incineration. Since heavy metals play an important role in these samples the highly sensitive x-ray microscope (XRM) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory was used. A feasibility study on individual aerosol particles sampled at the above background stations and in the urban area of Budapest is discussed.

  20. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  1. Asymmetric Distribution of Metals in the Xenopus Laevis Oocyte: a Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microprobe Study

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, B.F.Gh.; Belak, Z.R.; Ignatyev, K.; Ovsenek, N.; Nichol, H.

    2009-06-04

    The asymmetric distribution of many components of the Xenopus oocyte, including RNA, proteins, and pigment, provides a framework for cellular specialization during development. During maturation, Xenopus oocytes also acquire metals needed for development, but apart from zinc, little is known about their distribution. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe was used to map iron, copper, and zinc and the metalloid selenium in a whole oocyte. Iron, zinc, and copper were asymmetrically distributed in the cytoplasm, while selenium and copper were more abundant in the nucleus. A zone of high copper and zinc was seen in the animal pole cytoplasm. Iron was also concentrated in the animal pole but did not colocalize with zinc, copper, or pigment accumulations. This asymmetry of metal deposition may be important for normal development. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe will be a useful tool to examine how metals accumulate and redistribute during fertilization and embryonic development.

  2. Asymmetri Distribution of Metals in the Xenopus Laevis Oocyte: a Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence Microprobe Study

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, B.F.G.; Belak, Z.R.; Ignatyev, K.; Ovsenek, N.; Nichol, H.; /Saskatchewan U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    The asymmetric distribution of many components of the Xenopus oocyte, including RNA, proteins, and pigment, provides a framework for cellular specialization during development. During maturation, Xenopus oocytes also acquire metals needed for development, but apart from zinc, little is known about their distribution. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe was used to map iron, copper, and zinc and the metalloid selenium in a whole oocyte. Iron, zinc, and copper were asymmetrically distributed in the cytoplasm, while selenium and copper were more abundant in the nucleus. A zone of high copper and zinc was seen in the animal pole cytoplasm. Iron was also concentrated in the animal pole but did not colocalize with zinc, copper, or pigment accumulations. This asymmetry of metal deposition may be important for normal development. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe will be a useful tool to examine how metals accumulate and redistribute during fertilization and embryonic development.

  3. Feasibility study of a lunar landing area navigation network deployed by impacting micro-probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, P.; Yung, K. L.

    2010-05-01

    Exploration activities on the lunar surface will require precise knowledge of the position of a robotic or manned vehicle. This paper discusses the use of radio beacons as method to determine the position of a mobile unit on the surface. Previous concepts consider the installation of such equipment by the robot itself. A novel idea is discussed here, namely to use miniaturized radio beacons which are deployed (released) during the descent of the lander on the surface. This idea has three major advantages compared to previous proposals: (i) it avoids the time costly and energy consuming installation of the equipment by a rover. (ii) The impact velocities of the probes are in reasonable range since the probes are deployed at low altitude from the main lander that approaches its final landing site. (iii) The probes can take reconnaissance pictures during their free-fall to the surface. This method will therefore deliver charts of the proximity of the landing area with higher resolution than those done by orbital means. Such information will enable scientists and mission operators to precisely plan robotic excursions (and later Extra Vehicular Activity) through the identification of hazardous areas and spots of interest. The paper will study the feasibility of this system from different aspects. The first section will outline the application scenario and the potential outcome of such a system for the coming phase of lunar exploration. A technological readiness review was done to evaluate if the payload instrumentation for these high velocity impacting probes is available. The second section presents the simulation of the impact process of a preliminary probe model in nonlinear transient dynamic finite element analysis using the Lagrangian hydrocode LS-DYNA. The purpose of this simulation was to evaluate if the beacon is able to communicate with the mobile unit even when buried into the soil. The integration of this payload into coming lunar missions will contribute to

  4. Mars Microprobe Entry Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Cheatwood, F. McNeil

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Microprobe mission will provide the first opportunity for subsurface measurements, including water detection, near the south pole of Mars. In this paper, performance of the Microprobe aeroshell design is evaluated through development of a six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) aerodynamic database and flight dynamics simulation. Numerous mission uncertainties are quantified and a Monte-Carlo analysis is performed to statistically assess mission performance. Results from this 6-DOF Monte-Carlo simulation demonstrate that, in a majority of the cases (approximately 2-sigma), the penetrator impact conditions are within current design tolerances. Several trajectories are identified in which the current set of impact requirements are not satisfied. From these cases, critical design parameters are highlighted and additional system requirements are suggested. In particular, a relatively large angle-of-attack range near peak heating is identified.

  5. Simulation study of proton transport in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study the morphological changes induced in a Nafion-like ionomer by the imposition of a strong electric field. We observe that proton transport through this polymer electrolyte membrane is accompanied by morphological changes that include the formation of structures aligned along the direction of the applied field. The polar head groups of the ionomer side chains assemble into clusters, which then form rod-like formations, and these cylindrical structures then assemble into a hexagonally ordered array aligned with the direction of current flow. For dry ionomers, at current densities in excess of 1 A/cm^2 these rod-like clusters undergo an inner micro-phase separation, in which distinct wire-like lines of sulfonate head groups are accompanied by similar wire-like alignments of bound protons. The clusters appear to be of two types. If there are two, four, or five lines of sulfonates then there is an equal number of lines of protons, but if there are three lines of sulfonates then they are accompanied by four lines of protons. Occasionally these lines of sulfonates and protons form a helical structure. Upon removal of the electric field, the hexagonal array of rod-like structures remains, but the microphase separation disappears below the threshold current of 1 A/cm^2.

  6. Histological changes induced by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe especially designed for root canal sterilization: an in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Gal, Rivka

    1998-04-01

    Until now, no suitable delivery fiber existed for CO2 laser endodontic radiation in the apical region where it is most difficult to eliminate the pulp tissue using conventional methods. To overcome this problem, we designed a microprobe that reaches closer to the apex, distributing the energy density to a smaller area of the root canal, thus favorably increasing the thermal effects. The 15 F CO2 microprobe is a flexible, hollow, metal fiber, 300 micrometer in diameter and 20 mm in length, coupled onto a handpiece, with the following radiation parameters: wavelength -- 10.6 micrometer; pulse duration -- 50m/sec; energy per pulse 0.25 joule; energy density -- 353.7J/cm2 per pulse; power on tissue -- 5 W. The study was conducted on 30 vital maxillary or mandibulary; central, lateral, or premolar teeth destined for extraction due to periodontal problems. Twenty were experimentally treated with pulsed CO2 laser delivered by this newly developed fiber after conventional root canal preparation. Temperature measured at three points on the root surface during laser treatment did not exceed 38 degrees Celsius. Ten teeth represented the control group in which only root canal preparation was performed in the conventional method. Histological examination of the laser treated teeth showed coagulation necrosis and vacuolization of remaining pulp tissue in the root canal periphery. Primary and secondary dentin appeared normal, in all cases treated with 15 F CO2 laser. Gramm stain and bacteriologic examination revealed complete sterilization. These results demonstrate the unique capabilities of this special microprobe in sterilization of the root canal, and no thermal damage to the surrounding tissue.

  7. An ion microprobe study of individual zircon phenocrysts from voluminous post-caldera rhyolites of the Yellowstone caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, K. E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Following the formation of the Yellowstone caldera from the 640 ka supereruption of the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT), a voluminous episode of post-caldera volcanism filled the caldera with >600 km3 of low-δ18O rhyolite. Such low-δ18O signatures require remelting of 100s of km3 of hydrothermally altered (18O-depleted) rock in the shallow crust. We present a high resolution oxygen isotope and geochronology (U-Th and U-Pb) study of individual zircon crystals from seven of these voluminous post-caldera rhyolites in order to elucidate their genesis. Oxygen isotope and geochronology analyses of zircon were performed with an ion microprobe that enabled us to doubly fingerprint 25-30 µm diameter spots. Host groundmass glasses and coexisting quartz were analyzed in bulk for oxygen isotopes by laser fluorination. We find that zircons from the youngest (200-80 ka) post-caldera rhyolites have oxygen isotopic compositions that are in equilibrium with low-δ18O host groundmass glasses and quartz and are unzoned in oxygen and U-Th age. This finding is in contrast to prior work on older (500-250 ka) post-caldera rhyolites, which exhibit isotopic disequilibria and age zoning, including the presence of clearly inherited zircon cores. Average U-Th crystallization ages and δ18O zircon values for Pitchstone Plateau flow (81±7 ka, 2.8±0.2‰), West Yellowstone flow (118±8 ka, 2.8±0.1‰), Elephant Back flow (175±22 ka, 2.7±0.2‰) and Tuff of Bluff Point (176±20 ka, 2.7±0.1‰) are overlapping or nearly overlapping in age and identical in oxygen isotope composition within uncertainty (2 SE). New U-Pb geochronology and oxygen isotope data for the North Biscuit Basin flow establish that it has an age (188±33 ka) and δ18O signature (2.8±0.2‰) that is distinctive of the youngest post-caldera rhyolites. Conversely, the South Biscuit Basin flow has a heterogeneous zircon population with ages that range from 550-250 ka. In this unit, older and larger (200-400 µm) zircons have more

  8. A study of the behavior of bromide in artificial pits using in situ X-ray microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Kaneko, M.

    1997-12-31

    An in situ X-ray microprobe analysis of Type 316 stainless steel artificial pits has been carried out with a bromide/chloride solution. A high intensity 8 micron diameter polychromatic X-ray beam was scanned across the steel solution interface within the artificial pit. The resulting X-ray fluorescence was analyzed using an energy dispersive X-ray detector. In contrast to the light Cl atom, Br could be detected, making it possible to monitor the behavior of halides in the artificial pits and in the salt layer at the interface. It was found that Br was more active than Cl. At high potentials, elemental Br was produced as an oxidation product, whereas without added bromide, chloride only formed a salt layer. Br also concentrated at the salt steel interface at potentials below where it was oxidized.

  9. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) Studies and Focused Heavy Ion Microprobe Facility at the University of North Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. N.; Renfrow, S. N.; Jin, J.; Hughes, B. F.; Duggan, J. L.; McDaniel, F. D.

    1998-03-01

    As the feature sizes reduce, semiconductor devices increase their sensitivity to ionizing radiation that creates electron-hole pairs. The induced charge collection by the device p-n junctions can alter the state of the device, most commonly causing memory errors. To design robust devices immune to these effects, it is essential to create and test accurate models of this process. Such model-based testing requires energetic heavy ions whose number, arrival time, spatial location, energy, and angle can be controlled when they strike the integrated circuit. IBMAL is building a strong focusing lens system with spatial resolution 1μ m, raster-scanning capabilities for alpha particles and heavier ions. A detailed description of the focused heavy ion microprobe facility and IBICC experimental results conducted at Sandia National Laboratory will be presented.

  10. Experimental determination of the partitioning of gallium between solid iron metal and synthetic basaltic melt Electron and ion microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Reed, S. J. B.; Enright, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ga between solid Fe metal and synthetic basaltic melt is investigated experimentally at temperatures of 1190 and 1330 C, and over a narrow range of oxygen fugacities. Metal-silicate reversal experiments were conducted, indicating a close approach to equilibrium. The analysis of the partitioned products was performed using electron and ion microprobes. At one bar total pressure, the solid metal/silicate melt partition coefficient D(Ga) is used to evaluate metal-silicate fractionation processes in the earth, moon, and Eucrite Parent Body (EPB). It is found that the depletion of Ga abundances in the EPB is due to the extraction of Ga into a metallic core. Likewise, the depletion of Ga in the lunar mantle is consistent with the extraction of Ga into a smaller lunar core if Ga was originally present in a subchondritic concentration. The relatively high Ga abundances in the earth's mantle are discussed, with reference to several theoretical models.

  11. Zircon geochronology and ca. 400 Ma exhumation of Norwegian ultrahigh-pressure rocks: An ion microprobe and chemical abrasion study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Root, D.B.; Hacker, B.R.; Mattinson, J.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the formation and exhumation of the remarkable ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks of the Western Gneiss Region, Norway, hinges on precise determination of the time of eclogite recrystallization. We conducted detailed thermal ionization mass spectrometry, chemical abrasion analysis and sensitive high-resolution ion-microprobe analysis of zircons from four ultrahigh- and high-pressure (HP) rocks. Ion-microprobe analyses from the Flatraket eclogite yielded a broad range of apparently concordant Caledonian ages, suggesting long-term growth. In contrast, higher precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of zircon subject to combined thermal annealing and multi-step chemical abrasion yielded moderate Pb loss from the first (lowest temperature) abrasion step, possible minor Pb loss or minor growth at 400 Ma from the second step and a 407-404 Ma cluster of slightly discordant 206Pb/238U ages, most likely free from Pb loss, from the remaining abrasion steps. We interpret the latter to reflect zircon crystallization at ???405-400 Ma with minor discordance from inherited cores. Zircon crystallization occurred at eclogite-facies, possibly post-peak conditions, based on compositions of garnet inclusions in zircon as well as nearly flat HREE profiles and lack of Eu anomalies in zircon fractions subjected to chemical abrasion. These ages are significantly younger than the 425 Ma age often cited for western Norway eclogite recrystallization, implying faster rates of exhumation (>2.5-8.5 km/Myr), and coeval formation of eclogites across the UHP portion of the Western Gneiss Region. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Nuclear microprobe analysis of lead profile in crocodile bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlic, I.; Siegele, R.; Hammerton, K.; Jeffree, R. A.; Cohen, D. D.

    2003-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of lead were found in Australian free ranging saltwater crocodile ( Crocodylus porosus) bone and flesh. Lead shots were found as potential source of lead in these animals. ANSTO's heavy ion nuclear microprobe was used to measure the distribution of Pb in a number of bones and osteoderms. The aim was to find out if elevated Pb concentration remains in growth rings and if the concentration is correlated with the blood levels recorded at the time. Results of our study show a very distinct distribution of accumulated Pb in bones and osteoderms as well as good correlation with the level of lead concentration in blood. To investigate influence of ion species on detection limits measurements of the same sample were performed by using 3 MeV protons, 9 MeV He ions and 20 MeV carbon ions. Peak to background ratios, detection limits and the overall 'quality' of obtained spectra are compared and discussed.

  13. Intracochlear microprobe analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bone, R.C.; Ryan, A.F.

    1982-04-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) or microprobe analysis provides cochlear physiologists with a means of accurately assessing relative ionic concentrations in selected portions of the auditory mechanism. Rapid freezing followed by lyophilization allows the recovery of fluid samples in crystalline form not only from perilymphatic and endolymphatic spaces, but also from much smaller subregions of the cochlea. Because samples are examined in a solid state, there is no risk of diffusion into surrounding or juxtaposed fluids. Samples of cochlear tissues may also be evaluated without the danger of intercellular ionic diffusion. During direct visualization by scanning electron microscopy, determination of the biochemical makeup of the material being examined can be simultaneously, assuring the source of the data collected. Other potential advantages and disadvantages of EDXA are reviewed. Initial findings as they relate to endolymph, perilymph, stria vascularis, and the undersurface of the tectorial membrane are presented.

  14. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, F.; Dhenain, M.; Gurden, H.; Routier, A. L.; Lefebvre, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lanièce, P.

    2008-10-01

    The β-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous β-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed β-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is

  15. An ion microprobe study of the intra-crystalline behavior of REE and selected trace elements in pyroxene from mare basalts with different cooling and crystallization histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of crystallization interaction on the trace element zoning characteristics of pyroxenes are analyzed using electron and ion microprobe techniques. Four pigeonite basalts with similar isochemical composition, but different cooling rates and crystallization histories are studied. Pyroxene quadrilaterals displaying crystallization trends are presented. The crystal chemical rationalization of REE zoning, pattern shapes, and abundances are examined. The data reveal that the trace element zoning characteristics in pyroxene and the partitioning of trace elements between pyroxene and the melt are related to the interaction between the efficiency of the crystallization process, the kinetics at the crystal-melt interface, the kinetics of plagioclase nucleation and the characteristics of the crystal chemical substitutions in the pyroxene and the associated crystallizing phase.

  16. Positron microprobe at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka, P; Howell, R; Stoeffl, W

    1998-11-01

    The electron linac based positron source at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides the world's highest current beam of keV positrons. We are building a positron microprobe that will produce a pulsed, focused positron beam for 3-dimensional scans of defect size and concentration with sub-micron resolution. The widely spaced and intense positron packets from the tungsten moderator at the end of the 100 MeV LLNL linac are captured and trapped in a magnetic bottle. The positrons are then released in 1 ns bunches at a 20 MHz repetition rate. With a three-stage re-moderation we will compress the cm-sized original beam to a 1 micro-meter diameter final spot on the target. The buncher will compress the arrival time of positrons on the target to less than 100 ps. A detector array with up to 60 BaF2 crystals in paired coincidence will measure the annihilation radiation with high efficiency and low background. The energy of the positrons can be varied from less than 1 keV up to 50 keV.

  17. A combined electron microprobe (EMP) and Raman spectroscopic study of the alteration products in Martian meteorite MIL 03346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, K. E.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the secondary alteration products in MIL 03346 using Raman spectroscopic and electron microprobe traverses. Discussion focuses on the single olivine in ,177 supplemented with observations from ,168 and ,169. Traverses start at the rim and progress into the interior. Dark brown, nearly opaque, laihunite [Fe2+Fe3+2(SiO4)2] is present as overgrowths, and 20-50 µm veins of reddish-brown stilpnomelane [(K,Na,Ca)4(Ti0.1,Al2.3,Fe3+35.5,Mn0.8,Mg9.3) (Si63Al9)(O,OH)206∗n(H2O)] occur inside the olivine. Stilpnomelane crosscuts and postdates the laihunite; veins are in sharp contact with the host olivine but lined by ~5 µm films of jarosite [KFe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6] from a later generation of alteration. An interstitial laihunite also hosts stilpnomelane. The most recent secondary phases are gypsum and bassanite in our X-ray maps of ,168 and ,169. Ca-sulfates were not observed in X-ray maps of ,177 but were detected in our Raman point count. All sulfates are believed to be Martian. The groundmass of MIL indicates rapid cooling from elevated temperatures with fO2 near QFM. Reports of laihunite synthesis by olivine oxidation at elevated temperatures (100-800°C) suggest the overgrowths formed during consolidation. In terrestrial rocks, stilpnomelane is a product of late diagenesis to garnet-grade metamorphism. In MIL, stilpnomelane appears to be a secondary phase formed at the lower end of this stability range, at conditions akin to diagenesis. Raman spectra indicate that the stilpnomelane, jarosite, and Ca-sulfates are hydrated. The stilpnomelane contains Cl- and was followed by jarosite, a product of acid alteration, and the deposition of Ca-sulfates and halide salts from more neutral chloride solutions.

  18. An ion and electron microprobe study of amphibole in the Garland Peak Syenite, Red Hill Complex, NH

    SciTech Connect

    Dorais, M.J. ); Macrae, N.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Garland Peak Syenite (GPS) of the Red Hill complex, NH, consists predominantly of amphibole, oligoclase, perthite, and quartz; amphiboles are zoned from kaersutite cores to hastingsite-hornblende rims. The association of kaersutite with quartz indicates that the GPS magma experienced substantial changes in silica activity during its crystallization history. Camptonites are also associated with the Red Hill complex, and in order to elucidate the camptonite-GPS, and the GPS kaersutite-quartz relationships, amphiboles in these rocks were analyzed by electron and ion microprobe techniques. Kaersutites in the camptonites and GPS are very similar in terms of major and minor elements. REE concentrations in the camptonite's kaersutite are slightly less than the GPS kaersutite; LREE abundances are 100 times chondrites, La/Yb values are 4--5. GPS kaersutitic cores have LREE abundances between 200--300 times chondrites with La/Yb values between 6--8. Compared to the cores, the hastingsite rims are preferentially enriched in REE with LREE between 1,000 and 2,000 times chondrites, La/Yb values range between 16--18, and the patterns have large negative Eu anomalies. Although complicated by the certainty of changing partition coefficients during crystallization, the enrichment in total REE from camptonite--GPS kaersutite--GPS hastingsite is consistent with a differentiation origin of the suite. Rimward depletions in Sr, Eu, V, and Ti concentrations, and the increase in La/Yb values suggest that parental camptonites fractionated amphibole, magnetite, and feldspar to produce silica-oversaturated GPS liquids. The significance of amphibole and magnetite fractionation on camptonite-GPS silica activity is also indicated by bulk-rock, major element modeling.

  19. Quantitative elemental imaging of octopus stylets using PIXE and the nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, Zoë; Belton, David; Pecl, Gretta; Semmens, Jayson

    2008-01-01

    By utilising targeted microprobe technology, the analysis of elements incorporated within the hard bio-mineralised structures of marine organisms has provided unique insights into the population biology of many species. As hard structures grow, elements from surrounding waters are incorporated effectively providing a natural 'tag' that is often unique to the animal's particular location or habitat. The spatial distribution of elements within octopus stylets was investigated, using the nuclear microprobe, to assess their potential for determining dispersal and population structure in octopus populations. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was conducted using the Dynamic Analysis method and GeoPIXE software package, which produced high resolution, quantitative elemental maps of whole stylet cross-sections. Ten elements were detected within the stylets which were heterogeneously distributed throughout the microstructure. Although Ca decreased towards the section edge, this trend was consistent between individuals and remained homogeneous in the inner region of the stylet, and thus appears a suitable internal standard for future microprobe analyses. Additional analyses used to investigate the general composition of the stylet structure suggested that they are amorphous and largely organic, however, there was some evidence of phosphatic mineralisation. In conclusion, this study indicates that stylets are suitable for targeted elemental analysis, although this is currently limited to the inner hatch region of the microstructure.

  20. Multielement geochemical investigations by SRXRF microprobe studies on tectite material: Evidence from the NE-Mexican Cretaceous/Tertiary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, M.; Rickers, K.; Kramar, U.; Simon, R.; Staub, S.; Schulte, P.

    2002-12-01

    The K/T boundary is long known as one of a few mass extinctions in earth history. The impact of a big meteorite at the Chicxulub on the northern Yucatan peninsula in Mexico is discussed to have triggered the faunal mass extinction and the rapid change of the palaeoenvironmental conditions near the K/T boundary. Tectite material, especially spherules are explained from many of the sections in correlation to the K/T-boundary event. This rare, glassy or alterated material is extremely variable in its major element chemistry, morphology and stratigraphic position in K/T transitions worldwide. For the first time, we perfom trace element analysis on tectites from the K/T boundary using synchrotron radiation XRF (SRXRF). Measurements were performed at the Hamburger Strahlungssynchrotronlabor HASYLAB at DESY (Hamburg, Germany) and at the ANKA (Karlsruhe, Germany) with polychromatic and monochromatic excitation, respectively collimating the beam to 15 æm by capillary optics. Based on results from SRXRF microprobe determinations, these structures are to be interpreted as mixing of several melts with different chemical composition. The different components may represent melts from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material excavated by the Chicxulub impact. Igneous rocks with andesitic composition in cores at Chicxulub are considered to be impact melt rocks and are correlated mainly by the composition of major elements with the glass spherules found in the surrounding. Our investigations show that it is possible to trace elements with high sensitivity and a high spatial resolution. Some of the samples show clearly zonation and alteration parts, as well as carbonate inclusions, triggered by the Chicxulub impact event. In general, the results from the SRXRF show that the tectite material have different trace element patterns, formed by mixing of melts with different chemical composition derived from different sediment layers and possibly of basement material

  1. The second Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), Chris Voorhees (left) and Satish Krishnan (right), from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, remove the second Mars microprobe from a drum. Two microprobes will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander, scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  2. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  3. Electron microprobe analysis of cryolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, F.; Bravo Silva, P.; Ferreira, J.; Piedade, A. P.; Vieira, M. T. F.

    2014-03-01

    A sample of cryolite was studied with a JEOL JXA 8500-F electron microprobe under several operating conditions. A TAP crystal was used to analyse Na and Al and a LDE1 crystal to analyse F. As F and Na are both highly "volatile" elements, special care must be taken during analysis. The measurement order of Na, F and Al is not irrelevant and optimum conditions may also result in different combinations of accelerating voltage, beam current, beam size or counting times. Relevant X-ray signals were recorded in order to investigate the behaviour of the Na Ka and F Ka counts with elapsed time. The incident beam current was also recorded at the same time. In a clear contrast to what has normally been reported in the EPMA analysis of aluminosilicates and silicate glasses, we found that the Na X-ray counts increase with time. This increment of X-rays intensities for sodium in cryolite depends on the operating conditions and is accompanied by a strong migration of fluorine from the beam excitation volume, leading to a decrease in F X-ray counting rates. It was also observed that higher incident beam currents induce higher radiation damage in the mineral. The current instability is consistent with possible electron induced dissociation in the cryolite structure. An analytical protocol was achieved for 6 kV and 15kV accelerating voltage for the correct EPMA analysis of cryolite.

  4. Microprobe PIXE analysis of aluminium in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Horino, Y.; Mokuno, Y.; Kakimi, S.; Fujii, K.

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), we examined aluminium (Al) in the rat liver, and in the brains (hippocampus) of Alzheimer's disease patients using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobe and proton (2 MeV) microprobe PIXE analysis. Heavy ion microprobes (3 MeV Si 2+) have several time's higher sensitivity for Al detection than 2 MeV proton microprobes. (1) In the rat liver, Al was detected in the cell nuclei, where phosphorus (P) was most densely distributed. (2) We also demonstrated Al in the cell nuclei isolated from Alzheimer's disease brains using heavy ion (5 MeV Si 3+) microprobes. Al spectra were detected using 2 MeV proton microprobes in the isolated brain cell nuclei. Al could not be observed in areas where P was present in relatively small amounts, or was absent. Our results indicate that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of Al in the nuclei of brain cells.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  6. Study on patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment in hengjian proton medical facility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingbiao; Wang, Qingbin; Liang, Tianjiao; Zhang, Gang; Ma, Yinglin; Chen, Yu; Ye, Rong; Liu, Qiongyao; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Huaibao

    2016-09-01

    At present, increasingly more proton medical facilities have been established globally for better curative effect and less side effect in tumor treatment. Compared with electron and photon, proton delivers more energy and dose at its end of range (Bragg peak), and has less lateral scattering for its much larger mass. However, proton is much easier to produce neutron and induced radioactivity, which makes radiation protection for proton accelerators more difficult than for electron accelerators. This study focuses on the problem of patient-induced radioactivity during proton treatment, which has been ignored for years. However, we confirmed it is a vital factor for radiation protection to both patient escort and positioning technician, by FLUKA's simulation and activation formula calculation of Hengjian Proton Medical Facility (HJPMF), whose energy ranges from 130 to 230MeV. Furthermore, new formulas for calculating the activity buildup process of periodic irradiation were derived and used to study the relationship between saturation degree and half-life of nuclides. Finally, suggestions are put forward to lessen the radiation hazard from patient-induced radioactivity. PMID:27423927

  7. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T.; Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A.

    2010-07-07

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  8. Feasibility study of proton-based quality assurance of proton range compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Jeong, C.; Min, B. J.; Kwak, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, S.; Shin, D.; Lim, Y. K.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, S. B.

    2013-06-01

    All patient specific range compensators (RCs) are customized for achieving distal dose conformity of target volume in passively scattered proton therapy. Compensators are milled precisely using a computerized machine. In proton therapy, precision of the compensator is critical and quality assurance (QA) is required to protect normal tissues and organs from radiation damage. This study aims to evaluate the precision of proton-based quality assurance of range compensator. First, the geometry information of two compensators was extracted from the DICOM Radiotherapy (RT) plan. Next, RCs were irradiated on the EBT film individually by proton beam which is modulated to have a photon-like percent depth dose (PDD). Step phantoms were also irradiated on the EBT film to generate calibration curve which indicates relationship between optical density of irradiated film and perpendicular depth of compensator. Comparisons were made using the mean absolute difference (MAD) between coordinate information from DICOM RT and converted depth information from the EBT film. MAD over the whole region was 1.7, and 2.0 mm. However, MAD over the relatively flat regions on each compensator selected for comparison was within 1 mm. These results shows that proton-based quality assurance of range compensator is feasible and it is expected to achieve MAD over the whole region less than 1 mm with further correction about scattering effect of proton imaging.

  9. Decay Studies of Proton Emitter: 151Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Sun, B.; Zhu, L.; Liu, Z.

    An experiment aiming to search for new isomers in the region of proton emitter 151Lu was done in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). Rich information on 151Lu and 151mLu has been obtained from our data analysis. In this work, we revisit the level scheme of 151Lu by using the proton-tagging technique and measure the half-lives of 151Lu and 151mLu are 82.8±0.7 ms and 15.4±0.8 μs, respectively.

  10. Frontal IBICC study of the induced proton radiation damage in CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuović, Željko; Jakšić, Milko

    2001-07-01

    Within a continuous international effort in developing the non-cryogenic semiconductor detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy, various wide gap materials were considered. With a best performance achieved, CdTe- and CdZnTe-based detectors become today widely accepted and commercially available. In addition to possible future use of such detectors for particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), nuclear microprobes are in recent years applied more as their characterisation tool using the ion beam-induced charge collection (IBICC) technique. Several CdTe detectors of 2×2×1 mm3 size were used in this study. On the basis of frontal IBICC measurements of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) distribution, the spectroscopy performance of detectors were measured. Further degradation of charge collection efficiency and the downward trend in peak position were studied by on-line irradiation of CdTe samples with 3 MeV protons up to 10 10 p/cm2 radiation dose.

  11. Moessbauer and Electron Microprobe Studies of Density Separates of Martian Nakhlite Mil03346: Implications for Interpretation of Moessbauer Spectra Acquired by the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; McKay, G. A.; Agresti, D. G.; Li, Loan

    2008-01-01

    Martian meteorite MIL03346 is described as an augite-rich cumulate rock with approx.80%, approx.3%, and approx.21% modal phase proportions of augite (CPX), olivine and glassy mesostasis, respectively, and is classified as a nakhlite [1]. The Mossbauer spectrum for whole rock (WR) MIL 03346 is unusual for Martian meteorites in that it has a distinct magnetite subspectrum (7% subspectral area) [2]. The meteorite also has products of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration ("iddingsite") that is associated primarily with the basaltic glass and olivine. The Mossbauer spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have measured the Fe oxidation state and the Fe mineralogical composition of rocks and soils on the planet s surface since their landing in Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum in January, 2004 [3,4]. The MIL 03346 meteorite provides an opportunity to "ground truth" or refine Fe phase identifications. This is particularly the case for the so-called "nanophase ferric oxide" (npOx) component. NpOx is a generic name for a ferric rich product of oxidative alteration. On Earth, where we can take samples apart and study individual phases, examples of npOx include ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, akagaaneite, and superparamagnetic (small particle) goethite and hematite. It is also possible for ferric iron to be associated to some unknown extent with igneous phases like pyroxene. We report here an electron microprobe (EMPA) and Moessbauer (MB) study of density separates of MIL 03346. The same separates were used for isotopic studies by [5]. Experimental techniques are described by [6,7].

  12. An x-ray microprobe beam line for trace element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Long, G.J.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Spanne, P.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation to an x-ray microprobe for trace element analysis is a complementary and natural extension of existing microprobe techniques using electrons, protons, and heavier ions as excitation sources for x-ray fluorescence. The ability to focus charged particles leads to electron microprobes with spatial resolutions in the sub-micrometer range and down to 100 ppM detection limits and proton microprobes with micrometer resolution and ppM detection limits. The characteristics of synchrotron radiation that prove useful for microprobe analysis include a broad and continuous energy spectrum, a relatively small amount of radiation damage compared to that deposited by charged particles, a highly polarized source which reduces background scattered radiation in an appropriate counting geometry, and a small vertical divergence angle of approx.0.2 mrad which allows for focussing of the light beam into a small spot with high flux. The features of a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) are described. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Mautner, M. N.; Barry, B.; Markwitz, A.

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  14. Nuclear micro-probe analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ager, F. J.; Ynsa, M. D.; Domínguez-Solís, J. R.; López-Martín, M. C.; Gotor, C.; Romero, L. C.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective plant-based approach for remediation of soils and waters which takes advantage of the remarkable ability of some plants to concentrate elements and compounds from the environment and to metabolize various molecules in their tissues, such as toxic heavy metals and organic pollutants. Nowadays, phytoremediation technology is becoming of paramount importance when environmental decontamination is concerned, due to the emerging knowledge of its physiological and molecular mechanisms and the new biological and engineering strategies designed to optimize and improve it. In addition, the feasibility of using plants for environmental cleanup has been confirmed by many different trials around the world. Arabidopsis thaliana plants can be used for basic studies to improve the technology on phytoremediation. Making use of nuclear microscopy techniques, in this paper we study leaves of wild type and transgenic A. thaliana plants grown in a cadmium-rich environment under different conditions. Micro-PIXE, RBS and SEM analyses, performed on the scanning proton micro-probe at the CNA in Seville (Spain), prove that cadmium is preferentially sequestered in the central region of epidermal trichome and allow comparing the effects of genetic modifications.

  15. A wireless beta-microprobe based on pixelated silicon for in vivo brain studies in freely moving rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, J.; Benoit, D.; Balasse, L.; Benoit, M.; Clémens, J. C.; Fieux, S.; Fougeron, D.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Janvier, B.; Jevaud, M.; Genoux, A.; Gisquet-Verrier, P.; Menouni, M.; Pain, F.; Pinot, L.; Tourvielle, C.; Zimmer, L.; Morel, C.; Laniece, P.

    2013-07-01

    The investigation of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the functional specificity of brain regions requires the development of technologies that are well adjusted to in vivo studies in small animals. An exciting challenge remains the combination of brain imaging and behavioural studies, which associates molecular processes of neuronal communications to their related actions. A pixelated intracerebral probe (PIXSIC) presents a novel strategy using a submillimetric probe for beta+ radiotracer detection based on a pixelated silicon diode that can be stereotaxically implanted in the brain region of interest. This fully autonomous detection system permits time-resolved high sensitivity measurements of radiotracers with additional imaging features in freely moving rats. An application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) allows for parallel signal processing of each pixel and enables the wireless operation. All components of the detector were tested and characterized. The beta+ sensitivity of the system was determined with the probe dipped into radiotracer solutions. Monte Carlo simulations served to validate the experimental values and assess the contribution of gamma noise. Preliminary implantation tests on anaesthetized rats proved PIXSIC's functionality in brain tissue. High spatial resolution allows for the visualization of radiotracer concentration in different brain regions with high temporal resolution.

  16. Studies of Unstable Nuclei with Spin-Polarized Proton Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wakui, Takashi; Chebotaryov, Sergey; Kawahara, Tomomi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Milman, Evgeniy; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Teranishi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Roles of spin-dependent interactions in unstable nuclei have been investigated via the direct reaction of radioactive ions with a solid spin-polarized proton target. The target has a unique advantage of a high polarization of 20-30% under low magnetic field of 0.1 T and at a high temperature of 100 K, which allow us to detect recoil protons with good angular resolution. Present status of on-going experimental studies at intermediate energies, such as proton elastic scattering and (p, 2p) knockout reaction, and new physics opportunities expected with low-energy RI beams are overviewed.

  17. The first Mars microprobe is unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 (SAEF- 2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory open the drums containing the Mars microprobes that will hitchhike on the Mars Polar Lander. From left, they are Satish Krishnan, Charles Cruzan, Chris Voorhees and Arden Acord. Scheduled to be launched Jan. 3, 1999, aboard a Delta II rocket, the solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars microprobes, called Deep Space 2, are part of NASA's New Millennium Program. They will complement the climate-related scientific focus of the lander by demonstrating an advanced, rugged microlaser system for detecting subsurface water. Such data on polar subsurface water, in the form of ice, should help put limits on scientific projections for the global abundance of water on Mars.

  18. The Fudan nuclear microprobe set-up and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, L.; Zhuang, W.; Shen, H.; Mi, Y.; Wu, Y.; Liu, B.; Yang, M.; Cheng, H.

    2007-07-01

    A new scanning nuclear microprobe has been constructed at the Institute of Modern Physics in Fudan University, to replace the old microbeam system which had been running for more than ten years. The key parts were purchased from Oxford Microbeams Ltd., including triplet quadrupole lens (model OM-150), collimator slits, scanning system, target chamber, and data acquisition system. Ion beams are provided from a NEC 9SDH-2 Tandem accelerator. Three CCD cameras and multiple monitors were installed to assist beam adjust. The design of beam line and beam monitors is described. Beam optics calculations were carried out based on the specific Fudan microprobe system geometry, and the results regarding beam line performance and limitations of the spacial resolution are presented and discussed here. A comparison with experimental results is given as well. About 1.5 μm beam spot size could be achieved with a 3 MeV proton beam at a current of around 10 pA. Recently, the new microprobe is applied to obtain information of fly ash particle, algae cell and otoliths.

  19. Long-term clinical evaluation of endodontically treated teeth by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe: three years clinical follow-up of 1512 root canals--in-vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Kesler, Anat; Hay, Nissim; Gal, Rivka

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of 15 F CO2 laser microprobe, in cases of periapical lesions, by eliminating the pathological reaction caused by certain species of bacteria, reduction of reinfection and stimulation of osteogenesis in the periapical region. Until now, no suitable delivery fiber existed for CO2 laser endodontic radiation in the apical region where it is most difficult to eliminate the pulp tissue using conventional methods. To overcome this problem, Sharplan laser designed a microprobe that reaches closer to the apex, distributing the energy density to a smaller area of the root canal, thus favorably increasing the thermal effects. The study was conducted on 900 teeth, divided in two groups. 468 were new case, carefully selected according to strict parameters such as: wide periapical translucency over 1mm, supported by digital x-ray, with a lesion of 3mm and more. All root canals were mechanically prepared in the conventional method up to size 35, Physiological saline solution served as finding solution and were treated by 15 F CO2 laser microprobe for 60 pulses repeatedly. The temperature at the surrounding tissue of the root did not exceed 38 degrees C filling of the canal was possible at the same appointment, without antibiotical treatment. 432 of the cases, which were referred to us by other dentists, after an unsuccessful treatment according to the classical therapy, were treated by the same laser therapy. Follow up was performed by clinical examination, and digital x-ray taken, during and after treatment as well as after 3, 6, 9, 12 month. The result demonstrate 98% success rate in both study groups, according to objective criteria for a successful treatment such as: reduction of apical translucency after 2- 6 months, freedom form clinical complains, and no need for periapical surgery.

  20. Ion microprobe studies of trace elements in Apollo 14 volcanic glass beads - Comparisons to Apollo 14 mare basalts and petrogenesis of picritic magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.; Simon, S. B.; Shimizu, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from trace element analysis, by ion microprobe techniques, of individual glass beads representing seven compositionally distinct types of picritic glass beads from the Apollo 14 landing site. The picritic glass beads at the A-14 exhibited a wide range of primary magma compositions and a lack of petrogenetic linkage (via crystal fractionation) to crystalline basalts. The wide range of major and trace element characteristics of the picritic glass beads is consistent with derivation from mineralogically distinct sources which consist of varying proportions of olivine + orthopyroxene +/- clonopyroxene +/- ilmenite +/- plagioclase +/- KREEP component.

  1. Heavy-ion broad-beam and microprobe studies of single-event upsets in 0.20 um SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors and circuits.

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Karl; Irwin, Timothy J.; Niu, Guofu; Fodness, Bryan; Carts, Martin A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Reed, Robert A.; Gilbert, Barry; Randall, Barbara; Prairie, Jason; Riggs, Pam; Pickel, James C.; LaBel, Kenneth; Cressler, John D.; Krithivasan, Ramkumar; Dodd, Paul Emerson; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2003-09-01

    Combining broad-beam circuit level single-event upset (SEU) response with heavy ion microprobe charge collection measurements on single silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors improves understanding of the charge collection mechanisms responsible for SEU response of digital SiGe HBT technology. This new understanding of the SEU mechanisms shows that the right rectangular parallele-piped model for the sensitive volume is not applicable to this technology. A new first-order physical model is proposed and calibrated with moderate success.

  2. Progress in Fast Ignition Studies with Electrons and Protons

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Chen, H.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Wei, M. S.; Chen, C. D.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.

    2009-09-10

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) concept for initiating burn in a fusion capsule. In order to investigate critical aspects needed for a FI point design, experiments were performed to study 1) laser-to-electrons or protons conversion issues and 2) laser-cone interactions including prepulse effects. A large suite of diagnostics was utilized to study these important parameters. Using cone--wire surrogate targets it is found that pre-pulse levels on medium scale lasers such as Titan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory produce long scale length plasmas that strongly effect coupling of the laser to FI relevant electrons inside cones. The cone wall thickness also affects coupling to the wire. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled as a function of target thickness, material. Conclusions from the proton and electron source experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed. In conclusion, a program of study will be presented based on understanding the fundamental physics of the electron or proton source relevant to FI.

  3. 200 MeV Proton Radiography Studies with a Hand Phantom Using a Prototype Proton CT Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V.; Feng, V.; Hurley, F.; Johnson, R.P.; Leary, C.; Macafee, S.; Plumb, A.; Rykalin, V.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Schubert, K.; Schulte, R.; Schultze, B.; Steinberg, D.; Witt, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-01-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton CT scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  4. 200 MeV proton radiography studies with a hand phantom using a prototype proton CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Tia; Bashkirov, V; Feng, V; Hurley, F; Johnson, R P; Leary, C; Macafee, S; Plumb, A; Rykalin, V; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Schubert, K; Schulte, R; Schultze, B; Steinberg, D; Witt, M; Zatserklyaniy, A

    2014-04-01

    Proton radiography has applications in patient alignment and verification procedures for proton beam radiation therapy. In this paper, we report an experiment which used 200 MeV protons to generate proton energy-loss and scattering radiographs of a hand phantom. The experiment used the first-generation proton computed tomography (CT) scanner prototype, which was installed on the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. It was found that while both radiographs displayed anatomical details of the hand phantom, the energy-loss radiograph had a noticeably higher resolution. Nonetheless, scattering radiography may yield more contrast between soft and bone tissue than energy-loss radiography, however, this requires further study. This study contributes to the optimization of the performance of the next-generation of clinical proton CT scanners. Furthermore, it demonstrates the potential of proton imaging (proton radiography and CT), which is now within reach of becoming available as a new, potentially low-dose medical imaging modality. PMID:24710156

  5. Protonated Forms of Monoclinic Zirconia: A Theoretical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, Yves A.; Gemmen, Randall S.

    2010-05-06

    In various materials applications of zirconia, protonated forms of monoclinic zirconia may be formed, motivating their study within the framework of density-functional theory. Using the HCTH/120 exchange-correlation functional, the equations of state of yttria and of the three low-pressure zirconia polymorphs are computed, to verify our approach. Next, the favored charge state of a hydrogen atom in monoclinic zirconia is shown to be positive for all Fermilevel energies in the band gap, by the computation of defect formation energies.This result is consistent with a single previous theoretical prediction at midgap as well as muonium spectroscopy experiments. For the formally positively (+1e) charged system of a proton in monoclinic zirconia (with a homogeneous neutralizing background charge densityimplicitly included), modeled using up to a 3 x 3 x 3 arrangement of unit cells, different stable and metastable structures are identified. They are similar to those structures previously proposed for the neutral system of hydrogen-doedmonoclinic zirconia, at a similar level of theory. As predicted using the HCTH/120 functional, the lowest energy structure of the proton bonded to one of the two available oxygen atom types, O1, is favored by 0.39 eV compared to that of the proton bonded to O2. The rate of proton transfer between O1 ions is slower than that for hydrogen-dopedmonoclinic zirconia, whose transition-state structures may be lowered in energy by the extra electron.

  6. Studies of electron and proton isochoric heating for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Clarke, R; Clarke, D; Chen, M; Chung, H; Chen, S; Freeman, R; Green, J; Gu, P; Gregori, G; Highbarger, K; Habara, H; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Heathcote, R; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Lancaster, K; Langdon, B; Murphy, C; Norreys, P; Neely, D; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nakamura, H; Patel, N; Patel, P; Pasley, J; Snavley, R; Stephens, R; Stoeckl, C; Foord, M; Tabak, M; Theobald, W; Storm, M; Tanaka, K; Tempo, M; Toley, M; Town, R; Wilks, S; VanWoerkom, L; Weber, R; Yabuuchi, T; Zhang, B

    2006-10-02

    Isochoric heating of inertially confined fusion plasmas by laser driven MeV electrons or protons is an area of great topical interest in the inertial confinement fusion community, particularly with respect to the fast ignition (FI) proposal to use this technique to initiate burn in a fusion capsule. Experiments designed to investigate electron isochoric heating have measured heating in two limiting cases of interest to fast ignition, small planar foils and hollow cones. Data from Cu K{alpha} fluorescence, crystal x-ray spectroscopy of Cu K shell emission, and XUV imaging at 68eV and 256 eV are used to test PIC and Hybrid PIC modeling of the interaction. Isochoric heating by focused proton beams generated at the concave inside surface of a hemi-shell and from a sub hemi-shell inside a cone have been studied with the same diagnostic methods plus imaging of proton induced K{alpha}. Conversion efficiency to protons has also been measured and modeled. Conclusions from the proton and electron heating experiments will be presented. Recent advances in modeling electron transport and innovative target designs for reducing igniter energy and increasing gain curves will also be discussed.

  7. Microprobe analysis of chlorpromazine pigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, T.L.; McCormack, K.M.; Ingram, P.; Kaplan, D.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    We describe the histochemical, ultrastructural, and microanalytical features of a skin biopsy specimen obtained from a patient with chlorpromazine pigmentation. Golden-brown pigment granules were present in the dermis, predominantly in a perivascular arrangement. The granules stained positively with the Fontana-Masson stain for silver-reducing substances and negatively with Perl's stain for iron. Electron microscopy revealed dense inclusion bodies in dermal histiocytes, pericytes, endothelial cells, and Schwann cells, as well as lying free in the extracellular matrix. These ''chlorpromazine bodies'' were quite dense even in unosmicated, unstained ultrathin sections, indicating that the pigmentation is related, at least in part, to the inclusions. Microprobe analysis of the chlorpromazine bodies revealed a striking peak for sulfur, which strongly suggests the presence of the drug or its metabolite within these inclusions.

  8. Ion microprobe study of Au and Carlin-type trace metals in rhyolite melt inclusions from Eocene dikes and ash-flow tuff in northern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, K. E.; Colgan, J. P.; John, D. A.; Henry, C.; Coble, M. A.; Hervig, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    , Te, As) were within 'typical' ranges for rhyolites, and with the possible exception of As, cannot be used to differentiate the Caetano and Cortez melt inclusion datasets. Synthesis of SIMS trace element concentrations with major element data obtained by electron microprobe does not reveal any consistent trends of trace element enrichments or depletions in the analyzed inclusions. This study highlights the utility of SIMS for quantifying low-level concentrations of Au and other trace metals at the small spatial scales (10s of microns) required for melt inclusion work. Our results do not provide evidence for a magmatic origin of Au in Carlin-type gold deposits, or at least not as retained in the melt inclusion record of the Eocene rhyolites in this study.

  9. Short-lived proton radioactivity studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Karny, M.; Janas, Z.; Mas, F.; McConnell, J. W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.; Semmes, P.

    1999-11-16

    An accurate determination of the experimental spectroscopic factor of proton emitting nuclei precisely defines the main component of the proton wave function for the unbound state. However, this has proven difficult for nuclei with Z{<=}71 due to the unknown beta-branching ratios involved. One way to solve this problem is to study proton-emitters with half-lives far too short for beta-emission to compete. Recent work at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility has produced information on {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu, all of which have half-lives in the {mu}s region. A comparison between calculated and experimental spectroscopic factors for these nuclei is given.

  10. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  11. Progress of the Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS).

    PubMed

    Bryant, P J

    1999-06-01

    The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) was set up following an agreement between Professor M. Regler of the Med-AUSTRON (Austria) and Professor U. Amaldi of the TERA Foundation (Italy) to join their efforts in the design of a medical synchrotron that could later be adapted to individual national needs. CERN agreed to host this study inside its PS Division and to contribute one full-time member to the study team. The study group has worked in collaboration with GSI (Germany) and was more recently joined by Onkologie 2000 (Czech Republic). Work started in January 1996 and is expected to finish during 1998. The agreed aim of the study was to investigate and design a generic facility that would allow the direct clinical comparison of protons and carbon ions for cancer treatment. The accelerator was to be designed primarily for high-precision active beam scanning with both protons and ions, but was also to be capable of delivering proton beams with passive spreading. PMID:10394382

  12. Method study of parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Feng; Gao, Jie; Xiao, Ming; Wang, Dou; Wang, Yi-Wei; Bai, Sha; Bian, Tian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show a systematic method of appropriate parameter choice for a circular proton-proton collider by using an analytical expression for the beam-beam tune shift limit, starting from a given design goal and technical limitations. A suitable parameter space has been explored. Based on the parameter scan, sets of appropriate parameters designed for a 50 km and 100 km circular proton-proton collider are proposed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175192)

  13. Lack of effect of microinjection of noradrenaline or medetomidine on stimulus-evoked release of substance P in the spinal cord of the cat: a study with antibody microprobes.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, C. W.; Hope, P. J.; Grubb, B. D.; Duggan, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed on barbiturate anaesthetized, spinalized cats to investigate the effect of microinjected noradrenaline or medetomidine on the release of immunoreactive substance P in the dorsal spinal cord following peripheral nerve stimulation. The presence of immunoreactive substance P was assessed with microprobes bearing C-terminus-directed antibodies to substance P. 2. Noradrenaline or medetomidine were microinjected into the grey matter of the spinal cord, near microprobe insertion sites, at depths of 2.5, 2.0, 1.5 and 1.0 mm below the spinal cord surface with volumes of approximately 0.125 microliters and a concentration of 10(-3) M. 3. In the untreated spinal cord, electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral tibial nerve (suprathreshold for C-fibres) elicited release of immunoreactive substance P which was centred in and around lamina II. Neither noradrenaline nor medetomidine administration in the manner described produced significant alterations in this pattern of nerve stimulus-evoked release. 4. In agreement with recent ultrastructural studies these results do not support a control of substance P release by catecholamines released from sites near to the central terminals of small diameter primary afferent fibres. PMID:7522862

  14. A petrologic and ion microprobe study of a Vigarano Type B refractory inclusion - Evolution by multiple stages of alteration and melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, Glenn J.; Davis, Andrew M.

    1993-01-01

    A Type B Ca-, Al-rich 6-m-diam inclusion (CAI) found in the Vigarano C3V chondrite was inspected using optical and scanning electron microscopies and ion microprobe analyses. It was found that the primary constituents of the CAI inclusion are (in percent), melilite (52), fassaite, (20), anorthite (18), spinel (10), and trace Fe-Ni metal. It is noted that, while many of the properties of the inclusion indicate solidification from a melt droplet, the Al-26/Mg-26 isotopic systematics and some textural relationships are incompatible with single-stage closed system crystallization of a homogeneous molten droplet, indicating that the history of this inclusion must have been more complex than melt solidification alone. Moreover, there was unusually high content of Na in melilite, suggesting that the droplet did not form by melting of pristine high-temperature nebular condensates.

  15. Materials analysis with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The ability to produce focused beams of a few MeV light ions from Van de Graaff accelerators has resulted in the development of nuclear microprobes. Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions, and particle-induced x-ray emission are used to provide spatially resolved information from the near surface region of materials. Rutherford backscattering provides nondestructive depth and mass resolution. Nuclear reactions are sensitive to light elements (Z < 15). Particle-induced x-ray analysis is similar to electron microprobe analysis, but 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive. The focused beams are usually produced with specially designed multiplets of magnetic quadrupoles. The LASL microprobe uses a superconducting solenoid as a final lens. The data are acquired by a computer interfaced to the experiment with CAMAC. The characteristics of the information acquired with a nuclear microprobe are discussed; the means of producing the beams of nuclear particles are described; and the limitations and applications of such systems are given.

  16. Dynamic studies of proton diffusion in mesoscopic heterogeneous matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M.; Nachliel, E.; Kiryati, S.

    1992-01-01

    The thin water layer, as found in chloroplast or mitochondria, is confined between low dielectric amphypathic surfaces a few nm apart. The physical properties of this mesoscopic space, and how its dimensions affect the rate of chemical reactions proceeding in it, is the subject for this study. The method selected for this purpose is time resolved fluorometry which can monitor the reversible dissociation of a proton from excited molecule of pyranine (8 hydroxy pyrene 1,3,6 tri sulfonate) trapped in thin water layers of a multilamellar vesicle made of neutral or slightly charged phospholipids. The results were analyzed by a computer program of N. Agmon (Pines, E., D. Huppert, and N. Agmon. 1988. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 88:5620-5630) that simulates the diffusion of a proton, subjected to electrostatic attraction, in a thin water layer enclosed between low affinity, proton binding surfaces. The analysis determines the diffusion coefficient of the proton, the effective dielectric constant of the water and the water accessibility of the phosphomoieties of the lipids. These parameters were measured for various lipids [egg-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesterol + DPPC (1:1) and egg PC plus phosphatidyl serine (9:1)] and under varying osmotic pressure which reduces the width of the water layer down to ∼10 ∼ across. We found that: (a) The effective dielectric constant of the aqueous layer, depending on the lipid composition, is ∼40. (b) The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the thin layer (30-10 ∼ across) is that measured in bulk water D = 9.3 10-5 cm2/s, indicating that the water retains its normal liquid state even on contact with the membrane. (c) The reactivity of the phosphomoiety, quantitated by rate of its reaction with proton, diminishes under lateral pressure which reduces the surface area per lipid. We find no evidence for abnormal dynamics of proton transfer at the lipid water interface which, by any mechanism

  17. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-08-26

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs.

  18. Hard X-Ray Spectro Microprobe Analysis of Inhomogeneous Solids: A Case Study. Element Distribution and Speciation in Selected Iron Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Cavell, R.G.; Feng, R.; Barnes, E.M.; Cavell, P.A.; McCready, A.J.; Webb, M.A.

    2007-06-08

    The hard X-ray microprobe provides an effective methodology for the non-destructive analysis of inhomogeneous materials. Application of X-ray absorption/fluroescence spectroscopy techniques (XANES and EXAFS) permits the speciation of the elements and yields information about the local structural environment. Microfocussed, monochromatic, tunable X-rays allows examination of small areas of micrometer dimensions with spectroscopic procedures. Typically the materials which are presented are thick and cannot be altered for the experiment. This condition introduces difficulties which may compromise the results. Herein we discuss those difficulties and show that the system can yield reliable results in spite of the compromises. Some results are presented on the two iron meteorites we have examined. These specimens are representative of highly inhomogeneous materials and illustrate the difficulties encountered with compositional variations which may occur at sub-millimeter dimensions and also illustrate the difficulties presented by the need to analyze components present at ppm concentration levels in a concentrated matrix. In these particular samples the major constituent is Fe which ranges from 90% to 70%, balanced by Ni which ranges from 10% to 30%. The critical diagnostic trace elements Ga and Ge which must also be analyzed are present at the 80 and 340 ppm level respectively. These diagnostic elements have been shown by EXAFS to be substitutionally placed in the matrix of the major element species in these meteorite samples.

  19. Study on Solar Energetic proton (SEP) Prediction using Regression Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, KiChang; Kim, Jae-Hun; Kim, Young Yun; Kwon, Yongki; Wi, Gwan-sik

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) can cause significant effects on electric devices in satellite such as displacement damage and single event effect. It can be dangerous to flight crew/passenger flying high altitude with polar route, and therefore, it is essential that it should be predicted in advance to mitigate radiation exposure risk. However, SEP has been hard to predict, because it is not well-connected solar activities such as solar flare, coronal mass ejection (CME). In this study, we analyzed the variation pattern of proton event from 2000 to 2015, and suggested optimum Gaussian function which can well describe the maximum value of previous event, after then, we finally adopted the regression technique to predict SEP value repetitively. This paper shows that the maximum value and duration of ongoing SEP events can be well predicted, but this model typically has large errors in case of predicting starting point and occurrence of SEP events.

  20. A crystal routine for collimation studies in circular proton accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirarchi, D.; Hall, G.; Redaelli, S.; Scandale, W.

    2015-07-01

    A routine has been developed to simulate interactions of protons with bent crystals in a version of SixTrack for collimation studies. This routine is optimized to produce high-statistics tracking simulations for a highly efficient collimation system, like the one of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The routine has recently been reviewed and improved through a comparison with experimental data, benchmarked against other codes and updated by adding better models of low-probability interactions. In this paper, data taken with 400 GeV/c proton beams at the CERN-SPS North Area are used to verify the prediction of the routine, including the results of a more recent analysis.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, Lowell D; Focsan, A Ligia; Konovalova, Tatyana A; Lawrence, Jesse; Bowman, Michael K; Dixon, David A; Molnar, Peter; Deli, Jozsef

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond lengthening, a mechanism for nonradiative energy

  2. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  3. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Kawachi, T.

    2009-07-25

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of gamma-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  4. Radiobiological study by using laser-driven proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogo, A.; Sato, K.; Nishikino, M.; Mori, M.; Teshima, T.; Numasaki, H.; Murakami, M.; Demizu, Y.; Akagi, S.; Nagayama, S.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ikegami, M.; Tampo, M.; Sakaki, H.; Suzuki, M.; Daito, I.; Oishi, Y.; Sugiyama, H.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Shimomura, T.; Nakai, Y.; Tanoue, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Sasao, H.; Wakai, D.; Kawachi, T.; Nishimura, H.; Bolton, P. R.; Daido, H.

    2009-07-01

    Particle acceleration driven by high-intensity laser systems is widely attracting interest as a potential alternative to conventional ion acceleration, including ion accelerator applications to tumor therapy. Recent works have shown that a high intensity laser pulse can produce single proton bunches of a high current and a short pulse duration. This unique feature of laser-ion acceleration can lead to progress in the development of novel ion sources. However, there has been no experimental study of the biological effects of laser-driven ion beams. We describe in this report the first demonstrated irradiation effect of laser-accelerated protons on human lung cancer cells. In-vitro A549 cells are irradiated with a proton dose of 20 Gy, resulting in a distinct formation of γ-H2AX foci as an indicator of DNA double-strand breaks. This is a pioneering result that points to future investigations of the radiobiological effects of laser-driven ion beams. The laser-driven ion beam is apotential excitation source for time-resolved determination of hydroxyl (OH) radical yield, which will explore relationship between the fundamental chemical reactions of radiation effects and consequent biological processes.

  5. Ion and electron microprobe study of troctolites, norite, and anorthosites from Apollo 14: Evidence for urKREEP assimilation during petrogenesis of Apollo 14 Mg-suite rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shervais, J.W.; McGee, J.J.

    1998-09-01

    Most of the Moon`s highland crust comprises Fe-rich anorthosites with calcic plagioclase compositions. Subsequent evolution of the highland crust was dominated by troctolites, anorthosites, and norites of the Mg-suite. This plutonic series is characterized by calcic plagioclase, and mafic minerals with high mg{number_sign} (=100{sup *}Mg/[Mg + Fe]). In an effort to distinguish the origin of this important lunar rock series, the authors have analyzed the REE content of primary cumulus phases in ten Mg-suite cumulates using SIMS, along with their major and minor element compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Nine of these samples have high mg{number_sign}s, consistent with their formation from the most primitive parent melts of the Mg-suite. The data presented here show that Mg-suite troctolites and anorthosites preserve major and trace element characteristics acquired during their formation as igneous cumulate rocks and that these characteristics can be used to reconstruct related aspects of the parent magma composition. Data show that primitive cumulates of the Mg-suite crystallized from magmas with REE contents similar to high-K KREEP in both concentration and relative abundance. The highly enriched nature of this parent magma contrasts with its primitive major element characteristics, as pointed out by previous workers. This enigma is best explained by the mixing of residual magma ocean urKREEP melts with ultramagnesian komatiitic partial melts from the deep lunar interior. The data do not support earlier models that invoke crustal metasomatism to enrich the Mg-suite cumulates after formation, or models which call for a superKREEP parent for the troctolites and anorthosites.

  6. Ion microprobe U-Th-Pb geochronology and study of micro-inclusions in zircon from the Himalayan high- and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites, Kaghan Valley of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Kobayash, Katsura; Tsujimori, Tatsuki; Ota, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Eizo; Kaneko, Yoshiyuki; Khan, Tahseenullah; Terabayashi, Masaru; Yoshida, Kenta; Hirajima, Takao

    2013-02-01

    We report ion microprobe U-Th-Pb geochronology of in situ zircon from the Himalayan high- and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites, Kaghan Valley of Pakistan. Combined with the textural features, mineral inclusions, cathodoluminescence image information and the U-Th-Pb isotope geochronology, two types of zircons were recognized in Group I and II eclogites. Zircons in Group I eclogites are of considerably large size (>100 μm up to 500 μm). A few grains are euhederal and prismatic, show oscillatory zoning with distinct core-rim luminescence pattern. Several other grains show irregular morphology, mitamictization, embayment and boundary truncations. They contain micro-inclusions such as muscovite, biotite, quartz and albite. Core or middle portions of zircons from Group I eclogites yielded concordant U-Th-Pb age of 267.6 ± 2.4 Ma (MSWD = 8.5), have higher U and Th contents with a Th/U ratio > 1, indicating typical magmatic core domains. Middle and rim or outer portions of these zircons contain inclusions of garnet, omphacite, phengite and these portions show no clear zonation. They yielded discordant values ranging between 210 and 71 Ma, indicating several thermal or Pb-loss events during their growth and recrystalization prior to or during the Himalayan eclogite-facies metamorphism. Zircons in Group II eclogites are smaller in size, prismatic to oval, display patchy or sector zoning and contain abundant inclusions of garnet, omphacite, phengite, quartz, rutile and carbonates. They yielded concordant U-Th-Pb age of 44.9 ± 1.2 Ma (MSWD = 4.9). The lower U and Th contents and a lower Th/U ratio (<0.05) in these zircons suggest their formation from the recrystallization of the older zircons during the Himalayan high and ultrahigh-pressure eclogite-facies metamorphism.

  7. Electron Capture Dissociation Studies of the Fragmentation Patterns of Doubly Protonated and Mixed Protonated-Sodiated Peptoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Bogdan; Zhao, Xiaoning; Robinson, David B.; Ren, Jianhua

    2014-07-01

    The fragmentation patterns of a group of doubly protonated ([P + 2H]2+) and mixed protonated-sodiated ([P + H + Na]2+) peptide-mimicking oligomers, known as peptoids, have been studied using electron capturing dissociation (ECD) tandem mass spectrometry techniques. For all the peptoids studied, the primary backbone fragmentation occurred at the N-Cα bonds. The N-terminal fragment ions, the C-ions (protonated) and the C'-ions (sodiated) were observed universally for all the peptoids regardless of the types of charge carrier. The C-terminal ions varied depending on the type of charge carrier. The doubly protonated peptoids with at least one basic residue located at a position other than the N-terminus fragmented by producing the Z•-series of ions. In addition, most doubly protonated peptoids also produced the Y-series of ions with notable abundances. The mixed protonated-sodiated peptoids fragmented by yielding the Z•'-series of ions in addition to the C'-series. Chelation between the sodium cation and the amide groups of the peptoid chain might be an important factor that could stabilize both the N-terminal and the C-terminal fragment ions. Regardless of the types of the charge carrier, one notable fragmentation for all the peptoids was the elimination of a benzylic radical from the odd-electron positive ions of the protonated peptoids ([P + 2H]•+) and the sodiated peptoids ([P + H + Na]•+). The study showed potential utility of using the ECD technique for sequencing of peptoid libraries generated by combinatorial chemistry.

  8. A STUDY OF POLARIZED PROTON ACCELERATION IN J-PARC.

    SciTech Connect

    LUCCIO, A.U.; BAI, M.; ROSER, T.

    2006-10-02

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductive partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  9. A Study of Polarized Proton Acceleration in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Luccio, A. U.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.; Molodojentsev, A.; Ohmori, C.; Sato, H.; Hatanaka, K.

    2007-06-13

    We have studied the feasibility of polarized proton acceleration in rhe J-PARC accelerator facility, consisting of a 400 MeV linac, a 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and a 50 GeV synchrotron (MR). We show how the polarization of the beam can be preserved using an rf dipole in the RCS and two superconductve partial helical Siberian snakes in the MR. The lattice of the MR will be modified with the addition of quadrupoles to compensate for the focusing properties of the snakes.

  10. Studies of beam heating of proton beam profile monitor SEM's

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovich, Zarko; Osiecki, Thomas H.; Kopp, Sacha E.; /Texas U.

    2005-05-01

    The authors present calculations of the expected temperature rise of proton beam profile monitors due to beam heating. The profile monitors are secondary emission monitors (SEM's) to be made of Titanium foils. The heating is studied to understand whether there is any loss of tension or alignment of such devices. Additionally, calculations of thermally-induced dynamic stress are presented. Ti foil is compared to other materials and also to wire SEM's. The calculations were initially performed for the NuMI beam, where the per-pulse intensity is quite high; for completeness the calculations are also performed for other beam energies and intensities.

  11. The use of a scanning proton microprobe in AIDS research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, M.; Legge, G. J. F.; Weigold, H.; Holan, G.; Birch, C.

    1993-05-01

    A series of organometallic and inorganic drugs has been synthesized at the CSIRO Division of Chemicals and Polymers. The drugs, which are all polyanions of various size, shape and charge are being tested for their activity for the HIV virus in a continuous human T-lymphocyte line (MT2) and in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Determinations of drug activity have been carried out at the Fairfield Hospital's Virology Department. It is important for the drug synthesis programme to develop an understanding of the relationship between polyanion properties and antiviral activity. For this it is essential to establish: (a) whether polyanions enter HIV infected cells, (b) their distribution within these cells, (c) whether this distribution is the same for all polyanions, (d) whether the drugs remain intact (do not dissociate) on entering the cell, (e) the differences between active and inactive drugs of similar structure. Answers to these questions and to others will facilitate the synthesis programme.

  12. Proton Conduction and Defect Studies in Acceptor - Potassium Tantalate Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing Kit

    The protonic transport properties of the cubic perovskite structured crystal KTaO(,3) doped with transition metal ions (Fe('3+), Cu('2+), etc.) are studied. These dopants substitute for the Ta('5+) ions and require oxygen vacancies for charge compensation. Protons are introduced by annealing the doped crystals in water vapor. A sharp IR peak at 3472 cm('-1) is observed at room temperature. This OH('-) band can be removed by vacuum annealing. Undoped crystals are not susceptible to H('+) incorporation. A reaction is proposed for the incorporation of H('+): H(,2)O + V(,o) (--->) O(,o)('x) + 2H(.). A saturation content of H('+) is always attained which is independent of both pH(,2)O and annealing temperature. Impendence analysis is employed to obtain the bulk electrical conductivity, (sigma). The (sigma) of H('+) charged samples is an order of magnitude higher than that without H('+). The activation energy for conduction, E(,H), for H('+) charged samples is close to 1.05 eV, irrespective of nature of dopants. A rough monotonic relation between (sigma) and (alpha)(,OH), the IR absorption coefficient, is observed. Conductivity calculated from diffusion data is in rough agreement with the measured (sigma). In addi- tion, the protonic transport number is found to be almost unity in an electrochemical cell experiment. The position of the IR peak is the same for different dopants, suggesting no association between dopant and H('+). The presence of an EPR axial spectrum in H('+) free Fe-doped samples and its conversion to a cubic spectrum after charging with H('+) favors the suggestion that H('+) dissociates from dopants. No dielectric relaxa- tion peak related to H('+) is ever observed. E(,H) thus corresponds to migrational energy only. The migration of the proton is probably just the jump of H('+) between neighboring O('2-) ions in the direction of O-H vibration. The isotope effect on (sigma) is also studied when H('+) is replaced entirely by D('+). The result is non

  13. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories – A Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianfang; Liang, Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2006-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP (2 line pairs (lp) cm-1) to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm-1). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates. PMID:16878573

  14. Reconstruction for proton computed tomography by tracing proton trajectories: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Tianfang; Liang Zhengrong; Singanallur, Jayalakshmi V.; Satogata, Todd J.; Williams, David C.; Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2006-03-15

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) has been explored in the past decades because of its unique imaging characteristics, low radiation dose, and its possible use for treatment planning and on-line target localization in proton therapy. However, reconstruction of pCT images is challenging because the proton path within the object to be imaged is statistically affected by multiple Coulomb scattering. In this paper, we employ GEANT4-based Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional pCT reconstruction of an elliptical phantom to investigate the possible use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) with three different path-estimation methods for pCT reconstruction. The first method assumes a straight-line path (SLP) connecting the proton entry and exit positions, the second method adapts the most-likely path (MLP) theoretically determined for a uniform medium, and the third method employs a cubic spline path (CSP). The ART reconstructions showed progressive improvement of spatial resolution when going from the SLP [2 line pairs (lp) cm{sup -1}] to the curved CSP and MLP path estimates (5 lp cm{sup -1}). The MLP-based ART algorithm had the fastest convergence and smallest residual error of all three estimates. This work demonstrates the advantage of tracking curved proton paths in conjunction with the ART algorithm and curved path estimates.

  15. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  16. Scaling of SEU mapping and cross section, and proton induced SEU at reduced supply voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Barak, J.; Levinson, J.; Akkerman, A.

    1999-12-01

    New experimental study of heavy ion and proton induced SEU at reduced voltage (i.e., reduced critical charge) reveals interesting results. It is shown that the heavy ion cross section and microprobe mapping scale like the threshold LET and the parameter, which is almost invariant under bias changes, is the effective charge collection depth. For studying proton induced SEU and surface-barrier-detector spectra the authors use protons with energies from 5.6 to 300 MeV. The results are analyzed in view of the processes involved in low energy deposition by protons. Detailed calculations show the importance of straggling in proton direct ionization which might be the leading process in very sensitive devices like photodiodes.

  17. Perspective study of exotics and flavour baryons in antiproton-proton annihilation and proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabanov, Mikhail; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Abstract. The spectroscopy of exotic states with hidden charm is discussed. Together with charmonium, these provide a good tool for testing theories of the strong interactions including both perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, lattice QCD, potential and other phenomenological models. An elaborated analysis of exotics spectrum is given, and attempts to interpret recent experimentally observed states with masses above the DD̅ threshold region are considered. Experimental results from different collaborations (BES, BaBar, Belle, LHCb) are analyzed with special attention given to recently discovered hidden charm states. Some of these states can be interpreted as higher-lying charmonium states and others as tetraquarks with hidden charm. It has been shown that charged/neutral tetraquarks must have their neutral/charge partners with mass values differ by at most a few MeV/c2, hypotheses that tend to coincide with those proposed by Maiani and Polosa. However, measurements of different decay modes are needed before firm conclusions can be made. These data can be derived directly from the experiments using ahigh quality antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c and proton-proton collisions with momentum up to 26 GeV/c. DD

  18. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Coutrakon, G.; Hubbard, J.; Johanning, J.; Maudsley, G.; Slaton, T.; Morton, P. )

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3[times]10[sup 10] protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90--100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron.

  19. A performance study of the Loma Linda proton medical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Coutrakon, G; Hubbard, J; Johanning, J; Maudsley, G; Slaton, T; Morton, P

    1994-11-01

    More than three years have passed since Loma Linda treated the first cancer patient with the world's first proton accelerator dedicated to radiation therapy. Since that time, over 1000 patients have completed treatments and the facility currently treats more than 45 patients per day. With a typical intensity of 3 x 10(10) protons per pulse and 27 pulses per minute, dose rates of 90-100 cGy/min are easily achieved on a 20-cm diameter field. In most cases, patient treatment times are 2 min, much less than the patient alignment time required before each treatment. Nevertheless, there is considerable medical interest in increasing field sizes up to 40-cm diameter while keeping dose rates high and treatment times low. In this article, beam measurements relevant to intensity studies are presented and possible accelerator modifications for upgrades are proposed. It is shown that nearly all intensity losses can be ascribed to the large momentum spread of the injected beam and occur at or near the injection energy of 2 MeV. The agreement between calculations and measurements appears quite good. In addition, optimum beam characteristics for a new injector are discussed based upon the momentum acceptance and space charge limits of the Loma Linda synchrotron. PMID:7891629

  20. A simulation study of Methane by proton at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quashie, Edwin E.; Correaa, Alfredo A.; Schwegler, Eric R.; Saha, Bidhan C.

    2014-05-01

    Proton impact molecular collisions have received considerable attentions over last few decades due to wide applications in various fields such as plasma physics, astrophysics, material science, and radiation therapy. Methane is the simplest hydrocarbon and has recently been detected in the atmosphere of the outer planets. In addition to provide the fundamental information, the charge exchange studies remain critical for understanding the phenomena in studies of comets, the solar wind, and space weather. The charge exchange processes in recent years have been used as diagnostics for temperature and transport. Using the time dependent density functional theory our results for both the elastic and inelastic scattering will be presented. Supported by National Nuclear Security Agency & Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Theoretical studies of proton emission from drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Ring, P.

    2011-11-30

    In this work, we discuss proton radioactivity from spherical nuclei in a modern perspective, based on a fully self--consistent relativistic density functional calculation with fundamental interactions.

  2. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCTus) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCTap). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCTus, while no HU change was applied to the CBCTap. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CTref) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCTap was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCTus images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CTref, while the CBCTap images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCTap-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms. PMID:26233175

  3. Origins of PM10 determined by the micro-proton induced X-ray emission spectra of single aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, W.S.; Li, X.L.; Wan, T.M.; Liu, J.F.; Zhang, G.L.; Li, Y.

    2006-06-15

    The micro-proton induced X-ray emission (micro-PIXE) spectrum of a single aerosol particle (SAP) was considered as its fingerprint for tracing its origin. A proton microprobe was used to extract fingerprints of SAPs. Environmental monitoring samples of PM10 were collected from a heavy industrial area of Shanghai and were analyzed by proton microprobe for finding their pollution sources. In order to find the sources of SAPs collected from environmental monitoring sites, a fingerprint database of SAPS collected from various pollution Sources was established. The origins of samples collected through environmental monitoring were identified by comparison of the micro-PIXE spectra of SAPs with those of SAPs in the fingerprint database using a pattern recognition technique. The results of this study show that most of the measured PM10 is derived from metallurgic industry, soil dust, coal combustion, automobile exhaust, and motorcycle exhaust. The study also shows that the proton microprobe is an ideal tool for the analysis of SAPs. The unidentified particles of PM10 are classified into seven classes by hierarchical cluster analysis based on the element peak intensity in the spectra.

  4. Macroparticle simulation studies of a proton beam haloexperiment

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gilpatrick, D.; Smith, H.V.; Wangler,T.P.; Schulze, M.E.

    2002-09-12

    We report macroparticle simulations for comparison withmeasured results from a proton beam-halo experiment in a 52-quadrupoleperiodic-focusing channel. An important issue is that the inputphase-space distribution is not experimentally known. Three differentinitial distributions with different shapes predict different beamprofiles in the transport system. Simulations have been fairly successfulin reproducing the core of the measured matched-beam profiles and thetrend of emittance growth as a function of mismatch factor, butunderestimate the growth rate of halo and emittance for mismatched beams.In this study, we find that knowledge of the Courant-Snyder parametersand emittances of the input beam is not sufficient for reliableprediction of the halo. Input distributions iwth greater population inthe tails produce larger rates of emittance growth, a result that isqualitatively consistent with the particle-core model of halo formationin mismatched beams.

  5. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  6. Data acquisition with a nuclear microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.

    1980-01-01

    Spatially resolved information from the near surfaces of materials can be obtained with a nuclear microprobe. The spatial resolution is determined by the optics of the instrument and radiation damage in the specimen. Two- and three-dimensional maps of elemental concentration may be obtained from the near surfaces of materials. Data are acquired by repeated scans of a constantly moving beam over the region of interest or by counting for a preset integrated charge at each specimen location.

  7. Computed tomography with a low-intensity proton flux: results of a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Reinhard W.; Klock, Margio C. L.; Bashkirov, Vladimir; Evseev, Ivan G.; de Assis, Joaquim T.; Yevseyeva, Olga; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Li, Tianfang; Williams, David C.; Wroe, Andrew J.; Schelin, Hugo R.

    2004-10-01

    Conformal proton radiation therapy requires accurate prediction of the Bragg peak position. This problem may be solved by using protons rather than conventional x-rays to determine the relative electron density distribution via proton computed tomography (proton CT). However, proton CT has its own limitations, which need to be carefully studied before this technique can be introduced into routine clinical practice. In this work, we have used analytical relationships as well as the Monte Carlo simulation tool GEANT4 to study the principal resolution limits of proton CT. The GEANT4 simulations were validated by comparing them to predictions of the Bethe Bloch theory and Tschalar's theory of energy loss straggling, and were found to be in good agreement. The relationship between phantom thickness, initial energy, and the relative electron density uncertainty was systematically investigated to estimate the number of protons and dose needed to obtain a given density resolution. The predictions of this study were verified by simulating the performance of a hypothetical proton CT scanner when imaging a cylindrical water phantom with embedded density inhomogeneities. We show that a reasonable density resolution can be achieved with a relatively small number of protons, thus providing a possible dose advantage over x-ray CT.

  8. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  9. Investigation of elemental distribution in human femoral head by PIXE and SRXRF microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; Wang, Y. S.; Zhang, Y. P.; Zhang, G. L.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.

    2007-07-01

    In order to study the distribution and possible degenerative processes inducing the loss of inorganic substances in bone and to provide a scientific basis for the prevention and therapy of osteoporosis, proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method is used for the determination of elemental concentrations in femoral heads from five autopsies and seven patients with femoral neck fractures. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe analysis technique is used to scan a slice of the femoral head from its periphery to its center, via cartilage, compact and spongy zones. The specimen preparation and experiment procedure are described in detail. The results show that the concentrations of P, Ca, Fe, Cu, Sr in the control group are higher than those in the patient group, but the concentrations of S, K, Zn, Mn are not significantly different. The quantitative results of elemental distribution, such as Ca, P, K, Fe, Zn, Sr and Pb in bone slice tissue including cartilage, substantial compact and substantial spongy, are investigated. The data obtained show that the concentrations of Ca, P, K, (the major elements of bone composition), are obviously low in both spongy and cartilage zones in the patient group, but there are no remarkable differences in the compact zone. Combined with the correlations between P, K, Zn, Sr and Ca, the loss mechanism of minerals and the physiological functions of some metal elements in bone are also discussed.

  10. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the

  11. In-beam studies of proton emitters using the Recoil-Decay Tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Ressler, J.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Sonzogni, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.; Caggiano, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davinson, T.; Ding, K. Y.; Fotiades, N.; Garg, U.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T.-L.; Kondev, F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.; Shergur, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2000-01-19

    The last five years have witnessed a rapid increase in the volume of data on proton decaying nuclei. The path was led by decay studies with recoil mass separators equipped with double-sided Si strip detectors. The properties of many proton-decaying states were deduced, which triggered renewed theoretical interest in the process of proton decay. The decay experiments were closely followed by in-beam {gamma}-ray studies which extended one's knowledge of high-spin states of proton emitters. The unparalleled selectivity of the Recoil-Decay Tagging method combined with the high efficiency of large arrays of Ge detectors allowed, despite small cross sections and overwhelming background from strong reaction channels, the observation of excited states in several proton emitters. Recently, in-beam studies of the deformed proton emitters {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu have been performed with the GAMMASPHERE array of Ge detectors and the Fragment Mass Analyzer at ATLAS. Evidence was found for rotational bands in {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu. The deformations and the single-particle configurations proposed for the proton emitting states from the earlier proton-decay studies were confronted with the assignments deduced based on the in-beam data. It should be noted that the cross section for populating {sup 131}Eu is only about 50 nb, and it represents the weakest channel ever studied in an in-beam experiment.

  12. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  13. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  14. Study of {beta}-Decay in the Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson-Fermion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zuffi, L.; Brant, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2006-04-26

    We study {beta}-decay in odd-A nuclei together with the energy levels and other properties in the proton-neutron interacting-boson-fermion model. We also report on the preliminary results in the odd-odd nuclei in the proton-neutron interacting boson-fermion-fermion model.

  15. Technical aspects of nuclear microprobe analysis of senile plaques from alzheimer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, N. P.-O.; Tapper, U. A. S.; Sturesson, K.; Odselius, R.; Brun, A.

    1990-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a common form of senile dementia, has been proposed to be caused by aluminium. One of the interesting structures to be studied, senile plaque cores in the brain, have centres of only about 10 μm. We have investigated the possibility of applying nuclear microprobes to sections containing senile plaques. An alternative staining procedure, TMToluidin blue staining using a spray technique, is also presented. An outline is given of a procedure for preparing senile plaque specimens for nuclear microprobe analysis. This includes a technique for accurate ion beam positioning, utilizing electron microscopy-grids. The subject may be of general interest since sample preparation is one of the most important aspects in microprobe analysis of biological matter.

  16. Boron analysis by electron microprobe using MoB4C layered synthetic crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Slack, J.F.; Herrington, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary electron microprobe studies of B distribution in minerals have been carried out using MoB4C-layered synthetic crystals to improve analytical sensitivity for B. Any microprobe measurements of the B contents of minerals using this crystal must include analyses for Cl to assess and correct for the interference of Cl X-rays on the BK?? peak. Microprobe analyses for B can be made routinely in tourmaline and other B-rich minerals, and minor B contents also can be determined in common rock-forming minerals. Incorporation of unusually high B contents in minerals other than borosilicates has been discovered in prograde and retrograde minerals in tourmalinites from the Broken Hill district, Australia, and may reflect high B activities produced during the metamorphism of tourmaline-rich rocks. -from Authors

  17. The Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe and its Applications in Biology and Environmental Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Zsofia

    2007-11-26

    Nuclear microscopy is one of the most powerful tools which are able to determine quantitative trace element distributions in complex samples on a microscopic scale. The advantage of nuclear microprobes are that different ion beam analytical techniques, like PIXE, RBS, STIM and NRA can be applied at the same time allowing the determination of the sample structure, major, minor and trace element distribution simultaneously.In this paper a nuclear microprobe setup developed for the microanalysis of thin complex samples of organic matrix at the Debrecen Scanning Nuclear Microprobe Facility is presented. The application of nuclear microscopy in life sciences is shown through an example, the study of penetration of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles of bodycare cosmetics in skin layers.

  18. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  19. MicroProbe Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey; Miles, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The MicroProbe unmanned aerial system (UAS) concept incorporates twin electric motors mounted on the vehicle wing, thus enabling an aerodynamically and environmentally clean nose area for atmospheric sensors. A payload bay is also incorporated in the fuselage to accommodate remote sensing instruments. A key feature of this concept is lightweight construction combined with low flying speeds to minimize kinetic energy and associated hazards, as well as maximizing spatial resolution. This type of aerial platform is needed for Earth science research and environmental monitoring. There were no vehicles of this type known to exist previously.

  20. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  1. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe Solid State [sup 13]C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    A number of new approaches to the study of native wood tissue complementary to our earlier Raman spectroscopy including solid state [sup 13]C NMR and X-ray diffractometry. A wide variety of native cellulosic tissues were examined which led to the generation of biomimetic tertiary aggregates which simulate states of aggregation characteristic of cell walls. We have also explored charge transport characteristics of lignified tissue. Our Raman spectroscopic studies have advanced our understanding of key spectral features and confirmed the variability of the patterns of orientation of lignin reported earlier. A major effort was dedicated to assessing the contributions of electronic factors such as conjugation and the resonance Raman effect to enhancement of the spectra features associated with lignin. We have now established a solid foundation for spectral mapping of different regions in cell walls.

  2. Carrier phases for iodine in the Allende meteorite and their associated Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios - A laser microprobe study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the carrier phases of iodine in the Allende meteorite and their associated Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios, obtained using a new high-sensitivity low-blank mass spectrometer coupled with a low-blank laser extraction system. Two types of experiments were performed: a survey of the Xe-129(r) amounts in unirradiated specimens of fine-grained assemblages and individual coarse mineral grains, and a study of the relationship between chlorine and iodine in irradiated samples of the inclusions, in which the Xe-129(r)/I-127 ratios were determined for various minerals. As a by-product of these measurements, the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages were obtained along with some results on trapped Xe components. A schematic diagram of the new mass spectrometer system is included.

  3. Laser-induced oxidation kinetics of bismuth surface microdroplets on GaAsBi studied in situ by Raman microprobe analysis.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A; Lewis, R A

    2014-12-29

    We report the cw-laser-induced oxidation of molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAsBi bismuth surface microdroplets investigated in situ by micro-Raman spectroscopy under ambient conditions as a function of irradiation power and time. Our results reveal the surface droplets are high-purity crystalline bismuth and the resultant Bi2O3 transformation to be β-phase and stable at room temperature. A detailed Raman study of Bi microdroplet oxidation kinetics yields insights into the laser-induced oxidation process and offers useful real-time diagnostics. The temporal evolution of new β-Bi2O3 Raman modes is shown to be well described by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetic transformation theory and while this study limits itself to the laser-induced oxidation of GaAsBi bismuth surface droplets, the results will find application within the wider context of bismuth laser-induced oxidation and direct Raman laser processing. PMID:25607191

  4. Proton Emission Studies at GSI in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Sigurd

    2000-12-31

    This article describes the experiments that were performed during the first decade of the operation of UNILAC, GSI-Darmstadt, at the recoil separator SHIP and the on-line mass separator. The measurements resulted in the discovery of the first radioactive ground state proton emitters, {sup 151}Lu and {sup 147}Tm.

  5. The application of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and electron microprobe analysis to the study of dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Hagni, A.M.; Hagni, R.D. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    Over 500,000 tons of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is generated each year in the US. The mineralogy and characterization of this dust is being studied to determine the phases and relationships of the valuable zinc, the hazardous lead, cadmium, and chromium, and the deleterious chlorine and fluorine. EAF dust averages 15--20% zinc and is therefore a potential source for 100,000 tons of zinc per year. The major mineralogical phases of EAF dust are franklinite (ZnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), magnetite (FeFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), jacobsite (MnFe[sub 2]O[sub 4]), solid solutions between franklinite-magnetite-jacobsite, and zincite (ZnO). Franklinite, magnetite, and jacobsite solid solutions commonly are cruciform or dendritic crystals in a Ca-Fe-Si matrix and contain up to 5% chromium. Magnetite also occurs as spheres partially oxidized to hematite (Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3]) along its octahedral planes. The dust particles are predominantly in the form of spheres and broken spheres, ranging in size from 200 [mu]m to less than 1 [mu]m. Although many spheres are in the size ranges of 40--50 [mu]m and 10--20 [mu]m, most are less than 1 [mu]m in diameter. Automated scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) probed 118 particles in search of chlorine phases. Chlorine-bearing lime (CaO) was identified by that SEM study. In addition, chlorine is present as hydrophylite (CaCl[sub 2]) and sylvite (KCl). Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was used to sputter the outer 180[angstrom] layer of the dust particles to search for the possible presence of cotunnite (PbCl[sub 2]) coatings, but none were detected. Minor phases detected include chalcopyrite (CuFeS[sub 2]), sphalerite (ZnS), pyrite (FeS[sub 2]), and coke.

  6. First proton transfer reaction to study 18F+p resonances of novae interest

    SciTech Connect

    Adekola, Aderemi S; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Brune, C.; Chae, K. Y.; Domizioli, Carlo P; Greife, U.; Heinen, Z.; Hornish, M.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Massey, T.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, S. D.; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Nathan A; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.; Visser, D. W.; Voinov, A.

    2011-01-01

    The 18F(p,a)15O reaction is recognized as the predominant destruction mechanism of 18F in novae, and its rate is therefore important for understanding 18F production in nova outbursts. We have studied the properties of resonances in the 18F + p system using the proton-transfer reaction 18F(d, n) for the first time. We have observed fifteen 19Ne levels, five of which are below the proton threshold, including a subthreshold state at Ex = 6.289 MeV which has significant lp = 0 strength. The proton asymptotic normalization coefficient for this state and proton widths of states above the proton threshold, are extracted from angular distributions. The 18F(p,a)15O S-factor and reaction rate are re-evaluated, taking into account the subthreshold resonance and other new information determined in this experiment.

  7. Scanning electron microscope and dye penetration test: comparison of root canal preparation with 15 F CO2 laser microprobe versus conventional method--in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Gavriel; Koren, Rumelia; Kesler, Anat; Hay, Nissim; Gal, Rivka

    1999-05-01

    The study was conducted on 30 vital maxillary or mandibulary teeth destined for extraction due to periodontal problems. 21 were experimentally treated with pulsed CO2 laser delivered by a newly developed fiber and 9 teeth represented the control group. The micro probe is a flexible, hollow, metal fiber, 300 μm in diameter and 20 mm in length, coupled onto a handpiece, with the following radiation parameters: wavelength-10.6μm pulse duration-50m.sec; energy per pulses 0.25 joule; energy density-360 J/cm2 per pulse; power on tissue-5W. The laser group was divided into three, receiving 20, 40 or 60 pulses, respectively. On light microscopy: in all the control group cases, large amount of residual pulp tissue was seen, it was diminished in some of the low energy group and was totally eradicated in the high energy group. This was confirmed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination. The dentin tubuli were partly occluded with the low energy levels and completely with the high levels, as shown by the high-speed centrifuge dye penetration test and by the SEM tests.

  8. The temporal evolution of sanukitoids in the Karelian Craton, Baltic Shield: an ion microprobe U Th Pb isotopic study of zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikova, E. V.; Petrova, A.; Claesson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The U-Th-Pb isotopic systematics of zircons from six sanukitoid intrusions in the Karelian Craton has been investigated, using the secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). Our results show that Karelian sanukitoids formed between 2745 and 2705 Ma ago and that there is an age difference of about 30 Ma between sanukitoids in the eastern and western Karelia. Results for intrusions made up of a number of magmatic phases show no internal age variation. In the east of the study region, zircons from a monzodiorite and two quartz monzonites from the Panozero pluton were dated at 2737±11, 2739±11, and 2741±8 Ma; in the Hautavaara pluton, a monzodiorite and a subalkaline granite were dated at 2743±8 and 2742±23 Ma, and a quartz diorite from the Elmus pluton gave an age of 2741±7 Ma. In addition, a lamprophyre dyke within the Sjargozero pluton gave an age of 2742±14 Ma. In the west, zircons from a quartz monzonite and a granodiorite in the Njuk intrusion gave ages of 2709±10 and 2716±11 Ma. In the Kurgelampi pluton, zircons from a diorite and two granodiorites were dated at 2707±9, 2719±6, and 2712±9 Ma, respectively. Zircons from the granodiorites and the alkaline granites contain older cores with 207Pb/ 206Pb ages greater than 2800 Ma. The absence of inherited zircons in the more mafic sanukitoids is attributed to their higher saturation levels for zirconium. Sanukitoid zircons have Th/U ratios above 0.5 and often higher, whereas nearby tonalite-tondhjemite-granodiorites (TTGs) have Th/U ratios below 0.5. Typically, tonalites are older than sanukitoids by more than 100 Ma and it is possible that tectonic processes associated with the collision of the Belomorian Mobile Belt provided the heat necessary to initiate the generation of the sanukitoid melts.

  9. [Histopathologic study of melanoma of the choroid after proton therapy].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux Shishe Boran, M; Grange, J D; Patricot, L M; Adeleine, P; Chauvel, P; Chiquet, C; Vitrey, D; Thivolet Béjui, F

    1997-07-01

    To evaluate irradiation effects on choroidal melanomas, histopathologic findings of 18 eyes whose primary treatment was enucleation were compared to 15 eyes enucleated after proton beam irradiation. Irradiated tumors showed more likely necrosis (p = 0.01) had balloon cells (p = 0.01), and inflammatory infiltrate (p = 0.05). In the irradiated group, the prevalence of tumor blood vessel damage was higher (p = 0.0002) and mitotic figures were fewer (p = 0.01). These findings suggest that proton beam irradiation damages tumor cells and alters the tumor's capacity for cellular reproduction. It damages blood vessels leading to tumor necrosis. It induces an inflammatory response of unknown effects. Radiosensitivity of choroidal melanomas cannot be assessed using conventional histologic methods. However, tumor necrosis, mitotic activity and rate of balloon cells can help to establish tumoral sensitivity to irradiation. PMID:9296578

  10. A laboratory and theoretical study of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS+.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M C; Thaddeus, P; Wilke, Jeremiah J; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-06-21

    The rotational spectrum of protonated carbon disulfide, HSCS(+), has been detected in the centimeter-wave band in a molecular beam by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Rotational and centrifugal distortion constants have been determined from ten transitions in the K(a)=0 ladder of the normal isotopic species, HS(13)CS(+), and DSCS(+). The present assignment agrees well with high-level coupled cluster calculations of the HSCS(+) structure, which, like earlier work, predict this isomer to be the ground state on the HCS(2) (+) potential energy surface; HCSS(+), an isomer with C(2v) symmetry, is predicted to lie more than 20 kcal/mol higher in energy. Other properties of HSCS(+) including its dipole moment, anharmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared intensities have also been computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with large basis sets. Because carbon disulfide possesses a fairly large proton affinity, and because this nonpolar molecule may plausibly exist in astronomical sources, HSCS(+) is a good candidate for detection with radio telescopes in the submillimeter band where the stronger b-type transitions of this protonated cation are predicted to lie. PMID:19548724

  11. Design and characterization of a resonant triaxial microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goj, Boris; Dressler, Lothar; Hoffmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    A new trend for tactile microprobes leads to oscillating microprobes in order to overcome the drawbacks resulting from high Hertzian stress and disturbing surface forces. Thin water films on the measurement surface result in the so-called sticking effect which causes measurement faults such as snap-back and false triggering. This leads to measurement errors and low measurement speeds. We present an innovative oscillating triaxial microprobe which safely avoids sticking in all Cartesian measurement directions. The system design as well as the characterization of the microprobe are presented in this work. The low number of coupling elements, the batch-capable design and the low contact forces are the key features of the microprobe.

  12. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field-size effects on dose output. In the present study, we developed a pencil-beam algorithm for scanning-proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil-beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field-size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy. PMID:22297324

  13. Beyond Gaussians: a study of single-spot modeling for scanning proton dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Anand, Aman; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Active spot scanning proton therapy is becoming increasingly adopted by proton therapy centers worldwide. Unlike passive-scattering proton therapy, active spot scanning proton therapy, especially intensity-modulated proton therapy, requires proper modeling of each scanning spot to ensure accurate computation of the total dose distribution contributed from a large number of spots. During commissioning of the spot scanning gantry at the Proton Therapy Center in Houston, it was observed that the long-range scattering protons in a medium may have been inadequately modeled for high-energy beams by a commercial treatment planning system, which could lead to incorrect prediction of field size effects on dose output. In this study, we developed a pencil beam algorithm for scanning proton dose calculation by focusing on properly modeling individual scanning spots. All modeling parameters required by the pencil beam algorithm can be generated based solely on a few sets of measured data. We demonstrated that low-dose halos in single-spot profiles in the medium could be adequately modeled with the addition of a modified Cauchy-Lorentz distribution function to a double-Gaussian function. The field size effects were accurately computed at all depths and field sizes for all energies, and good dose accuracy was also achieved for patient dose verification. The implementation of the proposed pencil beam algorithm also enabled us to study the importance of different modeling components and parameters at various beam energies. The results of this study may be helpful in improving dose calculation accuracy and simplifying beam commissioning and treatment planning processes for spot scanning proton therapy

  14. Experimental stand for studying the impact of laser-accelerated protons on biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdonov, K. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Ignatova, N. I.; Osmanov, R. R.; Sladkov, A. D.; Soloviev, A. A.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Ginzburg, V. N.; Kuz'min, A. A.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Revet, G.; Sergeev, A. M.; Fuchs, J.; Khazanov, E. A.; Chen, S.; Shaykin, A. A.; Shaikin, I. A.; Yakovlev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    An original experimental stand is presented, aimed at studying the impact of high-energy protons, produced by the laser-plasma interaction at a petawatt power level, on biological objects. In the course of pilot experiments with the energy of laser-accelerated protons up to 25 MeV, the possibility is demonstrated of transferring doses up to 10 Gy to the object of study in a single shot with the magnetic separation of protons from parasitic X-ray radiation and fast electrons. The technique of irradiating the cell culture HeLa Kyoto and measuring the fraction of survived cells is developed. The ways of optimising the parameters of proton beams and the suitable methods of their separation with respect to energy and transporting to the studied living objects are discussed. The construction of the stand is intended for the improvement of laser technologies for hadron therapy of malignant neoplasms.

  15. The electron microprobe as a metallographic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.

    1974-01-01

    The electron microprobe (EMP) is shown to represent one of the most powerful techniques for the examination of the microstructure of materials. It is an electron optical instrument in which compositional and topographic information is obtained from regions smaller than 1 micron in diameter on a specimen. Photographs of compositional and topographic changes in 1-sq-mm to 20-sq-micron areas on various types of specimens can also be obtained. These photographs are strikingly similar to optical photomicrographs. Various signals measured in the EMP (X-rays, secondary electrons, backscattered electrons, etc.) are discussed, along with their resolution and the type of information they may help obtain. In addition to elemental analysis, solid state detecting and scanning techniques are reviewed. Various techniques extending the EMP instrument capabilities, such as deconvolution and soft X-ray analysis, are also described.

  16. Aerodynamics of the Mars Microprobe Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Moss, J. N.; Cheatwood, F. M.; Greene, F. A.; Braun, R. D.

    1997-01-01

    The selection of the unique aeroshell shape for the Mars Microprobes is discussed. A description of its aerodynamics in hypersonic rarefied, hypersonic continuum, supersonic and transonic flow regimes is then presented. This description is based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo analyses in the rarefied-flow regime, thermochemical nonequilibrium Computational Fluid Dynamics in the hypersonic regime, existing wind tunnel data in the supersonic and transonic regime, additional computational work in the transonic regime, and finally, ballistic range data. The aeroshell is shown to possess the correct combination of aerodynamic stability and drag to convert the probe's initial tumbling attitude and high velocity at atmospheric-interface into the desired surface-impact orientation and velocity.

  17. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  18. Unusual energy dispersion at the proton isotropy boundary: a statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaeva, Sonya; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Sergeev, Viktor; Chernyaev, Ivan

    The regular appearance of equatorward boundary of the isotropic proton precipitation (isotropy boundary, IB) is interpreted as a manifestation of the boundary between adiabatic and non-adiabatic particle motion regimes. Accordingly, the energy dependence of IB latitude (energy dispersion, with lower latitude IB observed for higher energy protons in case of normal dispersion) carries the information about the real magnetic field gradients (or, sporadic appearance of other scattering mechanism, in case of anomalous dispersion). In this study we investigate statistically the IB energy dispersion of the >30 and >80 keV energetic protons using data from low-altitude polar satellites NOAA-19 and -18 in September 2009, when two spacecraft follow each other along the same orbit. We found that the events with normal dispersion at proton energies of 30 to 80 keV protons constitute less than 20% of the total number of events (regardless of geomagnetic activity). In other cases (80%) we see either the coincidence of the proton IB at different energies (within 0.2(°) ), or the precipitation pattern is complicated by the presence of isolated precipitation structures equatorward of the IB. In small amount of cases the anomalous (inverse) energy dispersion was also observed, suggesting the presence of different precipitation mechanisms. To help discriminate between current sheet scattering and other mechanisms we also obtained the average relationship between empirical ratios of trapped and precipitated proton fluxes at different energies near the IB for cases of normal dispersion. The near coincidence of the proton IBs can be observed in the case of sharp magnetic field Bz gradients (Bz jumps), whose amplitude should be about 60% of the Bz background value. Their existence is tested by considering magnetic field observations at radial passes of THEMIS spacecraft near the IB observation meridian in the near magnetosphere, supported by adaptive modeling and other relevant

  19. Theoretical and computational studies of renewable energy materials: Room temperature ionic liquids and proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shulu

    2011-12-01

    Two kinds of renewable energy materials, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and proton exchange membranes (PEMs), especially Nafion, are studied by computational and theoretical approaches. The ultimate purpose of the present research is to design novel materials to meet the future energy demands. To elucidate the effect of alkyl side chain length and anion on the structure and dynamics of the mixtures, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three RTILs/water mixtures at various water mole fractions: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM+)/BF4-, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (OMIM+)/BF4-, and OMIM +/Cl- are performed. Replacing the BMIM + cation with OMIM+ results in stronger aggregation of the cations as well as a slower diffusion of the anions, and replacing the BF4- anion with Cl- alters the water distribution at low water mole fractions and slows diffusion of the mixtures. Potential experimental manifestations of these behaviors in both cases are provided. Proton solvation properties and transport mechanisms are studied in hydrated Nafion, by using the self-consistent multistate empirical valence bond (SCI-MS-EVB) method. It is found that by stabilizing a more Zundel-like (H5O 2+) structure in the first solvation shells, the solvation of excess protons, as well as the proton hydration structure are both influenced by the sulfonate groups. Hydrate proton-related hydrogen bond networks are observed to be more stable than those with water alone. In order to characterize the nature of the proton transport (PT), diffusive motion, Arrhenius activation energies, and transport pathways are calculated and analyzed. Analysis of diffusive motion suggests that (1) a proton-hopping mechanism dominates the proton transport for the studied water loading levels and (2) there is an obvious degree of anti-correlation between the proton hopping and the vehicular transport. The activation energy drops rapidly with an increasing water content when the water loading level is smaller

  20. Analysis of biological materials using a nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    The use of nuclear microprobe techniques including: Particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) for elemental analysis and quantitative elemental imaging of biological samples is especially useful in biological and biomedical research because of its high sensitivity for physiologically important trace elements or toxic heavy metals. The nuclear microprobe of the Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory (IBMAL) has been used to study the enhancement in metal uptake of two different plants. The roots of corn (Zea mays) have been analyzed to study the enhancement of iron uptake by adding Fe (II) or Fe(III) of different concentrations to the germinating medium of the seeds. The Fe uptake enhancement effect produced by lacing the germinating medium with carbon nanotubes has also been investigated. The aim of this investigation is to ensure not only high crop yield but also Fe-rich food products especially from calcareous soil which covers 30% of world's agricultural land. The result will help reduce iron deficiency anemia, which has been identified as the leading nutritional disorder especially in developing countries by the World Health Organization. For the second plant, Mexican marigold (Tagetes erecta ), the effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus intraradices ) for the improvement of lead phytoremediation of lead contaminated soil has been investigated. Phytoremediation provides an environmentally safe technique of removing toxic heavy metals (like lead), which can find their way into human food, from lands contaminated by human activities like mining or by natural disasters like earthquakes. The roots of Mexican marigold have been analyzed to study the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in enhancement of lead uptake from the contaminated rhizosphere.

  1. ATS-6 - Synchronous orbit trapped radiation studies with an electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Swanson, R. L.; Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the University of Minnesota experiment on ATS-6 designed to study the origin and dynamics of high-energy electrons and protons in the outer radiation belt and in the near-earth plasma sheet. The experiment consists of two nearly identical detector assemblies, each of which is a magnetic spectrometer containing four gold-silicon surface barrier detectors. The instrument provides a clean separation between protons and electrons by the combination of pulse height analysis and magnetic deflection.

  2. Ion microprobe mass spectrometry using sputtering atomization and resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, D.L.; Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has recently been developed into a useful technique for isotope ratio measurements. Studies performed in our laboratory (1-6) have been reported for a variety of elements using thermal vaporization sources to produce the atom reservoir for laser-induced resonance ionization. A commercial ion microprobe mass analyzer (IMMA) has been interfaced with a tunable pulsed dye laser for carrying out resonance ionization mass spectrometry of sputtered atoms. The IMMA instrument has many advantages for this work, including a micro-focused primary ion beam (2 ..mu..m in diameter) of selected mass, complete sample manipulation and viewing capability, and a double-focusing mass spectrometer for separation and detection of the secondary or laser-generated ions. Data were obtained demonstrating the number and type of ions formed along with optical spectral information showing the wavelengths at which resonance ionization occurs. 7 refs.

  3. Micro Electron MicroProbe and Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bearman, Gregory; Douglas, Susanne; Bronikowski, Michael; Urgiles, Eduardo; Kowalczyk, Robert; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A proposed, low-power, backpack-sized instrument, denoted the micro electron microprobe and sample analyzer (MEMSA), would serve as a means of rapidly performing high-resolution microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) of soil, dust, and rock particles in the field. The MEMSA would be similar to an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) but would be much smaller and designed specifically for field use in studying effects of geological alteration at the micrometer scale. Like an ESEM, the MEMSA could be used to examine uncoated, electrically nonconductive specimens. In addition to the difference in size, other significant differences between the MEMSA and an ESEM lie in the mode of scanning and the nature of the electron source.

  4. Studies of Zinc Oxide Nanocrystals: Quantification of Capping Ligands and the Coupling of Protons and Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Carolyn N.

    per NC (max) reaches a maximum, beyond which the addition of more acid has no effect. This max varies with the NC radius with an r3 dependence, so the density of electrons (max) is constant over a range of NC sizes. The approximately 1:1 relationship of with protons per NC, and the dramatic dependence of max on the nature of the cation (H+ vs. MCp*2+) suggest that the protons intercalate into the NCs under these conditions. These studies illustrate the strong coupling between protons and electrons in ZnO NCs and show that proton activity is a key parameter in nanomaterial energetics.

  5. Optimized Structures and Proton Affinities of Fluorinated Dimethyl Ethers: An Ab Initio Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Victoria B.; Ball, David W.; Zehe, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Ab initio methods have been used to investigate the proton affinity and the geometry changes upon protonation for the molecules (CH3)2O, (CH2F)2O, (CHF2)2O, and (CF3)2O. Geometry optimizations were performed at the MP2/3-2 I G level, and the resulting geometries were used for single-point energy MP2/6-31G calculations. The proton affinity calculated for (CH3)2O was 7 Kjoule/mole from the experimental value, within the desired variance of +/- 8Kjoule/mole for G2 theory, suggesting that the methodology used in this study is adequate for energy difference considerations. For (CF3)20, the calculated proton affinity of 602 Kjoule/mole suggests that perfluorinated ether molecules do not act as Lewis bases under normal circumstances; e.g. degradation of commercial lubricants in tribological applications.

  6. A fluorescence study of isofagomine protonation in β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Lindbäck, Emil; Laursen, Bo Wegge; Poulsen, Jens Christian Navarro; Kilså, Kristine; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Bols, Mikael

    2015-06-21

    N-(10-Chloro-9-anthracenemethyl)isofagomine 5 and N-(10-chloro-9-anthracenemethyl)-1-deoxynojirimycin 6 were prepared, and their inhibition of almond β-glucosidase was measured. The isofagomine derivative 5 was found to be a potent inhibitor, while the 1-deoxynojirimycin derivative 6 displayed no inhibition at the concentrations investigated. Fluorescence spectroscopy of 5 with almond β-glucosidase at different pH values showed that the inhibitor nitrogen is not protonated when bound to the enzyme. Analysis of pH inhibition data confirmed that 5 binds as the amine to the enzyme's unprotonated dicarboxylate form. This is a radically different binding mode than has been observed with isofagomine and other iminosugars in the literature. PMID:25978843

  7. Experimental study of proton beam halo in mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.; Chan, K. D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Garnett, R. W.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Qiang, J.; Lysenko, W. P.; Smith, H. V.; Schneider, J. D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Schulze, M. E.; Crandall, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of transverse beam-halo formation in mismatched proton beams in a 52-quadrupole FODO-transport channel following the 6.7 MeV RFQ at the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos. Beam profiles in both transverse planes were measured using a new diagnostic device that consists of a movable carbon filament for measurement of the beam core, and scraper plates for measurement of the outer part of the distributions. The initial results indicate a surprisingly strong growth rate of the rms emittance even for the modest space-charge tune depressions of the experiment. Our results are consistent with the complete transfer of free energy of the mismatched beams into emittance growth within 10 envelope oscillations for both the breathing and the quadrupole modes.

  8. A study on analytic parametrizations for proton-proton cross-sections and asymptotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, M. J.; Silva, P. V. R. G.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative study on some representative parametrizations for the total and elastic cross-sections as a function of energy is presented. The dataset comprises pp and \\bar{p}p scattering in the c.m. energy interval 5 GeV-8 TeV. The parametrization for the total cross-section at low and intermediate energies follows the usual reggeonic structure (non-degenerate trajectories). For the leading high-energy pomeron contribution, we consider three distinct analytic parametrizations: either a power (P) law, or a log-squared (L2) law or a log-raised-to-γ (Lγ) law, where the exponent γ is treated as a real free fit parameter. The parametrizations are also extended to fit the elastic (integrated) cross-section data in the same energy interval. Our main conclusions are the following: (1) the data reductions with the logarithmic laws show strong dependence on the unknown energy scale involved, which is treated here either as a free parameter or fixed at the energy threshold; (2) the fit results with the P law, the L2 law (free scale) and the Lγ law (fixed scale and exponent γ above 2) are all consistent within their uncertainties and with the experimental data up to 7 TeV, but they partially underestimate the high-precision TOTEM measurement at 8 TeV (3) once compared with these results, the L2 law with fixed scale is less consistent with the data and, in the case of a free scale, this pomeron contribution decreases as the energy increases below the scale factor (which lies above the energy cutoff); (4) in all cases investigated, the predictions for the asymptotic ratio between the elastic and total cross-sections, within the uncertainties, do not exceed the value 0.430 (therefore, below the black-disc limit) and the results favor rational limits between 1/3 and 2/5. We are led to conclude that the rise of the hadronic cross-sections at the highest energies still constitutes an open problem, demanding further and detailed investigation.

  9. A noncontact thermal microprobe for local thermal conductivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanliang; Castillo, Eduardo E; Mehta, Rutvik J; Ramanath, Ganpati; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact thermal microprobe technique for measuring the thermal conductivity κ with ∼3 μm lateral spatial resolution by exploiting quasiballistic air conduction across a 10-100 nm air gap between a joule-heated microprobe and the sample. The thermal conductivity is extracted from the measured effective thermal resistance of the microprobe and the tip-sample thermal contact conductance and radius in the quasiballistic regime determined by calibration on reference samples using a heat transfer model. Our κ values are within 5%-10% of that measured by standard steady-state methods and theoretical predictions for nanostructured bulk and thin film assemblies of pnictogen chalcogenides. Noncontact thermal microprobing demonstrated here mitigates the strong dependence of tip-sample heat transfer on sample surface chemistry and topography inherent in contact methods, and allows the thermal characterization of a wide range of nanomaterials. PMID:21361625

  10. A noncontact thermal microprobe for local thermal conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Castillo, Eduardo E.; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate a noncontact thermal microprobe technique for measuring the thermal conductivity κ with ˜3 μm lateral spatial resolution by exploiting quasiballistic air conduction across a 10-100 nm air gap between a joule-heated microprobe and the sample. The thermal conductivity is extracted from the measured effective thermal resistance of the microprobe and the tip-sample thermal contact conductance and radius in the quasiballistic regime determined by calibration on reference samples using a heat transfer model. Our κ values are within 5%-10% of that measured by standard steady-state methods and theoretical predictions for nanostructured bulk and thin film assemblies of pnictogen chalcogenides. Noncontact thermal microprobing demonstrated here mitigates the strong dependence of tip-sample heat transfer on sample surface chemistry and topography inherent in contact methods, and allows the thermal characterization of a wide range of nanomaterials.

  11. Aerothermal Heating Predictions for Mars Microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; DiFulvio, M.; Horvath, T. J.; Braun, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    A combination of computational predictions and experimental measurements of the aerothermal heating expected on the two Mars Microprobes during their entry to Mars are presented. The maximum, non-ablating, heating rate at the vehicle's stagnation point (at alpha = 0 degrees) is predicted for an undershoot trajectory to be 194 Watts per square centimeters with associated stagnation point pressure of 0.064 atm. Maximum stagnation point pressure occurs later during the undershoot trajectory and is 0.094 atm. From computations at seven overshoot-trajectory points, the maximum heat load expected at the stagnation point is near 8800 Joules per square centimeter. Heat rates and heat loads on the vehicle's afterbody are much lower than the forebody. At zero degree angle-of-attack, heating over much of the hemi-spherical afterbody is predicted to be less than 2 percent of the stagnation point value. Good qualitative agreement is demonstrated for forebody and afterbody heating between CFD calculations at Mars entry conditions and experimental thermographic phosphor measurements from the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. A novel approach which incorporates six degree-of-freedom trajectory simulations to perform a statistical estimate of the effect of angle-of-attack, and other off-nominal conditions, on heating is included.

  12. Stand-alone microprobe at Livermore

    SciTech Connect

    Antolak, A J; Bench, G S; Brown, T A; Frantz, B R; Grant, P G; Morse, D H; Roberts, M L

    1998-10-02

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories/California have jointly constructed a new stand-alone microprobe facility. Although the facility was built to develop a method to rapidly locate and determine elemental concentrations of micron scale particulates on various media using PIXE, the facility has found numerous applications in biology and materials science. The facility is located at LLNL and uses a General Ionex Corporation Model 358 duoplasmatron negative ion source, a National Electrostatics Corporation 5SDH-2 tandem accelerator, and an Oxford triplet lens. Features of the system include complete computer control of the beam transport using LabVIEWTM for Macintosh, computer controlled beam collimating and divergence limiting slits, automated sample positioning to micron resolution, and video optics for beam positioning and sample observation. Data collection is accomplished with the simultaneous use of as many as four EG&G Ortec IGLET-XTM X-Ray detectors, digital amplifiers made by X-Ray Instruments and Associates (XIA), and LabVIEWTM for Macintosh acquisition software.

  13. Wavelength dispersive analysis with the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Thorn, K. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) was tested on the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Compared to WDS spectra using an electron microprobe, the synchrotron WDS spectra have much better sensitivity and, due to the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation, lower backgrounds. The WDS spectrometer was successfully used to resolve REE L fluorescence spectra from standard glasses and transition metal K fluorescence spectra from kamacite.

  14. Study of new proton conducting glasses for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiple, S. R.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    The glasses in the series (35-x) BaO:65 P2O5:x (NH4)2SO4 are synthesized and characterized by Tg, CTE, density and electrical conductivity measurements. The decrease in density and Tg is observed with addition of (NH4)2SO4. The increase in CTE compliments the observed variation in Tg. The protonic conductivity increases with addition of (NH4)2SO4 up to 7.5 mol% and decreases beyond this composition. The increase in the ratio of O/P, which in turn, creates more non-bridging oxygens, enhances the conductivity. Further, sulfur is mainly incorporated in sulfophosphate glasses as isolated SO42- group which also results in increase in conductivity. The glass with maximum conductivity [7.5(NH4)2SO4:27.5BaO:65 P2O5] is used to fabricate a fuel cell. It gives the power density of 12.43 μW/cm2. The power density of the fuel cell in the present work at room temperature is higher than that reported in literature at 473 K. The fuel cell has a potential of giving higher power density at higher temperature of 423 K.

  15. Proton transport in triflic acid pentahydrate studied via ab initio path integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robin L; Paddison, Stephen J; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2011-06-16

    Trifluoromethanesulfonic acid hydrates provide a well-defined system to study proton dissociation and transport in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, typically used as the electrolyte in hydrogen fuel cells, in the limit of minimal water. The triflic acid pentahydrate crystal (CF(3)SO(3)H·5H(2)O) is sufficiently aqueous that it contains an extended three-dimensional water network. Despite it being extended, however, long-range proton transport along the network is structurally unfavorable and would require considerable rearrangement. Nevertheless, the triflic acid pentahydrate crystal system can provide a clear picture of the preferred locations of local protonic defects in the water network, which provides insights about related structures in the disordered, low-hydration environment of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the proton defect is most likely to transfer to the closest water that has the expected presolvation and only contains water in its first solvation shell. Unlike the tetrahydrate of triflic acid (CF(3)SO(3)H·4H(2)O), there is no evidence of the proton preferentially transferring to a water molecule bridging two of the sulfonate groups. However, this could be an artifact of the crystal structure since the only such water molecule is separated from the proton by long O-O distances. Hydrogen bonding criteria, using the two-dimensional potential of mean force, are extracted. Radial distribution functions, free energy profiles, radii of gyration, and the root-mean-square displacement computed from ab initio path integral molecular dynamics simulations reveal that quantum effects do significantly extend the size of the protonic defect and increase the frequency of proton transfer events by nearly 15%. The calculated IR spectra confirm that the dominant protonic defect mostly exists as an Eigen cation but contains some Zundel ion characteristics. Chain lengths and ring sizes determined from the

  16. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  17. SU-E-T-304: Study of Secondary Neutrons From Uniform Scanning Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, M; Zheng, Y; Benton, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Secondary neutrons are unwanted byproducts from proton therapy and exposure from secondary radiation during treatment could increase risk of developing a secondary cancer later in a patient's lifetime. The purpose of this study is to investigate secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams under various beam conditions using both measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: CR-39 Plastic Track Nuclear Detectors (PNTD) were used for the measurement. CR-39 PNTD has tissue like sensitivity to the secondary neutrons but insensitive to the therapeutic protons. In this study, we devised two experimental conditions: a) hollow-phantom; phantom is bored with a hollow cylinder along the direction of the beam so that the primary proton passes through the phantom without interacting with the phantom material, b) cylindrical-phantom; a solid cylinder of diameter close to the beam diameter is placed along the beam path. CR-39 PNTDs were placed laterally inside a 60X20X35 cm3 phantom (hollow-phantom) and in air (cylindrical-phantom) at various angles with respect to the primary beam axis. We studied for three different proton energies (78 MeV, 162 MeV and 226 MeV), using a 4 cm modulation width and 5cm diameter brass aperture for the entire experiment and simulation. A comparison of the experiment was performed using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Results: The measured secondary neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranges from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 25.42 ± 2.3 mSv/Gy for the hollow phantom study, and 2.7 ± 0.3 to 46.4 ± 3.4 mSv/Gy for the cylindrical phantom study. Monte Carlo simulations predicated neutron dose equivalent from measurements within a factor of 5. Conclusion: The study suggests that the production of external neutrons is significantly higher than the production of internal neutrons.

  18. Excess protons in water-acetone mixtures. II. A conductivity study.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Longinotti, M Paula

    2013-10-28

    In the present work we complement a previous simulation study [R. Semino and D. Laria, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 194503 (2012)] on the disruption of the proton transfer mechanism in water by the addition of an aprotic solvent, such as acetone. We provide experimental measurements of the mobility of protons in aqueous-acetone mixtures in a wide composition range, for water molar fractions, xw, between 0.05 and 1.00. Furthermore, new molecular dynamics simulation results are presented for rich acetone mixtures, which provide further insight into the proton transport mechanism in water-non-protic solvent mixtures. The proton mobility was analyzed between xw 0.05 and 1.00 and compared to molecular dynamics simulation data. Results show two qualitative changes in the proton transport composition dependence at xw ∼ 0.25 and 0.8. At xw < 0.25 the ratio of the infinite dilution molar conductivities of HCl and LiCl, Λ(0)(HCl).Λ(0)(LiCl)(-1), is approximately constant and equal to one, since the proton diffusion is vehicular and equal to that of Li(+). At xw ∼ 0.25, proton mobility starts to differ from that of Li(+) indicating that above this concentration the Grotthuss transport mechanism starts to be possible. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that at this threshold concentration the probability of interconversion between two Eigen structures starts to be non-negligible. At xw ∼ 0.8, the infinite molar conductivity of HCl concentration dependence qualitatively changes. This result is in excellent agreement with the analysis presented in the previous simulation work and it has been ascribed to the interchange of water and acetone molecules in the second solvation shell of the hydronium ion. PMID:24182052

  19. Benchmark Study of the SCC-DFTB Approach for a Biomolecular Proton Channel

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ruibin; Swanson, Jessica M. J.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method has been increasingly applied to study proton transport (PT) in biological environments. However, recent studies revealing some significant limitations of SCC-DFTB for proton and hydroxide solvation and transport in bulk aqueous systems call into question its accuracy for simulating PT in biological systems. The current work benchmarks the SCC-DFTB/MM method against more accurate DFT/MM by simulating PT in a synthetic leucine-serine channel (LS2), which emulates the structure and function of biomolecular proton channels. It is observed that SCC-DFTB/MM produces over-coordinated and less structured pore water, an over-coordinated excess proton, weak hydrogen bonds around the excess proton charge defect and qualitatively different PT dynamics. Similar issues are demonstrated for PT in a carbon nanotube, indicating that the inaccuracies found for SCC-DFTB are not due to the point charge based QM/MM electrostatic coupling scheme, but rather to the approximations of the semiempirical method itself. The results presented in this work highlight the limitations of the present form of the SCC-DFTB/MM approach for simulating PT processes in biological protein or channel-like environments, while providing benchmark results that may lead to an improvement of the underlying method. PMID:25104919

  20. Molecular dynamics study of proton binding to silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Wasserman, E.; Felmy, A.R.; Wilke, C.

    1998-02-01

    Molecular statics calculations on gas-phase and solvated clusters and on gas-phase and solvated slabs representing aqueous species and surfaces were applied to investigate acid/base reactions on silica surfaces. The gas-phase approach, which was previously applied to goethite, predicts a surface pK{sub a} of 8.5 for the reaction > SiOH {yields} > SiO{sup {minus}} + H{sup +} which is in good agreement with estimates based on potentiometric titration. However, the model gives an unrealistically large pK{sub a} for the reaction > SiOH{sub 2}{sup +} {yields} > SiOH + H{sup +}. The model dependence of this result was checked by using two different types of interaction potentials, one based on quantum mechanical calculations on H{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} clusters, and another empirical model fitted to the structure and elastic properties of {alpha}-quartz. Because these models gave similar results, the authors hypothesize that the failure of the gas-phase models is due to intrinsic solvation effects not accounted for by previously developed correlations. They tested this idea by carrying out energy minimization calculations on gas-phase clusters with one hydration shell as well as molecular dynamics simulations on fully-solvated H{sub 5}SiO{sub 4}{sup +} and a fully solvated (0001) surface of {beta}-quartz. Though the authors are unable to establish a quantitative measure of the pK{sub a} of SiOH{sub 2} groups, the solvated systems do indicate that SiOH groups do not protonate in any of the solvated models.

  1. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  2. Study of the Polarization Deterioration During Physics Stores in RHIC Polarized Proton Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Z.; Qin, Q.; Bai, M.; Roser, T.

    2016-02-01

    As the only high energy polarized proton collider in the world, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has achieved a great success in colliding polarized proton beams up to 255GeV per beam energy with over 50% average store polarizations for spin physics studies. With the help of Siberian snakes as well as outstanding beam control during the acceleration, polarization loss during acceleration up to 100 GeV is negligible. However, about 10% polarization loss was observed between acceleration from 100 GeV to 255 GeV. In addition, a mild polarization deterioration during long store for physics data taking was also observed. In this paper, studies in understanding the store depolarizing mechanism is reported, including the analysis of polarization deterioration data based on the past couple of RHIC polarized proton runs.

  3. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  4. Theoretical study of the structures of flavin in different oxidation and protonation states

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1996-10-02

    Ab initio molecular orbital theory was used to investigate the structure of flavin in different oxidation and protonation states using lumiflavin as a model compound. According to our study. oxidized flavin is planar no matter what its protonation state or whether it participates in hydrogen bonding. The structures of flavin semiquinone radicals are planar or very close to planar, but the reduced flavin H{sub 3}Fl{sub red} (9) is bent with a ring puckering angle of 27.3{degree} along the N5 and N10 axis. The calculations indicate that N1 is the site of protonation for oxidized flavin, which is in agreement with several crystallographic studies. The calculated spin density distribution for flavin semiquinone radicals is also consistent with experimental results. Electrostatic potential derived charges at the RHF/6-31G{sup *} level of theory are also provided for both oxidized and reduced flavins. 34 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Feasibility study of using statistical process control to customized quality assurance in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Do Hoon; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and improve the reliability of proton quality assurance (QA) processes and, to provide an optimal customized tolerance level using the statistical process control (SPC) methodology. Methods: The authors investigated the consistency check of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) and range in proton beams to see whether it was within the tolerance level of the daily QA process. This study analyzed the difference between the measured and calculated ranges along the central axis to improve the patient-specific QA process in proton beams by using process capability indices. Results: The authors established a customized tolerance level of ±2% for D/MU and ±0.5 mm for beam range in the daily proton QA process. In the authors’ analysis of the process capability indices, the patient-specific range measurements were capable of a specification limit of ±2% in clinical plans. Conclusions: SPC methodology is a useful tool for customizing the optimal QA tolerance levels and improving the quality of proton machine maintenance, treatment delivery, and ultimately patient safety.

  6. Impact of the material composition on proton range variation - A Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. W.; Tung, C. J.; Lee, C. C.; Fan, K. H.; Huang, H. C.; Chao, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we used the Geant4 toolkit to demonstrate the impacts of the material composition of tissues on proton range variation. Bragg curves of different materials subjected to a 250 MeV mono-energy proton beam were simulated and compared. These simulated materials included adipose, heart, brain, cartilage, cortical bone and water. The results showed that there was significant proton range deviation between Bragg curves, especially for cortical bone. The R50 values for a 250 MeV proton beam were approximately 39.55 cm, 35.52 cm, 37.00 cm, 36.51 cm, 36.72 cm, 22.53 cm, and 38.52 cm in the phantoms that were composed completely of adipose, cartilage, tissue, heart, brain, cortical bone, and water, respectively. Mass density and electron density were used to scale the proton range for each material; electron density provided better range scaling. In addition, a similar comparison was performed by artificially setting all material density to 1.0 g/cm3 to evaluate the range deviation due to chemical components alone. Tissue heterogeneity effects due to density variation were more significant, and less significant for chemical composition variation unless the Z/A was very different.

  7. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, , 119 , 5241 - 5249 ). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action. PMID:26862689

  8. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, D.L.

    1996-12-31

    Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques to photochromic materials are presented regarding dopant metal ions in the crystal matrices. Types of samples that are amenable to the technique will be discussed, along with sample format and experimental conditions. The chemical information that one can obtain from samples will be presented, and examples of copant contaminant studies in crystals will be given. New types of samples that are possible to study using this technique will be presented.

  9. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  10. Manipulating the proton transfer process in molecular complexes: synthesis and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sumit Kumar; Dwivedi, Nidhi; Saha, Satyen

    2016-08-01

    The proton transfer process in carefully designed molecular complexes has been investigated directly in the solid and solution phase. SCXRD studies have been employed to investigate the N-H-O bonding interaction sites of the molecular complexes, with additional experimental support from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies, to gain information on the relative position of hydrogen in between the N and O centers. Further, the proton transfer process in solution is studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy through monitoring the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in these molecular complexes, which is primarily governed by the number of electron withdrawing groups (nitro groups) on proton donor moieties (NP, DNP and TNP). It is found that the magnitude of the ICT process depends on the extent of proton transfer, which on the other hand depends on the relative stabilities of the constituent species (phenolate species). A correlation is observed between an increase in the number of nitro groups and an increase in the melting point of the molecular complexes, indicating the enhancement of ionic character due to the proton transfer process. The aliphatic H-bonding is identified and monitored using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy, which reveals that the identity of molecular complexes in solution interestingly depends on the extent of proton transfer, in addition to the nature of the solvents. The aliphatic C-H-O H-bonding interaction between the oxygen atom of the nitro group and the alkyl hydrogen in piperidinium was also found to play a significant role in strengthening the primary interaction involving a hydrogen transfer process. The conductivity of the molecular complexes increases with an increase in the number of nitro groups, indicating the enhancement in ionic character of the molecular complexes. PMID:27424765

  11. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  12. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26832347

  13. Molecular Dynamics Study of the Proposed Proton Transport Pathways in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Linehan, John C.; Cheng, Yuhui; Dupuis, Michel; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-01-15

    Possible proton channels in Clostridium pasteurianum [FeFe]-hydrogenase were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. This study was undertaken to discern proposed channels, compare their properties, evaluate the functional channel, and to provide insight into the features of an active proton channel. Our simulations suggest that protons are not transported through water wires. Instead, a five-residue motif (E282, S319, E279, HOH, C299) was found to be the likely channel, consistent with experimental observations. This channel connects the surface of the enzyme and the di-thiomethylamine bridge of the catalytic H-cluster, permitting the transport of protons. The channel was found to have a persistent hydrogen bonded core (residues E279 to S319), with less persistent hydrogen bonds at the ends of the channel. The hydrogen bond occupancy in this network was found to be sensitive to the protonation state of the residues in the channel, with different protonation states enhancing or stabilizing hydrogen bonding in different regions of the network. Single site mutations to non-hydrogen bonding residues break the hydrogen bonding network at that residue, consistent with experimental observations showing catalyst inactivation. In many cases, these mutations alter the hydrogen bonding in other regions of the channel which may be equally important in catalytic failure. A correlation between the protein dynamics near the proton channel and the redox partner binding regions was also found as a function of protonation state. The likely mechanism of proton movement in [FeFe]-hydrogenases is discussed based on the structural analysis presented here. This work was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of

  14. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton decays of {sup 145,147}Er

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, F.; Zhou, X. H.; Zheng, Y.; Xu, S. W.; Xie, Y. X.; Chen, L.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. H.; Li, Z. K.; Qiang, Y. H.; Guo, S.; Wang, H. X.; Zhou, H. B.; Ding, B.; Li, G. S.; Zhang, N. T.

    2010-04-15

    The beta-delayed proton decays of {sup 145,147}Er have been studied experimentally using the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 92}Mo reaction at beam energy of 383 MeV. On the basis of a He-jet apparatus coupled with a tape transport system, the beta-delayed proton radioactivities both from the nus{sub 1/2} ground state and the nuh{sub 11/2} isomer in {sup 145,147}Er were observed by proton-gamma coincidence measurements. By analyzing the time distributions of the 4{sup +}->2{sup +}gamma transitions in the granddaughter nuclei {sup 144,146}Dy, the half-lives of 1.0+-0.3 s and 1.6+-0.2 s have been deduced for the nuh{sub 11/2} isomers in {sup 145,147}Er, respectively.

  15. Experimental Studies of Fast Protons Originated from Fusion Reactions in Plasma-Focus Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowska, A.; Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zebrowski, J.; Szydlowski, A.

    2008-03-19

    The paper describes results of the recent measurements of fusion-reaction protons, which were performed within the PF-360 facility operated at the IPJ in Swierk, Poland. The main aim of those studies was to perform time-integrated measurements of fast protons (of energy of about 3 MeV) by means of ion-pinhole cameras, which were equipped with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) of the PM-355 type and absorption filters made of thin metal foils. In order to determine the spatial distribution of fusion-produced protons the use was made of several miniature pinhole cameras placed at different angles to the PF-360 axis. The irradiated and etched detectors were analyzed with an optical microscope coupled with a CCD camera and a PC unit.

  16. Biological Effects in Coral Biomineralization: The Ion-Microprobe Revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, A.

    2004-12-01

    Scleractinian corals are among the most prolific biomineralizing organisms on Earth and massive, reef-building corals are used extensively as proxies for past variations in the global climate. It is therefore of wide interest to understand the degree to which biological versus inorganic processes control the chemistry of the coral skeleton. Early workers considered aragonitic coral skeleton formation to be a purely physiochemical process. More recent studies have increasingly emphasized the role of a skeletal organic matrix, or intercalated organic macro-molecules that control the macroscopic shape and size of the growing crystals. It is now well established that organic compounds play a key role in controlling the morphology of crystals in a wide variety of calcium carbonate biomineralization processes by binding to specific sites, thereby causing direction-specific binding energies on the crystal surfaces. Macro-molecules, such as aspartic acid-rich or glutamic proteins and sulfated polysaccharides, are known to be embedded within the aragonitic skeletal components of coral. In addition, endosymbiotic algae and the layer of cells adjacent to the mineralizing surface, the calicoblastic ectoderm, are believed to play important roles in driving and controlling hermatypic coral skeletogenesis. However, until recently, further progress has been somewhat limited because it was not possible to obtain chemical analyses of the coral skeleton with sufficiently high spatial resolution and sensitivity to correlate chemical variations with the micrometer scale organization of its different structural components. The recent emergence of new ion microprobe technology is changing this situation radically. Conventional ion microprobe and laser ablation techniques have already contributed substantially to our knowledge about the micro-distribution of key trace elements such as B, Mg, Sr, Ba and U. However, with the development of the NanoSIMS, a newly designed ion microprobe

  17. Studies on PVA based nanocomposite Proton Exchange Membrane for Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahavan Palani, P.; Kannan, R.; Rajashabala, S.; Rajendran, S.; Velraj, G.

    2015-02-01

    Different concentrations of Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Montmorillonite (PVA/MMT) based proton exchange membranes (PEMs) have been prepared by solution casting method. The structural and electrical properties of these composite membranes have been characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and AC impedance spectroscopic methods. The conductivity of the PEMs has been estimated for the different concentration of MMT. Water/Methanol uptake measurement were also analyzed for the prepared PEMs and presented. The proton conductivity studies were carried out at room temperature with 100% of humidity.

  18. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  19. Low-x QCD studies with forward jets in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 14 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Cerci, Salim; D'Enterria, David

    2009-03-23

    Forward (di)jet measurements are a useful tool to constrain the Partom Distribution Functions (PDFs) at low values of parton momentum fraction x and to study the possible onset of BFKL or gluon saturation QCD evolutions in the proton. We present studies of jet reconstruction capabilities in the CMS Hadron Forward (HF) calorimeter (3<|{eta}|<5). The expected sensitivity of the inclusive forward jet p{sub T} spectrum to the proton PDF, as well as the azimuthal decorrelation of Mueller-Navelet jets with a large rapidity separation are presented for p-p collisions at {radical}(s) = 14 TeV.

  20. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  1. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  2. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  3. Determination of nitrogen in coal macerals using electron microprobe technique-experimental procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Gurba, L.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses nitrogen determination with the Cameca SX50 electron microprobe using PCO as an analyzing crystal. A set of conditions using differing accelerating voltages, beam currents, beam sizes, and counting times were tested to determine parameters that would give the most reliable nitrogen determination. The results suggest that, for the instrumentation used, 10 kV, current 20 nA, and a counting time of 20 s provides the most reliable nitrogen determination, with a much lower detection limit than the typical concentration of this element in coal. The study demonstrates that the electron microprobe technique can be used to determine the nitrogen content of coal macerals successfully and accurately. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain activity mapping at multiple scales with silicon microprobes containing 1,024 electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Shobe, Justin L.; Claar, Leslie D.; Parhami, Sepideh; Bakhurin, Konstantin I.

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated activity of neural ensembles across multiple interconnected regions has been challenging to study in the mammalian brain with cellular resolution using conventional recording tools. For instance, neural systems regulating learned behaviors often encompass multiple distinct structures that span the brain. To address this challenge we developed a three-dimensional (3D) silicon microprobe capable of simultaneously measuring extracellular spike and local field potential activity from 1,024 electrodes. The microprobe geometry can be precisely configured during assembly to target virtually any combination of four spatially distinct neuroanatomical planes. Here we report on the operation of such a device built for high-throughput monitoring of neural signals in the orbitofrontal cortex and several nuclei in the basal ganglia. We perform analysis on systems-level dynamics and correlations during periods of conditioned behavioral responding and rest, demonstrating the technology's ability to reveal functional organization at multiple scales in parallel in the mouse brain. PMID:26133801

  5. Study of Polarized Sea Quark Distributions in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at sq root(s) = 500 GeV with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mibe, Tsutomu

    2009-08-04

    The PHENIX spin program studies the flavor structure of the polarized sea quark distributions in polarized proton-proton collisions. Starting from 2009 run, the quark and antiquark polarization, sorted by flavor, will be investigated with the parity-violating single-spin asymmetry of W-boson production at the collision energy of sq root(s) = 500 GeV. High momentum muons from W-boson decay are detected in the PHENIX muon arms. The muon trigger is being upgraded to allow one to select high momentum muons.

  6. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  7. Feasibility studies on time-like proton electromagnetic form factors at PANDA-FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Iris; Dbeyssi, Alaa; Khaneft, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    This contribution reports on the latest status of the feasibility studies for the measurement of time-like proton electromagnetic form factors (FF's) at the PANDA experiment [1] at FAIR (Germany). Electromagnetic FF's are fundamental quantities parameterizing the electric and magnetic structure of hadrons. In the time-like region proton FF's can be accessed experimentally through the annihilation processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ), assuming that the interaction takes place through the exchange of one virtual photon. Due to the low luminosity available at colliders in the past, an individual determination of the time-like electric and magnetic proton FF's was not feasible. The statistical precision, at which the proton FF's will be determined at PANDA, is estimated for both signal processes p ¯p → l+l- (l = e, μ) using the PandaRoot software, which encompasses full detector simulation and event reconstruction. The signal identification and suppression of the main background process (p ¯p → π+π-) is studied. Different methods have been used to generate and analyze the processes of interest. The results from the different analyses show that time-like electromagnetic FF's can be measured at PANDA with unprecedented statistical accuracy.

  8. The use of the laser Raman microprobe for the determination of salinity in fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Mernagh, T.P.; Wilde, A.R. )

    1989-04-01

    The O-H stretching region (2,800-3,800 cm{sup {minus}1}) in Raman spectra of aqueous solutions is sensitive to changes in the salt concentration. This permits determination of the salinity in the aqueous phase of fluid inclusions (at room temperature) by calculating skewing parameters from Raman microprobe spectra. The technique does not require detailed knowledge of the fluid composition and can be applied to most chloride solutions which commonly occur in fluid inclusions. Studies of synthetic fluid inclusions from the NaCl-H{sub 2}O system show that salinities up to halite saturation may be determined to within {plus minus}2 wt%. Well-characterized fluid inclusions from the unconformity-related uranium deposits of Nabarlek and Koongarra, Northern Territory, Australia, were studied with the laser Raman microprobe. The salinities determined from the Raman spectra are comparable to those obtained using standard microthermometric techniques. The Raman microprobe technique has the advantage of not requiring analogy to binary salt-water phase diagrams which cannot adequately model the complex brines in these inclusions. Variations in the concentration of salt hydrates, observed in Raman spectra of frozen inclusion, validated the salinities derived from the Raman skewing parameters obtained at room temperature. The Raman analyses confirm previous microthermometric evidence for trapping of discrete high and low salinity fluids.

  9. SU-E-J-175: Proton Dose Calculation On Scatter-Corrected CBCT Image: Feasibility Study for Adaptive Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y; Winey, B; Sharp, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate feasibility of proton dose calculation on scattercorrected CBCT images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: Two CBCT image sets were acquired from a prostate cancer patient and a thorax phantom using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. 2-D scatter maps were estimated using a previously introduced CT-based technique, and were subtracted from each raw projection image. A CBCT image set was then reconstructed with an open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK). Conversion from the CBCT number to HU was performed by soft tissue-based shifting with reference to the plan CT. Passively scattered proton plans were simulated on the plan CT and corrected/uncorrected CBCT images using the XiO treatment planning system. For quantitative evaluation, water equivalent path length (WEPL) was compared in those treatment plans. Results: The scatter correction method significantly improved image quality and HU accuracy in the prostate case where large scatter artifacts were obvious. However, the correction technique showed limited effects on the thorax case that was associated with fewer scatter artifacts. Mean absolute WEPL errors from the plans with the uncorrected and corrected images were 1.3 mm and 5.1 mm in the thorax case and 13.5 mm and 3.1 mm in the prostate case. The prostate plan dose distribution of the corrected image demonstrated better agreement with the reference one than that of the uncorrected image. Conclusion: A priori CT-based CBCT scatter correction can reduce the proton dose calculation error when large scatter artifacts are involved. If scatter artifacts are low, an uncorrected CBCT image is also promising for proton dose calculation when it is calibrated with the soft-tissue based shifting.

  10. Identification of cosmogenic argon components in Allende by laser microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, C.

    1986-01-01

    New techniques are presented for using a laser microprobe to determine the spallation argon systematics of calcium-aluminum inclusions. The Ar-38(s) amounts determined for melilite and anorthite in a coarse-grained inclusion from Allende are 2.9 x 10 to the -8th and 1.3 x 10 to the -8th cc/g, respectively. The ratio of the amounts is consistent with the calcium contents of these two minerals. The Ar-38(s) amount determined for a fine-grained inclusion from Allende is 1.1 x 10 to the -8th cc/g. Calcium and potassium amounts were determined from irradiated samples of the same inclusions so that production of Ar-38 from calcium during the cosmic ray exposure of Allende could be determined for these samples. The production observed was 12.4 + or - 2.1 x 10 to the -8th cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the coarse-grained inclusion and 9.9 + or - 2.4 cc STP Ar-38/g Ca for the fine-grained inclusion. No evidence of unusual exposure was observed in the two inclusions studied.

  11. Nickel geochemistry of a Philippine laterite examined by bulk and microprobe synchrotron analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong; Gerson, Andrea R.

    2011-11-01

    The Ni geochemistry of limonite and saprolite laterite ores from Pujada in the Philippines has been investigated using a mixture of laboratory and synchrotron techniques. Nickel laterite profiles are typically composed of complicated mineral assemblages, with Ni being distributed heterogeneously at the micron scale, and thus a high degree of spatial resolution is required for analysis. This study represents the first such analysis of Philippine laterite ores. Synchrotron bulk and microprobe X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), comprising both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, together with synchrotron microprobe X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and diffraction (XRD) have been applied to provide quantitative analysis of the mineral components and Ni speciation. Synchrotron microprobe EXAFS spectroscopy suggests that the limonite Ni is associated with phyllomanganate via adsorption onto the Mn oxide layers and substitution for Mn within these layers. Laboratory scanning electron microscopy, coupled to electron dispersive spectroscopy analyses, indicates that Ni is also associated with concentrated Fe containing particles and this is further confirmed by synchrotron bulk and microprobe investigation. Linear combination fitting of the bulk EXAFS limonite data suggests 60 ± 15% of the Ni is associated with phyllomanganate, with the predominant fraction adsorbed above vacancies in the MnO 6 layers with the remainder being substituted for Mn within these layers. The remaining 40 ± 10% of the Ni in the limonite ore is incorporated into goethite through replacement of the Fe. In the saprolite ore, 90 ± 23% of the Ni is associated with a serpentine mineral, most likely lizardite, as a replacement for Mg. The remaining Ni is found within phyllomanganate adsorbed above vacancies in the MnO 6 layers.

  12. Numerical study of a linear accelerator using laser-generated proton beams as a source

    SciTech Connect

    Antici, P.; Fazi, M.; Migliorati, M.; Palumbo, L.; Lombardi, A.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-12-15

    The injection of laser-generated protons through conventional drift tube linear accelerators (linacs) has been studied numerically. For this, we used the parameters of the proton source produced by ultraintense lasers, i.e., with an intrinsic high beam quality. The numerical particle tracing code PARMELA[L. M. Young and J. H. Billen, LANL Report No. LA-UR-96-1835, 2004] is then used to inject experimentally measured laser-generated protons with energies of 7{+-}0.1 MeV and rms un-normalized emittance of 0.180 mm mrad into one drift tube linac tank that accelerated them to more than 14 MeV. The simulations exhibit un-normalized emittance growths of 8 in x direction and 22.6 in y direction, with final emittances lower than those produced using conventional sources, allowing a potential luminosity gain for the final beam. However, the simulations also exhibit a limitation in the allowed injected proton charge as, over 0.112 mA, space charge effect worsens significantly the beam emittance.

  13. Proton and tritium NMR relaxation studies of peptide inhibitor binding to bacterial collagenase: Conformation and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dive, V.; Lai, A.; Valensin, G.; Saba, G.; Yiotakis, A.; Toma, F. )

    1991-02-15

    The interaction of succinyl-Pro-Ala, a competitive inhibitor of Achromobacter iophagus collagenase, with the enzyme was studied by longitudinal proton and tritium relaxation. Specific deuterium and tritium labeling of the succinyl part at vicinal positions allowed the measurement of the cross-relaxation rates of individual proton or tritium spin pairs in the inhibitor-enzyme complex as well as in the free inhibitor. Overall correlation times, internuclear distances, and qualitative information on the internal mobility in Suc1 (as provided by the generalized order parameter S2) could be deduced by the comparison of proton and tritium cross-relaxation of spin pairs at complementary positions in the -CH2- CH2- moiety as analyzed in terms of the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo. The conformational and motional parameters of the inhibitor in the free and enzyme-bound state were directly compared by this method. The measurement of proton cross-relaxation in the Ala residue provided additional information on the inhibitor binding. The determination of the order parameter in different parts of the inhibitor molecule in the bound state indicates that the succinyl and alanyl residues are primarily involved in the interaction with the enzyme activity site. The succinyl moiety, characterized in solution by the conformational equilibrium among the three staggered rotamers--i.e., trans: 50%; g+: 20%; g-: 30%--adopted in the bound state the unique trans conformation.

  14. Ab Initio Study of Hydration and Proton Dissociation in Ionomer Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-07-01

    We present a comparative study of proton dissociation in various functional acidic units that are promising candidates as building blocks for polymeric electrolyte membranes. Minimum energy structures for four acidic moieties with clusters of 1-6 water molecules were determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311G** level starting from chemically rational initial configurations. The perfluoro sulfonyl imide acid group (CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3) was observed to be the strongest acid, due to the substantial electron withdrawing effect of both fluorocarbon groups. The hydrophilic functional group (CH3OC6H3OCH3C6H4SO3H) of sulfonated polyetherether ketone (SPEEK) membrane was found to be the strongest base with the acidic proton dissociation requiring the addition of six water molecules and the hydrated proton being more tightly bound to the conjugate base. Even though both perfluoro sulfonyl imides and sulfonic acids (hydrophilic functional groups for sulfonyl imide and Nafion ionomers respectively) required only three water molecules to exhibit spontaneous proton dissociation, the largest possible solvent-separated hydronium ion was attained only for the sulfonyl imide moiety. These results provide a scientific basis for understanding the improved conductivity of perfluorinated sulfonyl imide-based membranes relative to that of the widely-used Nafion membrane.

  15. Two-dimensional infrared study of 3-azidopyridine as a potential spectroscopic reporter of protonation state

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, Michael W.; Dutta, Samrat; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2010-10-07

    The lack of general spectroscopic probes that can be used in a range of systems to probe kinetics and dynamics is a major obstacle to the widespread application of two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. We have studied 3-azidopyridine to characterize its potential as a probe of the protonation state of the pyridine ring. We find that the azido-stretching vibration is split by accidental Fermi resonance interactions with one or more overtones and combination states. Using 2D IR spectroscopy, we determine the state structure of the resulting eigenstates for complexes of 3-azidopyridine with formic acid and trifluoroacetic acid in which the pyridine ring is unprotonated and protonated, respectively. Based on the measurements, we develop a two-oscillator depurturbation model to determine the energies and couplings of the zeroth-order azido-stretching state and the perturbing dark state that couples to it. Based on these results, we conclude that the azido-stretching vibration is, in fact, sensitive to the protonation state of the pyridine shifting up in frequency by 8 cm{sup -1} in the complex with trifluoroacetic acid relative to the formic acid complex. These results suggest that, although 3-azidopyridine is not suitable as a spectroscopic probe, the approach of employing an organic azide as a remote probe of protonation state holds significant promise.

  16. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  17. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  18. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  19. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU. 40 references.

  20. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU.

  1. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  2. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  3. Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe solid state 13C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates. Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Atalla, R.H.

    1993-12-31

    We have previously shown that all relatively pure plant and bacterial celluloses are, in their native states, composites of two lattice forms, I{sub {alpha}} and I{sub {beta}}, and that the two forms possess molecular chains in the same conformations but with different hydrogen bonding patterns. In the current period we have demonstrated that in higher plant cell wall matrices, the hemicelluloses are likely to have a regulatory function during the aggregation of cellulose. Different hemicelluloses appear to influence the aggregation in different ways. We have also developed preliminary evidence indicating the hemicelluloses may have a protective function against the action of some cellulolytic enzymes. The specific accomplishments during the current period are detailed. Demonstration that hemicelluloses present during biogenesis can transform bacterial cellulose into a cellulose typical of higher plant celluloses, and that each hemicellulose has a different effect on the pattern of aggregation. Evidence is presented that the hemicelluloses may limit the action of certain cellulolytic enzymes, suggesting that their function may go beyond regulation to include passive resistance to cellulolytic pathogens. Enhancing the potential of the Raman microprobe technique for mapping variability of lignin in the cell wall by identifying the contribution of the different substructures of lignin to the intensity of the key band in the Raman spectrum of lignin. Mapping of the variability of lignin across two cell wall sections. The mappings have convoluted within them both composition and concentration, but they demonstrate the potential of the method and point to the improvements we are now making so as to distinguish between variability of concentration and variability of composition.

  4. RAMAN MICROPROBE ANALYSIS OF STATIONARY SOURCE PARTICULATE POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of Raman spectroscopy to the molecular characterization of individual particles from stationary sources is described. The NBS-developed Raman microprobe has been used to characterize microparticles of oil- and coal-fired power plant emissions and boiler samples co...

  5. NMR spectroscopy and perfusion of mammalian cells using surface microprobes.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Pataky, Kristopher; Stettler, Matthieu; Wurm, Florian Maria; Brugger, Jürgen; Besse, Pierre-André; Popovic, Radivoje

    2007-03-01

    NMR spectra of mammalian cells are taken using surface microprobes that are based on microfabricated planar coils. The surface microprobe resembles a miniaturized Petri dish commonly used in biological research. The diameter of the planar coils is 1 mm. Chinese Hamster Ovaries are immobilized in a uniform layer on the microprobe surface or patterned by an ink-jet printer in the centre of the microcoil, where the rf-field of the planar microcoil is most uniform. The acquired NMR spectra show the prevalent metabolites found in mammalian cells. The volumes of the detected samples range from 25 nL to 1 nL (or 50,000 to 1800 cells). With an extended set-up that provides fluid inlets and outlets to the microprobe, the cells can be perfused within the NMR-magnet while constantly taking NMR spectra. Perfusion of the cells opens the way to increased cell viability for long acquisitions or to analysis of the cells' response to environmental change. PMID:17330170

  6. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Lorite, I; Zandalazini, C; Esquinazi, P; Spemann, D; Friedländer, S; Pöppl, A; Michalsky, T; Grundmann, M; Vogt, J; Meijer, J; Heluani, S P; Ohldag, H; Adeagbo, W A; Nayak, S K; Hergert, W; Ernst, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-07-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation. PMID:26043764

  7. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I.; Zandalazini, C.; Esquinazi, P.; Spemann, D.; Friedländer, S.; Pöppl, A.; Michalsky, T.; Grundmann, M.; Vogt, J.; Meijer, J.; Heluani, S. P.; Ohldag, H.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Nayak, S. K.; Hergert, W.; Ernst, A.; Hoffmann, M.

    2015-06-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation.

  8. Integrated Laser Microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb Dating of Titanite and Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, A.; Van Soest, M. C.; Hodges, K. V.; Tripathy-Lang, A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of laser technologies for high spatial resolution dating has proven to be an important advancement in (U-Th)/He thermochronology. Excimer laser microprobes have been used to successfully date high U+Th minerals and are an especially promising way to determine the distribution of (U-Th)/He zircon ages in detrital sedimentary samples. We have also found that another detrital mineral, titanite, may be amenable to this method as well. While titanite contains lower concentrations of parent isotopes than zircon, and consequently less radiogenic 4He, its typically larger grain size allows for these characteristics to be mitigated by the use of larger laser beam diameters during the ablation process. With the integrated use of ICPMS, an established method for U/Pb geochronology, this phase of the laser microprobe (U-Th)/He technique can be modified slightly to enable (U-Th)/He and U/Pb 'double' dating of detrital samples. Here we present a proof of concept study demonstrating the viability of integrated laser microprobe (U-Th)/He and U/Pb through dating Oligocene Fish Canyon tuff titanite and zircon from Colorado. Our use of a well characterized sample with established (U-Th)/He and U/Pb dates allows us to fully evaluate the utility of this technique. By selecting medium- to fine-grained crystals we are able to simulate a realistic, uni-modal detrital sample. Using our modified laser microprobe approach, we are able to reproduce the expected age modes with an analytical imprecision roughly twice that of more established methods, a difference that has little practical effect on geologic interpretations. Additionally, we believe that the technique could prove a viable method for double dating detrital rutile and apatite, so long as characteristically lower U+Th concentrations in these minerals are balanced by appropriately scaled ablation pits in an aliquot unbiased by the need for larger detrital grains. Ultimately, integrated laser microprobe U/Pb and (U

  9. Structural characteristics of hydrated protons in the conductive channels: effects of confinement and fluorination studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Song, Yuechun; Ruan, Xuehua; Yan, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Zhuanglin; Wu, Xuemei; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between the proton conductive channel and the hydrated proton structure is of significant importance for understanding the deformed hydrogen bonding network of the confined protons which matches the nanochannel. In general, the structure of hydrated protons in the nanochannel of the proton exchange membrane is affected by several factors. To investigate the independent effect of each factor, it is necessary to eliminate the interference of other factors. In this paper, a one-dimensional carbon nanotube decorated with fluorine was built to investigate the independent effects of nanoscale confinement and fluorination on the structural properties of hydrated protons in the nanochannel using classical molecular dynamics simulation. In order to characterize the structure of hydrated protons confined in the channel, the hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the hydrated protons has been studied according to suitable hydrogen bond criteria. The hydrogen bond criteria were proposed based on the radial distribution function, angle distribution and pair-potential energy distribution. It was found that fluorination leads to an ordered hydrogen bonding structure of the hydrated protons near the channel surface, and confinement weakens the formation of the bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the radial direction. Besides, fluorination lowers the free energy barrier of hydronium along the nanochannel, but slightly increases the barrier for water. This leads to disintegration of the sequential hydrogen bond network in the fluorinated CNTs with small size. In the fluorinated CNTs with large diameter, the lower degree of confinement produces a spiral-like sequential hydrogen bond network with few bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the central region. This structure might promote unidirectional proton transfer along the channel without random movement. This study provides the cooperative effect of confinement dimension and fluorination on the structure and hydrogen

  10. Proton radiography and fluoroscopy of lung tumors: A Monte Carlo study using patient-specific 4DCT phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Xu, X. George; Chen, George T. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods are used to simulate and optimize a time-resolved proton range telescope (TRRT) in localization of intrafractional and interfractional motions of lung tumor and in quantification of proton range variations. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with a particle tracking feature was employed to evaluate the TRRT performance, especially in visualizing and quantifying proton range variations during respiration. Protons of 230 MeV were tracked one by one as they pass through position detectors, patient 4DCT phantom, and finally scintillator detectors that measured residual ranges. The energy response of the scintillator telescope was investigated. Mass density and elemental composition of tissues were defined for 4DCT data. Results: Proton water equivalent length (WEL) was deduced by a reconstruction algorithm that incorporates linear proton track and lateral spatial discrimination to improve the image quality. 4DCT data for three patients were used to visualize and measure tumor motion and WEL variations. The tumor trajectories extracted from the WEL map were found to be within ∼1 mm agreement with direct 4DCT measurement. Quantitative WEL variation studies showed that the proton radiograph is a good representation of WEL changes from entrance to distal of the target. Conclusions:MCNPX simulation results showed that TRRT can accurately track the motion of the tumor and detect the WEL variations. Image quality was optimized by choosing proton energy, testing parameters of image reconstruction algorithm, and comparing to ground truth 4DCT. The future study will demonstrate the feasibility of using the time resolved proton radiography as an imaging tool for proton treatments of lung tumors. PMID:21626923