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Sample records for proton pump-driven cutaneous

  1. Micro electrohydrodynamic pump driven by traveling electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.W.; Kim, Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    A novel driving theory on the induction type electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pump driven by traveling electric fields without the temperature gradient is proposed. The micro EHD pump is fabricated by micromaching technology and experimented. The authors derive the equations of the generating pressure and the flow rate, and discuss the theoretical and the experimental results. The experimental results are consistent with the results of the proposed theory in this paper.

  2. A peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls.

    PubMed

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached. PMID:22574035

  3. A Peristaltic Micro Pump Driven by a Rotating Motor with Magnetically Attracted Steel Balls

    PubMed Central

    Du, Min; Ye, Xiongying; Wu, Kang; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a membrane peristaltic micro pump driven by a rotating motor with magnetically attracted steel balls for lab-on-a-chip applications. The fabrication process is based on standard soft lithography technology and bonding of a PDMS layer with a PMMA substrate. A linear flow rate range ∼490 μL/min was obtained by simply varying the rotation speed of a DC motor, and a maximum back pressure of 592 Pa was achieved at a rotation speed of 43 rpm. The flow rate of the pump can also be adjusted by using steel balls with different diameters or changing the number of balls. Nevertheless, the micro pump can also work in high speed mode. A high back pressure up to 10 kPa was achieved at 500 rpm using a high speed DC motor, and an utmost flow rate up to 5 mL/min was reached. PMID:22574035

  4. [Cutaneous lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Beyeler, M; Burg, G; Dummer, R

    2004-10-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. They must be distinguished from secondary skin manifestations of primary nodal lymphomas. Primary cutaneous lymphomas are divided into B-cell- and T-cell cutaneous lymphoma and commonly have good prognosis. Therapy is based on the stage of the disease. Since cure is not possible, the aim of treatment is to control the disease and reduce symptoms. A variety of new and promising therapeutic modalities have been introduced in recent years. PMID:15349694

  5. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  6. Cutaneous protothecosis.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, Paul B; Bahrami, Soon

    2011-07-01

    Prototheca species are an achlorophyllic algae that cause infections primarily in immunocompromised individuals. At least one-half of infectious cases are cutaneous. Because protothecosis is seldom suspected clinically, patients may be subjected to various treatment modalities for extended periods without satisfactory results. Cutaneous protothecosis shares similar clinical and pathologic findings with deep tissue fungal mycoses. The typical presentation occurs most commonly on the face and extremities as erythematous plaques, nodules, or superficial ulcers. Prototheca spp are spherical, unicellular, nonbudding organisms that are sometimes noted on routine hematoxylin-eosin staining but are best visualized with periodic acid-Schiff and Gomori methenamine-silver histochemical stains. Although protothecosis can be diagnosed on biopsy, culture of the organism on a medium such as Sabouraud dextrose agar is required for definitive diagnosis. Treatment may require a combination of surgical excision and antifungal agents. Therefore, cutaneous protothecosis should be considered in a lesion that appears suspicious for the more-common fungal infections. PMID:21732787

  7. Cutaneous Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Wanat, Karolyn A; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-12-01

    The skin is the second most common organ affected in sarcoidosis, which can affect patients of all ages and races, with African American women having the highest rates of sarcoidosis in the United States. The cutaneous manifestations are protean and can reflect involvement of sarcoidal granulomas within the lesion or represent reactive non-specific inflammation, as seen with erythema nodosum. Systemic work-up is necessary in any patient with cutaneous involvement of sarcoidal granulomas, and treatment depends on other organ involvement and severity of clinical disease. Skin-directed therapies are first line for mild disease, and immunomodulators or immunosuppressants may be necessary. PMID:26593142

  8. Cutaneous Horn

    MedlinePlus

    ... fair-skinned individuals with a history of significant sun exposure. Signs and Symptoms A cutaneous horn most often ... radiation therapy. Trusted Links MedlinePlus: Skin Conditions MedlinePlus: Sun Exposure References Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology , pp.1715. ...

  9. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range. PMID:26429427

  10. Cutaneous Myiasis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Michal; Lachish, Tamar; Schwartz, Eli

    2016-09-01

    Myiasis is defined as the infestation of live vertebrates, either humans or animals, with dipterous larvae. Many organs can be infested by these larvae with cutaneous myiasis being the most common form. Cutaneous myiasis can be divided into three categories: localized furuncular myiasis, migratory myiaisis and wound myiasis, which occurs when fly larvae infest the open wounds of the host. Human myiasis has worldwide distribution, with more species and a heavier burden in tropical and subtropical countries. In recent years with increased travel to the tropics, myiasis has become common in returning travelers from these regions, Furuncular myiasis, mainly Dermatobia homonis becomes the most common form seen among them. Treatment is based on full extraction of the larva and no antibiotic treatment is needed. Understanding the mode of transmission of each type of myiasis may help to prevent the infestation. PMID:27443558

  11. Cutaneous Listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    Godshall, Casey E.; Suh, Gina

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous infections due to Listeria monocytogenes are rare. Typically, infections manifest as nonpainful, nonpruritic, self-limited, localized, papulopustular or vesiculopustular eruptions in healthy persons. Most cases follow direct inoculation of the skin in veterinarians or farmers who have exposure to animal products of conception. Less commonly, skin lesions may arise from hematogenous dissemination in compromised hosts with invasive disease. Here, we report the first case in a gardener that occurred following exposure to soil and vegetation. PMID:23966491

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Laman, S D; Provost, T T

    1994-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that demonstrates cutaneous, systemic, or both cutaneous and systemic manifestations. This article reviews the cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus. PMID:8153399

  13. Cutaneous cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Ethan E; Crawford, Paul

    2012-12-15

    Cutaneous cryosurgery refers to localized application of freezing temperatures to achieve destruction of skin lesions. It can be used to treat a broad range of benign and premalignant skin conditions, and certain malignant skin conditions, with high cure rates. Cellular destruction is accomplished by delivery of the cryogen via dipstick, probe, or spray techniques. It is widely used in primary care because of its safety, effectiveness, low cost, ease of use, good cosmetic results, and lack of need for anesthesia. Cryosurgery is as effective as alternative therapies for most cases of molluscum contagiosum, dermatofibromas, keloids, and plantar or genital warts. It is a more effective cure for common warts than salicylic acid or observation. Cryosurgery is generally the treatment of choice for actinic keratosis. Contraindications to cryosurgery include cryofibrinogenemia, cryoglobulinemia, Raynaud disease, agammaglobulinemia, and multiple myeloma. Complications from cryosurgery include hypopigmentation and alopecia, and can be avoided by limiting freeze times to less than 30 seconds. Referral to a dermatologist should be considered in cases of diagnostic uncertainty or for treatment of skin cancer, which requires larger amounts of tissue destruction, resulting in higher complication rates. PMID:23316984

  14. Multiple Cutaneous Reticulohistiocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hemmady, Karishma D; Someshwar, Shylaja S; Jerajani, Hemangi R

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized in its full form by severe destructive arthritis, cutaneous nodules, and systemic manifestations. Cutaneous lesions may precede, accompany, or more commonly develop later than other features in this disease. We describe a case of multiple cutaneous reticulohistiocytoma without any systemic associations after thorough investigations. PMID:26955136

  15. Cutaneous metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Liu, Bai-Long; Liu, Bin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Qiang; Song, Yan-Qiu; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of cutaneous metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma by a retrospective analysis of published cases. METHODS: An extensive search was conducted in the English literature within the PubMed database using the following keywords: cutaneous metastasis or skin metastasis and cholangiocarcinoma or bile duct. The data of 30 patients from 21 articles from 1978 to 2014 were analyzed. Patient data retrieved from the articles included the following: age, gender, time cutaneous metastasis occurred, number of cutaneous metastases throughout life, sites of initial cutaneous metastasis, anatomic site, pathology and differentiation of cholangiocarcinoma, and immunohistochemical results of the cutaneous metastasis. The assessment of overall survival after cutaneous metastasis (OSCM) was the primary endpoint. RESULTS: The median age at diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma was 60.0 years (range: 35-77). This metastasis showed a predilection towards males, with a male to female ratio of 3.29. In 8 cases (27.6%), skin metastasis was the first sign of cholangiocarcinoma. Additionally, 18 cases (60.0%) manifested single cutaneous metastasis, while 12 cases (40.0%) demonstrated multiple skin metastases. In 50.0% of patients, the metastasis occurred in the drainage region, while 50.0% of patients had distant cutaneous metastases. The scalp was the most frequently involved region of distant skin metastasis, occurring in 36.7% of patients. The median OSCM of cholangiocarcinoma was 4.0 mo. Patient age and cutaneous metastatic sites showed no significant relation with OSCM, while male gender and single metastasis of the skin were associated with a poorer OSCM (hazard ratio: 0.168; P = 0.005, and hazard ratio: 0.296; P = 0.011, respectively). CONCLUSION: The prognosis of cutaneous metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma is dismal. Both male gender and single skin metastasis are associated with a poorer OSCM. PMID

  16. [Hereditary cutaneous leiomyomatosis].

    PubMed

    Braun, S A; Hanneken, S; Reifenberger, J; Helbig, D; Frank, J

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of multiple cutaneous leiomyomas can be indicative of hereditary cutaneous leiomyomatosis. This autosomal dominant disorder is due to germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Associations with uterine myomas and renal cell carcinomas have been described and are referred to as Multiple Cutaneous and Uterine Leiomyomas (MCUL) or Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (HLRCC), respectively. A 34-year-old man presented with multiple red-brown papules and nodules. After histopathologic confirmation of piloleiomyomas, we made the diagnosis of hereditary cutaneous leiomyomatosis. Taking into consideration the aforementioned complications, close interdisciplinary management of these patients and regular screening examinations within affected families are mandatory. PMID:22456612

  17. Cutaneous acanthamoebiasis in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Torno, M S; Babapour, R; Gurevitch, A; Witt, M D

    2000-02-01

    Acanthamoeba is a recognized pathogen in the immunocompromised patient, commonly presenting as chronic or subacute encephalitis. However, cutaneous disease in the absence of CNS involvement is increasingly recognized, especially in the setting of chronic, nonhealing skin lesions in the patient with AIDS. We describe a patient with AIDS and cutaneous acanthamoebiasis and review our experience with treatment and diagnosis. PMID:10640931

  18. [Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Dhouib Sellami, Rym; Sassi, Samia; Mrad, Karima; Abess, Imen; Driss, Maha; Ben Romdhane, Khaled

    2007-04-01

    Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma (PCP) is a rare cutaneous B cell lymphoma. We report a case of PCP in a 64 year old woman presenting with a nodular lesion of the left cheek. Histologically, the lesion was composed predominately of variably maturated plasma cells with monotypic expression of lambda chain. Extracutaneous localizations of the disease had been excluded. The prognosis of PCP is better than that of the metastatic cutaneous lesion of myeloma. The main prognosis factors are the size tumor and clinical presentation (solitary, versus multiple lesions). Solitary lesions of the PCP are treated by surgical excision and sometimes local radiotherapy. PMID:17909472

  19. The cutaneous porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Lim, H W; Cohen, J L

    1999-12-01

    Deficiencies of 7 enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway result in the development of porphyrias. Two of the porphyrias, aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency porphyria and acute intermittent porphyria do not have cutaneous findings. Cutaneous findings in the other porphyrias could be subdivided into acute phototoxicity and subacute phototoxicity. In addition, 2 of the porphyrias, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria have both cutaneous and neurovisceral findings. Now that chromosomal assignments for all the genes of the defective enzymes have been mode, prenatal diagnosis is possible for congenital erythropoietic porphyria, and in vitro gene therapy has been successfully performed for congenital erythropoietic porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. PMID:10604794

  20. [Penile sporotrichoid cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Masmoudi, A; Boudaya, S; Bouzid, L; Frigui, F; Meziou, T J; Akrout, F; Turki, H; Zahaf, A

    2005-12-01

    The localisation of the cutaneous leishmaniasis of L. major at the penis level is rare, we report here a new observation. Mr K. R aged of 41, without known pathological background presented for 20 days a nodular lesion of the anterior face of the neck, 2 juxtaposed ulcerated nodular lesions of the left wrist. He presented also subcutaneous nodules ranged linearly and extended to the root of the penis. Theses lesions were covered by an erythematous or ulcerated skin. The smear made from the genital lesions of the penis confirmed the diagnosis of a cutaneous leishmaniasis. The evolution was favourable after a 21 days treatment by doxycyclin after an interval of one week. Our observation was specific by the localisation of the cutaneous leishmaniasis and by the clinical form. This shows that in our region cutaneous leishmaniasis is characterised by different clinical symptoms. PMID:16425718

  1. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  2. Update on cutaneous calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe

    2013-03-01

    Calciphylaxis is a devastating disorder with a mortality rate of 80% due to sepsis and organ failure. Hallmarks of this rare disease are arteriolar media calcification, thrombotic cutaneous ischemia, and necrotic ulcerations. Different mechanisms of vascular calcification can lead to calciphylaxis. Early diagnosis by deep cutaneous ulcer biopsy is most important for prognosis. Here, dermatologists play a significant role although treatment usually needs an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical procedures had been the cornerstone of treatment in the past including parathyroidectomy, but recently new medical treatments emerged aiming to normalize disturbances of minerals to reduce the serum concentration of sodium phosphate and to prevent precipitation and calcification. Multimodal therapy is warranted but only aggressive surgical debridement of cutaneous ulcers has shown significant outcome improvement. PMID:23716795

  3. Cutaneous signs of piety.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, V; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2014-07-01

    It is important for dermatologists to be aware of cutaneous changes related to religious practices to help in their recognition and management. The anatomic location of cutaneous lesions associated with friction from praying varies based on religious practice. Allergic contact dermatitis from products and substances commonly used in worshipping also vary by religion. Some religious practices may render individuals prone to infections that manifest on the skin. Tattoos of godly figures also may adorn the body. Religious practices also have been implicated in cases of urticaria, köbnerization, and leukoderma. This article reviews the clinical presentation of some of the most common cutaneous changes that occur in individuals who practice the following religions: Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Sikhism. PMID:25101349

  4. Update on Cutaneous Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a devastating disorder with a mortality rate of 80% due to sepsis and organ failure. Hallmarks of this rare disease are arteriolar media calcification, thrombotic cutaneous ischemia, and necrotic ulcerations. Different mechanisms of vascular calcification can lead to calciphylaxis. Early diagnosis by deep cutaneous ulcer biopsy is most important for prognosis. Here, dermatologists play a significant role although treatment usually needs an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical procedures had been the cornerstone of treatment in the past including parathyroidectomy, but recently new medical treatments emerged aiming to normalize disturbances of minerals to reduce the serum concentration of sodium phosphate and to prevent precipitation and calcification. Multimodal therapy is warranted but only aggressive surgical debridement of cutaneous ulcers has shown significant outcome improvement. PMID:23716795

  5. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions. PMID:27065598

  6. Multiple cutaneous lipomatous neurofibromas.

    PubMed

    Texeira, M S; Duraes, Smb; Pereira, L A; Pantaleao, L

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lipomatous neurofibroma is a rare variant of neurofibroma with a little known pathogenesis; its presence has never been described in Brazil. A 61- year-old woman complaining scalp papules for one year, presented with skin colored to yellowish papules on the scalp. She noted that they were sometimes itchy and occasionally bled. Dermoscopy showed amorphous material, milky white, with a small poorly delimited yellowish area. Histopathological examination revealed spindle cell proliferation associated with mature adipocytes. Cutaneous lipomatous neurofibroma appears to be an underdiagnosed condition owing to the low index of suspicion and lack of knowledge of its existence. Few cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:27267198

  7. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Guan; Lei, Tie-Chi

    2014-11-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare human infection due to ubiquitous soil born gram-positive, filametous aerobic bacteria. First signs are frequently cutaneous either as part of systemic infection disseminated to the skin, or as primary cutaneous inoculation. An 88 years old man presented with a 3-day history of red papules and pustules with pain on his forehead. The combination of the unusual clinical presentation, laboratory examinations, and a favorable response to co-trimoxazole therapy were consistent with a diagnosis of primary cuteneous nocardiosis. Early recognition and treatment of the disease will improve the cure rate. PMID:25518763

  8. [A BANEFUL CUTANEOUS LESION].

    PubMed

    Defaee, A; Mancini, I; Vandemergel, X

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a patient presenting meningeal carcinomatosis and cutanenous metastasis as first manifestation of gastric adenocarcinoma. A 57-year-old patient was hospitalized because of headache and diplopia. Clinical examination revealed VI cranial nerve paralysis and anterior neck infiltration. Cutaneous biopsy and umbar puncture showed signet ring-cells. Extensive work-up disclosed gastric adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastasis and carcinomatous metastasis are both present exceptionally as first manifestation of gastric adenocarcinoma. We discuss frequency, etiology and treatment of these manifestations. PMID:27295896

  9. The cutaneous porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg-Brand, Danja; Katugampola, Ruwani; Anstey, Alexander V; Badminton, Michael N

    2014-07-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis where accumulation of porphyrins and/or porphyrin precursors gives rise to 2 types of clinical presentation: cutaneous photosensitivity and/or acute neurovisceral attacks. The cutaneous porphyrias present with either bullous skin fragility or nonbullous acute photosensitivity. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, complications, and current approach to porphyria management. Although focusing mainly on their dermatological aspects, the article also covers the management of acute porphyria, which by virtue of its association with variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, may become the responsibility of the clinical dermatologist. PMID:24891059

  10. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  11. Cutaneous Infections in Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Eugene K.; deWeber, Kevin; Berry, James W.; Wilckens, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Evidence Acquisition: Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Results: The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. Conclusion: For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers. PMID:24427413

  12. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  13. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: a rare cause of generalised cutaneous telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Toda-Brito, Helena; Resende, Cristina; Catorze, Goreti; Viana, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous microangiopathy of unknown aetiology with only 27 cases reported to date. It is characterised clinically by generalised cutaneous telangiectasias and microscopically by dilation and marked thickening of the walls of superficial dermal blood vessels. Differential diagnosis should be performed with other causes of disseminated telangiectasias, including generalised essential telangiectasia, from which it is clinically indistinguishable. We report a new case of cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy in a 61-year-old woman presenting with a 5-year history of asymptomatic telangiectasias distributed symmetrically on her upper and lower limbs and highlight the importance of clinicopathological correlation for the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26156838

  14. Cutaneous Infections and Infestations

    PubMed Central

    Tomecki, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    Directed and preventive therapies for cutaneous infectious disease and infestation continue to evolve, providing physicians with new options for care. Common infectious diseases (e.g., genital herpes, herpes zoster, and head lice) occur in the outpatient and inpatient setting. This review of the literature highlights new therapies, including those still in development, such as novel drugs and vaccines, all of which should help to decrease the frequency and severity of common infectious diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. PMID:22191004

  15. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, A C; Wood, G S

    2000-06-01

    Benign hyperplastic lymphoid infiltrates of the skin (pseudolymphoma, older term) simulate lymphoma clinically and histologically. They can be divided into B-cell predominant (typical cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH), angiolymphoid hyperplasia, Kimura's disease, and Castleman's disease) and T-cell predominant (T-cell CLH, lymphomatoid contact dermatitis, and lymphomatoid drug eruption). Both types may represent exaggerated reactions to diverse external antigens (insect bite, tattoo, zoster, trauma, among others). A composite assessment of clinical presentation and behavior, routine histology, immunophenotyping, and molecular studies is essential for the diagnosis of benign cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. Treatment includes antibiotics, intralesional and systemic corticosteroids, excision, radiotherapy, and immunosuppressants. Treatment depends on the assessment and biologic behavior, which is usually benign. Molecular biologic analysis has shown that a significant proportion of cases harbor occult B- or T-cell clones (clonal CLH). Progression to overt cutaneous lymphoma has been observed in a minority of cases. Patients with clonal populations of B or T cells and persistent lesions should be closely observed for emergence of a lymphoma. PMID:10892716

  16. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  17. Management of cutaneous erythrasma.

    PubMed

    Holdiness, Mack R

    2002-01-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum is the bacteria that leads to cutaneous eruptions of erythrasma and is the most common cause of interdigital foot infections. It is found mostly in occluded intertriginous areas such as the axillae, inframammary areas, interspaces of the toes, intergluteal and crural folds, and is more common in individuals with diabetes mellitus than other clinical patients. This organism can be isolated from a cutaneous site along with a concurrent dermatophyte or Candida albicans infection. The differential diagnosis of erythrasma includes psoriasis, dermatophytosis, candidiasis and intertrigo, and methods for differentiating include Wood's light examination and bacterial and mycological cultures. Erythromycin 250mg four times daily for 14 days is the treatment of choice and other antibacterials include tetracycline and chloramphenicol; however, the use of chloramphenicol is limited by bone marrow suppression potentially leading to neutropenia, agranulocytosis and aplastic anaemia. Further studies are needed but clarithromycin may be an additional drug for use in the future. Where there is therapeutic failure or intertriginous involvement, topical solutions such as clindamycin, Whitfield's ointment, sodium fusidate ointment and antibacterial soaps may be required for both treatment and prophylaxis. Limited studies on the efficacy of these medications exist, however, systemic erythromycin demonstrates cure rates as high as 100%. Compared with tetracyclines, systemic erythromycin has greater efficacy in patients with involvement of the axillae and groin, and similar efficacy for interdigital infections. Whitfield's ointment has equal efficacy to systemic erythromycin in the axillae and groin, but shows greater efficacy in the interdigital areas and is comparable with 2% sodium fusidate ointment for treatment of all areas. Adverse drug effects and potential drug interactions need to be considered. No cost-effectiveness data are available but there are

  18. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  19. Cutaneous reactions to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Stein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are important for infectious disease prevention; however, there are adverse effects of vaccines, many of which are cutaneous. Some of these reactions are due to nonspecific inflammation and irritation at the injection site, whereas other reactions are directly related to the live attenuated virus. Rarely, vaccinations have been associated with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. The onset of certain inflammatory dermatologic conditions, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and pemphigoid, were reported to occur shortly after vaccine administration. Allergic contact dermatitis can develop at the injection site, typically due to adjuvant ingredients in the vaccine, such as thimerosal and aluminum. Vaccinations are important to promote development of both individual and herd immunity. Although most vaccinations are considered relatively safe, there may be adverse effects associated with any vaccine. Cutaneous manifestations make up a large portion of the types of reactions associated with vaccines. There are many different reasons for the development of a cutaneous reaction to a vaccination. Some are directly related to the injection of a live attenuated virus, such as varicella or vaccinia (for immunity to smallpox), whereas others cause more nonspecific erythema and swelling at the injection site, as a result of local inflammation or irritation. Vaccinations have also been associated in rare reports with generalized hypersensitivity reactions, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, urticaria, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, and drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There have been case reports associating the administration of a vaccine with the new onset of a dermatologic condition, such as lichen planus, granuloma annulare, and Sweet syndrome. Finally, allergic contact

  20. Cutaneous sarcoidosis and polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J C; Belinchón, I; Albares, P; Vergara, G; Betlloch, I; Bañuls, J

    2004-11-01

    Polycythemia vera is classified with myelogenous leukaemia, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia and primary thrombocythemia as a myeloproliferative syndrome. Cutaneous symptoms have been reported with polycythemia vera, including facial plethora, aquagenic pruritus, urticaria, purpura, Sweet's syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum. However, polycythemia vera associated with systemic sarcoidosis has been rarely reported. An unusual case of polycythemia vera associated with cutaneous sarcoidosis is described. PMID:15482300

  1. [Cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Descamps, V; Bouscarat, F

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Its dermatological manifestations are extremely polymorphous. They are normally classed as either specific lesions, comprising granulomas, which are generally chronic, or non-specific lesions, principally acute erythema nodosum. These signs are seen in around 25% of sarcoidosis patients. The disease may be heralded by a skin disorder. Diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis provides the clinician with three problems: screening for a visceral site of the disease, determination of the prognosis, and long-term management with regular monitoring coupled with suitable therapy in the event of cosmetic or functional impairment. PMID:26804434

  2. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  3. Cutaneous decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Konstantinos; Sidiras, Georgios Gr; Kalentzos, Vasileios; Pyrpasopoulou, Athina

    2014-03-01

    A probable case of decompression illness with associated cutis marmorata is presented, which regressed over a few hours with oxygen breathing and after intravenous methylprednisolone and fluid resuscitation without recompression. He was eventually transferred for hyperbaric treatment some 10 hours post dive. Cutaneous decompression illness is not associated with high mortality per se, but prompt and accurate recognition is warranted, as it may represent a prodromal feature of potentially life-threatening complications. However, in this case, as differential diagnosis, an allergic reaction remains possible. PMID:24687485

  4. A cutaneous positioning system.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bernard J; Lee, Beom-Chan; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2015-04-01

    Our previous work revealed that torso cutaneous information contributes to the internal representation of the torso and plays a role in postural control. Hence, the aims of this study were to assess whether posture could be manipulated by patterns of vibrotactile stimulation and to determine whether resulting modified postures were associated with specific and consistent spatial attitudes. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the anatomical locations corresponding to left and right external oblique, internal oblique and erector spinae muscles at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. A 250-Hz tactile vibration was applied for 5 s either at a single location or consecutively at each location in clockwise or counterclockwise sequences. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that postural responses observed in response to single and sequential stimulation patterns were similar, while the center of pressure remained unaltered in any situations. Moreover, torso inclinations followed rectilinear-like path segments chartered by stimuli loci during sequential stimulations. Comparison of torso attitudes with previous results obtained with co-vibration patterns of the same duration showed that torso inclination amplitudes are equivalent for single (one location) and co-vibration (pairs of locations) patterns inducing the same directional effect. Hence, torso cutaneous information exhibits kinesthetic properties, appears to provide a map of upper body spatial configuration, and could assume the role of an internal positioning system for the upper body. PMID:25600816

  5. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  6. Cutaneous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polefka, Thomas G; Meyer, Thomas A; Agin, Patricia P; Bianchini, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The earliest known microfossil records suggest that microorganisms existed on the earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Not only did sunlight drive this evolutionary process, but it also allowed photosynthetic organisms to elaborate oxygen and fundamentally change the earth's atmosphere and subsequent evolution. Paradoxically, however, an atmosphere of 20% oxygen offers aerobic organisms both benefits and some key challenges, particularly, to the external integument. This mini-review summarizes almost 40 years of research and provides a "60 000-foot" perspective on cutaneous oxidative stress. Topics reviewed include the following: What are free radicals and reactive oxygen species? Where do they come from? What is their chemistry? What are their roles and/or impact on the skin? What antioxidant defenses are available to mitigate oxidative stress. PMID:22360336

  7. Familial cutaneous leiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Thyresson, H N; Su, W P

    1981-04-01

    A 24-year-old Caucasian man was evaluated because of a history of multiple firm, reddish, papulonodular skin lesions occurring over the buttocks, thighs, and lower portions of his back and legs since the age of 17 years. Most lesions had developed within 1 year of onset and had become very painful. The family history revealed that the patient's mother and maternal aunts had similar skin lesions. The mode of inheritance is that of autosomal dominant pattern. The mother and three maternal aunts all had had hysterectomies. Biopsy specimens of skin lesions with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson-trichrome stains showed typical leiomyoma. Bodian's staining method revealed an increased amount of nerve fibers interlacing within muscle fibers and in the surrounding tissue. This finding may explain the painful nature of the cutaneous leiomyomas. Treatments consist of analgesics for control of pain and selective excision of larger painful leiomyomas. PMID:7229147

  8. Cutaneous Melanoma in Women

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Eliades, Philip; Gupta, Sameer; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma (CM) continues to increase in the Caucasian population in the United States. In 2014, women only accounted for 42% of the 76,100 new melanoma cases and only 33% of the 9,710 deaths associated with CM in the US.1 These trends are consistently observed in populations around the world. Indeed, gender disparity in melanoma outcome is so consistently observed that gender has been suggested as an important prognostic factor in melanoma, despite not being formerly incorporated in staging algorithms.2 The source of this gender disparity in melanoma remains unclear but likely represents both biological and behavioral etiologies. Herein, we review the current knowledge of how melanoma differs between men and women. PMID:25844396

  9. Cutaneous temperature receptors.

    PubMed

    Spray, D C

    1986-01-01

    Specific thermoreceptors comprise an electrophysiologically distinct class of cutaneous receptors with a morphological substrate (free nerve endings) and plausible transduction mechanism (electrogenic Na pump with or without auxiliary temperature-dependent processes). Because responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli converge along the neural pathway, we have difficulty explaining the purity of cold and warm sensations; participation of dual-modality receptors in sensory discrimination cannot be ruled out. The field is now at a point where a leap in understanding would be achieved by intracellular recordings from the sensory receptor (for which patch clamp studies on isolated neuronal elements may provide the necessary technology) and from continued analysis of what information is lost and what retained in passage from one synapse to the next along the thermal pathway. PMID:3085583

  10. Early Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Wiley M.

    1966-01-01

    Cutaneous disorders which manifest themselves on the exposed parts are more likely than are hidden lesions to cause the patient to seek professional services promptly. Usually he consults his family physician or the community dermatologist. The physician who first sees the patient is dependent upon his own resources for management and diagnosis. A background of experience, a measure of energy and an inquisitive attitude are the necessary ingredients for successful management. The difficulties involved in differentiating early lupus erythematosus and polymorphic light eruptions cannot be invariably resolved even with the most complete review. The course of the disorder and the response to environmental factors supply important clues. Investigative work, especially in the field of immunology, offers hope for the solution of some of our problems. PMID:5909872

  11. Pseudolymphomatous cutaneous angiosarcoma: a rare variant of cutaneous angiosarcoma readily mistaken for cutaneous lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Requena, Luis; Santonja, Carlos; Stutz, Nathalie; Kaddu, Steven; Weenig, Roger H; Kutzner, Heinz; Menzel, Thomas; Cerroni, Lorenzo

    2007-08-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma is probably the most malignant neoplasm involving the skin. Three clinical variants of cutaneous angiosarcoma are recognized, including angiosarcoma of the scalp and face of elderly patients, angiosarcoma associated with chronic lymphedema, and postirradiation angiosarcoma. Histopathologically, these three variants of angiosarcoma show similar features, which consist of poorly circumscribed, irregularly dilated, and anastomosing vascular channels lined by prominent endothelial cells that dissect through the dermis. Focally, neoplastic endothelial cells show large, hyperchromatic, and pleomorphic nuclei, protruding within vascular lumina and creating small papillations. Usually, inflammatory infiltrate is sparse and consists of a patchy, perivascular lymphoid infiltrate around the neoformed vessels. In rare instances, cutaneous angiosarcomas may exhibit prominent inflammatory infiltrate, and the neoplasm may be mistaken for an inflammatory process, both from clinical and histopathologic points of view. We describe four examples of cutaneous angiosarcomas with dense lymphocytic infiltrates involving the neoplasm. Immunohistochemically, lymphocytes expressed immunoreactivity for CD3, CD5, and CD45 markers, whereas the germinal centers were positive for CD20, CD79a, and Bcl-6. The neoplastic endothelial cells expressed immunoreactivity for the CD31, CD34, podoplanin, Prox-1, Lyve-1, and D2-40. We discuss the possible relationship between neoplastic endothelial lymphatic cells and reactive lymphocytes. Cutaneous angiosarcoma with prominent lymphocytic infiltrate may be readily mistaken for cutaneous follicle center cell lymphoma or cutaneous pseudolymphoma. PMID:17667166

  12. Selected Cutaneous Disorders in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses selected cutaneous diseases seen in the athlete. These diseases may be caused by interaction with the elements, the playing surface, other athletes, or the clothing or equipment worn during sport. All of these dermatological conditions are relatively common, but the physically active individual can suffer from these maladies and their complications more often than the inactive person. The emphasis in caring for the participant is on prevention, early recognition and practical aspects of management of cutaneous diseases. PMID:21264034

  13. [Perspective of cutaneous lymphoma reserach].

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Urosevic, Mirjana; Cozzio, Antonio; Asagoe, Kenji; Döbbeling, Udo; Burg, Günter

    2006-06-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are characterized by an expansion of hematopoietic cells in the special microenvironment of the skin. They represent a special challenge both for researches and for clinicians who treat patients with these disorders. New research data concerning the biology of lymphocytes and the cutaneous microenvironment have increased our knowledge of these diseases in the last decades. The new WHO/EORTC classification definitely will facilitate a more detailed investigation of the various subtypes. PMID:16734840

  14. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered. PMID:8525575

  15. Familial cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 5-10 % of all cutaneous melanomas occur in families with hereditary melanoma predisposition. Worldwide, approximately 20-40% of kindreds with familial elanoma harbor germline mutations in the CDKN2A gene, located on chromosome 9p21, which encodes two different proteins, p16INK4 and p14ARF, both involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and induction of senescence. In different populations several recurring CDKN2A founder mutations have been described. The risk of melanoma in CDKN2A mutations carriers varies between populations and is higher in regions with high sun exposure and high incidence of melanoma in the general population. Some CDKN2A mutations have been associated not only with melanoma but also with increased risk of other malignancies--most notably pancreatic carcinoma. A much smaller number of families have germline mutations in the CDK4 gene on chromosome 12q14, encoding a cyclin dependent kinase which normally interacts with p16INK4A. The management of families with hereditary melanoma is discussed. PMID:20687502

  16. Genotyping of cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Glitza, Isabella C.; Davies, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma were very limited. This landscape has evolved dramatically since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in ~45% of cutaneous melanomas. Vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have all received regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients with a BRAFV600 mutation. Based on the necessity to document the presence of a BRAFV600 mutation to prescribe these agents, molecular testing is now the standard of care in this disease. However, the options and rationale for testing are evolving rapidly due to an improved understanding of the molecular drivers and heterogeneity of melanoma. Such testing may identify rational combinatorial approaches to prevent or overcome resistance for the approved BRAF inhibitors. In addition, new clinical strategies have been identified for a number of other molecular changes that are detected in this disease, including somatic changes in NRAS, PTEN, CDKN2A, and c-KIT, among others. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic landscape of mutations in melanoma, their associations with clinicopathological features, and their implications for clinical testing and treatment. PMID:25632386

  17. The Development of Cutaneous Neurofibromas

    PubMed Central

    Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Peltonen, Sirkku; Callens, Tom; Jokinen, Elina; Heape, Anthony M.; Messiaen, Ludwine; Peltonen, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous neurofibromas are the hallmarks of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). They are composed of multiple cell types, and traditionally they are believed to arise from small nerve tributaries of the skin. A key finding in the context of this view has been that subpopulations of tumor Schwann cells harbor biallelic inactivation of the NF1 gene (NF1−/−). In the present study, our aim was to clarify further the pathogenesis of cutaneous neurofibromas. First, we detected cells expressing multipotency-associated biomarkers in cutaneous neurofibromas. Second, we developed a method for isolating and expanding multipotent neurofibroma-derived precursor cells (NFPs) from dissociated human cutaneous neurofibromas and used it to analyze their growth and differentiation potential. In analogy to solitary cells resident in neurofibromas, NFPs were found to express nestin and had the potential to differentiate to, at least, Schwann cells, neurons, epithelial cells, and adipocytes. Mutation analysis of the NFPs revealed that their genotype was NF1+/−. The results led us to speculate that the development of cutaneous neurofibromas includes the recruitment of multipotent NF1+/− precursor cells. These cells may be derived from the multipotent cells of the hair roots, which often are intimately associated with microscopic neurofibromas. PMID:21281783

  18. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  19. Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus: Diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Lauren G.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus encompasses a wide range of dermatologic manifestations, which may or may not be associated with the development of systemic disease. Cutaneous lupus is divided into several subtypes, including acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus includes discoid lupus erythematosus, lupus erythematosus profundus, chilblain cutaneous lupus, and lupus tumidus. Diagnosis of these diseases requires proper classification of the subtype, through a combination of physical exam, laboratory studies, histology, antibody serology, and occasionally direct immunofluorescence, while ensuring to exclude systemic disease. Treatment of cutaneous lupus consists of patient education on proper sun protection along with appropriate topical and systemic agents. Systemic agents are indicated in cases of widespread, scarring, or treatment-refractory disease. In this review, we discuss issues in classification and diagnosis of the various subtypes of CLE, as well as provide an update on therapeutic management. PMID:24238695

  20. Cutaneous ectopic schistosomiasis: diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Barros, Cláudia Renata Castro do Rêgo; Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Medeiros, Camila Carolina Queiroz; de Araújo, Jessica Guido

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous schistosomiasis is a rare clinical manifestation of schistosomiasis, an infectious and parasitic disease, caused in Brazil by the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. The lesions are due to the deposition of eggs or, rarely, adult worms, usually involving the genital and groin areas. Extra-genital lesions occur mainly on the torso as papules of zosteriform appearance. The case of a patient with ectopic cutaneous schistosomiasis is reported in this article, due to the rarity of its occurrence and its difficult clinical diagnosis. PMID:26982792

  1. RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    RNase 7 belongs to the RNase A superfamily and exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. RNase 7 is expressed in human skin, and expression in keratinocytes can be induced by cytokines and microbes. These properties suggest that RNase 7 participates in innate cutaneous defense. In this review, we provide an overview about the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense with focus on the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, the regulation of RNase 7 expression, and the role of RNase 7 in skin diseases. PMID:27089327

  2. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  3. Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Caballero-Fonseca, Fernan; Capriles-Hulett, Arnaldo

    2013-05-01

    It has been recognized that a high proportion of chronic urticaria patients experience symptom aggravation when exposed to aspirin and NSAIDs. This clinical picture is known as Aspirin-exacerbated cutaneous disease. The pathogenesis of these exacerbations is related to the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 leading to a decreased synthesis of PGE2 and an increased cysteinyl leukotriene production in the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Patient management comprises the treatment of the underlying cutaneous disease with nonsedating antihistamines and other medications, avoidance of COX-1 inhibitors, and the use of alternative NSAIDs that do not inhibit COX-1 for the relief of pain, inflammation and fever. PMID:23639712

  4. Cutaneous manifestations associated with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ritva; Selph, Jacqueline; Gerstenblith, Meg R

    2016-06-01

    Melanoma is a malignancy most commonly arising from the skin; therefore, primary melanoma characteristics are usually the first cutaneous manifestations of melanoma. Cutaneous metastases, which can occur locally or diffusely, are important to detect in a timely manner as treatments for advanced melanoma that impact survival are now available. Melanoma can be associated with local or diffuse pigmentation changes, including depigmentation associated with the leukodermas and hyperpigmentation associated with diffuse melanosis cutis. The leukodermas occur frequently, illustrate the immunogenic nature of melanoma, and may impact prognosis. Paraneoplastic syndromes in association with melanoma are rare, though can occur. PMID:27178692

  5. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  6. Cutaneous cryptococcosis of the penis.

    PubMed

    Calista, Donato; Grosso, Carmela

    2008-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis is a well-known opportunistic infection in AIDS patients. We report an unusual patient who demonstrated an isolated plaque of cryptococcosis on the penis. Resolution of this plaque was obtained after treatment with fluconazole, but subsequent cutaneous dissemination occurred that was responsive to amphotericin B. PMID:18718193

  7. Resident Rounds: Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mariah; Fathi, Ramin; Alkousakis, Theodore

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old neutropenic man with acute myelogenous leukemia who presented for evaluation of a rapidly expanding necrotic eschar after adhesive placement. Histopathology revealed infection with primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Our case reviews the presentation and management of this condition as well highlights an uncommon cause in the hospital that can lead to this dangerous infection. PMID:27120566

  8. Cutaneous melanoma: A current overview.

    PubMed

    Wick, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma continues to increase in frequency, for unknown reasons, and it can pose considerable diagnostic challenges to clinician and pathologists alike. This review considers current concepts pertaining to that tumor, including those concerning epidemiology, clinical diagnosis, histologic findings, adjunctive diagnostic studies, and prognosis. PMID:27229301

  9. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    PubMed

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer. PMID:8994803

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of genitourinary malignancy.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary cancers are associated with a range of cutaneous syndromes, which can reflect direct metastatic spread, non-metastatic manifestations of malignancy or the consequences of treatment. More than 220,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur each year in the United States, and thus the associations with cutaneous involvement are quite well documented-rare metastatic spread, vasculitic and hemorrhagic syndromes. Cancers of the bladder and kidney may be associated with direct cutaneous metastases, vasculitic syndromes, hereditary leiomyomatosis, and other familial syndromes. Testicular cancer occasionally metastasizes to the skin but more commonly is associated with the dysplastic nevus (multiple atypical nevus) syndrome. A structured approach to history-taking, examination, and investigation is essential for optimal management, especially when these syndromes precede the diagnosis of a known malignancy. A brief review of the more common iatrogenic cutaneous complications is provided, and includes Raynaud's phenomenon, purpura, rash, hand-foot syndrome, the consequences of marrow failure, and bleomycin-induced pigmentation. PMID:27178687

  11. [Energy resonance through cutaneous stimulation].

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Energy resonance through cutaneous stimulation is a method basedon "listening" through the fingers to the body's vibrations at various points on the skin corresponding to the meridians used in Chinese medicine. It helps to relieve the patient by balancing the body's energies. It can be carried out by any caregiver after specific training. PMID:25630081

  12. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  13. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  14. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  15. Diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco, O; Savarino, S J; Walton, B C; Gam, A A; Neva, F A

    1989-09-01

    In Mexico, 6 cases of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL) were found in widely separated geographic regions. Information was also available on 2 other cases. In addition to the typical clinical features, half of the patients had evidence of nasopharyngeal mucosal involvement. All isolates from the DCL patients were identified as Leishmania mexicana mexicana by isoenzyme analysis and monoclonal antibody typing. In 1 region of Tabasco state where DCL was found, uncomplicated cutaneous leishmaniasis appeared to be highly endemic, and isolates from a few such patients were identified as L. mexicana mexicana. An incidental finding was the recovery of an isolate of L. braziliensis braziliensis from a patient with chiclero ulcer in Oaxaca state. The clinical and epidemiological significance of the reported cases are discussed. PMID:2802018

  16. Cutaneous diseases in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Raymond L

    2003-10-01

    Native Americans have a rich and complex heritage and culture. Although the genetic pool has changed with increasing integration with other Americans with different ancestry, there are important conditions that are unique to Native Americans, the most prominent example being actinic prurigo. The scientific literature dealing with Native American skin conditions is sparse and more studies are needed to understand more fully cutaneous disease in Native Americans. PMID:14717410

  17. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma. PMID:27136637

  18. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  19. Cutaneous mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour.

    PubMed

    Tan, Geok Chin; Yap, Yen Piow; Shiran, Mohd Sidik; Sabariah, Abdul Rahman; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumour (MSCP) has been reported in various sites, including skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lung and spleen. Cutaneous lesions are extremely rare and the differential diagnoses include various spindle cell lesions. Literature review shows that this lesion has preponderance for upper limb involvement and occurs largely in immunosuppressed individuals. We report a case of MSCP of the skin due to atypical mycobacterium and discuss the risk of misdiagnosis as a sarcoma. PMID:21686408

  20. Post-irradiation cutaneous angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Mikhail, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare and highly malignant tumor with potential to recur despite treatment, and carries a poor prognosis. Previous radiation therapy and lymphedema are some of the known risk factors. We present a case of cutaneous angiosarcoma which occurred at lumpectomy site in a patient with a history of breast cancer and radiation to the breast. The tumor kept on recurring repetitively despite continual treatments, and the patient finally succumbed to the disease roughly four years after initial diagnosis. PMID:18925942

  1. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P L

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  2. Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Krishnendra; Singh, Ujjwal Kumar; Jain, Mansi; Dhand, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis in anorectal adenocarcinoma is a rare entity. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old female who presented with yellowish-brown, irregular, solid, elevated rashes over the pubis with a recent history off palliative colostomy for anorectal adenocarcinoma. Clinically, we suspected metastasis that was proved on biopsy. We report this case due to the rare presenting site (i.e., perineum) of a metastatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26009722

  3. [Cutaneous symptoms of various vasculitides].

    PubMed

    Sunderkötter, C; Pappelbaum, K I; Ehrchen, J

    2015-08-01

    The skin is one of the organs most frequently involved in vasculitides. Cutaneous vasculitis may present (1) part of a systemic vasculitis (e.g., IgA vasculitis), (2) a skin-restricted or skin-dominant variant of the corresponding systemic vasculitis without clinically apparent visceral involvement (e.g., cutaneous IgA vasculitis), or (3) a vasculitis occurring exclusively in the skin (e.g., erythema elevatun diutinum). The clinical symptoms of vasculitides are markedly determined by the size of the predominantly affected blood vessels. Systemic polyarteritis nodosa is regarded as a medium vessel vasculitis and is associated with multiple skin symptoms: (1) vasculitis of digital arteries with ensuing digital infarction, (2) livedo racemosa and subcutaneous nodules, and (3) in some patients even purpura and hemorrhagic macules due to additional small vessel vasculitis. In contrast, in its skin-restricted entity (i.e., cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa), the predominant symptoms are subcutaneous nodules surrounded by livedo racemosa, often on the lower legs. Among small-vessel vasculitides palpable purpura with predilection for the legs is a nearly pathognomonic feature of immune complex vasculitis. Variations in clinical symptoms indicate additional pathophysiological mechanisms or different vascultides: (1) ANCA-associated vasculitides often also entail nodules or sometimes livedo, (2) cryoglobulinemic vasculitis additionally may present with necrosis at cold exposed areas and involvement of vessels of various size, (3) small vessel vasculitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis shows predilection for additional sites (e.g., nailfolds) and also involvement of vessels beyond postcapillary venules, (4) recurrent macular vasculitis in hypergammaglobulinemia also occurs on dependent parts, but shows numerous small hemorrhagic macules instead of palpable purpura, (5) erythema elevatum diutinum begins with brightly red to violaceous plaques

  4. Biology of Human Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Elias G.; Hasskamp, Joanne H.; Sharma, Bhuvnesh K.

    2010-01-01

    A review of the natural behavior of cutaneous melanoma, clinical and pathological factors, prognostic indicators, some basic research and the present and possible futuristic strategies in the management of this disease are presented. While surgery remains to be the most effective therapeutic approach in the management of early primary lesions, there is no standard adjuvant therapy after surgical resection, or for metastatic disease. PMID:24281039

  5. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases. PMID:27621348

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Megan L; McCusker, Meagen M; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disease reported in 1 in 2500 live births in Northern American and Northern European Caucasian populations. Classic disease findings include chronic bacterial infection of airways and sinuses, malabsorption of fat, infertility in men, and elevated concentrations of chloride in sweat. Less well-recognized findings associated with cystic fibrosis include cutaneous findings, which can be primary or secondary manifestations of the disease process. Patients demonstrate more atopic and drug hypersensitivity reactions than the general population, but have similar rates of urticaria compared with the general population. In atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis, the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of the disease may aid with diagnosis, and notably can be the presenting sign. Other dermatologic manifestations of cystic fibrosis include early aquagenic skin wrinkling and cutaneous vasculitis, which can be associated with arthralgias. Familiarity with the nutrient deficiency dermatitis of this entity may play a role in the timely diagnosis of the disease, and the other cutaneous findings add to our understanding of the protean nature of its manifestations. PMID:18429769

  7. Cutaneous macroglobulinosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Camp, Brendan J; Magro, Cynthia M

    2012-10-01

    Cutaneous macroglobulinosis is a rare skin manifestation of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. It is characterized by the deposition of eosinophilic, immunoglobulin-derived material in the dermis. It typically presents as pink or skin-colored papules favoring the extensor surfaces of the extremities. There are 11 reported cases of cutaneous macroglobulinosis in the literature. In our consultative dermatopathology practice we encountered three additional cases. In Case 1, a 41-year-old female with a monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM)-kappa gammopathy developed skin-colored papules on her extensor extremities, forehead and back. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive pink material in the dermis that stained with IgM. In Case 2, an 83-year-old female with a monoclonal IgM-lambda paraproteinemia developed non-blanching papules and plaques on the lower extremities and cheeks. Skin biopsies showed a striking occlusion of the vessels with a PAS-positive eosinophilic precipitate, which was also found in the extravascular spaces and stained with IgM using direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and immunohistochemical stains. In Case 3, an 80-year-old male with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia developed ulcerated papules and nodules on the lower extremities. The biopsy findings were similar to those of Case 2. We present a series of three patients with cutaneous macroglobulinosis and explore variations in the clinical and histopathological findings of this uncommon entity. PMID:22882527

  8. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy.

    PubMed

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  9. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  10. Cutaneous lesions in new born.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Kaur, Surjeet; Nagpal, Madhu; Dewan, S P

    2002-01-01

    Five hundred unselected newborn babies delivered in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Unit II of SGBT Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar during April 2000 to October 2000 were examined for cutaneous lesions daily for the first five days after birth. Different cutaneous lesions were seen in 474(94.8%) newborns. The physiological skin changes observed in order of frequency were Epstein pearls in 305(61%), Mongolian spot in 301(60.2%), superficial cutaneous desquamation in 200(40%), icterus in 128(25.6%), milia in 119(23.8%), sebaceous gland hyperplasia in 107(21.4%), occipital alopecia in 94(18.8%), lanugo in 72(14.4%), peripheral cyanosis in 47(9.4%), breast hypertrophy in 29(5.8%) and miniature puberty in 28(5.6%) newborns. Of the transient non-infective skin diseases, erythema toxicum neonatorum was observed most commonly in 105(21%), followed by miliaria rubra in 103(20.6%) and acne neonatorum in 27(5.4%) newborns. The naevi and other developmental defects in the descending order were salmon patch in 69(13.8%), congenital melanocytic noevi in 10(2%), accessory tragi in 3(0.6%), spina bifida in 2(0.4%), hydrocephalus in 1(0.2%) and poliosis in 1(0.2%) newborns. Cradle cap was the only dermatitis observed in 50(10%) newborns. One (0.2%) case each of Harlequin ichthyosis and labial cyst was seen. PMID:17656992

  11. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  12. Primary cutaneous cryptococcosis of the penis.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Moreno, Basilio; Bernabeu-Wittel, José; Zulueta-Dorado, Teresa; Conejo-Mir, Julián; Lissen, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Primary cutaneous cryptococcosis is characterized by skin lesions confined to one body region, without evidence of simultaneous dissemination. Skin lesions frequently occur in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of primary cutaneous cryptococcosis in an immunocompetent patient affecting genital area successfully treated with oral itraconazole. PMID:23007707

  13. Primary Cutaneous Aspergillosis in a Preterm Infant.

    PubMed

    Frick, Marie Antoinette; Boix, Hector; Camba Longueira, Fátima; Martin-Gomez, M Teresa; Rodrigo-Pendás, José Ángel; Soler-Palacin, Pere

    2016-06-01

    Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is rare in premature infants. It requires combined medical and surgical strategies. Liposomal amphotericin B is recommended as first-line therapy, but salvage regimens with others antifungal agents, such as voriconazole, have been reported. Voriconazole's pharmacodynamics is unknown in this population. We report a case of severe toxicity to voriconazole in a preterm patient with primary cutaneous aspergillosis. PMID:26974892

  14. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process. PMID:25589355

  15. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) Identification. A cutaneous electrode is an electrode that is applied directly to a patient's skin either...

  16. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV.

    PubMed

    Soza, Gabriela M; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison; Ryan, Caitriona

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4(+) count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  17. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  18. Cutaneous hemangiosarcoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naho; Furukawa, Satoshi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2013-06-01

    A male golden retriever of unknown age presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous masses from the left elbow to the digits. Histopathologically, multiple tumor foci had formed from the dermis to the subcutaneous tissue. Tumor foci consisted of a vascular structure, alveolar structure and solid proliferative area. The borders among these areas were not clear. Some neoplastic cells resembled a mature endothelium, while others were large pleomorphic cells. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were usually strongly positive for CD31 and often positive for PROX-1, the lymphatic endothelial cell marker. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as a hemangiosarcoma with lymphatic differentiation. PMID:23914061

  19. Adverse cutaneous drug eruptions: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Hoetzenecker, W; Nägeli, M; Mehra, E T; Jensen, A N; Saulite, I; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Guenova, E; Cozzio, A; French, L E

    2016-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous drug reactions are recognized as being major health problems worldwide causing considerable costs for health care systems. Most adverse cutaneous drug reactions follow a benign course; however, up to 2% of all adverse cutaneous drug eruptions are severe and life-threatening. These include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Physicians should be aware of specific red flags to rapidly identify these severe cutaneous drug eruptions and initiate appropriate treatment. Besides significant progress in clinical classification and treatment, recent studies have greatly enhanced our understanding in the pathophysiology of adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Genetic susceptibilities to certain drugs have been identified in SJS/TEN patients, viral reactivation in DRESS has been elucidated, and the discovery of tissue resident memory T cells helps to better understand the recurrent site-specific inflammation in patients with fixed drug eruption. PMID:26553194

  20. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  1. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in asians.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  2. The expanding spectrum of cutaneous borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Eisendle, K; Zelger, B

    2009-04-01

    The known spectrum of skin manifestations in cutaneous Lyme disease is continuously expanding and can not be regarded as completed. Besides the classical manifestations of cutaneous borreliosis like erythema (chronicum) migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans evidence is growing that at least in part also other skin manifestations, especially morphea, lichen sclerosus and cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma are causally related to infections with Borrelia. Also granuloma annulare and interstitial granulomatous dermatitis might be partly caused by Borrelia burgdorferi or similar strains. There are also single reports of other skin manifestations to be associated with borrelial infections like cutaneous sarcoidosis, necrobiosis lipoidica and necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. In addition, as the modern chameleon of dermatology, cutaneous borreliosis, especially borrelial lymphocytoma, mimics other skin conditions, as has been shown for erythema annulare centrifugum or lymphocytic infiltration (Jessner Kanof) of the skin. PMID:19357623

  3. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  4. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. PMID:12794914

  5. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  6. Cutaneous alternariosis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Essabbah, Nawel; Gorsane, Imen; Youssef, Monia; Hadhri, Rym; Aloui, Sabra; Gorcii, Mohamed; Ali, Hichem Bel Hadj; Chemli, Zeineb; Babba, Hammouda; El May, Mezri; Zili, Jameleddine; Zakhama, Abdelfatteh; Skhiri, Habib

    2014-05-01

    Alternariosis is a fungal infection that is usually described in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of cutaneous alternariosis in a renal transplant recipient caused by Alternaria tenuissima. The diagnosis was supported by histopathologic (ie, yeastlike cells, filamentous structures) and mycologic findings from a cutaneous biopsy. Cutaneous lesions regressed 1 month following a decrease in the dosage of immunosuppressive therapy. The patient also was treated with intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral fluconazole without improvement. Cryotherapy remarkably accelerated healing of the lesions. PMID:24897135

  7. Cutaneous melioidosis with unusual histological features.

    PubMed

    Yeo, B; Lee, J; Alagappan, U; Pan, J Y

    2016-04-01

    Melioidosis is caused by the saprophytic gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei, and has varied presentations, with cutaneous manifestations occurring in about 13% of cases. The usual histopathological features of melioidosis are suppurative to chronic granulomatous inflammation. Recommended treatment of melioidosis is sequential use of intravenous followed by oral antibiotics for a few months, although oral antibiotics alone can be used in primary cutaneous melioidosis. We report a case of cutaneous melioidosis in a healthy young man, with the unusual histopathological feature of lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, and failing an initial trial of oral antibiotics alone. PMID:26299451

  8. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  9. Treatment of cutaneous larva migrans.

    PubMed

    Caumes, E

    2000-05-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans caused by the larvae of animal hookworms is the most frequent skin disease among travelers returning from tropical countries. Complications (impetigo and allergic reactions), together with the intense pruritus and the significant duration of the disease, make treatment mandatory. Freezing the leading edge of the skin track rarely works. Topical treatment of the affected area with 10%-15% thiabendazole solution or ointment has limited value for multiple lesions and hookworm folliculitis, and requires applications 3 times a day for at least 15 days. Oral thiabendazole is poorly effective when given as a single dose (cure rate, 68%-84%) and is less well tolerated than either albendazole or ivermectin. Treatment with a single 400-mg oral dose of albendazole gives cure rates of 46%-100%; a single 12-mg oral dose of ivermectin gives cure rates of 81%-100%. PMID:10816151

  10. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management. PMID:26909210

  11. Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Ghersetich, I; Comacchi, C; Jorizzo, J L

    1998-11-01

    Cutaneous small-vessel vasculitis (CSVV) refers to a group of disorders usually characterized by palpable purpura; it is caused by leukocytoclastic vasculitis of postcapillary venules. CSVV can be idiopathic or can be associated with a drug, infection, or underlying systemic disease. Initially, the pathogenesis of CSVV is immune complex related, but in its later stages different pathogenetic mechanisms may intensify the reaction and lymphocytes may predominate in the infiltrate. Cure requires elimination of the cause (ie, drugs, chemicals, infections, food allergens) when possible, as well as therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, corticosteroids, dapsone, potassium iodide, fibrinolytic agents, aminocaproic acid, immunosuppressive agents (ie, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine) or even monoclonal antibodies, depending on disease severity. PMID:9810883

  12. [Visceral and cutaneous larva migrans].

    PubMed

    Petithory, Jean-Claude

    2007-11-30

    The syndrome of visceral larva migrans was described for the first time in 1952 by Beaver. He demonstrated that the presence of nematodes larvae, particularly in the liver, were those of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Baylisascaris procyonis, the common racoon ascarid in the U.S.A. can also cause serious diseases in human. Digestive and respiratory clinical symptoms are usually moderate, however severe disease resulting from invasion of the myocardium or the brain has been reported. A blood hypereosinophilia is usually present the first few years after infection. Diagnosis uses serological methods, among them the ELISA test. Ocular larva is also possible with in that case, immunological modifications of the aqueous. Cutaneous larva migrans characterized by a linear, progressing, serpigenous eruption and intense itching is easy to diagnose. Larva migrans is due to dogs, cats and horses helminths. Dogs and cats (referred here as pets) now receive antihelmintitic treatments and parasites are now in decrease. PMID:18326429

  13. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. PMID:27178690

  14. Cutaneous Scarring: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard; Urso-Baiarda, Fulvio; Linge, Claire; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring can cause patients symptoms ranging from the psychological to physical pain. Although the process of normal scarring is well described the ultimate cause of pathological scarring remains unknown. Similarly, exactly how early gestation fetuses can heal scarlessly remains unsolved. These questions are crucial in the search for a preventative or curative antiscarring agent. Such a discovery would be of enormous medical and commercial importance, not least because it may have application in other tissues. In the clinical context the assessment of scars is becoming more sophisticated and new physical, medical and surgical therapies are being introduced. This review aims to summarise some of the recent developments in scarring research for non-specialists and specialists alike. PMID:20585482

  15. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity. PMID:25765687

  16. Immunopathology of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Reed, S. G.; Roters, S. B.; Sadigursky, M.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively susceptible BALB/c and relatively resistant A/J mice were infected subcutaneously in the right hind footpad with promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A large localized lesion developed within 2 months after infection in the BALB/c mice, while A/J mice exhibited a small discrete fibrotic nodule. Sequential immunologic and histologic examination demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed a nodular foam-cell type of lesion and progressive depression of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to leishmania antigen, while the A/J mice had a mixed cellular fibrosing and encapsulating reaction and developed and maintained positive DTH responses to leishmania antigen. Anti-leishmania antibody responses were positive at similar levels in both strains. The lesions in BALB/c mice were found in bone marrow, tendon, skin appendages, and regional lymph nodes, with a tendency toward cutaneous metastases. Lesions in A/J mice remained localized. Fibrosis, focal fibrinoid necrosis, and lymphocytic and macrophagic infiltration were the outstanding features. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies indicated that no outstanding destruction of leishmanias seemed to occur within macrophages of either mouse strain. In the more resistant A/J mice, however, parasitized macrophages were frequently necrotic, and degenerating leishmanias were often seen free in the interstitial tissue. These observations help the interpretation of the histologic features, as well as the pathogenesis, of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6691411

  17. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  18. Ferrofluid-associated Cutaneous Dyschromia

    PubMed Central

    Arfa, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ferrofluid is a colloidal suspension that usually consists of surfactant-coated nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a carrier liquid. Ferromagnetic fluid forms spikes when the liquid is exposed to a magnetic field. Purpose: The authors describe a man who developed temporary discoloration of his right palm and fingers after accidental cutaneous contact with ferrofluid and discuss some of the current and potential applications of this unique liquid. Methods: A 28-year-old man was evaluating the effects of magnetic fields using ferrofluid. He performed a modification of the “leaping ferrofluid” demonstration in which he held a superstrong (14,800 gauss magnetic field strength) N52 rare earth neodymium magnet in his palm and slowly lowered that hand over an open bowl that was filled with ferrofluid. Results: As the magnet approached the liquid, the ferrofluid became magnetized. The liquid leaped from the bowl and contacted not only the magnet, but also the palmar surface of his hand and fingers, resulting in a black-brown dyschromia of the affected skin. The discoloration completely resolved after two weeks without any adverse sequellae. Conclusion: Ferrofluid has numerous current and potential applications; in addition to being of value educationally and aesthetically (after being subjected to magnetic fields), it is also utilized for audio loudspeakers, medical innovations (such as a component of either a research tool, a diagnostic aid, or a treatment modality), and seals. Although the authors’ patient did not experience any acute or chronic toxicity from his cutaneous exposure to ferrofluid, conservative follow-up for individuals who experience skin contact with ferromagnetic fluid may be appropriate. PMID:27354890

  19. Delay in cutaneous melanoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Marcus H.S.B.; Drummond-Lage, Ana P.; Baeta, Cyntia; Rocha, Lorena; Almeida, Alessandra M.; Wainstein, Alberto J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Advanced melanoma is an incurable disease with complex and expensive treatments. The best approach to prevent melanoma at advanced stages is an early diagnosis. A knowledge of factors associated with the process of detecting cutaneous melanomas and the reasons for delays in diagnosis is essential for the improvement of the secondary prevention of the disease. Identify sociodemographic, individual, and medical aspects related to cutaneous melanoma diagnosis delay. Interviews evaluated the knowledge of melanoma, signals, symptoms, persons who were suspected, delays in seeking medical attention, physician's deferrals, and related factors of 211 patients. Melanomas were self-discovered in 41.7% of the patients; healthcare providers detected 29.9% of patients and others detected 27%. The main component in delay was patient-related. Only 31.3% of the patients knew that melanoma was a serious skin cancer, and most thought that the pigmented lesion was not important, causing a delay in seeking medical assistance. Patients (36.4%) reported a wait interval of more than 6 months from the onset of an observed change in a pigmented lesion to the first visit to a physician. The delay interval from the first physician visit to a histopathological diagnosis was shorter (<1 month) in 55.5% of patients. Improper treatments without a histopathological confirmation occurred in 14.7% of patients. A professional delay was related to both inappropriate treatments performed without histopathological confirmation (P = 0.003) and long requirements for medical referrals (P < 0.001). A deficient knowledge in the population regarding melanoma and physicians’ misdiagnoses regarding suspicious lesions contributed to delays in diagnosis. PMID:27495055

  20. What's eating you? Cutaneous larva migrans.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Kyle A; Ferringer, Tammie C

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a focused update and clinical review on cutaneous larva migrans (CLM), including atypical clinical presentations and newer management recommendations. The results and recommendations are subject to modification based on future studies. PMID:25844779

  1. Cutaneous Cryptococcus: marker for disseminated infection.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, G N; Tilak, Ragini; Yadav, Jyoti; Bansal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an infection caused by the encapsulated yeast, Cryptococcus neoformans, a dimorphic fungus recovered from pigeon excreta, soil, dust and human skin. After a primary infection in the lungs, the disease can disseminate via a haematogenous route to various organs, including the central nervous system and skin, in susceptible individuals. Cryptococcosis can present with a variety of skin and soft tissue manifestations including acneiform lesions, purpura, vesicles, nodules, abscesses, ulcers, granulomas, pustules, draining sinuses and cellulitis. We present a case of a young man with HIV infection who developed molluscum-like cutaneous lesions secondary to pulmonary cryptococcosis. The diagnosis was confirmed by Indian ink preparation of the cutaneous lesions. Primary cutaneous infection occurs rarely due to direct inoculation. Cutaneous lesions are usually secondary and act as a key marker of disseminated infection, especially in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, such as those infected with HIV, solid-organ transplant recipients, and those on chronic corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26199299

  2. Cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Goskowicz, M; Eichenfield, L F

    1993-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies may be associated with a variety of cutaneous findings in children. This review emphasizes new developments relating to cutaneous findings of nutritional deficiencies. Zinc deficiency, acrodermatitis enteropathica, and acrodermatitis enteropathica-like eruptions are seen with a variety of conditions including cystic fibrosis, anorexia nervosa, and breastfeeding. Similar cutaneous findings not related to zinc deficiency may also occur with such metabolic disorders as methylmalonic aciduria, multiple carboxylase deficiency, essential fatty acid deficiency and other amino acid deficiencies. Vitamin K deficiency is associated with hemorrhagic disease of the newborn and coagulopathy. Vitamin A deficiency presents with a variety of systemic findings and distinctive dermatologic findings. Acute vitamin A deficiency may be seen in children infected with measles and is associated with more severe disease. The systemic and cutaneous findings of vitamin C deficiency, scurvy, are discussed. PMID:8374671

  3. Choroidal and cutaneous metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shoichiro; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Yoshito; Ezaki, Hisao; Yamada, Takuya; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Miyazaki, Masanori; Nakai, Kei; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Watabe, Kenji; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Nishida, Kohji; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-03-01

    Choroidal or cutaneous metastasis of gastric cancer is rare. Gastrointestinal cancer was found in only 4% in patients with uveal metastasis. Choroidal metastasis from gastric cancer was reported in two cases in earlier literature. The frequency of gastric cancer as a primary lesion was 6% in cutaneous metastasis of men, and cutaneous metastasis occurs in 0.8% of all gastric cancers. We report a patient with gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with visual disorder in his left eye and skin pain on his head as his initial symptoms. These symptoms were diagnosed to be caused by choroidal and cutaneous metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma. Two cycles of chemotherapy consisted of oral S-1 and intravenous cisplatin (SPIRITS regimen); this was markedly effective to reduce the primary gastric lesion and almost all the metastatic lesions. PMID:23538460

  4. Familial abdominal chemodectomas with associated cutaneous angiolipomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Nicholson, G I; Hitchcock, G

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of cutaneous angiolipomas and intra-abdominal retroperitoneal chemodectomas in two brothers is described. Both died from malignant dissemination of the chemodectomas. It is possible but speculative that two other brothers suffered from the same syndrome. PMID:195258

  5. Cutaneous alternariosis in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, T K; Rytina, E; O'Connell, P B; Sterling, J C

    2001-02-01

    A 55-year-old male cardiac transplant recipient presented with cutaneous nodules on the limbs caused by Alternaria alternata. Oral fluconazole 200 mg daily for 3 weeks was ineffective. Itraconazole 100 mg oral daily was ceased when hyperglycaemia developed. Individual lesions were successfully treated with either curettage and cautery or double freeze-thaw cryotherapy. Alternaria spp. are ubiquitous fungal saprophytes which may cause cutaneous infections particularly in immunocompromised patients. PMID:11233722

  6. Cutaneous mastocytosis associated with congenital alopecia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho Rok; Kim, Hyun-Je; Jung, Mi-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dong-Youn; Lee, Joo-Heung; Yang, Jun-Mo

    2012-07-01

    Mastocytosis is a rare disorder that shows accumulation of mast cells in tissues. Atypical clinical features may mimic impetigo, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and carcinoid syndrome; however, only 1 case of scarring alopecia associated with mastocytosis has been reported. We present the first case of cutaneous mastocytosis associated with congenital alopecia areata in a 3-year-old Korean girl. This case showed an atypical clinical presentation of congenital alopecia areata, but histopathological results confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis. PMID:22356916

  7. [Penile cutaneous horn. A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Conde Sánchez, J M; Rico López, J; Blasco Hernández, P; Espinosa Olmedo, J; Domínguez Domínguez, M; García Pérez, M

    2000-02-01

    Contribution of a case report of cutaneous horn of penis surgically treated with extensive resection of the implantation base. A well differentiated, microinvasive epidermoid carcinoma was histopathologically demonstrated on a hyperkeratosis squamous papilloma. Although underlying lesions to cutaneous horn are usually benign, malignant changes have been reported in up to one third of cases; surgical treatment should therefore include extensive resection of the implantation base. PMID:10829451

  8. CHILDHOOD CUTANEOUS VASCULITIS: A COMPREHENSIVE APPRAISAL

    PubMed Central

    Palit, Aparna; Inamadar, Arun C

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides in childhood are rare and often present with clinical features distinct from adults. Diagnosis of cutaneous vasculitides in children was difficult because of lack of a satisfactory classification systems for this age group. A new international classification system for childhood vasculitis has been discussed in the following section along with important clinical features, diagnostic modalities, and recent therapeutic developments of important vasculitides in children. PMID:20101304

  9. Cutaneous Manifestations of Common Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Sunil; Jindal, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Skin functions as a window to our overall health and a number of systemic diseases result in various cutaneous changes. Knowledge of these manifestations helps in suspecting an underlying systemic illness. Cutaneous abnormalities are quite common in patients with liver diseases and this article aims to focus on these dermatoses. Cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with liver disease though common are nonspecific. They can also be seen in patients without liver diseases and generally do not indicate about a specific underlying hepatic disorder. The presence of a constellation of signs and symptoms is more useful in pointing toward an underlying hepatobiliary condition. The commonest symptom in patients with liver disease is pruritus which is often protracted and disabling. Other common features include spider angiomas, palmar erythema, paper money skin, xanthelasmas, pigmentary changes, and nutritional deficiencies. In this article, first the common cutaneous manifestations that may be associated with liver disorders are discussed and then common liver diseases with their specific cutaneous findings are discussed. Cutaneous abnormalities may be the first clue to the underlying liver disease. Identifying them is crucial for early diagnosis and better management. PMID:25755383

  10. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  11. Choroidal Metastases From Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Carmel L; Toy, Brian C; Kistler, Henry B; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2016-05-01

    A 92-year-old man presented with months of progressive blurry vision, worsening acutely in his right eye. He denied pain, diplopia, or photopsias. His history was significant for multiple myeloma, prostate cancer, and malignant melanoma of his right shoulder treated with local excision. He had local recurrence with hepatic metastasis of the melanoma treated with radiation and chemotherapy. On examination, his visual acuity was counting fingers in the right eye and 20/60 in the left eye. Amsler grid testing demonstrated metamorphopsia in the right eye. Fundus exam of the right and left eyes revealed multiple, elevated, pigmented choroidal lesions, with associated subretinal fluid in the right macula. This appearance is consistent with hematogenous metastasis of cutaneous malignant melanoma to the choroid and associated serous fluid-causing metamorphopsia. The patient was enrolled in a clinical trial combining plasmid IL-12 with pembrolizumab (Keytruda; Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ). He passed away 2 months after initial presentation to our clinic. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:497.]. PMID:27183558

  12. [Cutaneous vasculitides. A diagnostic approach].

    PubMed

    Schäkel, K; Meurer, M

    2008-05-01

    Vasculitis is characterized by an inflammatory reaction of vessel walls with damage to the dependent tissues. Forms of vasculitis which frequently have skin changes include leukocytoclastic angiitis (LcV), Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), cutaneous polyarteriitis nodosum (cPAN), erythema elevatum et diutinum (EED) and urticarial vasculitis (UV). In other forms of vasculitis, systemic manifestations predominate but there are a variety of skin changes. Kawasaki disease (MK), cryoglobulinemic vasculitis (kV), Wegener granulomatosis (WG), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) and microscopic polyangitis (MPA) belong to this group. The causes of vasculitis are heterogeneous. Triggers include infections, drugs, collagen vascular diseases, autoimmune diseases and lymphoproliferative disorders. Idiopathic vasculitis, particularly LcV and EED, occur only once and have a self-limited course. The diagnostic work up depends on the clinical picture and includes inflammatory markers, circulating immune complexes, different types of cryoglobulins and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, collagen vascular disease specific autoantibodies and additional hematological studies. Vasculitis can manifest in many organs and requires a thorough work up specifically in cases where WG, MPA, CSS and PAN are under consideration. PMID:18415062

  13. Genomic Classification of Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    2015-06-18

    We describe the landscape of genomic alterations in cutaneous melanomas through DNA, RNA, and protein-based analysis of 333 primary and/or metastatic melanomas from 331 patients. We establish a framework for genomic classification into one of four subtypes based on the pattern of the most prevalent significantly mutated genes: mutant BRAF, mutant RAS, mutant NF1, and Triple-WT (wild-type). Integrative analysis reveals enrichment of KIT mutations and focal amplifications and complex structural rearrangements as a feature of the Triple-WT subtype. We found no significant outcome correlation with genomic classification, but samples assigned a transcriptomic subclass enriched for immune gene expression associated with lymphocyte infiltrate on pathology review and high LCK protein expression, a T cell marker, were associated with improved patient survival. This clinicopathological and multi-dimensional analysis suggests that the prognosis of melanoma patients with regional metastases is influenced by tumor stroma immunobiology, offering insights to further personalize therapeutic decision-making. PMID:26091043

  14. Cutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.; Staberg, B.

    1983-12-01

    The disappearance rate of /sup 133/Xe was studied in 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris, using an epicutaneous labeling technique in involved skin lesions or normal-appearing skin of the proximal extensor site of the forearm. Control experiments were performed in 10 normal subjects. Calculations of the cutaneous blood flow (CBF) in psoriatic skin lesions were performed using a tissue-to-blood partition coefficient for /sup 133/Xe, lambda c,pso, of 1.2 ml/100 g/min. lambda c,pso was estimated after the relative content of water, lipids, and proteins had been analyzed in psoriatic skin biopsies of 6 patients with untreated psoriasis. The mean relative content of water was markedly reduced to 23.5 +/- 1.5% (SEM), and lipids and proteins were markedly increased to 2.5 +/- 0.7% and 74.0 +/- 2.2, respectively, compared to previously published data for normal skin (water 72.5%, lipids 1%, proteins 26.5%). Mean CBF in untreated psoriatic skin was 63.5 +/- 9.0 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than the mean CBF in 10 normal subjects, 6.3 +/- 0.5 ml/100 g/min (p much less than 0.0001). Mean CBF in normal-appearing skin in patients with psoriasis was 11.0 +/- 1.3 ml/100 g/min. This was significantly higher than CBF in normal subjects (p less than 0.0002).

  15. Epidemiology of chronic cutaneous wounds in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yufeng; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing; Liu, Hongwei; Ran, Xingwu; Lu, Shuliang; Hu, Dahai; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Li, Ying; Wang, Runxiu; Xie, Ting; Cheng, Biao; Wang, Lingfeng; Liu, Yi; Ye, Xiangbai; Han, Chunmao; Chen, Huade

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cutaneous wounds represent a major health care burden in China. However, limited information exists regarding the epidemiologic changes associated with recent social and economic development. We designed a cross-sectional survey in 2,513 patients who underwent treatment of chronic cutaneous wounds from a nationally representative sample in 17 hospitals between 2007 and 2008. Results revealed the prevalence of chronic cutaneous wounds among hospitalized patients was 1.7‰. Patient ages ranged from 18 days to 96 years (median, 58 years). The highest ratios were among 40-60 and 60-80-year-old patients (31% and 38%, respectively). The leading causes of chronic cutaneous wounds were diabetes (31.3% men, 35.3% women) trauma (26.4% men, 19.2% women). Manual workers (38.5% men, 29.3% women) and retirees (27.9% men, 23.5% women) accounted for over half the chronic cutaneous wound patients. Regarding treatments, only 22.4% were treated with modern dressings or other novel technologies and more patients received antibiotics (77.8%). Treatment was paid for by the patients in 42.3% of cases, by social medical insurance in 25.0%, by commercial medical insurance in 4.8%, while 27.9% received free medical care. Approximately half the patients' wounds were completely healed at discharge (1,345/2,513). In conclusion, diabetes has recently become the leading cause of chronic cutaneous wounds in China. The large population and considerable financial burden mean that serious attention should be paid to the early detection, prevention and diagnosis of chronic cutaneous wounds, and suggest that an overall health insurance system should be established, especially for the elderly. PMID:21362085

  16. Immunopathological studies on feline cutaneous and (muco)cutaneous mycobacteriosis.

    PubMed

    Kipar, A; Schiller, I; Baumgärtner, W

    2003-02-10

    Eight cases of feline (muco)cutaneous mycobacteriosis were studied to identify the causative agent and examine for phenotype and functional characteristics (expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase) of the inflammatory cells. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing identified the causative agents as Mycobacterium tuberculosis or M. avium complex in each four cases. Lesions were characterised by pyogranulomatous infiltration, with variability in the presence and size of necrotic areas, the presence of multinucleated giant cells and the degree of lymphocyte infiltration. Macrophages were positive for myeloid/histiocyte antigen (calprotectin), suggesting they represented freshly recruited monocytes; further differentiation to epithelioid cells and multinucleated giant cells was associated with loss of the myeloid/histiocyte antigen. Lymphocytes were found disseminated in the infiltrate (predominantly T cells) and as B cell-dominated accumulations mainly in the periphery of the lesions. Acid-fast bacilli were numerous. In M. tuberculosis complex infection, extracellular bacilli were most prominent, whereas in M. avium complex infection, bacilli were mainly located intracellularly. All cytokines examined as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were variably expressed by macrophages, epithelioid cells and multinucleated giant cells. Expression was most intense in degenerating macrophages loaded with intracellular bacilli, but was also seen cell-free within necrotic areas. The intense induction of cytokine and iNOS expression especially in infected macrophages suggests a relatively low virulence for these infectious agents in cats. Furthermore, the confinement of the bacilli to lesions indicates a successful response to infection. PMID:12586480

  17. Histological types of polypoid cutaneous melanoma II.

    PubMed

    Knezević, Fabijan; Duancić, Vjekoslav; Sitić, Sanda; Horvat-Knezević, Anica; Benković, Vesna; Ramić, Snjezana; Kostović, Kresimir; Ramljak, Vesna; Vrdoljak, Danko Velemir; Stanec, Mladen; Bozović, Angelina

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain which histological types of melanoma can clinically and morphologically appear as polypoid melanomas. In 645 cases of primary cutaneous melanoma we have analyzed criteria for diagnosis of polypoid cutaneous melanoma and afterwards we have analyzed growth phase in each polypoid melanoma, histological type of atypical melanocytes, the number of epidermal ridges which are occupied by atypical melanocytes, and distribution according to age, sex and location, as well as the disease free survival. According to the criteria for polypoid melanomas we have found 147 (22.8%) polypoid cutaneous melanomas. Analyzing the growth phases, histological types of atypical melanocytes and the number of affected epidermal ridges in the group of polypoid melanomas we have ascertained 2 (1.4%) ALMs, 4 (2.8%) LMMs, 42 (28.6%) SSMs and 99 (67.2%) NMs. Our conclusion is that polypoid cutaneous melanomas are morphological forms of various histological melanoma types (ALM, LMM, SSM and NM) and they can all display polypoid morphological form. Polypoid cutaneous melanomas are most often of nodular histological type. PMID:18217457

  18. Genetics Home Reference: laryngo-onycho-cutaneous syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... LOC syndrome is missing patches of skin (cutaneous erosions). The erosions heal slowly and may become infected. People with ... These abnormalities of laminin 332 cause the cutaneous erosions and overgrowth of granulation tissue that are characteristic ...

  19. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Dao, Ro-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug eruptions can range from mild maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR), including drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) which are rare but occasionally fatal. Some pathogens may induce skin reactions mimicking SCAR. There are several models to explain the interaction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), drug and T-cell receptor (TCR): (i) the "hapten/prohapten" theory; (ii) the "p-i concept"; (iii) the "altered peptide repertoire"; and (iv) the "altered TCR repertoire". The checkpoints of molecular mechanisms of SCAR include specific drug antigens interacting with the specific HLA loci (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-induced SCAR), involvement of specific TCR, induction of T-cell-mediated responses (e.g. granulysin, Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme B and T-helper 1/2-associated cytokines) and cell death mechanism (e.g. miR-18a-5p-induced apoptosis; annexin A1 and formyl peptide receptor 1-induced necroptosis in keratinocytes). In addition to immune mechanism, metabolism has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAR, such as recent findings of strong association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced SCAR and impaired renal function with allopurinol SCAR. With a better understanding of the mechanisms, effective therapeutics and prevention for SCAR can be improved. PMID:27154258

  20. Cutaneous metastasis of breast adenoid cystic carcinoma to the scalp.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony J; Seline, Alison E; Swick, Brian L; Wanat, Karolyn A

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a tumor that can be of primary cutaneous origin or secondary to metastatic disease, most commonly salivary origin. Aside from primary cutaneous and salivary types, ACC of the breast is a rare, more indolent variant. Cutaneous metastases secondary to breast ACC is exceedingly uncommon and not previously reported to our knowledge. We present the case of a 67-year-old woman who developed cutaneous metastasis from primary breast ACC. PMID:26968987

  1. Cutaneous manifestations of nontargeted and targeted chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Veronica J; Levy, Lauren L; Choi, Jennifer N

    2016-06-01

    Care of the oncologic patient requires an integral understanding of the adverse reactions of chemotherapy. With the advent of targeted agents and immunomodulating therapies, reactions to these newer treatments are of clinical interest. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapeutic agents, including toxic erythema and mucositis, are common and may require cessation of treatment if associated with discomfort, superinfection, or negative impact on quality of life. This article reviews the cutaneous adverse reactions and treatment options of both conventional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and newer targeted, multikinase inhibitors and immunomodulating therapies. An understanding of possible cutaneous reactions by all providers involved in the care of the oncologic patient is critical for prompt recognition, allowing for appropriate treatment and referral to dermatologists when necessary. PMID:27178698

  2. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  3. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  4. Scrubbing for cutaneous procedures can be hazardous.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nghi T; Commens, Christopher A

    2002-05-01

    Office-based minor cutaneous surgery is a service provided by many medical practitioners. In New South Wales, Australia, it is a legal requirement for practitioners to surgically scrub before donning sterile gloves for all forms of invasive surgery, including minor cutaneous procedures. Frequent scrubbing causes altered skin barrier function, irritant dermatitis and a potential risk of latex sensitization. These adverse effects are associated with significant morbidity and cost. Better tolerated alternatives, including alcohol-based hand rubs, should be considered in preference to traditional surgical scrubs in order to reduce these occupational risks for minor proceduralists. Well-controlled, prospective studies should explore what extent of hand washing is necessary for donning sterile gloves for minor cutaneous surgery. PMID:11982565

  5. Medical devices; reclassification of the cutaneous carbon dioxide and the cutaneous oxygen monitor. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-12-13

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying the cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor from class II (performance standards) into class II (special controls). FDA is also reclassifying the cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor for an infant patient who is not under gas anesthesia from class II (performance standards) into class II (special controls) and is reclassifying the cutaneous oxygen (PcO2) monitor for all other uses from class III (premarket approval) into class II (special controls). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document entitled "Class II [[Page 76679

  6. Problems in Cutaneous Communication from Psychophysics to Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmer, B. VonHaller; Clark, Leslie L., Ed.

    After reviewing the history of communication through the skin, this paper considers recent research into the problem of cutaneous stimulation induced both mechanically and electrically. The general demands of a cutaneous communication system are discussed, and four primary dimensions of cutaneous stimulation are summarized (locus, intensity,…

  7. Cutaneous chancroid in a visitor from Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    McBride, William J H; Hannah, Rory C S; Le Cornec, Genevera M; Bletchly, Cheryl

    2008-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman from Vanuatu presented to an Australian hospital with a 3-week history of a non-healing ulcer on the lower leg. A swab was submitted for a multiplex polymerase chain reaction designed to investigate genital ulcerative conditions. Haemophilus ducreyi was detected and the gene product was subsequently sequenced, confirming the diagnosis of cutaneous chancroid. The lesion responded to intramuscular benzathine penicillin. This report adds further evidence that cutaneous chancroid should be considered in the evaluation of skin ulcers in the south Pacific. PMID:18412810

  8. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nalli R Sumitra; Valarmathi, K; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-02-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  9. Cutaneous Immune Defenses Against Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hae; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sang Young; Park, Kyungho

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a virulent bacterium that abundantly colonizes inflammatory skin diseases. Since S. aureus infections occur in an impaired skin barrier, it is important to understand the protective mechanism through cutaneous immune responses against S. aureus infections and the interaction with Staphylococcal virulence factors. In this review, we summarize not only the pathogenesis and key elements of S. aureus skin infections, but also the cutaneous immune system against its infections and colonization. The information obtained from this area may provide the groundwork for further immunomodulatory therapies or vaccination strategies to prevent S. aureus infections. PMID:26064853

  10. Cutaneous lymphoma in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ul Soo; Jeong, Seong Mok; Kang, Min-Soo; Jung, In Sung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Lee, Chang Woo

    2004-01-01

    An 18-month-old male Doberman Pinscher was referred to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the College of Veterinary Medicine for an erythemic nodular mass on the right forelimb. The mass was diagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma, based on cytologic examination of a mass aspirate and histopathology. Using immunohistochemistry, the neoplastic cells were positive for CD3 but negative for CD79a, E-cadherin, and pancytokeratin, confirming their origin as T lymphocytes. No tumor recurrence was noted 18 months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a solitary nodular form of cutaneous lymphoma in a young dog. PMID:15048628

  11. Cutaneous mosaicisms: concepts, patterns and classifications*

    PubMed Central

    Kouzak, Samara Silva; Mendes, Marcela Sena Teixeira; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    A mosaic is an organism composed of two or more genetically distinct cell populations derived from a genetically homogeneous zygote. Cutaneous mosaicisms are the clinical expressions of these disorders. The main event which allows the existence of mosaicism is a genetic mutation, either structural or functional. Cutaneous mosaicisms usually manifest by specific patterns on the skin and the archetypic pattern is the system of Blaschko lines, but others include checkerboard, phylloid, large patches without midline separation and lateralization. Since 1901, when Blaschko lines were first described, the study of mosasicism has helped to elucidate the behavior of numerous genetic diseases, generating therapeutic perspectives for these pathologies, including the promising gene therapy. PMID:24068120

  12. Paraneoplastic cutaneous manifestations: concepts and updates*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josenilson Antônio; Mesquita, Kleyton de Carvalho; Igreja, Ana Carolina de Souza Machado; Lucas, Isabella Cristina Rodrigues Naves; Freitas, Aline Ferreira; de Oliveira, Sandra Maximiano; Costa, Izelda Maria Carvalho; Campbell, Iphis Tenfuss

    2013-01-01

    The skin often signals systemic changes. Some neoplastic diseases that affect internal organs may trigger several cutaneous manifestations. Although these dermatoses are relatively unusual, the recognition of some typical paraneoplastic dermatoses may lead to the early diagnosis of a neoplasm and determine a better prognosis. In this review article, we discuss the paraneoplastic cutaneous manifestations strongly associated with neoplasms, which include acanthosis nigricans maligna, tripe palms, erythema gyratum repens, Bazex syndrome, acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa, necrolytic migratory erythema, Leser-Trélat sign and paraneoplastic pemphigus. We also review the clinical manifestations of each condition and include updated knowledge on disease pathogenesis. PMID:23538999

  13. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Valarmathi, K.; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  14. Cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin.

    PubMed

    Grammer, L C; Metzger, B E; Patterson, R

    1984-03-16

    p6 report two cases of cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin. Each patient had a history of systemic allergic reactions to porcine insulin and was at least as reactive to human as to porcine insulin by end-point cutaneous titration. Both patients' insulin allergy was managed with animal insulins and both have done well. Our experience with these two patients indicates that human insulin (rDNA) should not be expected to be efficacious in all patients with systemic allergy to insulin. PMID:6366262

  15. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with lymphatic proliferation limited to the skin with no involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow or viscera at the diagnosis. Cutaneous lymphomas originate from mature T-lymphocytes (65% of all cases), mature B-lymphocytes (25%) or NK cells. Histopathological evaluation including immunophenotyping of the skin biopsy specimen is the basis of the diagnosis, which must be complemented with a precise staging of the disease and identification of prognostic factors, to allow for the choice of the best treatment method as well as for the evaluation of the treatment results. PMID:26759546

  16. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  17. Poikiloderma-like cutaneous amyloidosis - a rare presentation of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Heng, Jun Khee; Ho, Sue Ann; Tan, Kong Bing

    2016-01-01

    Poikiloderma-like cutaneous amyloidosis (PCA) is a rare variant of primary cutaneous amyloidosis. It was first described in 1929 and there are two clinical forms of PCA, the ordinary type and PCA syndrome. The characteristics of PCA include poikiloderma-like skin changes, lichenoid papules, blister formation, and cutaneous amyloid deposits on histological examination. These skin lesions usually occur at the extremities, consistent with the few cases that have been reported. We present a case of a 62-year-old man who presented with the features of poikiloderma-like cutaneous amyloidosis. Diagnosis of this unique condition is a challenge and a skin biopsy is necessary in such instances. A discussion of the differential diagnosis of this condition is also included. PMID:26990468

  18. Cytomegalovirus Cutaneous Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Faye T; Alhassan, Sulaiman; Adjapong, Opoku; Thirumala, Raghukumar

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is an opportunistic infection with a typically benign course in the healthy host but has a more ominous course in the immunocompromised population. CMV infection commonly affects the visceral organs, particularly the respiratory and the gastrointestinal tract. CMV cutaneous lesions are rare and can be easily missed. We present a case of a 76-year-old woman presenting with a diffuse non-pruritic macular lesion with scattered vesicles and bullae, which was initially treated as a varicella zoster virus infection and herpes simplex viral infection, but was later found on biopsy to be due to cytomegalovirus. She has a history of Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, and being on chronic immunosuppression therapy. This case highlights the importance of considering CMV infection in the differential diagnosis of vesicular skin lesions in immunocompromised patients. Based on a PubMed search for “cutaneous cytomegalovirus”, “cutaneous CMV”, “cytomegalovirus skin”, and “skin CMV” in material published in the last 20 years (from 1996 to 2016) and reviewing any applicable referenced material outside of those dates, cases of cutaneous CMV are not well documented. PMID:27335710

  19. Cutaneous sarcoidosis simulating porokeratosis of Mibelli.

    PubMed

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; Soussi, Wessal; Chiheb, Soumia; Jabri, Lamia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    We report a skin localization of systemic sarcoidosis, which presented with lesions that resemble porokeratosis of Mibelli. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating sarcoidal granuloma. Whereas cutaneous sarcoidosis is present in up to one-third of cases and may present with a wide variety of lesions, our presentation is uncommon. Partial remission was obtained with hydroxychloroquine and prednisone. PMID:26113926

  20. Cutaneous sarcoidosis simulating porokeratosis of Mibelli

    PubMed Central

    Elfatoiki, Fatima Zahra; Soussi, Wessal; Chiheb, Soumia; Jabri, Lamia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2015-01-01

    We report a skin localization of systemic sarcoidosis, which presented with lesions that resemble porokeratosis of Mibelli. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating sarcoidal granuloma. Whereas cutaneous sarcoidosis is present in up to one-third of cases and may present with a wide variety of lesions, our presentation is uncommon. Partial remission was obtained with hydroxychloroquine and prednisone PMID:26113926

  1. [Cutaneous mold fungus granuloma from Ulocladium chartarum].

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, P; Schon, K

    1981-01-01

    Cutaneous granulomas due to the mold fungus Ulocladium chartarum (Preuss) are described in a 58 year old woman. This fungus is usually harmless for mammalian. It is thought that a consisting immunosuppression (Brill-Symmer's disease, therapy with corticosteroids) was a priming condition for the infection. The route of infection in this patient described is unknown. PMID:7194869

  2. Most common clinical presentations of cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bulat, Vedrana; Mihić, Liborija Lugović; Situm, Mirna; Buljan, Marija; Blajić, Iva; Pusić, Jana

    2009-03-01

    The term mastocytosis is referred to as an array of uncommon, usually sporadic, heterogeneous clinical illnesses that result from the hyperplasia of tissue mast cells. It comprises many different clinical manifestations varying from indolent cutaneous forms to systemic and malignant conditions. The characteristic presentation of mastocytosis consists of cutaneous manifestations: either a solitary mastocytoma, urticaria pigmentosa, or less commonly, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis. Urticaria pigmentosa is the most common manifestation of cutaneous mastocytosis that manifests as a generalized eruption of round or oval erythematous macules, papules and plaques with variable amounts of brown pigment, usually on the trunk, but may also occur in all regions of the body including face and mucous membranes. Pruritus, dermographism and Darier's sign are additional features of these eruptions. Mastocytosis may also be manifested as mastocytoma, a rare, benign, pediatric tumor that results from hyperplasia of mast cells in papillary dermis in the first few weeks of life. The clinical course of mastocytosis is variable. The prognosis for the majority of pediatric patients with urticaria pigmentosa is extremely good, and over half of cases clear completely by adolescence, while those with aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia show a progressive course, usually with a fatal outcome. PMID:19623875

  3. Periorbital cellulitis due to cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Grant; Starks, Victoria; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2015-12-01

    Virgil's plague of the ancient world, Bacillus anthracis, is rare in developed nations. Unfortunately rural communities across the globe continue to be exposed to this potentially lethal bacterium. Herein we report a case of periorbital cutaneous anthrax infection in a 3-year-old girl from the rural area surrounding Harare, Zimbabwe with a brief review of the literature. PMID:25763844

  4. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  5. Phenytoin Induced Cutaneous B Cell Pseudolymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Sasidharanpillai, Sarita; Aravindan, Karumathil P; Nobin, Babu K; Raghavan, Nisha T; Nikhila, Pappinissery K

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphomas are benign lymphoproliferative processes mimicking lymphomas clinically and histologically. One of the precipitating factors for pseudolymphoma is drugs like anticonvulsants, antidepressants and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. According to existing literature phenytoin-induced cutaneous pseudolymphomas are usually T-cell predominant. Most often withdrawal of the drug with or without short-course systemic steroids can attain a cure. Rarely malignant transformation has been reported years later despite withdrawal of the offending drug, which necessitates a long-term follow up of the affected. We report an 80-year-old male patient who was receiving phenytoin sodium and who presented with diffuse erythema and infiltrated skin lesions which histologically resembled cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Substituting phenytoin with levetiracetam achieved resolution of symptoms. Further evaluation was suggestive of a reactive process. A detailed drug history is of paramount importance in differentiating drug-induced pseudolymphoma from lymphoma. Searching literature we could not find any previous reports of phenytoin-induced cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma. PMID:26538730

  6. [From gene to disease; cutaneous leiomyomatosis].

    PubMed

    Badeloe, S; van Geel, M; van Steensel, M A M; Steijlen, P M; Poblete-Gutiérrez, P; Frank, J A

    2007-02-01

    Multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis (MCUL; OMIM 150800) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease characterized by leiomyomas of the skin and uterine leiomyomas. MCUL can be associated with various types of renal cancer. This syndrome is known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC; OMIM 605839). Both disorders result from heterozygous germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. PMID:17326474

  7. Cutaneous abscess after Conus textile sting.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, Stefano; Violetti, Silvia Alberti; Serini, Stefano Maria

    2011-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old man who, after a Conus textile sting acquired in New Caledonia, developed a cutaneous abscess on a buttock. The abscess was accompanied by pain, paraesthesia, general malaise, and fever. Complete remission was achieved by sodium hypochlorite packs and oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, metronidazole, and tramadol. PMID:21539663

  8. Cutaneous lesions of the external ear

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Sand, Daniel; Brors, Dominik; Altmeyer, Peter; Mann, Benno; Bechara, Falk G

    2008-01-01

    Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation. PMID:18261212

  9. Revisiting determinants of prognosis in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sarah A; Hanniford, Douglas; Hernando, Eva; Osman, Iman

    2015-12-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for cutaneous melanoma is based on primary tumor thickness and the presence of ulceration, mitoses, lymph node spread, and distant metastases as determinants of prognosis. Although this cutaneous melanoma staging system has evolved over time to more accurately reflect patient prognosis, improvements are still needed, because current understanding of the particular factors (genetic mutation, expression alteration, host response, etc) that are critical for predicting patient outcomes is incomplete. Given the clinical and biologic heterogeneity of primary melanomas, new prognostic tools are needed to more precisely identify patients who are most likely to develop advanced disease. Such tools would affect clinical surveillance strategies and aid in patient selection for adjuvant therapy. The authors reviewed the literature on prognostic molecular and immunologic markers in primary cutaneous melanoma, their associations with clinicopathologic and survival outcomes, and their potential for incorporation into current staging models. Overall, the studies considered in this review did not define prognostic markers that could be readily incorporated into the current staging system. Therefore, efforts should be continued in these and other directions to maximize the likelihood of identifying clinically useful prognostic biomarkers for cutaneous melanoma. PMID:26308244

  10. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  11. Clinical Characteristics of Odontogenic Cutaneous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Kang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background Odontogenic cutaneous fistula appears as dimpling or a nodule with purulent discharge, usually in the chin or jaw. Affected patients usually seek help from dermatologists or surgeons rather than from dentists. However, clinical symptoms of facial skin fistula without dental problems can lead to misdiagnosis. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. Methods This retrospective observational study was performed at Chungbuk National University Hospital by analyzing patients who visited from April 1994 to September 2014. Following clinical and radiographic examinations, the paths and origins of sinus fistulas were determined. Investigated factors were gender, age, morphology, location, originating tooth, time to evolution, recurrence, and treatment method. Results Thirty-three patients (22 males, 11 females; average age 49.2 years) were examined during the investigation period. Thirty-four fistulas were diagnosed as odontogenic cutaneous fistulas. The most common morphology was dimpling (n=14, 41.2%). The various locations observed were related to the originating tooth. The most common site was the mandibular body related to mandibular molars. The referral clinical diagnosis was of odontogenic origin in 6 cases (18.2%). The majority of patients had experienced recurrence after treatment in previous clinics that had failed to diagnose odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Surgical fistulectomy and/or tooth treatment were performed in all cases. All patients were followed-up for 1 year. None showed signs of recurrence. Conclusion Extraoral and dental examinations are required to make a diagnosis of odontogenic cutaneous fistula. Thus, cooperation between dermatologists and dentists is essential. PMID:27489421

  12. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument for Assessing Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Emily Y.; Kim, Ellen J.; Payne, Aimee S.; Takeshita, Junko; Vittorio, Carmela C.; Wanat, Karolyn A.; Werth, Victoria P.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability and convergent validity of two outcome instruments for assessing cutaneous sarcoidosis: Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument (CSAMI) and Sarcoidosis Activity and Severity Index (SASI). Design Cross-sectional study evaluating cutaneous sarcoidosis disease severity using CSAMI, SASI, and Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) as reference. Setting Cutaneous sarcoidosis clinic. Participants 8 dermatologists evaluated 11 patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes: Inter- and intra-rater reliability and convergent validity. Secondary outcomes: Correlation with quality of life measures and time required for completion. Results All instruments demonstrated good to excellent intra-rater reliability. Inter-rater reliability was excellent for CSAMI Activity scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-0.94), and fair to poor for CSAMI Damage (0.42; 0.21-0.72), modified Facial SASI (0.40; 0.17-0.72), and PGA scores (0.40; 0.18-0.70). CSAMI Activity, Damage, and modified Facial SASI scores all demonstrated convergent validity with statistically significant correlations with PGA scores. Trends for correlations were seen between CSAMI scores and specific Skindex-29 quality of life domains. While CSAMI required longer time to complete than SASI, both were scored within adequate time for use in clinical trials. Conclusions CSAMI appears to be a reliable and valid outcome instrument to measure cutaneous sarcoidosis and may capture a wide range of body surface and cutaneous morphologies. Future research is necessary to demonstrate its sensitivity to change and to confirm its correlation with quality of life measures. PMID:23677081

  13. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  14. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  15. Genetic determinants of cutaneous melanoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Mahato, Bisundev; Gabree, Michele; Tsao, Hensin

    2010-09-01

    In the last 2 decades, advances in genomic technologies and molecular biology have accelerated the identification of multiple genetic loci that confer risk for cutaneous melanoma. The risk alleles range from rarely occurring, high-risk variants with a strong familial predisposition to low-risk to moderate-risk variants with modest melanoma association. Although the high-risk alleles are limited to the CDKN2A and CDK4 loci, the authors of recent genome-wide association studies have uncovered a set of variants in pigmentation loci that contribute to low risk. A biological validation of these new findings would provide greater understanding of the disease. In this review we describe some of the important risk loci and their association to risk of developing cutaneous melanoma and also address the current clinical challenges in CDKN2A genetic testing. PMID:21051013

  16. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal Deepak; Hadawale, Snehal D.; Khopkar, Uday S.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a distinct, rare, and underdiagnosed condition. We report a case of CCV in a 50-year-old woman presenting as asymptomatic, erythematous to hyperpigmented nonblanchable macules over both the lower extremities. The clinical differential diagnosis of the lesions was pigmented purpuric dermatoses (Schamberg's purpura) and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Histology of the lesions revealed dilated superficial dermal vessels with abundant pink hyaline material in the vessel wall, which stained with periodic acid Schiff stain. The patient was diagnosed as CCV. This condition remains largely underdiagnosed and is commonly mistaken for pigmented purpuric dermatosis or generalized essential telangiectasia. Emphasis on the differentiation of CCV from its clinical and histological mimicks is made. PMID:26955587

  17. Ofloxacin Induced Cutaneous Reactions in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sailen Kumar; Rath, Bandana; Rath, Saroj Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse effects to antimicrobials are a major health problem. Though majority of them are mild and self-limiting, severe variants like Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are not uncommon. Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone widely used for the treatment of urinary tract infections, acute bacterial diarrheas, enteric fever, STDs and other soft tissue infections either as a single drug or in combination with other drugs. Earlier a case of mucocutaneous maculopapular rash with oral ofloxacin and was reported in an adult. In the present hospital set up there were few reports of such reactions to adults. Here we report three different variants of reactions associated with oral ofloxacin in chlidren. Early detection of cutaneous lesions and immediate withdrawal of the offending drug can prevent progression of such reactions to their severe variants as well as morbidity and mortality. PMID:26266136

  18. Severe Oculofacial Sequelae of Cutaneous Blastomyces dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, Joseph S; Ramey, Nicholas A; Gauthier, Gregory M; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    This study reports a case of Blastomyces dermatitidis soft tissue infection resulting in a disfiguring lower eyelid ectropion from cicatricial and postinflammatory cutaneous changes. Primary treatment included intravenous amphotericin B followed by long-term oral itraconazole, which resulted in complete remission of the disease without debridement, after which cicatricial ectropion was repaired surgically with scar release, full-thickness skin graft, and temporary Frost tarsorraphy. Cutaneous blastomycosis may cause severe oculofacial sequelae, ranging from eyelid ectropion to widespread facial cicatrix, and may mimic other more common infectious processes, in addition to malignancy. Recommended antifungal therapy includes induction with intravenous amphotericin B and a long course of oral antifungals, preferably coordinated in conjunction with an infectious disease specialist. Ectropion repair should be delayed until the inflammatory response has completely healed. If the ocular surface is compromised or nearby ocular structures are threatened, primary debridement and repair may be indicated. PMID:25098446

  19. Cutaneous neonatal lupus erythematosus with unusual features.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shankar; Amladi, S T; Wadhawa, S L; Nayak, C S; Nikam, B P

    2007-01-01

    A three month-old boy was brought by his mother with complaints of multiple reddish lesions on his trunk and face since birth. The patient had erythematous annular plaques with scaling on his extremities, palms and soles with periorbital erythema and edema giving the characteristic "eye mask" or "owl's eye" appearance. His mother did not have history of any illness. Hemogram, liver and renal function tests were within normal limits. A skin biopsy was suggestive of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Immunological work-up was positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) (1:40) with anti-Ro titers of 3.4 and 3.47 (>1.1 = clinically significant titre) in the mother and child respectively, although negative for anti-La antibodies. The child's electrocardiogram and 2D echocardiography were normal. We are presenting a case of anti-Ro-positive cutaneous lupus erythematosus with an uncommon skin manifestation. PMID:17675734

  20. Clinical outcome measures for Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Joerg; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous group of rare skin diseases that only rarely have been subjected to controlled clinical trials. This may be have been partly due to a lack of suitable validated outcome instruments. Recently the FDA mandated that organ specific trials for lupus erythematosus need to use a combination of different outcome measures. The patient’s condition needs to be assessed in terms of quality of life, the patient’s global response and organ specific instruments that measure activity of the disease as well as damage due to the disease. For the skin the only formally validated and published instrument is currently the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosis Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). This paper discusses the background of the development of the CLASI as well as issues related to its use and interpretation in the context of clinical research of CLE. PMID:20693208

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopy Investigations of Cutaneous Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Bliznakova, I.; Momchilov, N.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-04-01

    Fluorescence Spectroscopy of the human skin is very prominent for early diagnosis and differentiation of cutaneous diseases. Selection of proper excitation sources and sensitive detectors gives wide range of possibilities related to real-time determination of existing pathological conditions. A problem with using laser as an excitation source is the high expenses associated with the operation of these types of installations. This is why we test capability of a cheaper excitation sources - ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes. Initially, we investigate the spectral response of normal skin from different anatomic areas, as well as from different phototypes volunteers. Our first results obtained demonstrated promising possibility to implement an inexpensive system for detection of cutaneous lesions with wide clinical applications. The results achieved will be introduced in development of diagnostic algorithms for improvement of diagnostic sensitivity of benign and malignant tumor lesions determination.

  2. Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 injections.

    PubMed

    Lemlich, G; Green, M; Phelps, R; Lebwohl, M; Don, P; Gordon, M

    1993-02-01

    Cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1 injections are reported infrequently. Most previously reported cases have been associated with liver disease, primarily alcoholic cirrhosis and viral hepatitis. Four new cases are reported. One patient had polycythemia vera and the Budd-Chiari syndrome, the second such report in the literature. The other three patients had no known hepatic disease. The reactions consisted of erythematous plaques at the injection site without progression to sclerodermatous plaques. Histopathologic examination in three cases showed spongiotic changes and mononuclear infiltrates typical of cutaneous reactions to vitamin K1. In one instance a neutrophilic infiltrate was associated with the reaction site. Our findings support the observation that liver disease is not a necessary condition for the occurrence of vitamin K1 hypersensitivity. PMID:8436655

  3. [Systemic treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Joerg; Bieber, Thomas; Uerlich, Manfred; Tüting, Thomas

    2003-09-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) remains a therapeutic challenge. In many cases, systemic treatment of the disease is necessary, especially in cases resistant to topical treatment or with internal organ involvement. Even though many different agents can be employed in this situation, most are not approved in Germany for the treatment of CLE. We give an overview of the agents used in the systemic treatment of CLE and review their mechanisms of action, indications and their practical use in cutaneous LE based on literature results and our own experience. We discuss corticosteroids, antimalarials, dapsone, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, retinoids, cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, sulfasalazine, thalidomide, clofazimine, tacrolimus, immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies, plasmapheresis, etanercept, infliximab, feflunomid, gold and interferon-alpha. PMID:16285276

  4. Primary Cutaneous Actinomycosis:A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ranadeep; Mukherjee, Kheya; Ghoshal, Loknath

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a subacute or chronic suppurative bacterial infection caused by filamentous gram positive, anaerobic to microaerophilic non acid fast bacilli primarily of the genus Actinomyces that normally colonize the mouth, colon and vagina. Primary cutaneous actinomycosis is a rare entity and is generally associated with trauma. We report a case of primary cutaneous actinomycosis of the back and left axilla in a 32-year-old female patient with no suggestive history of trauma.The diagnosis was suggested by the characteristic lesions with multiple discharging sinuses draining sero-sanguinous fluid scattered all over the lesions. Gram positive bacilli with plenty of pus cells were demonstrated in the direct examination of the discharging pus. Diagnosis was confirmed by isolation of the organisms by anaerobic culture giving typical molar tooth colonies. Final confirmation was done by histopathological examination. PMID:25177623

  5. Multiple cutaneous, oropharyngeal and pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Veraitch, O; Bhargava, K; Moriarty, B; Calonje, E; Mallipeddi, R; Whittaker, S

    2015-08-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis defined by heterogeneous multiorgan involvement. Due to the rarity of this disease strong evidence-based therapies have yet to be established and prognosis has previously been considered to be poor, with more than half of patients dying within 3 years of initial presentation. We describe an 86-year-old woman with a 34-year history of extensive cutaneous and internal nodules with typical pathological and immunophenotypical (CD68(+) /CD1a(-) ) features of ECD without evidence of the BRAF V600E mutation. The cosmetic appearance of cutaneous nodules and hoarse voice caused by vocal cord nodules has been managed surgically. More aggressive therapies reported for ECD were trialled for this patient, such as radiotherapy and interferon-α, with no response. This case demonstrates a relatively good prognosis in ECD that has been managed conservatively. PMID:25639756

  6. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  7. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis and multidermatomic herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Margarita; Jaramillo, Laura; Ortiz, Diana; Díaz, Alejandro

    2013-12-01

    Standard treatment of leishmaniasis consists of n-metilglucamine, meglumine antimoniate, which can trigger side effects such as general malaise, renal and hepatic impairment, and cardiac arrhythmias. Infrequently, reactivations of varicella-zoster virus infections have been reported. This paper describes a patient with cutaneous leishmaniasis in treatment with meglumine and herpes zoster multiplex. After ruling out other possible causes of immunosuppression, an acyclovir therapy was initiated. PMID:24522317

  8. Epidemiology of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Greece.

    PubMed

    Stratigos, J; Tosca, A; Nicolis, G; Papavasiliou, S; Capetanakis, J

    1980-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease endemic in Greece. Cases collected between the years 1975 and 1979 are analyzed from a clinico-epidemiologic point of view. Prevalence is highest in the Ionian islands and Crete. The disease most commonly affects individuals 10 to 20 years of age. The exposed parts of the body are most commonly involved, particularly the face. The period of highest incidence is mid-winter. PMID:7358449

  9. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by Mucor irregularis.

    PubMed

    Xia, X J; Shen, H; Liu, Z H

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a 44-year-old man with an 18-month history of infiltrative erythematous plaques and haemorrhagic crusting on the dorsum of his left hand. The isolate was identified as Mucor irregularis (formerly Rhizomucor variabilis) based on the fungus morphology and DNA sequencing results. Improvement was observed after a 6-month treatment course of itraconazole. No recrudescence was seen during a follow-up of 23 months after treatment. PMID:25810249

  10. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis--an import from Belize].

    PubMed

    Schnedl, Jakob; Auer, Herbert; Fischer, Marcellus; Tomaso, Herbert; Pustelnik, Tom; Mooseder, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis of the New World, in particular when caused by Leishmania (L.) braziliensis, harbours the risk of lymphogenic as well as hematogenic dissemination. This may result in mucocutaneous leishmaniasis causing severe destruction of orofacial structures. Dissemination may occur years after the disappearance of the skin lesions. In contrast, cutaneous leishmaniasis of the old world, is typically restricted to the site of inoculation. Therefore, a conservative diagnostic and therapeutic approach is usually sufficient. Infections acquired in the new world should be treated systemically, if infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex cannot be excluded. Here we report on three Austrian soldiers, who, weeks after having participated in an international jungle patrol course in Belize, presented themselves with multiple ulcers on the upper limbs. Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis was made based upon histological evaluation of biopsies taken from several ulcers revealing the presence of leishmanial bodies, and detection of amastigote leishmania in smears of material obtained from the ulcers. As species phenotyping could not be performed, infection with L. brasiliensis as well as progression into a mucocutaneous form were possible, demanding systemic therapy. Several treatment options including local cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen, paromomycin (Humatis Pulvis, Parke-Davis) 15% topically or oral fluconazole (Diflucan, Pfizer) 200 mg/d were applied, but showed no effect. Hence, a systemic therapy with intravenous pentamidine (Pentacarinat, Gerot), three times in total, 3-4 mg/kg body weight each, led to a complete regression of the lesions within four weeks. PMID:17987367

  11. Cutaneous Phototoxicity: Clinical Observations versus Histopathological Findings.

    PubMed

    Learn, Douglas B; Elliott, Michelle W

    2016-06-01

    Determination of test material-induced cutaneous phototoxicity for risk assessment has traditionally been based on visually observed skin reactions such as erythema, edema, and flaking. Because of its role in determining a toxic effect, the use of histopathological evaluation in this determination arises from time to time. However, there is little published information regarding the time course and types of histopathologic changes in the skin after test material-induced phototoxic insult nor any regulatory requirement or precedent for its use. This work evaluated both the visual and histopathological time course of the phototoxic response of the skin of the Long-Evans rat after oral administration of the phototoxins sparfloxacin and 8-methoxypsoralen (MOP) followed by a single exposure to solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation. Both sparfloxacin and 8-MOP elicited visual cutaneous reactions and microscopic changes consistent with a phototoxic response. The visually observed cutaneous time course and elicited histopathologic changes differed in response and extent for each phototoxin, but in both instances, microscopic evaluation did not alter the determination of a phototoxic response based on visual observations. These results indicate that, though histopathologic evaluations may have value for investigating mechanisms of phototoxicity, histopathologic evaluation of the skin is not warranted for determination of phototoxic potential in safety assessment intended for regulatory submission. PMID:27073086

  12. Diagnostic Immunohistochemistry in Cutaneous Neoplasia: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Leigh A.; Murphy, George F.; Lian, Christine G.

    2015-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is an important adjunct in the diagnosis of neoplastic skin diseases. In addition to the many established IHC markers currently in use, new markers continue to emerge, although their general acceptance and routine application requires robust validation. Here, we summarize the most well-established and commonly used biomarkers along with an array of newer ones reported in the past several decades that either demonstrate or hold high clinical promise in the field of cutaneous pathology. We also highlight recent applications of novel IHC markers in melanoma diagnosis including genetic mutation status markers [e.g. BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) and NRAS (neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog)] and an epigenetic alteration marker (e.g. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine). We specifically focus on the role of IHC in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions that fall under the following categories: melanoma, epidermal tumors with an intraepidermal epitheliomatous pattern, spindle cell lesions of the dermis, small round blue cell tumors of the dermis, and cutaneous adnexal tumors. While IHC is a valuable tool in diagnostic dermatopathology, marker selection and interpretation must be highly informed by clinical context and the histologic differential diagnosis. With rapid progress in our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of tumorigenesis, new IHC markers will continue to emerge in the field of diagnostic dermatopathology. PMID:27047932

  13. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Jessica R.; Byers, Stacey R.; Schaffer, Paula A.; Worley, Deanna R.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Grossman, Alicia N.; Holt, Timothy; Callan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method. PMID:23956926

  14. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Giles T. S.; Mills, Stuart J.; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials. PMID:26137471

  15. Clinical benefits of tubeless umbilical cutaneous ureterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Numakura, Kazuyuki; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Takahashi, Makoto; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Akihama, Susumu; Saito, Mitsuru; Inoue, Takamitsu; Narita, Shintaro; Huang, Mingguo; Satoh, Shigeru; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We assess a novel technique of tubeless bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy, with a single umbilical stoma, for bladder cancer patients with short ureters after cystectomy. The benefit of cutaneous ureterostomy is equal to other incontinent urinary diversions, when the tubeless procedure is successfully achieved. This simple technique makes it easy to monitor the upper urinary tract (UUT) and is beneficial to patients with a high risk of UUT recurrence. Methods: This old and new surgical technique was used to perform total cystectomy and urinary diversion on three patients with bladder cancer at a high risk of UUT recurrence. Results: Two men and one woman (mean age: 73 years) underwent this surgery and the mean follow-up period was 8.3 years. The surgical approaches were laparotomy (n = 2) and laparoscopy (n = 1). One case developed para-stomal erosion, whereas another developed ureteral stenosis requiring catheter reinsertion. Although postoperative hydronephrosis was observed in all cases, the mean preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine levels were 0.70 and 0.76, respectively. UUT recurrence was not observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion: This tubeless umbilical cutaneous ureterostomy procedure greatly improves the outcome of urinary diversion for cancer patients with short ureters at a high risk of UUT recurrence. The benefits are equivalent to other urinary diversions when the tubeless procedure is successfully achieved. PMID:26225182

  16. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  17. Liver transplant recipient with concomitant cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Deren; Seçkin, Deniz; Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Weina, Peter J; Aydin, Hakan; Ozçay, Figen; Haberal, Mehmet

    2007-03-01

    Diagnosis of leishmaniasis in immunosuppressed patients may be a serious challenge for physicians because of the major clinical and laboratory differences with immunocompetent patients. In immunosuppressed patients, the disease is characterized usually by disseminated visceral involvement, atypical cutaneous lesions and persistent negativity of diagnostic tests. Here, we report an eight-yr-old liver transplant recipient with concomitant cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis in whom the cutaneous lesion led to the diagnosis of systemic involvement. PMID:17300508

  18. A case of primary cutaneous mucormycosis caused by minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Ari; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Bhattacharyya, Siddharth; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 66-year-old neutropenic man with mantle-cell lymphoma who presented for evaluation of a rapidly expanding necrotic eschar after a minor cutaneous injury. Histopathology revealed infection with Rhizopus indicating primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Our case reviews the presentation and management of this condition as well highlights the potential for minor cutaneous injuries in the hospital to lead to this dangerous infection. PMID:25612128

  19. Solitary cutaneous leiomyomata: a clinicopathological study of 28 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Heatley, M. K.; Walsh, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-eight cases of solitary cutaneous leiomyomata were encountered in a ten-year period. They occurred in nine males and nineteen females, the mean age at presentation being 53 years. The lesions occurred most commonly on the lower limbs and 36% were painful. Solitary cutaneous leiomyomata were found to differ from the better known syndrome of multiple cutaneous leiomyomata, in that they did not recur after excision and were not associated with leiomyomata at other body sites. PMID:2603267

  20. Management of High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is an increasing public health concern, representing the second most common cancer in the United States. High-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents a subgroup of this disease, where patients are at higher risk of metastasis and death. To date, there are no accepted criteria for defining or managing these patients. This review discusses the current state of knowledge of high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and outlines reasonable management strategies based on available data. PMID:20725546

  1. Gender disparity between cutaneous and non-cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Strle, Franc; Wormser, Gary P; Mead, Paul; Dhaduvai, Kanthi; Longo, Michael V; Adenikinju, Omosalewa; Soman, Sandeep; Tefera, Yodit; Maraspin, Vera; Lotrič-Furlan, Stanka; Ogrinc, Katarina; Cimperman, Jože; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva; Stupica, Daša

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans (EM) and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA); the most common non-cutaneous manifestations are Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and Lyme arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gender distribution of patients with these clinical manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Data on gender were obtained from the clinical records of patients with Lyme borreliosis aged ≥15 years who had been evaluated at the University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. Among 10,539 patients diagnosed with EM, 6,245 (59.3%) were female and among 506 ACA patients 347 (68.6%) were female. In contrast, among the 60 patients with Lyme arthritis only 15 (25%) were female (p<0.0001 for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA) and among the 130 patients with LNB only 51 (39.2%) were females (p<0.0001for the comparison of gender with EM or ACA). Although the proportion that was female in the LNB group was greater than that of patients with Lyme arthritis, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.10). Although older individuals are more likely to be female in the general Slovenian population, the age of patients with cutaneous versus non-cutaneous manifestations was not the explanation for the observed differences in gender. In conclusion, patients with cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis were predominantly female, whereas those with non-cutaneous manifestations were predominantly male. This provocative finding is unexplained but may have direct relevance to the pathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23737968

  2. Can proton pump inhibitors accentuate skin aging?

    PubMed

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Jowkar, Farideh

    2010-02-01

    Skin aging has long been important to human beings and in recent years this field has received tremendous attention by both researchers and the general population. Cutaneous aging includes two distinct phenomena, intrinsic aging and photoaging, and is characterized mainly by the loss of collagen fibers from dermis. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed gastric acid-reducing agents that are usually consumed for long periods in some conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. We suggest that PPIs can accentuate skin aging by two mechanisms. First, through increasing intralysosomal PH, PPIs can suppress transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) processing and consequently decrease its secretion. Second, through inhibiting MNK, a P-type ATPase with steady-state localization at the trans-Golgi network, PPIs can hamper copper transport and consequently curb lysyl oxidase activity. PMID:20470945

  3. Topical Application of Fingolimod Perturbs Cutaneous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wai Y; Dimasi, David P; Pitman, Melissa R; Zhuang, YiZhong; Heddle, Robert; Pitson, Stuart M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Bonder, Claudine S

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of allergies, including rhinitis, eczema, and anaphylaxis, is rising dramatically worldwide. This increase is especially problematic in children who bear the greatest burden of this rising trend. Increasing evidence identifies neutrophils as primary perpetrators of the more severe and difficult to manage forms of inflammation. A newly recognized mechanism by which neutrophils are recruited during the early phase of histamine-induced inflammation involves the sphingosine kinase (SK)/sphingosine-1-phosphate axis. This study examines whether topical application of fingolimod, an established SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate antagonist already in clinical use to treat multiple sclerosis, may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. Using two mouse models of ear skin inflammation (histamine- and IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis) we topically applied fingolimod prophylactically, as well as after establishment of the inflammatory response, and examined ear swelling, SK activity, vascular permeability, leukocyte recruitment, and production of proinflammatory mediators. The present study reveals that when applied topically, fingolimod attenuates both immediate and late-phase responses to histamine with reduced extravasation of fluid, SK-1 activity, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and neutrophil influx and prevents ear swelling. Intravital microscopy demonstrates that histamine-induced neutrophil rolling and adhesion to the postcapillary venules in the mouse ears is significantly attenuated even after 24 h. More importantly, these effects are achievable even once inflammation is established. Translation into humans was also accomplished with epicutaneous application of fingolimod resolving histamine-induced and allergen-induced inflammatory reactions in forearm skin. Overall, this study demonstrates, to our knowledge for the first time, that fingolimod may be repurposed to treat cutaneous inflammation. PMID:27001955

  4. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  5. Postural reorganization induced by torso cutaneous covibration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Martin, Bernard J; Ho, Allison; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous information from joints has been attributed proprioceptive properties similar to those of muscle spindles. This study aimed to assess whether vibration-induced changes in torso cutaneous information contribute to whole-body postural reorganization in humans. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the left and right external oblique, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscle locations at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. Vibrations around the torso were randomly applied at two locations simultaneously (covibration) or at all locations simultaneously. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that covibration applied to the skin over the internal oblique muscles induced shifts of both the head and torso in the anterior direction (torso flexion) while the hips shifted in the posterior direction (ankle plantar flexion). Conversely, covibration applied to the skin over the erector spinae muscle locations produced opposite effects. However, covibration applied to the skin over the left internal oblique and left erector spinae, the right internal oblique and right erector spinae, or at all locations simultaneously did not induce any significant postural changes. In addition, the center of pressure position as measured by the force plate was unaffected by all covibration conditions tested. These results were independent of stance and suggest an integrated and coordinated reorganization of posture in response to vibration-induced changes in cutaneous information. In addition, combinations of vibrotactile stimuli over multiple locations exhibit directional summation properties in contrast to the individual responses we observed in our previous work. PMID:23637178

  6. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  7. HYPEREOSINOPHILIC SYNDROME: CUTANEOUS INVOLVEMENT AS THE SOLE MANIFESTATION

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthi, Vidya lakshmi; Prabhavathy, D; Somasundaram, S V; Wahab, Afthab Jameela

    2011-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses a group of leukoproliferative disorders with variable involvement of the internal organs. More than half of all patients have cutaneous involvement. In a minority of the reported cases, skin involvement has been the only manifestation of HES . We report one such rare case of HES, with cutaneous involvement as the sole manifestation. PMID:21572808

  8. An unusual presentation of listeriosis: anemia and cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Yap, Jonathan; Fong, Yuke Tien

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing food-borne disease. It usually affects the young as well as immunocompromised individuals and is associated with high mortality rates. Cutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe an interesting case of a traveller from the tropics presenting with cutaneous listeriosis and anemia. PMID:24968680

  9. Cutaneous metastases of a mammary carcinoma in a llama.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, T L; Turner, O; Mason, G L; Barrington, G M

    2001-01-01

    An 8-year-old, female llama was evaluated for nonhealing, ulcerative, cutaneous lesions, which also involved the mammary gland. Biopsies of the lesions distant from and within the mammary gland area revealed an aggressive carcinoma. The tumor was confirmed at necropsy to be a mammary gland adenocarcinoma with cutaneous metastasis. Images Figure 1. PMID:11265189

  10. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effective, and universally acceptable vaccine against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:22661975

  11. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  12. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Rogdo, Bjarte; Kahlert, Christian; Diener, Pierre André; Micallef, John

    2014-01-01

    Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is a rare fungal infection in premature infants. Extreme prematurity, immature immune system, therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics and systemic steroids, as well as hyperglycaemia and a vulnerable and very thin epidermal layer are considered risk factors in this patient population. We present a premature male infant born at 24(+3) weeks of gestation with PCA, successfully treated with amphotericin and surgical curettage of the ulcerating skin lesions. Complete resolution of the lesions was achieved and scarring was barely visible at later follow-up. PMID:25178889

  13. Musculoskeletal and cutaneous sarcoidosis: exuberant case report.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Natalie; Oliveira Filho, Jayme de; Nasser, Kassila da Rosa; Corbett, Ana Maria França; Tebet, Ana Carolina Franco; Reis, Mariana Lacerda Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown cause. The osteoarticular involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and is often associated with cutaneous and long-standing chronic multisystem disease. More common in black women, osseous sarcoidosis is difficult to diagnose, with an incidence of 3 to 13%. The most characteristic radiological clinical picture evidences rounded, well-defined cysts, with no periosteal reaction and without peripheral sclerosis. The small bones of hands and feet are the most frequently involved sites. This report aims to demonstrate a rare case of osteoarticular sarcoidosis with characteristic clinical presentation, and highlight the importance of detecting osteoarticular involvement in this pathology. PMID:25054759

  14. Disseminated cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Cladophialophora bantiana.

    PubMed

    Khader, Anza; Ambooken, Betsy; Binitha, Manikoth Payyanadan; Francis, Saji; Kuttiyil, Ashokan K; Sureshan, Deepthi Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Cladophialophora bantiana is a neurotropic dematiaceous fungus which only rarely affects the skin. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Cladophialophora bantiana in an immunocompromised female who presented with multiple pyogenic granuloma-like nodules, dermatophytosis-like plaque, and subcutaneous cysts on the upper and lower extremities without systemic involvement. Biopsy revealed black yeasts resembling sclerotic bodies and culture yielded irregular, velvety, grey colonies with black reverse. Excision of the nodules and treatment with oral itraconazole 100 mg twice daily resulted in complete clinical resolution within two months, following which itraconazole was administered for another 4 months. PMID:26261143

  15. Cutaneous fascioliasis: a case report in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Le Thi; Hung, Nguyen Thien; Waikagul, Jitra

    2005-05-01

    A 40 year-old woman living in Gialai, Kontum, Vietnam, developed a red solid mass in the epigastric region. From ultrasound investigation, liver abscess and myositis of the intercostal muscle was diagnosed. Two weeks after treatment with antibiotics, the mass disappeared, but a migratory track developed in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. An aspiration of the vesicular end of the serpiginous track showed a light brown, living worm that was later identified as an immature Fasciola sp. This is the first case report of cutaneous fascioliasis in the form similar to creeping eruption. PMID:15891121

  16. A case of cutaneous protothecosis mimics eczema.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Li, Li; Yuli, Kang; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Junhao; Zhu, Min

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of cutaneous protothecosis due to Prototheca wickerhamii in an immunocompetent man presented with a specific eczema-like lesions. Dermatological examination revealed erythematous plaques, dark red papules with some coalescence, and a few superficial ulcerations, covered with less scales on his right side chest and neck. Fungal culture, histopathological examination and molecular identification confirmed the organism. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed strain sensitive to amphotericin B, Fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole. The patient was cured by oral itraconazole capsules and topical cream ketoconazole 2%. PMID:25200680

  17. Massive zosteriform cutaneous metastasis from rectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damin, D C; Lazzaron, A R; Tarta, C; Cartel, A; Rosito, M A

    2003-07-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a large and rapidly growing skin lesion approximately six months after resection of a rectal carcinoma. The lesion measured 40 cm in size, extended from the suprapubic area to the proximal half of the left groin, and showed a particular zosteriform aspect. Biopsy confirmed a metastatic skin adenocarcinoma. Cutaneous metastases from rectal cancer are very uncommon. Their gross appearance is not distinctive, although the skin tumors are usually solid, small (less than 5 cm) and painless nodules or papules. Early biopsies for suspicious skin lesions are needed in patients with a history of colorectal cancer. PMID:14605930

  18. A rare case of cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Meah, Nekma; Khirwadkar, Nitin; Ellison, Judith

    2016-08-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy is a rare microangiopathy first described by Salama and Rosenthal in 2000. Several cases have been reported to date, describing distinct histological findings of thick hyaline collagenous blood vessel walls in the superficial dermis. Clinical confusion can arise with generalised essential telangiectasia. We report a case occurring in a 76-year-old woman who presented with a 2-year history of a telangiectatic rash progressing from her knees upwards. The diagnosis was confirmed on skin biopsy and treatment with pulsed dye laser was later initiated at the patient's request. PMID:25872701

  19. Coagulation disorders and their cutaneous presentations: Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yunyoung; Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Baiyee Ebot, Emily; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner; Phillips, Tania

    2016-05-01

    Hypercoagulable states are inherited or acquired predispositions to venous or arterial thromboses that are best understood in the context of the coagulation cascade. Dermatologists can play a critical role in diagnosing and treating patients with hypercoagulable states because cutaneous symptoms may be a presenting manifestation, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality related to these conditions. This review focuses on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of hypercoagulable states, while the accompanying article iterates the basic clinical features, diagnostic testing, and management of patients who have these conditions. PMID:27085225

  20. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Paduraru, Mihai; Moreno-Sanz, Carlos; Olalla Gallardo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is most common in immunocompromised patients, but it can also occur in healthy hosts, most frequently as primary cutaneous mucormycosis (PCM) and predominantly as a result of skin trauma. We present an uncommon case of PCM in a healthy, young man with no previous history of local trauma. Despite rapid progression of the infection, the patient was successfully treated through surgical intervention and by administering liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole. He made a full recovery without the need for skin grafting. PMID:27530872

  1. Does acute intraoral pain alter cutaneous sensibility?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, P; Ekblom, A; Lindblom, U; Marchettini, P

    1988-01-01

    Cutaneous sensibility was tested in eight patients suffering from acute postoperative intraoral pain. Tactile-, cold-, warm-, and heat-pain thresholds as well as reaction time to cold pulses were unaffected by the presence of pain. However, reaction time to warm pulses was increased in the painful area on the day of pain compared to a non-painful state. The findings are discussed in relation to (1) functional convergence of different sensory fibres on central neurons (2) the phenomenon of diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and (3) secondary hyperalgesia. The observed effect of clinical pain on the warm pathway could be explained as an intrasegmental noxious inhibitory effect. PMID:3216205

  2. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  3. Indigenous human cutaneous anthrax in Texas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J P; Dimmitt, D C; Ezzell, J W; Whitford, H

    1993-01-01

    In December 1988 an indigenous case of cutaneous anthrax was identified in Texas. The patient, a 63-year-old male Hispanic from southwest Texas, was a sheep shearer and had a recent history of dissecting sheep that had died suddenly. He experienced an illness characterized by left arm pain and edema. A necrotic lesion developed on his left forearm, with cellulitis and lymphadenopathy. After treatment with oral and intravenous penicillins, the patient fully recovered. Western blot testing revealed a fourfold or greater rise in antibody titer to Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and lethal factor. This represents the first case of indigenous anthrax in Texas in more than 20 years. PMID:8420007

  4. [Necrotizing cutaneous infections and Fournier's gangrene].

    PubMed

    Lasocki, S; Geffroy, A; Montravers, P

    2006-09-01

    Fournier's gangrene is a necrotizing infection of skin and soft tissue of the perineum. Several sources of contamination have been described: cutaneous, urological or anorectal. Anatomy of the perineum helps in the prediction of the extension of the infection. The bacterial flora (usually mixed aero-anaerobic flora) depends on the source of infection: gram-positive cocci (skin source) combined with gram-negative bacilli and anaerobes (urological or anorectal source). CT scan and echography are useful tools for the diagnosis without delaying surgery. In the diagnostic procedure and the management, proctological examination, retrograde uretrography, bowel and urine derivation should be discussed. PMID:16675183

  5. General cutaneous examination of the podiatric patient.

    PubMed

    Graff, G E

    1986-07-01

    Dr. Graff has done something that I have always felt was important, that is to create a list of possible cutaneous lesions presenting on the lower extremities which might be associated with skin problems elsewhere or be manifestations of systemic disease. I agree that it is easy for podiatric physicians to become narrow-minded in our evaluation of the entire patient. He points out several simple ways to become more efficient in the initial examination process. Lastly, I hope that all of you will take some time to think about and review the lists he provides so that your diagnostic abilities will continue to increase. PMID:2943387

  6. The Horizon for Treating Cutaneous Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Amit M.; Chou, Elizabeth L.; Findeiss, Laura; Kelly, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Dermatologists encounter a wide range of cutaneous vascular lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, port-wine stain birthmarks, arteriovenous malformations, venous malformations, Kaposi sarcomas, angiosarcomas, and angiofibromas. Current treatment modalities to reduce these lesions include topical and/or intralesional steroids, laser therapy, surgical resection, and endovascular therapy. However, each method has limitations owing to recurrence, comorbidities, toxicity, or lesion location. Photodynamic therapy, antiangiogenic therapy, and evolving methods of sclerotherapy are promising areas of development that may mitigate limitations of current treatments and offer exciting options for patients and their physicians. PMID:22640429

  7. Genomic landscape of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Hong, Bok S.; Bunick, Christopher G.; Chen, Kan; Bjornson, Robert D.; Maman, Yaakov; Wang, Tiffany; Tordoff, Jesse; Carlson, Kacie; Overton, John D.; Liu, Kristina J.; Lewis, Julia M.; Devine, Lesley; Barbarotta, Lisa; Foss, Francine M.; Subtil, Antonio; Vonderheid, Eric C.; Edelson, Richard L.; Schatz, David G.; Boggon, Titus J.; Girardi, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of skin-homing T lymphocytes. We performed exome and whole genome DNA sequence and RNA sequencing on purified CTCL and matched normal cells. The results implicate mutations in 17 genes in CTCL pathogenesis, including genes involved in T cell activation and apoptosis, NFκB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. CTCL is distinctive in that somatic copy number variants (SCNVs) comprise 92% of all driver mutations (mean of 11.8 pathogenic SCNVs vs. 1.0 somatic single nucleotide variants per CTCL). These findings have implications for novel therapeutics. PMID:26192916

  8. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  9. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  10. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  11. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  12. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  13. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  14. Successful treatment of cutaneous lesions of dermatomyositis with topical pimecrolimus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Myeong Gil; Lee, Ha Eun; Ko, Joo Yeon; Ro, Young Suck

    2011-08-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory process characterized by proximal muscle weakness and cutaneous lesions, such as the Gottron's sign, heliotrope rash, and erythematous photosensitive rash. Administration of systemic agents for the treatment of underlying systemic diseases leads to remission of the cutaneous lesions in many cases. However, cutaneous lesions may remain refractory to treatment. Pimecrolimus is a calcineurin inhibitor with combined anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity. It has high affinity to the skin and low permeation potential, even in patients with acute skin inflammation and in those undergoing post-topical corticosteroid therapy. We herein report two DM patients whose cutaneous lesions were refractory to conventional treatment but showed dramatic response to topical pimecrolimus. The clinical outcomes suggest that topical pimecrolimus may be a good therapeutic alternative for the management of the cutaneous lesions of DM. PMID:21909206

  15. Cutaneous lichen planus: A systematic review of treatments.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Nasim

    2015-06-01

    Various treatment modalities are available for cutaneous lichen planus. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched for all the systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials related to cutaneous lichen planus. Two systematic reviews and nine relevant randomized controlled trials were identified. Acitretin, griseofulvin, hydroxychloroquine and narrow band ultraviolet B are demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous lichen planus. Sulfasalazine is effective, but has an unfavorable safety profile. KH1060, a vitamin D analogue, is not beneficial in the management of cutaneous lichen planus. Evidence from large scale randomized trials demonstrating the safety and efficacy for many other treatment modalities used to treat cutaneous lichen planus is simply not available. PMID:24916211

  16. TOX expression in cutaneous B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Anne M R; Jansen, Patty M; Willemze, Rein

    2016-08-01

    Thymocyte selection-associated high-mobility group box (TOX) is aberrantly expressed in cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. In a recent study, TOX expression was noted unexpectedly in the follicle center (germinal center) B-cells of reactive lymph nodes and tonsils, used as external controls. To evaluate whether TOX is also expressed by cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, TOX immunohistochemistry was performed on skin biopsies of 44 patients with primary and secondary cutaneous B-cell proliferations. TOX was expressed not only in the reactive follicle center cells of lymph nodes, tonsils, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, and primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphomas, but also by the neoplastic follicle center cells of 16/17 patients with primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) and 7/7 patients with cutaneous manifestations of systemic follicular lymphoma (FL). Notably, TOX showed a very similar expression pattern as BCL6, a marker of germinal center B-cells. In 4/10 patients with a BCL6(+) primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type (PCDLBCL,LT) and in 2/2 patients with a secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), TOX was expressed by more than 50 % of the neoplastic B-cells. In contrast, in 3/3 BCL6(-) PCDLBCL,LT, TOX was completely negative or weakly expressed by a minor proportion of the neoplastic B-cells. In conclusion, TOX is expressed not only by neoplastic T-cells, but also by both reactive and neoplastic follicle center (germinal center) B-cells and a proportion of BCL6(+) PCDLBCL,LT and secondary cutaneous BCL6(+) DLBCL. The functional significance of TOX expression in reactive and neoplastic B-cells remains to be elucidated. PMID:27180090

  17. Purification and properties of the proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase complex of bovine heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Serrano, R; Kanner, B I; Racker, E

    1976-04-25

    1. The proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) of bovine heart mitochondria was highly purified by extraction of submitochondrial particles with cholate, fractionation with ammonium sulfate, and sucrose gradient centrifugation in the presence of methanol, deoxycholate, and lysolecithin. 2. The preparation had a very low content of phospholipids, respiratory components, and adenine nucleotide transporter. The ATPase activity (14 o 16 micromoles/min/mg at 30 degrees) was dependent on addition of phospholipids. The purified enzyme was reconstituted with phospholipids, coupling factor 1 (F1), and the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP) yielding vesicles with highly active 32Pi-ATP exchange (up to 260 nanomoles/min/mg at 30 degrees), and a proton pump driven by ATP. Site III oxidative phosphorylation was reconstituted when purified cytochrome oxidase was included. 3. The 32Pi-ATP exchange of the reconstituted vesicles was sensitive to both rutamycin and dichylohexylcarbodiimide but the ATPase activity was sensitive to rutamycin and not to dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 4. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel scans of the complex, the subunits of F1, OSCP, and three other major bands with apparent molecular weights of 32,000, 23,000, and about 11,000 were noted. Three other minor bands with estimated molecular weights of 80,000, 70,000, and 52,000 were also detected. These bands apparently represent residual trace amounts of respiratory components. Quantitative assays of individual respiratory components revealed between 0 and 3% contamination. 5. We conclude that the rutamycin-sensitive ATPase complex functions as a reversible ATP-driven proton pump. PMID:177416

  18. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma of the penile foreskin.

    PubMed

    Afrose, Ruquiya; Nebhnani, Deepa; Wadhwa, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, considered to herald the onset of a blast crisis in the setting of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm/dysplasia, typically presents during the course of the disorder. Cutaneous involvement is uncommon and lesions on genital skin are seldom seen. We present a case of a well-differentiated myeloid sarcoma in the penile foreskin in an apparently healthy 29-year-old male presenting with phimosis. The unusual composition of the inflammatory cell infiltrate, and characteristic sparing of dermal blood vessels, nerves and smooth muscle fibres led to the correct diagnosis. Absence of commonly observed changes in the circumcision skin like those of balanitis xerotica was also helpful. Detailed hematological work up revealed a previously undiagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. The patient also had simultaneous priapism, another rare presentation of chronic myeloid leukemia. One year hence, the patient is in hematological remission with no evidence of extramedullary disease. Although priapism has been described as a rare presenting symptom in chronic myeloid leukemia, the present case is unique as this is the first time a cutaneous myeloid sarcoma has been documented in the penile foreskin. PMID:24913300

  19. Treatment of cutaneous lymphomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Izu-Belloso, R M; García-Ruiz, J C

    2012-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoid tumors that originate primarily in the skin. Most PCLs (75%) are T-cell lymphomas and only 20% to 25% involve B cells. It is important to differentiate between cutaneous lymphomas and lymph node tumors given the differences in their molecular biology and clinical, histopathologic, and immunophenotypic features. Moreover, PCLs generally follow a more indolent course and require different treatments. Many treatment options are available for managing PLC's. The choice should be based primarily on the clinical stage of disease but must also take into consideration other factors, such as the patient's age and general health, the availability and accessibility of the treatment, and the cost-benefit ratio. It will be important to use a multidisciplinary approach, involving a team of expert dermatologists, hematologist-oncologists, and radiotherapists who are familiar with this rare disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of many new therapies, particularly for advanced stages of the disease and for patients whose tumors have proven refractory to treatment. The objective of this article is to review all the treatment options available to us. PMID:22575363

  20. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27236509

  1. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  2. Keratinolytic activity of cutaneous and oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mikx, F H; de Jong, M H

    1987-03-01

    A test was developed to measure the keratinolytic activity of cutaneous and oral bacteria. Keratin, labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, was used in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) with 1 mM dithiothreitol. The degradation of keratin was estimated by measuring the fluorescence of the degradation products in the supernatant of the reaction mixtures in a luminescence spectrometer. Several oral and cutaneous bacteria were investigated: Bacteroides gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Treponema denticola, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Brevibacterium epidermidis, Brevibacterium lines, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Corynebacterium ovis, and Rhodococcus equi. The dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum was used as a control organism. The test offered a simple and quantitative method for the estimation of keratin degradation and enabled us to show keratinolytic activity in Trichophyton rubrum, S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, B. linens, B. epidermidis, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Treponema denticola. The keratinolytic activity was cell bound and heat sensitive. The presence of dithiothreitol stimulated the degradation of keratin to mainly high-molecular-weight products. PMID:2434427

  3. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  4. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  5. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we ‘go pale with fright’. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  6. Control of cutaneous blood flow by central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ootsuka, Youichirou; Tanaka, Mutsumi

    2015-01-01

    Hairless skin acts as a heat exchanger between body and environment, and thus greatly contributes to body temperature regulation by changing blood flow to the skin (cutaneous) vascular bed during physiological responses such as cold- or warm-defense and fever. Cutaneous blood flow is also affected by alerting state; we 'go pale with fright'. The rabbit ear pinna and the rat tail have hairless skin, and thus provide animal models for investigating central pathway regulating blood flow to cutaneous vascular beds. Cutaneous blood flow is controlled by the centrally regulated sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic premotor neurons in the medullary raphé in the lower brain stem are labeled at early stage after injection of trans-synaptic viral tracer into skin wall of the rat tail. Inactivation of these neurons abolishes cutaneous vasomotor changes evoked as part of thermoregulatory, febrile or psychological responses, indicating that the medullary raphé is a common final pathway to cutaneous sympathetic outflow, receiving neural inputs from upstream nuclei such as the preoptic area, hypothalamic nuclei and the midbrain. Summarizing evidences from rats and rabbits studies in the last 2 decades, we will review our current understanding of the central pathways mediating cutaneous vasomotor control. PMID:27227053

  7. Approach to Cutaneous Lymphoid Infiltrates: When to Consider Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Charli-Joseph, Yann Vincent; Gatica-Torres, Michelle; Pincus, Laura Beth

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates (CLIs) are common in routine dermatopathology. However, differentiating a reactive CLI from a malignant lymphocytic infiltrate is often a significant challenge since many inflammatory dermatoses can clinically and/or histopathologically mimic cutaneous lymphomas, coined pseudolymphomas. We conducted a literature review from 1966 to July 1, 2015, at PubMed.gov using the search terms: Cutaneous lymphoma, cutaneous pseudolymphoma, cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia, simulants/mimics/imitators of cutaneous lymphomas, and cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates. The diagnostic approach to CLIs and the most common differential imitators of lymphoma is discussed herein based on six predominant morphologic and immunophenotypic, histopathologic patterns: (1) Superficial dermal T-cell infiltrates (2) superficial and deep dermal perivascular and/or nodular natural killer/T-cell infiltrates (3) pan-dermal diffuse T-cell infiltrates (4) panniculitic T-cell infiltrates (5) small cell predominant B-cell infiltrates, and (6) large-cell predominant B-cell infiltrates. Since no single histopathological feature is sufficient to discern between a benign and a malignant CLI, the overall balance of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features should be considered carefully to establish a diagnosis. Despite advances in ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and molecular clonality, these studies often display specificity and sensitivity limitations. Therefore, proper clinicopathological correlation still remains the gold standard for the precise diagnosis of CLIs. PMID:27512181

  8. Local treatments for cutaneous warts: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Sam; Harvey, Ian; Sterling, Jane; Stark, Rosemary

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the evidence for the efficacy of local treatments for cutaneous warts. Methods Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Main outcomes measures Total clearance of warts and adverse effects such as irritation, pain, and blistering. Study selection Randomised controlled trials of any local treatment for uncomplicated cutaneous warts. All published and unpublished material was considered, with no restriction on date or language. Results 50 included trials provided generally weak evidence because of poor methods and reporting. The best evidence was for topical treatments containing salicylic acid. Data pooled from six placebo controlled trials showed a cure rate of 75% (144 of 191) in cases compared with 48% (89 of 185) in controls (odds ratio 3.91, 95% confidence interval 2.40 to 6.36). Some evidence for the efficacy of contact immunotherapy was provided by two small trials comparing dinitrochlorobenzene with placebo. Evidence for the efficacy of cryotherapy was limited. No consistent evidence was found for the efficacy of intralesional bleomycin, and only limited evidence was found for the efficacy of topical fluorouracil, intralesional interferons, photodynamic therapy, and pulsed dye laser. Conclusions Reviewed trials of local treatments for cutaneous warts were highly variable in methods and quality, and there was a paucity of evidence from randomised, placebo controlled trials on which to base the rational use of the treatments. There is good evidence that topical treatments containing salicylic acid have a therapeutic effect and some evidence for the efficacy of dinitrochlorobenzene. Less evidence was found for the efficacy of all the other treatments reviewed, including cryotherapy. What is already known on this topicA wide range of local treatments is available for treating wartsNo one treatment is strikingly effective and little is known about the absolute and relative efficacy of these treatmentsWhat this study addsHigh quality

  9. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  10. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: issues in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Walling, Hobart W; Sontheimer, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) may present in a variety of clinical forms. Three recognized subtypes of cutaneous LE are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE), and chronic cutaneous LE (CCLE). ACLE may be localized (most often as a malar or 'butterfly' rash) or generalized. Multisystem involvement as a component of systemic LE (SLE) is common, with prominent musculoskeletal symptoms. SCLE is highly photosensitive, with predominant distribution on the upper back, shoulders, neck, and anterior chest. SCLE is frequently associated with positive anti-Ro antibodies and may be induced by a variety of medications. Classic discoid LE is the most common form of CCLE, with indurated scaly plaques on the scalp, face, and ears, with characteristic scarring and pigmentary change. Less common forms of CCLE include hyperkeratotic LE, lupus tumidus, lupus profundus, and chilblain lupus. Common cutaneous disease associated with, but not specific for, LE includes vasculitis, livedo reticularis, alopecia, digital manifestations such as periungual telangiectasia and Raynaud phenomenon, photosensitivity, and bullous lesions. The clinical presentation of each of these forms, their diagnosis, and the inter-relationships between cutaneous LE and SLE are discussed. Common systemic findings in SLE are reviewed, as are diagnostic strategies, including histopathology, immunopathology, serology, and other laboratory findings. Treatments for cutaneous LE initially include preventive (e.g. photoprotective) strategies and topical therapies (corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors). For skin disease not controlled with these interventions, oral antimalarial agents (most commonly hydroxychloroquine) are often beneficial. Additional systemic therapies may be subdivided into conventional treatments (including corticosteroids, methotrexate, thalidomide, retinoids, dapsone, and azathioprine) and newer immunomodulatory therapies (including efalizumab, anti-tumor necrosis