Science.gov

Sample records for proton nmr study

  1. Theoretical and experimental study of 15N NMR protonation shifts.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Valentin A; Samultsev, Dmitry O; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2015-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study revealed that the nature of the upfield (shielding) protonation effect in 15N NMR originates in the change of the contribution of the sp(2)-hybridized nitrogen lone pair on protonation resulting in a marked shielding of nitrogen of about 100 ppm. On the contrary, for amine-type nitrogen, protonation of the nitrogen lone pair results in the deshielding protonation effect of about 25 ppm, so that the total deshielding protonation effect of about 10 ppm is due to the interplay of the contributions of adjacent natural bond orbitals. A versatile computational scheme for the calculation of 15N NMR chemical shifts of protonated nitrogen species and their neutral precursors is proposed at the density functional theory level taking into account solvent effects within the supermolecule solvation model. PMID:25891386

  2. Proton NMR studies of functionalized nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataurova, Yulia Nikolaevna

    in high-resolution NMR spectra. This technique is selective for protons on the surface organic functional groups due to their motional averaging in solution. In this study, 1H solution NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the interface of the organic functional groups in D2O. The pKa for these functional groups covalently bound to the surface of nanoparticles was determined using an NMR-pH titration method based on the variation in the proton chemical shift for the alkyl group protons closest to the amine group with pH. The adsorption of toxic contaminants (chromate and arsenate anions) on the surface of functionalized silicalite-1 and mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been studied by 1H solution NMR spectroscopy. With this method, the surface bound contaminants are detected. The analysis of the intensity and position of these peaks allows quantitative assessment of the relative amounts of functional groups with adsorbed metal ions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of solution NMR spectroscopy to the electronic environment and structure of the surface functional groups on porous nanomaterials.

  3. Proton NMR study of the state of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots

    SciTech Connect

    Blinc, A.; Lahajnar, G.; Blinc, R.; Zidansek, A.; Sepe, A. )

    1990-04-01

    A proton NMR relaxation and pulsed field gradient self-diffusion study of water in fibrin gels, plasma, and blood clots has been performed with special emphasis on the effect of the sol-gel and shrinkage transitions. Deuteron NMR in fibrin gels was also studied to supplement the proton data. It is shown that a measurement of the water proton or deuteron T1/T2 ratio allows for a determination of the bound water fraction in all these systems. The change in the T1/T2 ratio at the shrinkage transition further allows for a determination of the surface fractal dimension of the gel if the change in the volume of the gel is known. The self-diffusion coefficient of water in these systems, which determines the transport properties of the gel, is found to be proportional to the free water fraction in both the nonshrunken and shrunken state.

  4. Intrinsic Proton NMR Studies of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Yutaka; Isobe, Masahiko

    2016-09-01

    We studied the short proton free induction decay signals and the broad 1H NMR spectra of Mg(OH)2 and Ca(OH)2 powders at 77-355 K and 42 MHz using pulsed NMR techniques. Using a Gaussian-type back extrapolation procedure for the obscured data of the proton free induction decay signals, we obtained more precise values of the second moments of the Fourier-transformed broad NMR spectra than those in a previous report [Y. Itoh and M. Isobe, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 84, 113601 (2015)] and compared with the theoretical second moments. The decrease in the second moment could not account for the large decrease in the magnitude of the intrinsic proton spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 from Mg(OH)2 to Ca(OH)2. The analysis of 1/T1 ∝ exp(-Eg/kBT) with Eg ˜ 0.01 eV points to a local hopping mechanism, and that of 1/T1 ∝ Tn with n ˜ 0.5 points to an anharmonic rattling mechanism.

  5. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, , 119 , 5241 - 5249 ). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action. PMID:26862689

  6. Low Temperature 1H MAS NMR Spectroscopy Studies of Proton Motion in Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, H.; Peng, L; Grey, C

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy is used to study protonic motion in zeolite HZSM-5 in both samples that have been dried using procedures that are standard in the literature and samples that have been more carefully dehydrated. A significant enhancement of proton mobility is seen for the ''standard'' dehydrated HZSM-5 sample in comparison to that seen for the much drier sample. This is ascribed to a vehicle-hopping mechanism involving the residual water that is present in these zeolites. A gradual change of the framework structure is observed on cooling to approximately 213 K, as monitored via the change in {sup 1}H chemical shift values of the Broensted acid resonances and by X-ray diffraction. A more sudden change in structure is seen by differential scanning calorimetry and NMR at approximately 220?230 K, which is associated with changes in both the mobility and the modes of binding of the residual water to the Broensted acid sites and the zeolite framework.

  7. In vitro proton NMR study of collagen in human aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Vinée, P; Meurer, B; Constantinesco, A; Kohlberger, B; Hauenstein, K H; Laubenberger, J

    1993-03-01

    The authors relate the findings in the 1H solid state line shape (at 60 MHz) of human aortic walls (n = 12) in native state and after histologically controlled selective lysis of collagen and elastin. An analysis of the line shape shows a composite free induction decay (FID) consisting of a low amplitude (3-7%) fast decaying component (T2 approximately 20 microseconds) and a slow decaying one (T2 > 1 ms). The fast component is identified as the protons of the collagen macromolecules. The second moment computed from the experimental fast component of the FID is in agreement with published studies examining the motional characteristics of collagen by multinuclear NMR employing spin labeling. A theoretical second moment is computed for the collagen macromolecular backbone from the atomic positions in the superhelix. Comparison with the observed experimental values allows determination of the step angle (29 degrees) of the fast rotational motion of the collagen strands along their long axis. PMID:8383787

  8. 1H NMR study of proton dynamics in the inorganic solid acid Rb3 H( SO4 )2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koh-Ichi; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    2006-01-01

    Proton dynamics in Rb3H(SO4)2 has been studied by means of H1 NMR. The H1 magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were traced at room temperature (RT) at Larmor frequency of 400.13MHz . H1 static NMR spectra were measured at frequencies of 200.13MHz and 400.13MHz in the ranges of 165-513 and 300-513K , respectively. H1 spin-lattice relaxation times, T1 , were measured at 200.13 and 19.65MHz in the ranges of 260-513 and 260-470K , respectively. The H1 MAS NMR spectrum at 294K has an isotropic chemical shift of 16.3ppm from tetramethylsilane, demonstrating very strong hydrogen bonds. In RT phase, a wobbling motion of the O-H axis in one direction at the fast motional limit takes place above 400K , being supported by the H1 static NMR spectral line shapes and by the H1 T1 values. In the high temperature (HT) phase, the sharp H1 static NMR spectra indicate translational proton diffusion. From the analysis of H1 T1 , protons diffuse with the inverse of the frequency factor (τ0) of 9.5×10-13s and the activation energy (Ea) of 25kJmol-1 . These parameters can well explain the macroscopic electric conductivity in HT phase.

  9. Interactions between Nafion resin and protonated dodecylamine modified montmorillonite: a solid state NMR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xu, Jun; Hou, Guangjin; Tang, Huiru; Deng, Feng

    2007-07-01

    A series of nanocomposites have been prepared from perfluorosulfonylfluoride copolymer resin (Nafion) and layered montmorillonite (MMT) modified with protonated dodecylamine by conventional sol-gel intercalation. The structure of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized using FT-IR, elemental analysis, XRD and solid state NMR techniques, including 19F magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, 19F NMR relaxation time measurements, 29Si MAS, 1H MAS, 1H-13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS), and 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) 2D NMR. The results showed that thermal stability of Nafion was improved moderately by the addition of dodecylamine modified MMT without intercalation. FT-IR and 29Si MAS NMR results indicated that dodecylamine modification did not result in obvious changes in the MMT lattice structure. The XRD results showed that the protonated dodecylamine has been embedded and intercalated into the MMT interlayers, whereas Nafion was not. Elemental analysis results also suggested that some dodecylamine was adsorbed on the surface of MMT. 1H-13C HETCOR 2D NMR experiment clearly indicated that strong electrostatic interactions were present between the NH+3 group of dodecylamine and the fluorine-containing groups (CF3, OCF2, and SCF2) of Nafion resin. Such electrostatic interactions are probably the major contributors for the improved thermal stability of the resultant composite materials. PMID:17382953

  10. Helical stacking in DNA three-way junctions containing two unpaired pyrimidines: proton NMR studies.

    PubMed Central

    Leontis, N B; Hills, M T; Piotto, M; Ouporov, I V; Malhotra, A; Gorenstein, D G

    1995-01-01

    The proton NMR spectra of DNA three-way junction complexes (TWJ) having unpaired pyrimidines, 5'-TT- and 5'-TC- on one strand at the junction site were assigned from 2D NOESY spectra acquired in H2O and D2O solvents and homonuclear 3D NOESY-TOCSY and 3D NOESY-NOESY in D2O solvent. TWJ are the simplest branched structures found in biologically active nucleic acids. Unpaired nucleotides are common features of such structures and have been shown to stabilize junction formation. The NMR data confirm that the component oligonucleotides assemble to form conformationally homogeneous TWJ complexes having three double-helical, B-form arms. Two of the helical arms stack upon each other. The unpaired pyrimidine bases lie in the minor groove of one of the helices and are partly exposed to solvent. The coaxial stacking arrangement deduced is different from that determined by Rosen and Patel (Rosen, M.A., and D.J. Patel. 1993. Biochemistry. 32:6576-6587) for a DNA three-way junction having two unpaired cytosines, but identical to that suggested by Welch et al. (Welch, J. B., D. R. Duckett, D. M. J. Lilley. 1993. Nucleic Acids Res. 21:4548-4555) on the basis of gel electrophoretic studies of DNA three-way junctions containing unpaired adenosines and thymidines. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7711249

  11. Relaxation of water protons in highly concentrated aqueous protein systems studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Szuminska, K; Gutsze, A; Kowalczyk, A

    2001-01-01

    Concentrated Aqueous Protein Systems, Proton Relaxation Times, Slow Chemical Exchange In this paper we present proton spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times measured vs. concentration, temperature, pulse interval (tauCPMG) as well as 1H NMR spectral measurements in a wide range of concentrations of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The anomalous relaxation behaviour of the water protons, similar to that observed in mammalian lenses, was found in the two most concentrated solutions (44% and 46%). The functional dependence of the spin-spin relaxation time vs. tauCPMG pulse interval and the values of the motional activation parameters obtained from the temperature dependencies of spin-lattice relaxation times suggest that the water molecule mobility is reduced in these systems. The slow exchange process on the T2 time scale is proposed to explain the obtained data. The proton spectral measurements support the hypothesis of a slow exchange mechanism in the highest concentrated solutions. From the analysis of the shape of the proton spectra the mean exchange times between bound and bulk water proton groups (tauex) have been estimated for the range of the highest concentrations (30%-46%). The obtained values are of the order of milliseconds assuring that the slow exchange condition is fulfilled in the most concentrated samples. PMID:11837660

  12. Two-pulse NMR techniques for studying proton-unpaired electron interactions in coals and chars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, W. A.; Lynch, L. J.

    The time-domain NMR signals stimulated in solids by two-pulse sequences of the form 90°- τ- βφ, where β is the angle of rotation and φ the relative phase of the second pulse which is separated from the initial 90° pulse by a time τ, can be influenced by the presence of a second spin species and therefore, in principle, can yield information on the separate contributions, M2II and M2IS, of like- and unlike-spin interactions to the Van Vleck second moment M2I of the resonant spins. The validity of the standard operator formalism for predicting the transverse magnetization signals thus produced in homogeneous solids by the 90°- τ-90 φ° and 90°- τ-180 φ° ( φ = 0° and 90°) sequences is discussed and the effects of pulse duration are briefly outlined. The time-series expansions yielded by the operator formalism for these signals are reviewed with emphasis on the effects of unlike-spin interactions, and a useful difference signal is discussed. The potential for application of these two-pulse techniques to protons in heterogeneous solids such as coals, in which unpaired electrons constitute the second spin species, is considered and experimentally assessed. Semiquantitative estimates of M2IS are made for protons in diphenyl picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and several coals and chars at room temperature from measurements of the amplitude of the 90°- τ-90° 0 ° transient signal at small τ and of the initial rate of attenuation of the 90°- τ-90 90°° solid echo with increasing τ. It is found that (i) organic radicals and paramagnetic ions produce relatively small M2IS values, a result which limits the usefulness of this approach to studying unpaired electron properties of coals and chars; (ii) the M2II values deduced from these results and calculations of M2I follow expected trends; and (iii) only specimens containing small particles of magnetically ordered material give rise to rapidly decaying time-domain signals and a well-defined 90°- τ-180 90°° spin

  13. Proton and tritium NMR relaxation studies of peptide inhibitor binding to bacterial collagenase: Conformation and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dive, V.; Lai, A.; Valensin, G.; Saba, G.; Yiotakis, A.; Toma, F. )

    1991-02-15

    The interaction of succinyl-Pro-Ala, a competitive inhibitor of Achromobacter iophagus collagenase, with the enzyme was studied by longitudinal proton and tritium relaxation. Specific deuterium and tritium labeling of the succinyl part at vicinal positions allowed the measurement of the cross-relaxation rates of individual proton or tritium spin pairs in the inhibitor-enzyme complex as well as in the free inhibitor. Overall correlation times, internuclear distances, and qualitative information on the internal mobility in Suc1 (as provided by the generalized order parameter S2) could be deduced by the comparison of proton and tritium cross-relaxation of spin pairs at complementary positions in the -CH2- CH2- moiety as analyzed in terms of the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo. The conformational and motional parameters of the inhibitor in the free and enzyme-bound state were directly compared by this method. The measurement of proton cross-relaxation in the Ala residue provided additional information on the inhibitor binding. The determination of the order parameter in different parts of the inhibitor molecule in the bound state indicates that the succinyl and alanyl residues are primarily involved in the interaction with the enzyme activity site. The succinyl moiety, characterized in solution by the conformational equilibrium among the three staggered rotamers--i.e., trans: 50%; g+: 20%; g-: 30%--adopted in the bound state the unique trans conformation.

  14. Interactions of hydrogen with alkali promoted Ru/SiO{sub 2} catalysts: A proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbay, U.D.

    1994-05-10

    Role of H spillover to the silica support was studied using chemisorption; a strongly bound component of spilled over H was found in the silica support which interfered with accurate measurements of active metal sites via volumetric strong H chemisorption. The volumetric chemisorption technique was modified so that measurement times were reduced from 12--36 h to 1 h. The active Ru surface was characterized means of changes in proton spin counts and NMR Knight shifts vs alkali loading. Na, K blocked the active surface of Ru metal, but Cs was pushed off by H chemisorption. The alkali promoters restricted H mobility on both metal surface and at the metal support interfaces; this is consistent with effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. {sup 1}H NMR was used to study the effect of the active metal and promoter on support hydroxyl groups. The OH group density in the silica support decreased with metal and/or promoter loading, but not on a one-to-one basis; the exchange efficiency of the hydroxyls decreased with atomic size of the alkali metal. An additional downfield proton resonance was detected which was assigned to the alkali hydroxide species in the support.

  15. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Goff, H.M.

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin.

  16. Proton and nitrogen-15 NMR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen ion-dependent pseudo-halide ion binding to chloroperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lukat, G S; Goff, H M

    1986-12-15

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of several chloroperoxidase-inhibitor complexes have been investigated. Titrations of chloroperoxidase with azide, thiocyanate, cyanate, or nitrite ions indicate that only the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex exhibits slow ligand exchange on the 360-MHz NMR time scale. The temperature dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the complexes suggests that, although the complexes are predominantly low-spin ferric heme iron, a spin equilibrium is present presumably between S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 states. The pH dependence of the proton NMR spectra of the psuedo-halide-chloroperoxidase complexes was examined at 360 and 90 MHz. Chloroperoxidase complexes with azide and cyanate show similar behavior; 360-MHz proton spectra are readily observed at low pH (less than 5.0) but not at high pH. At high pH, the ligand exchange rate falls in an intermediate time range. When the complexes are examined at 90 MHz, however, spectra consisting of averaged signals are observed. The chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate complex does not form at high pH values; the proton NMR spectrum observed is that of native chloroperoxidase. The pKa for the chloroperoxidase-thiocyanate heme-linked ionizable amino acid residue falls between 4.2 and 5.0. Only an averaged azide signal was observed in the nitrogen-15 NMR spectra for solutions that contained the azide complex of chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and myoglobin. PMID:3023353

  17. 1H NMR study of proton motion in hydrogen-bonded chain in Mannich base of 5,5'-dibromo-3-diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, G.; Rozwadowski, Z.; Dziembowska, T.; Brzezinski, B.

    2001-01-01

    5,5'-dibromo-3-diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol was synthesized and the collective proton motion in two intramolecular hydrogen bonds was studied by 1H and 13C NMR as well as by FTIR spectroscopy in chloroform, acetonitrile and chloroform containing traces of water solutions. In dry chloroform, always, two separated proton signals for the two OH groups were observed. If traces of water were present at room temperature in the chloroform solution only one signal for the two OH protons was found. With decreasing temperature the collective proton motion, indicated by continuous absorption in the FTIR spectrum, was interrupted and two separate signals appeared in the 1H NMR spectrum. In acetonitrile the collective proton motion in the two intramolecular hydrogen-bonded system observed at room temperature vanished with decreasing temperature and finally only a cooperative hydrogen-bonded system, like in the solid state, was observed.

  18. Proton NMR study of spin dynamics in the magnetic organic chains M (hfac)3 NITEt (M =Eu3 +,Gd3 + )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Lascialfari, A.; Caneschi, A.; Ammannato, L.; Gatteschi, D.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Cucci, C.; Borsa, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the spin dynamics in the rare-earth-based low-dimensional molecular magnetic chains Eu (hfac) 3NITEt and Gd (hfac) 3NITEt (in short, Eu-Et and Gd-Et). Although both samples are based on the same chemical building block, [(hfac) 3NITEt ] , their magnetic properties change dramatically when the Eu3 + ion, which is nonmagnetic at low temperatures, is substituted by the magnetic Gd3 + ion. The present proton NMR investigation shows that, down to the lowest investigated temperature (T =1.5 K for Gd-Et and T =3 K for Eu-Et), the Eu-Et chain behaves as a one-dimensional Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling (J =-20 K) between s =1 /2 organic radicals, and has a T -independent exchange frequency (ωe=2.6 ×1012 rad/s). In the Gd-Et chain, in contrast, a competition arises between nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic coupling; moreover, two phase transitions have previously been found, in agreement with Villain's conjecture: a first transition, at T0=2.2 K, from a high temperature paramagnetic phase to a chiral spin liquid phase, and a second transition, at TN=1.9 K, to a three-dimensional helical spin solid phase. Contrary to the Eu-Et chain (whose three-dimensional ordering temperature is estimated to insurge at very low, TN≈0.3 K), critical spin dynamics effects have been measured in the Gd-Et chain on approaching TN=1.9 K: namely, a divergence of the proton nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 , which in turn produces a sudden wipe-out of the NMR signal in a very narrow (Δ T ˜0.04 K) temperature range above TN. Below TN, an inhomogeneous broadening of the NMR line indicates a complete spin freezing. At T0=2.2 K, instead, such critical effects are not observed because NMR measurements probe the two-spin correlation function, while the chiral spin liquid phase transition is associated with a divergence of the four

  19. Proton NMR spectral study of UV treated live Escherichia coli Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokopud, Michael

    The lethal effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms have been known and utilized for many years. In sufficiently high photon fluences, light and in particular, UV light, is an effective and subtle means of killing or at least immobilizing most, if not all cells and micro-organisms. Because of their small size, light can penetrate the enclosing protective walls and enter the inner volumes where it can break organic bonds in components that are vital to cell function. Despite the fact that a very low dose of UV light (1-9 mJ/cm2) has been shown to inactivate many micro-organisms, there remains a dearth of biological information about light induced effects in molecules and their interactions within living microbial systems. The use of 1H NMR as a spectroscopic tool was chosen to undertake an examination of the possible effects resulting from exposing E. coli to lethal fluencies of UV radiation. Once sample preparation, treatment, and NMR mounting methods were optimized, the high sensitivity and high resolution capabilities of the method produced reproducible results for a series of experiments. These results reveal significant changes in the ratio of the 1H NMR spectra of the treated to untreated E.coli samples when the treated sample was exposed to a lethal fluence of 275nm light. Photons at the 275nm wavelength, used in this study, have enough energy to break all of the principle bonds in an organic molecule. The difference spectrum between treated to untreated samples appears to be fitted well using specific component spectra from these groups of compounds. Increases in NMR peak amplitudes are observed and appear to be correlated with the spectral locations of several amino acids, membrane components and several sugars/saccharides. Increases in peak intensities of 4-8% were observed in the 0.8-1.1 ppm chemical shift region, characteristic of lipid and amino acid groups. A 3.5-4% increase was observed in the 2 ppm and 3.4-4 ppm region characteristic of

  20. Isotope-edited proton NMR study on the structure of a pepsin/inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Erickson, J.W.; Abad-Zapatero, C.

    1988-11-01

    A general approach is illustrated for providing detailed structural information on large enzyme/inhibitor complexes using NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the use of isotopically labeled ligands to simplify two-dimensional NOE spectra of large molecular complexes by isotope-editing techniques. With this approach, the backbone and side-chain conformations (at the P/sub 2/ and P/sub 3/ sites) of a tightly bound inhibitor of porcine pepsin have bene determined. In addition, structural information on the active site of pepsin has been obtained. Due to the sequence homology between porcine pepsin and human renin, this structural information may prove useful for modeling renin/inhibitor complexes with the ultimate goal of designing more effective renin inhibitors. Moreover, this general approach can be applied to study other biological systems of interest such as other enzyme/inhibitor complexes, ligands bound to soluble receptors, and enzyme/substrate interactions.

  1. Proton NMR study of a complex between the lac repressor headpiece and a 22 base pair symmetric lac operator

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerichs, R.M.J.N.; Boelens, R.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Kaptein, R.; Buck, F.; Fera, B.; Rueterjans, H. )

    1989-04-04

    A complex between the lac repressor headpiece and a fully symmetric tight-binding 22 bp lac operator was studied by 2D NMR. Several 2D NOE spectra were recorded for the complex in both H{sub 2}O and {sup 2}H{sub 2}O. Many NOE cross-peaks between the headpiece and DNA could be identified, and changes in the chemical shift of the DNA protons upon complex formation were analyzed. Comparison of these data with those obtained for a complex between the headpiece and a 14 bp half-operator, studied previously, shows that two headpieces form a specific complex with the 22 bp lac operator in which each headpiece binds in the same way as found for the 14 bp complex. The orientation of the recognition helix in the major groove of DNA in these complexes is opposite with respect to the dyad axis to that found for other repressors.

  2. Salt-dependent structure change and ion binding in cytochrome c studied by two-dimensional proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiqing; Englander, S.W. )

    1990-04-10

    To search for salt-dependent structure changes that might help to explain physicochemical differences observed in previous solution studies, two-dimensional proton NMR spectra of reduced and oxidized cytochrome c were recorded at relatively high and low salt concentrations. The results rule out substantial ionic strength dependent structure change in either redox form over the salt concentrations tested. Chemical shift changes were found for several residues within a limited segment of the oxidized protein, most prominently in the sequence Lys-86, Lys-87, Lys-88, Thr-89. A salt-dependent binding of phosphate anion(s) at this site, as observed earlier by others, is indicated. The binding of one or two phosphates at the cytochrome c surface can explain earlier small-angle X-ray scattering observations of an increase in the calculated radius of gyration of the oxidized protein at the same low-salt condition used here. The results obtained support the view that the absence of sizeable redox-dependent structure change observed in X-ray and NMR studies at varying salt conditions is characteristic of the protein at all salt conditions above the low millimolar range. Physicochemical differences between oxidized and reduced cytochrome c apparently represent differences in stability without patent structure change.

  3. NMR studies of protonation and hydrogen bond states of internal aldimines of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate acid-base in alanine racemase, aspartate aminotransferase, and poly-L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chan-Huot, Monique; Dos, Alexandra; Zander, Reinhard; Sharif, Shasad; Tolstoy, Peter M; Compton, Shara; Fogle, Emily; Toney, Michael D; Shenderovich, Ilya; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2013-12-01

    Using (15)N solid-state NMR, we have studied protonation and H-bonded states of the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) linked as an internal aldimine in alanine racemase (AlaR), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT), and poly-L-lysine. Protonation of the pyridine nitrogen of PLP and the coupled proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen (enolimine form) to the aldimine nitrogen (ketoenamine form) is often considered to be a prerequisite to the initial step (transimination) of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Indeed, using (15)N NMR and H-bond correlations in AspAT, we observe a strong aspartate-pyridine nitrogen H-bond with H located on nitrogen. After hydration, this hydrogen bond is maintained. By contrast, in the case of solid lyophilized AlaR, we find that the pyridine nitrogen is neither protonated nor hydrogen bonded to the proximal arginine side chain. However, hydration establishes a weak hydrogen bond to pyridine. To clarify how AlaR is activated, we performed (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR experiments on isotopically labeled PLP aldimines formed by lyophilization with poly-L-lysine. In the dry solid, only the enolimine tautomer is observed. However, a fast reversible proton transfer involving the ketoenamine tautomer is observed after treatment with either gaseous water or gaseous dry HCl. Hydrolysis requires the action of both water and HCl. The formation of an external aldimine with aspartic acid at pH 9 also produces the ketoenamine form stabilized by interaction with a second aspartic acid, probably via a H-bond to the phenolic oxygen. We postulate that O-protonation is an effectual mechanism for the activation of PLP, as is N-protonation, and that enzymes that are incapable of N-protonation employ this mechanism. PMID:24147985

  4. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  5. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  6. Complex dynamics of 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 studied by proton spin-lattice NMR relaxation and second moment of NMR line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Latanowicz, L.; Medycki, W.; Świergiel, J.; Natkaniec, I.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular dynamics of a solid 1.3.5-trimethylbenzene-2.4.6-D3 in phase I is studied on the basis of the proton T1 (24.7 MHz and 15 MHz) relaxation time measurements and the proton second moment of NMR line, M2. The measurements of the T1 were performed for temperatures from 20 to 167 K, while those of the second moment M2 from 23 to 220 K. The phase I was accurately prepared. The obtained second moment, M2 values were correlated with those based on T1 relaxation time measurements. The proton spin pairs of the methyl groups perform a complex motion being a resultant of two components characterized by the correlation times τ3T and τ3H, referring to the tunneling and over the barrier jumps in a triple potential. For τ3H the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for τ3T - the Schrödinger one. The jumps over the barrier causes a minimum in T1 (24.7 MHz) at temperature about 35 K. The high temperatures slope of this minimum permits evaluation of the activation energy as EH=2.0 kJ/mol. The relaxation time T1 is temperature independent in the lowest temperature regime. This indicates that tunnelling correlation time assumes a constant value of about 1.3·10-10 s according to the Schrödinger equation (τ3T ≈ τ03T e B√{EH } at lowest temperatures). The tunneling jumps of methyl protons reduce M2 from the rigid lattice value 22.6 G2 to the value 5.7 G2 at zero Kelvin temperature. The second reduction to the value 1.41 G2 at 4.5-7 K is due to C3 jumps over the barrier. According to the Schrödinger equation the tunnelling jumps ceases above Ttun temperature where the thermal energy is equal to the activation energy. The Ttun equals 43.8 K (from T1 data fit, EH=2.0 kJ/mol) or 35 K (from M2 data fit, EH=1.47 kJ/mol). The second moment assumes again the value 5.7 G2 above Ttun temperature. The tunneling splitting, ωT, was estimated equal 2.47 GHz as best fit parameter from the T1 fit. The symmetrical T1 minimum indicates the same value of ωT for the all

  7. Proton NMR studies of the electronic structure of ZrH/sub x/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attalla, A.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Craft, B. D.; Venturini, E. L.; Rhim, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The proton spin lattice relaxation times and Knight shifts were measured in f.c.c. (delta-phase) and f.c.t. (epsilon-phase) ZrH/sub x/ for 1.5 or = to x or = to 2.0. Both parameters indicate that N(E/sub F/) is very dependent upon hydrogen content with a maximum occurring at ZrH1 83. This behavior is ascribed to modifications in N(E/sub F/) through a fcc/fct distortion in ZrH/sub x/ associated with a Jahn-Teller effect.

  8. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  9. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  10. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  11. Proton NMR study of molecular dynamics in ammonium tribromo stannate (NH 4SnBr 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K. P.; Devaraj, N.; Ramakrishna, J.; Venu, K.; Sastry, V. S. S.

    1993-11-01

    The proton second moment M2 and spin-lattice relaxation time T1 have been measured in ammonium tribromo stannate (NH 4SnBr 3) in the temperature range 77-300 K, to determine the ammonium dynamics. The continuous wave signal is strong and narrow at 77 and 300 K but has revealed an interesting intensity anomaly between 210 and 125 K. T1 shows a maximum (13 s) around 220 K. No minimum in the T1 vs 1000/ T plot was observed down to 77 K. M2 and T1 results are interpreted in terms of NH +4 ion dynamics. The activation energy Ea for NH +4 ion reorientation is estimated to be 1.4 kcal mol -1.

  12. H1 NMR study of proton dynamics in Cs5H3(SO4)4•xH2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koh-Ichi; Hayashi, Shigenobu

    2006-10-01

    Complicated phase relations in Cs5H3(SO4)4•xH2O are revealed by thermal analyses. A superprotonic phase transition takes place at 420K for both the hydrated and the anhydrous forms. The H1 magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra were traced at room temperature and at Larmor frequency of 400.13MHz . The H1 chemical shifts of the acidic protons are 10.9 and 11.2ppm for the hydrated and the anhydrous forms, respectively. The hydrated sample shows a signal at 9.7ppm additionally, which is ascribed to H3O+ . Proton dynamics has been studied by H1 static NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times, T1 . In both a room-temperature phase (phase RT) and a high-temperature phase (phase HT), translational diffusion of protons takes place. The H1 mean residence times in phase RT are obtained from the second moment analysis; Ea=49kJmol-1 and τ0=1.8×10-11s for the anhydrous form and Ea=31kJmol-1 and τ0=2.2×10-9s for the hydrated form. From the analysis of H1 T1 results we have obtained parameters of proton diffusion for phase HT; Ea=34kJmol-1 and τ0=3×10-13s for the anhydrous form and Ea=36kJmol-1 and τ0=3×10-14s for the hydrated form. In both phases, protons diffuse faster in the hydrated form than in the anhydrous form. The proton conductivities estimated from the NMR results for the anhydrous form agree with the macroscopic values in literature.

  13. Proton NMR studies on the covalently linked RNA-DNA hybrid r(GCG)d(TATACGC). Assignment of proton resonances by application of the nuclear Overhauser effect.

    PubMed Central

    Mellema, J R; Haasnoot, C A; van der Marel, G A; Wille, G; van Boeckel, C A; van Boom, J H; Altona, C

    1983-01-01

    Proton NMR spectra of a covalently linked self-complementary RNA X DNA hybrid, r(GCG)-d(TATACGC), are recorded in H2O and D2O. Imino proton resonances as well as the non-exchangeable base and H-1' resonances are unambiguously assigned by means of nuclear. Overhauser effect measurements. Additional information was obtained by 31P NMR and circular dichroism spectra. The RNA parts in the duplex attain full conformational purity and adopt the usual A-RNA conformation. The DNA residues opposite the RNA tract do not adopt an A-type structure completely. Their respective sugar rings still appear to possess a certain conformational freedom. The same holds true for the central d(-TATA-) sequence which forms a DNA X DNA duplex. There appears to be a structural break in this part: the first two residues, T(4) and A(5), are clearly influenced by the adjacent RNA structure, whereas residues T(6) and A(7) behave quite similar to what usually is found in DNA duplexes in aqueous solution. PMID:6193486

  14. Experimental study of resolution of proton chemical shifts in solids: Combined multiple pulse NMR and magic-angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.; Taylor, R.E.; Paff, A.J.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of protons in rigid, randomly oriented solids have been measured using combined homonuclear dipolar decoupling (via multiple pulse techniques) and attenuation of chemical shift anisotropies (via magic-angle sample spinning). Under those conditions, isotropic proton chemical shifts were recorded for a variety of chemical species, with individual linewidths varying from about 55 to 110 Hz (1--2 ppm). Residual line broadening was due predominately to (i) magnetic-field instability and inhomogeneity, (ii) unresolved proton--proton spin couplings, (iii) chemical shift dispersion, (iv) residual dipolar broadening, and (v) lifetime broadening under the multiple pulse sequences used. The magnitudes of those effects and the current limits of resolution for this experiment in our spectrometer have been investigated. The compounds studied included organic solids (4, 4'-dimethylbenzophenone, 2, 6-dimethylbenzoic acid, and aspirin), polymers (polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate), and the vitrain portion of a bituminous coal.

  15. Transport Properties of Ibuprofen Encapsulated in Cyclodextrin Nanosponge Hydrogels: A Proton HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Monica; Castiglione, Franca; Punta, Carlo; Melone, Lucio; Panzeri, Walter; Rossi, Barbara; Trotta, Francesco; Mele, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The chemical cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTA) led to branched polymers referred to as cyclodextrin nanosponges (CDNSEDTA). Two different preparations are described with 1:4 and 1:8 CD-EDTA molar ratios. The corresponding cross-linked polymers were contacted with 0.27 M aqueous solution of ibuprofen sodium salt (IP) leading to homogeneous, colorless, drug loaded hydrogels. The systems were characterized by high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy. Pulsed field gradient spin echo (PGSE) NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the mean square displacement (MSD) of IP inside the polymeric gel at different observation times td. The data were further processed in order to study the time dependence of MSD: MSD = f(td). The proposed methodology is useful to characterize the different diffusion regimes that, in principle, the solute may experience inside the hydrogel, namely normal or anomalous diffusion. The full protocols including the polymer preparation and purification, the obtainment of drug-loaded hydrogels, the NMR sample preparation, the measurement of MSD by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy and the final data processing to achieve the time dependence of MSD are here reported and discussed. The presented experiments represent a paradigmatic case and the data are discussed in terms of innovative approach to the characterization of the transport properties of an encapsulated guest within a polymeric host of potential application for drug delivery. PMID:27585291

  16. α-Substituted Bis(octabutoxyphthalocyaninato)Terbium(III) Double-Decker Complexes: Preparation and Study of Protonation by NMR and DFT.

    PubMed

    Damjanović, Marko; Horie, Yusuke; Morita, Takaumi; Horii, Yoji; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Enders, Markus

    2015-12-21

    Synthesis of the anionic, α-substituted, bis(phthalocyaninato)Tb(III) complex [Tb(α-obPc)2](-) ([1](-)) (obPc = α-octabutoxyphthalocyaninato) leads to the isolation of its protonated form [1H](0). This complex was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), mass spectroscopy (MS), infrared (IR) and ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy. Crystal structure analysis did not allow localization of the additional proton, which is probably attached to the meso-N atom or isoindole-N atom of the phthalocyaninato ligand. [1H](0) can easily be deprotonated or protonated, giving the corresponding anionic and cationic complexes. The three compounds [1H](0), [1](-), and [1HH](+) were studied by a combination of paramagnetic NMR experiments ((1)H, (13)C, variable-temperature measurements, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and DFT calculations (done on Y(III) analogues with octamethoxyphthalocyaninato ligands), for the purpose of elucidating the positions of the acidic protons and for understanding the structural changes of the coordination environment of the Tb ion induced by protonation. PMID:26650727

  17. Proton-Detected 2D Radio Frequency Driven Recoupling Solid-state NMR Studies on Micelle-associated Cytochrome-b5

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles. PMID:24657390

  18. Proton-detected 2D radio frequency driven recoupling solid-state NMR studies on micelle-associated cytochrome-b5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Manoj Kumar; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Im, Sangchoul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-05-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is increasingly used in the high-resolution structural studies of membrane-associated proteins and peptides. Most such studies necessitate isotopically labeled (13C, 15N and 2H) proteins/peptides, which is a limiting factor for some of the exciting membrane-bound proteins and aggregating peptides. In this study, we report the use of a proton-based slow magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiment that exploits the unaveraged 1H-1H dipolar couplings from a membrane-bound protein. We have shown that the difference in the buildup rates of cross-peak intensities against the mixing time - obtained from 2D 1H-1H radio frequency-driven recoupling (RFDR) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments on a 16.7-kDa micelle-associated full-length rabbit cytochrome-b5 (cytb5) - can provide insights into protein dynamics and could be useful to measure 1H-1H dipolar couplings. The experimental buildup curves compare well with theoretical simulations and are used to extract relaxation parameters. Our results show that due to fast exchange of amide protons with water in the soluble heme-containing domain of cyb5, coherent 1H-1H dipolar interactions are averaged out for these protons while alpha and side chain protons show residual dipolar couplings that can be obtained from 1H-1H RFDR experiments. The appearance of resonances with distinct chemical shift values in 1H-1H RFDR spectra enabled the identification of residues (mostly from the transmembrane region) of cytb5 that interact with micelles.

  19. Lactonization and protonation of gluconic acid: a thermodynamicand kinetic study by potentiometry, nmr and esi-ms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Gibson, P.; Clark, S.B.; Tian, G.; Zanonato, P.; Rao, L.

    2007-01-10

    In acidic aqueous solutions, gluconate protonation is coupled with lactonization of gluconic acid. With the decrease of pC{sub H}, two lactones ({delta}/{gamma}) are sequentially formed. The {delta}-lactone forms more readily than the {gamma}-lactone. In 0.1 M gluconate solutions, if pC{sub H} is above 2.5, only the {delta}-lactone is generated. When pC{sub H} is decreased below 2.0, the formation of the {gamma}-lactone is observable although the {delta}-lactone predominates. At I = 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and room temperature, the deprotonation constant of the carboxylic group, using the NMR technique, was determined to be log K{sub a} = 3.30 {+-} 0.02; the {delta}-lactonization constant, by the batch potentiometric titrations, was obtained to be log K{sub L} = - (0.54 {+-} 0.04). Using ESI-MS, the rate constants of the {delta}-lactonization and the hydrolysis at pC{sub H} {approx} 5.0 were estimated to be k{sub 1} = 3.2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and k{sup -1} = 1.1 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, respectively.

  20. Complete thermodynamic characterization of the multiple protonation equilibria of the aminoglycoside antibiotic paromomycin: a calorimetric and natural abundance 15N NMR study.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Christopher M; Pilch, Daniel S

    2006-02-15

    The binding of aminoglycoside antibiotics to a broad range of macromolecular targets is coupled to protonation of one or more of the amino groups that typify this class of drugs. Determining how and to what extent this linkage influences the energetics of the aminoglycoside-macromolecule binding reaction requires a detailed understanding of the thermodynamics associated with the protonation equilibria of the aminoglycoside amino groups. In recognition of this need, a calorimetric- and NMR-based approach for obtaining the requisite thermodynamic information is presented using paromomycin as the model aminoglycoside. Temperature- and pH-dependent 15N NMR studies provide pK(a) values for the five paromomycin amino groups, as well as the temperature dependence of these pK(a) values. These studies also indicate that the observed pK(a) values associated with the free base form of paromomycin are lower in magnitude than the corresponding values associated with the sulfate salt form of the drug. This difference in pK(a) is due to drug interactions with the sulfate counterions at the high drug concentrations (> or = 812 mM) used in the 15N NMR studies. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies conducted at drug concentrations < or = 45 microM reveal that the extent of paromomycin protonation linked to the binding of the drug to its pharmacologically relevant target, the 16 S rRNA A-site, is consistent with the pK(a) values of the free base and not the sulfate salt form of the drug. Temperature- and pH-dependent isothermal titration calorimetry studies yield exothermic enthalpy changes (deltaH) for protonation of the five paromomycin amino groups, as well as positive heat capacity changes (deltaC(p)) for three of the five amino groups. Regarded as a whole, the results presented here represent an important first step toward establishing a thermodynamic database that can be used to predict how aminoglycoside-macromolecule binding energetics will be influenced by conditions such

  1. Proton conductors by the NMR method with modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, L.N.; Sosikov, A.I.; Shteinberg, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    The NMR spectra and NMR relaxation in hydrates of phosphoro tungstic acid (PTA) and its salt were investigated. There was a narrow central line in both spectra, and the linewidth, measured in the temperature interval 130-290 K, was 4kHz. A previously proposed modulation technique by L. N. Erofeev, A.I. Sosikow, and A. K. Khitrin, was used to clarify the nature of the observed spectra. It was confirmed that model samples (gypsum, adamantane, rubber) make it possible to use the modulation technique to study the structure of proton systems. Decay curves for the magnetization in samples of PTA and Na-PTA are presented as obtained under multi-pulse spin locking conditions with and without modulation.

  2. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  3. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    PubMed Central

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John-Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2015-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) uses a Zn-bound OH−/H2O mechanism to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2. This catalysis also involves a separate proton transfer step, mediated by an ordered solvent network coordinated by hydrophilic residues. One of these residues, Tyr7, was previously shown to be deprotonated in the neutron crystal structure at pH 10. This observation indicated that Tyr7 has a perturbed pKa compared with free tyrosine. To further probe the pKa of this residue, NMR spectroscopic measurements of [13C]Tyr-labeled holo HCA II (with active-site Zn present) were preformed to titrate all Tyr residues between pH 5.4–11.0. In addition, neutron studies of apo HCA II (with Zn removed from the active site) at pH 7.5 and holo HCA II at pH 6 were conducted. This detailed interrogation of tyrosines in HCA II by NMR and neutron crystallography revealed a significantly lowered pKa of Tyr7 and how pH and Tyr proximity to Zn affect hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:25902526

  4. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J; Bacik, John-Paul; Schrader, Tobias E; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoë

    2015-05-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) uses a Zn-bound OH(-)/H2O mechanism to catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2. This catalysis also involves a separate proton transfer step, mediated by an ordered solvent network coordinated by hydrophilic residues. One of these residues, Tyr7, was previously shown to be deprotonated in the neutron crystal structure at pH 10. This observation indicated that Tyr7 has a perturbed pKa compared with free tyrosine. To further probe the pKa of this residue, NMR spectroscopic measurements of [(13)C]Tyr-labeled holo HCA II (with active-site Zn present) were preformed to titrate all Tyr residues between pH 5.4-11.0. In addition, neutron studies of apo HCA II (with Zn removed from the active site) at pH 7.5 and holo HCA II at pH 6 were conducted. This detailed interrogation of tyrosines in HCA II by NMR and neutron crystallography revealed a significantly lowered pKa of Tyr7 and how pH and Tyr proximity to Zn affect hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:25902526

  5. Effect of solvent on proton location and dynamic behavior in short intramolecular hydrogen bonds studied by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yukie; Masuda, Yuichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen phthalate anion has a short strong O-H-O hydrogen bond (H-bond). According to previous experimental studies, the H-bond is asymmetric and two tautomers are interconverted in aqueous solutions. In the present study, the effects of polar solvents on the H-bond in a zwitterionic hydrogen phthalate derivative 1 were investigated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analyses of the trajectories for the methanol solution showed that the H-bonding proton tends to be located closer to the carboxylate group that forms fewer intermolecular H-bonds, than to the other carboxylate group and that the intramolecular proton transfer in 1 is triggered by the breakage and/or formation of an intermolecular H-bond. The enol form of dibenzoylmethane (2) also has a short H-bond, and the OH bond is reported to be rather long (>1.1 Å) in the crystal. In the present study, the effects of the solvent on the H-bond in 2 were investigated by molecular orbital (MO) calculations, MD simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for 2 in vacuum indicated that the barrier height for the intramolecular proton transfer is almost the same as the zero-point energy of the vibrational ground state, resulting in broad distribution of the proton density along the H-bond, owing to the nuclear quantum effect. The OH distances were determined in CCl4, acetonitrile, and dimethylsulfoxide solutions from the magnetic dipolar interactions between the 17O and 1H nuclei monitoring the nuclear magnetic relaxation times of 1H. The experimental results indicated that the H-bond geometry of 2 is influenced by the interactions with dimethylsulfoxide, suggesting the formation of a bifurcated H-bond, which was supported by the DFT calculations. The MD simulations for the methanol solution of 2 showed that the asymmetry of the OH distance is correlated with the asymmetry in the electrostatic field of the

  6. 1H NMR studies of maltose, maltoheptaose, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, and complexes in aqueous solutions with hydroxy protons as structural probes.

    PubMed

    Bekiroglu, Somer; Kenne, Lennart; Sandström, Corine

    2003-03-01

    The (1)H NMR chemical shifts, coupling constants, temperature coefficients, and exchange rates have been measured for the hydroxy protons of aqueous solutions of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins, maltose, and maltoheptaose. In cyclodextrins (CDs), the high chemical shift of the O(3)H signal and its small (3)J(OH,CH) value suggest that O(3)H is involved in a hydrogen bond. The small temperature coefficients and rate of exchange values of O(2)H and O(3)H confirm the involvement of O(3)H in hydrogen bonding and indicate that O(2)H is the hydrogen bond partner. In maltose, two distinct NMR signals with two different vicinal coupling constants are found for O(2')H. A cross-peak in the ROESY spectrum indicates chemical exchange between the O(2')H and O(3)H protons. The existence of two distinct NMR signals with different J values for O(2')H shows the influence of anomeric configuration on the O(2')H-O(3)H interaction. The effect of complexation with methyl benzoate, adamantane-1-carboxylic acid, adamantane-1-ol, and l- and d-tryptophane on the NMR spectra of the hydroxy protons of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins and of maltose has been investigated. No significant spectral changes were observed upon addition of methyl benzoate and adamantane-1-carboxylic acid. The addition of adamantane-1-ol resulted in an upfield shift and a strong broadening of the O(2)H signal from alpha-CD, and a small temperature coefficient was measured upon complexation. The O(2)H and O(3)H signals in beta-CD were broadened and shifted downfield upon addition of l- and d-tryptophane. PMID:12608778

  7. 224} studied by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Y; Fang, X; Kögerler, P

    2014-05-14

    7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies have been performed to investigate magnetic properties and spin dynamics of Mn3+ (S = 2) spins in the giant polyoxometalate molecule {Mn40W224}. The 7Li-NMR line width is proportional to the external magnetic field H as expected in a paramagnetic state above 3 K. Below this temperature the line width shows a sudden increase and is almost independent of H, which indicates freezing of the local Mn3+ spins. The temperature dependence of T1 for both 1H and 7Li reveals slow spin dynamics at low temperatures, consistent with spin freezing. The slow spin dynamics is also evidenced by the observation of a peak of 1/T2 around 3 K, where the fluctuation frequency of spins is of the order of ~200 kHz. An explicit form of the temperature dependence of the fluctuation frequency of Mn3+ spins is derived from the nuclear relaxation data.

  8. A 300 MHz and 600 MHz proton NMR study of a 12 base pair restriction fragment: investigation of structure by relaxation measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T A; Kearns, D R; Hillen, W; Wells, R D

    1980-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of a 12 base pair DNA restriction fragment has been measured at 300 and 600 MHz and resonances from over 70 protons are individually resolved. Relaxation rate measurements have been carried out at 300 MHz and compared with the theoretical predictions obtained using an isotropic rigid rotor model with coordinates derived from a Dreiding model of DNA. The model gives results that are in excellent agreement with experiment for most protons when a 7 nsec rotational correlation time is used, although agreement is improved for certain base protons by using a shorter correlation time for the sugar group, or by increasing the sugar-base interproton distances. A comparison of non-selective and selective spin-lattice relaxation rates for carbon bound protons indicates that there is extensive spin diffusion even in this short DNA fragment. Examination of the spin-spin relaxation rates for the same type of proton on different base pairs reveals little sequence effect on conformation. PMID:6258152

  9. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid–liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid–liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  10. Operando NMR spectroscopic analysis of proton transfer in heterogeneous photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Lu; Liu, Wenqing; Yu, Yan-Yan; Song, Yanhong; Fang, Wen Qi; Wei, Daxiu; Gong, Xue-Qing; Yao, Ye-Feng; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-01-01

    Proton transfer (PT) processes in solid-liquid phases play central roles throughout chemistry, biology and materials science. Identification of PT routes deep into the realistic catalytic process is experimentally challenging, thus leaving a gap in our understanding. Here we demonstrate an approach using operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that allows to quantitatively describe the complex species dynamics of generated H2/HD gases and liquid intermediates in pmol resolution during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this system, the effective protons for HER are mainly from H2O, and CH3OH evidently serves as an outstanding sacrificial agent reacting with holes, further supported by our density functional theory calculations. This results rule out controversy about the complicated proton sources for HER. The operando NMR method provides a direct molecular-level insight with the methodology offering exciting possibilities for the quantitative studies of mechanisms of proton-involved catalytic reactions in solid-liquid phases. PMID:27311326

  11. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  12. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    SciTech Connect

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  13. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  14. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface.

  15. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  16. Development and application of proton NMR methodology to lipoprotein analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Ari Juhani

    1998-11-01

    The present thesis describes the development of 1H NMR spectroscopy and its applications to lipoprotein analysis in vitro, utilizing biochemical prior knowledge and advanced lineshape fitting analysis in the frequency domain. A method for absolute quantification of lipoprotein lipids and proteins directly from the terminal methyl-CH3 resonance region of 1H NMR spectra of human blood plasma is described. Then the use of NMR methodology in time course studies of the oxidation process of LDL particles is presented. The function of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in lipoprotein mixtures was also assessed by 1H NMR, which allows for dynamic follow-up of the lipid transfer reactions between VLDL, LDL, and HDL particles. The results corroborated the suggestion that neutral lipid mass transfer among lipoproteins is not an equimolar heteroexchange. A novel method for studying lipoprotein particle fusion is also demonstrated. It is shown that the progression of proteolytically (α- chymotrypsin) induced fusion of LDL particles can be followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy and, moreover, that fusion can be distinguished from aggregation. In addition, NMR methodology was used to study the changes in HDL3 particles induced by phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in HDL3 + PLTP mixtures. The 1H NMR study revealed a gradual production of enlarged HDL particles, which demonstrated that PLTP-mediated remodeling of HDL involves fusion of the HDL particles. These applications demonstrated that the 1H NMR approach offers several advantages both in quantification and in time course studies of lipoprotein-lipoprotein interactions and of enzyme/lipid transfer protein function.

  17. Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectroscopy of Intra-Vesicular Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luke Y.-J.; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under 1H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall. PMID:24109882

  18. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  19. NMR methodologies for studying mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Jarak, Ivana; Carvalho, Rui A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique with an increasing importance in the study of metabolic diseases. Its initial important role in the determination of chemical structures (1, 2) has been considerably overcome by its potential for the in vivo study of metabolism (3-5). The main characteristic that makes this technique so attractive is its noninvasiveness. Only nuclei capable of transitioning between energy states, in the presence of an intense and constant magnetic field, are studied. This includes abundant nuclei such as proton ((1)H) and phosphorous ((31)P), as well as stable isotopes such as deuterium ((2)H) and carbon 13 ((13)C). This allows a wide range of applications that vary from the determination of water distribution in tissues (as obtained in a magnetic resonance imaging scan) to the calculation of metabolic fluxes under ex vivo and in vivo conditions without the need to use radioactive tracers or tissue biopsies (as in a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) scan). In this chapter, some technical aspects of the methodology of an NMR/MRS experiment as well as how it can be used to study mitochondrial bioenergetics are overviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo MRS versus high-resolution NMR using proton high rotation magic angle spinning (HRMAS) of tissue biopsies and tissue extracts are also discussed. PMID:22057574

  20. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-01

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. PMID:25621992

  1. Line Narrowing in Solid-State Proton NMR with Acquisition Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, B. M.; Tong, Tat-Hung; Dollase, Thilo; Magnuson, Matthew L.

    Organic solids have extensive proton-proton dipolar interactions, and their 1H NMR linewidths are very large even with magic-angle spinning at moderate speeds. Recently it has been shown that substantial narrowing of the proton linewidths of organic solids can be achieved by using single-pulse excitation with acquisition delay or spin echo [S. Ding and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson. A111, 212 (1994); 115, 141 (1995); 117, 171 (1995)]. This interesting line-narrowing phenomenon has been further examined through the study of several amino acids, their deuterated analogs, and some aromatic compounds. The results confirm that narrow proton peaks are observed with long acquisition delay, and the peaks appear in the appropriate chemical-shift ranges for organic protons (0-10 ppm with respect to tetramethylsilane). However, except for some special cases, the observed peaks cannot be assigned to individual types of protons based on chemical-shift considerations only. To explore the reason for the line narrowing, the effect of acquisition delay on the 19F linewidth of CaF 2was also studied and compared with that on the 1H linewidths of organic solids. It is suggested that the broad proton peak in an organic solid is a superposition of numerous transitions. These transitions have different linewidths, and the narrow peaks in the spectrum remain observable with long acquisition delays.

  2. Residual methyl protonation in perdeuterated proteins for multi-dimensional correlation experiments in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Vipin; Reif, Bernd

    2008-09-01

    NMR studies involving perdeuterated proteins focus in general on exchangeable amide protons. However, non-exchangeable sites contain as well a small amount of protons as the employed precursors for protein biosynthesis are not completely proton depleted. The degree of methyl group protonation is in the order of 9% for CD 2H using >97% deuterium enriched glucose. We show in this manuscript that this small amount of residual protonation is sufficient to perform 2D and 3D MAS solid-state NMR experiments. In particular, we suggest a HCCH-TOBSY type experiment which we successfully employ to assign the methyl resonances in aliphatic side chains in a perdeuterated sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin.

  3. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance)

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Bellon, V. , 34 - Montpellier )

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  5. Structure of fully protonated proteins by proton-detected magic-angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Stanek, Jan; Lalli, Daniela; Bertarello, Andrea; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Knott, Benno; Wegner, Sebastian; Engelke, Frank; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Tars, Kaspars; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2016-08-16

    Protein structure determination by proton-detected magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR has focused on highly deuterated samples, in which only a small number of protons are introduced and observation of signals from side chains is extremely limited. Here, we show in two fully protonated proteins that, at 100-kHz MAS and above, spectral resolution is high enough to detect resolved correlations from amide and side-chain protons of all residue types, and to reliably measure a dense network of (1)H-(1)H proximities that define a protein structure. The high data quality allowed the correct identification of internuclear distance restraints encoded in 3D spectra with automated data analysis, resulting in accurate, unbiased, and fast structure determination. Additionally, we find that narrower proton resonance lines, longer coherence lifetimes, and improved magnetization transfer offset the reduced sample size at 100-kHz spinning and above. Less than 2 weeks of experiment time and a single 0.5-mg sample was sufficient for the acquisition of all data necessary for backbone and side-chain resonance assignment and unsupervised structure determination. We expect the technique to pave the way for atomic-resolution structure analysis applicable to a wide range of proteins. PMID:27489348

  6. Reversible proton transfer phenomenon in the 2,4-dichlorophenol-triethylamine hydrogen-bonded complex studied by low-temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilczyszyn, Marek; Ratajczak, Henryk; Ladd, John A.

    1988-12-01

    Low-temperature 1H NMR studies of the bridging OHN signal in the hydrogen-bonded complex formed between 2,4-dichlorophenol and triethylamine in C 2H 5Cl solution have demonstrated for the first time that separate signals for the molecular and ion-pair forms of this type of system can be observed. The temperature dependence of these signals leads to thermodynamic and kinetic quantities which suggest that the potential energy profile of the hydrogen bond is roughly symmetric with a double minimum.

  7. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Guido F; Niemitz, Matthias; Bisson, Jonathan; Lodewyk, Michael W; Soldi, Cristian; Shaw, Jared T; Tantillo, Dean J; Saya, Jordy M; Vos, Klaas; Kleinnijenhuis, Roel A; Hiemstra, Henk; Chen, Shao-Nong; McAlpine, James B; Lankin, David C; Friesen, J Brent

    2016-02-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of "structural correctness" depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D (1)H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D (1)H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by (1)H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D (1)H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  8. Toward Structural Correctness: Aquatolide and the Importance of 1D Proton NMR FID Archiving

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The revision of the structure of the sesquiterpene aquatolide from a bicyclo[2.2.0]hexane to a bicyclo[2.1.1]hexane structure using compelling NMR data, X-ray crystallography, and the recent confirmation via full synthesis exemplify that the achievement of “structural correctness” depends on the completeness of the experimental evidence. Archived FIDs and newly acquired aquatolide spectra demonstrate that archiving and rigorous interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data may enhance the reproducibility of (bio)chemical research and curb the growing trend of structural misassignments. Despite being the most accessible NMR experiment, 1D 1H spectra encode a wealth of information about bonds and molecular geometry that may be fully mined by 1H iterative full spin analysis (HiFSA). Fully characterized 1D 1H spectra are unideterminant for a given structure. The corresponding FIDs may be readily submitted with publications and collected in databases. Proton NMR spectra are indispensable for structural characterization even in conjunction with 2D data. Quantum interaction and linkage tables (QuILTs) are introduced for a more intuitive visualization of 1D J-coupling relationships, NOESY correlations, and heteronuclear experiments. Overall, this study represents a significant contribution to best practices in NMR-based structural analysis and dereplication. PMID:26812443

  9. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  10. Water Proton NMR for In Situ Detection of Insulin Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Taraban, Marc B; Truong, Huy C; Feng, Yue; Jouravleva, Elena V; Anisimov, Mikhail A; Yu, Yihua Bruce

    2015-12-01

    The need for quality control during the manufacturing and distribution of biopharmaceuticals is becoming increasingly necessary. At present, detecting drug degradation through the monitoring of active factor aggregation is accomplished through "invasive" techniques, such as size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), and so on. Unfortunately, these analytical methods require sampling the drug by opening the drug container that renders the remaining drug unusable regardless of the outcome of the test. Visual inspection, the current non-invasive quality control method is qualitative and can only detect visible particulates. Thus, it will miss sub-visible protein aggregates. In this paper, human insulin preparations were used to demonstrate that the transverse relaxation rate of water protons R2 ((1) H2 O) can serve as a sensitive and reliable indicator to detect and quantify both visible and sub-visible protein aggregates. R2 ((1) H2 O) is measured using a wide-bore low-field bench-top NMR instrument with permanent magnets. Such analysis could be carried out without opening the drug container, thus saving a drug for further use. The results suggest a novel, economical, non-destructive in situ analytical technique that allows for on-the-site quantification of protein aggregation in biopharmaceutical products. PMID:26344698

  11. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  12. Proton NMR: a convenient method for determining 2-monoacylglycerol acyl migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acyl migration kinetics of neat (not exposed to solvent) 2-monoacylglycerol (2-MAG) to form 1-monoacylglycerol (1-MAG) was determined using proton NMR spectroscopy to monitor the B-proton integration ratios of the two species over time. 2-MAG was synthesized by the Novozym 435-catalyzed alcohol...

  13. NMR studies of the conformation and motion of tetrahydrofuran in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, D. F.

    1991-11-01

    The behavior of tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules intercalated in graphite layers in compounds Cs(THF){sub 1.3}C{sub 24} and K(THF){sub 2.5}C{sub 24} was studied by proton NMR. The graphite layers in these compounds impose a uniform ordering on the THF molecules, giving rise to sharp NMR spectra. Experimental and simulated proton NMR spectra were used to investigate geometry, orientation and conformation of intercalated THF, and to determine whether pseudorotation, a large amplitude low-frequency vibration observed in gaseous THF, can also occur in the constrained environment provided by the graphite intercalation compounds. Deuterium and multiple quantum proton NMR spectra were also simulated in order to determine if these techniques could further refine the proton NMR results.

  14. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  15. Proton NMR Spectra: Deceptively Simple and Deceptively Complex Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurst, J. E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes relatively simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that demonstrate unexpected results of the deceptively simple and deceptively complex types. Background information, experimental procedures, and typical results obtained are included. (JN)

  16. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  17. Structural studies by proton-NMR spectroscopy of plant horseradish peroxidase C, the wild-type recombinant protein from Escherichia coli and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys.

    PubMed

    Veitch, N C; Williams, R J; Bray, R C; Burke, J F; Sanders, S A; Thorneley, R N; Smith, A T

    1992-07-15

    Wild-type recombinant horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C and two protein variants, Phe41----Val and Arg38----Lys, have been characterised using both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Proton NMR spectra recorded in both resting and cyanide-ligated states of the proteins were compared with those of the corresponding plant peroxidase. The latter contains 18% carbohydrate in eight N-linked oligosaccharide side chains whereas the recombinant proteins are expressed in nonglycosylated form. The spectra of the plant enzyme and refolded recombinant protein are essentially identical with the exception of carbohydrate-linked resonances in the former, indicating that their solution structures are highly similar. This comparison also identifies classes of carbohydrate resonances in the plant enzyme which provides new information on the local environment and mobility of the oligosaccharide side chains. Comparison of the spectra of the cyanide-ligated states of the two variants and those of plant horseradish peroxidase C indicated that there were significant differences with respect to haem and haem-linked resonances. These could not be rationalised simply on the basis of the local perturbation expected from a single-site substitution. The two substitutions made to residues on the distal side of the haem apparently influenced the degree of imidazolate character of the proximal His170 imidazole ring thus perturbing the magnetic environment of the haem group. Inspection of the spectra of the Phe41----Val variant also showed that the resonances of a phenylalanine residue in the haem pocket had been incorrectly assigned to Phe41 in a previous study. A new assignment, based on additional information from two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy, was made to Phe152. The assignments made for the Phe41----Val variant were also used as a basis to investigate the structure of the complex formed with the aromatic donor molecule, benzhydroxamic acid. PMID:1633807

  18. Surface NMR measurement of proton relaxation times in medium to coarse-grained sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Shushakov, O A

    1996-01-01

    A surface NMR investigation of groundwater in the geomagnetic field is under study. To detect the surface NMR a wire loop with a diameter of about 100 m, being an antenna for both an exciting field source and the NMR signal receiver, is laid out on the ground. A sinusoidal current pulse with a rectangular envelope is passed through the loop to excite the NMR signal. The carrier frequency of the oscillating current in this pulse is equal to the Larmor frequency of protons in the Earth's magnetic field. The current amplitude is changed up to 200 amps and the pulse duration is fixed and is equal to 40 ms. The exciting pulse is followed by an induction emf signal caused by the Larmor nuclear precession in geomagnetic field. The relaxation times T1, T2, and T2* were measured by the surface NMR for both groundwater in medium to coarse-grained sand at borehole and for bulk water under the ice surface of frozen lake. To determine T1, a longitudinal interference in experiments with repeated pulses was measured. A sequence with equal period between equal excitation pulses was used. The relaxation times T1, T2, measured for bulk water under the ice of the Ob reservoir were 1.0 s and 0.7 s, respectively. To estimate an influence of dissolved oxygen T1 of the same water at the same temperature was measured by lab NMR with and without pumping of oxygen. The relaxation time T1 measured for water in the medium to coarse-grained sand is 0.65 s. The relaxation time T2 estimated by spin echo sequence is found to be equal to 0.15 s. The relaxation time T2* is found to be about 80 ms. This result contradicts published earlier phenomenological correlation between relaxation time T2* and grain size of water-bearing rock. This could be as a result of unsound approach based on grain size or influence of paramagnetic impurities. PMID:8970122

  19. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2016-07-01

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  20. Influence of the incorporation of fibers in biscuit dough on proton mobility characterized by time domain NMR.

    PubMed

    Serial, M R; Blanco Canalis, M S; Carpinella, M; Valentinuzzi, M C; León, A E; Ribotta, P D; Acosta, R H

    2016-02-01

    The effect of fiber addition on the distribution and mobility of protons in biscuits is studied by using low resolution time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR). The proportion of flour is reduced in order to incorporate inulin and oat fiber. NMR temperature dependent experiments are carried out in order to gain insight on the processes occurring in biscuit baking. Proton populations were identified measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T2). The major change in the relaxation profiles upon incorporation of fibers corresponds to mobile water molecules, which appear to be related to dough spreading behavior and biscuit quality. Biscuit samples baked in a commercial oven were studied by two dimensional spin-lattice/spin-spin (T1-T2) relaxation maps. The T1/T2 ratio is used as an indicator of the population mobility, where changes in the mobility of water in contact with flour components as starch, proteins and pentosans are observed. PMID:26304434

  1. Deuteron and proton NMR study of D2, p-dichlorobenzene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene in bimesogenic liquid crystals with two nematic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, E. E.; Ahmed, Z.; Welch, C.; Mehl, G. H.; Dong, R. Y.

    2016-08-01

    The solutes dideuterium, 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene and p-dichlorobenzene (pdcb) are co-dissolved in a 61/39 wt% mixture of CBC9CB/5CB, a bimesogenic liquid crystal with two nematic phases. NMR spectra are collected for each solute. The local electric field gradient (FZZ) is obtained from the dideuterium spectrum. A double Maier-Saupe potential (MSMS) is used to rationalize the order parameters of pdcb. The liquid-crystal fields G1 and G2 are taken to be due to size and shape interactions and interactions between the solute molecular quadrupole and the mean FZZ of the medium. The FZZ 's obtained from D2 and G2 (from pdcb) are compared and discussed.

  2. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  3. Rapid amide proton exchange rates in peptides and proteins measured by solvent quenching and two-dimensional NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Paterson, Y.; Roder, H.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to develop a more versatile quenched hydrogen exchange method for studies of peptide conformation and protein-ligand interactions, the mechanism of amide proton exchange for model peptides in DMSO-D2O mixtures was investigated by NMR methods. As in water, H-D exchange rates in the presence of 90% or 95% DMSO exhibit characteristic acid- and base-catalyzed processes and negligible water catalysis. However, the base-catalyzed rate is suppressed by as much as four orders of magnitude in 95% DMSO. As a result, the pH at which the exchange rate goes through a minimum is shifted up by about two pH units and the minimum exchange rate is approximately 100-fold reduced relative to that in D2O. The solvent-dependent decrease in base-catalyzed exchange rates can be attributed primarily to a large increase in pKa values for the NH group, whereas solvent effects on pKW seem less important. Addition of toluene and cyclohexane resulted in improved proton NMR chemical shift dispersion. The dramatic reduction in exchange rates observed in the solvent mixture at optimal pH makes it possible to apply 2D NMR for NH exchange measurements on peptides under conditions where rates are too rapid for direct NMR analysis. To test this solvent-quenching method, melittin was exchanged in D2O (pH 3.2, 12 degrees C), aliquots were quenched by rapid freezing, lyophilized, and dissolved in quenching buffer (70% DMSO, 25% toluene, 4% D2O, 1% cyclohexane, 75 mM dichloroacetic acid) for NMR analysis. Exchange rates for 21 amide protons were measured by recording 2D NMR spectra on a series of samples quenched at different times. The results are consistent with a monomeric unfolded conformation of melittin at acidic pH. The ability to trap labile protons by solvent quenching makes it possible to extend amide protection studies to peptide ligands or labile protons on the surface of a protein involved in macromolecular interactions. PMID:7613478

  4. Proton NMR assignments and regular backbone structure of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.D. ); Purisima, E.O. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Eastman, M.A.; Scheraga, H.A. )

    1989-07-11

    Proton NMR assignments have been made for 121 of the 124 residues of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A). During the first stage of assignment, COSY and relayed COSY data were used to identify 40 amino acid spin systems belonging to alanine, valine, threonine, isoleucine, and serine residues. Approximately 60 other NH-{alpha}CH-{beta}CH systems were also identified but not assigned to specific amino acid type. NOESY data then were used to connect sequentially neighboring spin systems; approximately 475 of the possible 700 resonances in RNase A were assigned in this way. The authors' assignments agree with those for 20 residues assigned previously. NOESY correlations were used to identify regular backbone structure elements in RNase A, which are very similar to those observed in X-ray crystallographic studies.

  5. Proton NMR investigation into the basis for the relatively high redox potential of lignin peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Banci, L.; Bertini, I.; Turano, P. ); Ming Tien ); Kirk, T.K. )

    1991-08-15

    Lignin peroxidase shares several structural features with the well-studied horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase but carries a higher redox potential. Here the heme domain of lignin peroxidase and the lignin peroxidase cyanide adduct was examined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, including nuclear Overhauser effect and two-dimensional measurements, and the findings were compared with those for horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c peroxidase. Structural information was obtained on the orientation of the heme vinyl and propionate groups and the proximal and distal histidines. The shifts of the {var epsilon}1 proton of the proximal histidine were found to be empirically related to the Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} redox potentials.

  6. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  7. NMR and protein folding: equilibrium and stopped-flow studies.

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, C.; Hoeltzli, S. D.; Ropson, I. J.

    1993-01-01

    NMR studies are now unraveling the structure of intermediates of protein folding using hydrogen-deuterium exchange methodologies. These studies provide information about the time dependence of formation of secondary structure. They require the ability to assign specific resonances in the NMR spectra to specific amide protons of a protein followed by experiments involving competition between folding and exchange reactions. Another approach is to use 19F-substituted amino acids to follow changes in side-chain environment upon folding. Current techniques of molecular biology allow assignments of 19F resonances to specific amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis. It is possible to follow changes and to analyze results from 19F spectra in real time using a stopped-flow device incorporated into the NMR spectrometer. PMID:8298453

  8. Line-narrowing in proton-detected nitrogen-14 NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavadini, Simone; Vitzthum, Veronika; Ulzega, Simone; Abraham, Anuji; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    In solids spinning at the magic angle, the indirect detection of single-quantum (SQ) and double-quantum (DQ) 14N spectra ( I = 1) via spy nuclei S = 1/2 such as protons can be achieved in the manner of heteronuclear single- or multiple-quantum correlation (HSQC or HMQC) spectroscopy. The HMQC method relies on the excitation of two-spin coherences of the type T11IT11S and T21IT11S at the beginning of the evolution interval t1. The spectra obtained by Fourier transformation from t1 to ω1 may be broadened by the homogenous decay of the transverse terms of the spy nuclei S. This broadening is mostly due to homonuclear dipolar S- S' interactions between the proton spy nuclei. In this work we have investigated the possibility of inserting rotor-synchronized symmetry-based C or R sequences and decoupling schemes such as Phase-Modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) sequences in the evolution period. These schemes reduce the homonuclear proton-proton interactions and lead to an enhancement of the resolution of both SQ and DQ proton-detected 14N HMQC spectra. In addition, we have investigated the combination of HSQC with symmetry-based sequences and PMLG and shown that the highest resolution in the 14N dimension is achieved by using HSQC in combination with symmetry-based sequences of the R-type. We show improvements in resolution in samples of L-alanine and the tripeptide ala-ala-gly (AAG). In particular, for L-alanine the width of the 14N SQ peak is reduced from 2 to 1.2 kHz, in agreement with simulations. We report accurate measurements of quadrupolar coupling constants and asymmetry parameters for amide 14N in AAG peptide bonds.

  9. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  10. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  11. NMR Studies of Enzyme Structure and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildvan, Albert

    2006-03-01

    At least three NMR methodologies pioneered by Al Redfield, have greatly benefited enzymology: (1) the suppression of strong water signals without pre-saturation; (2) sequence specific NH/ND exchange; and (3) dynamic studies of mobile loops of proteins. Water suppression has enabled us to identify unusually short, strong H-bonds at the active sites of five enzymes (three isomerases and two esterases), and to measure their lengths from both the chemical shifts and D/H fractionation factors of the deshielded protons involved (J. Mol. Struct. 615, 163 (2002)). Backbone NH exchange studies were used to detect regions of an NTP pyrophosphohydrolase in which NH groups became selectively protected against exchange on Mg(2+) binding, and further protected on product (NMP) binding, thus locating binding sites as well as conformationally linked remote sites (Biochemistry 42, 10140 (2003)). Dynamic studies were used to elucidate the frequency of motion of a flexible loop of GDP-mannose hydrolase (66,000/sec) containing the catalytic base His-124, from exchange broadening of the side chain NH signals of His-124 in the free enzyme. The binding of Mg(2+) and GDP-mannose lock His-124 in position to deprotonate the entering water and complete the reaction.

  12. Analysis of human muscle extracts by proton NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, P.N.; Barany, M.; Arus, C.

    1986-03-01

    Perchloric acid extracts were prepared from pooled human muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with scoliosis (SCOL) and cerebral palsy (CP). After neutralization with KOH and removal of perchlorate, the extracts were concentrated by freeze drying and dissolved in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O to contain 120 O.D. units at 280 nm per 0.5 ml. /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy was performed with the 5 mm probe of a Varian XL300 instrument. Creatine, lactate, carnosine, and choline were the major resonances in the one-dimensional spectra of both extracts. With creatine as reference, 2.5-fold more lactate was found in SCOL than in CP, and a much smaller difference was also found in their carnosine content. Two-dimensional COSY comparison revealed several differences between the two extracts. Taurine, N-acetyl glutamate, glycerophosphoryl choline (or phosphoryl choline) and an unidentified spot were present only in the extract from SCOL but not in that from CP. On the other hand, aspartate, hydroxy-proline, carnitine and glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine were only present in CP but absent in SCOL. Alanine, cysteine, lysine and arginine appeared in both extracts without an apparent intensity difference.

  13. NMR study of the potential composition of Titan's lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2015-05-01

    A large number of hydrocarbon lakes have been discovered in Titan's surface. However, the chemical composition and physical properties of these lakes are not fully understood. We investigate the potential composition of Titan's lakes by NMR. Based upon NMR data, the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the hydrocarbons in Titan's lakes are simulated on a 1 T spectrometer [being developed at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for future in situ characterization of Titan's lakes]. The study indicates that the dominant composition (all components>1% of the lake composition by mole fraction) in Titan's lakes can be determined and the major soluble organics quantitatively identified from either quantitative 1H or 13C spectra on a 1 T NMR spectrometer. The proton T1 relaxation times are determined for a number of candidate organics in hydrocarbon solution, a necessary determinant for quantitative NMR. The gas solubility of these organics is also investigated to understand the equilibrium of composition between Titan's lakes and atmosphere and the precipitation rates of the molecules at Titan's ground level. Our results are significant for the ongoing discussion regarding the development of in situ, low bias analysis methods and instruments for Titan missions and other outer planet exploration.

  14. Solid-state proton multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy with fast magic angle spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Helen; Titman, Jeremy J.; Gottwald, Johannes; Spiess, Hans W.

    1994-09-01

    The feasibility of multiple-quantum NMR spectroscopy with high resolution for protons in solids is explored. A new multiple-quantum excitation sequence suitable for use with fast magic angle spinning is described, and its performance is compared to that of both static and slow-spinning multiple-quantum methods. Modified sequences with scale the rate of development of the multiple-quantum coherences are also demonstrated, and two-dimensional double-quantum spectra of adamantane and polycarbonate are presented.

  15. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of {sup 1}H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to {sup 13}C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired {sup 13}C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific {sup 13}C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  16. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and (1)H-(1)H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-21

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of (1)H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as (13)C or (15)N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to (13)C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired (13)C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific (13)C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of (1)H-(1)H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids. PMID:26203019

  17. Selective excitation enables assignment of proton resonances and 1H-1H distance measurement in ultrafast magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Remarkable developments in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy enabled proton-based high-resolution multidimensional experiments on solids. To fully utilize the benefits rendered by proton-based ultrafast MAS experiments, assignment of 1H resonances becomes absolutely necessary. Herein, we propose an approach to identify different proton peaks by using dipolar-coupled heteronuclei such as 13C or 15N. In this method, after the initial preparation of proton magnetization and cross-polarization to 13C nuclei, transverse magnetization of desired 13C nuclei is selectively prepared by using DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutations for Tailored Excitation) sequence and then, it is transferred to bonded protons with a short-contact-time cross polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that protons bonded to specific 13C atoms can be identified and overlapping proton peaks can also be assigned. In contrast to the regular 2D HETCOR experiment, only a few 1D experiments are required for the complete assignment of peaks in the proton spectrum. Furthermore, the finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling sequence could be incorporated right after the selection of specific proton signals to monitor the intensity buildup for other proton signals. This enables the extraction of 1H-1H distances between different pairs of protons. Therefore, we believe that the proposed method will greatly aid in fast assignment of peaks in proton spectra and will be useful in the development of proton-based multi-dimensional solid-state NMR experiments to study atomic-level resolution structure and dynamics of solids.

  18. NMR resonance splitting of urea in stretched hydrogels: proton exchange and (1)H/(2)H isotopologues.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Naumann, Christoph; Chapman, Bogdan E; Shishmarev, Dmitry; Håkansson, Pär; Bacskay, George; Hush, Noel S

    2014-10-01

    Urea at ∼12 M in concentrated gelatin gel, that was stretched, gave (1)H and (2)H NMR spectral splitting patterns that varied in a predictable way with changes in the relative proportions of (1)H2O and (2)H2O in the medium. This required consideration of the combinatorics of the two amide groups in urea that have a total of four protonation/deuteration sites giving rise to 16 different isotopologues, if all the atoms were separately identifiable. The rate constant that characterized the exchange of the protons with water was estimated by back-transformation analysis of 2D-EXSY spectra. There was no (1)H NMR spectral evidence that the chiral gelatin medium had caused in-equivalence in the protons bonded to each amide nitrogen atom. The spectral splitting patterns in (1)H and (2)H NMR spectra were accounted for by intra-molecular scalar and dipolar interactions, and quadrupolar interactions with the electric field gradients of the gelatin matrix, respectively. PMID:25241007

  19. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF[sub 2]) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  20. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  1. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  2. MRI and unilateral NMR study of reindeer skin tanning processes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizheng; Del Federico, Eleonora; Ilott, Andrew J; Klokkernes, Torunn; Kehlet, Cindie; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-04-01

    The study of arctic or subarctic indigenous skin clothing material, known for its design and ability to keep the body warm, provides information about the tanning materials and techniques. The study also provides clues about the culture that created it, since tanning processes are often specific to certain indigenous groups. Untreated skin samples and samples treated with willow (Salix sp) bark extract and cod liver oil are compared in this study using both MRI and unilateral NMR techniques. The two types of samples show different proton spatial distributions and different relaxation times, which may also provide information about the tanning technique and aging behavior. PMID:25719858

  3. Proton NMR investigation of heme and surrounding proton in low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Wu, J; Guang, S; Zhang, H; Liang, S; Shi, Y

    2000-02-01

    (1)H NMR spectra of low-spin cyanide-ligated bacterial hemoglobin from Vitreoscilla (VtHb-CN) are reported. The assignments of the(1)H NMR spectra of VtHb-CN have been made through MCOSY, NOESY, 1D TOE and SUPERWEFT experiments. Almost all resonance peaks of heme and ligated His85 are identified. The spin-lattice relaxation time T (1)'s and the variation relationships of chemical shifts of these peaks with temperature have been acquired, from which the distances between the measured protons and Fe(3+), and the diamagnetic chemical shifts have been acquired, respectively. The ionization constants of pK (a)'s of ligated His85 are determined through pH titration of chemical shift, which is 4.95 for ligated His85 C(2)H proton. The lower pK (a) is attributed to the influence of the Fe(3+) of carrying positive charge and the coordination of His85 and Fe(3+) of heme. PMID:18763116

  4. NMR Methods to Study Dynamic Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Grutsch, Sarina; Brüschweiler, Sven; Tollinger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a unique toolbox of experimental probes for studying dynamic processes on a wide range of timescales, ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds and beyond. Along with NMR hardware developments, recent methodological advancements have enabled the characterization of allosteric proteins at unprecedented detail, revealing intriguing aspects of allosteric mechanisms and increasing the proportion of the conformational ensemble that can be observed by experiment. Here, we present an overview of NMR spectroscopic methods for characterizing equilibrium fluctuations in free and bound states of allosteric proteins that have been most influential in the field. By combining NMR experimental approaches with molecular simulations, atomistic-level descriptions of the mechanisms by which allosteric phenomena take place are now within reach. PMID:26964042

  5. Use of acetimidation in the NMR identification of neurophysin lysine protons

    SciTech Connect

    Sardana, V.; Breslow, E.

    1986-05-01

    Acetimidation of the two lysine residues of neurophysin (NP) results in localized changes in the proton magnetic resonance spectrum, allowing identification of lysine side-chain resonances. Neither peptide-binding nor protein self-association appeared to be significantly altered by acetimidation. Additionally, no significant effect of either peptide-binding or self-association on lysine epsilon-CH/sub 2/ protons was seen. However, dimerization-induced NMR changes in the 1.6-1.8 ppm region, associated with lysine ..beta..,..gamma..,sigma protons, were altered in the acetimidated protein. In particular, while the spectrum of the acetimidated NP monomer was almost identical to that of the native protein, a shoulder at 1.72 ppm in the native protein dimer was shifted upfield in the modified dimer. Additionally the direction of NMR shifts in the 1.6-1.8 ppm region normally associated with peptide binding to the NP dimer appeared to be reversed in the acetimidated protein. Binding-induced and dimerization-induced changes in all other regions of the spectrum were identical in the native and modified proteins. These results suggest that one or both NP lysine residues may be near the dimer subunit interface and indicate an effect of peptide-binding on lysine side-chain environment.

  6. Uncertainty measurement for automated macro program-processed quantitative proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Hays, Patrick A; Schoenberger, Torsten

    2014-11-01

    The evaluation of a fully automated quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (qNMR) processing program, including the determination of its processing uncertainty, and the calculations of the combined uncertainty of the qNMR result, is presented with details on the use of a trimmed purity average. Quantitative NMR spectra (1359) were collected over a 4-month period on various concentrations of pseudoephedrine HCl dissolved in D2O (0.0610 to 93.60 mg/mL) containing maleic acid (the internal standard) to yield signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 3 to 72,000 for analyte integral regions. The resulting 5436 purities exhibited a normal distribution about the best estimate of the true value. The median absolute deviation (MAD) statistical method was used to obtain a model of uncertainty relative to the signal-to-noise of the analyte's integral peaks. The model was then tested using different concentrations of known purity chloroquine diphosphate. qNMR results of numerous illicit heroin HCl samples were compared to those obtained by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25273593

  7. HyperBIRD: a sensitivity-enhanced approach to collecting homonuclear-decoupled proton NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kevin J; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Samples prepared following dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enable the detection of NMR spectra from low-γ nuclei with outstanding sensitivity, yet have limited use for the enhancement of abundant species like (1)H nuclei. Small- and intermediate-sized molecules, however, show strong heteronuclear cross-relaxation effects: spontaneous processes with an inherent isotopic selectivity, whereby only the (13)C-bonded protons receive a polarization enhancement. These effects are here combined with a recently developed method that delivers homonuclear-decoupled (1)H spectra in natural abundance samples based on heteronuclear couplings to these same, (13)C-bonded nuclei. This results in the HyperBIRD methodology; a single-shot combination of these two effects that can simultaneously simplify and resolve complex, congested (1)H NMR spectra with many overlapping spin multiplets, while achieving 50-100 times sensitivity enhancements over conventional thermal counterparts. PMID:25256418

  8. NMR study of compressed supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, W. J.; Jonas, J.

    1981-01-01

    The proton spin-lattice relaxation time T1 in water has been measured as a function of pressure in the temperature range 150 to 700°C. This study focuses on the supercritical region (tc=374°C) where the spin-rotation interaction mechanism dominates the observed proton relaxation rate. Since water is an asymmetric top molecule, the analysis of the experimental data involves a number of simplifying assumptions discussed in detail. The experimental finding that in supercritical water the spin-rotation relaxation time T 1SR is a linear function of density ρ, up to relatively high densities (ρ≃ 1.5 ρc) provides rationale for analysis of the NMR experimental data in terms of a model used for dilute gases. The T 1SR data are analyzed on the basis of the assumption that the collision modulated spin-rotation interactions can be described by a single correlation function which is an exponential function of time. Using this procedure, we find that T 1SR/ρ αT-2, i.e.T 1SR/ρ exhibits a stronger temperature dependence than that found (T 1SR/ρ αT-3/2) for many polar and nonpolar gases. The calculated effective cross sections for the transfer of angular momentum σeff which show strong temperature dependence (σeff αT-1.5) are several times larger than the kinetic cross sections. By assuming applicability of expressions derived for isotropic reorientation of spherical-top molecules and using the effective spin-rotation interaction constant as obtained from microwave measurements, we are able to calculate the angular momentum correlation time τJ, over the range of temperatures and densities studied. In the supercritical region τJ⩾τΘ, where τΘ is the reorientational correlation time, and the estimated mean angle of reorientation ΔΘ¯ is in the range 50° to 800°. The T 1SR data are also interpreted in terms of the modified rough hard sphere (RHS) model which for ρ<2ρc takes into account the effect of attractive forces. We find that 1/T 1SR is a linear

  9. NMR studies of cation transport across membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Shochet, N.R.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 23/Na NMR Studies of cation transport across membranes were conducted both on model and biological membranes. Two ionophores, the carrier monensin and the channel-former gramicidin, were chosen to induce cation transport in large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The distinction between the NMR signals arising from the two sides of the membrane was achieved by the addition of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent to the outer solution. The kinetics of the cation transport across the membrane was observed simultaneously monitoring the changes in the /sup 23/Na NMR signals of both compartments. Two mathematical models were developed for the estimation of the transport parameters of the monensin- and gramicidin-induced cation transport. The models were able to fit the experimental data very well. A new method for the estimation of the volume trapped inside the vesicles was developed. The method uses the relative areas of the intra- and extravesicular NMR signals arising from a suspension of vesicles bathed in the same medium they contain, as a measure for the relative volumes of these compartments. Sodium transport across biological membranes was studied by /sup 23/ NMR, using suspensions of cultured nerve cells. The sodium influx through voltage-gated channels was studied using the channel modifier batrachotoxin in combination with scorpion toxin.

  10. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-14

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110–120 kHz), {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow {sup 1}H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) {sup 1}H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about {sup 1}H–{sup 1}H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic

  11. NMR structural studies on antifreeze proteins.

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, F D; Davies, P L; Sykes, B D

    1998-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a structurally diverse class of proteins that bind to ice and inhibit its growth in a noncolligative manner. This adsorption-inhibition mechanism operating at the ice surface results in a lowering of the (nonequilibrium) freezing point below the melting point. A lowering of approximately 1 degree C, which is sufficient to prevent fish from freezing in ice-laden seawater, requires millimolar AFP levels in the blood. The solubility of AFPs at these millimolar concentrations and the small size of the AFPs (typically 3-15 kDa) make them ideal subjects for NMR analysis. Although fish AFPs are naturally abundant, seasonal expression, restricted access to polar fishes, and difficulties in separating numerous similar isoforms have made protein expression the method of choice for producing AFPs for structural studies. Expression of recombinant AFPs has also facilitated NMR analysis by permitting isotopic labeling with 15N and 13C and has permitted mutations to be made to help with the interpretation of NMR data. NMR analysis has recently solved two AFP structures and provided valuable information about the disposition of ice-binding side chains in a third. The potential exists to solve other AFP structures, including the newly described insect AFPs, and to use solid-state NMR techniques to address fundamental questions about the nature of the interaction between AFPs and ice. PMID:9923697

  12. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  13. An NMR structural study of nickel-substituted rubredoxin.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Brian J; Duarte, Iven C N; Macedo, Anjos L; Volkman, Brian F; Nunes, Sofia G; Moura, I; Markley, John L; Moura, José J G

    2010-03-01

    The Ni(II) and Zn(II) derivatives of Desulfovibrio vulgaris rubredoxin (DvRd) have been studied by NMR spectroscopy to probe the structure at the metal centre. The beta CH(2) proton pairs from the cysteines that bind the Ni(II) atom have been identified using 1D nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) difference spectra and sequence specifically assigned via NOE correlations to neighbouring protons and by comparison with the published X-ray crystal structure of a Ni(II) derivative of Clostridium pasteurianum rubredoxin. The solution structures of DvRd(Zn) and DvRd(Ni) have been determined and the paramagnetic form refined using pseudocontact shifts. The determination of the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy tensor allowed the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed chemical shifts to be obtained. Analysis of the pseudocontact and contact chemical shifts of the cysteine H beta protons and backbone protons close to the metal centre allowed conclusions to be drawn as to the geometry and hydrogen-bonding pattern at the metal binding site. The importance of NH-S hydrogen bonds at the metal centre for the delocalization of electron spin density is confirmed for rubredoxins and can be extrapolated to metal centres in Cu proteins: amicyanin, plastocyanin, stellacyanin, azurin and pseudoazurin. PMID:19997764

  14. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  15. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  16. Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency diagnosed by proton NMR spectroscopy of body fluids.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Udo F H; Tassini, Maria; Hayek, Joseph; de Vries, Maaike; Bilos, Appie; Vivi, Antonio; Valensin, Gianni; Buoni, Sabrina; Zannolli, Raffaella; Brussel, Wim; Kremer, Berry; Salomons, Gajja S; Veendrick-Meekes, Monique J B M; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A

    2009-06-01

    In patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency several parameters may point towards the diagnosis of GAMT deficiency. These include the low levels of creatine and creatinine in urine, the high concentration of guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) in urine and the low levels of creatine and creatinine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this study, body fluids from 10 GAMT deficient patients were analysed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The urine 1D (1)H NMR spectra of all the patients showed a doublet resonance at 3.98 ppm (pH 2.50) derived from GAA present in high concentration. For this compound, a good recovery and good correlation was found between an LC-MS/MS method and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In CSF NMR spectra of these patients, the singlet resonances of creatine and creatinine (3.05 and 3.13 ppm, respectively) were absent (normally always present in (1)H NMR spectra of CSF). Due to overlap by other resonances, the doublet of GAA could not be observed. Our data demonstrate that (1)H NMR spectroscopy of urine and CSF can be used to diagnose patients with GAMT deficiency. PMID:19288536

  17. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Grey, Clare P

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or 'supercapacitors' are attracting increasing attention as high-power energy storage devices for a wide range of technological applications. These devices store charge through electrostatic interactions between liquid electrolyte ions and the surfaces of porous carbon electrodes. However, many aspects of the fundamental mechanism of supercapacitance are still not well understood, and there is a lack of experimental techniques which are capable of studying working devices. Recently, solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool for studying the local environments and behaviour of electrolyte ions in supercapacitor electrodes. In this Trends article, we review these recent developments and applications. We first discuss the basic principles underlying the mechanism of supercapacitance, as well as the key NMR observables that are relevant to the study of supercapacitor electrodes. We then review some practical aspects of the study of working devices using ex situ and in situ methodologies and explain the key advances that these techniques have allowed on the study of supercapacitor charging mechanisms. NMR experiments have revealed that the pores of the carbon electrodes contain a significant number of electrolyte ions in the absence of any charging potential. This has important implications for the molecular mechanisms of supercapacitance, as charge can be stored by different ion adsorption/desorption processes. Crucially, we show how in situ NMR experiments can be used to quantitatively study and characterise the charging mechanism, with the experiments providing the most detailed picture of charge storage to date, offering the opportunity to design enhanced devices. Finally, an outlook for future directions for solid-state NMR in supercapacitor research is offered. PMID:26974032

  19. ADVANCED SOLIDS NMR STUDIES OF COAL STRUCTURE AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. The study of coal chemical structure is a vital component of research efforts to develop better chemical utilization of coals, and for furthering our basic understanding of coal geochemistry. In this grant we are addressing several structural questions pertaining to coals with advances in state of the art solids NMR methods. Our goals are twofold. First, we are interested in developing new methods that will enable us to measure important structural parameters in whole coals not directly accessible by other techniques. In parallel with these efforts we will apply these NMR methods in a study of the chemical differences between gas-sourcing and oil-sourcing coals. The NMR methods work will specifically focus on determination of the number and types of methylene groups, determination of the number and types of methane groups, identification of carbons adjacent to nitrogen and sites with exchangeable protons, and methods to more finely characterize the distribution of hydrogen in coals. The motivation for investigating these specific structural features of coals arises from their relevance to the chemical reactivity of coals, and their suitability for possible correlations with the oil sourcing potential of some types of coals. The coals to be studied and contrasted include oil-prone coals from Australia and Indonesia, those comprising the Argonne Premium Coal Sample bank, and other relevant samples. In this report period we have focused our work on 1 segment of the program. Our last report outlined progress in using our NMR editing methods with higher field operation where higher magic angle spinning rates are required. Significant difficulties were identified, and these have been the main subject of study during the most recent granting period.

  20. Analysis of the carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules.

    PubMed

    Sharp, R R; Richards, E P

    1977-03-29

    Natural abundance carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules have been obtained and analyzed using computer simulation techniques. High resolution spectra show the presence of a fluid aqueous phase containing epinephrine, ATP and a random coil protein. The protein spectrum contains unusually intense resonances due to glutamic acid and proline and has been simulated satisfactorily using the known amino acid composition of chromogranin A. The lipid phase of chromaffin granules gives rise to intense, but very broad, resonances in the carbon-13 spectrum. Protons in the lipid phase are also observable as a very rapid component of the proton-free induction decay (T2 approximately equal to 15 microns). Linewidths of the carbon-13 spectra have been used to set upper limits on rotational correlation times and on the motional anisotropy in the aqueous phase. These limits show that the aqueous phase is a simple solution (not a gel) that is isotropic over regions much larger than solute dimensions. No gel transition is observed between -3 and 25 degrees C. The carbon-13 spectra are definitely inconsistent with a lipoprotein matrix model and chromaffin granules previously proposed by Helle and Serck-Hanssen ((1975) Mol. Cell, Biochem. 6, 127-146). Relative carbon-13 intensities of ATP and epinephrine are not consistent with the known 1 : 4 mol ratio of these components. This fact suggests that epinephrine and ATP are not directly complexed in intact chromaffin granules. PMID:849474

  1. New approach for characterization of gelatin biopolymer films using proton behavior determined by low field 1H NMR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Teck; Hong, Young-Shick; Kimmel, Robert M; Rho, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Cherl-Ho

    2007-12-26

    The behavior of protons in biopolymer films (BFs) formed with gelatin, water, and glycerol was investigated at various relative humidities (RHs) and concentrations of glycerol using a low field 1H NMR spectrometer. At a RH of approximately 0%, the distributed spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of protons in BFs showed two components: a rapidly relaxing proton with the shortest T2 derived from protons in the rigid backbone of the gelatin polymer such as CH1-, CH2-, and CH3-, and a slowly relaxing component with longer T2 from protons of the functional groups in amino acid residues in gelatin such as -OH, -COOH, and -NH3. These two components are referred to as nonexchangeable (T2N) and exchangeable protons (T2E), respectively, indicating the different mobility of the protons. The T2E increased as RH increased indicating the increase in relative mobility of protons due to the larger free volume in the BF matrix. Above a RH of 33%, the slowest relaxing component was found in all BFs and referred to as hydration-water protons (T2W) with the highest relative mobility of all protons in the films. It suggests that the free volume in BFs can be formed above a RH of 33% in the absence of glycerol. The behaviors of T2N, T2E, and T2W reveal the formation of free volume in the BF matrix associated with the presence of plasticizers (water and glycerol). The T2 behavior in BFs is consistent with the behavior of spin-lattice relaxation (T1). Our result is the first attempt to characterize using low field 1H NMR technology how all protons in a film matrix behave and to develop correlations between proton mobility and free volume in protein-based BFs plasticized with water and glycerol. PMID:18052122

  2. Proton-detected solid-state NMR spectroscopy of fully protonated proteins at slow to moderate magic-angle spinning frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K.

    2015-12-01

    1H -detection offers a substitute to the sensitivity-starved experiments often used to characterize biomolecular samples using magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (MAS-ssNMR). To mitigate the effects of the strong 1H -1H dipolar coupled network that would otherwise severely broaden resonances, high MAS frequencies (>40 kHz) are often employed. Here, we have explored the alternative of stroboscopic 1H -detection at moderate MAS frequencies of 5-30 kHz using windowed version of supercycled-phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg homonuclear decoupling. We show that improved resolution in the 1H dimension, comparable to that obtainable at high spinning frequencies of 40-60 kHz without homonuclear decoupling, can be obtained in these experiments for fully protonated proteins. Along with detailed analysis of the performance of the method on the standard tri-peptide f-MLF, experiments on micro-crystalline GB1 and amyloid- β aggregates are used to demonstrate the applicability of these pulse-sequences to challenging biomolecular systems. With only two parameters to optimize, broadbanded performance of the homonuclear decoupling sequence, linear dependence of the chemical-shift scaling factor on resonance offset and a straightforward implementation under experimental conditions currently used for many biomolecular studies (viz. spinning frequencies and radio-frequency amplitudes), we expect these experiments to complement the current 13C -detection based methods in assignments and characterization through chemical-shift mapping.

  3. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ming; Trébosc, J.; Lafon, O.; Pourpoint, F.; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong 1H-1H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave 1H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of 1H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that 1H-1H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D 1H-{13C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-13C]-L-histidineṡHClṡH2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and

  4. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  5. Rhodopsin-lipid interactions studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the lipid matrix are known to influence function of integral membrane proteins. We report on a sample preparation method for reconstitution of membrane proteins which uses porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) filters with 200-nm-wide pores of high density. The substrate permits formation of tubular, single membranes that line the inner surface of pores. One square centimeter of filter with a thickness of 60μm yields on the order of 500cm(2) of solid-supported single bilayer surface, sufficient for NMR studies. The tubular bilayers are free of detergent, fully hydrated, and accessible for ligands from one side of the membrane. The use of AAO filters greatly improves reproducibility of the reconstitution process such that the influence of protein on lipid order parameters can be studied with high resolution. As an example, results for the G protein-coupled receptor of class A, bovine rhodopsin, are shown. By (2)H NMR order parameter measurements, it is detected that rhodopsin insertion elastically deforms membranes near the protein. Furthermore, by (1)H saturation-transfer NMR under conditions of magic angle spinning, we demonstrate detection of preferences in interactions of rhodopsin with particular lipid species. It is assumed that function of integral membrane proteins depends on both protein-induced elastic deformations of the lipid matrix and preferences for interaction of the protein with particular lipid species in the first layer of lipids surrounding the protein. PMID:23374188

  6. Molecular structure, tautomeric stability, protonation and deprotonation effects, vibrational, NMR and NBO analyses of 2,4-Dioxoimidazolidine-5-acetic acid (DOIAA) by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, C; Velraj, G

    2014-01-01

    This study represents the conformation, tautomeric stability, protonation and deprotonation effects, vibrational, electronic, NBO and NMR aspects of 2,4-Dioxoimidazolidine-5-acetic acid (DOIAA). Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT)/B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Tautomerism and the effect of solvent on the tautomeric equilibria in the gas phase and in different solvents were studied. The protonation and deprotonation effects on the reactivity and conformations of DOIAA were investigated. Electronic transitions were also studied and the most prominent transition corresponds to π→π*. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was also carried out to find the intramolecular interactions and their stabilization energy. In DOIAA, the interaction between the lone pair donor orbital (n(LP1N5)) and the acceptor antibonding orbital π*(C6O7) reveals the strong stabilization energy of 224.9 kJ mol(-1). Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was calculated to predict the reactive sites of the title compound. The NMR results indicated that the observed chemical shifts for NH, COOH protons of DOIAA not only depend on the structure of the molecule being studied but also on the nature of the solvent, concentration of the sample and the presence of the other exchangeable protons. PMID:24291430

  7. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) methods for determining the purity of reference drug standards and illicit forensic drug seizures.

    PubMed

    Hays, Patrick A

    2005-11-01

    A rapid, sensitive, accurate, precise, reproducible, and versatile method for determining the purity of reference drug standards and the routine analysis of illicit drugs and adulterants using proton (1H) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is presented. The methodology uses a weighed sample dissolved in a deuterated solvent or solvent mixture containing a high purity internal standard. The NMR experiment employs 8 scans using a 45 second delay and 90 degrees pulse. In the determination of purity of reference standards, the number of quantitative determinations available is equal to the number of peak groups that are baseline resolved. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of these signals is usually < 1% for pure standards, and the results agree well with other purity determining methods. This method can also aid in the determination of correct molecular weight for standards containing an unknown number of waters of hydration or an unknown number of acids per drug in salts. Because the molar response for the hydrogen nucleus is 1 for all compounds, and since no separation media are used, only one linearity study is required to test a probe. In the presented study, the linearity of the NMR probe was determined using methamphetamine HCl dissolved in deuterium oxide (D2O) with maleic acid as the internal standard (5 mg) for a range of concentrations from 0.033 to 69.18 mg/ml with a resulting correlation coefficient of >0.9999 for all 6 methamphetamine peak groups. The spectra of complex illicit heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, and cocaine samples are presented, as well as an extensive list of compounds, their solubilities and the solvent(s) and internal standard used. PMID:16382828

  8. The Structural Response of Polyelectrolyte Dendrimer toward the Molecular Protonation: The Inconsistence Revealed by SANS and NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Herwig, Kenneth W; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin; Liu, Dazhi; Gao, Carrie Y

    2012-01-01

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and their charged state in deuterium oxide have been investigated with diffusion NMR and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques. NMR measurement suggests that, upon increasing the molecular protonation by progressive acidification of solutions, significant variation of hydrodynamic radius, calculated by the Stokes-Einstein relation with given surface condition, is observed upon increasing the molecular protonation. However, comparative SANS experiment indicates little dependence of dendrimer global size, in terms of radius of gyration, on molecular protonation. This observed inconsistence indicates the necessity of incorporating the effect of molecular interface modification by dressed counterion, when dynamical measurements are used for determination the structural characteristics of ionic soft colloids even in a dilute enough suspension.

  9. High-resolution proton CRAMPS NMR using narrowband analog filters and postponed data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liying; Zhou, Donghua H.

    2013-09-01

    Proton linewidths decrease with increasing magic-angle spinning (MAS) rates. However, without spin dilution by deuteration, even with the fastest MAS rates available today, the narrowest proton linewidths are obtained by using the combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) method. Direct observation under windowed CRAMPS typically introduces several tens of times more noise, partly because wideband analog filters (e.g. 5 MHz) must be used or sometimes even bypassed. Here we report that it is possible to keep using narrowband analog filters (about 50 kHz cutoff frequency) in CRAMPS by taking advantage of the time delay caused by the filters, which is inversely proportional to the cutoff frequency. This delay coincides with typical CRAMPS cycle times, enabling acquisition of the data point in the next detection window. The noise of such CRAMPS spectra is only about 5 times larger than MAS-only spectra. This new method allows CRAMPS to be performed on systems that lack wideline hardware (wideband filters and fast ADCs), for example, older spectrometers originally intended for solution NMR.

  10. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Hass, Mathias A S; Yilmaz, Ali; Christensen, Hans E M; Led, Jens J

    2009-08-01

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13C(epsilon1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13C(epsilon1) dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13C(epsilon1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed. PMID:19533375

  11. Proton NMR of Escherichia coli sulfite reductase: the unligated hemeprotein subunit.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J; Spicer, L D; Siegel, L M

    1993-03-23

    The isolated hemeprotein subunit of sulfite reductase (SiR-HP) from Escherichia coli consists of a high spin ferric isobacteriochlorin (siroheme) coupled to a diamagnetic [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster. When supplied with an artificial electron donor, such as methyl viologen cation radical, SiR-HP can catalyze the six electron reductions of sulfite to sulfide and nitrite to ammonia. Thus, the hemeprotein subunit appears to represent the minimal protein structure required for multielectron reductase activity. Proton magnetic resonance spectra are reported for the first time on unligated SiR-HP at 300 MHz in all three redox states. The NMR spectrum of high spin ferric siroheme at pH 6.0 was obtained for the purpose of comparing its spectrum with that of oxidized SiR-HP. On the basis of line widths, T1 measurements, and 1D NOE experiments, preliminary assignments have been made for the oxidized enzyme in solution. The pH profile of oxidized SiR-HP is unusual in that a single resonance shows a 9 ppm shift over a range of only 3 pH units with an apparent pK = 6.7 +/- 0.2. Resonances arising from the beta-CH2 protons of cluster cysteines have been assigned using deuterium substitution for all redox states. One beta-CH2 resonance has been tentatively assigned to the bridging cysteine on the basis of chemical shift, T1, line width, and the presence of NOEs to protons from the siroheme ring. The observed pattern of hyperfine shifts can be used as a probe to measure the degree of coupling between siroheme and cluster in solution. The cluster iron sites of the resting (oxidized) enzyme are found to possess both positive and negative spin density which is in good agreement with Mossbauer results on frozen enzyme. The NMR spectrum of the 1-electron reduced form of SiR-HP is consistent with an intermediate spin (S = 1) siroheme. Intermediate spin Fe(II) hemes have only been previously observed in 4-coordinate model compounds. However, the amount of electron density transferred to the

  12. Amide Proton Solvent Protection in Amylin Fibrils Probed by Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T.

    2013-01-01

    Amylin is an endocrine hormone that accumulates in amyloid plaques in patients with advanced type 2 diabetes. The amyloid plaques have been implicated in the destruction of pancreatic β-cells, which synthesize amylin and insulin. To better characterize the secondary structure of amylin in amyloid fibrils we assigned the NMR spectrum of the unfolded state in 95% DMSO and used a quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange technique to look at amide proton solvent protection in the fibrils. In this technique, partially exchanged fibrils are dissolved in 95% DMSO and information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils is determined from DMSO-denatured monomers. Hydrogen exchange lifetimes at pH 7.6 and 37°C vary between ∼5 h for the unstructured N-terminus to 600 h for amide protons in the two β-strands that form inter-molecular hydrogen bonds between amylin monomers along the length of the fibril. Based on the protection data we conclude that residues A8-H18 and I26-Y37 comprise the two β-strands in amylin fibrils. There is variation in protection within the β-strands, particularly for strand β1 where only residues F15-H18 are strongly protected. Differences in protection appear to be due to restrictions on backbone dynamics imposed by the packing of two-layers of C2-symmetry-related β-hairpins in the protofilament structure, with strand β1 positioned on the surface and β2 in the interior. PMID:23457571

  13. High pressure NMR study of a small protein, gurmarin.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Yamada, H; Imoto, T; Akasaka, K

    1998-11-01

    The effect of pressure on the structure of gurmarin, a globular, 35-residue protein from Gymnema sylvestre, was studied in aqueous environment (95% 1H2O/5% 2H2O, pH 2.0) with an on-line variable pressure NMR system operating at 750 MHz. Two-dimensional TOCSY and NOESY spectra were measured as functions of pressure between 1 and 2000 bar at 40 degrees C. Practically all the proton signals of gurmarin underwent some shifts with pressure, showing that the entire protein structure responds to, and is altered by, pressure. Most amide protons showed different degrees of low field shifts with pressure, namely 0-0.2 ppm with an average of 0.051 ppm at 2000 bar, showing that they are involved in hydrogen bonding and that these hydrogen bonds are shortened by pressure by different degrees. The tendency was also confirmed that the chemical shifts of the amide protons exposed to the solvent (water) are more sensitive to pressure than those internally hydrogen bonded with carbonyls. The pressure-induced shifts of the H alpha signals of the residues in the beta-sheet showed a negative correlation with the 'folding' shifts (difference between the shift at 1 bar and that of a random coil), suggesting that the main-chain torsion angles of the beta-sheet are slightly altered by pressure. Significant pressure-induced shifts were also observed for the side-chain protons (but no larger than 10% of the 'folding' shifts), demonstrating that the tertiary structure of gurmarin is also affected by pressure. Finally, the linearity of the pressure-induced shifts suggest that the compressibility of gurmarin is invariant in the pressure range between 1 and 2000 bar. PMID:9862129

  14. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K. S.; Mas, J. F.; McConnell, J. W.; Yu, C.-H.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R. C.; Woods, P. J.; Ginter, T. N.; Gross, C. J.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S. H.; Weintraub, W.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; MacDonald, B. D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E. F.

    1998-12-21

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu.

  15. Proton decay studies at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Rykaczewski, K.; Toth, K.S.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Yu, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Kim, S.H.; Weintraub, W.; Rykaczewski, K.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Davinson, T.; Slinger, R.C.; Woods, P.J.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; MacDonald, B.D.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.F.; Ressler, J.J.; Walters, W.B.; Szerypo, J.

    1998-12-01

    A double-sided Si-strip detector system has been installed and commissioned at the focal plane of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The system can be used for heavy charged particle emission studies with half-lives as low as a few {mu}sec. In this paper we present identification and study of the decay properties of the five new proton emitters: {sup 140}Ho, {sup 141m}Ho, {sup 145}Tm, {sup 150m}Lu and {sup 151m}Lu. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. NMR Relaxation and Diffusion Study of Ultrasound Recycling of Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Ghose, S.; Isayev, A. I.

    2004-04-01

    We have examined the effect of intense ultrasound on unfilled polyurethane foam and rubber using proton NMR transverse relaxation and pulsed-gradient diffusion studies, sol extraction, GPC characterization, and glass transition measurements. Results correlate well with ultrasound amplitude. The proton T2 relaxation at 70.5 deg. C exhibits three discrete components, due to heavily entangled sol and crosslinked network; unentangled polymeric sol plus dangling network chain ends; and oligomer remnants. Devulcanizing produces heavy sol, increases segmental mobility of all species, and generates more dangling chain ends. In foams, but not in rubber, additional light sol is generated at the expense of network. All mobilities are significantly lower than in the other rubbers we have studied, an effect unrelated to the glass transition, nearly constant at -60 deg. C. Diffusion measurements, possible only in foams, show a bimodal spectrum whose fast component slows markedly with ultrasound amplitude, attesting to the production of fragments heavier than the original oligomers, as confirmed by GPC analysis. This work is the first to study ultrasound devulcanization in industrial rubbery foams.

  17. Symmetrization of cationic hydrogen bridges of protonated sponges induced by solvent and counteranion interactions as revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Mariusz; Wehling, Jens P; Kong, Shushu; Tolstoy, Peter M; Shenderovich, Ilya G; López, Concepción; Claramunt, Rosa María; Elguero, José; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2010-02-01

    The properties of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds of doubly (15)N-labeled protonated sponges of the 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMANH(+)) type have been studied as a function of the solvent, counteranion, and temperature using low-temperature NMR spectroscopy. Information about the hydrogen-bond symmetries was obtained by the analysis of the chemical shifts delta(H) and delta(N) and the scalar coupling constants J(N,N), J(N,H), J(H,N) of the (15)NH(15)N hydrogen bonds. Whereas the individual couplings J(N,H) and J(H,N) were averaged by a fast intramolecular proton tautomerism between two forms, it is shown that the sum |J(N,H)+J(H,N)| generally represents a measure of the hydrogen-bond strength in a similar way to delta(H) and J(N,N). The NMR spectroscopic parameters of DMANH(+) and of 4-nitro-DMANH(+) are independent of the anion in the case of CD(3)CN, which indicates ion-pair dissociation in this solvent. By contrast, studies using CD(2)Cl(2), [D(8)]toluene as well as the freon mixture CDF(3)/CDF(2)Cl, which is liquid down to 100 K, revealed an influence of temperature and of the counteranions. Whereas a small counteranion such as trifluoroacetate perturbed the hydrogen bond, the large noncoordinating anion tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate B[{C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)}(4)](-) (BARF(-)), which exhibits a delocalized charge, made the hydrogen bond more symmetric. Lowering the temperature led to a similar symmetrization, an effect that is discussed in terms of solvent ordering at low temperature and differential solvent order/disorder at high temperatures. By contrast, toluene molecules that are ordered around the cation led to typical high-field shifts of the hydrogen-bonded proton as well as of those bound to carbon, an effect that is absent in the case of neutral NHN chelates. PMID:20024986

  18. NMR relaxation studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. Jugeshwar; Clark, W. G.; Gaidos, G.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Menon, R.; Ramesh, K. P.

    2015-05-01

    NMR relaxation rates (1 /T1 ), magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity studies in doped poly-3-methylthiophene are reported in this paper. The magnetic susceptibility data show the contributions from both Pauli and Curie spins, with the size of the Pauli term depending strongly on the doping level. Proton and fluorine NMR relaxation rates have been studied as a function of temperature (3-300 K) and field (for protons at 0.9, 9.0, 16.4, and 23.4 T, and for fluorine at 9.0 T). The temperature dependence of T1 is classified into three regimes: (a) For T <(g μBB /2 kB ) , the relaxation mechanism follows a modified Korringa relation due to electron-electron interactions and disorder. 1H - T1 is due to the electron-nuclear dipolar interaction in addition to the contact term. (b) For the intermediate temperature range (g μBB /2 kB ) study. Fluorine relaxation data have been analyzed and attributed to the P F6 reorientation. The cross relaxation among the 1H and 19F nuclei has been observed in the entire temperature range suggesting the role of magnetic dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric molecular subgroups. The data analysis shows that the enhancement in the Korringa ratio is greater in a less conducting sample. Intra- and interchain hopping of charge carriers is found to be a dominant relaxation mechanism at low temperature. Frequency dependence of T1-1 on temperature shows that at low temperature [T <(g μBB /2 kB ) ] the system shows three dimensions and changes to quasi one dimension at

  19. High field and 2D-nmr studies with the aporphine alkaloid glaucine.

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; Kook, A M; Davis, P J

    1986-01-01

    The aporphine alkaloid glaucine (1) was examined by comparison of the high field (600 MHz) 1H-nmr spectra of 1 vs. racemic 6a,7,7-trideutereoglaucine (4,5), by computer-simulated 1H-nmr spectra at 600 MHz, by using decoupled proton spectra, and two-dimensional COSY and HETCOR experiments with 1 at 500 and 360 MHz, respectively, and using high field (90 MHZ) 13C-nmr of S-(+)-glaucine (1). Emphasis was placed on the resolution of the chemical shifts and coupling constants for the H-4 alpha, H-4 beta, H-5 alpha, H-5 beta, H-6 alpha, H-7 alpha, and H-7 beta alicyclic protons of the molecule, which were previously unassigned. The complete assignment of the alicyclic protons of 1 by 1H-nmr was required for the structural elucidation of deuterated analogs of glaucine, which will be used in microbial transformation studies to determine the stereochemical course of aporphine dehydrogenation by the fungi Fusarium solani (ATCC 12823) and Aspergillus flavipes (ATCC 1030). PMID:3783155

  20. Proton NMR characterization of isomeric sulfmyoglobins: preparation, interconversion, reactivity patterns, and structural features

    SciTech Connect

    Chatfield, M.J.; La Mar, G.N.; Kauten, R.J.

    1987-11-03

    The preparations of sulfmyoglobin (sulf-Mb) by standard procedures have been found heterogeneous by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Presented here are the results of a comprehensive study of the factors that influence the selection among the three dominant isomeric forms of sperm whale sulf-Mb and their resulting detailed optical and /sup 1/H NMR properties as related to their detectability and structural properties of the heme pocket. A single isomer is formed initially in the deoxy state; further treatment in any desired oxidation/ligation state can yield two other major isomers. Acid catalysis and chromatography facilitate formation of a second isomer, particularly in the high-spin state. At neutral pH, a third isomer is formed by a first-order process. The processes that alter oxidation/ligation state are found to be reversible and are judged to affect only the metal center, but the three isomeric sulf-Mbs are found to exhibit significantly different ligand affinity and chemical stability. The present results allow, for the first time, a rational approach for preparing a given isomeric sulf-Mb in an optimally pure state for subsequent characterization by other techniques. While optical spectroscopy can distinguish the alkaline forms, only /sup 1/H NMR clearly distinguishes all three ferric isomers. The hyperfine shift patterns in the various oxidation/spin states of sulf-Mbs indicate relatively small structural alteration, and the proximal and distal sides of the heme suggest that peripheral electronic effects are responsible for the differentially reduced ligand affinities for the three isomeric sulf-Mbs. The first /sup 1/H NMR spectra of sulfhemoglobins are presented, which indicate a structure similar to that of the initially formed sulf-Mb isomer but also suggest the presence of a similar molecular heterogeneity as found for sulf-Mb, albiet to a smaller extent.

  1. Assignments of proton populations in dough and bread using NMR relaxometry of starch, gluten, and flour model systems.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Geertrui M; Lagrain, Bert; Deleu, Lomme J; Fierens, Ellen; Hills, Brian P; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-05-30

    Starch-water, gluten-water, and flour-water model systems as well as straight-dough bread were investigated with (1)H NMR relaxometry using free induction decay and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. Depending on the degree of interaction between polymers and water, different proton populations could be distinguished. The starch protons in the starch-water model gain mobility owing to amylopectin crystal melting, granule swelling, and amylose leaching, whereas water protons lose mobility due to increased interaction with starch polymers. Heating of the gluten-water sample induces no pronounced changes in proton distributions. Heating changes the proton distributions of the flour-water and starch-water models in a similar way, implying that the changes are primarily attributable to starch gelatinization. Proton distributions of the heated flour-water model system and those of fresh bread crumb are very similar. This allows identifying the different proton populations in bread on the basis of the results from the model systems. PMID:22553963

  2. NMR Study of Strontium Binding by a Micaceous Mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, Geoffrey M.; Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, S.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-04-13

    The nature of strontium binding by soil minerals directly affects the transport and sequestration/remediation of radioactive strontium species released from leaking high-level nuclear waste storage tanks. However, the molecular-level structure of strontium binding sites has seldom been explored in phyllosilicate minerals by direct spectroscopic means and is not well-understood. In this work, we use solid-state NMR to analyze strontium directly and indirectly in a fully strontium-exchanged synthetic mica of nominal composition Na4Mg6Al4Si4O20F4. Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and NMR evidence supports that heat treatment at 500 °C for 4 h fully dehydrates the mica, creating a hydrogen-free interlayer. Analysis of the strontium NMR spectrum of the heat-treated mica shows a single strontium environment with a quadrupolar coupling constant of 9.02 MHz and a quadrupolar asymmetry parameter of 1.0. These quadrupolar parameters are consistent with a highly distorted and asymmetric coordination environment that would be produced by strontium cations without water in the coordination sphere bound deep within the ditrigonal holes. Evidence for at least one additional strontium environment, where proton-strontium couplings may occur, was found via a 1H-87Sr transfer of populations by double resonance NMR experiment. We conclude that the strontium cations in the proton-free interlayer are observable by 87Sr NMR and bound through electrostatic interactions as nine coordinate inner-sphere complexes sitting in the ditrigonal holes. Partially hydrated strontium cations invisible to direct 87Sr NMR are also present and located on the external mica surfaces, which are known to hydrate upon exposure to atmospheric moisture. These results demonstrate that modern pulsed NMR techniques and high fields can be used effectively to provide structural details of strontium binding by phyllosilicate minerals.

  3. Synthesis and carbon-13 NMR studies of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hong

    2000-08-01

    The orientation of different segments of 4'-cyanophenyl 4-heptylbenzoate (7CPB) has been investigated using 13C NMR. The method of proton encoded local field (PELF) spectroscopy was used in combination with off-magic-angle spinning (OMAS) of the sample. High-resolution 2D spectra were obtained and the order parameters were calculated from the spectra. Linear relationships between the obtained order parameters and anisotropic chemical shifts determined by 1D 13C NMR were established and semi-empirical parameters were obtained. A 1:2 mixture of 7CPB and its chain-perfluorinated analog (7PFCPB) shows interesting phase behavior with changing of temperature. The mixture was studied by the use of 13C NMR and polarizing optical microscopy. The order parameters of 7CPB in the smectic A phase of the mixture were calculated using the semi-empirical parameters obtained by the 2D NMR method. Eight series of liquid crystals containing an electron- donating group at one end of a conjugated system and an electron-withdrawing group at the other end have been synthesized. The electron-donating group is 4- n-alkylpiperazinyl group, the electron- withdrawing group is nitro group and the conjugated system is diphenyldiazene with zero, one or two substituents on the phenyl rings. The substituents are -F, -Cl, and -CH3. Two series of compounds with cyano group as electron-withdrawing group were also synthesized. Most of the compounds synthesized are nematogenic and exhibit rather broad liquid crystalline ranges. The effects of the lateral substituents on the optical absorption and phase transition temperatures are correlated with their nature and position of substitution. Birefringence, dielectric anisotropy, elastic constant ratio and rise time of the liquid crystals were carried out using 10 wt% LC mixtures in E7. It has been found that lateral substituents have subtle effects on the properties. The presence of lateral substituents depresses melting points and clearing points of the

  4. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria).

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P

    2016-01-15

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs. PMID:26312739

  5. Theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupka, Teobald; Wieczorek, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report results of combined theoretical and experimental NMR studies on muscimol, the bioactive alkaloid from fly agaric mushroom (Amanita muscaria). The assignment of 1H and 13C NMR spectra of muscimol in DMSO-d6 was supported by additional two-dimensional heteronuclear correlated spectra (2D NMR) and gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) NMR calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The effect of solvent in theoretical calculations was included via polarized continuum model (PCM) and the hybrid three-parameter B3LYP density functional in combination with 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis set enabled calculation of reliable structures of non-ionized (neutral) molecule and its NH and zwitterionic forms in the gas phase, chloroform, DMSO and water. GIAO NMR calculations, using equilibrium and rovibrationally averaged geometry, at B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J levels of theory provided muscimol nuclear magnetic shieldings. The theoretical proton and carbon chemical shifts were critically compared with experimental NMR spectra measured in DMSO. Our results provide useful information on its structure in solution. We believe that such data could improve the understanding of basic features of muscimol at atomistic level and provide another tool in studies related to GABA analogs.

  6. Role of NMR in diagnosis and evaluation of stroke: 303 studies of 152 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, R.L.; Kertesz, A.; Black, S.; Carr, T.; McFadden, L.; Cooper, P.E.; Stewart, S.

    1985-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) proton imaging of 158 patients with clinical stroke was done over 18 months (0.15T Technicare resistive prototype imager). Spin echo (TR250-2150, TE30-240 m sec.) and inversion spin echo (TR1600, TI450, TE30 m sec.) sequences were used. Early sensitivity of NMR was superior to CT and 24 and 48 hours but not at 48-72 hours from clinical onset. Cerebral hemorrhage was studied by NMR in 18 patients (7 within 72 hours); all could be diagnosed as hemorrhage within 72 hours though findings were more subtle than CT. NMR findings became striking by 5 days and persisted longer than CT on late follow-up. Increased NMR signal on spin echo imaging in acute stroke correlated with tissue oedema and necrosis on pathologic study, while high signal in sub-acute stroke corresponded to gliosis, microcystic change, and macrophage infiltration. Zones of altered TI-weighted signal are presently under comparison by digitizer to pathologic zones in a patient with cerebral hemorrhage. NMR convincingly demonstrates superior early sensitivity in diagnoses of stroke but uncertainty remains concerning reliable detection of early hemorrhage.

  7. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  8. Toxicometabolomics approach to urinary biomarkers for mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2})-induced nephrotoxicity using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyu-Bong; Um, So Young; Chung, Myeon Woo; Jung, Seung Chul; Oh, Ji Seon; Kim, Seon Hwa; Na, Han Sung; Lee, Byung Mu; Choi, Ki Hwan

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine and characterize surrogate biomarkers that can predict nephrotoxicity induced by mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) using urinary proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) spectral data. A procedure for {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis using pattern recognition was proposed to evaluate nephrotoxicity induced by HgCl{sub 2} in Sprague-Dawley rats. HgCl{sub 2} at 0.1 or 0.75 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), and urine was collected every 24 h for 6 days. Animals (n = 6 per group) were sacrificed 3 or 6 days post-dosing in order to perform clinical blood chemistry tests and histopathologic examinations. Urinary {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy revealed apparent differential clustering between the control and HgCl{sub 2} treatment groups as evidenced by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS)-discriminant analysis (DA). Time- and dose-dependent separation of HgCl{sub 2}-treated animals from controls was observed by PCA of {sup 1}H NMR spectral data. In HgCl{sub 2}-treated rats, the concentrations of endogenous urinary metabolites of glucose, acetate, alanine, lactate, succinate, and ethanol were significantly increased, whereas the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, allantoin, citrate, formate, taurine, and hippurate were significantly decreased. These endogenous metabolites were selected as putative biomarkers for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity. A dose response was observed in concentrations of lactate, acetate, succinate, and ethanol, where severe disruption of the concentrations of 2-oxoglutarate, citrate, formate, glucose, and taurine was observed at the higher dose (0.75 mg/kg) of HgCl{sub 2}. Correlation of urinary {sup 1}H NMR PLS-DA data with renal histopathologic changes suggests that {sup 1}H NMR urinalysis can be used to predict or screen for HgCl{sub 2}-induced nephrotoxicity{sub .}

  9. NMR-Metabolic Methodology in the Study of GM Foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 1H NMR methodology used in the study of genetically modified (GM) foodstuff is discussed. The study of transgenic lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv "Luxor") over-expressing the KNAT1 gene from Arabidopsis is presented as a novel study-case. The 1H NMR metabolic profiling was carried out. Twenty-two wat...

  10. Magic-angle-spinning NMR studies of zeolite SAPO-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freude, D.; Ernst, H.; Hunger, M.; Pfeifer, H.; Jahn, E.

    1988-01-01

    SAPO-5 was synthesized using triethylamine as template. Magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR of 1H, 27Al, 29Si and 31P was used to study the silicon incorporation into the framework and the nature of the Brønsted sites. 1H MAS NMR shows two types of bridging hydroxyl groups. 29Si MAS NMR indicates that silicon substitutes mostly for phosphorus and that there is a small amount of crystalline SiO 2 in the zeolite powder.

  11. Correlation between 1H NMR chemical shifts of hydroxyl protons in n-hexanol/cyclohexane and molecular association properties investigated using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Mario E.; Shibue, Toshimichi; Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Association of n-hexanol molecules in cyclohexane forming clusters is studied by DFT and 1H NMR. Geometry optimization, corrected binding energies, charge distributions, charge transfer energies, and 1H NMR chemical shifts have been obtained. The calculated chemical shifts of hydroxyl protons have been correlated to experimental data obtained in the range of n-hexanol molar fraction between 0.002 and 0.2, showing that n-hexanol molecules at a molar fraction around 0.1, where well-structured hydrogen bond networks are observed, tend to form linear pentamers and hexamers. The experimental data are consistent with the continuous linear association thermodynamic model, showing a dimensionless association constant of 284.

  12. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  13. Multinuclear solid film state NMR studies of metal oxide catalysts and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.S.; Stec, D.F.; Ellis, P.D.

    1996-10-01

    Several of our investigations of heterogeneous process by novel NMR experiments and analyses are reviewed and the utility and limitations of NMR spectroscopy for these areas discussed. Out studies have included the following: dynamics and arrangements of proton-containing adsorbates, primarily Bronsted acid sites and water, on the surface of zirconia and alumina catalysts; hydrogen dynamics and coordinates in synthetic aluminum oxyhydroxides; phase separation and crystallinity of synthetic minerals. In combination with the complementary results obtained in our laboratory via infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis (primarily TGA and DSC), and catalytic activity measurements, these NMR data provide unique and valuable information on atomic and molecular dynamics, identities, and structures without requiring pristine, single crystal specimens.

  14. NMR studies of multiphase flows II

    SciTech Connect

    Altobelli, S.A.; Caprihan, A.; Fukushima, E.

    1995-12-31

    NMR techniques for measurements of spatial distribution of material phase, velocity and velocity fluctuation are being developed and refined. Versions of these techniques which provide time average liquid fraction and fluid phase velocity have been applied to several concentrated suspension systems which will not be discussed extensively here. Technical developments required to further extend the use of NMR to the multi-phase flow arena and to provide measurements of previously unobtainable parameters are the focus of this report.

  15. A multinuclear static NMR study of geopolymerisation

    SciTech Connect

    Favier, Aurélie; Habert, Guillaume; Roussel, Nicolas; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-09-15

    Geopolymers are inorganic binders obtained by alkali activation of aluminosilicates. While the structure of geopolymers is now well understood, the details of the geopolymerisation reaction and their impact on the rheology of the paste remain uncertain. In this work, we follow the elastic properties of a paste made with metakaolin and sodium silicate solution. After the first sharp increase of elastic modulus occurring a few hundred of seconds after mixing and related to the heterogeneous formation of an alumina–silicate gel with a molar ratio Si/Al < 4 located at the grains boundaries, we focus on the progressive increase in elastic modulus on a period of few hours during the setting of the geopolymer. In this study, we combine the study of rheological properties of the paste with {sup 23}Na, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si static NMR measurement in order to better understand the origin of this second increase in elastic modulus. Our results show that, after a few hours, Al and Na evolution in the liquid phase are concomitant. This suggests the precipitation of an aluminosilicate phase where Al is in tetrahedral position and Na compensates the charge. Furthermore, Si speciation confirms this result and allows us to identify the precipitation of a product, which has a chemical composition close to the final composition of geopolymer. This study provides strong evidence for a heterogeneous formation of an aluminosilicate glass directly from the first gel and the silicate solution without the need for a reorganisation of Gel 1 into Gel 2.

  16. UV-visible and (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopic studies of colorimetric thiosemicarbazide anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kristina N; Makuc, Damjan; Podborska, Agnieszka; Szaciłowski, Konrad; Plavec, Janez; Magri, David C

    2015-02-14

    Four model thiosemicarbazide anion chemosensors containing three N-H bonds, substituted with phenyl and/or 4-nitrophenyl units, were synthesised and studied for their anion binding abilities with hydroxide, fluoride, acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and chloride. The anion binding properties were studied in DMSO and 9 : 1 DMSO-H2O by UV-visible absorption and (1)H/(13)C/(15)N NMR spectroscopic techniques and corroborated with DFT studies. Significant changes were observed in the UV-visible absorption spectra with all anions, except for chloride, accompanied by dramatic colour changes visible to the naked eye. These changes were determined to be due to the deprotonation of the central N-H proton and not due to hydrogen bonding based on (1)H/(15)N NMR titration studies with acetate in DMSO-d6-0.5% water. Direct evidence for deprotonation was confirmed by the disappearance of the central thiourea proton and the formation of acetic acid. DFT and charge distribution calculations suggest that for all four compounds the central N-H proton is the most acidic. Hence, the anion chemosensors operate by a deprotonation mechanism of the central N-H proton rather than by hydrogen bonding as is often reported. PMID:25451865

  17. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  18. Molecular ordering of mixed surfactants in mesoporous silicas: A solid-state NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Mao, Kanmi; Wang, Shy-Guey; Lin, Victor S.-Y.; Pruski, Marek

    2011-02-17

    The use of mixed surfactants in the synthesis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) is of importance in the context of adjusting pore structures, sizes and morphologies. In the present study, the arrangement of molecules in micelles produced from a mixture of two surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was detailed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Proximities of methyl protons in the trimethylammonium headgroup of CTAB and protons in the pyridinium headgroup of CPB were observed under fast magic angle spinning (MAS) by {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H double quantum (DQ) MAS NMR and NOESY. This result suggested that CTAB and CPB co-exist in the pores without forming significant monocomponent domain structures. {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR showed that protons in the headgroups of CTAB are in closer proximity to the silica surface than those in the CPB headgroups. The structural information obtained in this investigation leads to better understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and their role in determining the structure and morphology of mesoporous materials.

  19. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  20. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  1. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  2. Identification of endogenous metabolites in human sperm cells using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Amaral, A; Rodriguez, M; Canyellas, N; Correig, X; Ballescà, J L; Ramalho-Santos, J; Oliva, R

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to the first comprehensive metabolomic characterization of the human sperm cell through the application of two untargeted platforms based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using these two complementary strategies, we were able to identify a total of 69 metabolites, of which 42 were identified using NMR, 27 using GC-MS and 4 by both techniques. The identity of some of these metabolites was further confirmed by two-dimensional (1) H-(1) H homonuclear correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and (1) H-(13) C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy. Most of the metabolites identified are reported here for the first time in mature human spermatozoa. The relationship between the metabolites identified and the previously reported sperm proteome was also explored. Interestingly, overrepresented pathways included not only the metabolism of carbohydrates, but also of lipids and lipoproteins. Of note, a large number of the metabolites identified belonged to the amino acids, peptides and analogues super class. The identification of this initial set of metabolites represents an important first step to further study their function in male gamete physiology and to explore potential reasons for dysfunction in future studies. We also demonstrate that the application of NMR and MS provides complementary results, thus constituting a promising strategy towards the completion of the human sperm cell metabolome. PMID:25854681

  3. Rapid proton-detected NMR assignment for proteins with fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J; Retel, Joren S; Andreas, Loren B; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Franks, W Trent; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Hiller, Matthias; Higman, Victoria; Guerry, Paul; Bertarello, Andrea; Knight, Michael J; Felletti, Michele; Le Marchand, Tanguy; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars; Stoppini, Monica; Bellotti, Vittorio; Bolognesi, Martino; Ricagno, Stefano; Chou, James J; Griffin, Robert G; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Herrmann, Torsten; Pintacuda, Guido

    2014-09-01

    Using a set of six (1)H-detected triple-resonance NMR experiments, we establish a method for sequence-specific backbone resonance assignment of magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of 5-30 kDa proteins. The approach relies on perdeuteration, amide (2)H/(1)H exchange, high magnetic fields, and high-spinning frequencies (ωr/2π ≥ 60 kHz) and yields high-quality NMR data, enabling the use of automated analysis. The method is validated with five examples of proteins in different condensed states, including two microcrystalline proteins, a sedimented virus capsid, and two membrane-embedded systems. In comparison to contemporary (13)C/(15)N-based methods, this approach facilitates and accelerates the MAS NMR assignment process, shortening the spectral acquisition times and enabling the use of unsupervised state-of-the-art computational data analysis protocols originally developed for solution NMR. PMID:25102442

  4. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  5. ⁵¹V NMR Crystallography of Vanadium Chloroperoxidase and Its Directed Evolution P395D/L241V/T343A Mutant: Protonation Environments of the Active Site.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Hou, Guangjin; Renirie, Rokus; Wever, Ron; Polenova, Tatyana

    2015-04-29

    Vanadium-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPOs) perform two-electron oxidation of halides using hydrogen peroxide. Their mechanism, including the factors determining the substrate specificity and the pH-dependence of the catalytic rates, is poorly understood. The vanadate cofactor in the active site of VHPOs contains "spectroscopically silent" V(V), which does not change oxidation state during the reaction. We employed an NMR crystallography approach based on (51)V magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory, to gain insights into the structure and coordination environment of the cofactor in the resting state of vanadium-dependent chloroperoxidases (VCPO). The cofactor environments in the wild-type VCPO and its P395D/L241V/T343A mutant exhibiting 5-100-fold improved catalytic activity are examined at various pH values. Optimal sensitivity attained due to the fast MAS probe technologies enabled the assignment of the location and number of protons on the vanadate as a function of pH. The vanadate cofactor changes its protonation from quadruply protonated at pH 6.3 to triply protonated at pH 7.3 to doubly protonated at pH 8.3. In contrast, in the mutant, the vanadate protonation is the same at pH 5.0 and 8.3, and the cofactor is doubly protonated. This methodology to identify the distinct protonation environments of the cofactor, which are also pH-dependent, could help explain the different reactivities of the wild-type and mutant VCPO and their pH-dependence. This study demonstrates that (51)V-based NMR crystallography can be used to derive the detailed coordination environments of vanadium centers in large biological molecules. PMID:25856001

  6. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  7. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  8. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  9. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, September 13, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-05-27

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed a delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  10. Two dimensional NMR and NMR relaxation studies of coal structure. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zilm, K.W.

    1992-12-31

    This report covers the progress made on the title project for the project period. Four major areas of inquiry are being pursued. Advanced solid state NMR methods are being developed to assay the distribution of the various important functional groups that determine the reactivity of coals. Special attention is being paid to methods that are compatible with the very high magic angle sample spinning rates needed for operation at the high magnetic field strengths available today. Polarization inversion methods utilizing the difference in heat capacities of small groups of spins are particularly promising. Methods combining proton-proton spin diffusion with {sup 13}C CPMAS readout are being developed to determine the connectivity of functional groups in coals in a high sensitivity relay type of experiment. Additional work is aimed at delineating the role of methyl group rotation in the proton NMR relaxation behavior of coals.

  11. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  12. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  13. Proton Fingerprints Portray Molecular Structures: Enhanced Description of the 1H NMR Spectra of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, José G.; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Niemitz, Matthias; Korhonen, Samuli-Petrus; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic signals observed in NMR spectra encode essential information on the structure of small molecules. However, extracting all of this information from complex signal patterns is not trivial. This report demonstrates how computer-aided spectral analysis enables the complete interpretation of 1D 1H NMR data. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated with a set of organic molecules, for which replicas of their 1H NMR spectra were generated. The potential impact of this methodology on organic chemistry research is discussed. PMID:24007197

  14. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lozovoi, A; Mattea, C; Herrmann, A; Rössler, E A; Stapf, S; Fatkullin, N

    2016-06-28

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time. PMID:27369489

  15. Communication: Proton NMR dipolar-correlation effect as a method for investigating segmental diffusion in polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovoi, A.; Mattea, C.; Herrmann, A.; Rössler, E. A.; Stapf, S.; Fatkullin, N.

    2016-06-01

    A simple and fast method for the investigation of segmental diffusion in high molar mass polymer melts is presented. The method is based on a special function, called proton dipolar-correlation build-up function, which is constructed from Hahn Echo signals measured at times t and t/2. The initial rise of this function contains additive contributions from both inter- and intramolecular magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The intermolecular contribution depends on the relative mean squared displacements (MSDs) of polymer segments from different macromolecules, while the intramolecular part reflects segmental reorientations. Separation of both contributions via isotope dilution provides access to segmental displacements in polymer melts at millisecond range, which is hardly accessible by other methods. The feasibility of the method is illustrated by investigating protonated and deuterated polybutadiene melts with molecular mass 196 000 g/mol at different temperatures. The observed exponent of the power law of the segmental MSD is close to 0.32 ± 0.03 at times when the root MSD is in between 45 Å and 75 Å, and the intermolecular proton dipole-dipole contribution to the total proton Hahn Echo NMR signal is larger than 50% and increases with time.

  16. NMR Studies of the Li-Mg-N-H Phases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Robert; Reiter, J. W.; Kulleck, J. G.; Hwang, S.-J.; Luo, Weifang

    2007-03-01

    Solid state NMR including magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) MAS experiments have been used to characterize various amide and imide phases containing Li and/or Mg. MAS-NMR spectra for the ^1H, ^6Li, ^7Li, and ^15N nuclei have been obtained to improve understanding on formation, processing, and degradation behavior. Only limited information could be obtained from the proton and ^7Li MAS-NMR spectra to due large dipolar interactions and small chemical shifts. However, more success was obtained from the ^6Li and ^15N nuclei although their very long spin-lattice relaxation times did impact signal acquisition times. For example, three distinct ^6Li peaks were resolved from LiNH2 phases that were clearly separated from the LiH secondary phase in these samples. While the ^15N spectra for LiNH2 phase in isotopically enriched samples exhibited only a single peak at least three distinct ^15N peaks were observed from the similarly enriched Mg amide samples. These differences will be related to crystal structures. The NMR spectra also revealed very little motion in these hydrides upon to nearly 500 K.

  17. The Synthesis and Proton NMR Spectrum of Methyl 7-Cycloheptatrienylacetate: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurch, G. R., Jr.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes an advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment designed to give the senior chemistry student an opportunity to apply several synthetic and purification techniques as well as possibilities for the application of NMR spectroscopy. (CS)

  18. Some nitrogen-14 NMR studies in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pratum, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The first order quadrupolar perturbation of the /sup 14/N NMR spectrum yields information regarding the static and dynamic properties of the surrounding electronic environment. Signal to noise problems caused by long /sup 14/N longitudinal relaxation times (T/sub 1/) and small equilibrium polarizations are reduced by rotating frame cross polarization (CP) experiments between /sup 14/N and /sup 1/H. Using quadrupolar echo and CP techniques, the /sup 14/N quadrupolar coupling constants (e/sup 2/qQ/h) and asymmetry parameters (eta) have been obtained for a variety of tetraalkylammonium compounds by observation of their quadrupolar powder patterns at various temperatures. For choline chloride and iodide the /sup 14/N NMR powder patterns exhibit the effects of anisotropic molecular motion, while choline bromide spectra show no such effects.

  19. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  20. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  1. NMR studies on polyphosphide Ce6Ni6P17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.; Yamada, H.; Ueda, K.; Mito, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Nakano, T.; Takeda, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report the result of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies on Ce6Ni6P17. The observed NMR spectra show a Lorentzian-type and an asymmetric shapes, reflecting the local symmetry around each P site in the cubic unit cell. We have identified the observed NMR lines corresponding to three inequivalent P sites and deduced the temperature dependence of the Knight shift for each site. The Knight shifts increase with decreasing temperature down to 1.5 K, indicating a localized spin system of Ce6Ni6P17. Antiferromagnetic correlation between 4f spins is suggested from the negative sign of the Weiss-temperature.

  2. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  3. Study of molecular interactions with 13C DNP-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Mathilde H.; Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Baumann, Herbert; Petersen, Bent O.; Karlsson, Magnus; Duus, Jens Ø.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H.

    2010-03-01

    NMR spectroscopy is an established, versatile technique for the detection of molecular interactions, even when these interactions are weak. Signal enhancement by several orders of magnitude through dynamic nuclear polarization alleviates several practical limitations of NMR-based interaction studies. This enhanced non-equilibrium polarization contributes sensitivity for the detection of molecular interactions in a single NMR transient. We show that direct 13C NMR ligand binding studies at natural isotopic abundance of 13C gets feasible in this way. Resultant screens are easy to interpret and can be performed at 13C concentrations below μM. In addition to such ligand-detected studies of molecular interaction, ligand binding can be assessed and quantified with enzymatic assays that employ hyperpolarized substrates at varying enzyme inhibitor concentrations. The physical labeling of nuclear spins by hyperpolarization thus provides the opportunity to devise fast novel in vitro experiments with low material requirement and without the need for synthetic modifications of target or ligands.

  4. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part V

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-10-01

    A method to predict the octane number of automobile gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry was studied. Samples of gasoline whose octane numbers had been identified according to the ASTM standards (commercially available premium gasoline to which MTBE was added at rates of 7 vol % and 14 vol %) were used in this investigation of the effect of MTBE on the octane number. The findings were utilized to introduce a term regarding MTBE into the previously reported linear regression equation for estimating the octane number from the PMR spectrum, and the appropriateness of the linear regression equation was assessed. As a result the MTBE contents in the sample were determined with satisfactory accuracy by using a standard addition method, and a linear regression equation reflecting the effect of MTBE was obtained. These achievements are reported. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Basic principles of static proton low-resolution spin diffusion NMR in nanophase-separated materials with mobility contrast.

    PubMed

    Schäler, Kerstin; Roos, Matthias; Micke, Peter; Golitsyn, Yury; Seidlitz, Anne; Thurn-Albrecht, Thomas; Schneider, Horst; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2015-11-01

    We review basic principles of low-resolution proton NMR spin diffusion experiments, relying on mobility differences in nm-sized phases of inhomogeneous organic materials such as block-co- or semicrystalline polymers. They are of use for estimates of domain sizes and insights into nanometric dynamic inhomogeneities. Experimental procedures and limitations of mobility-based signal decomposition/filtering prior to spin diffusion are addressed on the example of as yet unpublished data on semicrystalline poly(ϵ-caprolactone), PCL. Specifically, we discuss technical aspects of the quantitative, dead-time free detection of rigid-domain signals by aid of the magic-sandwich echo (MSE), and magic-and-polarization-echo (MAPE) and double-quantum (DQ) magnetization filters to select rigid and mobile components, respectively. Such filters are of general use in reliable fitting approaches for phase composition determinations. Spin diffusion studies at low field using benchtop instruments are challenged by rather short (1)H T1 relaxation times, which calls for simulation-based analyses. Applying these, in combination with domain sizes as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering, we have determined spin diffusion coefficients D for PCL (0.34, 0.19 and 0.032nm(2)/ms for crystalline, interphase and amorphous parts, respectively). We further address thermal-history effects related to secondary crystallization. Finally, the state of knowledge concerning the connection between D values determined locally at the atomic level, using (13)C detection and CP- or REDOR-based "(1)H hole burning" procedures, and those obtained by calibration experiments, is summarized. Specifically, the non-trivial dependence of D on the magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequency, with a minimum under static and a local maximum under moderate-MAS conditions, is highlighted. PMID:26404771

  6. A 19F NMR Study of Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, Keith E.; Lentz, Kevin; Duncan, Jeffery

    1998-10-01

    This basic enzyme activity laboratory experiment demonstrates how 19F NMR can be used in biochemical studies and presents the advantages of 19F NMR over 1H NMR for studies of this nature. N-Trifluoroacetylglycine was selected as a commercially available model fluorine-tagged substrate that readily undergoes acylase I-catalyzed hydrolysis to produce trifluoroacetic acid and glycine. Progress of the reaction was monitored by following conversion of the trifluoroacetyl moiety peak of N-trifluoroacetylglycine to trifluoroacetic acid. The extent of hydrolysis was determined by comparing integrated ratios of the two 19F NMR peaks. A plot of percent hydrolysis versus enzyme concentration was used to calculate unit activity of the enzyme. This is a viable laboratory experiment for junior/senior-level courses in instrumental analytical chemistry, biochemistry, molecular biology, or spectroscopy.

  7. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  8. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  9. Analysis of Chain Branch of Polyolefins by a New Proton NMR Approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minhwan; Lee, Yura; Kwak, Sooyoung; Park, Heeyong; Kim, Byoungsoo; Kim, Sulhee; Lee, Kwang Hwan; Cho, Hye Sung; Hwang, Kwang Yeon

    2016-02-01

    The crystallinity of polyethylene, which significantly affects the properties of the polymer, is quite sensitive to the concentration of its branches. Thus, it is necessary to estimate branch concentration with reasonable accuracy. Currently, (13)C NMR and gel permeation chromatography-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are widely-used analysis methods for the analysis of branch concentration. Despite several advantages, these methods sometimes have limitations. For instance, the preparation of samples for (13)C- NMR is tedious because high-concentration samples are required and the time for analysis is greater than 12 h. To more efficiently estimate the branch concentration of polyethylene, we developed a new high-field (1)H NMR method with an improved peak resolution by employing (1) homonuclear decoupling and (2) 2D heteronuclear correlation. The new method was observed to significantly reduce the experimental time to ∼ 30 min; furthermore, sample preparation was relatively simple because the method did not require high-concentration samples. PMID:26713895

  10. Proton and carbon NMR measurements of the effects of hydration on the wheat protein ω-gliadin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, P. S.; Gil, A. M.; Grant, A.; Alberti, E.; Tatham, A. S.

    1998-07-01

    The wheat protein ω-gliadin consists of a simple repeat sequence composed mainly of proline and glutamine. It thus represents a simple model for many cereal proteins and other proline and glutamine rich sequences which occur in multiple repeats. The behaviour on hydration has been examined by the measurement of proton NMR relaxation times. Sidechain motions (methyl and amino group rotation, proline ring puckering) were largely responsible for T1 relaxation. It was found that the glass transition does not affect T1 and T1 ρ relaxation and only affects transverse relaxation. Magic angle spinning experiments have been used to observe line narrowed proton spectra as well as carbon cross polarisation spectra. In the proton spectra, at high levels of hydration, backbone and sidechain NH groups are observed indicating that whole segments of the protein chain are in the mobile regime. The carbon spectra are characterised by a loss of the proline C δ signal intensity at high levels of hydration indicating the involvement of proline in the hydration process. It is concluded that the behaviour of ω-gliadin on hydration may be explained by the formation of mobile protein loops together with residual regions of strong interprotein interaction.

  11. Isolation and 2D NMR Studies of Alkaloids from Comptonella sessilifoliola1.

    PubMed

    Pusset, J; Lopez, J L; Pais, M; Neirabeyeh, M A; Veillon, J M

    1991-04-01

    Six known furanoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated from the wood and trunk bark of COMPTONELLA SESSILIFOLIOLA (Guillaumin) Hartley (Rutaceae). 2D NMR experiments gave the assignment of all the signals for both (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra. Pteleine and kokusaginine were used as models. The two-dimensional carbon-proton correlation experiments, performed for the first time on furanoquinoline alkaloids, led us to correct (13)C-NMR assignments previously described in the literature. PMID:17226139

  12. Backbone dynamics of barstar: a (15)N NMR relaxation study.

    PubMed

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Majumdar, A; Udgaonkar, J B

    2000-12-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly (15)N-labeled barstar have been studied at 32 degrees C, pH 6.7, by using (15)N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy. (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R(1)), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R(2)), and steady-state heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOEs have been determined for 69 of the 86 (excluding two prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide (15)N at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla. The primary relaxation data have been analyzed by using the model-free formalism of molecular dynamics, using both isotropic and axially symmetric diffusion of the molecule, to determine the overall rotational correlation time (tau(m)), the generalized order parameter (S(2)), the effective correlation time for internal motions (tau(e)), and NH exchange broadening contributions (R(ex)) for each residue. As per the axially symmetric diffusion, the ratio of diffusion rates about the unique and perpendicular axes (D( parallel)/D( perpendicular)) is 0.82 +/- 0.03. The two results have only marginal differences. The relaxation data have also been used to map reduced spectral densities for the NH vectors of these residues at three frequencies: 0, omega(H), and omega(N), where omega(H),(N) are proton and nitrogen Larmor frequencies. The value of tau(m) obtained from model-free analysis of the relaxation data is 5.2 ns. The reduced spectral density analysis, however, yields a value of 5.7 ns. The tau(m) determined here is different from that calculated previously from time-resolved fluorescence data (4.1 ns). The order parameter ranges from 0.68 to 0.98, with an average value of 0.85 +/- 0.02. A comparison of the order parameters with the X-ray B-factors for the backbone nitrogens of wild-type barstar does not show any considerable correlation. Model-free analysis of the relaxation data for seven residues required the inclusion of an exchange broadening term, the magnitude of which ranges from 2

  13. Fluorine-19 NMR of solids with both homonuclear (multipulse) decoupling and pulsed proton decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Ulrich; Harris, Robin K.

    1996-11-01

    The application of multipulse and of combined rotation and multipulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) to fluorine is demonstrated. The MREV-8 multipulse sequence is applied to average the homonuclear dipolar coupling between the fluorine nuclei. The heteronuclear dipolar coupling to the protons can be suppressed by irradiation with a synchronized sequence of π pulses at the proton frequency. MAS is applied to average the anisotropy of the chemical shift. Applications to a fluorinated adamantane derivative and to polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) are shown.

  14. Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part IV

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S.; Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K.

    1992-08-01

    Software for predicting the octane number of motor gasoline by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry has been formulated. At the same time, a method has been studied to predict the composition of gasoline (in terms of the contents of paraffin, olefin, and aromatic compounds). The formulated program was evaluated by using it to predict the octane numbers of 31 samples of marketed summer gasoline (including 16 regular and 15 premium products), whose octane numbers and compositions were identified according to the ASTM standards. Also, the relationship between the PMR spectrum and gasoline composition was subjected to linear regression analysis by using the 31 samples whose octane numbers were calculated, and the appropriateness of the resultant regression equations was assessed. This report concerns the results of the study in which the octane numbers of the 31 samples were satisfactorily predicted by the formulated program and useful linear regression equation were obtained for the prediction of the composition of gasoline. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz. PMID:25885091

  16. Arterial metabolism as studied in vitro by NMR: preliminary results in normotensive and hypertensive aortas.

    PubMed

    Carlier, P G; Grandjean, J; Michel, P; D'Orio, V; Rorive, G L

    1985-12-01

    Arterial tissue has been analysed by 31P-, 13C-, 23Na- and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Rabbit thoracic aortas were mounted on a system with perfusate circulation and studied in basal conditions. Phosphorus spectra remained stable for hours and showed low levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) compared to skeletal, cardiac or even to nonvascular smooth muscle. Significant levels of sugar-phosphates (SP), phosphodiesters (PDE) were detected, as well as occasionnally a peak in the diphosphodiester region. Experiments with phosphate-free perfusate demonstrated a very low level of intracellular inorganic phosphate. As expected from previous data, free ADP levels in tonic arterial tissue were found much higher than in any other muscle. Addition of norepinephrine into the perfusate induced transient decrease in ATP and PCr levels, associated with an increased production of phosphorylated intermediates. At the early stage of renovascular hypertension, aortic energetic pattern was characterized by an increased ADP/ATP ratio. Natural abundant 13C spectra were recorded from dog aortic fragments and showed mainly resonances attributed to fatty components. After addition of a shift-reagent, dysprosium tripolyphosphate, 23Na-NMR allowed separation of intra- and extracellular Na of perfused rabbits aortas. Proton NMR of lyophilized aortic fragments revealed several peaks originating from biologically relevant molecules, lactate, creatine, taurine... These preliminary data demonstrate the feasability of multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of vascular tissue and are suggestive of the potential of the method when it will be combined with monitoring of functional parameters. PMID:2424380

  17. The effects of bone on proton NMR relaxation times of surrounding liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. A.; Genant, H. K.; Dunham, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary attempts by our group at UCSF to assess fat content of vertebral marrow in the lumbar spine using relaxation time information demonstrated that the presence of trabecular bone affects relaxation times. The objective of this work was a thorough study of the effects of bone on NMR relaxation characteristics of surrounding liquids. Trabecular bone from autopsy specimens was ground up and sifted into a series of powders with graded densities ranging from 0.3 gm/cc to 0.8 gm/cc. Each powder was placed first in n-saline and then in cottonseed oil. With spectroscopy, spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) and effective spin-spin relaxation times (T2*) were measured for each liquid in each bone powder. As bone density and surface to volume ratio increased, T1 decreased faster for saline than for oil. T2* decreased significantly for both water and oil as the surface to volume ratio increased. It was concluded that effects of water on T1 could be explained by a surface interaction at the bone/liquid interface, which restricted rotational and translational motion of nearby molecules. The T1s of oil were not affected since oil molecules are nonpolar, do not participate in significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding, and therefore would not be expected to interact strongly with the bone surface. Effects on T2* could be explained by local magnetic field inhomogeneities created by discontinuous magnetic susceptibility near the bone surface. These preliminary results suggest that water in contact with trabecular bone in vivo will exhibit shortened relaxation times.

  18. Solid-state proton NMR of paramagnetic metal complexes: DANTE spin echoes for selective excitation in inhomogeneously broadened lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Perez Linde, A. J.; Bauer, Gerald; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-08-01

    The paramagnetic complex bis(oxazolinylphenyl)amine-Fe(III)Cl2 is investigated by means of solid-state proton NMR at 18.8 T (800 MHz) using magic-angle spinning at 65 kHz. Spin echoes that are excited and refocused by combs of rotor-synchronized pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) allow one to characterize different chemical environments that severely overlap in conventional MAS spectra. Such sequences combine two apparently contradictory features: an overall bandwidth exceeding several MHz, and very selective irradiation of a few kHz within inhomogeneously broadened sidebands. The experimental hyperfine interactions correlate well with DFT calculations.

  19. Free volume of poly(perfluorosulfonic acid)/SiO 2 composite proton exchange membranes by 129Xe NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utiu, Lavinia; Filipoi, Carmen; Demco, Dan E.; Zhu, Xiaomin; Vinokur, Rostislav; Conradi, Oliver; Graichen, Andreas; Blümich, Bernhard; Möller, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid)/silica (PFSA/SiO2) composites were investigated by 129Xe NMR spectroscopy and relaxometry. 129Xe chemical shift extrapolated to zero pressure was used for calculation of average free volume hole size. This quantity reaches a maximum at 2 wt.% SiO2 that could be correlated to the performance of composites proton exchange membrane. 129Xe longitudinal magnetization relaxation revealed a bimodal distribution of the free volume that was explained by the presence of xenon atoms in the backbone and pendant-chain domains. Thus, the free volume is heterogeneous and depends on the content of SiO2. Implications of the free volume changes for the hydrogen crossover through PFSA/SiO2 membranes are also discussed.

  20. Simulation study of proton transport in ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations were used to study the morphological changes induced in a Nafion-like ionomer by the imposition of a strong electric field. We observe that proton transport through this polymer electrolyte membrane is accompanied by morphological changes that include the formation of structures aligned along the direction of the applied field. The polar head groups of the ionomer side chains assemble into clusters, which then form rod-like formations, and these cylindrical structures then assemble into a hexagonally ordered array aligned with the direction of current flow. For dry ionomers, at current densities in excess of 1 A/cm^2 these rod-like clusters undergo an inner micro-phase separation, in which distinct wire-like lines of sulfonate head groups are accompanied by similar wire-like alignments of bound protons. The clusters appear to be of two types. If there are two, four, or five lines of sulfonates then there is an equal number of lines of protons, but if there are three lines of sulfonates then they are accompanied by four lines of protons. Occasionally these lines of sulfonates and protons form a helical structure. Upon removal of the electric field, the hexagonal array of rod-like structures remains, but the microphase separation disappears below the threshold current of 1 A/cm^2.

  1. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the 15N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H 2O/D 2O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu II to enable rapid data acquisition.

  2. Investigating the Dissolution Performance of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton NMR.

    PubMed

    Tres, Francesco; Coombes, Steven R; Phillips, Andrew R; Hughes, Leslie P; Wren, Stephen A C; Aylott, Jonathan W; Burley, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions of poorly water-soluble bicalutamide in a Kollidon VA64 polymeric matrix as a function of the drug loading (5% vs. 30% bicalutamide). A combined suite of state-of-the-art analytical techniques were employed to obtain a clear picture of the drug release, including an integrated magnetic resonance imaging UV-Vis flow cell system and 1H-NMR. Off-line 1H-NMR was used for the first time to simultaneously measure the dissolution profiles and rates of both the drug and the polymer from a solid dispersion. MRI and 1H-NMR data showed that the 5% drug loading compact erodes linearly, and that bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64 are released at approximately the same rate from the molecular dispersion. For the 30% extrudate, data indicated a slower water ingress into the compact which corresponds to a slower dissolution rate of both bicalutamide and Kollidon VA64. PMID:26378506

  3. Some specific features of the NMR study of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Some specific features of studying fluid flows with a NMR spectrometer are considered. The consideration of these features in the NMR spectrometer design makes it possible to determine the relative concentrations of paramagnetic ions and measure the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times ( T 1 and T 2, respectively) in fluid flows with an error no larger than 0.5%. This approach allows one to completely avoid errors in determining the state of a fluid from measured relaxation constants T 1 and T 2, which is especially urgent when working with medical suspensions and biological solutions. The results of an experimental study of fluid flows are presented.

  4. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, S.; Horikawa, Y.; Tanaka, C.; Hirakawa, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Yoshizaki, K.

    1982-06-01

    The water in normal and edematous brain tissues of rats was studied by the pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, measuring the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and the transverse relaxation time (T2). In the normal brain, T1 and T2 were single components, both shorter than in pure water. Prolongation and separation of T2 into two components, one fast and one slow, were the characteristic findings in brain edema induced by both cold injury and triethyl tin (TET), although some differences between the two types of edema existed in the content of the lesion and in the degree of changes in T1 and T2 values. Quantitative analysis of T1 and T2 values in their time course relating to water content demonstrated that prolongation of T1 referred to the volume of increased water in tissues examined, and that two phases of T2 reflected the distribution and the content of the edema fluid. From the analysis of the slow component of T2 versus water content during edema formation, it was demonstrated that the increase in edema fluid was steady, and its content was constant during formation of TET-induced edema. On the contrary, during the formation of cold-injury edema, water-rich edema fluid increased during the initial few hours, and protein-rich edema fluid increased thereafter. It was concluded that proton NMR relaxation time measurements may provide new understanding in the field of brain edema research.

  5. Sterically Demanding Multidentate Ligand Tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine Slows Exchange and Enhances Solution State Ligand Proton NMR Coupling to 199Hg(II)

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Deborah C.; Bush, James F.; Crahan, Kathleen K.; Bowers, Edith V.; Butcher, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    The solution state coordination chemistry of Hg(ClO4)2 with tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine (TLA) was investigated in acetonitrile-d3 by proton NMR. Although Hg(II) is a d10 metal ion commonly associated with notoriously rapid exchange between coordination environments, as many as six ligand environments were observed to be in slow exchange on the chemical shift time scale at select metal-to-ligand ratios. One of these ligand environments was associated with extensive heteronuclear coupling between protons and 199Hg and was assigned to the complex [Hg(TLA)]2+. The 5J(1H199Hg) = 8 Hz associated with this complex is the first example of five-bond coupling in a nitrogen coordination compound of Hg(II). The spectral complexity of related studies conducted in acetone-d6 precluded analysis of coordination equilibria. Crystallographic characterization of the T-shaped complex [Hg(TLAH)(CH2COCH3)](ClO4)2 (1) in which two pyridyl rings are pendant suggested that the acidity of acetone combined with the poor coordinating abilities of the neutral solvent adds additional complexity to solution equilibria. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1¯ with a = 9.352(2) Å, b = 12.956(2) Å, c = 14.199(2) Å, α = 115.458(10)°, β = 90.286(11)°, γ = 108.445(11)°, and Z = 2. The HgNamine, Hg-Npyridyl, and Hg-C bond lengths in the complex are 2.614(4), 2.159(4), and 2.080(6) Å, respectively. Relevance to development of 199Hg NMR as a metallobioprobe is discussed. PMID:11978122

  6. Cross polarization and magic angle sample spinning NMR spectra of model organic compounds. 1. Highly protonated molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alemany, L.B.; Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.; Alger, T.D.; Zilm, K.W.

    1983-04-20

    CP/MAS /sup 13/C NMR spectra were obtained at various contact times on ten solid organic compounds containing a variety of simple functional groups. The spectra show that signal intensities that agree with atomic ratios can be obtained with a contact time of 2.25 ms and often with a contact time as short as about 1 ms. Computer analysis of signal intensities obtained at a minimum of ten different contact times provides T/sub CH/ data that are consistent with these experimental results. The experimental results are also consistent with the previously reported lack of significant variation in the spectra of complex organic solids obtained with contact times of about 1 to 3 ms. In general, nonprotonated carbon atoms polarize more slowly than protonated carbon atoms. The compounds exhibit a wide range of proton spin lattice relaxation times. Some compounds exhibit more resonances than are found in the /sup 13/C(/sup 1/H) spectra of the compounds in solution because the crystalline environment removes the nominal spatial equivalence found for carbon atoms related to each other by unimolecular symmetry elements.

  7. NMR study in sodium-hydrogen-C{sub 60} superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, H.; Miyajima, S.; Imaeda, K.; Inokuchi, H.

    1998-12-31

    {sup 23}Na and {sup 1}H NMR studies have been carried out for a Na{sub x}H{sub y}C{sub 60} superconductor. The peak position of the {sup 23}Na NMR spectrum exhibits discontinuous upfield shift of 30 ppm at about 250 K, indicates a first order phase transition. From the line shape of the {sup 23}Na spectrum obtained at 7 K, the quadrupole coupling constant tensor is evaluated to be {vert_bar}e{sup 2}Qq/h{vert_bar} = 3.7 MHz with the asymmetry parameter {eta} = 0.95. The {sup 1}H NMR spectrum suggests an anionic hydrogen state with weakly delocalized nature.

  8. MAS PFG NMR Studies of Mixtures in Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Marcel; Hertel, Stefan; Wehring, Markus; Schlayer, Stefan; Stallmach, Frank; Galvosas, Petrik

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR techniques have been successfully combined for the study of mixture diffusion in porous materials. Using a modular setup of commercially available components, gradient pulses of up to ±2.6 T/m can be applied coinciding with fast sample rotation at the magic angle. Methods for the proper alignment of all components are presented along with protocols for MAS PFG NMR experiments. Finally, first diffusion measurements of n-hexane and benzene being adsorbed together in the metal-organic framework MOF-5 are presented.

  9. 1H NMR study of the effect of heme insertion on the folding of apomyoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kenji; Matsuo, Hitomi

    2002-01-01

    NMR signals arising from His EF5 and His GH1 N ɛH protons of sperm whale myoglobin and apomyoglobin have been assigned, and the protein folding has been studied through the analysis of these signals. His EF5 and His GH1 N ɛH protons participate in the internal hydrogen bonds at the B-GH and EF-H interfaces, respectively, and their signals are remarkably sensitive to local structural alterations at these sites. The shifts of these signals in alkaline pH condition were only slightly affected by the removal of heme, indicating that the overall protein folding is essentially retained in apoprotein. The line width of His EF5 proton signal, however, increased largely in the spectra of apomyoglobin and this result suggests a conformational lability of the EF-H interface in the absence of heme. Furthermore, the His EF5 proton signal was found to be influenced by not only the orientation of heme relative to the protein, but also by the type of hemin used to reconstitute apomyoglobin. These results clearly demonstrate the presence of a long-range structural correlation between the heme active site and the EF-H interface.

  10. Joint Experimental and Computational 17O and 1H Solid State NMR Study of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrated form of the brownmillerite-type phase Ba2In2O5, Ba2In2O4(OH)2, is reported using experimental multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) energy and GIPAW NMR calculations. When the oxygen ions from H2O fill the inherent O vacancies of the brownmillerite structure, one of the water protons remains in the same layer (O3) while the second proton is located in the neighboring layer (O2) in sites with partial occupancies, as previously demonstrated by Jayaraman et al. (Solid State Ionics2004, 170, 25−32) using X-ray and neutron studies. Calculations of possible proton arrangements within the partially occupied layer of Ba2In2O4(OH)2 yield a set of low energy structures; GIPAW NMR calculations on these configurations yield 1H and 17O chemical shifts and peak intensity ratios, which are then used to help assign the experimental MAS NMR spectra. Three distinct 1H resonances in a 2:1:1 ratio are obtained experimentally, the most intense resonance being assigned to the proton in the O3 layer. The two weaker signals are due to O2 layer protons, one set hydrogen bonding to the O3 layer and the other hydrogen bonding alternately toward the O3 and O1 layers. 1H magnetization exchange experiments reveal that all three resonances originate from protons in the same crystallographic phase, the protons exchanging with each other above approximately 150 °C. Three distinct types of oxygen atoms are evident from the DFT GIPAW calculations bare oxygens (O), oxygens directly bonded to a proton (H-donor O), and oxygen ions that are hydrogen bonded to a proton (H-acceptor O). The 17O calculated shifts and quadrupolar parameters are used to assign the experimental spectra, the assignments being confirmed by 1H–17O double resonance experiments. PMID:26321789

  11. Novel Dodecaarylporphyrins: Synthesis and Variable Temperature NMR Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, Mark; Lebrilla, Carlito; Ma, Jian-Guo; Medforth, Craig J.; Muzzi, Cinzia M.; Shelnutt, John A.; Smith, Kevin M.; Voss, Lisa

    1999-05-05

    An investigation of the synthesis of novel dodecaarylporphyrins using the Suzuki coupling reaction of arylboronic acids with octabromotetraarylporphyrins is reported. Studies of the dynamic properties of these new porphyrins using variable temperature (VT) 1H NMR spectroscopy and molecular mechanics provide interesting insights into their dynamic properties, including the first determination of {beta} aryl rotation in a porphyrin system.

  12. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  13. Density functional theoretical and NMR study of Hammett bases in acidic zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, J.B.; Haw, J.F.; Beck, L.W.; Krawietz, T.R.; Ferguson, D.B.

    1995-12-13

    We demonstrate here that theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) accurately model proton transfer reactions between Bronsted sites in zeolites (the archetypal solid acids) and Hammett bases. The validity of the theoretical results is verified by NMR measurements of key nuclei of the same Hammett bases in zeolites HZSM-5 (MFI) and HY (FAU), the first such experiments. The accuracy of the predictions of the DFT calculations for the HZSM-5 zeolite model suggests that they may be extended to other zeolite cluster models, including those which have not yet been realized experimentally and hence are not available for NMR study. We optimized the adsorbate zeolite complexes with this angle constrained to larger values; to our surprise, the SVWN/DNP calculations resulted in the proton being transferred from p-fluoronitrobenzene back to the zeolite, even if the Si-O-Al angle was held fixed at 180{degree}. Further tests at higher levels of theory are in progress. This investigation used a choice of indicators that necessarily resulted in wide limits on zeolite acid strength, but the theoretical and experimental methodologies have been established. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  14. NMR studies of structure and dynamics in fruit cuticle polyesters.

    PubMed

    Stark, R E; Yan, B; Ray, A K; Chen, Z; Fang, X; Garbow, J R

    2000-05-01

    Cutin and suberin are support polymers involved in waterproofing the leaves and fruits of higher plants, regulating the flow of nutrients among various plant organs, and minimizing the deleterious impact of microbial pathogens. Despite the complexity and intractable nature of these plant biopolyesters, their molecular structure and development are amenable to study by suitable solid-state and solution-state NMR techniques. Interactions of tomato cutin with water were examined by solid-state 2H and 13C NMR, showing that water films enhance rapid segmental motions of the acyl chains and are associated with a fivefold increase in surface elasticity upon cutin hydration. The suberization of wounded potato tissues was studied by solid-state 13C NMR, revealing the likely phenylpropanoid structures that permit dense cross-linking of the suberin structure and their proximity to the cell-wall polysaccharides. Finally, two new approaches were developed to elucidate the molecular structures of these biopolymers: partial depolymerization followed by spectroscopic analysis of the soluble oligomers; and swelling of the intact materials followed by magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR analysis. PMID:10811427

  15. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.H.

    1981-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH/sub 3/ and CD/sub 3/) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed.

  16. The differences in the T2 relaxation rates of the protons in the partially-deuteriated and fully protonated sugar residues in a large oligo-DNA ('NMR-window') gives complementary structural information.

    PubMed Central

    Agback, P; Maltseva, T V; Yamakage, S I; Nilson, F P; Földesi, A; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1994-01-01

    Selective incorporation of the stereospecifically deuteriated sugar moieties (> 97 atom % 2H enhancements at H2', H2'', H3' and H5'/5'' sites, approximately 85 atom % 2H enhancement at H4' and approximately 20 atom % 2H enhancement at H1') in DNA and RNA by the 'NMR-window' approach has been shown to solve the problem of the resonance overlap [refs. 1, 2 & 3]. Such specific deuterium labelling gives much improved resolution and sensitivity of the residual sugar proton (i.e. H1' or H4') vicinal to the deuteriated centers (ref. 3). The T2 relaxation time of the residual protons also increases considerably in the partially-deuteriated (shown by underline) sugar residues in dinucleotides [d(CpG), d(GpC), d(ApT), d(TpA)], trinucleotide r(A2'p5'A2'p5'A) and 20-mer DNA duplex 5'd(C1G2C3-G4C5G6C7G8A9A10T11T12C13G14C15G16C17G18C19G20)(2) 3'. The protons with shorter T2 can be filtered away using a number of different NMR experiments such as ROESY, MINSY or HAL. The NOE intensity of the cross-peaks in these experiments includes only straight pathway from H1' to aromatic proton (i-i and i-i + 1) without any spin-diffusion. The volumes of these NOE cross-peaks could be measured with high accuracy as their intensity is 3 to 4 times larger than the corresponding peaks in the fully protonated residues in the normal NOESY spectra. The structural informations thus obtainable from the residual protons in the partially-deuteriated part of the duplex and the fully protonated part in the 'NMR window' can indeed complement each other. PMID:8190632

  17. High resolution 1H solid state NMR studies of polyethyleneterephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, T. T. P.; Gerstein, B. C.; Ryan, L. M.; Taylor, R. E.; Dybowski, D. R.

    1980-12-01

    Molecular motions and spatial properties of the solid polymer polyethyleneterephthalate have been investigated using high resolution 1H solid state NMR techniques. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1ρ of protons (1H) in the rotating frame was measured for a spin locking field ranging from 5 to 20 G. The decay of the 1H magnetization indicated the existence of two distinct T1ρ's and their field dependence shows that they are associated with two mobile phases of the polymer. The 1H magnetization also relaxes under the dipolar narrowed Carr-Purcell (DNCP) multipulse sequence with two dintinct T1y relaxation times. The ratios T1y's and T1ρ's deviate significantly from the expected theoretical values. The combined experiment with magic angle spinning and the DNCP sequence followed by homonuclear dipolar decoupling reveals the individual T1y relaxation of the resolved methylene and aromatic protons. These two species of protons were found to relax with the same T1y's, thus implying that spin diffusion must have taken place under the homonuclear dipolar decoupling multipulse. The qualitative description of spin diffusion under homonuclear decoupling is given. The combined experiment with spin locking and the DNCP sequence yields the correspondence between the two T1ρ's and the two T1y's. The long T1ρ corresponds to the short T1y whereas the short T1ρ corresponds to the long T1y. Communication between the two spatial phases via spin diffusion was also observed in this experiment by monitoring the recovery of the 1H magnitization associated with the short T1ρ after it has been eliminated during the spin locking. The total 1H magnetization is allowed to equilibrate in the laboratory frame for a variable time much shorter than T1 after the spin locking field has been turned off. The spatial relationship between the two phases is discussed.

  18. Excited States of Nucleic Acids Probed by Proton Relaxation Dispersion NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Juen, Michael Andreas; Wunderlich, Christoph Hermann; Nußbaumer, Felix; Tollinger, Martin; Kontaxis, Georg; Konrat, Robert; Hansen, D Flemming; Kreutz, Christoph

    2016-09-19

    In this work an improved stable isotope labeling protocol for nucleic acids is introduced. The novel building blocks eliminate/minimize homonuclear (13) C and (1) H scalar couplings thus allowing proton relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments to report accurately on the chemical exchange of nucleic acids. Using site-specific (2) H and (13) C labeling, spin topologies are introduced into DNA and RNA that make (1) H relaxation dispersion experiments applicable in a straightforward manner. The novel RNA/DNA building blocks were successfully incorporated into two nucleic acids. The A-site RNA was previously shown to undergo a two site exchange process in the micro- to millisecond time regime. Using proton relaxation dispersion experiments the exchange parameters determined earlier could be recapitulated, thus validating the proposed approach. We further investigated the dynamics of the cTAR DNA, a DNA transcript that is involved in the viral replication cycle of HIV-1. Again, an exchange process could be characterized and quantified. This shows the general applicablility of the novel labeling scheme for (1) H RD experiments of nucleic acids. PMID:27533469

  19. Proton NMR investigation of the heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase that mimics manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lu, Y

    1999-07-13

    The heme active site structure of an engineered cytochrome c peroxidase [MnCcP; see Yeung, B. K., et al. (1997) Chem. Biol. 4, 215-221] that closely mimics manganese peroxidase (MnP) has been characterized by both one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. All hyperfine-shifted resonances from the heme pocket as well as resonances from catalytically relevant amino acid residues in the congested diamagnetic envelope have been assigned. From the NMR spectral assignment and the line broadening pattern of specific protons in NOESY spectra of MnCcP, the location of the engineered Mn(II) center is firmly identified. Furthermore, we found that the creation of the Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in no detectable structural changes on the distal heme pocket of the protein. However, notable structural changes are observed at the proximal side of the heme cavity. Both CepsilonH shift of the proximal histidine and (15)N shift of the bound C(15)N(-) suggest a weaker heme Fe(III)-N(His) bond in MnCcP compared to WtCcP. Our results indicate that the engineered Mn(II)-binding site in CcP resulted in not only a similar Mn(II)-binding affinity and improved MnP activity, but also weakened the Fe(III)-N(His) bond strength of the template protein CcP so that its bond strength is similar to that of the target protein MnP. The results presented here help elucidate the impact of designing a metal-binding site on both the local and global structure of the enzyme, and provide a structural basis for engineering the next generation of MnCcP that mimics MnP more closely. PMID:10413489

  20. Hydrogen bonds and a hydrogen-bonded chain in mannich bases of 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol-FT-IR and 1H NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Bogumil; Urjasz, Hanna; Bartl, Franz; Zundel, Georg

    1997-11-01

    5,5'-Dinitro-3-diethylaminomethyl-2,2'-biphenol ( 1) and 5,5'-dinitro-3,3' bis(diethylaminomethyl)-2,2'-biphenol ( 2) as well as 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol ( 3) were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile or acetonitrile-d 3 solutions, respectively. With compound 1 a hydrogen-bonded system with large proton polarizability is found. In the hydrogen bonds in compound 2 the protons are localized at the N atoms. These hydrogen bonds show no proton polarizability. In the protonated compound 2 a very strong homoconjugated -O⋯H +⋯O - hydrogen bond with large proton polarizability is found, whereas two other protons are localized at the N atoms. The deviation of the results obtained with other derivatives of 2,2'-biphenols are caused by the larger acidity of the nitro groups.

  1. NMR studies of bond arrangements in alkali phosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Brow, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the investigation of local structure and medium range order in glasses. Previous {sup 31}P MAS NMR studies have detailed the local structure for a series of phosphate glasses. Phosphate tetrahedra within the glass network are commonly described using the Q{sup n} notation, where n = 0, 1, 2, 3 and represents the number of bridging oxygens attached to the phosphate. Using {sup 31}P MAS NMR different phosphate environments are readily identified and quantified. In this paper, the authors present a brief description of recent one dimensional (1D) {sup 6}Li, {sup 7}Li and {sup 31}P MAS experiments along with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 31}P exchange NMR experiments for a series of lithium ultraphosphate glasses. From the 2D exchange experiments the connectivities between different Q{sup n} phosphate tetrahedra were directly measured, while the 1D experiments provided a measure of the P-O-P bond angle distribution and lithium coordination number as a function of Li{sub 2}O concentration.

  2. Time-resolved NMR studies of RNA folding.

    PubMed

    Fürtig, Boris; Buck, Janina; Manoharan, Vijayalaxmi; Bermel, Wolfgang; Jäschke, Andres; Wenter, Philipp; Pitsch, Stefan; Schwalbe, Harald

    The application of real-time NMR experiments to the study of RNA folding, as reviewed in this article, is relatively new. For many RNA folding events, current investigations suggest that the time scales are in the second to minute regime. In addition, the initial investigations suggest that different folding rates are observed for one structural transition may be due to the hierarchical folding units of RNA. Many of the experiments developed in the field of NMR of protein folding cannot directly be transferred to RNA: hydrogen exchange experiments outside the spectrometer cannot be applied since the intrinsic exchange rates are too fast in RNA, relaxation dispersion experiments on the other require faster structural transitions than those observed in RNA. On the other hand, information derived from time-resolved NMR experiments, namely the acquisition of native chemical shifts, can be readily interpreted in light of formation of a single long-range hydrogen bonding interaction. Together with mutational data that can readily be obtained for RNA and new ligation technologies that enhance site resolution even further, time-resolved NMR may become a powerful tool to decipher RNA folding. Such understanding will be of importance to understand the functions of coding and non-coding RNAs in cells. PMID:17595685

  3. A carbon-13 and proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of some experimental referee broadened-specification /ERBS/ turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalling, D. K.; Pugmire, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy study of alternative jet fuels are presented. A referee broadened-specification (ERBS) aviation turbine fuel, a mixture of 65 percent traditional kerosene with 35 percent hydrotreated catalytic gas oil (HCGO) containing 12.8 percent hydrogen, and fuels of lower hydrogen content created by blending the latter with a mixture of HCGO and xylene bottoms were studied. The various samples were examined by carbon-13 and proton NMR at high field strength, and the resulting spectra are shown. In the proton spectrum of the 12.8 percent hydrogen fuel, no prominent single species is seen while for the blending stock, many individual lines are apparent. The ERBS fuels were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography and the resulting fractions analyzed by NMR. The species found are identified.

  4. Use of /sup 1/H NMR to study molecular motion in cellulose, pectin, and bean cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, I.E.P.; Tepfer, M.; Callaghan, P.T.; MacKay, A.L.; Bloom, M.

    1983-01-01

    Growing plant cells are enclosed in a framework, the cell wall, whose rigidity must be overcome for cell enlargement to occur. It has been shown that one of the primary modes of action of plant growth substances is to induce cell wall loosening. The mechansim of cell wall loosening is very poorly understood and may involve large-scale changes in the molecular mobility of the cell wall polysaccharides. Proton magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) was used to study molecular motion in bean stem cell walls as well as in cellulose, sodium pectate solutions, and calcium pectate gels. All samples were prepared in K/sub 2/O to minimize the contribution of water to the observed signals. The different NMR properties that have been measured are sensitive to molecular motions over a wide range of frequencies (10 kHz-90 MHz). For each sample, a free induction decay was obtained and the second moment as well as spin-lattice (longitudinal), spin-spin (transverse), and dipolar relaxations were measured. As expected, the different samples studied had strikingly different NMR properties. These results have been extended to look for pH-sensitive changes in the NMR properties of calcium pectate gels and bean cell walls, since both show marked pH-sensitive changes in their rheological behavior. Pulsed field gradient NMR studies of very mobile components of polysaccharide systems are discussed.

  5. An NMR Study of Enzyme Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Keith E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A laboratory experiment designed as a model for studying enzyme activity with a basic spectrometer is presented. Included are background information, experimental procedures, and a discussion of probable results. Stressed is the value of the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in biochemistry. (CW)

  6. NMR studies and applications of perfluorocarbon gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yulin

    Hyperpolarized 3He has been very successful in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs. It provides ways to study the physiological properties of the lungs and lung function. However, the high costs of the polarizing apparatus and the complicated polarizing procedure are preventing this technique from being clinically used routinely. Recent developments have shown that several fluorinated gases have the potential to replace 3He in some of its applications. This thesis presents some preliminary results of human excised lung imaging using C2F6 and C3F8. These two fluorinated gases were able to yield images with good signal-to-noise ratio and reasonable resolutions in a 1.5 T magnet. Using diffusion MRI of these two gases can distinguish emphysematous lungs from healthy ones. An important application of these gases would be to determine local lung surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio in vivo, which requires the unrestricted (free) diffusivity in each pixel to be known. We present data in this thesis which allow free diffusivities to be calculated from the relaxation time T1. Samples of pure C 2F6 and C3F8 at different pressures and in mixtures with oxygen at different concentrations were made. Measurements were done at two different magnetic fields and temperature was regulated to study the temperature dependence over a small range. These two gases were also used in studies of carbon-block filters, where the strong adsorption of the gases to the high surface-area carbon is beneficial. A brief review of our work on mouse lung imaging using hyperpolarized 3He is presented in Appendix A; Appendix B is a study of the longitudinal spin magnetization in the presence of a strong magnetic field gradient; the construction of the pulsed field gradient waveform measurement coils and some experimental results using these coils are contained in Appendix C.

  7. NMR studies of the conformation of the natural sweetener rebaudioside A.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Wayne E; Lin, Alvin

    2009-12-14

    Rebaudioside A is a natural sweetener from Stevia rebaudiana in which four beta-D-glucopyranose units are attached to the aglycone steviol. Its (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra in pyridine-d(5) were assigned using 1D and 2D methods. Constrained molecular dynamics of solvated rebaudioside using NMR constraints derived from ROESY cross peaks yielded the orientation of the beta-D-glucopyranose units. Hydrogen bonding was examined using the temperature coefficients of the hydroxyl chemical shifts, ROESY and long-range COSY spectra, and proton-proton coupling constants. PMID:19889398

  8. Studies of Lung Micromechanics via Hyperpolarized Helium-3 Diffusion NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajari, Adam James

    While high quality MR Images of lungs are difficult to obtain with conventional proton MRI due to the organ's low tissue density, the advent of techniques in noble gas polarization have enabled MR investigations of the lung's more abundant air space rather than its tissue. In addition to high-resolution images of lung ventilation, lung morphometry via gas diffusion NMR provides information about the size and shape of the microscopic airways that account for over 95% of the lung's airspace. Consequently, gas diffusion NMR provides an important new tool for investigating changes in lung microstructure during macroscopic changes in lung volume. Despite decades of research into the mechanisms of lung inflation and deflation, there is little consensus about whether macroscopic changes in lung volume occur due to changes in the size and/or shape of alveoli and alveolar ducts or by alveolar recruitment and derecruitment. In this dissertation lung morphometry is performed via 3He diffusion MRI in order to measure the average alveolar depth and alveolar duct radius at multiple levels of both inspiration and expiration in in vivo human subjects and in explanted human and canine lungs. Average alveolar volume, surface area, and the total number of alveoli at each lung volume are calculated from the 3He morphometric parameters. The results suggest that human lungs inflate/deflate primarily by recruitment/derecruitment of alveoli, and that individual alveolar ducts in both human and canine lungs increase in volume non-isotropically by accordion-like extension. The results further suggest that this change in alveolar duct volume is the primary mechanism of lung volume change in canine lungs but is secondary to alveolar recruitment/derecruitment in humans.

  9. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances a protein by two-dimensional NMR: the case of mouse epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kohda, D; Sawada, T; Inagaki, F

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p2H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) 1H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable groups which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups (alpha-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and alpha-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the beta-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. We found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins. PMID:2036358

  10. Characterization of pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a protein by two-dimensional NMR: The case of mouse epidermal growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohda, Daisuke; Sawada, Toshie; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko )

    1991-05-21

    The pH titration shifts for all the nonlabile proton resonances in a 53-residue protein (mouse epidermal growth factor) were measured in the p{sup 2}H range 1.5-9 with two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H NMR. The 2D NMR pH titration experiment made it possible to determine the pK values for all the ionizable group which were titrated in the pH range 1.5-9 in the protein. The pK values of the nine ionizable groups ({alpha}-amino group, four Asp, two Glu, one His, and {alpha}-carboxyl group) were found to be near their normal values. The 2D titration experiment also provided a detailed description of the pH-dependent behavior of the proton chemical shifts and enabled us to characterize the pH-dependent changes of protein conformation. Analysis of the pH-dependent shifts of ca. 200 proton resonances offered evidence of conformational changes in slightly basic pH solution: The deprotonation of the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group induced a widespread conformational change over the {beta}-sheet structure in the protein, while the effects of deprotonation of the His22 imidazole group were relatively localized. The authors found that the 2D NMR pH titration experiment is a powerful tool for investigating the structural and dynamic properties of proteins.

  11. The Peculiarities of the NMR Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Proton Exchanged LINBO_{3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertegel, Igor; Chesnokov, Eugeny; Ovcharenko, Alexander; Vertegel, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time T_{1} of Li^{7} nuclei in the temperature range (170-430 K) was investigated in LiNbO_{3} polycrystalline samples: the clean and annealed ones in a hydrogen environment at temperature around 1000° C. The anomaly in the temperature dependence of T_{1} was found in range 300-340 K for both pure and annealed crystals. The reduction of the time T_{1} in the annealed lithium niobate crystal is caused by the creation of point defects (F^{+} or F-centers), with the dominant F-centers contribution. An increase in the activation energy in the annealed crystal can be explained by the following. It is known for the pure lithium niobate that an oscillation of lithium occurs in a symmetrical potential consisting of three wells. Formation of the oxygen vacancies in the annealed crystals is accompanied with extrinsic protons occupation of the vacancies. It leads to the symmetry violation and causes an i ncrease of the activation barrier.

  12. High-Temperature NMR Studies of Quasicrystals and Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Edward Arthur

    1995-01-01

    Icosahedral alloys such as rm Al _{65}Cu_{20}Ru_ {15}, Al_{62.5}Cu_ {24.5}Fe_{13}, and rm Al_{70}Pd_{20}Re _{10} have motivated a great deal of experimental and theoretical effort to understand fundamental issues such as the electronic structure, "lattice" dynamics, and thermodynamic stability of quasicrystalline materials. It has been shown here that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a useful tool for exploring many of the essential properties of quasicrystal alloys and the so-called approximant phase alloys. Specifically, the ^{27 }Al Knight shift has been used here to study the electronic density of states in these alloys up to temperatures of 1200 K. Furthermore, ^{27}Al nuclear spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation measurements across a wide temperature range have been used to show that the dynamic processes found in quasicrystals are quite different from those found in some crystalline alloys of similar compositions. In addition, two-dimensional exchange experiments have been employed to study the dynamics of these materials. Finally, the semiconducting alloy rm Al_2Ru has also been studied by the techniques mentioned above. It has also been demonstrated here that high temperature NMR techniques are useful in the study of organic polymers. These experiments focus on determining the timescales and other aspects of molecular motion for several specific samples. ^2H NMR measurements, including the ^2H two-dimensional exchange technique, on the high temperature polymer polybenzamidazole (PBI) are described here. ^2H NMR results for high melting temperature copolyester liquid crystals of the PCnNBB family will also be discussed. An assessment of the high temperature motion in these samples is relevant to an understanding of the physical properties that influence their high temperature applications and high temperature processing.

  13. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Jin Jung; Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui; Jung, Seunho; Kwon, Chanho

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  14. ¹H and (15)N NMR Analyses on Heparin, Heparan Sulfates and Related Monosaccharides Concerning the Chemical Exchange Regime of the N-Sulfo-Glucosamine Sulfamate Proton.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-01-01

    Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally related glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Both GAGs present, although in different concentrations, N-sulfo-glucosamine (GlcNS) as one of their various composing units. The conditional fast exchange property of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in these GAGs has been pointed as the main barrier to its signal detection via NMR experiments, especially ¹H-(15)N HSQC. Here, a series of NMR spectra is collected on heparin, heparan sulfate and related monosaccharides. The N-acetyl glucosamine-linked uronic acid types of these GAGs were properly assigned in the ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) was employed in order to facilitate 1D spectral acquisition of the sulfamate (15)N signal of free GlcNS. Analyses on the multiplet pattern of scalar couplings of GlcNS (15)N has helped to understand the chemical properties of the sulfamate proton in solution. The singlet peak observed for GlcNS happens due to fast chemical exchange of the GlcNS sulfamate proton in solution. Analyses on kinetics of alpha-beta anomeric mutarotation via ¹H NMR spectra have been performed in GlcNS as well as other glucose-based monosaccharides. 1D ¹H and 2D ¹H-(15)N HSQC spectra recorded at low temperature for free GlcNS dissolved in a proton-rich solution showed signals from all exchangeable protons, including those belonging to the sulfamate group. This work suits well to the current grand celebration of one-century-anniversary of the discovery of heparin. PMID:27618066

  15. 2H NMR studies of supercooled and glassy aspirin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, R.; Nowaczyk, A.; Geil, B.; Bohmer, R.

    2007-11-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid, deuterated at the methyl group, was investigated using 2H-NMR in its supercooled and glassy states. Just above the glass transition temperature the molecular reorientations were studied using stimulated-echo spectroscopy and demonstrated a large degree of similarity with other glass formers. Deep in the glassy phase the NMR spectra look similar to those reported for the crystal [A. Detken, P. Focke, H. Zimmermann, U. Haeberlen, Z. Olejniczak, Z. T. Lalowicz, Z. Naturforsch. A 50 (1995) 95] and below 20 K they are indicative for rotational tunneling with a relatively large tunneling frequency. Measurements of the spin-lattice relaxation times for temperatures below 150 K reveal a broad distribution of correlation times in the glass. The dominant energy barrier characterizing the slow-down of the methyl group is significantly smaller than the well defined barrier in the crystal.

  16. Double rotation NMR studies of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, R. |

    1993-07-01

    Goal is to study the organization and structures of guest atoms and molecules and their reactions on internal surfaces within pores of zeolites and aluminophosphate molecular sieves. {sup 27}Al and {sup 23}Na double rotation NMR (DOR) is used since it removes the anisotropic broadening in NMR spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, thus increasing resolution. This work concentrates on probing aluminum framework atoms in aluminophosphate molecular sieves and sodium extra framework cations in porous aluminosilicates. In aluminophosphates, ordering and electronic environments of the framework {sup 27}Al nuclei are modified upon adsorption of water molecules within the channels; a relation is sought between the sieve channel topology and the organization of adsorbed water, as well as the interaction between the Al nuclei and the water molecules. Extra framework Na{sup +} cations are directly involved in adsorption processes and reactions in zeolite cavities.

  17. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Lorite, I; Zandalazini, C; Esquinazi, P; Spemann, D; Friedländer, S; Pöppl, A; Michalsky, T; Grundmann, M; Vogt, J; Meijer, J; Heluani, S P; Ohldag, H; Adeagbo, W A; Nayak, S K; Hergert, W; Ernst, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-07-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation. PMID:26043764

  18. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I.; Zandalazini, C.; Esquinazi, P.; Spemann, D.; Friedländer, S.; Pöppl, A.; Michalsky, T.; Grundmann, M.; Vogt, J.; Meijer, J.; Heluani, S. P.; Ohldag, H.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Nayak, S. K.; Hergert, W.; Ernst, A.; Hoffmann, M.

    2015-06-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation.

  19. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. 7Li NMR study of normal human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettegrew, J. W.; Post, J. F. M.; Panchalingam, K.; Withers, G.; Woessner, D. E.

    The biological action of lithium is of great interest because of the therapeutic efficacy of the cation in manic-depressive illness. To investigate possible molecular interactions of lithium, 7Li NMR studies were conducted on normal human erythrocytes which had been incubated with lithium chloride. The uptake of lithium ions was followed by 7Li NMR, using a dysprosium, tripolyphosphate shift reagent. Lithium uptake followed single-exponential kinetics with a time constant of 14.7 h. The intracellular lithium relaxation times were T 1 ⋍ 5 s and T 2 ⋍ 0.15 s, which implies a lengthening of the lithium correlation time. It was found that lithium does not interact significantly with hemoglobin, the erythrocyte membrane, or artificial phospholipid membranes. Based on measurements of lithium T1 and T2 in concentrated agar gels, the large difference between T1 and T2 for intracellular lithium ions may be due to diffusion of the hydrated lithium ion through heterogeneous electrostatic field gradients created by the erythrocyte membrane-associated cytoskeletal network. Lithium binding to the membrane-associated cytoskeleton, however, cannot be ruled out. Because of the large differences between T1 and T2 of intracellular lithium ions, 1Li NMR may be a sensitive and promising noninvasive method to probe the intracellular environment.

  1. A 13C-NMR study of azacryptand complexes.

    PubMed

    Wild, Aljoscha A C; Fennell, Kevin; Morgan, Grace G; Hewage, Chandralal M; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2014-09-28

    An azacryptand has been solubilised in aqueous media containing 50% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide. (13)C-NMR has been used to determine how the azacryptand is affected by zinc binding at pH 10. Using (13)C-NMR and (13)C-enriched bicarbonate we have been able to observe the formation of 4 different carbamate derivatives of the azacryptand at pH 10. The azacryptand was shown to solubilise zinc or cadmium at alkaline pHs. Two moles of zinc are bound per mole of azacryptand and this complex binds 1 mole of carbonate. By replacing the zinc with cadmium-113 we have shown that the (13)C-NMR signal of the (13)C-enriched carbon of the bound carbonate is split into two triplets at 2.2 °C. This shows that two cadmium complexes are formed and in each of these complexes the carbonate group is bound by two magnetically equivalent metal ions. It also demonstrates that these cadmium complexes are not in fast exchange. From temperature studies we show that in the zinc complexes both complexes are in fast exchange with each other but are in slow exchange with free bicarbonate. HOESY is used to determine the position of the carbonate carbon in the complex. The solution and crystal structures of the zinc-carbonate-azacryptand complexes are compared. PMID:25091182

  2. NMR study of new ruthenates with high magnetic ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, P. L.; Chakrabarty, Tanmoy

    The Ru based compounds, Ca3LiRuO6 and Ca3NaRuO6 show unusually high magnetic ordering temperature. Extended super exchange model is invoked to explain the magnetic behavior in the isostructural compound Ca3LiOsO6. We have carried out NMR investigation on these two Ru-based compounds. Ca3LiRuO6 is a weak ferromagnet with a magnetic ordering temperature (TC) of 115 K which is explored by the temperature dependence of 7Li NMR line shift, line-width and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . Above TC, a broad maximum is observed in the evolution of line-width of the spectra. We speculate that this feature might be attributed to some low-dimensional magnetic behavior. Contrastingly, Ca3NaRuO6 with similar structure and local geometry of the Ru5+ ions is a conventional antiferromagnet with a transition temperature of 90 K. The temperature dependence of 23Na NMR line shift and 1/T1 is studied across magnetic transition in Ca3NaRuO6. The temperature variation of line-width is found to be different compared to Ca3LiRuO6. In both these systems, 1/T1 decreases significantly below ordering temperature, characteristic of many antiferromagnetic systems.

  3. NMR Studies of Biodegradation Reactions in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitreiter, I.; Oswald, S. E.; Stallmach, F.

    2007-12-01

    Subsurface contamination caused by organic compounds is a widespread environmental problem. Biodegradation is the main process to reduce the mass of organic contaminants in soils and groundwater. Often the biodegradation is limited by the supply of electron acceptors at the location of the contaminants, and mixing and diffusion are therefore coupled to the degradation process. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allows non- invasive and non-destructive insight into diffusion processes and effects of microbial biomass on the pore scale, where the mixing and degradation processes actually are taking place. Studying key processes non-invasively with high temporal resolution will contribute to a better understanding of the effective biodegradation rates of organic contaminants in saturated porous systems. The application of 1H NMR relaxometry and PFG NMR diffusometry provide the possibilities to study diffusive transport at the mixing zones in porous media, where contaminants and electron acceptors show strong concentration gradients due to degradation reactions. Nuclear spin relaxation times of water reflect its interaction with the porous media as well as the biomass. To localize microbial biomass the mobility of the water molecules (relaxation times) can be classified corresponding to bound water in the biomass and bulk water. Oxygen is the most important electron acceptor that stimulate the activity and growth of aerobic microbes, and iron(III) a major one for anaerobes. In our work we applied low field (0.2 T) and high field (3 T) NMR measurements to analyze the diffusion in water and biomass and to monitor the concentration changes of electron acceptors. The experimental setup consists of small columns containing saturated porous media applying inversion recovery (IR) and pulsed field gradient (PFG) sequences. We show that both, oxygen as well as iron(III) affect the relaxation times by their paramagnetic properties, and can be determined by NMR relaxometry in

  4. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  5. NMR spectroscopic study of organic phosphate esters coprecipitated with calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Brian L.; Zhang, Zelong; Kubista, Laura; Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Organic phosphorus incorporated in calcite during laboratory precipitation experiments and in natural cave deposits was investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For calcite precipitated in the presence of organic phosphoesters of varying size and functionality, solid-state 31P{1H} CP/MAS NMR shows that the phosphoesters were incorporated intact into the solid. Systematic changes in the 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphate group were observed between the solid phosphoester and that incorporated in the solid precipitate, yielding 31P NMR chemical shifts of the coprecipitates in the range of +1.8 to -2.2 ppm. These chemical shifts are distinct from that of similarly prepared calcite coprecipitated with inorganic phosphate, 3.5 ppm. Only minor changes were noted in the phosphoester 31P chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) which suggests no significant change in the local structure of the phosphate group, which is dominated by C-O-P bonding. Close spatial proximity of the organic phosphate group to calcite structural components was revealed by 31P/13C rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) experiments for coprecipitates prepared with 13C-labeled carbonate. All coprecipitates showed significant 31P dephasing effects upon 13C-irradiation, signaling atomic-scale proximity to carbonate carbon. The dephasing rate for smaller organophosphate molecules is similar to that observed for inorganic phosphate, whereas much slower dephasing was observed for larger molecules having long and/or bulky side-chains. This result suggests that small organic molecules can be tightly enclosed within the calcite structure, whereas significant structural disruption required to accommodate the larger organic molecules leads to longer phosphate-carbonate distances. Comparison of 31P NMR spectroscopic data from the synthetic coprecipitates with those from calcite moonmilk speleothems indicates that phosphorus occurs mainly as inorganic orthophosphate in the natural deposits, although small

  6. A Kinetic Study of DDGS Hemicellulose Acid Hydrolysis and NMR Characterization of DDGS Hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Liu, Shijie

    2015-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) extraction was used as a pretreatment method to separate the hemicellulose fraction from dried distiller's grain with solubles (DDGS) into liquid phase. Acid hydrolysis using 3.264 % w/w sulfuric acid at 130 °C was performed to convert polysaccharides in LHW extract to monosaccharides. The structure characterization of DDGS in anomeric carbon region based on proton NMR and heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) during acid hydrolysis was studied in this work. It reveals that the sugar units in DDGS hemicelluloses are constructed with (1-4)-β-D-xylopyranose and α-L-arabinofuranosyl residues. A kinetic model is included to explain the changing concentration of monomer, oligomer, and sugar units. The model was further tested based on the changing concentration of five carbon sugar units during hydrolysis. PMID:26198022

  7. NMR Studies of 3He Films on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of the dynamics of 3He adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride. These studies can identify the phase transitions of the 2D films as a function of temperature. A thermally activated temperature dependence is observed for 2.6 < T < 8 K compared to a linear temperature dependence for 0.7 < T < 2.6 K. This linear dependence is consistent with that expected for thermal diffusion in a fluid for coverages of 0.4 - 0.6 of a monolayer.

  8. Characterization of the Dynamics in the Protonic Conductor CsH2PO4 by 17O Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and First-Principles Calculations: Correlating Phosphate and Protonic Motion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    17O NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles calculations was employed to understand the local structure and dynamics of the phosphate ions and protons in the paraelectric phase of the proton conductor CsH2PO4. For the room-temperature structure, the results confirm that one proton (H1) is localized in an asymmetric H-bond (between O1 donor and O2 acceptor oxygen atoms), whereas the H2 proton undergoes rapid exchange between two sites in a hydrogen bond with a symmetric double potential well at a rate ≥107 Hz. Variable-temperature 17O NMR spectra recorded from 22 to 214 °C were interpreted by considering different models for the rotation of the phosphate anions. At least two distinct rate constants for rotations about four pseudo C3 axes of the phosphate ion were required in order to achieve good agreement with the experimental data. An activation energy of 0.21 ± 0.06 eV was observed for rotation about the P–O1 axis, with a higher activation energy of 0.50 ± 0.07 eV being obtained for rotation about the P–O2, P–O3d, and P–O3a axes, with the superscripts denoting, respectively, dynamic donor and acceptor oxygen atoms of the H-bond. The higher activation energy of the second process is most likely associated with the cost of breaking an O1–H1 bond. The activation energy of this process is slightly lower than that obtained from the 1H exchange process (0.70 ± 0.07 eV) (Kim, G.; Blanc, F.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Grey, C. P. J. Phys. Chem. C2013, 117, 6504−6515) associated with the translational motion of the protons. The relationship between proton jumps and phosphate rotation was analyzed in detail by considering uncorrelated motion, motion of individual PO4 ions and the four connected/H-bonded protons, and concerted motions of adjacent phosphate units, mediated by proton hops. We conclude that, while phosphate rotations aid proton motion, not all phosphate rotations result in proton jumps. PMID:25732257

  9. A study by (1)H NMR on the influence of some factors affecting lipid in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Nieva-Echevarría, Bárbara; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Manzanos, María J; Guillén, María D

    2016-11-15

    This article focuses on the impact of several experimental factors, including gastric acidification, intestinal transit time, presence of gastric lipase, sample/digestive fluids ratio, concentration and nature of the enzymes in intestinal juice, and bile concentration, on the extent of in vitro lipolysis when using a static model that simulates human digestion processes in mouth, stomach and small intestine. The study was carried out by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H NMR). This technique provides a complete molecular picture of lipolysis, evidencing for the first time, whether preferential hydrolysis of certain glycerides over others occurs. A lipolysis degree similar to that reported in vivo was reached by varying certain variables within a physiological range; among them, bile concentration was found to be crucial. The holistic view of this (1)H NMR study provides information of paramount importance to design sound in vitro digestion models to determine the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of lipophilic compounds. PMID:27283602

  10. Application of NMR techniques for studying coking of FCC catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonardet, J.J.; Barrage, M.C.; Fraissard, J.

    1995-12-31

    NMR occupies an important place in the study of the deactivation of zeolites by coking. Indeed, association of the resonances of several nuclei has shown that it is possible to investigate: the nature of the, carbonaceous; deposits; under certain conditions, the coke content; the mode of zeolite deactivation; the exact location of the internal coke and the evolution of its distribution with the coke content, the presence of carbonaceous; residues at the crystallite surface; the effect of zeolite structure and the nature of the reactant on coking and regeneration. It also reveals the role of extra framework aluminium species and that of certain lattice Al atoms in the coking process.