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Sample records for proton translocation coupled

  1. The mechanism of coupling between electron transfer and proton translocation in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sazanov, Leonid A

    2014-08-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the first and largest enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and many bacteria. It couples the transfer of two electrons between NADH and ubiquinone to the translocation of four protons across the membrane. Complex I is an L-shaped assembly formed by the hydrophilic (peripheral) arm, containing all the redox centres performing electron transfer and the membrane arm, containing proton-translocating machinery. Mitochondrial complex I consists of 44 subunits of about 1 MDa in total, whilst the prokaryotic enzyme is simpler and generally consists of 14 conserved "core" subunits. Recently we have determined the first atomic structure of the entire complex I, using the enzyme from Thermus thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 Fe-S clusters, 64 TM helices). Structure suggests a unique coupling mechanism, with redox energy of electron transfer driving proton translocation via long-range (up to ~200 Å) conformational changes. It resembles a steam engine, with coupling elements (akin to coupling rods) linking parts of this molecular machine. PMID:24943718

  2. Stoichiometry of Proton Translocation Coupled to Substrate Oxidation in Plant Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, François; de Virville, Jacques Davy

    1985-01-01

    The proton translocation coupled to the electron flux from succinate, exogenous NADH, and NAD+-linked substrates (malate and isocitrate) to cytochrome c and to oxygen was studied in purified potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria using oxygen and ferricyanide pulse techniques. In the presence of valinomycin plus K+ (used as a charge compensating cation), optimum values of H+/2 e− were obtained when low amounts of electron acceptors (oxygen or ferricyanide) were added to the mitochondria (1-2 nanogram [2 e−] equivalents per milligram protein). The stoichiometry of proton translocation to electron flux was unaffected in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide, an inhibitor of the Pi/H+ symport. With succinate as substrate, H+/2 e− ratios were 4.0 ± 0.2 and 3.7 ± 0.3 with oxygen and ferricyanide as electron acceptors, respectively. With exogenous NADH, H+/2e− ratios were 4.1 ± 0.9 and 3.4 ± 0.2, respectively. The proton translocation coupled to the oxidation of NAD+-linked substrates (malate, isocitrate) was dependent upon the presence of adenylates (ADP, AMP, or ATP). For malate (+ glutamate) oxidation the observed H+/2 e− ratios were increased from 3.6 ± 2.2 to 6.5 ± 0.5 in the presence of 20 micromolar ADP. PMID:16663992

  3. The coupling of electron transfer and proton translocation: electrostatic calculations on Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Kannt, A; Lancaster, C R; Michel, H

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated the electrostatic potential and interaction energies of ionizable groups and analyzed the response of the protein environment to redox changes in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase by using a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique. Subsequent Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states enabled us to calculate the titration curves of all protonatable groups in the enzyme complex. Inclusion of a model membrane allowed us to restrict the calculations to the functionally essential subunits I and II. Some residues were calculated to have complex titration curves, as a result of strong electrostatic coupling, desolvation, and dipolar interactions. Around the heme a3-CuB binuclear center, we have identified a cluster of 18 strongly interacting residues that account for most of the proton uptake linked to electron transfer. This was calculated to be between 0.7 and 1.1 H+ per electron, depending on the redox transition considered. A hydroxide ion bound to CuB was determined to become protonated to form water upon transfer of the first electron to the binuclear site. The bulk of the protonation changes linked to further reduction of the heme a3-CuB center was calculated to be due to proton uptake by the interacting cluster and Glu(II-78). Upon formation of the three-electron reduced state (P1), His325, modeled in an alternative orientation away from CuB, was determined to become protonated. The agreement of these results with experiment and their relevance in the light of possible mechanisms of redox-coupled proton transfer are discussed. PMID:9533684

  4. The coupling of electron transfer and proton translocation: electrostatic calculations on Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kannt, A; Lancaster, C R; Michel, H

    1998-02-01

    We have calculated the electrostatic potential and interaction energies of ionizable groups and analyzed the response of the protein environment to redox changes in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase by using a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique. Subsequent Monte Carlo sampling of protonation states enabled us to calculate the titration curves of all protonatable groups in the enzyme complex. Inclusion of a model membrane allowed us to restrict the calculations to the functionally essential subunits I and II. Some residues were calculated to have complex titration curves, as a result of strong electrostatic coupling, desolvation, and dipolar interactions. Around the heme a3-CuB binuclear center, we have identified a cluster of 18 strongly interacting residues that account for most of the proton uptake linked to electron transfer. This was calculated to be between 0.7 and 1.1 H+ per electron, depending on the redox transition considered. A hydroxide ion bound to CuB was determined to become protonated to form water upon transfer of the first electron to the binuclear site. The bulk of the protonation changes linked to further reduction of the heme a3-CuB center was calculated to be due to proton uptake by the interacting cluster and Glu(II-78). Upon formation of the three-electron reduced state (P1), His325, modeled in an alternative orientation away from CuB, was determined to become protonated. The agreement of these results with experiment and their relevance in the light of possible mechanisms of redox-coupled proton transfer are discussed. PMID:9533684

  5. Mechanism of long-range proton translocation along biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Emile S.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that protons can travel along biological membranes up to tens of micrometers, but the mechanism of transport is unknown. To explain such a long-range proton translocation we describe a model that takes into account the coupled bulk diffusion that accompanies the migration of protons on the surface. We show that protons diffusing at or near the surface before equilibrating with the bulk desorb and re-adsorb at the surface thousands of times, giving rise to a power-law desorption kinetics. As a result, the decay of the surface protons occurs very slowly, allowing for establishing local gradient and local exchange, as was envisioned in the early local models of biological energy transduction. PMID:23268201

  6. Squeezing at entrance of proton transport pathway in proton-translocating pyrophosphatase upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yen-Wei; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lee, Ching-Hung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Pan, Rong-Long

    2013-07-01

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) is indispensable for many organisms in maintaining organellar pH homeostasis. This unique proton pump couples the hydrolysis of PPi to proton translocation across the membrane. H(+)-PPase consists of 14-16 relatively hydrophobic transmembrane domains presumably for proton translocation and hydrophilic loops primarily embedding a catalytic site. Several highly conserved polar residues located at or near the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase are essential for proton pumping activity. In this investigation single molecule FRET was employed to dissect the action at the pathway entrance in homodimeric Clostridium tetani H(+)-PPase upon ligand binding. The presence of the substrate analog, imidodiphosphate mediated two sites at the pathway entrance moving toward each other. Moreover, single molecule FRET analyses after the mutation at the first proton-carrying residue (Arg-169) demonstrated that conformational changes at the entrance are conceivably essential for the initial step of H(+)-PPase proton translocation. A working model is accordingly proposed to illustrate the squeeze at the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase upon substrate binding. PMID:23720778

  7. Proton Translocation in Cytochrome c Oxidase: Insights from Proton Exchange Kinetics and Vibrational Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLOS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. PMID:25268561

  8. Different modes of proton translocation by sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed Central

    Haupts, U; Bamberg, E; Oesterhelt, D

    1996-01-01

    The membrane-bound complex between sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) and its transducer HtrI forms the functional photoreceptor unit that allows transmission of light signals to the flagellar motor. Although being a photosensor, SRI, the mutant SRI-D76N and the HtrI-SRI complex can transport protons, as we demonstrate by using the sensitive and ion-specific black lipid membrane technique. SRI sustains an orange light-driven (one-photon-driven) outward proton transport which is enhanced by additional blue light (two-photon-driven). The vectoriality of the two-photon-driven transport could be reversed at neutral pH from the outward to the inward direction by switching the cut-off wavelength of the long wavelength light from 550 to 630 nm. The cut-off wavelength determining the reversal point decreases with decreasing pH. The currents could be enhanced by azide. A two-photon-driven inward proton transport by SRI-D76N (catalyzed by azide) and by the complex HtrI-SRI is demonstrated. The influence of pH and azide concentration on the rise and decay kinetics of the SRI380 intermediate is analyzed. The different modes of proton translocation of the SRI species are discussed on the basis of a general model of proton translocation of retinal proteins and in the context of signal transduction. Images PMID:8617229

  9. Essential regions in the membrane domain of bacterial complex I (NDH-1): the machinery for proton translocation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Motoaki; Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2014-08-01

    The proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I/NDH-1) is the first and largest enzyme of the respiratory chain which has a central role in cellular energy production and is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases and aging. It is believed that the peripheral domain of complex I/NDH-1 transfers the electron from NADH to Quinone (Q) and the redox energy couples the proton translocation in the membrane domain. To investigate the mechanism of the proton translocation, in a series of works we have systematically studied all membrane subunits in the Escherichia coli NDH-1 by site-directed mutagenesis. In this mini-review, we have summarized our strategy and results of the mutagenesis by depicting residues essential for proton translocation, along with those for subunit connection. It is suggested that clues to understanding the driving forces of proton translocation lie in the similarities and differences of the membrane subunits, highlighting the communication of essential charged residues among the subunits. A possible proton translocation mechanism with all membrane subunits operating in unison is described. PMID:24973951

  10. Electronic transduction of proton translocations in nanoassembled lamellae of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Gerardo; Magliulo, Maria; Mallardi, Antonia; Angione, Maria Daniela; Gobeljic, Danka; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Torsi, Luisa

    2014-08-26

    An organic field-effect transistor (OFET) integrating bacteriorhodopsin (bR) nanoassembled lamellae is proposed for an in-depth study of the proton translocation processes occurring as the bioelectronic device is exposed either to light or to low concentrations of general anesthetic vapors. The study involves the morphological, structural, electrical, and spectroscopic characterizations necessary to assess the functional properties of the device as well as the bR biological activity once integrated into the functional biointerlayer (FBI)-OFET structure. The electronic transduction of the protons phototranslocation is shown as a current increase in the p-type channel only when the device is irradiated with photons known to trigger the bR photocycle, while Raman spectroscopy reveals an associated C═C isomer switch. Notably, higher energy photons bring the cis isomer back to its trans form, switching the proton pumping process off. The investigation is extended also to the study of a PM FBI-OFET exposed to volatile general anesthetics such as halothane. In this case an electronic current increase is seen upon exposure to low, clinically relevant, concentrations of anesthetics, while no evidence of isomer-switching is observed. The study of the direct electronic detection of the two different externally triggered proton translocation effects allows gathering insights into the underpinning of different bR molecular switching processes. PMID:25077939

  11. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  12. A model of the proton translocation mechanism of complex I.

    PubMed

    Treberg, Jason R; Brand, Martin D

    2011-05-20

    Despite decades of speculation, the proton pumping mechanism of complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is unknown and continues to be controversial. Recent descriptions of the architecture of the hydrophobic region of complex I have resolved one vital issue: this region appears to have multiple proton transporters that are mechanically interlinked. Thus, transduction of conformational changes to drive the transmembrane transporters linked by a "connecting rod" during the reduction of ubiquinone (Q) can account for two or three of the four protons pumped per NADH oxidized. The remaining proton(s) must be pumped by direct coupling at the Q-binding site. Here, we present a mixed model based on a crucial constraint: the strong dependence on the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH) of superoxide generation at the Q-binding site of complex I. This model combines direct and indirect coupling mechanisms to account for the pumping of the four protons. It explains the observed properties of the semiquinone in the Q-binding site, the rapid superoxide production from this site during reverse electron transport, its low superoxide production during forward electron transport except in the presence of inhibitory Q-analogs and high protonmotive force, and the strong dependence of both modes of superoxide production on ΔpH. PMID:21454533

  13. A Model of the Proton Translocation Mechanism of Complex I*

    PubMed Central

    Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of speculation, the proton pumping mechanism of complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is unknown and continues to be controversial. Recent descriptions of the architecture of the hydrophobic region of complex I have resolved one vital issue: this region appears to have multiple proton transporters that are mechanically interlinked. Thus, transduction of conformational changes to drive the transmembrane transporters linked by a “connecting rod” during the reduction of ubiquinone (Q) can account for two or three of the four protons pumped per NADH oxidized. The remaining proton(s) must be pumped by direct coupling at the Q-binding site. Here, we present a mixed model based on a crucial constraint: the strong dependence on the pH gradient across the membrane (ΔpH) of superoxide generation at the Q-binding site of complex I. This model combines direct and indirect coupling mechanisms to account for the pumping of the four protons. It explains the observed properties of the semiquinone in the Q-binding site, the rapid superoxide production from this site during reverse electron transport, its low superoxide production during forward electron transport except in the presence of inhibitory Q-analogs and high protonmotive force, and the strong dependence of both modes of superoxide production on ΔpH. PMID:21454533

  14. Charge Requirements for Proton Gradient-driven Translocation of Anthrax Toxin*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael J.; Thoren, Katie L.; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin is used as a model system to study protein translocation. The toxin is composed of a translocase channel, called protective antigen (PA), and an enzyme, called lethal factor (LF). A proton gradient (ΔpH) can drive LF unfolding and translocation through PA channels; however, the mechanism of ΔpH-mediated force generation, substrate unfolding, and establishment of directionality are poorly understood. One recent hypothesis suggests that the ΔpH may act through changes in the protonation state of residues in the substrate. Here we report the charge requirements of LF's amino-terminal binding domain (LFN) using planar lipid bilayer electrophysiology. We found that acidic residues are required in LFN to utilize a proton gradient for translocation. Constructs lacking negative charges in the unstructured presequence of LFN translocate independently of the ΔpH driving force. Acidic residues markedly increase the rate of ΔpH-driven translocation, and the presequence is optimized in its natural acidic residue content for efficient ΔpH-driven unfolding and translocation. We discuss a ΔpH-driven charge state Brownian ratchet mechanism for translocation, where glutamic and aspartic acid residues in the substrate are the “molecular teeth” of the ratchet. Our Brownian ratchet model includes a mechanism for unfolding and a novel role for positive charges, which we propose chaperone negative charges through the PA channel during ΔpH translocation. PMID:21507946

  15. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  16. Unraveling the mechanism of proton translocation in the extracellular half-channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoxia; Gunner, M R

    2016-05-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, a light activated protein that creates a proton gradient in halobacteria, has long served as a simple model of proton pumps. Within bacteriorhodopsin, several key sites undergo protonation changes during the photocycle, moving protons from the higher pH cytoplasm to the lower pH extracellular side. The mechanism underlying the long-range proton translocation between the central (the retinal Schiff base SB216, D85, and D212) and exit clusters (E194 and E204) remains elusive. To obtain a dynamic view of the key factors controlling proton translocation, a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulation was performed for eight bacteriorhodopsin models varying in retinal isomer and protonation states of the SB216, D85, D212, and E204. The side-chain orientation of R82 is determined primarily by the protonation states of the residues in the EC. The side-chain reorientation of R82 modulates the hydrogen-bond network and consequently possible pathways of proton transfer. Quantum mechanical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of proton-transfer in the methyl guanidinium-hydronium-hydroxide model system show that proton transfer via a guanidinium group requires an initial geometry permitting proton donation and acceptance by the same amine. In all the bacteriorhodopsin models, R82 can form proton wires with both the CC and the EC connected by the same amine. Alternatively, rare proton wires for proton transfer from the CC to the EC without involving R82 were found in an O' state where the proton on D85 is transferred to D212. Proteins 2016; 84:639-654. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868676

  17. Purification and properties of the proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase complex of bovine heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Serrano, R; Kanner, B I; Racker, E

    1976-04-25

    1. The proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) of bovine heart mitochondria was highly purified by extraction of submitochondrial particles with cholate, fractionation with ammonium sulfate, and sucrose gradient centrifugation in the presence of methanol, deoxycholate, and lysolecithin. 2. The preparation had a very low content of phospholipids, respiratory components, and adenine nucleotide transporter. The ATPase activity (14 o 16 micromoles/min/mg at 30 degrees) was dependent on addition of phospholipids. The purified enzyme was reconstituted with phospholipids, coupling factor 1 (F1), and the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP) yielding vesicles with highly active 32Pi-ATP exchange (up to 260 nanomoles/min/mg at 30 degrees), and a proton pump driven by ATP. Site III oxidative phosphorylation was reconstituted when purified cytochrome oxidase was included. 3. The 32Pi-ATP exchange of the reconstituted vesicles was sensitive to both rutamycin and dichylohexylcarbodiimide but the ATPase activity was sensitive to rutamycin and not to dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 4. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel scans of the complex, the subunits of F1, OSCP, and three other major bands with apparent molecular weights of 32,000, 23,000, and about 11,000 were noted. Three other minor bands with estimated molecular weights of 80,000, 70,000, and 52,000 were also detected. These bands apparently represent residual trace amounts of respiratory components. Quantitative assays of individual respiratory components revealed between 0 and 3% contamination. 5. We conclude that the rutamycin-sensitive ATPase complex functions as a reversible ATP-driven proton pump. PMID:177416

  18. Light-driven proton translocations in Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Bogomolni, R A; Baker, R A; Lozier, R H; Stoeckenius, W

    1976-07-01

    The purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium acts as a light-driven proton pump, ejecting protons from the cell interior into the medium and generating electrochemical proton gradient across the cell membrane. However, the type response of cells to light as measured with a pH electrode in the medium consists of an initial net inflow of protons which subsides and is then replaced by a net outflow which exponentially approaches a new lower steady state pH level. When the light turned off a small transient acidification occurs before the pH returns to the original dark level. We present experiments suggesting that the initial inflow of protons is triggered by the beginning ejection of protons through the purple membrane and that the initial inflow rate is larger than the continuing light-driven outflow. When the initial inflow has decreased exponentially to a small value, the outflow dominates and causes the net acidification of the medium. The initial inflow is apparently driven by a pre-existing electrochemical gradient across the membrane, which the cells can maintain for extended times in the absence of light and oxygen. Treatments which collapse this gradient such as addition of small concentrations of uncouplers abolish the initial inflow. The triggered inflow occurs through the ATPase and is accompanied by ATP synthesis. Inhibitors of the ATPase such as N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) inhibit ATP synthesis and abolish the inflow. They also abolish the transient light-off acidification, which is apparently caused by a short burst of ATP hydrolysis before the enzyme is blocked by its endogenous inhibitor. Similar transient inflows and outflows of protons are also observed when anaerobic cells are exposed to short oxygen pulses. PMID:7322

  19. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Blattmann, Christoph O.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2015-12-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer.Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol-1 and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon

  20. Stoichiometry of proton translocation by respiratory complex I and its mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in the respiratory chain of mitochondria and several bacteria functions as a redox-driven proton pump that contributes to the generation of the protonmotive force across the inner mitochondrial or bacterial membrane and thus to the aerobic synthesis of ATP. The stoichiometry of proton translocation is thought to be 4 H+ per NADH oxidized (2 e-). Here we show that a H+/2 e- ratio of 3 appears more likely on the basis of the recently determined H+/ATP ratio of the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase of animal mitochondria and of a set of carefully determined ATP/2 e- ratios for different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This lower H+/2 e- ratio of 3 is independently supported by thermodynamic analyses of experiments with both mitochondria and submitochondrial particles. A reduced H+/2 e- stoichiometry of 3 has important mechanistic implications for this proton pump. In a rough mechanistic model, we suggest a concerted proton translocation mechanism in the three homologous and tightly packed antiporter-like subunits L, M, and N of the proton-translocating membrane domain of complex I. PMID:22392981

  1. Nanoantioxidant-driven plasmon enhanced proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Blattmann, Christoph O; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2016-01-14

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions involve the transfer of a proton and an electron and play an important role in a number of chemical and biological processes. Here, we describe a novel phenomenon, plasmon-enhanced PCET, which is manifested using SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles functionalized with gallic acid (GA), a natural antioxidant molecule that can perform PCET. These GA-functionalized nanoparticles show enhanced plasmonic response at near-IR wavelengths, due to particle agglomeration caused by the GA molecules. Near-IR laser irradiation induces strong local hot-spots on the SiO2-coated Ag nanoparticles, as evidenced by surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This leads to plasmon energy transfer to the grafted GA molecules that lowers the GA-OH bond dissociation enthalpy by at least 2 kcal mol(-1) and therefore facilitates PCET. The nanoparticle-driven plasmon-enhancement of PCET brings together the so far unrelated research domains of nanoplasmonics and electron/proton translocation with significant impact on applications based on interfacial electron/proton transfer. PMID:26505730

  2. Dual mode of energy coupling by the oxyanion-translocating ArsB protein.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    The arsA and arsB genes of the ars operon of R-factor R773 confer arsenite resistance in Escherichia coli by coding for an anion-translocating ATPase. Arsenite resistance and the in vivo energetics of arsenite transport were compared in cells expressing the arsA and arsB genes and those expressing just the arsB gene. Cells expressing the arsB gene exhibited intermediate arsenite resistance compared with cells expressing both the arsA and arsB genes. Both types of cells exhibited energy-dependent arsenite exclusion. Exclusion of 73AsO2- from cells expressing only the arsB gene was coupled to electrochemical energy, while in cells expressing both genes, transport was coupled to chemical energy, most likely ATP. These results suggest that the Ars anion transport system can be either an obligatory ATP-coupled primary pump or a secondary carrier coupled to the proton motive force, depending on the subunit composition of the transport complex. PMID:7814328

  3. Salt-Excluding Artificial Water Channels Exhibiting Enhanced Dipolar Water and Proton Translocation.

    PubMed

    Licsandru, Erol; Kocsis, Istvan; Shen, Yue-Xiao; Murail, Samuel; Legrand, Yves-Marie; van der Lee, Arie; Tsai, Daniel; Baaden, Marc; Kumar, Manish; Barboiu, Mihail

    2016-04-27

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are biological water channels known for fast water transport (∼10(8)-10(9) molecules/s/channel) with ion exclusion. Few synthetic channels have been designed to mimic this high water permeability, and none reject ions at a significant level. Selective water translocation has previously been shown to depend on water-wires spanning the AQP pore that reverse their orientation, combined with correlated channel motions. No quantitative correlation between the dipolar orientation of the water-wires and their effects on water and proton translocation has been reported. Here, we use complementary X-ray structural data, bilayer transport experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to gain key insights and quantify transport. We report artificial imidazole-quartet water channels with 2.6 Å pores, similar to AQP channels, that encapsulate oriented dipolar water-wires in a confined chiral conduit. These channels are able to transport ∼10(6) water molecules/s, which is within 2 orders of magnitude of AQPs' rates, and reject all ions except protons. The proton conductance is high (∼5 H(+)/s/channel) and approximately half that of the M2 proton channel at neutral pH. Chirality is a key feature influencing channel efficiency. PMID:27063409

  4. Proton translocation during denitrification by a nitrifying--denitrifying Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Castignetti, D; Hollocher, T C

    1983-04-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifying Alcaligenes sp. from soil was grown as a denitrifier on nitrate and subjected to oxidant pulse experiments to ascertain the apparent efficiencies of proton translocations during O2 and nitrogen-oxide respirations. With endogenous substrate as the reducing agent the leads to H+/2e- ratios, extrapolated to zero amount of oxidant per pulse, were 9.4, 3.7, 4.3 and 3.5 for O2, nitrate, nitrite and N2O, respectively. The value for O2 and those for the N-oxides are, respectively, somewhat larger and smaller than corresponding values for Paracoccus denitrificans. None of the three permeant ions employed with the Alcaligenes sp. (valinomycin-K+, thiocyanate and triphenylmethylphosphonium) was ideal for all purposes. Thiocyanate provided highest ratios for O2 but abolished the oxidant pulse response for nitrate and N2O. Valinomycin was slow to penetrate to the cytoplasmic membrane and relatively high concentrations were required for optimal performance. Triphenylmethylphosphonium enhanced passive proton permeability and diminished proton translocation at concentrations required to realize the maximal oxidant pulse response. PMID:6311094

  5. Proton-coupled sugar transport in the prototypical major facilitator superfamily protein XylE

    PubMed Central

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Park, Min-Sun; Iadanza, Matthew G.; Zheng, Hongjin; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest collection of structurally related membrane proteins that transport a wide array of substrates. The proton-coupled sugar transporter XylE is the first member of the MFS that has been structurally characterized in multiple transporting conformations, including both the outward and inward-facing states. Here we report the crystal structure of XylE in a new inward-facing open conformation, allowing us to visualize the rocker-switch movement of the N-domain against the C-domain during the transport cycle. Using molecular dynamics simulation, and functional transport assays, we describe the movement of XylE that facilitates sugar translocation across a lipid membrane and identify the likely candidate proton-coupling residues as the conserved Asp27 and Arg133. This study addresses the structural basis for proton-coupled substrate transport and release mechanism for the sugar porter family of proteins. PMID:25088546

  6. A redirected proton pathway in the bacteriorhodopsin mutant Tyr-57-->Asp. Evidence for proton translocation without Schiff base deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Marti, T; Rath, P; Fischer, W; Coleman, M; Nilsson, A; Khorana, H G; Rothschild, K J

    1994-11-18

    Light-driven proton pumping in bacteriorhodopsin involves deprotonation of the retinylidene Schiff base during M formation and reprotonation during N formation as key steps. This study reports on the spectroscopic characterization of the bacteriorhodopsin mutant Tyr-57-->Asp (Y57D). The results reveal that although formation of the M intermediate and Schiff base deprotonation is blocked, the mutant still exhibits a significant level of light-driven proton translocation. The photocycle of Y57D involves formation of K and L intermediates accompanied by the normal chromophore isomerization and changes in the hydrogen bonding of Asp-96 and Asp-115. However, an additional Asp residue deprotonates during formation of the L intermediate along with a transmembrane alpha-helical structural change that normally occurs upon N formation. We postulate that proton transport in Y57D occurs through a redirected pathway that does not involve the deprotonation of the Schiff base. Chromophore isomerization, which normally results in the transfer of a proton from the Schiff base to Asp-85, instead causes the deprotonation of Asp-57 in Y57D, most likely through an interaction involving Asp-212. This deprotonation of Asp-57 causes the release of a proton into the extracellular medium. Reprotonation of Asp-57 occurs through the Schiff base reprotonation pathway, which consists of a hydrogen-bonded network of residues spanning from Asp-96 to Asp-212. The results also indicate that the transmembrane alpha-helical structural changes observed during N formation (Rothschild, K.J., Marti, T., Sonar, S., He, Y.W., Rath, P., Fischer, W., Bousche, O., and Khorana, H. G. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 27046-27052) do not require deprotonation of Asp-96 or of the Schiff base. PMID:7961844

  7. Configurationally-Coupled Protonation of Polyproline-7.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E; Khanal, Neelam; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-15

    Structure and dynamics regulate protein function, but much less is known about how biomolecule-solvent interactions affect the structure-function relationship. Even less is known about the thermodynamics of biomolecule-solvent interactions and how such interactions influence conformational entropy. When transferred from propanol into 40:60 propanol:water under acidic conditions, a remarkably slow protonation reaction coupled with the conversion of the polyproline-I helix (PPI, having all cis-configured peptide bonds) into polyproline-II (PPII, all trans) helix is observed in this work. Kinetics and equilibrium measurements as a function of temperature allow determination of the thermochemistry and insight into how proton transfer is regulated in this system. For the proton-transfer process, PPI(+)(PrOH) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) + H2O, we determine ΔG = -20 ± 19 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -75 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -188 ± 48 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the overall reaction, and values of ΔG(⧧) = 91 ± 3 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH(⧧) = 84 ± 9 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS(⧧) = -23 ± 31 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for the transition state. For a minor process, PPI(+)(PrOH) → PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) without protonation, we determine ΔG = -9 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = 64 ± 14 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= 247 ± 50 J·mol(-1)·K(-1). This thermochemistry yields ΔG = -10 ± 29 kJ·mol(-1), ΔH = -139 ± 20 kJ·mol(-1), and ΔS= -435 ± 70 J·mol(-1)·K(-1) for PPII(+)(PrOH/aq) + H3O(+) → PPII(2+)(PrOH/aq) +H2O. The extraordinarily slow proton transfer appears to be an outcome of configurational coupling through a PPI-like transition state. PMID:26115587

  8. Bacteriorhodopsin mutants containing single substitutions of serine or threonine residues are all active in proton translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, T.; Otto, H.; Mogi, T.; Roesselet, S.J.H.; Heyn, M.P.; Khorana, H.G. )

    1991-04-15

    To study their role in proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin, 22 serine and threonine residues presumed to be located within and near the border of the transmembrane segments have been individually replaced by alanine or valine, respectively. Thr-89 was substituted by alanine, valine, and aspartic acid, and Ser-141 by alanine and cysteine. Most of the mutants showed essentially wild-type phenotype with regard to chromophore regeneration and absorption spectrum. However, replacement of Thr-89 by Val and of Ser-141 by Cys caused striking blue shifts of the chromophore by 100 and 80 nm, respectively. All substitutions of Thr-89 regenerated the chromophore at least 10-fold faster with 13-cis retinal than with all-trans retinal. The substitutions at positions 89, 90, and 141 also showed abnormal dark-light adaptation, suggesting interactions between these residues and the retinylidene chromophore. Proton pumping measurements revealed 60-75% activity for mutants of Thr-46, -89, -90, -205, and Ser-226, and about 20% for Ser-141----Cys, whereas the remaining mutants showed normal pumping. Kinetic studies of the photocycle and of proton release and uptake for mutants in which proton pumping was reduced revealed generally little alterations. The reduced activity in several of these mutants is most likely due to a lower percentage of all-trans retinal in the light-adapted state. In the mutants Thr-46----Val and Ser-226----Ala the decay of the photointer-mediate M was significantly accelerated, indicating an interaction between these residues and Asp-96 which reprotonates the Schiff base. Our results show that no single serine or threonine residue is obligatory for proton pumping.

  9. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  10. Adaptation of the Mitochondrial Genome in Cephalopods: Enhancing Proton Translocation Channels and the Subunit Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Daniela; Maldonado, Emanuel; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein-coding genes (mt genes) encode subunits forming complexes of crucial cellular pathways, including those involved in the vital process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Despite the vital role of the mitochondrial genome (mt genome) in the survival of organisms, little is known with respect to its adaptive implications within marine invertebrates. The molluscan Class Cephalopoda is represented by a marine group of species known to occupy contrasting environments ranging from the intertidal to the deep sea, having distinct metabolic requirements, varied body shapes and highly advanced visual and nervous systems that make them highly competitive and successful worldwide predators. Thus, cephalopods are valuable models for testing natural selection acting on their mitochondrial subunits (mt subunits). Here, we used concatenated mt genes from 17 fully sequenced mt genomes of diverse cephalopod species to generate a robust mitochondrial phylogeny for the Class Cephalopoda. We followed an integrative approach considering several branches of interest–covering cephalopods with distinct morphologies, metabolic rates and habitats–to identify sites under positive selection and localize them in the respective protein alignment and/or tridimensional structure of the mt subunits. Our results revealed significant adaptive variation in several mt subunits involved in the energy production pathway of cephalopods: ND5 and ND6 from Complex I, CYTB from Complex III, COX2 and COX3 from Complex IV, and in ATP8 from Complex V. Furthermore, we identified relevant sites involved in protein-interactions, lining proton translocation channels, as well as disease/deficiencies related sites in the aforementioned complexes. A particular case, revealed by this study, is the involvement of some positively selected sites, found in Octopoda lineage in lining proton translocation channels (site 74 from ND5) and in interactions between subunits (site 507 from ND5) of

  11. A protonation-coupled feedback mechanism controls the signalling process in bathy phytochromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Piwowarski, Patrick; Salewski, Johannes; Michael, Norbert; Fernandez Lopez, Maria; Rupp, Anna; Muhammad Qureshi, Bilal; Scheerer, Patrick; Bartl, Franz; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole; Siebert, Friedrich; Andrea Mroginski, Maria; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Phytochromes are bimodal photoswitches composed of a photosensor and an output module. Photoactivation of the sensor is initiated by a double bond isomerization of the tetrapyrrole chromophore and eventually leads to protein conformational changes. Recently determined structural models of phytochromes identify differences between the inactive and the signalling state but do not reveal the mechanism of photosensor activation or deactivation. Here, we report a vibrational spectroscopic study on bathy phytochromes that demonstrates that the formation of the photoactivated state and thus (de)activation of the output module is based on proton translocations in the chromophore pocket coupling chromophore and protein structural changes. These proton transfer steps, involving the tetrapyrrole and a nearby histidine, also enable thermal back-isomerization of the chromophore via keto-enol tautomerization to afford the initial dark state. Thus, the same proton re-arrangements inducing the (de)activation of the output module simultaneously initiate the reversal of this process, corresponding to a negative feedback mechanism.

  12. Crystal structures reveal the molecular basis of ion translocation in sodium/proton antiporters.

    PubMed

    Coincon, Mathieu; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Nji, Emmanuel; Dotson, David L; Winkelmann, Iven; Abdul-Hussein, Saba; Cameron, Alexander D; Beckstein, Oliver; Drew, David

    2016-03-01

    To fully understand the transport mechanism of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, it is necessary to clearly establish the global rearrangements required to facilitate ion translocation. Currently, two different transport models have been proposed. Some reports have suggested that structural isomerization is achieved through large elevator-like rearrangements similar to those seen in the structurally unrelated sodium-coupled glutamate-transporter homolog GltPh. Others have proposed that only small domain movements are required for ion exchange, and a conventional rocking-bundle model has been proposed instead. Here, to resolve these differences, we report atomic-resolution structures of the same Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NapA from Thermus thermophilus) in both outward- and inward-facing conformations. These data combined with cross-linking, molecular dynamics simulations and isothermal calorimetry suggest that Na(+)/H(+) antiporters provide alternating access to the ion-binding site by using elevator-like structural transitions. PMID:26828964

  13. Effect of an uncE ribosome-binding site mutation on the synthesis and assembly of the Escherichia coli proton-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K A; Brusilow, W S

    1988-04-15

    Plasmid pRPG54, which carries the genes for the eight subunits of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli, has been found to carry a single base change of a G to an A in the ribosome-binding site for uncE, the gene which codes for the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding subunit c of the Fo. This noncoding region mutation both lowers expression of uncE by a factor of 2-3 and affects the function of the ATPase, specifically of the Fo sector. The presence of the mutation results in a decrease in the proton permeability of the Fo or of the entire F1Fo-ATPase complex when either is synthesized from genes on a multicopy plasmid. Expression of uncE from an F1Fo plasmid carrying the wild type ribosome binding site results in increased membrane proton permeability and decreased ability of the resultant ATPase to couple a transmembrane proton gradient to ATP synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. Also, although an Fo plasmid carrying the correct ribosome-binding site causes harmful, F1-dependent proton permeability in unc+ cells (Brusilow, W. S. S. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990), an identical plasmid carrying the mutation does not, even though it still codes for a functional reconstitutable Fo. The results show a relationship between the relative level of expression of uncE from a multicopy plasmid and the assembly pathway, proton permeability, and energy-coupling characteristics of the ATPase. PMID:2895768

  14. Influence of genes encoding proton-translocating enzymes on suppression of Salmonella typhimurium growth and colonization.

    PubMed

    Zhang-Barber, L; Turner, A K; Martin, G; Frankel, G; Dougan, G; Barrow, P A

    1997-11-01

    Twenty-four-hour-old, aerobically grown, Luria-Bertani broth cultures of Salmonella typhimurium F98 suppressed the growth of a spectinomycin-resistant (Spcr) derivative of the same strain inoculated at 10(3) CFU ml(-1). This growth suppression is genus specific and RpoS independent, and it is not solely a result of nutrient depletion (P. A. Barrow, M. A. Lovell, and L. Zhang-Barber, J. Bacteriol. 178:3072-3076, 1996). Mutations in three genes are shown here to significantly reduce growth suppression under these conditions. The mutations were located in the nuo, cyd, and unc operons, which code for the NADH dehydrogenase I, cytochrome d oxidase, and F0F1 proton-translocating ATPase complexes, respectively. When cultures were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions, only the unc mutant did not suppress growth. Prior colonization of the alimentary tract of newly hatched chickens with the S. typhimurium F98 wild type or nuo or cyd mutants suppressed colonization by an S. typhimurium F98 Spcr derivative inoculated 24 h later. In contrast, the S. typhimurium unc mutant did not suppress colonization. The nuo and unc mutants showed poorer growth on certain carbon sources. The data support the hypothesis that growth suppression operates because of the absence of a utilizable carbon source or electron acceptor. PMID:9371470

  15. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2015-08-21

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441-445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu(2+) ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50-90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10-20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  16. Theoretical analysis of proton relays in electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura E; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently the concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this double proton transfer system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wave functions and the incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in these systems. The calculated KIEs and the ratio of the standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard PCET rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wave functions, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The theory predicts that this rate constant may be increased by modifying the molecule in a manner that decreases the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or alters the molecular thermal motions to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. These insights may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy conversion devices. PMID:21524104

  17. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2

    PubMed Central

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  18. G-protein coupling and nuclear translocation of the human abscisic acid receptor LANCL2.

    PubMed

    Fresia, Chiara; Vigliarolo, Tiziana; Guida, Lucrezia; Booz, Valeria; Bruzzone, Santina; Sturla, Laura; Di Bona, Melody; Pesce, Mattia; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a long known phytohormone, has been recently demonstrated to be present also in humans, where it targets cells of the innate immune response, mesenchymal and hemopoietic stem cells and cells involved in the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. LANCL2, a peripheral membrane protein, is the mammalian ABA receptor. We show that N-terminal glycine myristoylation causes LANCL2 localization to the plasmamembrane and to cytoplasmic membrane vesicles, where it interacts with the α subunit of a Gi protein and starts the ABA signaling pathway via activation of adenylate cyclase. Demyristoylation of LANCL2 by chemical or genetic means triggers its nuclear translocation. Nuclear enrichment of native LANCL2 is also induced by ABA treatment. Therefore human LANCL2 is a non-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor susceptible to hormone-induced nuclear translocation. PMID:27222287

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    PubMed

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  20. Inversion of proton translocation in bacteriorhodopsin mutants D85N, D85T, and D85,96N.

    PubMed Central

    Tittor, J; Schweiger, U; Oesterhelt, D; Bamberg, E

    1994-01-01

    Proton translocation activity of bacteriorhodopsin mutants lacking the proton acceptor Asp-85 was investigated using the black lipid membrane technique. Mutants D85N, D85T, and D85,96N were constructed and homologously expressed in Halobacterium salinarium to yield a membrane fraction with a buoyant density of 1.18 g/cm3, i.e., identical to that of wild-type purple membrane. In all mutants, the absorbance maximum was red-shifted between 27 and 49 nm compared with wild type, and the pKa values of the respective Schiff bases were reduced to between 8.3 and 8.9 compared with the value of > 13 in wild type. Therefore, a mixture of chromophores absorbing at 410 nm (deprotonated form) and around 600 nm (protonated form) exists at physiological pH. In continuous blue light, the deprotonated form generates stationary photocurrents. The currents are enhanced by a factor of up to 50 upon addition of azide in D85N and D85,96N mutants, whereas D85T shows no azide effect. The direction of these currents is the same as in wild type in yellow light. Yellow light alone is not sufficient to generate stationary currents in the mutants, but increasing yellow light intensity in the presence of blue light leads to an inversion of the current. Because all currents are carried by protons, this two-photon process demonstrates an inverted proton translocation by BR mutants. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7819500

  1. His-75 in Proteorhodopsin, a Novel Component in Light-driven Proton Translocation by Primary Pumps*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bergo, Vladislav B.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Kralj, Joel M.; Partha, Ranga; Spudich, Elena N.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.; Spudich, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs), photoactive retinylidene membrane proteins ubiquitous in marine eubacteria, exhibit light-driven proton transport activity similar to that of the well studied bacteriorhodopsin from halophilic archaea. However, unlike bacteriorhodopsin, PRs have a single highly conserved histidine located near the photoactive site of the protein. Time-resolved Fourier transform IR difference spectroscopy combined with visible absorption spectroscopy, isotope labeling, and electrical measurements of light-induced charge movements reveal participation of His-75 in the proton translocation mechanism of PR. Substitution of His-75 with Ala or Glu perturbed the structure of the photoactive site and resulted in significantly shifted visible absorption spectra. In contrast, His-75 substitution with a positively charged Arg did not shift the visible absorption spectrum of PR. The mutation to Arg also blocks the light-induced proton transfer from the Schiff base to its counterion Asp-97 during the photocycle and the acid-induced protonation of Asp-97 in the dark state of the protein. Isotope labeling of histidine revealed that His-75 undergoes deprotonation during the photocycle in the proton-pumping (high pH) form of PR, a reaction further supported by results from H75E. Finally, all His-75 mutations greatly affect charge movements within the PR and shift its pH dependence to acidic values. A model of the proteorhodopsin proton transport process is proposed as follows: (i) in the dark state His-75 is positively charged (protonated) over a wide pH range and interacts directly with the Schiff base counterion Asp-97; and (ii) photoisomerization-induced transfer of the Schiff base proton to the Asp-97 counterion disrupts its interaction with His-75 and triggers a histidine deprotonation. PMID:19015272

  2. Functional Coupling of Duplex Translocation to DNA Cleavage in a Type I Restriction Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Csefalvay, Eva; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Guzanova, Alena; Csefalvay, Ladislav; Baikova, Tatsiana; Bialevich, Vitali; Shamayeva, Katsiaryna; Janscak, Pavel; Kuta Smatanova, Ivana; Panjikar, Santosh; Carey, Jannette; Weiserova, Marie; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Type I restriction-modification enzymes are multifunctional heteromeric complexes with DNA cleavage and ATP-dependent DNA translocation activities located on motor subunit HsdR. Functional coupling of DNA cleavage and translocation is a hallmark of the Type I restriction systems that is consistent with their proposed role in horizontal gene transfer. DNA cleavage occurs at nonspecific sites distant from the cognate recognition sequence, apparently triggered by stalled translocation. The X-ray crystal structure of the complete HsdR subunit from E. coli plasmid R124 suggested that the triggering mechanism involves interdomain contacts mediated by ATP. In the present work, in vivo and in vitro activity assays and crystal structures of three mutants of EcoR124I HsdR designed to probe this mechanism are reported. The results indicate that interdomain engagement via ATP is indeed responsible for signal transmission between the endonuclease and helicase domains of the motor subunit. A previously identified sequence motif that is shared by the RecB nucleases and some Type I endonucleases is implicated in signaling. PMID:26039067

  3. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°ref=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pHin or pHout) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F0 to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F1, is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase. PMID:26940516

  4. The proton-coupled folate transporter: physiological and pharmacological roles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have identified the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) as the mechanism by which folates are absorbed across the apical brush-border membrane of the small intestine and across the basolateral membrane of the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid. Both processes are defective when there are loss-of-function mutations in this gene as occurs in the autosomal recessive disorder hereditary folate malabsorption. Because this transporter functions optimally at low pH, antifolates are being developed that are highly specific for PCFT in order to achieve selective delivery to malignant cells within the acidic environment of solid tumors. PCFT has a spectrum of affinities for folates and antifolates that narrows and increases at low pH. Residues have been identified that play a role in folate and proton binding, proton coupling, and oscillation of the carrier between its conformational states. PMID:24383099

  5. Single-stranded DNA translocation of E. coli UvrD monomer is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Fischer, Christopher J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2012-04-20

    Escherichia coli UvrD is an SF1A (superfamily 1 type A) helicase/translocase that functions in several DNA repair pathways. A UvrD monomer is a rapid and processive single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) translocase but is unable to unwind DNA processively in vitro. Based on data at saturating ATP (500 μM), we proposed a nonuniform stepping mechanism in which a UvrD monomer translocates with biased (3' to 5') directionality while hydrolyzing 1 ATP per DNA base translocated, but with a kinetic step size of 4-5 nt/step, suggesting that a pause occurs every 4-5 nt translocated. To further test this mechanism, we examined UvrD translocation over a range of lower ATP concentrations (10-500 μM ATP), using transient kinetic approaches. We find a constant ATP coupling stoichiometry of ∼1 ATP/DNA base translocated even at the lowest ATP concentration examined (10 μM), indicating that ATP hydrolysis is tightly coupled to forward translocation of a UvrD monomer along ssDNA with little slippage or futile ATP hydrolysis during translocation. The translocation kinetic step size remains constant at 4-5 nt/step down to 50 μM ATP but increases to ∼7 nt/step at 10 μM ATP. These results suggest that UvrD pauses more frequently during translocation at low ATP but with little futile ATP hydrolysis. PMID:22342931

  6. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins—protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor—translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  7. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  8. Proton-coupled electron transfer in solution, proteins, and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Soudackov, Alexander V

    2008-11-13

    Recent advances in the theoretical treatment of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are reviewed. These reactions play an important role in a wide range of biological processes, as well as in fuel cells, solar cells, chemical sensors, and electrochemical devices. A unified theoretical framework has been developed to describe both sequential and concerted PCET, as well as hydrogen atom transfer (HAT). A quantitative diagnostic has been proposed to differentiate between HAT and PCET in terms of the degree of electronic nonadiabaticity, where HAT corresponds to electronically adiabatic proton transfer and PCET corresponds to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In both cases, the overall reaction is typically vibronically nonadiabatic. A series of rate constant expressions have been derived in various limits by describing the PCET reactions in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between electron-proton vibronic states. These expressions account for the solvent response to both electron and proton transfer and the effects of the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. The solvent and protein environment can be represented by a dielectric continuum or described with explicit molecular dynamics. These theoretical treatments have been applied to numerous PCET reactions in solution and proteins. Expressions for heterogeneous rate constants and current densities for electrochemical PCET have also been derived and applied to model systems. PMID:18842015

  9. Exchangers man the pumps: Functional interplay between proton pumps and proton-coupled Ca(2+) exchangers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tonoplast-localised proton-coupled Ca(2+) transporters encoded by cation/H(+) exchanger (CAX) genes play a critical role in sequestering Ca(2+) into the vacuole. These transporters may function in coordination with Ca(2+) release channels, to shape stimulus-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations. Recen...

  10. Stoichiometry of mitochondrial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation at level flow.

    PubMed

    Costa, L E; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-04-25

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria in the presence of a permeant cation has been determined under level flow conditions with a membraneless fast responding O2 electrode kinetically matched with a glass pH electrode. The reactions were initiated by rapid injection of O2 into the anaerobically preincubated test system under conditions in which interfering H+ backflow was minimized. The rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection, obtained from computer-fitted regression lines, were monotonic and first order over 75% of the course of O2 consumption. Extrapolation of the observed rates to zero time, at which zero delta mu H+ and thus level flow prevails, yielded vectorial H+/O flow ratios above 7 and closely approaching 8. The mitochondria undergo no irreversible change and give identical H+/O ratios on repeated tests. In a further refinement, the lower and upper limits of the mechanistic H+/O ratio were determined to be 7.55 and 8.56, respectively, from plots of the rates of O2 uptake versus H+ ejection at increasing malonate and increasing valinomycin concentrations, respectively. It is therefore concluded that the mechanistic H+/O ratio for energy-conserving sites 2 + 3 is 8, in confirmation of earlier measurements. KCl concentration is critical for maximal observed H+/O ratios. Optimum conditions and possible errors in determination of mechanistic H+/O translocation ratios are discussed. PMID:6232269

  11. Respiration-dependent proton translocation in alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Krulwich, T A; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1983-02-25

    Obligately alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB had a higher molar growth yield on L-malate (Ymal = 38 mg, dry weight/mmol of L-malate) than its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative, strain RABN (Ymal = 12 mg, dry weight/mmol of L-malate). Measurements of respiration dependent proton translocation by the two strains in the presence of K+ and valinomycin showed that the alkalophile also has much higher H+/O stoichiometries (at pH 9.0) than does the mutant (at pH 7.0). H+/O ratios for B. firmus RAB at pH 9.0 were as high as 13, with a frequently observed value of 9. These high values were observed in the first phase of a set of biphasic curves for both oxygen consumption and proton ejection. At pH 7.0, both the wild type and the mutant exhibited H+/O ratios near 4 in a single phase of oxygen consumption and proton ejection. The results are consistent with suggestions that the alkalophilic respiratory chain is especially well adapted for effective energy transduction at alkaline but not neutral pH. PMID:6296129

  12. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Wesley D.; Darcy, Julia W.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)4]2- (1, SAr = S-2,4-6-(iPr)3C6H2) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4S4(SAr)3L]1- (2) + ArSH (L = solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2 + ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4S4(SAr)4]1- (1ox) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4S4(SAr)3(HSAr)]1-(1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  13. Protonation and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer at S-Ligated [4Fe-4S] Clusters.

    PubMed

    Saouma, Caroline T; Morris, Wesley D; Darcy, Julia W; Mayer, James M

    2015-06-15

    Biological [Fe-S] clusters are increasingly recognized to undergo proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), but the site of protonation, mechanism, and role for PCET remains largely unknown. Here we explore this reactivity with synthetic model clusters. Protonation of the arylthiolate-ligated [4Fe-4S] cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](2-) (1, SAr=S-2,4-6-(iPr)3 C6 H2 ) leads to thiol dissociation, reversibly forming [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 L](1-) (2) and ArSH (L=solvent, and/or conjugate base). Solutions of 2+ArSH react with the nitroxyl radical TEMPO to give [Fe4 S4 (SAr)4 ](1-) (1ox ) and TEMPOH. This reaction involves PCET coupled to thiolate association and may proceed via the unobserved protonated cluster [Fe4 S4 (SAr)3 (HSAr)](1-) (1-H). Similar reactions with this and related clusters proceed comparably. An understanding of the PCET thermochemistry of this cluster system has been developed, encompassing three different redox levels and two protonation states. PMID:25965413

  14. Transverse beam coupling impedance of the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichelli, S.; Migliorati, M.; Biancacci, N.; Gilardoni, S.; Metral, E.; Salvant, B.

    2016-04-01

    Beam coupling impedance is a fundamental parameter to characterize the electromagnetic interaction of a particle beam with the surrounding environment. Synchrotron machine performances are critically affected by instabilities and collective effects triggered by beam coupling impedance. In particular, transverse beam coupling impedance is expected to impact beam dynamics of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS), since a significant increase in beam intensity is foreseen within the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. In this paper we describe the study of the transverse beam coupling impedance of the PS, taking into account the main sources of geometrical impedance and the contribution of indirect space charge at different energies. The total machine impedance budget, determined from beam-based dedicated machine measurement sessions, is also discussed and compared with the theoretical model.

  15. Enhanced Proton Translocating Pyrophosphatase Activity Improves Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Romaine Lettuce1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Valencia, Julio; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Marsh, Ellen; Dorneles, Liane T.; Santos, Mirella P.; Sanchez, Diego; Winter, Alexander; Murphy, Sean; Cox, Jennifer; Trzaska, Marcin; Metler, Jason; Kozic, Alex; Facanha, Arnoldo R.; Schachtman, Daniel; Sanchez, Charles A.; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant nitrate (NO3−) acquisition depends on the combined activities of root high- and low-affinity NO3− transporters and the proton gradient generated by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. These processes are coordinated with photosynthesis and the carbon status of the plant. Here, we present the characterization of romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa ‘Conquistador’) plants engineered to overexpress an intragenic gain-of-function allele of the type I proton translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The proton-pumping and inorganic pyrophosphate hydrolytic activities of these plants are augmented compared with control plants. Immunohistochemical data show a conspicuous increase in H+-PPase protein abundance at the vasculature of the transgenic plants. Transgenic plants displayed an enhanced rhizosphere acidification capacity consistent with the augmented plasma membrane H+-ATPase proton transport values, and ATP hydrolytic capacities evaluated in vitro. These transgenic lines outperform control plants when challenged with NO3− limitations in laboratory, greenhouse, and field scenarios. Furthermore, we report the characterization of a lettuce LsNRT2.1 gene that is constitutive up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Of note, the expression of the LsNRT2.1 gene in control plants is regulated by NO3− and sugars. Enhanced accumulation of 15N-labeled fertilizer by transgenic lettuce compared with control plants was observed in greenhouse experiments. A negative correlation between the level of root soluble sugars and biomass is consistent with the strong root growth that characterizes these transgenic plants. PMID:23307651

  16. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11897.001 PMID:26714107

  17. Integrating proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Kent, Caleb A.; Paul, Jared J.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-11-01

    In many of the chemical steps in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis, proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays an essential role. An important issue is how excited state reactivity can be integrated with PCET to carry out solar fuel reactions such as water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen or water reduction of CO2 to methanol or hydrocarbons. The principles behind PCET and concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways are reasonably well understood. In Photosystem II antenna light absorption is followed by sensitization of chlorophyll P680 and electron transfer quenching to give P680+. The oxidized chlorophyll activates the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), a CaMn4 cluster, through an intervening tyrosine–histidine pair, YZ. EPT plays a major role in a series of four activation steps that ultimately result in loss of 4e-/4H+ from the OEC with oxygen evolution. The key elements in photosynthesis and artificial photosynthesis – light absorption, excited state energy and electron transfer, electron transfer activation of multiple-electron, multiple-proton catalysis – can also be assembled in dye sensitized photoelectrochemical synthesis cells (DS-PEC). In this approach, molecular or nanoscale assemblies are incorporated at separate electrodes for coupled, light driven oxidation and reduction. Separate excited state electron transfer followed by proton transfer can be combined in single semi-concerted steps (photo-EPT) by photolysis of organic charge transfer excited states with H-bonded bases or in metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states in pre-associated assemblies with H-bonded electron transfer donors or acceptors. In these assemblies, photochemically induced electron and proton transfer occur in a single, semi-concerted event to give high-energy, redox active intermediates.

  18. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups. PMID:26439818

  19. Proton transfer and energy coupling in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    A description of the rate constants and the energetics of the elementary reaction steps of the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin has been helpful in understanding the mechanism of proton transport in this light-driven pump. The evidence suggests a single unbranched reaction sequence, BR-hv----K in equilibrium with L in equilibrium with M1----M2 in equilibrium with N in equilibrium with O----BR, where coupling to the proton-motive force is at the energetically and mechanistically important M1----M2 step. The consequences of site-specific mutations expressed homologously in Halobacterium halobium have revealed characteristics of the Schiff base deprotonation in the L----M1 reaction, the reorientation of the Schiff base from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side in the M1----M2 reaction, and the reprotonation of the Schiff base in the M2----N reaction.

  20. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Krab, K; Soos, J; Wikström, M

    1984-12-10

    In a recent communication Lehninger and co-workers (Costa, L.E., Reynaferje, B., and Lehninger, A.L. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811) reported values approaching 8 for the H+/O ratio of vectorial proton ejection from rat liver mitochondria respiring with succinate. Here we present a rigorous analysis of these measurements which reveals that they may significantly overestimate the true H+/O stoicheiometry. PMID:6096164

  1. Auxin regulation of a proton translocating ATPase in pea root plasma membrane vesicles. [Pisum sativum. L

    SciTech Connect

    Gabathuler, R.; Cleland, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    Pea root microsomal vesicles have been fractionated on a Dextran step gradient to give three fractions, each of which carries out ATP-dependent proton accumulation as measured by fluorescence quenching of quinacrine. The fraction at the 4/6% Dextran interface is enriched in plasma membrane, as determined by UDPG sterol glucosyltransferase and vanadate-inhibited ATPase. The vanadate-sensitive phosphohydrolase is not specific for ATP, has a K/sub m/ of about 0.23 millimolar for MgATP, is only slightly affected by K/sup +/ or Cl/sup -/ and is insensitive to auxin. Proton transport, on the other hand, is more specific for ATP, enhanced by anions (NO/sub 3//sup -/ > Cl/sup -/) and has a K/sub m/ of about 0.7 millimolar. Auxins decrease the K/sub m/ to about 0.35 millimolar, with no significant effect on the V/sub max/, while antiauxins or weak acids have no such effect. It appears that auxin has the ability to alter the efficiency of the ATP-driven proton transport.

  2. Search for a coupling of the proton spin to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek; Dudley, Jordan; Li, Yan; Patel, Dilan

    2016-05-01

    We present an overview of progress in our search for a long-range coupling between rubidium (Rb) nuclear spins and the mass of the Earth, which can be interpreted as a search for a long-range monopole-dipole interaction or a spin-gravity coupling. The experiment consists of simultaneous measurement of the spin precession frequencies of overlapping ensembles of Rb-85 and Rb-87 atoms contained within an evacuated, antirelaxation-coated vapor cell. Because of the nuclear structure of Rb-85 and Rb-87, the experiment is particularly sensitive to anomalous spin-dependent interactions of the proton. We have studied a number of important systematic effects related to vector and tensor light shifts, optical pumping effects, the ac and nonlinear Zeeman effects, and magnetic field gradients. We anticipate that our experiment can improve sensitivity to anomalous long-range spin-mass couplings of the proton compared to previous experiments by more than an order of magnitude. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1307507.

  3. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for couples at high risk of Down syndrome pregnancy owing to parental translocation or mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Conn, C.; Cozzi, J.; Harper, J.; Winston, R.; Delhanty, J.

    1999-01-01

    The population risk for trisomy 21 is 1 in 700 births but some couples are at a much higher risk owing to parental translocation or mosaicism. We report on the first attempt to carry out preimplantation genetic diagnosis for two such couples using cleavage stage embryo biopsy and dual colour FISH analysis. Each couple underwent two treatment cycles. Couple 1 (suspected gonadal mosaicism for trisomy 21) had two embryos normal for chromosome 21 transferred, but no pregnancy resulted; 64% (7/11) unfertilised oocytes/embryos showed chromosome 21 aneuploidy. Couple 2 (46,XX,t(6;21)(q13;q22.3)) had a single embryo transferred resulting in a biochemical pregnancy; 91% (10/11) oocytes/embryos showed chromosome 21 imbalance, most resulting from 3:1 segregation of this translocation at gametogenesis. The opportunity to test embryos before implantation enables the outcome of female meiosis to be studied for the first time and the recurrence risk for a Down syndrome pregnancy to be assessed.


Keywords: preimplantation genetic diagnosis; Down syndrome; reciprocal translocation; gonadal mosaicism PMID:9950365

  4. Resolving intermediates in biological proton-coupled electron transfer: a tyrosyl radical prior to proton movement.

    PubMed

    Faller, Peter; Goussias, Charilaos; Rutherford, A William; Un, Sun

    2003-07-22

    The coupling of proton chemistry with redox reactions is important in many enzymes and is central to energy transduction in biology. However, the mechanistic details are poorly understood. Here, we have studied tyrosine oxidation, a reaction in which the removal of one electron from the amino acid is linked to the release of its phenolic proton. Using the unique photochemical properties of photosystem II, it was possible to oxidize the tyrosine at 1.8 K, a temperature at which proton and protein motions are limited. The state formed was detected by high magnetic field EPR as a high-energy radical intermediate trapped in an unprecedentedly electropositive environment. Warming of the protein allows this state to convert to a relaxed, stable form of the radical. The relaxation event occurs at 77 K and seems to involve proton migration and only a very limited movement of the protein. These reactions represent a stabilization process that prevents the back-reaction and determines the reactivity of the radical. PMID:12855767

  5. Resolving intermediates in biological proton-coupled electron transfer: A tyrosyl radical prior to proton movement

    PubMed Central

    Faller, Peter; Goussias, Charilaos; Rutherford, A. William; Un, Sun

    2003-01-01

    The coupling of proton chemistry with redox reactions is important in many enzymes and is central to energy transduction in biology. However, the mechanistic details are poorly understood. Here, we have studied tyrosine oxidation, a reaction in which the removal of one electron from the amino acid is linked to the release of its phenolic proton. Using the unique photochemical properties of photosystem II, it was possible to oxidize the tyrosine at 1.8 K, a temperature at which proton and protein motions are limited. The state formed was detected by high magnetic field EPR as a high-energy radical intermediate trapped in an unprecedentedly electropositive environment. Warming of the protein allows this state to convert to a relaxed, stable form of the radical. The relaxation event occurs at 77 K and seems to involve proton migration and only a very limited movement of the protein. These reactions represent a stabilization process that prevents the back-reaction and determines the reactivity of the radical. PMID:12855767

  6. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria. Reply to a commentary.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Hendler, R W; Shrager, R I

    1985-11-18

    Costa, L.E., Reynafarje, B. and Lehninger, A.L. [(1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811] have reported 'second-generation' measurements of the H+/O ratio approaching 8.0 for vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria. In a Commentary in this Journal [Krab, K., Soos, J. and Wikström, M. (1984) FEBS Lett. 178, 187-192] it was concluded that the measurements of Costa et al. significantly overestimated the true H+/O stoichiometry. It is shown here that the mathematical simulation on which Krab et al. based this claim is faulty and that data reported by Costa et al. had already excluded the criticism advanced by Krab et al. Also reported are new data, obtained under conditions in which the arguments of Krab et al. are irrelevant, which confirm that the H+/O ratio for succinate oxidation extrapolated to level flow is close to 8. PMID:4065321

  7. On the Importance of Exchangeable NH Protons in Creatine for the Magnetic Coupling of Creatine Methyl Protons in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruiskamp, M. J.; Nicolay, K.

    2001-03-01

    The methyl protons of creatine in skeletal muscle exhibit a strong off-resonance magnetization transfer effect. The mechanism of this process is unknown. We previously hypothesized that the exchangeable amide/amino protons of creatine might be involved. To test this the characteristics of the creatine magnetization transfer effect were investigated in excised rat hindleg skeletal muscle that was equilibrated in either H2O or D2O solutions containing creatine. The efficiency of off-resonance magnetization transfer to the protons of mobile creatine in excised muscle was similar to that previously reported in intact muscle in vivo. Equilibrating the isolated muscle in D2O solution had no effect on the magnetic coupling to the immobile protons. It is concluded that exchangeable protons play a negligible role in the magnetic coupling of creatine methyl protons in muscle.

  8. Proton-coupled electron transfer with photoexcited metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Oliver S

    2013-07-16

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a crucial role in many enzymatic reactions and is relevant for a variety of processes including water oxidation, nitrogen fixation, and carbon dioxide reduction. Much of the research on PCET has focused on transfers between molecules in their electronic ground states, but increasingly researchers are investigating PCET between photoexcited reactants. This Account describes recent studies of excited-state PCET with d(6) metal complexes emphasizing work performed in my laboratory. Upon photoexcitation, some complexes release an electron and a proton to benzoquinone reaction partners. Others act as combined electron-proton acceptors in the presence of phenols. As a result, we can investigate photoinduced PCET involving electron and proton transfer in a given direction, a process that resembles hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT). In other studies, the photoexcited metal complexes merely serve as electron donors or electron acceptors because the proton donating and accepting sites are located on other parts of the molecular PCET ensemble. We and others have used this multisite design to explore so-called bidirectional PCET which occurs in many enzymes. A central question in all of these studies is whether concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) can compete kinetically with sequential electron and proton transfer steps. Short laser pulses can trigger excited-state PCET, making it possible to investigate rapid reactions. Luminescence spectroscopy is a convenient tool for monitoring PCET, but unambiguous identification of reaction products can require a combination of luminescence spectroscopy and transient absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, in some cases, distinguishing between PCET photoproducts and reaction products formed by simple photoinduced electron transfer (ET) (reactions that don't include proton transfer) is tricky. Some of the studies presented here deal directly with this important problem. In one case study we

  9. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  10. Proton-translocating nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase. Reconstitution of the extramembranous nucleotide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M; Hatefi, Y

    1995-11-24

    The nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase of bovine mitochondria is a homodimer of monomer M(r) = 109,065. The monomer is composed of three domains, an NH2-terminal 430-residue-long hydrophilic domain I that binds NAD(H), a central 400-residue-long hydrophobic domain II that is largely membrane intercalated and carries the enzyme's proton channel, and a COOH-terminal 200-residue-long hydrophilic domain III that binds NADP(H). Domains I and III protrude into the mitochondrial matrix, where they presumably come together to form the enzyme's catalytic site. The two-subunit transhydrogenase of Escherichia coli and the three-subunit transhydrogenase of Rhodospirillum rubrum have each the same overall tridomain hydropathy profile as the bovine enzyme. Domain I of the R. rubrum enzyme (the alpha 1 subunit) is water soluble and easily removed from the chromatophore membranes. We have isolated domain I of the bovine transhydrogenase after controlled trypsinolysis of the purified enzyme and have expressed in E. coli and purified therefrom domain III of this enzyme. This paper shows that an active bidomain transhydrogenase lacking domain II can be reconstituted by the combination of purified bovine domains I plus III or R. rubrum domain I plus bovine domain III. PMID:7499307

  11. Insights into Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer from Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provorse, Makenzie R.

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is utilized throughout Nature to facilitate essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and DNA replication and repair. The general approach to studying PCET processes is based on a two-dimensional More O'Ferrall-Jencks diagram in which electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) occur in a sequential or concerted fashion. Experimentally, it is difficult to discern the contributing factors of concerted PCET mechanisms. Several theoretical approaches have arisen to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate these reactions. Here, we present a multistate density functional theory (MSDFT) method to efficiently and accurately model PCET mechanisms. The MSDFT method is validated against experimental and computational data previously reported on an isoelectronic series of small molecule self-exchange hydrogen atom transfer reactions and a model complex specifically designed to study long-range ET through a hydrogen-bonded salt-bridge interface. Further application of this method to the hydrogen atom abstraction of ascorbate by a nitroxyl radical demonstrates the sensitivity of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties to solvent effects. In particular, the origin of the unusual kinetic isotope effect is investigated. Lastly, the MSDFT is employed in a combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach to explicitly model PCET in condensed phases.

  12. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-17

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency regimes for the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term does not significantly impact the rate constants derived using the cumulant expansion approach in any of the regimes studied. The effects of the quadratic term may become significant when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant, however, particularly at high temperatures and for proton transfer interfaces with extremely soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with extraordinarily weak hydrogen bonds. Even with the thermal averaging procedure, the effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances, and the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer in chemical and biological processes. We are grateful for support from National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (applications to enzymes) and the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  14. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  15. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-07-22

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa's for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as insights into linear correlations and non-innocent ligands, are also described. In addition, computational methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoexcited PCET are discussed. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. PMID:26110700

  16. Proton translocation stoichiometry of cytochrome oxidase: use of a fast-responding oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Alexandre, A; Davies, P; Lehninger, A L

    1982-12-01

    The mechanistic stoichiometry of vectorial H+ ejection coupled to electron transport from added ferrocytochrome c to oxygen by the cytochrome oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) of rat liver mitoplasts was determined from measurements of the initial rates of electron flow and H+ ejection in the presence of K+ (with valinomycin). Three different methods of measuring electron flow were used: (a) dual-wavelength spectrophotometry of ferrocytochrome c oxidation, (b) uptake of scalar H+ for the reduction of O2 in the presence of a protonophore, and (c) a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode. The reliability of the rate measurements was first established against the known stoichiometry of the scalar reaction of cytochrome oxidase (2ferrocytochrome c + 2H+ + 1/2O2 leads to 2ferricytochrome c + H2O) in the presence of excess protonophore. With all three methods the directly observed vectorial H+/O ejection ratios in the presence of K+ + valinomycin significantly exceeded 3.0. However, because the rate of backflow of the ejected H+ into the mitoplasts is very high and increases with the increasing delta pH generated across the membrane, there is a very rapid decline in the observed H+/O ratio from the beginning of the reaction. Kinetic analysis of ferrocytochrome c oxidation by the mitoplasts, carried out with a fast-responding membraneless oxygen electrode, showed the reaction to be first order in O2 and allowed accurate extrapolation of the rates of O2 uptake and H+ ejection to zero time. At this point, at which there is zero delta pH across the membrane, the H+/O ejection ratio of the cytochrome oxidase reaction, obtained from the rates at zero time, is close to 4.0. PMID:6296824

  17. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme’s central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  18. Two tyrosyl radicals stabilize high oxidation states in cytochrome c oxidase for efficient energy conservation and proton translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2012-02-01

    The reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO) was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to determine the properties of radical intermediates. Two distinct radicals with widths of 12 and 46 G are directly observed by X-band CW-EPR in the reaction of bCcO with H2O2 at pH 6 and pH 8. High-frequency EPR (D-band) provides assignments to tyrosine for both radicals based on well-resolved g-tensors. The 46 G wide radical has extensive hyperfine structure and can be fit with parameters consistent with Y129. However, the 12 G wide radical has minimal hyperfine structure and can be fit using parameters unique to the post-translationally modified Y244 in CcO. The results are supported by mixed quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. This study reports spectroscopic evidence of a radical formed on the modified tyrosine in CcO and resolves the much debated controversy of whether the wide radical seen at low pH in the bovine system is a tyrosine or tryptophan. A model is presented showing how radical formation and migration may play an essential role in proton translocation. This work was done in collaboration with Michelle A. Yu, Tsuyoshi Egawa, Syun-Ru Yeh and Gary J. Gerfen from Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Kyoko Shinzawa-Itoh and Shinya Yoshikawa from the University of Hyogo; and Victor Guallar from the Barcelona Supercomputing Center.

  19. Synthetic Applications of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Emily C; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-16

    Redox events in which an electron and proton are exchanged in a concerted elementary step are commonly referred to as proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs). PCETs are known to operate in numerous important biological redox processes, as well as recent inorganic technologies for small molecule activation. These studies suggest that PCET catalysis might also function as a general mode of substrate activation in organic synthesis. Over the past three years, our group has worked to advance this hypothesis and to demonstrate the synthetic utility of PCET through the development of novel catalytic radical chemistries. The central aim of these efforts has been to demonstrate the ability of PCET to homolytically activate a wide variety of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using known molecular H atom transfer catalysts. To do so, we made use of a simple formalism first introduced by Mayer and co-workers that allowed us to predict the thermodynamic capacity of any oxidant/base or reductant/acid pair to formally add or remove H· from a given substrate. With this insight, we were able to rationally select catalyst combinations thermodynamically competent to homolyze the extraordinarily strong E-H σ-bonds found in many common protic functional groups (BDFEs > 100 kcal/mol) or to form unusually weak bonds to hydrogen via the reductive action of common organic π-systems (BDFEs < 35 kcal/mol). These ideas were reduced to practice through the development of new catalyst systems for reductive PCET activations of ketones and oxidative PCET activation of amide N-H bonds to directly furnish reactive ketyl and amidyl radicals, respectively. In both systems, the reaction outcomes were found to be successfully predicted using the effective bond strength formalism, suggesting that these simple thermochemical considerations can provide useful and actionable insights into PCET reaction design. The ability of PCET catalysis to control

  20. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Moving Together and Charging Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-06-25

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is ubiquitous throughout chemistry and biology. This Perspective discusses recent advances and current challenges in the field of PCET, with an emphasis on the role of theory and computation. The fundamental theoretical concepts are summarized, and expressions for rate constants and kinetic isotope effects are provided. Computational methods for calculating reduction potentials and pKa’s for molecular electrocatalysts, as well as methods for simulating the nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced processes, are also described. Representative applications to PCET in solution, proteins, electrochemistry, and photoinduced processes are presented, highlighting the interplay between theoretical and experimental studies. The current challenges and suggested future directions are outlined for each type of application, concluding with an overall view to the future. The work described herein was supported by National Science Foundation Grant CHE-13-61293 (theory development), National Institutes of Health Grant GM056207 (soybean lipoxygenase), Center for Chemical Innovation of the National Science Foundation Solar Fuels Grant CHE-1305124 (cobalt catalysts), Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (nickel catalysts), and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Award No. FA9550-14-1-0295 (photoinduced PCET).

  1. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  2. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  3. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Mahesh Kumar; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M.; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D.; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-01-01

    Endonucleolytic double-strand DNA break production requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple dimeric endonucleases are available, there are many complex nuclease machines which are poorly understood in comparison. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide following convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are unexpectedly located upstream of the direction of translocation, inconsistent with simple nuclease domain-dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex where the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  4. Thermal coupling of protons and neutral hydrogen with anisotropic temperatures in the fast solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lorraine A.; Habbal, Shadia R.; Li, Xing

    2000-10-01

    The thermal coupling between the neutral hydrogen and protons in the inner corona is explored by extending the study of Allenet al. [1998] to include anisotropic proton temperature to determine what the neutral hydrogen Ly α spectral line measurements reveal about the proton temperature, temperature anisotropy, and outflow velocity in the fast solar wind. The anisotropic proton temperature is produced by ion cyclotron resonant interaction of protons with high-frequency waves, produced by a nonlinear cascade at the Kolmogorov dissipation rate from dominant lower-frequency Alfvén waves. As a result of the coupling between the respective parallel and perpendicular components of the neutral hydrogen and proton temperatures, a greater temperature anisotropy in the neutral hydrogen develops as compared to the case when the proton temperature is isotropic. The neutral hydrogen and proton effective temperatures (Teff), incorporating both random and wave motions of the particles, and outflow velocities, are comparable below ~3Rs. Neutral hydrogen anisotropy ratios, TH(eff)/T∥, ~4 below 3Rs are readily attained, in agreement with observations. Below ~3Rs, these reflect the proton anisotropy ratio. For plasma conditions typical of the fast solar wind, these results imply that the measured Ly α spectral line profiles, from which the neutral hydrogen temperature, anisotropy ratio, and outflow velocity are inferred, are equivalent to measurements of protons below ~3Rs. Beyond this distance the width of the measured Ly α spectral lines provides a lower limit to the proton effective temperature and temperature anisotropy in the inner corona.

  5. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases. PMID:27596355

  6. Alteration of interleaflet coupling due to compounds displaying rapid translocation in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The spatial coincidence of lipid domains at both layers of the cell membrane is expected to play an important role in many cellular functions. Competition between the surface interleaflet tension and a line hydrophobic mismatch penalty are conjectured to determine the transversal behavior of laterally heterogeneous lipid membranes. Here, by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, a continuum field theory and kinetic equations, I demonstrate that the presence of small, rapidly translocating molecules residing in the lipid bilayer may alter its transversal behavior by favoring the spatial coincidence of similar lipid phases. PMID:27596355

  7. First acceleration of a proton beam in a side coupled drift tube linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronsivalle, C.; Picardi, L.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Marracino, F.; Nenzi, P.; Snels, C.; Surrenti, V.; Vadrucci, M.; Ambrosini, F.

    2015-07-01

    We report the first experiment aimed at the demonstration of low-energy protons acceleration by a high-efficiency S-band RF linear accelerator. The proton beam has been accelerated from 7 to 11.6 MeV by a 1 meter long SCDTL (Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac) module powered with 1.3 MW. The experiment has been done in the framework of the Italian TOP-IMPLART (Oncological Therapy with Protons-Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Linear Accelerator for Radio-Therapy) project devoted to the realization of a proton therapy centre based on a proton linear accelerator for intensity modulated cancer treatments to be installed at IRE-IFO, the largest oncological hospital in Rome. It is the first proton therapy facility employing a full linear accelerator scheme based on high-frequency technology.

  8. Coupling effect on the proton optics from the electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we calculate the effect of the electron lense solenoids on the proton optics. Electron lenses (e-lenses) are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Electron lenses are to be used for head-on beam-beam compensation in the polarized proton (pp) runs to compensate the large tune spread generated by the head-on proton-proton beam-beam interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The main part of an electron lens is a superconducting solenoid with a longitudinal magnetic field up to 6 T. In this report, we will estimate the e-elenses effects on the {beta} and dispersion functions with 100 GeV and 250 GeV pp run lattices. Table 1 lists some lattice and beam parameters to be used in the following study.

  9. Transient characteristics for proton gating in laterally coupled indium-zinc-oxide transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Chao, Jin Yu

    2015-03-25

    The control and detection over processing, transport and delivery of chemical species is of great importance in sensors and biological systems. The transient characteristics of the migration of chemical species reflect the basic properties in the processings of chemical species. Here, we observed the field-configurable proton effects in a laterally coupled transistor gated by phosphorosilicate glass (PSG). The bias on the lateral gate would modulate the interplay between protons and electrons at the PSG/indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) channel interface. Due to the modulation of protons flux within the PSG films, the IZO channel current would be modified correspondingly. The characteristic time for the proton gating is estimated to be on the order of 20 ms. Such laterally coupled oxide based transistors with proton gating are promising for low-cost portable biosensors and neuromorphic system applications. PMID:25741771

  10. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening. PMID:25759509

  11. High-Affinity Proton Donors Promote Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer by Samarium Diiodide.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-05-10

    The relationship between proton-donor affinity for Sm(II) ions and the reduction of two substrates (anthracene and benzyl chloride) was examined. A combination of spectroscopic, thermochemical, and kinetic studies show that only those proton donors that coordinate or chelate strongly to Sm(II) promote anthracene reduction through a PCET process. These studies demonstrate that the combination of Sm(II) ions and water does not provide a unique reagent system for formal hydrogen atom transfer to substrates. PMID:27061351

  12. Visualizing the kinetic power stroke that drives proton-coupled Zn(II) transport

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Chai, Jin; Cheng, Jie; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Chance, Mark R.; Fu, Dax

    2014-01-01

    The proton gradient is a principal energy source for respiration-dependent active transport, but the structural mechanisms of proton-coupled transport processes are poorly understood. YiiP is a proton-coupled zinc transporter found in the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, and the transport-site of YiiP receives protons from water molecules that gain access to its hydrophobic environment and transduces the energy of an inward proton gradient to drive Zn(II) efflux1,2. This membrane protein is a well characterized member3-7 of the protein family of cation diffusion facilitators (CDFs) that occurs at all phylogenetic levels8-10. X-ray mediated hydroxyl radical labeling of YiiP and mass spectrometric analysis showed that Zn(II) binding triggered a highly localized, all-or-none change of water accessibility to the transport-site and an adjacent hydrophobic gate. Millisecond time-resolved dynamics revealed a concerted and reciprocal pattern of accessibility changes along a transmembrane helix, suggesting a rigid-body helical reorientation linked to Zn(II) binding that triggers the closing of the hydrophobic gate. The gated water access to the transport-site enables a stationary proton gradient to facilitate the conversion of zinc binding energy to the kinetic power stroke of a vectorial zinc transport. The kinetic details provide energetic insights into a proton-coupled active transport reaction. PMID:25043033

  13. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  14. Mechanism of proton-coupled quinone reduction in Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Keisuke; Rutherford, A. William; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Photosystem II uses light to drive water oxidation and plastoquinone (PQ) reduction. PQ reduction involves two PQ cofactors, QA and QB, working in series. QA is a one-electron carrier, whereas QB undergoes sequential reduction and protonation to form QBH2. QBH2 exchanges with PQ from the pool in the membrane. Based on the atomic coordinates of the Photosystem II crystal structure, we analyzed the proton transfer (PT) energetics adopting a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach. The potential-energy profile suggests that the initial PT to QB•– occurs from the protonated, D1-His252 to QB•– via D1-Ser264. The second PT is likely to occur from D1-His215 to QBH− via an H-bond with an energy profile with a single well, resulting in the formation of QBH2 and the D1-His215 anion. The pathway for reprotonation of D1-His215– may involve bicarbonate, D1-Tyr246 and water in the QB site. Formate ligation to Fe2+ did not significantly affect the protonation of reduced QB, suggesting that formate inhibits QBH2 release rather than its formation. The presence of carbonate rather than bicarbonate seems unlikely because the calculations showed that this greatly perturbed the potential of the nonheme iron, stabilizing the Fe3+ state in the presence of QB•–, a situation not encountered experimentally. H-bonding from D1-Tyr246 and D2-Tyr244 to the bicarbonate ligand of the nonheme iron contributes to the stability of the semiquinones. A detailed mechanistic model for QB reduction is presented. PMID:23277574

  15. Mechanism of proton-coupled quinone reduction in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keisuke; Rutherford, A William; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-15

    Photosystem II uses light to drive water oxidation and plastoquinone (PQ) reduction. PQ reduction involves two PQ cofactors, Q(A) and Q(B), working in series. Q(A) is a one-electron carrier, whereas Q(B) undergoes sequential reduction and protonation to form Q(B)H(2). Q(B)H(2) exchanges with PQ from the pool in the membrane. Based on the atomic coordinates of the Photosystem II crystal structure, we analyzed the proton transfer (PT) energetics adopting a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach. The potential-energy profile suggests that the initial PT to Q(B)(•-) occurs from the protonated, D1-His252 to Q(B)(•)(-) via D1-Ser264. The second PT is likely to occur from D1-His215 to Q(B)H(-) via an H-bond with an energy profile with a single well, resulting in the formation of Q(B)H(2) and the D1-His215 anion. The pathway for reprotonation of D1-His215(-) may involve bicarbonate, D1-Tyr246 and water in the Q(B) site. Formate ligation to Fe(2+) did not significantly affect the protonation of reduced Q(B), suggesting that formate inhibits Q(B)H(2) release rather than its formation. The presence of carbonate rather than bicarbonate seems unlikely because the calculations showed that this greatly perturbed the potential of the nonheme iron, stabilizing the Fe(3+) state in the presence of Q(B)(•-), a situation not encountered experimentally. H-bonding from D1-Tyr246 and D2-Tyr244 to the bicarbonate ligand of the nonheme iron contributes to the stability of the semiquinones. A detailed mechanistic model for Q(B) reduction is presented. PMID:23277574

  16. Spin asymmetries for elastic proton scattering and the spin-dependent couplings of the Pomeron

    SciTech Connect

    Trueman, T. L.

    2008-03-01

    This paper serves as a report on the large amount of analysis done in conjunction with the polarized proton program at the Relavitistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This comprises elastic scattering data of protons on protons in colliding beam or fixed target mode and proton beams on carbon targets. In addition to providing a model for the energy dependence of the analyzing power of elastic scattering needed for proton polarimetry, it also provides some significant information about the spin dependence of dominant Regge poles. Most notably, the data indicate that the Pomeron has a significant spin-flip coupling. This allows the exploration of the double-spin flip asymmetry A{sub NN} for which some data over a wide energy range are now available, along with a concrete realization of a proposed Odderon search.

  17. The roles of the alpha and gamma subunits in proton conduction through the Fo sector of the proton-translocating ATPase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pati, S; Brusilow, W S

    1989-02-15

    Previous genetic and biochemical studies have shown that the Fo sector of the Escherichia coli H+-ATPase is synthesized and assembled in a nonleaky form from plasmid-borne genes. The proton channel then appears to be opened by an interaction of F1 subunits, especially the alpha subunit, with the nonleaky Fo (Brusilow, W. S. A. (1987) J. Bacteriol. 169, 4984-4990; Solomon, K. A., and Brusilow, W. S. A. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 5402-5407). To study the role of the alpha and gamma subunits in proton conduction, we constructed an inducible alpha plasmid. In an alpha-gamma- background, the induction of alpha synthesis caused lethal proton leakiness, as assayed by the loss of respiration-dependent acridine orange fluorescence quenching of E. coli membranes. The presence of a gamma subunit counteracted the lethal effects as if gamma were blocking the opened channel. PMID:2536718

  18. The HRDC domain of E. coli RecQ helicase controls single-stranded DNA translocation and double-stranded DNA unwinding rates without affecting mechanoenzymatic coupling

    PubMed Central

    Harami, Gábor M.; Nagy, Nikolett T.; Martina, Máté; Neuman, Keir C.; Kovács, Mihály

    2015-01-01

    DNA-restructuring activities of RecQ-family helicases play key roles in genome maintenance. These activities, driven by two tandem RecA-like core domains, are thought to be controlled by accessory DNA-binding elements including the helicase-and-RnaseD-C-terminal (HRDC) domain. The HRDC domain of human Bloom’s syndrome (BLM) helicase was shown to interact with the RecA core, raising the possibility that it may affect the coupling between ATP hydrolysis, translocation along single-stranded (ss)DNA and/or unwinding of double-stranded (ds)DNA. Here, we determined how these activities are affected by the abolition of the ssDNA interaction of the HRDC domain or the deletion of the entire domain in E. coli RecQ helicase. Our data show that the HRDC domain suppresses the rate of DNA-activated ATPase activity in parallel with those of ssDNA translocation and dsDNA unwinding, regardless of the ssDNA binding capability of this domain. The HRDC domain does not affect either the processivity of ssDNA translocation or the tight coupling between the ATPase, translocation, and unwinding activities. Thus, the mechanochemical coupling of E. coli RecQ appears to be independent of HRDC-ssDNA and HRDC-RecA core interactions, which may play roles in more specialized functions of the enzyme. PMID:26067769

  19. Proton-coupled protein transport through the anthrax toxin channel

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Anthrax toxin consists of three proteins (approx. 90 kDa each): lethal factor (LF); oedema factor (OF); and protective antigen (PA). The former two are enzymes that act when they reach the cytosol of a targeted cell. To enter the cytosol, however, which they do after being endocytosed into an acidic vesicle compartment, they require the third component, PA. PA (or rather its proteolytically generated fragment PA63) forms at low pH a heptameric β-barrel channel, (PA63)7, through which LF and OF are transported—a phenomenon we have demonstrated in planar phospholipid bilayers. It might appear that (PA63)7 simply forms a large hole through which LF and OF diffuse. However, LF and OF are folded proteins, much too large to fit through the approximately 15 Å diameter (PA63)7 β-barrel. This paper discusses how the (PA63)7 channel both participates in the unfolding of LF and OF and functions in their translocation as a proton–protein symporter. PMID:18957378

  20. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Proton Dynamics on Goethite Nanoparticles and Coupling to Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Smith, Dayle M; Rosso, Kevin M

    2015-04-14

    The surface chemistry of metal oxide particles is governed by the charge that develops at the interface with aqueous solution. Mineral transformation, biogeochemical reactions, remediation, and sorption dynamics are profoundly affected in response. Here we report implementation of replica-exchange constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations that use classical molecular dynamics for exploring configurational space and Metropolis Monte Carlo walking through protonation space with a simulated annealing escape route from metastable configurations. By examining the archetypal metal oxide, goethite (α-FeOOH), we find that electrostatic potential gradients spontaneously arise between intersecting low-index crystal faces and across explicitly treated oxide nanoparticles at a magnitude exceeding the Johnson-Nyquist voltage fluctuation. Fluctuations in adsorbed proton density continuously repolarize the surface potential bias between edge-sharing crystal faces, at a rate slower than the reported electron-polaron hopping rate in goethite interiors. This suggests that these spontaneous surface potential fluctuations will control the net movement of charge carriers in the lattice. PMID:26574382

  2. Studies of Zinc Oxide Nanocrystals: Quantification of Capping Ligands and the Coupling of Protons and Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Carolyn N.

    The energetics of semiconductors are widely relevant to technologies ranging from chemical- and photo-catalysis to charge injection in photovoltaic materials. In these processes involving electron transfer, protons often play a critical but overlooked role in facilitating charge transfer. For example, the conduction band energies of most metal oxides in contact with an aqueous solution demonstrate a Nernstian pH dependence, an observation that cannot be explained by surface protonation models. Given that a Nernstian dependence is typically attributed to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET), we are interested in determining if the reduction of metal oxides can also be described by PCET. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) were chosen as a model system given the broad range of previous research on bulk and nanocrystalline forms of ZnO, the relative ease of synthesis and characterization, and their use in developing a fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer. We demonstrate that photochemically reduced NCs react with hydrogen-atom acceptors, indicating that both electrons and protons are transferred by the NCs. To isolate the influence of a proton coupled to the extra electron in the conduction band, the NCs have also been reduced chemically. Addition of an excess of the one-electron reductant CoCp*2 (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, -1.94 V vs. Fc/Fc+) gives NCs that contain extra electrons in the conduction band, without protons that arise from photoreduction. Protons can also be individually added stoichiometrically to the NCs by either a photoreduction/oxidation sequence or by addition of acid. Using these methods, we have shown that the presence of one extra proton drastically alters the redox potential of the NCs. With the addition of acid the NC orbitals are lowered, allowing the systematic variation of driving force for electron transfer from the reductant to the NCs. In the presence of excess reductant and acid, the number of electrons

  3. Actions of translocator protein ligands on neutrophil adhesion and motility induced by G-protein coupled receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Camila Bento; Tamura, Eduardo K; Montero-Melendez, Trindad; Palermo-Neto, João; Perretti, Mauro; Markus, Regina P; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2012-01-13

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), mediates the transportation of cholesterol and anions from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane in different cells types. Although recent evidences indicate a potential role for TSPO in the development of inflammatory processes, the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. The present study investigated the ability of the specific TSPO ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK11195 and benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, on neutrophil recruitment promoted by the N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide (fMLP), an agonist of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). Pre-treatment with Ro5-4864 abrograted fMLP-induced leukocyte-endothelial interactions in mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo. Moreover, in vitro Ro5-4864 treatment prevented fMLP-induced: (i) L-selectin shedding and overexpression of PECAM-1 on the neutrophil cell surface; (ii) neutrophil chemotaxis and (iii) enhancement of intracellular calcium cations (iCa(+2)). Intriguingly, the two latter effects were augmented by cell treatment with PK11195. An allosteric agonist/antagonist relation may be suggested, as the effects of Ro5-4864 on fMLP-stimulated neutrophils were reverted by simultaneous treatment with PK11195. Taken together, these data highlight TSPO as a modulator of pathways of neutrophil adhesion and locomotion induced by GPCR, connecting TSPO actions and the onset of an innate inflammatory response. PMID:22209795

  4. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J.; Tronic, Tristan A.; Mayer, James M.

    2010-12-08

    Many, if not most, redox reactions are coupled to proton transfers. This includes most common sources of chemical potential energy, from the bioenergetic processes that power cells to the fossil fuel combustion that powers cars. These proton-coupled electron transfer or PCET processes may involve multiple electrons and multiple protons, as in the 4 e–, 4 H+ reduction of dioxygen (O2) to water (eq 1), or can involve one electron and one proton such as the formation of tyrosyl radicals from tyrosine residues (TyrOH) in enzymatic catalytic cycles (eq 2). In addition, many multi-electron, multi-proton processes proceed in one-electron and one-proton steps. Organic reactions that proceed in one-electron steps involve radical intermediates, which play critical roles in a wide range of chemical, biological, and industrial processes. This broad and diverse class of PCET reactions are central to a great many chemical and biochemical processes, from biological catalysis and energy transduction, to bulk industrial chemical processes, to new approaches to solar energy conversion. PCET is therefore of broad and increasing interest, as illustrated by this issue and a number of other recent reviews.

  5. Nickel phlorin intermediate formed by proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen evolution mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Brian H.; Maher, Andrew G.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The development of more effective energy conversion processes is critical for global energy sustainability. The design of molecular electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction is an important component of these efforts. Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer, play an important role in these processes and can be enhanced by incorporating proton relays into the molecular electrocatalysts. Herein nickel porphyrin electrocatalysts with and without an internal proton relay are investigated to elucidate the hydrogen evolution mechanisms and thereby enable the design of more effective catalysts. Density functional theory calculations indicate that electrochemical reduction leads to dearomatization of the porphyrin conjugated system, thereby favoring protonation at the meso carbon of the porphyrin ring to produce a phlorin intermediate. A key step in the proposed mechanisms is a thermodynamically favorable PCET reaction composed of intramolecular electron transfer from the nickel to the porphyrin and proton transfer from a carboxylic acid hanging group or an external acid to the meso carbon of the porphyrin. The C–H bond of the active phlorin acts similarly to the more traditional metal-hydride by reacting with acid to produce H2. Support for the theoretically predicted mechanism is provided by the agreement between simulated and experimental cyclic voltammograms in weak and strong acid and by the detection of a phlorin intermediate through spectroelectrochemical measurements. These results suggest that phlorin species have the potential to perform unique chemistry that could prove useful in designing more effective electrocatalysts. PMID:26655344

  6. Probing Nonadiabaticity in the Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reaction Catalyzed by Soybean Lipoxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. PCET rate constant expressions are available for various well-defined regimes, and determining which expression is appropriate for a given system is essential for reliable modeling. Quantitative diagnostics have been devised to characterize the vibronic nonadiabaticity between the electron–proton quantum subsystem and the classical nuclei, as well as the electron–proton nonadiabaticity between the electrons and proton(s) within the quantum subsystem. Herein these diagnostics are applied to a model of the active site of the enzyme soybean lipoxygenase, which catalyzes a PCET reaction that exhibits unusually high deuterium kinetic isotope effects at room temperature. Both semiclassical and electronic charge density diagnostics illustrate vibronic and electron–proton nonadiabaticity for this PCET reaction, supporting the use of the Golden rule nonadiabatic rate constant expression with a specific form of the vibronic coupling. This type of characterization will be useful for theoretical modeling of a broad range of PCET processes. PMID:25258676

  7. Transverse Mode-Coupling Instability in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métral, E.; Arduini, G.; Benedetto, E.; Burkhardt, H.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Rumolo, G.

    2005-06-01

    A vertical single-bunch instability has been observed in 2003 right after injection at 26 GeV/c in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). High-intensity proton bunches (˜1.2 1011 p/b) with low longitudinal emittance (˜0.2 eVs) are affected by heavy losses after less than one synchrotron period. Such phenomenon has already been observed with leptons in many machines, e.g. in the SPS, or with protons at transition, e.g. in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). However, to the authors' knowledge, it is the first time with protons far from transition. The absence of transverse mode-coupling instability in hadron machines is generally explained by three mechanisms: (i) the intensity threshold for the longitudinal microwave instability is generally lower than for the transverse mode-coupling instability, (ii) the intensity threshold due to mode-coupling between the two lowest azimuthal modes increases with space charge, and (iii) the intensity threshold increases with bunch length (in the long-bunch regime). In this talk measurements performed in the SPS are compared to analytical and simulation predictions.

  8. Modulation of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer through Molybdenum-Quinonoid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Justin T; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-06-01

    An expanded series of π-bound molybdenum-quinonoid complexes supported by pendant phosphines has been synthesized. These compounds formally span three protonation-oxidation states of the quinonoid fragment (catechol, semiquinone, quinone) and two different oxidation states of the metal (Mo(0), Mo(II)), notably demonstrating a total of two protons and four electrons accessible in the system. Previously, the reduced Mo(0)-catechol complex 1 and its reaction with dioxygen to yield the two-proton/two-electron oxidized Mo(0)-quinone compound 4 was explored, while, herein, the expansion of the series to include the two-electron oxidized Mo(II)-catechol complex 2, the one-proton/two-electron oxidized Mo-semiquinone complex 3, and the two-proton/four-electron oxidized Mo(II)-quinone complexes 5 and 6 is reported. Transfer of multiple equivalents of protons and electrons from the Mo(0) and Mo(II) catechol complexes, 1 and 2, to H atom acceptor TEMPO suggests the presence of weak O-H bonds. Although thermochemical analyses are hindered by the irreversibility of the electrochemistry of the present compounds, the reactivity observed suggests weaker O-H bonds compared to the free catechol, indicating that proton-coupled electron transfer can be facilitated significantly by the π-bound metal center. PMID:27227812

  9. Thermochemistry of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reagents and its Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey J; Tronic, Tristan A; Mayer, James M

    2010-01-01

    The primary goals of this review are (1) to assemble thermochemical data—reduction potentials, pK{sub a} values, and bond dissociation free energies and enthalpies—from disparate sources and (2) to illustrate the utility of these data in understanding proton-coupled redox chemistry. We hope to have illustrated the value and power of thermochemical cycles (“square schemes”).

  10. Determination of the stoichiometry of redox-linked proton translocation from the kinetics of pulse experiments. A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Krab, K; Wikström, M

    1986-06-01

    We have previously published a simple kinetic model to analyse possible pitfalls in kinetic measurements of H+/O ratios in mitochondria [(1984) FEBS Lett. 178, 187-192]. While this model demonstrated how relative electrode response times may affect the results, it did not adequately describe the kinetics of proton back-diffusion across the membrane. Here this model is further developed and improved, and shown to give a good quantitative description of both oxygen-pulse type experiments as well as of experiments where the reaction is started by photolysis of the cytochrome c oxidase-CO complex. Simulations based on this model reveal that the extrapolation procedure used by Lehninger et al. [e.g. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811] to estimate the H+/O ratio will tend to yield overestimated values. This is mainly due to the back-diffusion of protons into the mitochondria, which is not correctly accounted for by this extrapolation. PMID:3011510

  11. United Atom Rotational Coupling in Proton + Helium Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiiling

    United-atom 2p(sigma)-2p(pi) rotational coupling in asymmetric collisions is influenced by an avoided crossing between the 2p(sigma) and 2s(sigma) orbitals. This influence is studied using the HeH('+) system as a prototype. In (SIGMA)(,2)-(SIGMA)(,3)-(pi)(,1) three-state calculations, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved numerically. Substantial population of the 2s(sigma) state is found, which disagrees with the estimates based on the Landau-Zener model. The (SIGMA)(,3) level is populated directly by transitions near the avoided crossing at b = 0.4 au and indirectly by (SIGMA)(,2)-(pi)(,1)-(SIGMA)(,3) rotational coupling for b > 0.4 au. The ratios of P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b)/ P(,(SIGMA)(,3))(b) + P(,(pi)(,1))(b) are calculated and compared with Dr. R. Hippler's experimental data. A six-state calculation, in the basis of (SIGMA)(,1), (SIGMA)(,2), (SIGMA)(,3), (SIGMA)(,4), (pi)(,1) and (pi)(,2) molecular states, is also made. Cross sections and alignment and orientation parameters have been computed from the transition amplitudes for various energies.

  12. Relativistic force field: parametric computations of proton-proton coupling constants in (1)H NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2014-09-01

    Spin-spin coupling constants in (1)H NMR carry a wealth of structural information and offer a powerful tool for deciphering molecular structures. However, accurate ab initio or DFT calculations of spin-spin coupling constants have been very challenging and expensive. Scaling of (easy) Fermi contacts, fc, especially in the context of recent findings by Bally and Rablen (Bally, T.; Rablen, P. R. J. Org. Chem. 2011, 76, 4818), offers a framework for achieving practical evaluation of spin-spin coupling constants. We report a faster and more precise parametrization approach utilizing a new basis set for hydrogen atoms optimized in conjunction with (i) inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries, (ii) inexpensive 4-31G basis set for carbon atoms in fc calculations, and (iii) individual parametrization for different atom types/hybridizations, not unlike a force field in molecular mechanics, but designed for the fc's. With the training set of 608 experimental constants we achieved rmsd <0.19 Hz. The methodology performs very well as we illustrate with a set of complex organic natural products, including strychnine (rmsd 0.19 Hz), morphine (rmsd 0.24 Hz), etc. This precision is achieved with much shorter computational times: accurate spin-spin coupling constants for the two conformers of strychnine were computed in parallel on two 16-core nodes of a Linux cluster within 10 min. PMID:25158224

  13. Hypothesis on Skeletal Muscle Aging: Mitochondrial Adenine Nucleotide Translocator Decreases Reactive Oxygen Species Production While Preserving Coupling Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Diolez, Philippe; Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Calmettes, Guillaume; Pasdois, Philippe; Detaille, Dominique; Rouland, Richard; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production—but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius) of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling) or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating—in vivo—conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand), coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies. PMID:26733871

  14. Insights into proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms of electrocatalytic H2 oxidation and production

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura E.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The design of molecular electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and production is important for the development of alternative renewable energy sources that are abundant, inexpensive, and environmentally benign. Recently, nickel-based molecular electrocatalysts with pendant amines that act as proton relays for the nickel center were shown to effectively catalyze H2 oxidation and production. We developed a quantum mechanical approach for studying proton-coupled electron transfer processes in these types of molecular electrocatalysts. This theoretical approach is applied to a nickel-based catalyst in which phosphorous atoms are directly bonded to the nickel center, and nitrogen atoms of the ligand rings act as proton relays. The catalytic step of interest involves electron transfer between the nickel complex and the electrode as well as intramolecular proton transfer between the nickel and nitrogen atoms. This process can occur sequentially, with either the electron or proton transferring first, or concertedly, with the electron and proton transferring simultaneously without a stable intermediate. The electrochemical rate constants are calculated as functions of overpotential for the concerted electron-proton transfer reaction and the two electron transfer reactions in the sequential mechanisms. Our calculations illustrate that the concerted electron-proton transfer standard rate constant will increase as the equilibrium distance between the nickel and nitrogen atoms decreases and as the pendant amines become more flexible to facilitate the contraction of this distance with a lower energy penalty. This approach identifies the favored mechanisms under various experimental conditions and provides insight into the impact of substituents on the nitrogen and phosphorous atoms. PMID:22529352

  15. EPR Studies of V-ATPase with Spin-Labeled Inhibitors DCC and Archazolid: Interaction Dynamics with Proton Translocating Subunit c.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Jan Philipp; Bockelmann, Svenja; Mayer, Kerstin; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Wieczorek, Helmut; Huss, Markus; Klare, Johann P; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-17

    Vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPases (V-ATPases) have gained recent attention as highly promising anticancer drug targets, and therefore detailed structural analyses and studies of inhibitor interactions are very important research objectives. Spin labeling of the V-ATPase holoenzyme from the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and V-ATPase in isolated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) vacuoles was accomplished by two novel methods involving the covalent binding of a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) derivative of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) to the essential glutamate residue in the active site and the noncovalent interaction of a radical analogue of the highly potent inhibitor archazolid, a natural product from myxobacteria. Both complexes were evaluated in detail by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic studies and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements, revealing insight into the inhibitor binding mode, dynamics, and stoichiometry as well as into the structure of the central functional subunit c of these medicinally important hetero-multimeric proton-translocating proteins. This study also demonstrates the usefulness of natural product derived spin labels as tools in medicinal chemistry. PMID:26662886

  16. FT-IR spectroscopic characterization of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli: oxidation of FeS cluster N2 is coupled with the protonation of an aspartate or glutamate side chain.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, P; Scheide, D; Bungert, S; Mäntele, W; Friedrich, T

    2000-09-01

    The proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, also called complex I, is the first energy-transducing complex of many respiratory chains. It couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. One FMN and up to nine iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters participate in the redox reaction. So far, complex I has been described mainly by means of EPR- and UV-vis spectroscopy. Here, we report for the first time an infrared spectroscopic characterization of complex I. Electrochemically induced FT-IR difference spectra of complex I from Escherichia coli and of the NADH dehydrogenase fragment of this complex were obtained for critical potential steps. The spectral contributions of the FMN in both preparations were derived from a comparison using model compounds and turned out to be unexpectedly small. Furthermore, the FT-IR difference spectra reveal that the redox transitions of the FMN and of the FeS clusters induce strong reorganizations of the polypeptide backbone. Additional signals in the spectra of complex I reflect contributions induced by the redox transition of the high-potential FeS cluster N2 which is not present in the NADH dehydrogenase fragment. Part of these signals are attributed to the reorganization of protonated/deprotonated Asp or Glu side chains. On the basis of these data we discuss the role of N2 for proton translocation of complex I. PMID:10978175

  17. Surface Proton Hopping and Coupling Pathway of Water Oxidation on Cobalt Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Frei, Heinz; Wang, Lin-Wang

    We propose an oxidation pathway of water splitting on cobalt oxide surface with clear thermodynamic and kinetic details. The density-functional theory studies suggest that the coupled proton-electron transfer is not necessarily sequential and implicit in every elementary step of this mechanistic cycle. Instead, the initial O-O bond could be formed by the landing of water molecule on the surface oxos, which is then followed by the dispatch of protons through the hopping manner and subsequent release of di-oxygen. Our theoretical investigations of intermediates and transition states indicate that all chemical conversions in this pathway, including the proton transfers, are possible with low activation barriers, in addition to their favorable thermodynamics. Our hypothesis is supported by recent experimental observations of surface superoxide that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding to adjacent hydroxyl group, as an intermediate on fast-kinetics catalytic site.

  18. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation with a Hydrogen-Bonded Proton Acceptor by Bidirectional Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Pizano, Arturo A.; Yang, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acid radical generation and transport are fundamentally important to numerous essential biological processes to which small molecule models lend valuable mechanistic insights. Pyridyl-amino acid-methyl esters are appended to a rhenium(I) tricarbonyl 1,10-phenanthroline core to yield rhenium–amino acid complexes with tyrosine ([Re]–Y–OH) and phenylalanine ([Re]–F). The emission from the [Re] center is more significantly quenched for [Re]–Y–OH upon addition of base. Time-resolved studies establish that excited-state quenching occurs by a combination of static and dynamic mechanisms. The degree of quenching depends on the strength of the base, consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) quenching mechanism. Comparative studies of [Re]–Y–OH and [Re]–F enable a detailed mechanistic analysis of a bidirectional PCET process. PMID:23495362

  19. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II. PMID:27063577

  20. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions. PMID:27232936

  1. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  2. ATP-dependent substrate transport by the ABC transporter MsbA is proton-coupled

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himansha; Velamakanni, Saroj; Deery, Michael J.; Howard, Julie; Wei, Shen L.; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporters mediate the transbilayer movement of a vast number of substrates in or out of cells in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Current alternating access models for ABC exporters including the multidrug and Lipid A transporter MsbA from Escherichia coli suggest a role for nucleotide as the fundamental source of free energy. These models involve cycling between conformations with inward- and outward-facing substrate-binding sites in response to engagement and hydrolysis of ATP at the nucleotide-binding domains. Here we report that MsbA also utilizes another major energy currency in the cell by coupling substrate transport to a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. The dependence of ATP-dependent transport on proton coupling, and the stimulation of MsbA-ATPase by the chemical proton gradient highlight the functional integration of both forms of metabolic energy. These findings introduce ion coupling as a new parameter in the mechanism of this homodimeric ABC transporter. PMID:27499013

  3. Analysis of kinetic isotope effects for proton-coupled electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sarah J; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-03-12

    A series of rate constant expressions for nonadiabatic proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions are analyzed and compared. The approximations underlying each expression are enumerated, and the regimes of validity for each expression are illustrated by calculations on model systems. In addition, the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for a series of model PCET reactions are analyzed to elucidate the fundamental physical principles dictating the magnitude of the KIE and the dependence of the KIE on the physical properties of the system, including temperature, reorganization energy, driving force, equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance, and effective frequency of the proton donor-acceptor mode. These calculations lead to three physical insights that are directly relevant to experimental data. First, these calculations provide an explanation for a decrease in the KIE as the proton donor-acceptor distance increases, even though typically the KIE will increase with increasing equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance if all other parameters remain fixed. Often the proton donor-acceptor frequency decreases as the proton donor-acceptor distance increases, and these two effects impact the KIE in opposite directions, so either trend could be observed. Second, these calculations provide an explanation for an increase in the KIE as the temperature increases, even though typically the KIE will decrease with increasing temperature if all other parameters remain fixed. The combination of a rigid hydrogen bond, which corresponds to a high proton donor-acceptor frequency, and low solvent polarity, which corresponds to small solvent reorganization energy, allows the KIE to either increase or decrease with temperature, depending on the other properties of the system. Third, these calculations provide insight into the dependence of the rate constant and KIE on the driving force, which has been studied experimentally for a wide range of PCET systems. The rate constant

  4. Proton Quantization and Vibrational Relaxation in Nonadiabatic Dynamics of Photoinduced Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Solvated Phenol-Amine Complex.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-03-10

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in a phenol-amine complex in solution were performed. The electronic potential energy surfaces were generated on-the-fly with a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach that described the solute with a multiconfigurational method in a bath of explicit solvent molecules. The transferring hydrogen nucleus was represented as a quantum mechanical wave function calculated with grid-based methods, and surface hopping trajectories were propagated on the adiabatic electron-proton vibronic surfaces. Following photoexcitation to the excited S1 electronic state, the overall decay to the ground vibronic state was found to be comprised of relatively fast decay from a lower proton vibrational state of S1 to a highly excited proton vibrational state of the ground S0 electronic state, followed by vibrational relaxation within the S0 state. Proton transfer can occur either on the highly excited proton vibrational states of S0 due to small environmental fluctuations that shift the delocalized vibrational wave functions or on the low-energy proton vibrational states of S1 due to solvent reorganization that alters the asymmetry of the proton potential and reduces the proton transfer barrier. The isotope effect arising from replacing the transferring hydrogen with deuterium is predicted to be negligible because hydrogen and deuterium behave similarly in both types of proton transfer processes. Although an isotope effect could be observed for other systems, in general the absence of an isotope effect does not imply the absence of proton transfer in photoinduced PCET systems. This computational approach is applicable to a wide range of other photoinduced PCET processes. PMID:26812149

  5. The possible role of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in water oxidation by photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas J; Huynh, My Hang V; Thorp, H Holden

    2007-01-01

    All higher life forms use oxygen and respiration as their primary energy source. The oxygen comes from water by solar-energy conversion in photosynthetic membranes. In green plants, light absorption in photosystem II (PSII) drives electron-transfer activation of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The mechanism of water oxidation by the OEC has long been a subject of great interest to biologists and chemists. With the availability of new molecular-level protein structures from X-ray crystallography and EXAFS, as well as the accumulated results from numerous experiments and theoretical studies, it is possible to suggest how water may be oxidized at the OEC. An integrated sequence of light-driven reactions that exploit coupled electron-proton transfer (EPT) could be the key to water oxidation. When these reactions are combined with long-range proton transfer (by sequential local proton transfers), it may be possible to view the OEC as an intricate structure that is "wired for protons". PMID:17604381

  6. G2A is a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor antagonized by lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoka; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Takao

    2004-10-01

    G2A (from G2 accumulation) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that regulates the cell cycle, proliferation, oncogenesis, and immunity. G2A shares significant homology with three GPCRs including ovarian cancer GPCR (OGR1/GPR68), GPR4, and T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8). Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) were reported as ligands for G2A and GPR4 and for OGR1 (SPC only), and a glycosphingolipid psychosine was reported as ligand for TDAG8. As OGR1 and GPR4 were reported as proton-sensing GPCRs (Ludwig, M. G., Vanek, M., Guerini, D., Gasser, J. A., Jones, C. E., Junker, U., Hofstetter, H., Wolf, R. M., and Seuwen, K. (2003) Nature 425, 93-98), we evaluated the proton-sensing function of G2A. Transient expression of G2A caused significant activation of the zif 268 promoter and inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation at pH 7.6, and lowering extracellular pH augmented the activation only in G2A-expressing cells. LPC inhibited the pH-dependent activation of G2A in a dose-dependent manner in these assays. Thus, G2A is another proton-sensing GPCR, and LPC functions as an antagonist, not as an agonist, and regulates the proton-dependent activation of G2A. PMID:15280385

  7. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme–substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  8. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(II) pyridylimidazole complex.

    PubMed

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-28

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  9. Redox-coupled proton transfer mechanism in nitrite reductase revealed by femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Tse, Ka Man; Nakane, Takanori; Nakatsu, Toru; Suzuki, Mamoru; Sugahara, Michihiro; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yumoto, Fumiaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Nango, Eriko; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Song, Changyong; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Murphy, Michael E P; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, So; Mizohata, Eiichi

    2016-03-15

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), a ubiquitous phenomenon in biological systems, plays an essential role in copper nitrite reductase (CuNiR), the key metalloenzyme in microbial denitrification of the global nitrogen cycle. Analyses of the nitrite reduction mechanism in CuNiR with conventional synchrotron radiation crystallography (SRX) have been faced with difficulties, because X-ray photoreduction changes the native structures of metal centers and the enzyme-substrate complex. Using serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), we determined the intact structures of CuNiR in the resting state and the nitrite complex (NC) state at 2.03- and 1.60-Å resolution, respectively. Furthermore, the SRX NC structure representing a transient state in the catalytic cycle was determined at 1.30-Å resolution. Comparison between SRX and SFX structures revealed that photoreduction changes the coordination manner of the substrate and that catalytically important His255 can switch hydrogen bond partners between the backbone carbonyl oxygen of nearby Glu279 and the side-chain hydroxyl group of Thr280. These findings, which SRX has failed to uncover, propose a redox-coupled proton switch for PCET. This concept can explain how proton transfer to the substrate is involved in intramolecular electron transfer and why substrate binding accelerates PCET. Our study demonstrates the potential of SFX as a powerful tool to study redox processes in metalloenzymes. PMID:26929369

  10. Coupling of electron and proton transport in photosynthetic membranes: molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kukushkin, A; Poltev, S; Khuznetsova, S

    2002-05-15

    Using the method of Modified Neglect of Diatomic Overlap (MNDO), the electronic structure of plastoquinol (PQH(2)) and plastoquinone (PQ) in neutral, singly (PQ(-)) and doubly (PQ(2-)) reduced states is studied. The conformational analysis performed on these molecules shows that in the lowest energy conformation, the angle between the first link of the tail backbone and the ring plane of neutral and singly reduced PQ and plastoquinol is nearly the same and differs by 15 degrees from that of doubly reduced PQ. Nevertheless, for all states of plastoquinone and for plastoquinol, the total energy changes by less than 0.2 eV when the studied angle is varied from 0 degrees to 180 degrees. As in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the oxygen of the PQ ring is reported to form a hydrogen bond with a nitrogen in the ring of Histidine (His) L 190. The energy of the PQ-His complex was calculated for different redox states of PQ and for several values of the distance between the molecules (N-O distance from 0.2 to 0.5 nm). For every considered complexes, the total energy dependence on the proton position on the line connecting the N and O atoms was determined, to see if the hydrogen bond is formed. It is shown that for only singly reduced PQ this dependence has a symmetric two-well form, i.e. the hydrogen bond is formed. For neutral and doubly reduced PQ, the curve is also two-well but asymmetric, so that the proton is bound to His or to PQ, correspondingly. On the basis of these results, we propose the following scheme of electron-proton coupling. Negatively charged oxygens of PQ form H-bonds with proton donor groups of the surrounding protein and fix PQ in its pocket. While the negative charges of oxygens increase after quinone reduction, protons shift to PQ oxygens and form strong hydrogen bonds with them. Upon second PQ reduction, protons are torn away from surrounding amino acids and form covalent bonds with the quinol. Resulting PQH(2) detaches from its binding place and is

  11. Local conformational fluctuations can modulate the coupling between proton binding and global structural transitions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Steven T.; García-Moreno E., Bertrand; Hilser, Vincent J.

    2005-01-01

    Local conformational fluctuations in proteins can affect the coupling between ligand binding and global structural transitions. This finding was established by monitoring quantitatively how the population distribution in the ensemble of microstates of staphylococcal nuclease was affected by proton binding. Analysis of acid unfolding and proton-binding data with an ensemble-based model suggests that local fluctuations: (i) can be effective modulators of ligand-binding affinities, (ii) are important determinants of the cooperativity of ligand-driven global structural transitions, and (iii) are well represented thermodynamically as local unfolding processes. These studies illustrate how an ensemble-based description of proteins can be used to describe quantitatively the interdependence of local conformational fluctuations, ligand-binding processes, and global structural transitions. This level of understanding of the relationship between conformation, energy, and dynamics is required for a detailed mechanistic understanding of allostery, cooperativity, and other complex functional and regulatory properties of macromolecules. PMID:15767576

  12. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Organic Synthesis: Fundamentals, Applications, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Miller, David C; Tarantino, Kyle T; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) are unconventional redox processes in which both protons and electrons are exchanged, often in a concerted elementary step. While PCET is now recognized to play a central a role in biological redox catalysis and inorganic energy conversion technologies, its applications in organic synthesis are only beginning to be explored. In this chapter, we aim to highlight the origins, development, and evolution of the PCET processes most relevant to applications in organic synthesis. Particular emphasis is given to the ability of PCET to serve as a non-classical mechanism for homolytic bond activation that is complimentary to more traditional hydrogen atom transfer processes, enabling the direct generation of valuable organic radical intermediates directly from their native functional group precursors under comparatively mild catalytic conditions. The synthetically advantageous features of PCET reactivity are described in detail, along with examples from the literature describing the PCET activation of common organic functional groups. PMID:27573270

  14. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna; Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Peptide transport in living organisms is facilitated by either primary transport, hydrolysis of ATP, or secondary transport, cotransport of protons. In this study, we focused on investigating the ligand specificity of the Neisseria meningitidis proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (NmPOT). It has been shown that the gene encoding this transporter is upregulated during infection. NmPOT conformed to the typical chain length preference as observed in prototypical transporters of this family. In contrast to prototypical transporters, it was unable to accommodate a positively charged peptide residue at the C-terminus position of the substrate peptide. Sequence analysis of the active site of NmPOT displayed a distinctive aromatic patch, which has not been observed in any other transporters from this family. This aromatic patch may be involved in providing NmPOT with its atypical preferences. This study provides important novel information towards understanding how these transporters recognize their substrates. PMID:27438044

  15. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer across multiple regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-04-01

    The coupled transfer of electrons and protons is a central feature of biological and molecular catalysis, yet fundamental aspects of these reactions remain poorly understood. In this study, we extend the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method to enable direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions across a wide range of physically relevant regimes. In a system-bath model for symmetric, co-linear PCET in the condensed phase, RPMD trajectories reveal distinct kinetic pathways associated with sequential and concerted PCET reaction mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that concerted PCET proceeds by a solvent-gating mechanism in which the reorganization energy is mitigated by charge cancellation among the transferring particles. We further employ RPMD to study the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across multiple coupling regimes, including the fully non-adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally non-adiabatic), partially adiabatic (electronically adiabatic, but vibrationally non-adiabatic), and fully adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally adiabatic) limits. Comparison of RPMD with the results of PCET rate theories demonstrates the applicability of the direct simulation method over a broad range of conditions; it is particularly notable that RPMD accurately predicts the crossover in the thermal reaction rates between different coupling regimes while avoiding a priori assumptions about the PCET reaction mechanism. Finally, by utilizing the connections between RPMD rate theory and semiclassical instanton theory, we show that analysis of ring-polymer configurations in the RPMD transition path ensemble enables the a posteriori determination of the coupling regime for the PCET reaction. This analysis reveals an intriguing and distinct "transient-proton-bridge" mechanism for concerted PCET that emerges in the transition between the proton-mediated electron superexchange mechanism for fully non

  16. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer across multiple regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F. III

    2013-04-07

    The coupled transfer of electrons and protons is a central feature of biological and molecular catalysis, yet fundamental aspects of these reactions remain poorly understood. In this study, we extend the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method to enable direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions across a wide range of physically relevant regimes. In a system-bath model for symmetric, co-linear PCET in the condensed phase, RPMD trajectories reveal distinct kinetic pathways associated with sequential and concerted PCET reaction mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that concerted PCET proceeds by a solvent-gating mechanism in which the reorganization energy is mitigated by charge cancellation among the transferring particles. We further employ RPMD to study the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across multiple coupling regimes, including the fully non-adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally non-adiabatic), partially adiabatic (electronically adiabatic, but vibrationally non-adiabatic), and fully adiabatic (both electronically and vibrationally adiabatic) limits. Comparison of RPMD with the results of PCET rate theories demonstrates the applicability of the direct simulation method over a broad range of conditions; it is particularly notable that RPMD accurately predicts the crossover in the thermal reaction rates between different coupling regimes while avoiding a priori assumptions about the PCET reaction mechanism. Finally, by utilizing the connections between RPMD rate theory and semiclassical instanton theory, we show that analysis of ring-polymer configurations in the RPMD transition path ensemble enables the a posteriori determination of the coupling regime for the PCET reaction. This analysis reveals an intriguing and distinct 'transient-proton-bridge' mechanism for concerted PCET that emerges in the transition between the proton-mediated electron superexchange mechanism for fully non

  17. Redox-controlled proton gating in bovine cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain of essentially all organisms that utilize oxygen to generate energy. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the energy to pump protons across the mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes and the plasma membrane in prokaryotes. The mechanism by which proton pumping is coupled to the oxygen reduction reaction remains unresolved, owing to the difficulty of visualizing proton movement within the massive membrane-associated protein matrix. Here, with a novel hydrogen/deuterium exchange resonance Raman spectroscopy method, we have identified two critical elements of the proton pump: a proton loading site near the propionate groups of heme a, which is capable of transiently storing protons uploaded from the negative-side of the membrane prior to their release into the positive-side of the membrane and a conformational gate that controls proton translocation in response to the change in the redox state of heme a. These findings form the basis for a postulated molecular model describing a detailed mechanism by which unidirectional proton translocation is coupled to electron transfer from heme a to heme a3, associated with oxygen chemistry occurring in the heme a3 site, during enzymatic turnover. Each time heme a undergoes an oxidation-reduction transition a proton is translocated across the membrane accounting for the observation that two protons are translocated during the oxidative phase of the enzymatic cycle and two more are translocated during the reductive phase. This work was done in collaboration with Drs. Tsuyoshi Egawa and Syun-Ru Yeh. This work was supported the National Institutes of Health Grant GM098799 to D.L.R and National Science Foundation Grant NSF 0956358 to S.-R.Y.

  18. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-01-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. Images FIGURE 2 p2482-a FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8744288

  19. Calculated coupling of electron and proton transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, C R; Michel, H; Honig, B; Gunner, M R

    1996-06-01

    Based on new Rhodopseudomonas (Rp.) viridis reaction center (RC) coordinates with a reliable structure of the secondary acceptor quinone (QB) site, a continuum dielectric model and finite difference technique have been used to identify clusters of electrostatically interacting ionizable residues. Twenty-three residues within a distance of 25 A from QB (QB cluster) have been shown to be strongly electrostatically coupled to QB, either directly or indirectly. An analogous cluster of 24 residues is found to interact with QA (QA cluster). Both clusters extend to the cytoplasmic surface in at least two directions. However, the QB cluster differs from the QA cluster in that it has a surplus of acidic residues, more strong electrostatic interactions, is less solvated, and experiences a strong positive electrostatic field arising from the polypeptide backbone. Consequently, upon reduction of QA or QB, it is the QB cluster, and not the QA cluster, which is responsible for substoichiometric proton uptake at neutral pH. The bulk of the changes in the QB cluster are calculated to be due to the protonation of a tightly coupled cluster of the three Glu residues (L212, H177, and M234) within the QB cluster. If the lifetime of the doubly reduced state QB2- is long enough, Asp M43 and Ser L223 are predicted to also become protonated. The calculated complex titration behavior of the strongly interacting residues of the QB cluster and the resulting electrostatic response to electron transfer may be a common feature in proton-transferring membrane protein complexes. PMID:8744288

  20. Measurement of carbon-proton dipolar couplings in liquid crystals using DAPT.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, S; Madhu, P K; Ramanathan, K V

    2008-11-01

    Dipolar couplings provide valuable information on order and dynamics in liquid crystals. For measuring heteronuclear dipolar couplings in oriented systems, a new separated local field experiment is presented here. The method is based on the dipolar assisted polarization transfer (DAPT) pulse sequence proposed recently (Chem. Phys. Lett. 2007, 439, 407) for transfer of polarization between two spins I and S. DAPT utilizes the evolution of magnetization of the I and S spins under two blocks of phase shifted BLEW-12 pulses on the I spin separated by a 90 degree pulse on the S spin. Compared to the rotating frame techniques based on Hartmann-Hahn match, this approach is easy to implement and is independent of any matching conditions. DAPT can be utilized either as a proton encoded local field (PELF) technique or as a separated local field (SLF) technique, which means that the heteronuclear dipolar coupling can be obtained by following either the evolution of the abundant spin like proton (PELF) or that of the rare spin such as carbon (SLF). We have demonstrated the use of DAPT both as a PELF and as a SLF technique on an oriented liquid crystalline sample at room temperature and also have compared its performance with PISEMA. We have also incorporated modifications to the original DAPT pulse sequence for (i) improving its sensitivity and (ii) removing carrier offset dependence. PMID:18841947

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Molecular Electrocatalysis: Theoretical Methods and Design Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Brian H.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-07-07

    Molecular electrocatalysts play an essential role in a wide range of energy conversion processes. The objective of electrocatalyst design is to maximize the turnover frequency and minimize the overpotential for the overall catalytic cycle. Typically the catalytic cycle is dominated by key proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes comprised of sequential or concerted electron transfer and proton transfer steps. A variety of theoretical methods have been developed to investigate the mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of PCET processes in electrocatalytic cycles. Electronic structure methods can be used to calculate the reduction potentials and pKa’s and to generate thermodynamic schemes, free energy reaction pathways, and Pourbaix diagrams, which indicate the most stable species at each pH and potential. These types of calculations have assisted in identifying the thermodynamically favorable mechanisms under specified experimental conditions, such as acid strength and overpotential. Such calculations have also revealed linear correlations among the thermodynamic properties, which can be used to predict the impact of modifying the ligand, substituents, or metal center. The role of non-innocent ligands, namely ligand protonation or reduction, has also been examined theoretically. In addition, the rate constants for electron and proton transfer reactions, as well as concerted PCET reactions, have been calculated to investigate the kinetics of molecular electrocatalysts. The concerted PCET mechanism is thought to lower the overpotential required for catalysis by avoiding high-energy intermediates. Rate constant calculations have revealed that the concerted mechanism involving intramolecular proton transfer will be favored by designing more flexible ligands that facilitate the proton donor-acceptor motion while also maintaining a sufficiently short equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance. Overall, theoretical methods have assisted in the interpretation

  2. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer: comparison of explicit and implicit solvent simulations.

    PubMed

    Auer, Benjamin; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-07-01

    Theoretical approaches for simulating the ultrafast dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions in solution are developed and applied to a series of model systems. These processes are simulated by propagating nonadiabatic surface hopping trajectories on electron-proton vibronic surfaces that depend on the solute and solvent nuclear coordinates. The PCET system is represented by a four-state empirical valence bond model, and the solvent is treated either as explicit solvent molecules or as a dielectric continuum, in which case the solvent dynamics is described in terms of two collective solvent coordinates corresponding to the energy gaps associated with electron and proton transfer. The explicit solvent simulations reveal two distinct solvent relaxation time scales, where the faster time scale relaxation corresponds to librational motions of solvent molecules in the first solvation shell, and the slower time scale relaxation corresponds to the bulk solvent dielectric response. The charge transfer dynamics is strongly coupled to both the fast and slow time scale solvent dynamics. The dynamical multistate continuum theory is extended to include the effects of two solvent relaxation time scales, and the resulting coupled generalized Langevin equations depend on parameters that can be extracted from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The implicit and explicit solvent approaches lead to qualitatively similar charge transfer and solvent dynamics for model PCET systems, suggesting that the implicit solvent treatment captures the essential elements of the nonequilibrium solvent dynamics for many systems. A combination of implicit and explicit solvent approaches will enable the investigation of photoinduced PCET processes in a variety of condensed phase systems. PMID:22651684

  3. Peroxyl Radical Reactions in Water Solution: A Gym for Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Theories.

    PubMed

    Amorati, Riccardo; Baschieri, Andrea; Morroni, Gloria; Gambino, Rossana; Valgimigli, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The reactions of alkylperoxyl radicals with phenols have remained difficult to investigate in water. We describe herein a simple and reliable method based on the inhibited autoxidation of water/THF mixtures, which we calibrated against pulse radiolysis. With this method we measured the rate constants kinh for the reactions of 2-tetrahydrofuranylperoxyl radicals with reference compounds: urate, ascorbate, ferrocenes, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-chromanol, Trolox, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-acetic acid, 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol, catechol and 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. The role of pH was investigated: the value of kinh for Trolox and 4-methoxyphenol increased 11- and 50-fold from pH 2.1 to 12, respectively, which indicate the occurrence of a SPLET-like mechanism. H(D) kinetic isotope effects combined with pH and solvent effects suggest that different types of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanisms are involved in water: less electron-rich phenols react at low pH by concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT) to the peroxyl radical, whereas more electron-rich phenols and phenoxide anions react by multi-site EPT in which water acts as proton relay. PMID:27111024

  4. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The pH regulation has a fundamental role in several intracellular processes and its variation via exogenous compounds is a potential tool for intervening in the intracellular processes. Proton caged compounds (PPCs) release protons upon UV irradiation and may efficiently provoke intracellular on-command acidification. Here, we explore the intracellular pH variation, when purposely synthesized PCCs are coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and dosed to HEK-293 cells. We detected the acidification process caused by the UV irradiation by monitoring the intensity of the asymmetric stretching mode of the CO(2) molecule at 2343 cm(-1). The comparison between free and AuNPs functionalized proton caged compound demonstrates a highly enhanced CO(2) yield, hence pH variation, in the latter case. Finally, PCC functionalized AuNPs were marked with a purposely synthesized fluorescent marker and dosed to HEK-293 cells. The corresponding fluorescence optical images show green grains throughout the whole cytoplasm. PMID:26235337

  5. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  6. Theory of proton-coupled electron transfer in energy conversion processes.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2009-12-21

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes, including photosynthesis and respiration. These reactions also form the basis of many types of solar fuel cells and electrochemical devices. Recent advances in the theory of PCET enable the prediction of the impact of system properties on the reaction rates. These predictions may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy production, including those based on artificial photosynthesis and solar energy conversion. This Account summarizes the theoretically predicted dependence of PCET rates on system properties and illustrates potential approaches for tuning the reaction rates in chemical systems. A general theoretical formulation for PCET reactions has been developed over the past decade. In this theory, PCET reactions are described in terms of nonadiabatic transitions between the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states. A series of nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for both homogeneous and electrochemical PCET reactions have been derived in various well-defined limits. Recently this theory has been extended to include the effects of solvent dynamics and to describe ultrafast interfacial PCET. Analysis of the rate constant expressions provides insight into the underlying physical principles of PCET and enables the prediction of the dependence of the rates on the physical properties of the system. Moreover, the kinetic isotope effect, which is the ratio of the rates for hydrogen and deuterium, provides a useful mechanistic probe. Typically the PCET rate will increase as the electronic coupling and temperature increase and as the total reorganization energy and equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance decrease. The rate constant is predicted to increase as the driving force becomes more negative, rather than exhibit turnover behavior in the inverted region, because excited vibronic product states associated with low

  7. Direct simulation of proton-coupled electron transfer reaction dynamics and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Miller, Thomas F., III

    2014-03-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, in which both an electron and an associated proton undergo reactive transfer, play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. Due to the complexity of this class of reactions, a variety of different mechanisms fall under the umbrella of PCET. However, the physical driving forces that determine the preferred mechanism in a given system still remain poorly understood. Towards this end, we extend ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD), a path-integral quantum dynamics method, to enable the direct simulation and characterization of PCET reaction dynamics in both fully atomistic and system-bath models of organometallic catalysts. In addition to providing validation for the simulation method via extensive comparison with existing PCET rate theories, we analyze the RPMD trajectories to investigate the competition between the concerted and sequential reaction mechanisms for PCET, elucidating the large role of the solvent in controlling the preferred mechanism. We further employ RPMD to determine the kinetics and mechanistic features of concerted PCET reactions across different regimes of electronic and vibrational coupling, providing evidence for a new and distinct PCET reaction mechanism.

  8. Translocation of reptating chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żurek, S.; Drzewiński, A.; van Leeuwen, J. M. J.

    2011-05-01

    Voltage-driven translocation is modeled with the Rubinstein-Duke rules for hopping reptons in one- and two-dimensional lattices. The chain is driven through the pore by a bias potential promoting the transition of stored length in one direction. Coupling states give a semi-periodicity of the process that enables us to relate the properties to the stationary state of the master equation. The exact solution for short chains and Monte Carlo simulations for longer chains are used to calculate displacements, velocities and the translocation time.

  9. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3− to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  10. Exogenous control over intracellular acidification: Enhancement via proton caged compounds coupled to gold nanoparticles and an alternative pathway with DMSO.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Sabbatella, Gianfranco; Antonaroli, Simonetta; Remita, Hynd; Orlando, Viviana; Biagioni, Stefano; Nucara, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Proton caged compounds exhibit a characteristic behavior when directly dosed into cells or being coupled to gold nanoparticles prior to the dosing. When irradiated in the near ultraviolet region, they release protons that interact with intracellular HCO3 (-) to yield H2CO3. The dissociation of carbonic acid, then, releases CO2 that can be distinctively singled out in infrared spectra. In the process of searching a pathway to augment the intracellular uptake of proton caged compounds, we probed the association of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) with DMSO, an agent to enhance the membrane permeability. We found out a different UV-induced protonation mechanism that opens up to new conduits of employing of proton caged compounds. Here, we report the infrared data we collected in this set of experiments. PMID:26870760

  11. Hydrogen Bonding Networks Tune Proton-Coupled Redox Steps during the Enzymatic Six-Electron Conversion of Nitrite to Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron multiproton reactions play an important role in both biological systems and chemical reactions involved in energy storage and manipulation. A key strategy employed by nature in achieving such complex chemistry is the use of proton-coupled redox steps. Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) catalyzes the six-electron seven-proton reduction of nitrite to ammonia. While a catalytic mechanism for ccNiR has been proposed on the basis of studies combining computation and crystallography, there have been few studies directly addressing the nature of the proton-coupled events that are predicted to occur along the nitrite reduction pathway. Here we use protein film voltammetry to directly interrogate the proton-coupled steps that occur during nitrite reduction by ccNiR. We find that conversion of nitrite to ammonia by ccNiR adsorbed to graphite electrodes is defined by two distinct phases; one is proton-coupled, and the other is not. Mutation of key active site residues (H257, R103, and Y206) modulates these phases and specifically alters the properties of the detected proton-dependent step but does not inhibit the ability of ccNiR to conduct the full reduction of nitrite to ammonia. We conclude that the active site residues examined are responsible for tuning the protonation steps that occur during catalysis, likely through an extensive hydrogen bonding network, but are not necessarily required for the reaction to proceed. These results provide important insight into how enzymes can specifically tune proton- and electron transfer steps to achieve high turnover numbers in a physiological pH range. PMID:25137350

  12. The Effect of Vanadate on Proton-Sucrose Cotransport in Ricinus Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    Vreugdenhil, Dick; Spanswick, Roger M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of orthovanadate on the uptake of sucrose by Ricinus cotyledons and on sucrose-coupled proton influx were measured in order to gain insight into the relationship to the plasma membrane proton pump. Vanadate had no effect on short-term sucrose uptake. In longterm experiments (>30 min) sucrose uptake was progressively inhibited, but only at high external sucrose concentrations. Vanadate did not affect proton efflux pumping in the absence of sucrose and neither did it change the initial rate of sucrose-coupled proton influx. However, it enhanced the maximal level of sucrose-induced alkalinization of the medium at all sucrose concentrations tested. This is interpreted as an inhibiting effect of vanadate on the proton pump that recycles protons during sucrose-proton cotransport. The sensitivity towards vanadate indicates that this proton pump is an ATPase. A second proton-translocating system, that is insensitive to vanadate, is postulated to function in the absence of sucrose. PMID:16665488

  13. Identification of the coupling step in Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from real-time kinetics of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belevich, Nikolai P; Bertsova, Yulia V; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) uses a unique set of prosthetic redox groups-two covalently bound FMN residues, a [2Fe-2S] cluster, FAD, riboflavin and a Cys4[Fe] center-to catalyze electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in a reaction coupled with Na(+) translocation across the membrane. Here we used an ultra-fast microfluidic stopped-flow instrument to determine rate constants and the difference spectra for the six consecutive reaction steps of Vibrio harveyi Na(+)-NQR reduction by NADH. The instrument, with a dead time of 0.25 ms and optical path length of 1 cm allowed collection of visible spectra in 50-μs intervals. By comparing the spectra of reaction steps with the spectra of known redox transitions of individual enzyme cofactors, we were able to identify the chemical nature of most intermediates and the sequence of electron transfer events. A previously unknown spectral transition was detected and assigned to the Cys4[Fe] center reduction. Electron transfer from the [2Fe-2S] cluster to the Cys4[Fe] center and all subsequent steps were markedly accelerated when Na(+) concentration was increased from 20 μM to 25 mM, suggesting coupling of the former step with tight Na(+) binding to or occlusion by the enzyme. An alternating access mechanism was proposed to explain electron transfer between subunits NqrF and NqrC. According to the proposed mechanism, the Cys4[Fe] center is alternatively exposed to either side of the membrane, allowing the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NqrF and the FMN residue of NqrC to alternatively approach the Cys4[Fe] center from different sides of the membrane. PMID:26655930

  14. TDAG8 is a proton-sensing and psychosine-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju-Qiang; Kon, Junko; Mogi, Chihiro; Tobo, Masayuki; Damirin, Alatangaole; Sato, Koichi; Komachi, Mayumi; Malchinkhuu, Enkhzol; Murata, Naoya; Kimura, Takao; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Wakamatsu, Kaori; Koizumi, Hideki; Uede, Toshimitsu; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Kurose, Hitoshi; Sato, Takashi; Harada, Akihiro; Misawa, Norihiko; Tomura, Hideaki; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2004-10-29

    T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8) has been reported to be a receptor for psychosine. Ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) closely related to TDAG8, however, have recently been identified as proton-sensing or extracellular pH-responsive GPCRs that stimulate inositol phosphate and cAMP production, respectively. In the present study, we examined whether TDAG8 senses extracellular pH change. In the several cell types that were transfected with TDAG8 cDNA, cAMP was markedly accumulated in response to neutral to acidic extracellular pH, with a peak response at approximately pH 7.0-6.5. The pH effect was inhibited by copper ions and was reduced or lost in cells expressing mutated TDAG8 in which histidine residues were changed to phenylalanine. In the membrane fractions prepared from TDAG8-transfected cells, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) binding activity and adenylyl cyclase activity were remarkably stimulated in response to neutral and acidic pH. The concentration-dependent effect of extracellular protons on cAMP accumulation was shifted to the right in the presence of psychosine. The inhibitory psychosine effect was also observed for pH-dependent actions in OGR1- and GPR4-expressing cells but not for prostaglandin E(2)- and sphingosine 1-phosphate-induced actions in any pH in native and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-expressing cells. Glucosylsphingosine and sphingosylphosphorylcholine similarly inhibited the pH-dependent action, although to a lesser extent. Psychosine-sensitive and pH-dependent cAMP accumulation was also observed in mouse thymocytes. We concluded that TDAG8 is one of the proton-sensing GPCRs coupling to adenylyl cyclase and psychosine, and its related lysosphingolipids behave as if they were antagonists against protein-sensing receptors, including TDAG8, GPR4, and OGR1. PMID:15326175

  15. Crystal structure of a membrane-embedded H+-translocating pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Jia-Yin; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Chiu, Chen-Liang; Liu, Mu-Hsuan; Tung, Jung-Yu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Pan, Rong-Long; Sun, Yuh-Ju

    2012-04-19

    H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatases (H(+)-PPases) are active proton transporters that establish a proton gradient across the endomembrane by means of pyrophosphate (PP(i)) hydrolysis. H(+)-PPases are found primarily as homodimers in the vacuolar membrane of plants and the plasma membrane of several protozoa and prokaryotes. The three-dimensional structure and detailed mechanisms underlying the enzymatic and proton translocation reactions of H(+)-PPases are unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of a Vigna radiata H(+)-PPase (VrH(+)-PPase) in complex with a non-hydrolysable substrate analogue, imidodiphosphate (IDP), at 2.35 Å resolution. Each VrH(+)-PPase subunit consists of an integral membrane domain formed by 16 transmembrane helices. IDP is bound in the cytosolic region of each subunit and trapped by numerous charged residues and five Mg(2+) ions. A previously undescribed proton translocation pathway is formed by six core transmembrane helices. Proton pumping can be initialized by PP(i) hydrolysis, and H(+) is then transported into the vacuolar lumen through a pathway consisting of Arg 242, Asp 294, Lys 742 and Glu 301. We propose a working model of the mechanism for the coupling between proton pumping and PP(i) hydrolysis by H(+)-PPases. PMID:22456709

  16. Studies of the Maltose Transport System Reveal a Mechanism for Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Substrate Translocation without Direct Recognition of Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Alister D.; Shilton, Brian H.

    2010-10-11

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK{sub 2}) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK{sub 2} are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK{sub 2} is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK{sub 2}. High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr{sup 62}-Gly{sup 69} is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK{sub 2} is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK{sub 2} in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  17. Electron/proton coupling in bacterial nitric oxide reductase during reduction of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Flock, Ulrika; Watmough, Nicholas J; Adelroth, Pia

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans catalyzes the two-electron reduction of NO to N(2)O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) --> N(2)O + H(2)O), which is an obligatory step in the sequential reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen known as denitrification. NOR has four redox-active cofactors, namely, two low-spin hemes c and b, one high-spin heme b(3), and a non-heme iron Fe(B), and belongs to same superfamily as the oxygen-reducing heme-copper oxidases. NOR can also use oxygen as an electron acceptor; this catalytic activity was investigated in this study. We show that the product in the steady-state reduction of oxygen is water. A single turnover of the fully reduced NOR with oxygen was initiated using the flow-flash technique, and the progress of the reaction monitored by time-resolved optical absorption spectroscopy. Two major phases with time constants of 40 micros and 25 ms (pH 7.5, 1 mM O(2)) were observed. The rate constant for the faster process was dependent on the O(2) concentration and is assigned to O(2) binding to heme b(3) at a bimolecular rate constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-)(1) s(-)(1). The second phase (tau = 25 ms) involves oxidation of the low-spin hemes b and c, and is coupled to the uptake of protons from the bulk solution. The rate constant for this phase shows a pH dependence consistent with rate limitation by proton transfer from an internal group with a pK(a) = 6.6. This group is presumably an amino acid residue that is crucial for proton transfer to the catalytic site also during NO reduction. PMID:16060680

  18. Proton-coupled electron transfer at modified electrodes by multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuofeng; Vannucci, Aaron K; Concepcion, Javier J; Jurss, Jonah W; Meyer, Thomas J

    2011-12-27

    In single site water or hydrocarbon oxidation catalysis with polypyridyl Ru complexes such as [Ru(II)(Mebimpy)(bpy)(H(2)O)](2+) [where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and Mebimpy is 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine] 2, or its surface-bound analog [Ru(II)(Mebimpy)(4,4'-bis-methlylenephosphonato-2,2'-bipyridine)(OH(2))](2+) 2-PO(3)H(2), accessing the reactive states, Ru(V) = O(3+)/Ru(IV) = O(2+), at the electrode interface is typically rate limiting. The higher oxidation states are accessible by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of aqua precursors, but access at inert electrodes is kinetically inhibited. The inhibition arises from stepwise mechanisms which impose high energy barriers for 1e- intermediates. Oxidation of the Ru(III)-OH(2+) or forms of 2-PO(3)H(2) to Ru(IV) = O(2+) on planar fluoride-doped SnO(2) electrode and in nanostructured films of Sn(IV)-doped In(2)O(3) and TiO(2) has been investigated with a focus on identifying microscopic phenomena. The results provide direct evidence for important roles for the nature of the electrode, temperature, surface coverage, added buffer base, pH, solvent, and solvent H(2)O/D(2)O isotope effects. In the nonaqueous solvent, propylene carbonate, there is evidence for a role for surface-bound phosphonate groups as proton acceptors. PMID:22160681

  19. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  20. Coupling factor B is a component of the Fo proton channel of mitochondrial H+-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Kantham, L.; Sanadi, D.R.

    1987-03-05

    Repeated extraction of bovine heart submitochondrial particles with ammonia and EDTA (AE) yields a preparation that is highly deficient in coupling factor B (FB). The activity of the thrice extracted particle (AE-P3) in ATP-driven NAD+ reduction by succinate and the /sup 32/Pi-ATP exchange activity were substantially stimulated, 8-fold and 5-fold, respectively, by purified FB. To decrease the basal activity of the particle further, the residual FB in AE-P3 was inactivated by treatment with the -SH reagent, 4-vinylpyridine. The resulting particle was depleted of F1 by treatment with 3.5 M NaBr. This particle was incorporated into asolectin liposomes alone and in the presence of added FB. Passive proton conduction in the FB-deficient proteoliposomes was negligible and restored in the presence of FB. The H+ conductance was inhibited extensively by oligomycin and partially by F1-ATPase. The results show absolute dependence on FB for functioning of the FO proton channel.

  1. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in the Reduction of Carbonyls by Samarium Diiodide-Water Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-07-20

    Reduction of carbonyls by SmI2 is significantly impacted by the presence of water, but the fundamental step(s) of initial transfer of a formal hydrogen atom from the SmI2-water reagent system to produce an intermediate radical is not fully understood. In this work, we provide evidence consistent with the reduction of carbonyls by SmI2-water proceeding through proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Combined rate and computational studies show that a model aldehyde and ketone are likely reduced through an asynchronous PCET, whereas reduction of a representative lactone occurs through a concerted PCET. In the latter case, concerted PCET is likely a consequence of significantly endergonic initial electron transfer. PMID:27367158

  2. Proton-Nucleus Total Cross Sections in Coupled-Channel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross sections in the medium have been extracted directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. In the present study the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  3. Elastic Proton Scattering of Medium Mass Nuclei from Coupled-Cluster Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, G.; MichelN.,

    2012-01-01

    Using coupled-cluster theory and interactions from chiral effective field theory, we compute overlap functions for transfer and scattering of low-energy protons on the target nucleus 40Ca. Effects of three-nucleon forces are included phenomenologically as in-medium two-nucleon interactions. Using known asymptotic forms for one-nucleon overlap functions we derive a simple and intuitive way of computing scattering observables such as elastic scattering phase shifts and cross sections. As a first application and proof of principle, we compute phase shifts and differential interaction cross sections at energies of 9.6 and 12.44 MeV and compare with experimental data. Our computed diffraction minima are in fair agreement with experimental results, while we tend to overestimate the cross sections at large scattering angles.

  4. Catalytic Alkene Carboaminations Enabled by Oxidative Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Gilbert J.; Knowles, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a dual catalyst system comprised of an iridium photocatalyst and weak phosphate base that is capable of both selectively homolyzing the N–H bonds of N-arylamides (bond dissociation free energies ~ 100 kcal/mol) via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and mediating efficient carboamination reactions of the resulting amidyl radicals. This manner of PCET activation, which finds its basis in numerous biological redox processes, enables the formal homolysis of a stronger amide N–H bond in the presence of weaker allylic C–H bonds, a selectivity that is uncommon in conventional molecular H atom acceptors. Moreover, this transformation affords access to a broad range of structurally complex heterocycles from simple amide starting materials. The design, synthetic scope, and mechanistic evaluation of the PCET process are described. PMID:26166022

  5. The purified and reconstituted ornithine/citrulline carrier from rat liver mitochondria: electrical nature and coupling of the exchange reaction with H+ translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, C; Tonazzi, A; Stipani, I; Palmieri, F

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism and the electrical nature of ornithine/citrulline exchange has been investigated in proteoliposomes reconstituted with the ornithine/citrulline carrier purified from rat liver mitochondria. The stoichiometry of the exchanging substrates was close to 1:1. The exchange was not affected by inducing electrogenic flux of K+ with valinomycin. In contrast, the pH gradient generated by the K+/H+ exchanger nigericin in the presence of an outwardly directed K+ gradient stimulated the ornithineout/citrullinein exchange, but not the ornithine/ornithine homoexchange. Experiments in which either the internal or the external pH was varied, while keeping constant the pH in the other compartment, indicated that maximal exchange rates are found at pH 6 in the compartment containing citrulline and at pH 8 in the compartment containing ornithine. Changes in fluorescence of the pH indicator pyranine, included inside the proteoliposomes, showed that the exchanges ornithineout/citrullinein and citrullineout/ornithinein are accompanied by translocation of H+ in the same direction as citrulline. It is concluded that the mitochondrial ornithine/citrulline carrier catalyses an electroneutral exchange of ornithine+ for citrulline plus an H+. A reasonable model is one in which ornithine binds to a deprotonated carrier and citrulline to a protonated carrier and both substrate-carrier complexes are neutral. The physiological implications of this transport process are discussed. PMID:9359400

  6. Coupled Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions during the O→E Transition in Bovine Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Dragan M.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    A combined DFT/electrostatic approach is employed to study the coupling of proton and electron transfer reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and its proton pumping mechanism. The coupling of the chemical proton to the internal electron transfer between heme a and the binuclear center is examined for the O→E transition. The novel features of the His291 pumping model are proposed, which involve timely well-synchronized sequence of the proton-coupled electron transfer reactions. The obtained pKas and Ems of the key ionizable and redox-active groups at the different stages of the O→E transition are consistent with available experimental data. The PT step from E242 to H291 is examined in detail for various redox states of the hemes and various conformations of E242 side-chain. Redox potential calculations of the successive steps in the reaction cycle during the O→E transition are able to explain a cascade of equilibria between the different intermediate states and electron redistribution between the metal centers during the course of the catalytic activity. All four electrometric phases are discussed in the light of the obtained results, providing a robust support for the His291 model of proton pumping in CcO. PMID:22086149

  7. Metal-free aqueous redox capacitor via proton rocking-chair system in an organic-based couple.

    PubMed

    Tomai, Takaaki; Mitani, Satoshi; Komatsu, Daiki; Kawaguchi, Yuji; Honma, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    Safe and inexpensive energy storage devices with long cycle lifetimes and high power and energy densities are mandatory for the development of electrical power grids that connect with renewable energy sources. In this study, we demonstrated metal-free aqueous redox capacitors using couples comprising low-molecular-weight organic compounds. In addition to the electric double layer formation, proton insertion/extraction reactions between a couple consisting of inexpensive quinones/hydroquinones contributed to the energy storage. This energy storage mechanism, in which protons are shuttled back and forth between two electrodes upon charge and discharge, can be regarded as a proton rocking-chair system. The fabricated capacitor showed a large capacity (>20 Wh/kg), even in the applied potential range between 0-1 V, and high power capability (>5 A/g). The support of the organic compounds in nanoporous carbon facilitated the efficient use of the organic compounds with a lifetime of thousands of cycles. PMID:24395117

  8. Multidimensional treatment of stochastic solvent dynamics in photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer processes: sequential, concerted, and complex branching mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hazra, Anirban; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-10-14

    A theoretical approach for the multidimensional treatment of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes in solution is presented. This methodology is based on the multistate continuum theory with an arbitrary number of diabatic electronic states representing the relevant charge distributions in a general PCET system. The active electrons and transferring proton(s) are treated quantum mechanically, and the electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces are represented as functions of multiple scalar solvent coordinates corresponding to the single electron and proton transfer reactions involved in the PCET process. A dynamical formulation of the dielectric continuum theory is used to derive a set of coupled generalized Langevin equations of motion describing the time evolution of these collective solvent coordinates. The parameters in the Langevin equations depend on the solvent properties, such as the dielectric constants, relaxation time, and molecular moment of inertia, as well as the solute properties. The dynamics of selected intramolecular nuclear coordinates, such as the proton donor-acceptor distance or a torsional angle within the PCET complex, may also be included in this formulation. A surface hopping method in conjunction with the Langevin equations of motion is used to simulate the nonadiabatic dynamics on the multidimensional electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces following photoexcitation. This theoretical treatment enables the description of both sequential and concerted mechanisms, as well as more complex processes involving a combination of these mechanisms. The application of this methodology to a series of model systems corresponding to collinear and orthogonal PCET illustrates fundamental aspects of these different mechanisms and elucidates the significance of proton vibrational relaxation and nonequilibrium solvent dynamics. PMID:22010706

  9. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  10. An Annular Lipid Belt Is Essential for Allosteric Coupling and Viral Inhibition of the Antigen Translocation Complex TAP (Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing)*

    PubMed Central

    Eggensperger, Sabine; Fisette, Olivier; Parcej, David; Schäfer, Lars V.; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) constitutes a focal element in the adaptive immune response against infected or malignantly transformed cells. TAP shuttles proteasomal degradation products into the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum for loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here, the heterodimeric TAP complex was purified and reconstituted in nanodiscs in defined stoichiometry. We demonstrate that a single heterodimeric core-TAP complex is active in peptide binding, which is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Notably, with increasing peptide length, the ATP turnover was gradually decreased, revealing that ATP hydrolysis is coupled to the movement of peptide through the ATP-binding cassette transporter. In addition, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show that the observed 22 lipids are sufficient to form an annular belt surrounding the TAP complex. This lipid belt is essential for high affinity inhibition by the herpesvirus immune evasin ICP47. In conclusion, nanodiscs are a powerful approach to study the important role of lipids as well as the function, interaction, and modulation of the antigen translocation machinery. PMID:25305015

  11. Virtual coupling potential for elastic scattering of 10,11Be on proton and carbon targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoux, V.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Casandjian, J.-M.; Chartier, M.; Cortina-Gil, M. D.; Fékou-Youmbi, V.; Gillibert, A.; Cormick, M. Mac; Maréchal, F.; Marie, F.; Mittig, W.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Orr, N. A.; Ostrowski, A. N.; Ottini-Hustache, S.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Scarpaci, J.-A.; Sida, J.-L.; Suomijärvi, T.; Winfield, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    The 10,11Be(p, p) and (12C, 12C) reactions were analyzed to determine the influence of the weak binding energies of exotic nuclei on their interaction potential. The elastic cross sections were measured at GANIL in inverse kinematics using radioactive 10,11Be beams produced at energies of 39.1A and 38.4 A MeV. The elastic proton scattering data were analyzed within the framework of the microscopic Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) nucleon-nucleus potential. The angular distributions are found to be best reproduced by reducing the real part of the microscopic optical potential, as a consequence of the coupling to the continuum. These effects modify deeply the elastic potential. Including the Virtual Coupling Potential (VCP), we show the ability of the general optical potentials to reproduce the data for scattering of unstable nuclei, using realistic densities. Finally, the concepts needed to develop a more general and microscopic approach of the VCP are discussed.

  12. ASIC1-mediated calcium entry stimulates NFATc3 nuclear translocation via PICK1 coupling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V; Plomaritas, Danielle R; Herbert, Lindsay M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Browning, Carly; Jernigan, Nikki L

    2016-07-01

    The development of chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) Ca(2+) influx through acid-sensing ion channel-1 (ASIC1) and activation of the Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor known as nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c3 (NFATc3). Whether Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 activation in the pulmonary vasculature is unknown. Furthermore, both ASIC1 and calcineurin have been shown to interact with the scaffolding protein known as protein interacting with C kinase-1 (PICK1). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 nuclear translocation in PASMC in a PICK1-dependent manner. Using both ASIC1 knockout (ASIC1(-/-)) mice and pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1, we demonstrate that ASIC1 contributes to CH-induced (1 wk at 380 mmHg) and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced (10(-7) M) Ca(2+) responses and NFATc3 nuclear import in PASMC. The interaction between ASIC1/PICK1/calcineurin was shown using a Duolink in situ Proximity Ligation Assay. Inhibition of PICK1 by using FSC231 abolished ET-1-induced and ionomycin-induced NFATc3 nuclear import, but it did not alter ET-1-mediated Ca(2+) responses, suggesting that PICK1 acts downstream of Ca(2+) influx. The key findings of the present work are that 1) Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 mediates CH- and ET-1-induced NFATc3 nuclear import and 2) the scaffolding protein PICK1 is necessary for NFATc3 nuclear import. Together, these data provide an essential link between CH-induced ASIC1-mediated Ca(2+) influx and activation of the NFATc3 transcription factor. Identification of this ASIC1/PICK1/NFATc3 signaling complex increases our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the vascular remodeling and increased vascular contractility that are associated with CH-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27190058

  13. Feeding induces translocation of vacuolar proton ATPase and pendrin to the membrane of leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) mitochondrion-rich gill cells.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Munévar, Christian L; Tresguerres, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In this study we characterized mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells and regulation of acid/base (A/B) relevant ion-transporting proteins in leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) gills. Immunohistochemistry revealed that leopard shark gills posses two separate cell populations that abundantly express either Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase (NKA) or V-H⁺-ATPase (VHA), but not both ATPases together. Co-immunolocalization with mitochondrial Complex IV demonstrated, for the first time in shark gills, that both NKA- and VHA-rich cells are also MR cells, and that all MR cells are either NKA- or VHA-rich cells. Additionally we localized the anion exchanger pendrin to VHA-rich cells, but not NKA-rich cells. In starved sharks, VHA was localized throughout the cell cytoplasm and pendrin was present at the apical pole (but not in the membrane). However, in a significant number of gill cells from fed leopard sharks, VHA translocated to the basolateral membrane (as previously described in dogfish), and pendrin translocated to the apical membrane. Our results highlight the importance of translocation of ion-transporting proteins to the cell membrane as a regulatory mechanism for A/B regulation. PMID:24746982

  14. Proton-coupled electron transfer at modified electrodes by multiple pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Vannucci, A. K.; Concepcion, J. J.; Jurss, J. W.; Meyer, T. J.

    2011-12-12

    In single site water or hydrocarbon oxidation catalysis with polypyridyl Ru complexes such as [RuII(Mebimpy)(bpy)(H₂O)]2+ [where bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and Mebimpy is 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine] 2, or its surface-bound analog [RuII(Mebimpy)(4,4'-bis-methlylenephosphonato-2,2'-bipyridine)(OH₂)]2+ 2-PO₃H₂, accessing the reactive states, RuV = O3+/RuIV = O2+, at the electrode interface is typically rate limiting. The higher oxidation states are accessible by proton-coupled electron transfer oxidation of aqua precursors, but access at inert electrodes is kinetically inhibited. The inhibition arises from stepwise mechanisms which impose high energy barriers for 1e- intermediates. Oxidation of the RuIII-OH2+ or RuIII-OH₂3+ forms of 2-PO₃H₂ to RuIV = O2+ on planar fluoride-doped SnO₂ electrode and in nanostructured films of Sn(IV)-doped In₂O₃ and TiO₂ has been investigated with a focus on identifying microscopic phenomena. The results provide direct evidence for important roles for the nature of the electrode, temperature, surface coverage, added buffer base, pH, solvent, and solvent H₂O/D₂O isotope effects. In the nonaqueous solvent, propylene carbonate, there is evidence for a role for surface-bound phosphonate groups as proton acceptors.

  15. Thermodynamic investigation into the mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer events in heme protein maquettes.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Amit R; Reedy, Charles J; Mui, Steven; Gibney, Brian R

    2007-01-01

    To study the engineering requirements for proton pumping in energy-converting enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase, the thermodynamics and mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer in two designed heme proteins are elucidated. Both heme protein maquettes chosen, heme b-[H10A24]2 and heme b-[delta7-His]2, are four-alpha-helix bundles that display pH-dependent heme midpoint potential modulations, or redox-Bohr effects. Detailed equilibrium binding studies of ferric and ferrous heme b with these maquettes allow the individual contributions of heme-protein association, iron-histidine ligation, and heme-protein electrostatics to be elucidated. These data demonstrate that the larger, less well-structured [H10A24]2 binds heme b in both oxidation states tighter than the smaller and more well-structured [Delta7-His]2 due to a stronger porphyrin-protein hydrophobic interaction. The 66 mV (1.5 kcal/mol) difference in their heme reduction potentials observed at pH 8.0 is due mostly to stabilization of ferrous heme in [H10A24]2 relative to [delta7-His]2. The data indicate that porphyrin-protein hydrophobic interactions and heme iron coordination are responsible for the Kd value of 37 nM for the heme b-[delta7-His]2 scaffold, while the affinity of heme b for [H10A24]2 is 20-fold tighter due to a combination of porphyrin-protein hydrophobic interactions, iron coordination, and electrostatic effects. The data also illustrate that the contribution of bis-His coordination to ferrous heme protein affinity is limited, <3.0 kcal/mol. The 1H+/1e- redox-Bohr effect of heme b-[H10A24]2 is due to the greater absolute stabilization of the ferric heme (4.1 kcal/mol) compared to the ferrous heme (1.4 kcal/mol) binding upon glutamic acid deprotonation, i.e., an electrostatic response mechanism. The 2H+/1e- redox-Bohr effect observed for heme b-[delta7-His]2 is due to histidine protonation and histidine dissociation of ferrous heme b upon reduction, i.e., a ligand loss mechanism. These

  16. Tyrosine analogues for probing proton-coupled electron transfer processes in peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Nara, Susheel J; Valgimigli, Luca; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Pratt, Derek A

    2010-01-20

    A series of amino acids analogous to tyrosine, but differing in the physicochemical properties of the aryl alcohol side chain, have been prepared and characterized. These compounds are expected to be useful in understanding the relationships between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics in long-range proton-coupled electron transfer processes in peptides and proteins. Systematic changes in the acidity, redox potential, and O-H bond strength of the tyrosine side chain could be induced upon substituting the phenol for pyridinol and pyrimidinol moieties. Further modulation was possible by introducing methyl and t-butyl substitution in the position ortho to the phenolic hydroxyl. The unnatural amino acids were prepared by Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling of the corresponding halogenated aryl alcohol protected as their benzyl ethers with an organozinc reagent derived from N-Boc L-serine carboxymethyl ester. Subsequent debenzylation by catalytic hydrogenation yielded the tyrosine analogues in good yield. Spectrophotometric titrations revealed a decrease in tyrosine pK(a) of ca. 1.5 log units per included nitrogen atom, along with a corresponding increase in the oxidation (peak) potentials of ca. 200 mV, respectively. All told, the six novel amino acids described here have phenol-like side chains with pK(a)'s that span a range of 7.0 to greater than 10, and an oxidation (peak) potential range of greater than 600 mV at and around physiological pH. Radical equilibration EPR experiments were carried out to reveal that the O-H bond strengths increase systematically upon nitrogen incorporation (by ca. 0.5-1.0 kcal/mol), and radical stability and persistence increase systematically upon introduction of alkyl substitution in the ortho positions. The EPR spectra of the aryloxyl radicals derived from tyrosine and each of the analogues could be determined at room temperature, and each featured distinct spectral properties. The uniqueness of their spectra will be helpful in discerning

  17. Probing the coupling between proton and electron transfer in Photosystem II core complexes containing a 3-fluorotyrosine

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Fabrice; Boussac, Alain; Force, Dee Ann; Peloquin, Jeffrey; Brynda, Marcin; Sugiura, Miwa; Un, Sun; Britt, R. David; Diner, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic cycle of numerous enzymes involves the coupling between proton transfer and electron transfer. Yet, the understanding of this coordinated transfer in biological systems remains limited, likely because its characterization relies on the controlled but experimentally challenging modifications of the free energy changes associated with either the electron or proton transfer. We have performed such a study here in Photosystem II. The driving force for electron transfer from TyrZ to P680•+ has been decreased by ~ 80 meV by mutating the axial ligand of P680, and that for proton transfer upon oxidation of TyrZ by substituting a 3-fluorotyrosine (3F-TyrZ) for TyrZ. In Mn-depleted Photosystem II, the dependence upon pH of the oxidation rates of TyrZ and 3F-TyrZ were found to be similar. However, in the pH range where the phenolic hydroxyl of TyrZ is involved in a H-bond with a proton acceptor, the activation energy of the oxidation of 3F-TyrZ is decreased by 110 meV, a value which correlates with the in vitro finding of a 90 meV stabilization energy to the phenolate form of 3F-Tyr when compared to Tyr (Seyedsayamdost et al., 2006, JACS 128:1569–79). Thus, when the phenol of YZ acts as a H-bond-donor, its oxidation by P680•+ is controlled by its prior deprotonation. This contrasts with the situation prevailing at lower pH, where the proton acceptor is protonated and therefore unavailable, in which the oxidation-induced proton transfer from the phenolic hydroxyl of TyrZ has been proposed to occur concertedly with the electron transfer to P680•+. This suggests a switch between a concerted proton/electron transfer at pHs < 7.5 to a sequential one at pHs > 7.5 and illustrates the roles of the H-bond and of the likely salt-bridge existing between the phenolate and the nearby proton acceptor in determining the coupling between proton and electron transfer. PMID:19265377

  18. Coupling between protonation and conformation in cytochrome c oxidase: Insights from constant-pH MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Sofia F; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-06-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs) are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes reduce dioxygen (O2) to water and, simultaneously, generate a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite their importance in the aerobic metabolism and the large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A1-type CcO family, there is still no consensually accepted description of the molecular mechanisms operating in this protein. A substantial number of questions about the CcO's working mechanism remain to be answered, including how the protonation behavior of some key residues is modulated during a reduction cycle and how is the conformation of the protein affected by protonation. The main objective of this work was to study the protonation-conformation coupling in CcOs and identify the molecular factors that control the protonation state of some key residues. In order to directly capture the interplay between protonation and conformational effects, we have performed constant-pH MD simulations of an A1-type CcO inserted into a lipid bilayer in two redox states (oxidized and reduced) at physiological pH. From the simulations, we were able to identify several groups with unusual titration behavior that are highly dependent on the protein redox state, including the A-propionate from heme a and the D-propionate from heme a3, two key groups possibly involved in proton pumping. The protonation state of these two groups is heavily influenced by subtle conformational changes in the protein (notably of R481I and R482I) and by small changes in the hydrogen bond network. PMID:27033303

  19. Inelastic dark matter with spin-dependent couplings to protons and large modulation fractions in DAMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yoon, Kook-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We discuss a scenario where the DAMA modulation effect is explained by a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) which upscatters inelastically to a heavier state and predominantly couples to the spin of protons. In this scenario constraints from xenon and germanium targets are evaded dynamically, due to the suppression of the WIMP coupling to neutrons, while those from fluorine targets are evaded kinematically, because the minimal WIMP incoming speed required to trigger upscatters off fluorine exceeds the maximal WIMP velocity in the Galaxy, or is very close to it. In this scenario WIMP scatterings off sodium are usually sensitive to the large-speed tail of the WIMP velocity distribution and modulated fractions of the signal close to unity arise in a natural way. On the other hand, a halo-independent analysis with more conservative assumptions about the WIMP velocity distribution allows to extend the viable parameter space to configurations where large modulated fractions are not strictly necessary. We discuss large modulated fractions in the Maxwellian case showing that they imply a departure from the usual cosine time dependence of the expected signal in DAMA. However we explicitly show that the DAMA data is not sensitive to this distortion, both in time and frequency space, even in the extreme case of a 100 % modulated fraction. Moreover the same scenario provides an explanation of the maximum in the energy spectrum of the modulation amplitude detected by DAMA in terms of WIMPs whose minimal incoming speed matches the kinematic threshold for inelastic upscatters. For the elastic case the detection of such maximum suggests an inversion of the modulation phase below the present DAMA energy threshold, while this is not expected for inelastic scattering. This may allow to discriminate between the two scenarios in a future low-threshold analysis of the DAMA data.

  20. Robertsonian translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.; Izatt, R.M.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Shirts, R.B.

    1996-08-24

    The objective of this research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period. In addition, new, more convenient synthetic routes were achieved for several nitrogen-containing bicyclic and tricyclic macrocycles. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber and other membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. A study of the effect of methoxyalkyl macrocycle substituents on metal ion transport was completed. A new calorimeter was constructed which made it possible to study the thermodynamics of macrocycle-cation binding to very high temperatures. Measurements of thermodynamic data for the interaction of crown ethers with alkali and alkaline earth cations were achieved to 473 K. Molecular modeling work was begun for the first time on this project and fundamental principles were identified and developed for the establishment of working models in the future.

  2. Functional elements in the minimal promoter of the human proton-coupled folate transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Michal; Gonen, Nitzan; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2009-10-09

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is the dominant intestinal folate transporter, however, its promoter has yet to be revealed. Hence, we here cloned a 3.1 kb fragment upstream to the first ATG of the human PCFT gene and generated sequential deletion constructs evaluated in luciferase reporter assay. This analysis mapped the minimal promoter to 157 bp upstream to the first ATG. Crucial GC-box sites were identified within the minimal promoter and in its close vicinity which substantially contribute to promoter activity, as their disruption resulted in 94% loss of luciferase activity. We also identified upstream enhancer elements including YY1 and AP1 which, although distantly located, prominently transactivated the minimal promoter, as their inactivation resulted in 50% decrease in reporter activity. This is the first functional identification of the minimal PCFT promoter harboring crucial GC-box elements that markedly contribute to its transcriptional activation via putative interaction with distal YY1 and AP1 enhancer elements.

  3. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer. PMID:25023856

  4. Proton transport via the membrane surface.

    PubMed Central

    Georgievskii, Yuri; Medvedev, Emile S; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2002-01-01

    Some proton pumps, such as cytochrome c oxidase (C(c)O), translocate protons across biological membranes at a rate that considerably exceeds the rate of proton transport to the entrance of the proton-conducting channel via bulk diffusion. This effect is usually ascribed to a proton-collecting antenna surrounding the channel entrance. In this paper, we consider a realistic phenomenological model of such an antenna. In our model, a homogeneous membrane surface, which can mediate proton diffusion toward the channel entrance, is populated with protolytic groups that are in dynamic equilibrium with the solution. Equations that describe coupled surface-bulk proton diffusion are derived and analyzed. A general expression for the rate constant of proton transport via such a coupled surface-bulk diffusion mechanism is obtained. A rigorous criterion is formulated of when proton diffusion along the surface enhances the transport. The enhancement factor is found to depend on the ratio of the surface and bulk diffusional constants, pK(a) values of surface protolytic groups, and their concentration. A capture radius for a proton on the surface and an effective size of the antenna are found. The theory also predicts the effective distance that a proton can migrate on the membrane surface between a source (such as CcO) and a sink (such as ATP synthase) without fully equilibrating with the bulk. In pure aqueous solutions, protons can travel over long distances (microns). In buffered solutions, the travel distance is much shorter (nanometers); still the enhancement effect of the surface diffusion on the proton flow to a target on the surface can be tens to hundreds at physiological buffer concentrations. These results are discussed in a general context of chemiosmotic theory. PMID:12023208

  5. Kinetic coupling between electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: simultaneous measurements of conductance and absorbance changes.

    PubMed Central

    Adelroth, P; Sigurdson, H; Hallén, S; Brzezinski, P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase is an electron-current driven proton pump. To investigate the mechanism by which this pump operates it is important to study individual electron- and proton-transfer reactions in the enzyme, and key reactions in which they are kinetically and thermodynamically coupled. In this work, we have simultaneously measured absorbance changes associated with electron-transfer reactions and conductance changes associated with protonation reactions following pulsed illumination of the photolabile complex of partly reduced bovine cytochrome c oxidase and carbon monoxide. Following CO dissociation, several kinetic phases in the absorbance changes were observed with time constants ranging from approximately 3 microseconds to several milliseconds, reflecting internal electron-transfer reactions within the enzyme. The data show that the rate of one of these electron-transfer reactions, from cytochrome a3 to a on a millisecond time scale, is controlled by a proton-transfer reaction. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which cytochrome a3 interacts electrostatically with a protonatable group, L, in the vicinity of the binuclear center, in equilibrium with the bulk through a proton-conducting pathway, which determines the rate of proton transfer (and indirectly also of electron transfer). The interaction energy of cytochrome a3 with L was determined independently from the pH dependence of the extent of the millisecond-electron transfer and the number of protons released, as determined from the conductance measurements. The magnitude of the interaction energy, 70 meV (1 eV = 1.602 x 10(-19) J), is consistent with a distance of 5-10 A between cytochrome a3 and L. Based on the recently determined high-resolution x-ray structures of bovine and a bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, possible candidates for L and a physiological role for L are discussed. PMID:8901574

  6. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  7. On-shell coupled-channel approach to proton-hydrogen collisions without partial-wave expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    2006-01-15

    A fully quantal approach to proton collisions with hydrogen based on the atomic-orbital close-coupling method is presented. The method leads to a system of coupled three-dimensional momentum-space integral equations for the scattering amplitudes. These equations are reduced to two-dimensional ones using an on-shell approximation. Furthermore, by considering the symmetry of the problem, we demonstrate that these can be reduced to just one dimension. The resulting equations are solved without partial-wave expansion. Cross sections for electron transfer in proton collisions with the ground state of atomic hydrogen are calculated and shown to agree well with experiment over a wide energy range.

  8. Minimalist Relativistic Force Field: Prediction of Proton-Proton Coupling Constants in (1)H NMR Spectra Is Perfected with NBO Hybridization Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-05-15

    We previously developed a reliable method for multiparametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. We now report that utilization of NBO hybridization coefficients for carbon atoms in the involved C-H bonds allows for a significant simplification of this parametric scheme, requiring only four general types of SSCCs: geminal, vicinal, 1,3-, and long-range constants. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) molecular geometries. A new DU8 basis set, based on a training set of 475 experimental spin-spin coupling constants, is developed for hydrogen and common non-hydrogen atoms (Li, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl, Se, Br, I) to calculate Fermi contacts. On a test set of 919 SSCCs from a diverse collection of natural products and complex synthetic molecules the method gave excellent accuracy of 0.29 Hz (rmsd) with the maximum unsigned error not exceeding 1 Hz. PMID:25885091

  9. Ion translocation by the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, T; Stolpe, S; Schneider, D; Barquera, B; Hellwig, P

    2005-08-01

    The energy-converting NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, also known as respiratory complex I, couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of ions across the membrane. It was assumed that the complex exclusively works as a proton pump. Recently, it has been proposed that complex I from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli work as Na+ pumps. We have used an E. coli complex I preparation to determine the type of ion(s) translocated by means of enzyme activity, generation of a membrane potential and redox-induced Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We did not find any indications for Na+ translocation by the E. coli complex I. PMID:16042610

  10. Delineating the extracellular water-accessible surface of the proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Duddempudi, Phaneendra Kumar; Goyal, Raman; Date, Swapneeta Sanjay; Jansen, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was recently identified as the major uptake route for dietary folates in humans. The three-dimensional structure of PCFT and its detailed interplay with function remain to be determined. We screened the water-accessible extracellular surface of HsPCFT using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method, to investigate the boundaries between the water-accessible surface and inaccessible buried protein segments. Single-cysteines, engineered individually at 40 positions in a functional cysteine-less HsPCFT background construct, were probed for plasma-membrane expression in Xenopus oocytes with a bilayer-impermeant primary-amine-reactive biotinylating agent (sulfosuccinimidyl 6-(biotinamido) hexanoate), and additionally for water-accessibility of the respective engineered cysteine with the sulfhydryl-selective biotinylating agent 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate. The ratio between Cys-selective over amine-selective labeling was further used to evaluate three-dimensional models of HsPCFT generated by homology / threading modeling. The closest homologues of HsPCFT with a known experimentally-determined three-dimensional structure are all members of one of the largest membrane protein super-families, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). The low sequence identity--14% or less--between HsPCFT and these templates necessitates experiment-based evaluation and model refinement of homology/threading models. With the present set of single-cysteine accessibilities, the models based on GlpT and PepTSt are most promising for further refinement. PMID:24205192

  11. Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, Karen S

    2013-10-24

    The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are

  12. Role of the fourth transmembrane domain in proton-coupled folate transporter function as assessed by the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Zhao, Rongbao; Fiser, Andras; Goldman, I David

    2013-06-15

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT, SLC46A1) mediates folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine and the basolateral membrane of choroid plexus ependymal cells. Two loss-of-function mutations in PCFT, which are the basis for hereditary folate malabsorption, have been identified within the fourth transmembrane domain (TMD4) in subjects with this disorder. We have employed the substituted Cys accessibility method (SCAM) to study the accessibilities of all residues in TMD4 and their roles in folate substrate binding to the carrier. When residues 146-167 were replaced by Cys, all except R148C were expressed at the cell surface. Modification of five of these substituted Cys residues (positions 147, 152, 157, 158, and 161) by methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents led to reduction of PCFT function. All five residues could be labeled with N-biotinylaminoethyl-MTS, and this could be blocked by the high-affinity PCFT substrate pemetrexed. Pemetrexed also protected PCFT mutant function from inhibitory modification of the substituted Cys at positions 157, 158, and 161 by a MTS. The findings indicate that these five residues in TMD4 are accessible to the aqueous translocation pathway, play a role in folate substrate binding, and are likely located within or near the folate binding pocket. A homology model of PCFT places three of these residues, Phe¹⁵⁷, Gly¹⁵⁸, and Leu¹⁶¹, within a breakpoint in the midportion of TMD4, a region that likely participates in alterations in the PCFT conformational state during carrier cycling. PMID:23552283

  13. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at a Heme-Propionate in an Iron-Protoporphyrin-IX Model Compound

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A heme model system has been developed in which the heme-propionate is the only proton donating/accepting site, using protoporphyrin IX-monomethyl esters (PPIXMME) and N-methylimidazole (MeIm). Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions of these model compounds have been examined in acetonitrile solvent. (PPIXMME)FeIII(MeIm)2-propionate (FeIII~CO2) is readily reduced by the ascorbate derivative 5,6-isopropylidine ascorbate to give (PPIXMME)FeII(MeIm)2-propionic acid (FeII~CO2H). Excess of the hydroxylamine TEMPOH or of hydroquinone similarly reduce FeIII~CO2, and TEMPO and benzoquinone oxidize FeII~CO2H to return to FeIII~CO2. The measured equilibrium constants, and the determined pKa and E1/2 values, indicate that FeII~CO2H has an effective bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 67.8 ± 0.6 kcal mol–1. In these PPIX models, electron transfer occurs at the iron center and proton transfer occurs at the remote heme propionate. According to thermochemical and other arguments, the TEMPOH reaction occurs by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET), and a similar pathway is indicated for the ascorbate derivative. Based on these results, heme propionates should be considered as potential key components of PCET/CPET active sites in heme proteins. PMID:21524059

  14. Thermal hydraulic studies of spallation target for one-way coupled Indian accelerator driven systems with low energy proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantha, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Satyamurthy, P.

    2007-02-01

    BARC has recently proposed a one-way coupled ADS reactor. This reactor requires typically 1 GeV proton beam with 2 mA of current. Approximately 8 kW of heat is deposited in the window of the target. Circulating liquid metal target (lead/lead-bismuth{eutectic) has to extract this heat and this is a critical R&D problem to be solved. At present there are very few accelerators, which can give few mA and high-energy proton beam. However, accelerators with low energy and hundreds of micro-ampere current are commercially available. In view of this, it is proposed in this paper to simulate beam window heating of 8 kW in the target with low-energy proton beam. Detailed thermal analysis in the spallation and window region has been carried out to study the capability of heat extraction by circulating LBE for a typical target loop with a proton beam of 30 MeV energy and current of 0.267 mA. The heat deposition study is carried out using FLUKA code and flow analysis by CFD code. The detailed analysis of this work is presented in this paper.

  15. Structural insights into ribosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N

    2016-09-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF-G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF-2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single-molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the 'head' domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward- and back-swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF-G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF-G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620-636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  16. Metal-free aqueous redox capacitor via proton rocking-chair system in an organic-based couple

    PubMed Central

    Tomai, Takaaki; Mitani, Satoshi; Komatsu, Daiki; Kawaguchi, Yuji; Honma, Itaru

    2014-01-01

    Safe and inexpensive energy storage devices with long cycle lifetimes and high power and energy densities are mandatory for the development of electrical power grids that connect with renewable energy sources. In this study, we demonstrated metal-free aqueous redox capacitors using couples comprising low-molecular-weight organic compounds. In addition to the electric double layer formation, proton insertion/extraction reactions between a couple consisting of inexpensive quinones/hydroquinones contributed to the energy storage. This energy storage mechanism, in which protons are shuttled back and forth between two electrodes upon charge and discharge, can be regarded as a proton rocking-chair system. The fabricated capacitor showed a large capacity (>20 Wh/kg), even in the applied potential range between 0–1 V, and high power capability (>5 A/g). The support of the organic compounds in nanoporous carbon facilitated the efficient use of the organic compounds with a lifetime of thousands of cycles. PMID:24395117

  17. Interrogation of the intersubunit interface of the open Hv1 proton channel with a probe of allosteric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Singh, Vikrant; Wulff, Heike; Tombola, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel is a dimeric complex consisting of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a gated proton permeation pathway. Dimerization is controlled by a cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain. The transitions from the closed to the open state in the two VSDs are known to occur cooperatively; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Intersubunit interfaces play a critical role in allosteric processes; but, such interfaces have not been determined in the open Hv1 channel. Here we show that 2-guanidinothiazole derivatives block the two Hv1 VSDs in a cooperative way, and use one of the compounds as a probe of allosteric coupling between open subunits. We find that the extracellular ends of the first transmembrane segments of the VSDs form the intersubunit interface that mediates coupling between binding sites, while the coiled-coil domain does not directly participate in the process. We also find strong evidence that the channel’s proton selectivity filter controls blocker binding cooperativity. PMID:26365828

  18. Dda helicase tightly couples translocation on single-stranded DNA to unwinding of duplex DNA: Dda is an optimally active helicase

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Alicia K.; Matlock, Dennis L.; Bagchi, Debjani; Aarattuthodiyil, Suja; Harrison, David; Croquette, Vincent; Raney, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Helicases utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to unwind double-stranded DNA while translocating on the DNA. Mechanisms for melting the duplex have been characterized as active or passive, depending on whether the enzyme actively separates the base pairs or simply sequesters single-stranded DNA that forms due to thermal fraying. Here we show that Dda translocates unidirectionally on single-stranded DNA at the same rate at which it unwinds double-stranded DNA in both ensemble and single molecule experiments. Further, the unwinding rate is largely insensitive to the duplex stability and to applied force. Thus, Dda transduces all of its translocase activity into DNA unwinding activity so that the rate of unwinding is limited by the rate of translocation and the enzyme actively separates the duplex. Active and passive helicases have been characterized by dividing the velocity of DNA unwinding in base pairs per second (Vun) by the velocity of translocation on single-stranded DNA in nucleotides per second (Vtrans). If the resulting fraction is 0.25, then a helicase is considered to be at the lower end of the “active” range. In the case of Dda, the average DNA unwinding velocity was 257 ± 42 bp/s and the average translocation velocity was 267 ± 15 nucleotides/s. The Vun/Vtrans value of 0.96 places Dda in a unique category of being an essentially “perfectly” active helicase. PMID:22504228

  19. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one- and two-proton transfer reactions for the 28Si + 90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Sandal, Rohit; Chakraborty, Santosh; Verma, Shashi; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one- and two-proton stripping reactions for 28Si + 90,94Zr systems were performed at 120 MeV. The experiment was carried out with the 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. The theoretical calculations were performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code fresco. The distorted wave Born approximation calculations reproduced the experimental angular distributions for the one-proton transfer channel for both the systems reasonably well but failed for the two-proton transfer channel. Coupled channels calculations including various intermediate states (involving target and projectile inelastic excitations before and/or after transfer) along with the sequential transfer were able to reproduce the two-proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It seems that at an energy above the Coulomb barrier, there is significant contribution of the indirect multistep and sequential transfer to the two-proton stripping reaction.

  20. A minimal non-supersymmetric S O(10) model: Gauge coupling unification, proton decay and fermion masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saki

    2016-06-01

    We present a minimal renormalizable non-supersymmetric S O(10) grand unified model with a symmetry breaking sector consisting of Higgs fields in the 54H + 126H + 10H representations. This model admits a single intermediate scale associated with Pati-Salam symmetry along with a discrete parity. Spontaneous symmetry breaking, the unification of gauge couplings and proton lifetime estimates are studied in detail in this framework. Including threshold corrections self-consistently, obtained from a full analysis of the Higgs potential, we show that the model is compatible with the current experimental bound on proton lifetime. The model generally predicts an upper bound of few times 1035 yrs for proton lifetime, which is not too far from the present Super-Kamiokande limit of τp ≳ 1.29 × 1034 yrs. With the help of a Pecci-Quinn symmetry and the resulting axion, the model provides a suitable dark matter candidate while also solving the strong CP problem. The intermediate scale, MI ≈ (1013 - 1014) GeV which is also the B - L scale, is of the right order for the right-handed neutrino mass which enables a successful description of light neutrino masses and oscillations. The Yukawa sector of the model consists of only two matrices in family space and leads to a predictive scenario for quark and lepton masses and mixings. The branching ratios for proton decay are calculable with the leading modes being p → e+π0 and p →v ¯π+ . Even though the model predicts no new physics within the reach of LHC, the next generation proton decay detectors and axion search experiments have the capability to pass verdict on this minimal scenario.

  1. Proton-coupled calcium transport by intact cells of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E M

    1980-08-01

    Addition of ionophores to resting aerobic cultures of Azotobacter vinelandii OP resulted in 45Ca2+ uptake (Km = 60 microM Ca2+; Vmax 1.1 nmol/min per mg of cell protein) which was inhibited by cations (La3+ greater than Mn2+ greater than Sr2+ greater Ba2+). The rate of Ca2+ entry correlated with the magnitude of a transmembrane proton gradient (inside acid) which developed in the respective order: valinomycin less than tetrachlorosalicylanilide less than nigericin less than gramicidin D less than tetrachlorosalicylanilide plus valinomycin. A process of calcium-proton exchange (antiport) is responsible for calcium accumulation under these conditions. PMID:6162836

  2. Photoregenerative I−/I3− couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-01-01

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I−/I3− redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I−/I3−-based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I− was regenerated to I3− by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells. PMID:25348812

  3. Cytochrome b-559 and proton conductance in oxygenic photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arnon, Daniel I.; Tang, George M.-S.

    1988-01-01

    Although cytochrome b-559 has long been known as a membrane-bound redox component closely linked to the reaction center of the oxygen-generating photosystem (PSII), its role in photosynthesis has remained obscure. This paper reports evidence and outlines a hypothesis in support of a “b-559 cycle”—i.e., a light-induced, cytochrome b-559-dependent, cyclic electron transport pathway around PSII that promotes translocation of protons from plastoquinol into the aqueous domain (lumen) of photosynthetic membranes (thylakoids). Light-induced proton transport coupled to light-induced electron transport is an essential aspect of energy transduction in photosynthesis because it generates an electrochemical proton gradient that drives ATP synthesis by the process of photosynthetic phosphorylation. The principal carrier of electrons and protons in thylakoids is the plastoquinone/plastoquinol couple. We propose that the b-559 cycle functions as a redox-linked proton pump that may operate jointly with the Rieske iron-sulfur pathway in oxidizing plastoquinol. The overall effect of such concerted oxidation of plastoquinol would be the translocation into the thylakoid lumen of two protons for each electron transferred from water to plastocyanin via plastoquinone. PMID:16594007

  4. Use of an electrochemically-induced proton-coupled electron transfer reaction to control dimerization in a ureidopyrimidone 4 H-bond array.

    PubMed

    Clare, Laurie A; Smith, Diane K

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic voltammetric and spectroelectrochemical evidence is presented showing that the H-bonded dimer formed from a ureidopyrimidone derivative containing a phenylenediamine redox couple can be reversibly broken apart at mM concentrations in CH2Cl2 by an electrochemically induced proton-coupled electron transfer reaction. PMID:27227749

  5. Proton-coupled electron transfer: Metal hydrides find the sweet spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, Jillian L.

    2015-02-01

    The synchronous movement of protons and electrons orchestrated by enzymes gives rise to highly efficient catalytic processes in nature, such as photosynthesis. Now, researchers have choreographed similar reactivity for a metal hydride complex, setting the stage for efficient solar fuel production in artificial systems.

  6. Laser induced autofluorescence in the monitoring of β-mercaptoethanol mediated photo induced proton coupled electron transfer in proteins.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, S; Satish Rao, B S; Satyamoorthy, K; Mahato, K K

    2015-01-01

    Photo induced proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is an important process that many organisms use for progression of catalytic reactions leading to energy conversion. In the present study, the influence of SDS and BME on the redox properties of tyrosine and tryptophan for five different globular proteins, BSA, HSA, RNase-A, trypsin and lysozyme were studied using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were subjected to denaturation under SDS, SDS plus heat and SDS plus β-mercaptoethanol (BME) plus heat and the corresponding fluorescence were recorded. The influence of BME on the autofluorescence properties of the proteins were evaluated upon tris-2-corboxy-ethyl phosphine (TCEP) denaturation. The BSA and HSA when exposed to SDS alone, exhibited hydrophobic collapse around their tryptophan moieties. However, these proteins when treated with SDS plus BME plus heat, an unusual red shift in the emission was observed, may be due to proton transfer from hydroxyl group of the excited tyrosine residues to the local microenvironments. The observation was further confirmed with similar proton transfer in absence of tryptophan in RNase-A showing involvement of tyrosine in the process. A drastic quenching of fluorescence in all of the proteins under study were also observed, may be due to photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from BME to the intrinsic fluorophores resulting in radical ions formation, evaluated upon DCFDA measurements. PMID:25985124

  7. Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex: theoretical analysis of asymmetric tafel plots and transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Michelle K; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer of an osmium aquo complex attached to a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode is studied with a recently developed theoretical formulation. The calculated hydrogen/deuterium kinetic isotope effect for the standard rate constant, the cathodic transfer coefficient at zero overpotential, and the Tafel plot are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The input quantities to the heterogeneous rate constant expressions were calculated with density functional theory in conjunction with dielectric continuum models, and no parameters were fit to experimental data. The theoretical calculations indicate that the asymmetry of the Tafel plot and the deviation of the transfer coefficient at zero overpotential from the standard value of one-half arise from the change in the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distance upon electron transfer. The direction of the asymmetry and deviation from one-half is determined by the sign of this distance change, and the magnitude of these effects is determined by the magnitude of this distance change, as well as the reorganization energy and the distance dependence of the overlap between the initial and final proton vibrational wave functions. This theory provides experimentally testable predictions for the impact of specific system properties on the qualitative behavior of the Tafel plots. PMID:20067257

  8. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes. PMID:25545667

  9. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  10. Neutron-Proton Coupling and the Lifetime of the First Excited State in ^16C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Nuclei near the valley of β-stability have strongly correlated proton and neutron spatial distributions. This need not be the case for nuclei with a large excess of one nucleon type and the search for new phenomena and structure effects due to the ``decoupling'' of neutrons and protons is of great interest in nuclear structure physics. Cited examples of decoupled behavior include neutron-halo nuclei with measurably different proton and neutron radial distributions, and low-energy dipole modes such as ``pygmy'' resonances where, simplistically, a core of equal numbers of protons and neutrons oscillates against the excess neutron ``skin'''. Recently, another example was suggested to occur in ^16C where the measurement of an anomalously quenched B(E2;2^+->^ 0^+) value of 0.63 e^2fm^4 combined with a large nuclear deformation led to the suggestion that the ^16C valence neutrons were decoupled from its near-spherical proton core (N.Imai et al., PRL 92 (2004) 062501; Z.Elekes et al., PLB 586 (2004) 34; H.J.Ong et al., PRC 73 (2006) 024610). In this talk I will discuss a new lifetime measurement for the first-excited 2^+ state in ^16C carried out at the LBNL 88-Inch Cyclotron using the Recoil Distance Method and ^9Be(^9Be,2p) fusion-evaporation reaction. The mean lifetime was found to be 11.7(20) ps corresponding to a B(E2) of 4.15(73) e^2fm^4, consistent with other even-even closed shell nuclei and neighboring systematics. Our result does not support the interpretation of decoupled protons and neutrons in ^16C. The revised value provides an important benchmark for theory. Time permitting I will present results on the neutron-rich nucleus ^30Ne produced in a 2p knockout reaction performed at the NSCL using the S800 spectrometer and SeGA gamma-ray detector. The measured (quenched) 2p knockout cross-section, when compared to theory, suggests a significant difference in the neutron intruder content between ^32Mg and ^30Ne, contrary to current shell models.

  11. Increased expression of the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor Gpr65 during retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ail, D; Rüfenacht, V; Caprara, C; Samardzija, M; Kast, B; Grimm, C

    2015-08-20

    The retina is a metabolically highly active tissue that is sensitive to pH changes. Blinding diseases of the retina are often characterized by degeneration of photoreceptor cells altering the acid-base homeostasis of the tissue microenvironment and by an accompanying inflammatory response. GPR4, GPR65 and GPR68 are G protein-coupled receptors that aid cells to sense and survive conditions of acidic pH and inflammatory cells express Gpr65 enhancing their viability. Hence, we investigated expression and function of these proton-sensing GPRs in the normal and degenerating retina. We observed increased retinal expression of Gpr65, but not of Gpr4 and Gpr68, in mouse models of both inherited (rd10) and induced (light damage) retinal degeneration. Lack of GPR65 slightly accelerated photoreceptor degeneration in rd10 mice and resulted in a strong activation of microglia after light-injury. Since GPR65 was dispensable for normal retinal development, function and aging as evidenced by the evaluation of Gpr65(-/-) mice, our results indicate that the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor GPR65 may be involved in a mechanism that supports survival of photoreceptors in the degenerating retina. PMID:26117715

  12. Proton-Conducting Graphene Oxide-Coupled Neuron Transistors for Brain-Inspired Cognitive Systems.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Liu, Yang Hui; Feng, Ping; Liu, Zhao Ping; Cao, Hai Liang; Xiao, Peng; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-05-01

    Proton-conducting graphene oxide electrolyte films with very high electric-double-layer capacitance are used as the gate dielectrics for oxide-based neuron transistor fabrication. Paired-pulse facilitation, dendritic integration, and orientation tuning are successfully emulated. Additionally, neuronal gain controls (arithmetic) are also experimentally demonstrated. The results provide a new-concept approach for building brain-inspired cognitive systems. PMID:26972820

  13. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  14. Nonequilibrium Spin Dynamics: from Protons in Water to a Gauge Theory of Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokatly, I. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.

    Nonequilibrium dynamics of spin degrees of freedom in condensed matter, ranging from classical liquids to solids and ultracold atomic gases, is one of the focus topics in physics. Here we present a gauge theory of spin dynamics in spinorbit coupled gases for a "pure" gauge realization of the spin-orbit coupling field. This approach allows one to describe the spin dynamics in fermionic systems in terms of exact general response functions and to map it on the density dynamics in a dual system without spin-orbit coupling. We apply this approach to electrons in disordered two-dimensional structures and to cold atomic gases of interacting fermions with synthetic spin-orbit coupling at very low temperatures.

  15. A Close Look at 13C CPMAS Linewidths in Solids for Rigid, Strongly Coupled Carbons under CW Proton Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderHart, D. L.; Campbell, G. C.

    1998-09-01

    Ambient-temperature13C linewidth (LW) and transverse relaxation (TC2) data are presented for the natural-abundance crystalline carbons of linear polyethylene (LPE) under CW proton decoupling conditions and magic angle spinning (MAS). This linewidth behavior typifies that seen for rigid methylene carbons whose attached protons are also strongly coupled to other protons. These data are presented for two LPE samples (unoriented, melt-crystallized and uniaxially oriented, extruded) as a function of several parameters including static field (1.4 T proton decoupling field strength (38 kHz < νH1< 90 kHz), MAS frequency (0.5 kHz < νr< 8 kHz) and RF frequency offsets from resonance (-4 kHz < Δνoff< 4 kHz). It is the ubiquitous nature of off-resonance proton irradiation (ORPI) (arising from fixed or rotationally dependent deviations from the true proton resonance condition) which provides the focus for this work. Corresponding contributions, LW(ORPI), to the total LW are treated within the general framework of the effective-field picture of CW decoupling. Then, considering the presence of spin fluctuations characteristic of the strongly-dipolar-coupled protons of LPE, LW(ORPI) can be traced to orbit-dependentTC2contributions to LW. Important dependences demonstrated and discussed include: (1) For "off-resonance" decoupling, there is a quadratic dependence of LW(ORPI) on (Δνoff/νH1)andthere is a strong dependence of the corresponding parabolic coefficient on νr. From the latter dependence, characteristic times for spin fluctuations are also estimated. (2) For "on-resonance" decoupling, LW(ORPI) is proportional to (νH1)-2andshows very little sensitivity to νr. These LW(ORPI) contributions become more important at higherB0since the principle reason for ORPI is the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) of the13C-bonded protons. The difference in sensitivities of LW(ORPI) to νrfor the off-resonance and the on-resonance cases is traced back, respectively, to the

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfers: pH-dependent driving forces? Fundamentals and artifacts.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Routier, Mathilde; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2013-09-25

    Besides its own interest, tryptophan oxidation by photogenerated Ru complexes is one of the several examples where concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) to water as proton acceptor endowed with a pH-dependent driving force has been invoked to explain the data. Since this notion is contrary to the very basic principles of chemical physics, it was interesting to attempt uncovering the source of this contradiction with an easily accessible substrate. Careful examination of the oxidation of the tryptophan (ethyl ester derivative) bearing a NH3(+)/NH2 group showed that there is no trace of such an unconventional H2O-CPET with a pH-dependent driving force. The reaction mechanism simply consists, with both the NH3(+) acid and NH2 basic forms of the tryptophan derivative, in a rate-determining electron-transfer step followed by deprotonation steps. The same is true with the ethyl ester-methyl amide derivative of tryptophan, whose behavior is even simpler since the molecule does not bear an acid-base group. No such unconventional H2O-CPET was found with phenol, another easily accessible substrate. It may thus be inferred that the same applies to less easily available systems in which electron transfer occurs intramolecularly. These observations help to rid the road of such artificial obstacles and improve present models of H2O-CPET reactions, a landmark towards the understanding of the role of water chains in natural systems. PMID:23972082

  17. Inorganic proton conducting electrolyte coupled oxide-based dendritic transistors for synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals.Ionic/electronic hybrid devices with synaptic functions are considered to be the essential building blocks for neuromorphic systems and brain-inspired computing. Here, artificial synapses based on indium-zinc-oxide (IZO) transistors gated by nanogranular SiO2 proton-conducting electrolyte films are fabricated on glass substrates. Spike-timing dependent plasticity and paired-pulse facilitation are successfully mimicked in an individual bottom-gate transistor. Most importantly, dynamic logic and dendritic integration established by spatiotemporally correlated spikes are also mimicked in dendritic transistors with two in-plane gates as the presynaptic input terminals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The structures and transfer characteristics of the IZO junctionless transistor working in bottom-gate mode and in-plane gate mode. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05882d

  18. Structural Changes and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna; Johansson, Ann-Louise; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 is linked to transmembrane proton pumping, which contributes to maintaining a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The mechanism by which cytochrome c oxidase couples the exergonic electron transfer to the endergonic proton translocation is not known, but it presumably involves local structural changes that control the alternating proton access to the two sides of the membrane. Such redox-induced structural changes have been observed in X-ray crystallographic studies at residues 423–425 (in the R. sphaeroides oxidase), located near heme a. The aim of the present study is to investigate the functional effects of these structural changes on reaction steps associated with proton pumping. Residue Ser425 was modified using site-directed mutagenesis and time-resolved spectroscopy was used to investigate coupled electron-proton transfer upon reaction of the oxidase with O2. The data indicate that the structural change at position 425 propagates to the D proton pathway, which suggests a link between redox changes at heme a and modulation of intramolecular proton-transfer rates. PMID:26310633

  19. Weak-coupling structure of proton resonant states in 23Al studied with RI beam at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. J.; Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Michimasa, S.; Baba, H.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Hokoiwa, N.; Kibe, M.; Gono, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. S.; Iwasaki, H.; Kato, S.

    2006-07-01

    Proton resonances in 23Al have been investigated for the first time by the resonant elastic and inelastic scattering of 22Mg+p by using a 4.38 MeV/nucleon 22Mg beam bombarding a thick Hydrogen target. The low-energy 22Mg beam was separated by the CNS radioactive ion beam separator (CRIB). A new resonant state due to elastic scattering was observed at Ex = 3.00 MeV with a Jπ = (3/2+) assignment. Other three excited states due to resonant inelastic scattering at 3.14, 3.26 and 3.95 MeV were identified and all mainly decay to the first excited state in 22Mg by the proton emissions. The newly observed 3.95-MeV state probably has a spin-parity of Jπ = (7/2+). The resonant properties were determined from an R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. The weak-coupling structure in 23Al is discussed in conjunction with a shell-model calculation.

  20. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  1. The HP-1 maquette: From an apoprotein structure to a structured hemoprotein designed to promote redox-coupled proton exchange

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steve S.; Koder, Ronald L.; Lewis, Mitchell; Wand, A. Joshua; Dutton, P. Leslie

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic heme-binding four-α-helix bundles show promise as working model systems, maquettes, for understanding heme cofactor–protein assembly and function in oxidoreductases. Despite successful inclusion of several key functional elements of natural proteins into a family of heme protein maquettes, the lack of 3D structures, due principally to conformational heterogeneity, has prevented them from achieving their full potential. We report here the design and synthesis of HP-1, a disulfide-bridged two-α-helix peptide that self-assembles to form an antiparallel twofold symmetric diheme four-α-helix bundle protein with a stable conformation on the NMR time-scale. The HP-1 design strategy began with the x-ray crystal structure of the apomaquette L31M, an apomaquette derived from the structurally heterogeneous tetraheme-binding H10H24 prototype. L31M was functionally redesigned to accommodate two hemes ligated to histidines and to retain the strong coupling of heme oxidation-reduction to glutamate acid–base transitions and proton exchange that was characterized in molten globule predecessors. Heme insertion was modeled with angular constraints statistically derived from natural proteins, and the pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues on each helix was then altered to account for this large structural reorganization. The transition to structured holomaquette involved the alteration of 6 of 31 residues in each of the four identical helices and, unlike our earlier efforts, required no design intermediates. Oxidation-reduction of both hemes displays an unusually low midpoint potential (–248 mV vs. normal hydrogen electrode at pH 9.0), which is strongly coupled to proton binding, as designed. PMID:15056758

  2. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang Hui; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ˜5.5 × 10-3 S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ˜2.0 μF/cm2 at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm2 V-1 s-1, 2.8 × 106, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  3. UV-Induced Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Cyclic DNA Miniduplexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Li, Xi-Bo; Fleming, Aaron M; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Orendt, Anita M; Burrows, Cynthia J; Kohler, Bern

    2016-06-15

    The excited-state dynamics of two cyclic DNA miniduplexes, each containing just two base pairs, are investigated using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. As in longer DNA duplexes, intrastrand electron transfer induced by UV excitation triggers interstrand proton transfer in the alternating miniduplex containing two out-of-phase G·C base pairs. The resulting excited state decays on a time scale of several tens of picoseconds. This state is absent when one of the two G residues is substituted by 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine, a modification that is suggested to disrupt base stacking, while maintaining base pairing. These findings demonstrate that a nucleobase tetramer arranged as two stacked base pairs accurately captures the interplay between intrastrand and interstrand decay channels. The similar signals seen in the miniduplexes and longer sequences suggest that excited states in the latter rapidly localize on two adjacent base pairs. PMID:27203223

  4. Proton-coupled self-assembly of a porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyad.

    PubMed

    Tu, Siyu; Kim, Se Hye; Joseph, Jojo; Modarelli, David A; Parquette, Jon R

    2013-06-01

    The construction of an n-p heterojunction through the self-assembly of a dyad based on tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) and 1,4,5,8-naphthalenedimide (NDI) (1) is described. Proton transfer from the lysine head group of 1 to the porphyrin ring occurs concomitantly with self-assembly into 1D nanorods in CHCl3. TEM and AFM studies showed that the nanorods are formed by the lateral and vertical fusion of multilameller vesicles into networks and hollow ribbons, respectively. These intermediate structures transitioned to nanorods over the course of 4-6 days. Time-resolved spectroscopy revealed that photoinduced charge separation occurs with rate constants that depend on the nature of the aggregation. PMID:23564748

  5. Carbon-proton scalar couplings in RNA. 3D heteronuclear and 2D isotope-edited NMR of a [sup 13]C-labeled extra-stable hairpin

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; Varani, G.; Tinoco, I. Jr. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-29

    Long range carbon-proton scalar couplings were measured for an RNA hairpin of 12 nucleotides using 3D and [sup 13]C-edited 2D NMR. The large one-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) and small n-bond couplings ([sup 1]J[sub CH]) produce ECOSY type cross-peaks, thus facilitating the determination of the sign and magnitude of the smaller [sup 2]J[sub CH] or [sup 3]J[sub CH]. The UUCGRNA hairpin (5[prime]-rGGACUUCGGUCC-3[prime]), whose structure has been determined by our laboratory, was uniformly [sup 13]C-labeled at 30% isotopic enrichment. The observed [sup 1]J[sub CH] couplings were then correlated to the known structure. The signs of [sup 2]J[sub C4[prime]H5[prime

  6. Measurements and coupled reaction channels analysis of one and two proton transfer reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Mandal, S.; Jhingan, A.; Gehlot, J.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Madhavan, N.; Garg, Ritika; Goyal, Savi; Mohanto, Gayatri; Verma, S.; Sandal, Rohit; Behera, Bivash; Eleonora, G.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of angular distributions for one and two proton stripping reactions for 28Si+90,94Zr systems were performed at lab energy 120 MeV with 28Si beam at Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi. Theoretical calculations performed using the quantum mechanical coupled reaction channels code FRESCO (including various intermediate states involving target and projectile excitations before and/or after transfer along with sequential transfer) were able to reproduce one and two proton transfer angular distributions for both the systems reasonably well. It was found that the DWBA calculations could describe the one proton transfer data well for both the systems but failed to reproduce the angular distributions for two proton transfer channels. The present measurements underline the importance of sequential transfer at energies much above the Coulomb barrier. We had also performed transfer reaction measurements for these systems in the sub- and near barrier region using recoil mass separator.

  7. Pseudo-scalar pi N coupling and relativistic proton-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Franz; Maung, Khin Maung; Tjon, J. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wallace, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    Relativistic p-Ca-40 elastic scattering observables are calculated using relativistic NN amplitudes obtained from the solution of a two-body relativistic equation in which one particle is kept on its mass-shell. Results at 200 MeV are presented for two sets of NN amplitudes, one with pure pseudo-vector coupling for the pion and another with a 25 percent admixture of pseudo-scaling coupling. Both give a very good fit to the positive energy on-shell NN data. Differences between the predictions of these two models (which are shown to be due only to the differences in their corresponding negative energy amplitudes) provide a measure of the uncertainty in contructing Dirac optical potentials from NN amplitudes.

  8. Solar-Driven Water Oxidation and Decoupled Hydrogen Production Mediated by an Electron-Coupled-Proton Buffer.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Leanne G; Solarska, Renata; Bienkowski, Krzysztof; Kulesza, Pawel J; Augustynski, Jan; Symes, Mark D; Cronin, Leroy

    2016-06-01

    Solar-to-hydrogen photoelectrochemical cells (PECs) have been proposed as a means of converting sunlight into H2 fuel. However, in traditional PECs, the oxygen evolution reaction and the hydrogen evolution reaction are coupled, and so the rate of both of these is limited by the photocurrents that can be generated from the solar flux. This in turn leads to slow rates of gas evolution that favor crossover of H2 into the O2 stream and vice versa, even through ostensibly impermeable membranes such as Nafion. Herein, we show that the use of the electron-coupled-proton buffer (ECPB) H3PMo12O40 allows solar-driven O2 evolution from water to proceed at rates of over 1 mA cm(-2) on WO3 photoanodes without the need for any additional electrochemical bias. No H2 is produced in the PEC, and instead H3PMo12O40 is reduced to H5PMo12O40. If the reduced ECPB is subjected to a separate electrochemical reoxidation, then H2 is produced with full overall Faradaic efficiency. PMID:27159121

  9. Proton conducting sodium alginate electrolyte laterally coupled low-voltage oxide-based transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Hui; Wan, Qing; Qiang Zhu, Li; Shi, Yi

    2014-03-31

    Solution-processed sodium alginate electrolyte film shows a high proton conductivity of ∼5.5 × 10{sup −3} S/cm and a high lateral electric-double-layer (EDL) capacitance of ∼2.0 μF/cm{sup 2} at room temperature with a relative humidity of 57%. Low-voltage in-plane-gate indium-zinc-oxide-based EDL transistors laterally gated by sodium alginate electrolytes are fabricated on glass substrates. The field-effect mobility, current ON/OFF ratio, and subthreshold swing of such EDL transistors are estimated to be 4.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, 2.8 × 10{sup 6}, and 130 mV/decade, respectively. At last, a low-voltage driven resistor-load inverter is also demonstrated. Such in-plane-gate EDL transistors have potential applications in portable electronics and low-cost biosensors.

  10. Overexpression of a proton-coupled vacuolar glucose exporter impairs freezing tolerance and seed germination.

    PubMed

    Klemens, Patrick A W; Patzke, Kathrin; Trentmann, Oliver; Poschet, Gernot; Büttner, Michael; Schulz, Alexander; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-04-01

    Arabidopsis vacuoles harbor, besides sugar transporter of the TMT-type, an early response to dehydration like 6 (ERDL6) protein involved in glucose export into the cytosol. However, the mode of transport of ERDL6 and the plant's feedback to overexpression of its activity on essential properties such as, for example, seed germination or freezing tolerance, remain unexplored. Using patch-clamp studies on vacuoles expressing AtERDL6 we demonstrated directly that this carrier operates as a proton-driven glucose exporter. Overexpression of BvIMP, the closest sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) homolog to AtERDL6, in Arabidopsis leads surprisingly to impaired seed germination under both conditions, sugar application and low environmental temperatures, but not under standard conditions. Upon cold treatment, BvIMP overexpressor plants accumulated lower quantities of monosaccharides than the wild-type, a response in line with the reduced frost tolerance of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and the fact that cold temperatures inhibits BvIMP transcription in sugar beet leaves. With these findings we show that the tight control of vacuolar sugar import and export is a key requisite for cold tolerance and seed germination of plants. PMID:24329902

  11. Inhibition, but not uncoupling, of respiratory energy coupling of three bacterial species by nitrite.

    PubMed Central

    Rake, J B; Eagon, R G

    1980-01-01

    The effect of nitrite on respiratory energy coupling of three bacteria was studied in light of a recent report that nitrite acted as an uncoupling agent with Paracoccus denitrificans grown under denitrifying conditions. Our determinations of proton translocation stoichiometry of Pseudomonas putida (aerobically grown), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and P. denitrificans (grown both aerobically and under denitrifying conditions) showed nitrite inhibition of proton-to-oxidant stoichiometry, but not uncoupling. Nitrite both reduced the H+/O ratio and decreased the rate of proton resorption. Increased proton resorption rates, characteristic of authentic uncoupling agents, were not observed. The lack of enhanced proton permeability due to nitrite was verified via passive proton permeability assays. The H+/O ratio of P. aeruginosa increased when growth conditions were changed from aerobic to denitrifying. This suggested the induction of an additional coupling site in the electron transport chain of denitrifying P. aeruginosa. PMID:6777373

  12. Non-adiabatic electron-proton couplings in H2 by floating Gaussian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Yuichi; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    Time-dependent electron-nuclear wave functions of H2 were described by the floating Gaussian method. The equations of motion for the parameters that specify the wave functions are explicitly derived. By the imaginary time propagation, the ground-state wave functions were obtained. Five high frequency components appearing in the Fourier transformed spectra of the squared inter-particle distances were ascribed to the motion of electrons, and the two lowest frequency components among the five were identified as those representing coupling of the motions of electrons and nuclei.

  13. An efficient proton-coupled electron-transfer process during oxidation of ferulic acid by horseradish peroxidase: coming full cycle.

    PubMed

    Derat, Etienne; Shaik, Sason

    2006-10-25

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations were utilized to study the process of oxidation of a native substrate (ferulic acid) by the active species of horseradish peroxidase (Dunford, H. B. Heme Peroxidases; Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999), Compound I and Compound II, and the manner by which the enzyme returns to its resting state. The results match experimental findings and reveal additional novel features. The calculations demonstrate that both oxidation processes are initiated by a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) step, in which the active species of the enzyme participate only as electron-transfer partners, while the entire proton-transfer event is being relayed from the substrate to and from the His42 residue by a water molecule (W402). The reason for the observed (Henriksen, A; Smith, A. T.; Gajhede, M. J. Biol. Chem. 1999, 274, 35005-35011) similar reactivities of Compound I and Compound II toward ferulic acid is that the reactive isomer of Compound II is the, hitherto unobserved, Por(*)(+)Fe(III)OH isomer that resembles Compound I. The PCET mechanism reveals that His42 and W402 are crucial moieties and they determine the function of the HRP enzyme and account for its ability to perform substrate oxidation (Poulos, T. L. Peroxidases and Cytochrome P450. In The Porphyrin Handbook; Kadish, K. M., Smith, K. M., Guilard, R., Eds.; Academic Press: New York, 2000; Vol. 4, pp 189). In view of the results, the possibility of manipulating substrate oxidation by magnetic fields is an intriguing possibility. PMID:17044722

  14. Investigations on the role of proton-coupled electron transfer in hydrogen activation by [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mulder, David W; Ratzloff, Michael W; Bruschi, Maurizio; Greco, Claudio; Koonce, Evangeline; Peters, John W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-29

    Proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is a fundamental process at the core of oxidation-reduction reactions for energy conversion. The [FeFe]-hydrogenases catalyze the reversible activation of molecular H2 through a unique metallocofactor, the H-cluster, which is finely tuned by the surrounding protein environment to undergo fast PCET transitions. The correlation of electronic and structural transitions at the H-cluster with proton-transfer (PT) steps has not been well-resolved experimentally. Here, we explore how modification of the conserved PT network via a Cys → Ser substitution at position 169 proximal to the H-cluster of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase (CrHydA1) affects the H-cluster using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Despite a substantial decrease in catalytic activity, the EPR and FTIR spectra reveal different H-cluster catalytic states under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Under H2 or sodium dithionite reductive treatments, the EPR spectra show signals that are consistent with a reduced [4Fe-4S]H(+) subcluster. The FTIR spectra showed upshifts of νCO modes to energies that are consistent with an increase in oxidation state of the [2Fe]H subcluster, which was corroborated by DFT analysis. In contrast to the case for wild-type CrHydA1, spectra associated with Hred and Hsred states are less populated in the Cys → Ser variant, demonstrating that the exchange of -SH with -OH alters how the H-cluster equilibrates among different reduced states of the catalytic cycle under steady-state conditions. PMID:25286239

  15. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  16. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    channel is large enough to contain water molecules. and is normally filled with water. In analogy to the mechanism of proton transfer in some other channels, it has been postulated that protons are translocated along the network of water molecules filling the pore of the channel. This mechanism, however, must involve an additional important step because the channel contains four histidine amino acid residues, one from each of the helices, which are sufficiently large to occlude the pore and interrupt the water network. The histidine residues ensure channel selectivity by blocking transport of small ions, such as sodium or potassium. They have been also implicated in gating protons due to the ability of each histidine to become positively charged by accepting an additional proton. Two mechanisms of gating have been proposed. In one mechanism, all four histidines acquire an additional proton and, due to repulsion between their positive charges, move away from one another, thus opening the channel. The alternative mechanism relies of the ability of protons to move between different atoms in a molecule (tautomerization). Thus, a proton is captured on one side of the gate while another proton is released from the opposite side, and the molecule returns to the initial state through tautomerization. The simulations were designed to test these two mechanisms. Large-scale, atomic-level molecular dynamics simulations of the channel with the histidine residues in different protonation states revealed that all intermediate states of the system involved in the tautomerization mechanism are structurally stable and the arrangement of water molecules in the channel is conducive to the proton transport. In contrast, in the four-protonated state, postulated to exist in the gate-opening mechanism, the electrostatic repulsion between the histidine residues appears to be so large that the channel loses its structural integrity and one helix moves away from the remaining three. Additional

  17. Intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation

    PubMed Central

    Horan, Lucas H.; Noller, Harry F.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of tRNA and mRNA during protein synthesis is believed to be coupled to structural changes in the ribosome. The “ratchet model,” based on cryo-EM reconstructions of ribosome complexes, invokes relative movement of the 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits in this process; however, evidence that directly demonstrates a requirement for intersubunit movement during translocation is lacking. To address this problem, we created an intersubunit disulfide cross-link to restrict potential movement. The cross-linked ribosomes were unable to carry out polypeptide synthesis; this inhibition was completely reversed upon reduction of the disulfide bridge. In vitro assays showed that the cross-linked ribosomes were specifically blocked in elongation factor G-dependent translocation. These findings show that intersubunit movement is required for ribosomal translocation, accounting for the universal two-subunit architecture of ribosomes. PMID:17360328

  18. Proton zero-quantum 2D NMR of 2-propenenitrile aligned by an electric field. Determination of the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. H.; De Kanter, F. J. J.; MaClean, C.

    Zero-quantum NMR, selectively detected by 2D NMR, is applied to observe small 1H- 1H dipolar couplings in a polar liquid partially oriented by a strong electric field. The normal (single-quantum) 1H spectrum is severely broadened, which prevents the observation of small couplings. The results from the zero-quantum proton spectrum are used to calculate the 2H and 14N quadrupole coupling constants of 2-deutero-2-propenenitrile from the 2H and 14N NMR spectra.

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in a Series of Ruthenium-Linked Tyrosines with Internal Bases: Evaluation of a Tunneling Model for Experimental Temperature-Dependent Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Zhang, Ming-Tian; Santoni, Marie-Pierre; Johannissen, Linus O; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) kinetics has been investigated in a series of four modified tyrosines linked to a ruthenium photosensitizer in acetonitrile, with each tyrosine bearing an internal hydrogen bond to a covalently linked pyridine or benzimidazole base. After correcting for differences in driving force, it is found that the intrinsic PCET rate constant still varies by 2 orders of magnitude. The differences in rates, as well as the magnitude of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = kH/kD), both generally correlate with DFT calculated proton donor-acceptor distances. An Arrhenius analysis of temperature dependent data shows that the difference in reactivity arises primarily from differences in activation energies. We use this kinetic data to evaluate a commonly employed theoretical model for proton tunneling which includes a harmonic distribution of proton donor-acceptor distances due to vibrational motions of the molecule. Applying this model to the experimental data yields the conclusion that donor-acceptor compression is more facile in the compounds with shorter PT distance; however, this is contrary to independent calculations for the same compounds. This discrepancy is likely because the assumption in the model of Morse-shaped proton potential energy surfaces is inappropriate for (strongly) hydrogen-bonded systems. These results question the general applicability of this model. The results also suggest that a correlation of rate vs proton tunneling distance for the series of compounds is complicated by a concomitant variation of other relevant parameters. PMID:27490689

  20. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. 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D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Bagaturia, I.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. 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Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]The CMS

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of.

  1. Electron Transfer Reactivity of the Aqueous Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex. Outer-Sphere vs Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, Fe(IV)(H2O)5O(2+) (hereafter Fe(IV)aqO(2+)), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)3(2+) (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS(-)/ABTS(2-), phenothiazines, Co(II)(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. Fe(IV)aqO(2+) oxidizes even Ce(III) (E(0) in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7 V) with a rate constant greater than 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)3(2+) (k = 2.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), IrCl6(3-) (1.6 × 10(6)), ABTS(2-) (4.7 × 10(7)), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 10(7)) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)3(2+) and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H(+)] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of Fe(IV)aqO(2+) and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E(0)Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E(0)Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+) couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) and thus E(0)(Fe(IV)aqO(2+)/Fe(III)aqO(+)) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E(0) (Fe(IV)aqO(2+), H(+)/Fe(III)aqOH(2+)) ≥ 1.95 V. PMID:27320290

  2. H/sup +/-translocating ATPases: advances using membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, H.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, two primary active transport systems (H/sup +/ -ATPases) in plant cells are examined using membrane vesicles as a simple experimental tool. One electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPase is vanadate-sensitive and associated with the plasma membrane. Another electrogenic, H/sup +/ -translocating ATPases is anion-sensitive, and localized on the tonoplast (and perhaps other membranes). According to the working model, the plasma membrane and tonoplast-type H/sup +/ -ATPases are detectable in inside-out plasma membrane and right-side-out tonoplast vesicles. The direction of H/sup +/ pumping into these vesicles would be consistent with the results from intact cells where H/sup +/ are extruded from the cell across the plasma membrane and pumped into the vacuole from the cytoplasm. Understanding the properties of H/sup +/ -pumping ATPases using membrane vesicles has paved the way for studies to identify secondary active transport systems coupled to the proton electrochemical gradient. Redox-driven transport systems can also be studied directly using the isolated vesicles. As transport proteins are identified, the functional activities can be specifically studied after reconstitution of the purified protein(s) into phospholipid membrane vesicles. 154 references.

  3. Structure of the hexameric HerA ATPase reveals a mechanism of translocation-coupled DNA-end processing in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Neil J.; Blackwood, John K.; Bray, Sian M.; Maman, Joseph D.; Pellegrini, Luca; Robinson, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    The HerA ATPase cooperates with the NurA nuclease and the Mre11-Rad50 complex for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks in thermophilic archaea. Here we extend our structural knowledge of this minimal end-resection apparatus by presenting the first crystal structure of hexameric HerA. The full-length structure visualises at atomic resolution the N-terminal HerA-ATP Synthase (HAS) domain and a conserved C-terminal extension, which acts as a physical brace between adjacent protomers. The brace also interacts in trans with nucleotide-binding residues of the neighbouring subunit. Our observations support a model in which the coaxial interaction of the HerA ring with the toroidal NurA dimer generates a continuous channel traversing the complex. HerA-driven translocation would propel the DNA towards the narrow annulus of NurA, leading to duplex melting and nucleolytic digestion. This system differs substantially from the bacterial end-resection paradigms. Our findings suggest a novel mode of DNA-end processing by this integrated archaeal helicase-nuclease machine. PMID:25420454

  4. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  5. Coupled modeling of water transport and air-droplet interaction in the electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Pianese, Cesare; Guezennec, Yann G.

    In this work, an accurate and computationally fast model for liquid water transport within a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) electrode is developed by lumping the space-dependence of the relevant variables. Capillarity is considered as the main transport mechanism within the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The novelty of the model lies in the coupled simulation of the water transport at the interface between gas diffusion layer and gas flow channel (GFC). This is achieved with a phenomenological description of the process that allows its simulation with relative simplicity. Moreover, a detailed two-dimensional visualization of such interface is achieved via geometric simulation of water droplets formation, growth, coalescence and detachment on the surface of the GDL. The model is useful for optimization analysis oriented to both PEMFC design and balance of plant. Furthermore, the accomplishment of reduced computational time and good accuracy makes the model suitable for control strategy implementation to ensure PEM fuel cells operation within optimal electrode water content.

  6. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free-energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green's function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. PMID:27111050

  7. Novel macrocyclic carriers for proton-coupled liquid membrane transport. Progress report, 1 December 1988--31 May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.D.

    1991-06-10

    The objective of our research program is to elucidate the chemical principles which are responsible for the cation selectivity and permeability of liquid membranes containing macrocyclic carriers. Several new macrocyclic carriers were synthesized during the last three year period, including selenium-containing macrocycles, new crown-4 structures, and several new crown structures containing nitrogen based heterocycles as substituents in the principal macrocyclic ring. The cation binding properties of these macrocycles were investigated by potentiometric titration, calorimetric titration, solvent extraction, and NMR techniques. In addition, hydrophobic macrocycles were incorporated into dual hollow fiber membrane systems to investigate their membrane performance, especially in the proton-coupled transport mode. It was found that the dual hollow fiber system maintains the cation selectivity and permeability of supported liquid membranes, while enhancing membrane stability. The diffusion limited transport model was expanded to account for membrane solvent effects. Furthermore, Eu{sup 2+} transport was found to be similar to that of strontium and much higher than that of the lanthanides, in supported liquid membrane systems.

  8. Proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of J-coupled resonances in human brain at 3 and 4 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Posse, Stefan; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Bustillo, Juan; Chen, Hongji; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Gasparovic, Charles; Zuo, Chun; Magnotta, Vincent; Mueller, Bryon; Mullins, Paul; Renshaw, Perry; Ugurbil, Kamil; Lim, Kelvin O; Alger, Jeffry R

    2007-08-01

    In this multicenter study, 2D spatial mapping of J-coupled resonances at 3T and 4T was performed using short-TE (15 ms) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI). Water-suppressed (WS) data were acquired in 8.5 min with 1-cm(3) spatial resolution from a supraventricular axial slice. Optimized outer volume suppression (OVS) enabled mapping in close proximity to peripheral scalp regions. Constrained spectral fitting in reference to a non-WS (NWS) scan was performed with LCModel using correction for relaxation attenuation and partial-volume effects. The concentrations of total choline (tCho), creatine + phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr), glutamate (Glu), glutamate + glutamine (Glu+Gln), myo-inositol (Ins), NAA, NAA+NAAG, and two macromolecular resonances at 0.9 and 2.0 ppm were mapped with mean Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) between 6% and 18% and approximately 150-cm(3) sensitive volumes. Aspartate, GABA, glutamine (Gln), glutathione (GSH), phosphoethanolamine (PE), and macromolecules (MMs) at 1.2 ppm were also mapped, although with larger mean CRLBs between 30% and 44%. The CRLBs at 4T were 19% lower on average as compared to 3T, consistent with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and increased spectral resolution. Metabolite concentrations were in the ranges reported in previous studies. Glu concentration was significantly higher in gray matter (GM) compared to white matter (WM), as anticipated. The short acquisition time makes this methodology suitable for clinical studies. PMID:17610279

  9. Effect of J coupling on 1.3-ppm lipid methylene signal acquired with localised proton MRS at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, Dylan Y; Fallone, B Gino; Yahya, Atiyah

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of J-coupling interactions on the quantification and T2 determination of 1.3-ppm lipid methylene protons at 3 T. The response of the 1.3-ppm protons of hexanoic, heptanoic, octanoic, linoleic and oleic acid was measured as a function of point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) TE. In addition, a narrow-bandwidth refocusing PRESS sequence designed to rewind J-coupling evolution of the 1.3-ppm protons was applied to the five fatty acids, to corn oil and to tibial bone marrow of six healthy volunteers. Peak areas were plotted as a function of TE, and data were fitted to monoexponentially decaying functions to determine Mo (the extrapolated area for TE = 0 ms) and T2 values. In phantoms, rewinding J-coupling evolution resulted in 198%, 64%, 44%, 20% and 15% higher T2 values for heptanoic, octanoic, linoleic and oleic acid, and corn oil, respectively, compared with those obtained with standard PRESS. The narrow-bandwidth PRESS sequence also resulted in significant changes in Mo , namely -77%, -22%, 28%, 23% and 28% for heptanoic, octanoic, linoleic and oleic acid, and corn oil, respectively. T2 values obtained with STEAM were closer to the values measured with narrow-bandwidth PRESS. On average, in tibial bone marrow (six volunteers) rewinding J-coupling evolution resulted in 21% ± 3% and 9 % ± 1% higher Mo and T2 values, respectively. This work demonstrates that the consequence of neglecting to consider scalar coupling effects on the quantification of 1.3-ppm lipid methylene protons and their T2 values is not negligible. The linoleic and oleic acid T2 results indicate that T2 measures of lipids with standard MRS techniques are dependent on lipid composition. PMID:26314546

  10. Electrostatics, hydration, and proton transfer dynamics in the membrane domain of respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Kaila, Ville R. I.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Complex I serves as the primary electron entry point into the mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains. It catalyzes the reduction of quinones by electron transfer from NADH, and couples this exergonic reaction to the translocation of protons against an electrochemical proton gradient. The membrane domain of the enzyme extends ∼180 Å from the site of quinone reduction to the most distant proton pathway. To elucidate possible mechanisms of the long-range proton-coupled electron transfer process, we perform large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane domain of complex I from Escherichia coli. We observe spontaneous hydration of a putative proton entry channel at the NuoN/K interface, which is sensitive to the protonation state of buried glutamic acid residues. In hybrid quantum mechanics/classical mechanics simulations, we find that the observed water wires support rapid proton transfer from the protein surface to the center of the membrane domain. To explore the functional relevance of the pseudosymmetric inverted-repeat structures of the antiporter-like subunits NuoL/M/N, we constructed a symmetry-related structure of a possible alternate-access state. In molecular dynamics simulations, we find the resulting structural changes to be metastable and reversible at the protein backbone level. However, the increased hydration induced by the conformational change persists, with water molecules establishing enhanced lateral connectivity and pathways for proton transfer between conserved ionizable residues along the center of the membrane domain. Overall, the observed water-gated transitions establish conduits for the unidirectional proton translocation processes, and provide a possible coupling mechanism for the energy transduction in complex I. PMID:24778264

  11. The stereospecific assignment of H5' and H5' in RNA using the sign of two-bond carbon-proton scalar couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.V.; Varani, G.; Landry, S.M.; Tinoco, I. Jr. )

    1993-11-17

    Stereospecific assignment of H5' and H5' protons in the NMR spectra of nucleic acids provides significant improvement in the use of NOE distance and torsion angle constraints for structure determination. With stereospecific assignments, the torsion angles [beta] (P5'-O5'-C5'-C4') and [gamma] (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') can be determined on the basis of [sup 1]H-[sup 1]H and [sup 31]P-[sup 1]H couplings. In addition, stereospecific assignment allows use of NOE distance constraints for H5' and H5'. We report a novel, independent method for the stereospecific assignment of the H5' (pro-S) and H5' (pro-R) protons which is based only on the sign of the carbon-proton two-bond scalar couplings and will not be greatly limited by line width. The sign of [sup 2]J[sub CH] can also be used to determine torsion angle [gamma] and the sugar conformation. Determination of the sign of the two-bond carbon-proton couplings provides a useful new method for the structure determination of RNA molecules. The ribose sugar conformation and torsion angle [gamma] (O5'-C5'-C4'-C3') can be specified. Furthermore, H5' and H5' protons can be stereospecifically assigned, allowing their use in NOE distance constraints and in determining [beta] (P5'-O5'-C5'-C4'). The correlation we have reported between the sign of [sup 2]J[sub CH] and RNA structure will be particularly useful in the study of large RNAs and RNA-protein complexes. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Roles of multiple-proton transfer pathways and proton-coupled electron transfer in the reactivity of the bis-FeIV state of MauG.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongxin; Williamson, Heather R; Davidson, Victor L

    2015-09-01

    The high-valent state of the diheme enzyme MauG exhibits charge-resonance (CR) stabilization in which the major species is a bis-Fe(IV) state with one heme present as Fe(IV)=O and the other as Fe(IV) with axial heme ligands provided by His and Tyr side chains. In the absence of its substrate, the high-valent state is relatively stable and returns to the diferric state over several minutes. It is shown that this process occurs in two phases. The first phase is redistribution of the resonance species that support the CR. The second phase is the loss of CR and reduction to the diferric state. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the rates of the two phases exhibited different temperature dependencies and activation energies of 8.9 and 19.6 kcal/mol. The two phases exhibited kinetic solvent isotope effects of 2.5 and 2.3. Proton inventory plots of each reaction phase exhibited extreme curvature that could not be fit to models for one- or multiple-proton transfers in the transition state. Each did fit well to a model for two alternative pathways for proton transfer, each involving multiple protons. In each case the experimentally determined fractionation factors were consistent with one of the pathways involving tunneling. The percent of the reaction that involved the tunneling pathway differed for the two reaction phases. Using the crystal structure of MauG it was possible to propose proton-transfer pathways consistent with the experimental data using water molecules and amino acid side chains in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme. PMID:26283395

  13. Surface modification of Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles by silane coupling agent: Synthesis and application in proton exchange composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Salarizadeh, Parisa; Javanbakht, Mehran; Pourmahdian, Saeed; Bagheri, Ahmad; Beydaghi, Hossein; Enhessari, Morteza

    2016-06-15

    Modifying surfaces of nanoparticles with silane coupling agent provides a simple method to alter their surface properties and improve their dispersibility in organic solvents and polymer matrix. Fe2TiO5 nanoparticles (IT) were modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as novel reinforcing filler for proton exchange membranes. The main operating parameters such as reaction time (R.T), APTES/IT and triethylamine (TEA)/IT ratios have been optimized for maximum grafting efficiency. The optimum conditions for R.T, APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were 6h, 4 and 0.3 respectively. It was observed that the APTES/IT and TEA/IT ratios were the most significant parameters affecting the grafting percentage. Modified nanoparticles were characterized using FT-IR, TGA, SEM, TEM and XRD techniques. Effects of modified nanoparticles in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) were evaluated. The resulting nanocomposite membranes exhibited higher proton conductivity in comparison with pristine SPPEK and SPPEK/IT membranes. This increase is attributed to connectivity of the water channels which creates more direct pathways for proton transport. Composite membrane with 3% AIT (6.46% grafting amount) showed 0.024Scm(-1) proton conductivity at 25°C and 149mWcm(-2) power density (at 0.5V) at 80°C which were about 243% and 51%, respectively higher than that of pure SPPEK. PMID:27023633

  14. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  15. Slow Proton Transfer Coupled to Unfolding Explains the Puzzling Results of Single-Molecule Experiments on BBL, a Paradigmatic Downhill Folding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cerminara, Michele; Campos, Luis A.; Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    A battery of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural approaches has indicated that the small α-helical protein BBL folds-unfolds via the one-state downhill scenario. Yet, single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy offers a more conflicting view. Single-molecule experiments at pH 6 show a unique half-unfolded conformational ensemble at mid denaturation, whereas other experiments performed at higher pH show a bimodal distribution, as expected for two-state folding. Here we use thermodynamic and laser T-jump kinetic experiments combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the pH dependence of BBL stability, folding kinetics and mechanism within the pH 6–11 range. We find that BBL unfolding is tightly coupled to the protonation of one of its residues with an apparent pKa of ∼7. Therefore, in chemical denaturation experiments around neutral pH BBL unfolds gradually, and also converts in binary fashion to the protonated species. Moreover, under the single-molecule experimental conditions (denaturant midpoint and 279 K), we observe that proton transfer is much slower than the ∼15 microseconds folding-unfolding kinetics of BBL. The relaxation kinetics is distinctly biphasic, and the overall relaxation time (i.e. 0.2–0.5 ms) becomes controlled by the proton transfer step. We then show that a simple theoretical model of protein folding coupled to proton transfer explains quantitatively all these results as well as the two sets of single-molecule experiments, including their more puzzling features. Interestingly, this analysis suggests that BBL unfolds following a one-state downhill folding mechanism at all conditions. Accordingly, the source of the bimodal distributions observed during denaturation at pH 7–8 is the splitting of the unique conformational ensemble of BBL onto two slowly inter-converting protonation species. Both, the unprotonated and protonated species unfold gradually (one-state downhill), but they exhibit different degree of unfolding at any

  16. Roles of multiple-proton transfer pathways and proton-coupled electron transfer in the reactivity of the bis-FeIV state of MauG

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhongxin; Williamson, Heather R.; Davidson, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    The high-valent state of the diheme enzyme MauG exhibits charge–resonance (CR) stabilization in which the major species is a bis-FeIV state with one heme present as FeIV=O and the other as FeIV with axial heme ligands provided by His and Tyr side chains. In the absence of its substrate, the high-valent state is relatively stable and returns to the diferric state over several minutes. It is shown that this process occurs in two phases. The first phase is redistribution of the resonance species that support the CR. The second phase is the loss of CR and reduction to the diferric state. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the rates of the two phases exhibited different temperature dependencies and activation energies of 8.9 and 19.6 kcal/mol. The two phases exhibited kinetic solvent isotope effects of 2.5 and 2.3. Proton inventory plots of each reaction phase exhibited extreme curvature that could not be fit to models for one- or multiple-proton transfers in the transition state. Each did fit well to a model for two alternative pathways for proton transfer, each involving multiple protons. In each case the experimentally determined fractionation factors were consistent with one of the pathways involving tunneling. The percent of the reaction that involved the tunneling pathway differed for the two reaction phases. Using the crystal structure of MauG it was possible to propose proton–transfer pathways consistent with the experimental data using water molecules and amino acid side chains in the distal pocket of the high-spin heme. PMID:26283395

  17. Reaction dynamics and proton coupled electron transfer: studies of tyrosine-based charge transfer in natural and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In bioenergetic reactions, electrons are transferred long distances via a hopping mechanism. In photosynthesis and DNA synthesis, the aromatic amino acid residue, tyrosine, functions as an intermediate that is transiently oxidized and reduced during long distance electron transfer. At physiological pH values, oxidation of tyrosine is associated with a deprotonation of the phenolic oxygen, giving rise to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. Tyrosine-based PCET reactions are important in photosystem II, which carries out the light-induced oxidation of water, and in ribonucleotide reductase, which reduces ribonucleotides to form deoxynucleotides. Photosystem II contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD (Y160 in the D2 polypeptide) and YZ (Y161 in the D1 polypeptide). YD forms a light-induced stable radical, while YZ functions as an essential charge relay, oxidizing the catalytic Mn₄CaO₅ cluster on each of four photo-oxidation reactions. In Escherichia coli class 1a RNR, the β2 subunit contains the radical initiator, Y122O•, which is reversibly reduced and oxidized in long range electron transfer with the α2 subunit. In the isolated E. coli β2 subunit, Y122O• is a stable radical, but Y122O• is activated for rapid PCET in an α2β2 substrate/effector complex. Recent results concerning the structure and function of YD, YZ, and Y122 are reviewed here. Comparison is made to recent results derived from bioengineered proteins and biomimetic compounds, in which tyrosine-based charge transfer mechanisms have been investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25260243

  18. Role of the tryptophan residues in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT-SLC46A1) function.

    PubMed

    Najmi, Mitra; Zhao, Rongbao; Fiser, Andras; Goldman, I David

    2016-07-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mediates folate absorption across the brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine and is required for folate transport across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid. In this study, the functional role and accessibility of the seven PCFT Trp residues were assessed by the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Six Trp residues at a lipid-aqueous interface tolerated Cys substitution in terms of protein stability and function. W85C, W202C, and W213C were accessible to N-biotinyl aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate; W48C and W299C were accessible only after treatment with dithiotreitol (DTT), consistent with modification of these residues by an endogenous thiol-reacting molecule and their extracellular location. Neither W107C nor W333C was accessible (even after DTT) consistent with their cytoplasmic orientation. Biotinylation was blocked by pemetrexed only for the W48C (after DTT), W85C, W202C residues. Function was impaired only for the W299C PCFT mutant located in the 4th external loop between the 7th and 8th transmembrane helices. Despite its aqueous location, function could only be fully preserved with Phe and, to a lesser extent, Ala substitutions. There was a 6.5-fold decrease in the pemetrexed influx Vmax and a 3.5- and 6-fold decrease in the influx Kt and Ki, respectively, for the W299S PCFT. The data indicate that the hydrophobicity of the W299 residue is important for function suggesting that during the transport cycle this residue interacts with the lipid membrane thereby impacting on the oscillation of the carrier and, indirectly, on the folate binding pocket. PMID:27251438

  19. Metabolic targeting of oncogene MYC by selective activation of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate family of transporters.

    PubMed

    Gan, L; Xiu, R; Ren, P; Yue, M; Su, H; Guo, G; Xiao, D; Yu, J; Jiang, H; Liu, H; Hu, G; Qing, G

    2016-06-01

    Deregulation of the MYC oncogene produces Myc protein that regulates multiple aspects of cancer cell metabolism, contributing to the acquisition of building blocks essential for cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, disabling Myc function represents an attractive therapeutic option for cancer treatment. However, pharmacological strategies capable of directly targeting Myc remain elusive. Here, we identified that 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), a drug candidate that primarily inhibits glycolysis, preferentially induced massive cell death in human cancer cells overexpressing the MYC oncogene, in vitro and in vivo, without appreciable effects on those exhibiting low MYC levels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of glutamine metabolism synergistically potentiated the synthetic lethal targeting of MYC by 3-BrPA due in part to the metabolic disturbance caused by this combination. Mechanistically, we identified that the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and MCT2, which enable efficient 3-BrPA uptake by cancer cells, were selectively activated by Myc. Two regulatory mechanisms were involved: first, Myc directly activated MCT1 and MCT2 transcription by binding to specific recognition sites of both genes; second, Myc transcriptionally repressed miR29a and miR29c, resulting in enhanced expression of their target protein MCT1. Of note, expressions of MCT1 and MCT2 were each significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas and C-MYC-overexpressing lymphomas than in tumors without MYC overexpression, correlating with poor prognosis and unfavorable patient survival. These results identify a novel mechanism by which Myc sensitizes cells to metabolic inhibitors and validate 3-BrPA as potential Myc-selective cancer therapeutics. PMID:26434591

  20. HC[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors in protonated complexes containing two phosphorus bases: structures, binding energies, and spin-spin coupling constants.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Bene, Janet E Del

    2007-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ level have been carried out to investigate the structures and binding energies of cationic complexes involving protonated sp, sp2, and sp3 phosphorus bases as proton donor ions and the sp-hybridized phosphorus bases H-C[triple bond]P and H3C-C[triple bond]P as proton acceptors. These proton-bound complexes exhibit a variety of structural motifs, but all are stabilized by interactions that occur through the pi cloud of the acceptor base. The binding energies of these complexes range from 6 to 15 kcal/mol. Corresponding complexes with H3C-C[triple bond]P as the proton acceptor are more stable than those with H-C[triple bond]P as the acceptor, a reflection of the greater basicity of H3C-C[triple bond]P. In most complexes with sp2- or sp3-hybridized P-H donor ions, the P-H bond lengthens and the P-H stretching frequency is red-shifted relative to the corresponding monomers. Complex formation also leads to a lengthening of the C[triple bond]P bond and a red shift of the C[triple bond]P stretching vibration. The two-bond coupling constants 2pihJ(P-P) and 2pihJ(P-C) are significantly smaller than 2hJ(P-P) and 2hJ(P-C) for complexes in which hydrogen bonding occurs through lone pairs of electrons on P or C. This reflects the absence of significant s electron density in the hydrogen-bonding regions of these pi complexes. PMID:17760429

  1. First high-power model of the annular-ring coupled structure for use in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Yoshishige

    2012-01-01

    A prototype cavity for the annular-ring coupled structure (ACS) for use in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) linac has been developed to confirm the feasibility of achieving the required performance. This prototype cavity is a buncher module, which includes ten accelerating cells in total. The ACS cavity is formed by the silver brazing of ACS half-cell pieces stacked in a vacuum furnace. The accelerating cell of the ACS is surrounded by a coupling cell. We, therefore, tuned the frequencies of the accelerating and coupling cells by an ultraprecision lathe before brazing, taking into account the frequency shift due to brazing. The prototype buncher module was successfully conditioned up to 600 kW, which corresponds to an accelerating field that is higher than the designed field of 4.1MV/m by 30%. We describe the frequency-tuning results for the prototype buncher module and its high-power conditioning.

  2. The Proton-Sensing G-Protein Coupled Receptor GPR4 Promotes Angiogenesis in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Zhong, Qi; Huang, Junwei; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Wei; Yang, Zheng; Ding, Shuo; Chen, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is an aggressive disease with poor survival and is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Gastroesophageal reflux is a common event in SCCHN patients. GPR4 is a proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which can be activated by acidosis. The objective of this study was to explore the role of GPR4 in acid exposure and tumor angiogenesis in SCCHN. In this study, we confirmed that overexpressing GPR4 in SCCHN cells could increase the expression and secretion of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA at pH 5.9. This effect could be inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Western blot analysis indicated that phosphorylation of p38 increased in GPR4 infected cells at pH 5.9, which could be inhibited by SB203580. In tube formation assay, HMEC-1 cells were incubated with conditioned medium (CM, pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) derived from control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells. Tube length was significantly increased in HMEC-1 cells incubated with CM from GPR4 infected cells compared with control cells at pH5.9, which indicated the pro-angiogenic effect of GPR4 in acidic pH. The neutralizing antibodies of IL6, IL8 and VEGFA could inhibit tube formation of HMEC-1 cells. In vivo, the effect of GPR4 on angiogenesis was investigated with the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Control and GPR4 infected SCCHN cells were seeded onto the upper CAM surface (n = 5 in each group) and 5 μL DMEM/F12 (pH 5.9, 6.5, 7.4) was added to the surface of the cell every 24 h. Four days later, the upper CAM were harvested and the ratio of the vascular area to the CAM area was quantified using Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. GPR4 infected cells could recruit more vascular than control cells at pH5.9. In conclusion, we suggested that GPR4 induces angiogenesis via GPR4-induced p38-mediated IL6, IL8 and VEGFA secretion at acidic extracellular pH in SCCHN. PMID:27078157

  3. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation ofmore » free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.« less

  4. Photo-induced water oxidation at the aqueous GaN (101¯0) interface: Deprotonation kinetics of the first proton-coupled electron-transfer step

    SciTech Connect

    Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Kharche, Neerav; Batista, Victor S.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Tully, John C.; Muckerman, James T.

    2015-03-12

    Photoeclectrochemical water splitting plays a key role in a promising path to the carbon-neutral generation of solar fuels. Wurzite GaN and its alloys (e.g., GaN/ZnO and InGaN) are demonstrated photocatalysts for water oxidation, and they can drive the overall water splitting reaction when coupled with co-catalysts for proton reduction. In the present work, we investigate the water oxidation mechanism on the prototypical GaN (101¯0) surface using a combined ab initio molecular dynamics and molecular cluster model approach taking into account the role of water dissociation and hydrogen bonding within the first solvation shell of the hydroxylated surface. The investigation of free-energy changes for the four proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) steps of the water oxidation mechanism shows that the first PCET step for the conversion of –Ga-OH to –Ga-O˙⁻ requires the highest energy input. We further examine the sequential PCETs, with the proton transfer (PT) following the electron transfer (ET), and find that photo-generated holes localize on surface –NH sites is thermodynamically more favorable than –OH sites. However, proton transfer from –OH sites with subsequent localization of holes on oxygen atoms is kinetically favored owing to hydrogen bonding interactions at the GaN (101¯0)–water interface. We find that the deprotonation of surface –OH sites is the limiting factor for the generation of reactive oxyl radical ion intermediates and consequently for water oxidation.

  5. Measurements of the Z Z production cross sections in the 2l 2ν channel in proton-proton collisions at √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV and combined constraints on triple gauge couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, l.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, T. A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryn, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beir ao; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. Ferreira; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, l.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Yzquierdo, A. Pérez-Calero; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Narain, M.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, l. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, CMS

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the Z Z production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are presented. Candidate events for the leptonic decay mode ZZ→ 2l 2ν where l denotes an electron or a muon, are reconstructed and selected from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 (19.6) {fb}^{-1} at 7 (8) TeV collected with the CMS experiment. The measured cross sections, σ ({p}{p}→ ZZ) = 5.1_{-1.4}^{+1.5} {(stat)} _{-1.1}^{+1.4} {(syst)} ± 0.1 {(lumi)} { pb} at 7 TeV, and 7.2_{-0.8}^{+0.8} {(stat)} _{-1.5}^{+1.9} {(syst)} ± 0.2 {(lumi)} { pb} at 8 TeV, are in good agreement with the standard model predictions with next-to-leading-order accuracy. The selected data are analyzed to search for anomalous triple gauge couplings involving the Z Z final state. In the absence of any deviation from the standard model predictions, limits are set on the relevant parameters. These limits are then combined with the previously published CMS results for Z Z in 4l final states, yielding the most stringent constraints on the anomalous couplings.

  6. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer During the S-State Transitions of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Szejgis, Witold; Vassiliev, Serguei; Brudvig, Gary W; Bruce, Doug; Gunner, M R

    2015-06-18

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) is a unique Mn4O5Ca cluster that catalyzes water oxidation via four photoactivated electron transfer steps. As the protein influence on the redox and protonation chemistry of the OEC remains an open question, we present a classical valence model of the OEC that allows the redox state of each Mn and the protonation state of bridging μ-oxos and terminal waters to remain in equilibrium with the PSII protein throughout the redox cycle. We find that the last bridging oxygen loses its proton during the transition from S0 to S1. Two possible S2 states are found depending on the OEC geometry: S2 has Mn4(IV) with a proton lost from a terminal water (W1) trapped by the nearby D1-D61 if O5 is closer to Mn4, or Mn1(IV), with partial deprotonation of D1-H337 and D1-E329 if O5 is closer to Mn1. In S3, the OEC is Mn4(IV) with W2 deprotonated. The estimated OEC Em's range from +0.7 to +1.3 V, enabling oxidation by P680(+), the primary electron donor in PSII. In chloride-depleted PSII, the proton release increases during the S1 to S2 transition, leaving the OEC unable to properly advance through the water-splitting cycle. PMID:25575266

  7. Problem-Elephant Translocation: Translocating the Problem and the Elephant?

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating “problem-elephants” is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they were released, while all the others left those parks. Translocated elephants showed variable responses: “homers” returned to the capture site, “wanderers” ranged widely, and “settlers” established home ranges in new areas soon after release. Translocation caused wider propagation and intensification of HEC, and increased elephant mortality. We conclude that translocation defeats both HEC mitigation and elephant conservation goals. PMID:23236404

  8. Subunit δ Is the Key Player for Assembly of the H+-translocating Unit of Escherichia coli FOF1 ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Hilbers, Florian; Eggers, Ruth; Pradela, Kamila; Friedrich, Kathleen; Herkenhoff-Hesselmann, Brigitte; Becker, Elisabeth; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The ATP synthase (FOF1) of Escherichia coli couples the translocation of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane to the synthesis or hydrolysis of ATP. This nanomotor is composed of the rotor c10γϵ and the stator ab2α3β3δ. To study the assembly of this multimeric enzyme complex consisting of membrane-integral as well as peripheral hydrophilic subunits, we combined nearest neighbor analyses by intermolecular disulfide bond formation or purification of partially assembled FOF1 complexes by affinity chromatography with the use of mutants synthesizing different sets of FOF1 subunits. Together with a time-delayed in vivo assembly system, the results demonstrate that FOF1 is assembled in a modular way via subcomplexes, thereby preventing the formation of a functional H+-translocating unit as intermediate product. Surprisingly, during the biogenesis of FOF1, F1 subunit δ is the key player in generating stable FO. Subunit δ serves as clamp between ab2 and c10α3β3γϵ and guarantees that the open H+ channel is concomitantly assembled within coupled FOF1 to maintain the low membrane proton permeability essential for viability, a general prerequisite for the assembly of multimeric H+-translocating enzymes. PMID:23864656

  9. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    Transport of molecules across membranes is an essential mechanism for life processes. These molecules are often long, and the pores in the membranes are too narrow for the molecules to pass through as a single unit. In such circumstances, the molecules have to squeeze -- i.e., translocate -- themselves through the pores. DNA, RNA and proteins are such naturally occuring long molecules in a variety of biological processes. Understandably, the process of translocation has been an active topic of current research: not only because it is a cornerstone of many biological processes, but also due to its relevance for practical applications. Translocation is a complicated process in living organisms -- the presence of chaperone molecules, pH, chemical potential gradients, and assisting molecular motors strongly influence its dynamics. Consequently, the translocation process has been empirically studied in great variety in biological literature. Study of translocation as a biophysical process is more recent. Herein, the polymer is simplified to a sequentially connected string of N monomers as it passes through a narrow pore on a membrane. The quantities of interest are the typical time scale for the polymer to leave a confining cell (the ``escape of a polymer from a vesicle'' time scale), and the typical time scale the polymer spends in the pore (the ``dwell'' time scale) as a function of N and other parameters like membrane thickness, membrane adsorption, electrochemical potential gradient, etc. Our research is focused on computer simulations of translocation. Since our main interest is in the scaling properties, we use a highly simplified description of the translocation process. The polymer is described as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and its dynamics consists of single-monomer jumps from one lattice site to another neighboring one. Since we have a very efficient program to simulate such polymer dynamics, which we decribe in Chapter 2, we can perform long

  10. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  11. Coupled-Channel Investigation of the Collision of Protons and Antiprotons with hydrogen-Like Atoms in the 2s States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Reda S.

    2003-03-01

    The influence of the electric charge of both the projectile and the target nucleus on the cross section of the inelastic collision of protons and antiprotons with atoms is investigated at energies ranging from 1 to 2500 KeV. The impact parameter method is used to analyse the cross sections of the excitation of the n = 3 states of H atom and He+, Li2+ ions being initially in the excited 2s states. The calculated cross sections for hydrogen atoms are compared with the other theoretical results based on coupled-channels methods.

  12. "On-the-fly" coupled cluster path-integral molecular dynamics: impact of nuclear quantum effects on the protonated water dimer.

    PubMed

    Spura, Thomas; Elgabarty, Hossam; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-06-14

    We present an accelerated ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics technique, where the interatomic forces are calculated "on-the-fly" by accurate coupled cluster electronic structure calculations. In this way not only dynamic electron correlation, but also the harmonic and anharmonic zero-point energy, as well as tunneling effects are explicitly taken into account. This method thus allows for very precise finite temperature quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The predictive power of this novel approach is illustrated on the example of the protonated water dimer, where the impact of nuclear quantum effects on its structure and the (1)H magnetic shielding tensor are discussed in detail. PMID:25650366

  13. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakib, Farnaz A.; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  14. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  15. Proton transport and torque generation in rotary biomotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Savel'Ev, S.; Mourokh, L. G.; Nori, Franco

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of rotary biomotors within a simple nanoelectromechanical model, consisting of a stator part and a ring-shaped rotor having 12 proton-binding sites. This model is closely related to the membrane-embedded F0 motor of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase, which converts the energy of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of protons into mechanical motion of the rotor. It is shown that the Coulomb coupling between the negative charge of the empty rotor site and the positive stator charge, located near the periplasmic proton-conducting channel (proton source), plays a dominant role in the torque-generating process. When approaching the source outlet, the rotor site has a proton energy level higher than the energy level of the site, located near the cytoplasmic channel (proton drain). In the first stage of this torque-generating process, the energy of the electrochemical potential is converted into potential energy of the proton-binding sites on the rotor. Afterwards, the tangential component of the Coulomb force produces a mechanical torque. We demonstrate that, at low temperatures, the loaded motor works in the shuttling regime where the energy of the electrochemical potential is consumed without producing any unidirectional rotation. The motor switches to the torque-generating regime at high temperatures, when the Brownian ratchet mechanism turns on. In the presence of a significant external torque, created by ATP hydrolysis, the system operates as a proton pump, which translocates protons against the transmembrane potential gradient. Here we focus on the F0 motor, even though our analysis is applicable to the bacterial flagellar motor.

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfer and adduct configuration are important for C4a-hydroperoxyflavin formation and stabilization in a flavoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Surawatanawong, Panida; Visitsatthawong, Surawit; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Scrutton, Nigel S; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the mechanism of dioxygen activation by flavoenzymes remains one of the most challenging problems in flavoenzymology for which the underlying theoretical basis is not well understood. Here, the reaction of reduced flavin and dioxygen catalyzed by pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O), a flavoenzyme oxidase that is unique in its formation of C4a-hydroperoxyflavin, was investigated by density functional calculations, transient kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Based on work from the 1970s-1980s, the current understanding of the dioxygen activation process in flavoenzymes is believed to involve electron transfer from flavin to dioxygen and subsequent proton transfer to form C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. Our findings suggest that the first step of the P2O reaction is a single electron transfer coupled with a proton transfer from the conserved residue, His548. In fact, proton transfer enhances the electron acceptor ability of dioxygen. The resulting ·OOH of the open-shell diradical pair is placed in an optimal position for the formation of C4a-hydroperoxyflavin. Furthermore, the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin is stabilized by the side chains of Thr169, His548, and Asn593 in a "face-on" configuration where it can undergo a unimolecular reaction to generate H2O2 and oxidized flavin. The computational results are consistent with kinetic studies of variant forms of P2O altered at residues Thr169, His548, and Asn593, and kinetic isotope effects and pH-dependence studies of the wild-type enzyme. In addition, the calculated energy barrier is in agreement with the experimental enthalpy barrier obtained from Eyring plots. This work revealed new insights into the reaction of reduced flavin with dioxygen, demonstrating that the positively charged residue (His548) plays a significant role in catalysis by providing a proton for a proton-coupled electron transfer in dioxygen activation. The interaction around the N5-position of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin is important for dictating the

  17. Solution of the proton-hydrogen scattering problem using a quantum-mechanical two-center convergent close-coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Avazbaev, S. K.; Bray, I.

    2016-06-01

    Details of the recently developed quantum-mechanical two-center convergent close-coupling approach (Abdurakhmanov et al 2016 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 49 03LT01) to proton-hydrogen scattering are presented. The formulation is based on the exact (fully quantum-mechanical) three-body Schrödinger equation. The total scattering wavefunction is expanded using a two-center pseudostate basis. This allows one to include all underlying processes, namely, direct scattering and ionization, electron capture into bound and continuum states of the projectile. The off-shell integration in the coupled-channel Lippmann–Schwinger integral equations emerging from the three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wavefunction is taken analytically which greatly reduces computational effort. While the calculated electron capture cross sections are in a good agreement with experiment, some discrepancy exists for the ionization cross sections.

  18. Search for heavy vector-like quarks coupling to light quarks in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, A. K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Böser, S.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Silva, P. V. M.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Taille, C.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Lotto, B.; de Mora, L.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; de Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delemontex, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Fellmann, D.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Fopma, J.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. 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G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    This Letter presents a search for singly produced vector-like quarks, Q, coupling to light quarks, q. The search is sensitive to both charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) processes, pp → Qq → Wqq‧ and pp → Qq → Zqq‧ with a leptonic decay of the vector gauge boson. In 1.04 fb-1 of data taken in 2011 by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy √{ s} = 7 TeV, no evidence of such heavy vector-like quarks is observed above the expected Standard Model background. Limits on the heavy vector-like quark production cross section times branching ratio as a function of mass mQ are obtained. For a coupling κqQ = v /mQ, where v is the Higgs vacuum expectation value, 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of a vector-like quark are set at 900 GeV and 760 GeV from CC and NC processes, respectively.

  19. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section and limits on anomalous neutral triple gauge couplings in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Bachy, G; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barashkou, A; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Battistoni, G; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Benchouk, C; Bendel, M; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bona, M; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Boorman, G; Booth, C N; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Buira-Clark, D; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V

    2012-01-27

    A measurement of the ZZ production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.02 fb(-1) recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC is presented. Twelve events containing two Z boson candidates decaying to electrons and/or muons are observed, with an expected background of 0.3 ± 0.3(stat)(-0.3)(+0.4)(syst) events. The cross section measured in a phase-space region with good detector acceptance and for dilepton masses within the range 66 to 116 GeV is σ(ZZ → ℓ+ ℓ- ℓ+ ℓ-)(fid) = 19.4(-5.2)(+6.3)(stat)(-0.7)(+0.9)(syst) ± 0.7(lumi) fb. The resulting total cross section for on-shell ZZ production, σ(ZZ)(tot) = 8.5(-2.3)(+2.7)(stat)(-0.3)(+0.4)(syst) ± 0.3(lumi) pb, is consistent with the standard model expectation of 6.5(-0.2)(+0.3) pb calculated at the next-to-leading order in QCD. Limits on anomalous neutral triple gauge boson couplings are derived. PMID:22400826

  20. Biochemical and proton NMR characterization of the isolated functional beta-subunit of coupling factor one from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Roux-Fromy, M.; Neumann, J.M.; Andre, F.; Berger, G.; Girault, G.; Galmiche, J.M.; Remy, R.

    1987-04-29

    Beta subunits have been dissociated from CF1 of spinach chloroplasts, purified by HPLC and characterized by two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence emission. The solutions of isolated beta subunits are able to hydrolyze MgATP; this ATPase activity is an intrinsic property of the beta molecule. From proton NMR at 300 and 500 MHz, it is shown that the preparations are fully reproducible and that beta subunits remain monomeric with 75% aliphatic protons associated with rigid parts of the molecule. The other 25% give rise to separate resonances and belong to mobile side-chains and/or to flexible regions. The measurement of the transverse relaxation times T2 has permitted a detailed characterization of the molecular dynamics of the isolated beta subunits.

  1. The Proton-Driven Rotor of ATP Synthase: Ohmic Conductance (10 fS), and Absence of Voltage Gating

    PubMed Central

    Feniouk, Boris A.; Kozlova, Maria A.; Knorre, Dmitry A.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Junge, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The membrane portion of F0F1-ATP synthase, F0, translocates protons by a rotary mechanism. Proton conduction by F0 was studied in chromatophores of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. The discharge of a light-induced voltage jump was monitored by electrochromic absorption transients to yield the unitary conductance of F0. The current-voltage relationship of F0 was linear from 7 to 70 mV. The current was extremely proton-specific (>107) and varied only slightly (≈threefold) from pH 6 to 10. The maximum conductance was ≈10 fS at pH 8, equivalent to 6240 H+ s−1 at 100-mV driving force, which is an order-of-magnitude greater than of coupled F0F1. There was no voltage-gating of F0 even at low voltage, and proton translocation could be driven by ΔpH alone, without voltage. The reported voltage gating in F0F1 is thus attributable to the interaction of F0 with F1 but not to F0 proper. We simulated proton conduction by a minimal rotary model including the rotating c-ring and two relay groups mediating proton exchange between the ring and the respective membrane surface. The data fit attributed pK values of ≈6 and ≈10 to these relays, and placed them close to the membrane/electrolyte interface. PMID:15189903

  2. Differential proton sensitivity of related G protein-coupled receptors T cell death-associated gene 8 and G2A expressed in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Radu, Caius G; Nijagal, Amar; McLaughlin, Jami; Wang, Li; Witte, Owen N

    2005-02-01

    G2A, T cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8), ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1), and G protein-coupled receptor 4 (GPR4) form a group of structurally related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) originally proposed to bind proinflammatory lipids. More recent studies have challenged the identification of lipid agonists for these GPCRs and have suggested that they function primarily as proton sensors. We compared the ability of these four receptors to modulate pH-dependent responses by using transiently transfected cell lines. In accordance with previously published reports, OGR1 was found to evoke strong pH-dependent responses as measured by inositol phosphate accumulation. We also confirmed the pH-dependent cAMP production by GPR4 and TDAG8. However, we found the activity of the human G2A receptor and its mouse homolog to be significantly less sensitive to pH fluctuations as measured by inositol phosphate and cAMP accumulation. Sequence homology analysis indicated that, with one exception, the histidine residues that were previously shown to be important for pH sensing by OGR1, GPR4, and TDAG8 were not conserved in the G2A receptor. We further addressed the pH-sensing properties of G2A and TDAG8 in a cellular context where these receptors are coexpressed. In thymocytes and splenocytes explanted from receptor-deficient mice, TDAG8 was found to be critical for pH-dependent cAMP production. In contrast, G2A was found to be dispensable for this process. We conclude that members of this GPCR group exhibit differential sensitivity to extracellular protons, and that expression of TDAG8 by immune cells may regulate responses in acidic microenvironments. PMID:15665078

  3. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  4. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. PMID:26895087

  5. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1–2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10051.001 PMID:26895087

  6. Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals in aqueous solutions; electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasović, Brunislav; Bonifačić, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Reductive dehalogenation of 5-bromouracil by aliphatic organic radicals CO2-rad , rad CH 2OH, rad CH(CH 3)OH, and rad CH(CH 3)O - have been studied in oxygen free aqueous solutions in the presence of organic additives: formate, methanol or ethanol. For radicals production 60Co γ-radiolysis was employed and the yield of bromide was measured by means of ion chromatography. Both radical anions have reducing potential negative enough to transfer an electron to BrU producing bromide ion and U rad radical. High yields of bromide have been measured increasing proportional to the concentration of the corresponding organic additives at a constant dose rate. This is characteristic for a chain process where regeneration of radical ions occurs by H-atom abstraction by U rad radical from formate or ethanol. Results with the neutral radicals conformed earlier proposition that the reduction reaction of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals proceeds by the proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism ( Matasović and Bonifačić, 2007). Thus, while both rad CH 2OH and rad CH(CH 3)OH did not react with BrU in water/alcohol solutions, addition of bicarbonate and acetate in mmol dm -3 concentrations, pH 7, brought about chain debromination to occur in the case of rad CH(CH 3)OH radical as reactant. Under the same conditions phosphate buffer, a base with higher bulk proton affinity, failed to have any influence. The results are taken as additional proofs for the specific complex formation of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals with suitable bases which enhances radicals' reduction potential in comparison with only water molecules as proton acceptors. Rate constants for the H-atom abstraction from ethanol and formate by U rad radicals have been estimated to amount to about ≥85 and 1200 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, respectively.

  7. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Teles, P. Rebello; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kame, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. 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T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Roinishvili, V.

    2015-05-01

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include , , , , , and pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 at 7 and up to 19.7 at 8. From the high-resolution and channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be . For this mass value, the event yields obtained in the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.

  8. Ketyl Radical Formation via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in an Aqueous Solution versus Hydrogen Atom Transfer in Isopropanol after Photoexcitation of Aromatic Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiting; Ma, Jiani; Li, Songbo; Li, Ming-De; Guan, Xiangguo; Lan, Xin; Zhu, Ruixue; Phillips, David Lee

    2016-07-01

    The excited nπ* and ππ* triplets of two benzophenone (BP) and two anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives have been observed in acetonitrile, isopropanol, and mixed aqueous solutions using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic and nanosecond transient absorption experiments. These experimental results, combined with results from density functional theory calculations, reveal the effects of solvent and substituents on the properties, relative energies, and chemical reactivities of the nπ* and ππ* triplets. The triplet nπ* configuration was found to act as the reactive species for a subsequent hydrogen atom transfer reaction to produce a ketyl radical intermediate in the isopropanol solvent, while the triplet ππ* undergoes a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) in aqueous solutions to produce a ketyl radical intermediate. This PCET reaction, which occurs via a concerted proton transfer (to the excited carbonyl group) and electron transfer (to the excited phenyl ring), can account for the experimental observation by several different research groups over the past 40 years of the formation of ketyl radicals after photolysis of a number of BP and AQ derivatives in aqueous solutions, although water is considered to be a relatively "inert" hydrogen-donor solvent. PMID:27266916

  9. Ab initio calculation of proton-coupled electron transfer rates using the external-potential representation: a ubiquinol complex in solution.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-06-14

    In quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) treatment of chemical reactions in condensed phases, one solves the electronic Schrodinger equation for the solute (or an active site) under the electrostatic field from the environment. This Schrodinger equation depends parametrically on the solute nuclear coordinates R and the external electrostatic potential V. This fact suggests that one may use R and V as natural collective coordinates for describing the entire system, where V plays the role of collective solvent variables. In this paper such an (R,V) representation of the QM/MM canonical ensemble is described, with particular focus on how to treat charge transfer processes in this representation. As an example, the above method is applied to the proton-coupled electron transfer of a ubiquinol analog with phenoxyl radical in acetonitrile solvent. Ab initio free-energy surfaces are calculated as functions of R and V using the reference interaction site model self-consistent field method, the equilibrium points and the minimum free-energy crossing point are located in the (R,V) space, and then the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are evaluated approximately. The results suggest that a stiffer proton potential at the transition state may be responsible for unusual KIEs observed experimentally for related systems. PMID:17581070

  10. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  11. Pore formation and translocation of melittin.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, K; Yoneyama, S; Miyajima, K

    1997-01-01

    Melittin, a bee venom, is a basic amphiphilic peptide, which mainly acts on the lipid matrix of membranes, lysing various cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism, we investigated its interactions with phospholipid vesicles. The peptide formed a pore with a short lifetime in the membrane, as revealed by the release of an anionic fluorescent dye, calcein, from the liposomes. Our new double-labeling method clarified that the pore size increased with the peptide-to-lipid ratio. Upon the disintegration of the pore, a fraction of the peptides translocated across the bilayer. The pore formation was coupled with the translocation, which was proved by three fluorescence experiments recently developed by our laboratory. A novel model for the melittin pore formation was discussed in comparison with other pore-forming peptides. PMID:9251799

  12. Origin of translocation barriers for polyelectrolyte chains.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2009-11-21

    For single-file translocations of a charged macromolecule through a narrow pore, the crucial step of arrival of an end at the pore suffers from free energy barriers, arising from changes in intrachain electrostatic interaction, distribution of ionic clouds and solvent molecules, and conformational entropy of the chain. All contributing factors to the barrier in the initial stage of translocation are evaluated by using the self-consistent field theory for the polyelectrolyte and the coupled Poisson-Boltzmann description for ions without radial symmetry. The barrier is found to be essentially entropic due to conformational changes. For moderate and high salt concentrations, the barriers for the polyelectrolyte chain are quantitatively equivalent to that of uncharged self-avoiding walks. Electrostatic effects are shown to increase the free energy barriers, but only slightly. The degree of ionization, electrostatic interaction strength, decreasing salt concentration, and the solvent quality all result in increases in the barrier. PMID:19929072

  13. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  14. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution. PMID:27394120

  15. Sterically Demanding Multidentate Ligand Tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine Slows Exchange and Enhances Solution State Ligand Proton NMR Coupling to 199Hg(II)

    PubMed Central

    Bebout, Deborah C.; Bush, James F.; Crahan, Kathleen K.; Bowers, Edith V.; Butcher, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    The solution state coordination chemistry of Hg(ClO4)2 with tris[(2-(6-methylpyridyl))methyl]amine (TLA) was investigated in acetonitrile-d3 by proton NMR. Although Hg(II) is a d10 metal ion commonly associated with notoriously rapid exchange between coordination environments, as many as six ligand environments were observed to be in slow exchange on the chemical shift time scale at select metal-to-ligand ratios. One of these ligand environments was associated with extensive heteronuclear coupling between protons and 199Hg and was assigned to the complex [Hg(TLA)]2+. The 5J(1H199Hg) = 8 Hz associated with this complex is the first example of five-bond coupling in a nitrogen coordination compound of Hg(II). The spectral complexity of related studies conducted in acetone-d6 precluded analysis of coordination equilibria. Crystallographic characterization of the T-shaped complex [Hg(TLAH)(CH2COCH3)](ClO4)2 (1) in which two pyridyl rings are pendant suggested that the acidity of acetone combined with the poor coordinating abilities of the neutral solvent adds additional complexity to solution equilibria. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1¯ with a = 9.352(2) Å, b = 12.956(2) Å, c = 14.199(2) Å, α = 115.458(10)°, β = 90.286(11)°, γ = 108.445(11)°, and Z = 2. The HgNamine, Hg-Npyridyl, and Hg-C bond lengths in the complex are 2.614(4), 2.159(4), and 2.080(6) Å, respectively. Relevance to development of 199Hg NMR as a metallobioprobe is discussed. PMID:11978122

  16. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M.; Li, Yue; Miller, David S.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.—Wang, X., Cabrera, R. M., Li, Y., Miller, D. S., Finnell, R. H. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice. PMID:23212123

  17. Upper and lower limits of the charge translocation stoichiometry of mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Beavis, A D

    1987-05-01

    The upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry (n) of electric charge translocation coupled to mitochondrial electron transport have been determined for the oxidation of succinate and beta-hydroxybutyrate using a recently described method (Beavis, A. D., and Lehninger, A. L. (1986) Eur. J. Biochem. 158, 307-314). This method requires no assumptions regarding the magnitude of proton leakage or pump slippage, but it takes advantage of the ability to predict the direction of change as the coupled fluxes are modulated by specific means. In this study, the rates of K+ uptake (JK) and O2 consumption (JO) were determined from simultaneous electrode measurements in the presence of various concentrations of valinomycin or inhibitors of electron flow. When valinomycin is varied, the rate of proton leakage or pump slippage should decrease as JO increases, with the result that the slope dJK/dJO will be greater than n. On the other hand, when an inhibitor of electron flow is varied, the rate of proton leakage or pump slippage should increase as JO increases, with the result that the slope dJK/dJO should be less than n. The data obtained using this approach indicate that n lies between 6.7 and 7.3 for succinate oxidation and between 10.2 and 11.7 for beta-hydroxybutyrate (or NADH) oxidation. It is concluded that the mechanistic stoichiometry of charge separation coupled to electron flow is 7 q+/O in the span from succinate to oxygen and 11 q+/O in the span from NADH to oxygen. These conclusions are fully consistent with the limits of the mechanistic ATP/O ratios previously determined for these spans (Beavis, A. D., and Lehninger, A. L. (1986) Eur. J. Biochem. 158, 315-322). PMID:3571252

  18. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  19. Mutation of a single residue in the ba3 oxidase specifically impairs protonation of the pump site

    PubMed Central

    von Ballmoos, Christoph; Gonska, Nathalie; Lachmann, Peter; Gennis, Robert B.; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The ba3-type cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus is a membrane-bound protein complex that couples electron transfer to O2 to proton translocation across the membrane. To elucidate the mechanism of the redox-driven proton pumping, we investigated the kinetics of electron and proton transfer in a structural variant of the ba3 oxidase where a putative “pump site” was modified by replacement of Asp372 by Ile. In this structural variant, proton pumping was uncoupled from internal electron transfer and O2 reduction. The results from our studies show that proton uptake to the pump site (time constant ∼65 μs in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase) was impaired in the Asp372Ile variant. Furthermore, a reaction step that in the wild-type cytochrome c oxidase is linked to simultaneous proton uptake and release with a time constant of ∼1.2 ms was slowed to ∼8.4 ms, and in Asp372Ile was only associated with proton uptake to the catalytic site. These data identify reaction steps that are associated with protonation and deprotonation of the pump site, and point to the area around Asp372 as the location of this site in the ba3 cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25733886

  20. Application of the Convergent Close-Coupling method to collisions of electrons, positrons, and protons with light atomic and molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) method for electron-atom collisions has been applied successfully for around two decades for quasi one- and two-electron atomic targets. The underlying engine is the complete Laguerre basis for treating to convergence the target discrete and continuous spectra via a square-integrable approach, together with a formulation of the close-coupling equations in momentum space. The method has continued to be extended, and now incorporates collisions with positrons with allowance for positronium formation. This is a major advancement because it addresses the complexity associated with treating multi-center collision problems. These techniques have then been readily transferred to collisions with protons, where charge-exchange can be a substantial scattering outcome. The latter also required a move to solving the CCC equations using an impact parameter formalism. Most recently, in addition to the extension of the variety of projectiles, the collision targets have been generalized to molecules. Presently, just the H2+and the H2 molecules have been implemented. In the talk a broad range of applications of the CCC method will be discussed and future developments will be indicated. coauthors: A. S. Kadyrov, D.V. Fursa, I. Abdurakhmanov, M. Zammit.

  1. Photoinduced proton transfer coupled with energy transfer: Mechanism of sensitized luminescence of terbium ion by salicylic acid doped in polymer.

    PubMed

    Misra, Vinita; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2008-06-28

    In the present work, excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in salicylic acid (SA) monoanion and subsequent sensitization of Tb(3+) ion in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) have been studied. The study has been carried out both by steady state and time domain fluorescence measurement techniques at room temperature. It is found that the SA completely ionizes and exists as monoanion in PVA. It exhibits a large Stokes shifted blue emission (10 000 cm(-1)) due to ESIPT and shows a decay time of 6.85 ns. On the other hand, Tb(3+) ion shows a very weak green emission and a decay time of approximately 641 mus in PVA film. Upon incorporating Tb(3+) ion in SA doped PVA film, both intensity and decay time of SA decrease and sensitized emission from Tb(+3) ion along with 3.8 mus rise time is observed. Energy transfer is found to take place both from excited singlet as well as triplet states. A brief description of the properties of the present system from the viewpoint of luminescent solar collector material is addressed. PMID:18601359

  2. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the 15N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H 2O/D 2O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu II to enable rapid data acquisition.

  3. Electrostatic Effects on Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Oxomanganese Complexes Inspired by the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M.; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.; Gunner, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton-coupled-electron-transfer (PCET) in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII), are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced Multi-Conformer Continuum Electrostatics (MCCE) model, parameterized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKas and oxidation midpoint potentials (Ems) match experimental values for eight complexes indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKas of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6]2+/3+ (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2]3- (2, P = 5,10,15,20- tetrakis (2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato), [Mn(IV,IV)2(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2]4+ (3, terpy = 2,2’:6’,2”-terpyridine) and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2]4+ (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKas of μ-oxo bridges and Mn Ems in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4]2+ (5, bpy = 2,2’-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn= N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7) and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8) which are most relevant to PCET mechanisms. The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5±0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the Ems due to ligand substituents, such as those in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where PCET plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  4. Low processivity for DNA translocation by the ISWI molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Eastlund, Allen; Al-Ani, Gada; Fischer, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    The motor protein ISWI (Imitation SWItch) is the conserved catalytic ATPase domain of the ISWI family of chromatin remodelers. Members of the ISWI family are involved in regulating the structure of cellular chromatin during times of transcription, translation, and repair. Current models for the nucleosome repositioning activity of ISWI and other chromatin remodelers require the translocation of the remodeling protein along double-stranded DNA through an ATP-dependent mechanism. Here we report results from spectrofluorometric stopped-flow experiments which demonstrate that ISWI displays very low processivity for free DNA translocation. By combining these results with those from experiments monitoring the DNA stimulated ATPase activity of ISWI we further demonstrate that the DNA translocation by ISWI is tightly coupled to ATP hydrolysis. The calculated coupling efficiency of 0.067±0.018 ATP/ISWI/bp is seemingly quite low in comparison to similar DNA translocases and we present potential models to account for this. Nevertheless, the tight coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation suggests that DNA translocation is not energetically rate limiting for nucleosome repositioning by ISWI. PMID:26116984

  5. Stepwise translocation of nucleic acid motors

    PubMed Central

    Myong, Sua; Ha, Taekjip

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent single molecule studies have made a significant contribution to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in the movement of motor proteins which process DNA and RNA. Measurement of stepsize in two disparate motors, NS3 helicase and ribosome both revealed three basepair steps which consist of three hidden substeps. Combined with previous structural studies, NS3 is likely taking a single nucleotide step of translocation coupled to one ATP binding event and this mode may be conserved in multitude of helicases. Such a stepwise translocation movement appears to occur through main contacts with the phosphate backbone. Double stranded RNA and DNA motor, RIG-I and Φ29 respectively showed translocation on a duplex while tracking exclusively a single stranded RNA/DNA in a directional manner, 5′ to 3′ in both cases. Spontaneous dynamics displayed by ribosome ratcheting and SSB (single stranded DNA binding protein) diffusing on DNA were rectified by interacting cofactors and proteins, EF-G and RecA respectively. PMID:20061135

  6. Measurement of Z+ γ production and search for anomalous triple gauge couplings in proton-antiproton collisions at √S = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The author presents a measurement of p$\\bar{p}$ → Zγ + X → e+e-γ + X production using proton-antiproton collisions data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Zγ production provides a direct test of the triple neutral gauge couplings. A measurement of Zγ production cross section and search for anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are presented. The data presented are from 1.1 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ integrated luminosity collected at the CDF Detector. Electrons from Z decays are selected with Et > 20 Gev. Photons (Et > 7 GeV) are required to be well-separated from the electrons. There are 390 eeγ candidate events found with 1.1 fb-1 of data, compared to the SM prediction of 375.3 ± 25.2 events. The Standard Model prediction for the cross section for p$\\bar{p}$ → e+e-γ + X production at √s = 1.96 TeV is 4.5 ± 0.4 pb. The measured cross section is 4.7 ± 0.6 pb. The cross section and kinematic distributions of the eeγ events are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Limits on the ZZγ and Zγγ couplings are extracted using the photon Et distribution of eeγ events with meeγ > 100 GeV/c2. These are the first limits measured using CDF Run II data. These limits provide important test of the interaction of the photon and the Z boson.

  7. Substituted cysteine accessibility reveals a novel transmembrane 2-3 reentrant loop and functional role for transmembrane domain 2 in the human proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-09-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [(3)H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2-3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding. PMID:25053408

  8. Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Reveals a Novel Transmembrane 2–3 Reentrant Loop and Functional Role for Transmembrane Domain 2 in the Human Proton-coupled Folate Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H.

    2014-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) is a folate-proton symporter highly expressed in solid tumors that can selectively target cytotoxic antifolates to tumors under acidic microenvironment conditions. Predicted topology models for PCFT suggest that the loop domain between transmembrane domains (TMDs) 2 and 3 resides in the cytosol. Mutations involving Asp-109 or Arg-113 in the TMD2-3 loop result in loss of activity. By structural homology to other solute carriers, TMD2 may form part of the PCFT substrate binding domain. In this study we mutated the seven cysteine (Cys) residues of human PCFT to serine, creating Cys-less PCFT. Thirty-three single-Cys mutants spanning TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop in a Cys-less PCFT background were transfected into PCFT-null HeLa cells. All 33 mutants were detected by Western blotting, and 28 were active for [3H]methotrexate uptake at pH 5.5. For the active residues, we performed pulldown assays with membrane-impermeable 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin and streptavidin beads to determine their aqueous-accessibilities. Multiple residues in TMD2 and the TMD2-3 loop domain reacted with 2-aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate-biotin, establishing aqueous accessibilities. Pemetrexed pretreatment inhibited biotinylation of TMD2 mutants G93C and F94C, and biotinylation of these residues inhibited methotrexate transport activity. Our results suggest that the TMD 2–3 loop domain is aqueous-accessible and forms a novel reentrant loop structure. Residues in TMD2 form an aqueous transmembrane pathway for folate substrates, and Gly-93 and Phe-94 may contribute to a substrate binding domain. Characterization of PCFT structure is essential to understanding the transport mechanism including the critical determinants of substrate binding. PMID:25053408

  9. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation in the Structurally Well-Defined α3Y Protein: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Long-Lived Tyrosine Radical

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine oxidation–reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+ oxidant provides high-quality Y32–O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 105 M–1 s–1 (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 103 M–1 s–1 (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pD 8.5). kH/kD of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32–O• is 28–58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+. Y32–O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2–10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical–radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32–O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32–O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y. PMID:25121576

  10. Stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) gel aligns small organic molecules in chloroform. stereochemical analysis and diastereotopic proton NMR assignment in ludartin using residual dipolar couplings and 3J coupling constant analysis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Roberto R; Gayathri, Chakicherla; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-02-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) gels prepared by copolymerizing methyl methacrylate (MMA) and various amounts of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) in the presence of the radical initiator V-70 (2,2'-azobis(2,4-dimethyl-4-methoxyvaleronitrile)) can orient small organic molecules when swollen in NMR tubes with CDCl(3). The aligning properties of the stretched PMMA gels were evaluated by monitoring the quadrupolar splitting of the (2)H NMR signal of CDCl(3), and the aligning degree is proportional to the cross-linking density. Natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for menthol measured in the gels depended on the cross-link density. The stereochemistry and assignment of the diastereotopic protons of the gastroprotective and nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor sesquiterpene lactone ludartin, isolated from Stevia yaconensis var. subeglandulosa, were unambiguously determined using a combination of natural abundance one-bond (1)H-(13)C RDCs measured in a PMMA gel and a (3)J coupling constant analysis. PMID:18177050

  11. Steric and Electronic Influence on Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Reactivity of a Mononuclear Mn(III)-Hydroxo Complex.

    PubMed

    Rice, Derek B; Wijeratne, Gayan B; Burr, Andrew D; Parham, Joshua D; Day, Victor W; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-08-15

    A mononuclear hydroxomanganese(III) complex was synthesized utilizing the N5 amide-containing ligand 2-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)]amino-N-2-methyl-quinolin-8-yl-acetamidate (dpaq(2Me) ). This complex is similar to previously reported [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+) [Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 7622-7634] but contains a methyl group adjacent to the hydroxo moiety. This α-methylquinoline group in [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) gives rise to a 0.1 Å elongation in the Mn-N(quinoline) distance relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). Similar bond elongation is observed in the corresponding Mn(II) complex. In MeCN, [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) reacts rapidly with 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-ol (TEMPOH) at -35 °C by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism (second-order rate constant k2 of 3.9(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Using enthalpies and entropies of activation from variable-temperature studies of TEMPOH oxidation by [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) (ΔH(‡) = 5.7(3) kcal(-1) M(-1); ΔS(‡) = -41(1) cal M(-1) K(-1)), it was determined that [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) oxidizes TEMPOH ∼240 times faster than [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). The [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) complex is also capable of oxidizing the stronger O-H and C-H bonds of 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol and xanthene, respectively. However, for these reactions [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) displays, at best, modest rate enhancement relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+). A combination of density function theory (DFT) and cyclic voltammetry studies establish an increase in the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential of [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) relative to [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(H))](+), which gives rise to a larger driving force for CPET for the former complex. Thus, more favorable thermodynamics for [Mn(III)(OH)(dpaq(2Me))](+) can account for the dramatic increase in rate with TEMPOH. For the more sterically encumbered substrates, DFT computations suggest that this effect is mitigated by unfavorable steric interactions between the

  12. Electron transfer reactivity of the aqueous iron(IV)–oxo complex. Outer-sphere vs proton-coupled electron transfer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bataineh, Hajem; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

    2016-06-18

    Here, the kinetics of oxidation of organic and inorganic reductants by aqueous iron(IV) ions, FeIV(H2O)5O2+ (hereafter FeIVaqO2+), are reported. The substrates examined include several water-soluble ferrocenes, hexachloroiridate(III), polypyridyl complexes M(NN)32+ (M = Os, Fe and Ru; NN = phenanthroline, bipyridine and derivatives), HABTS–/ABTS2–, phenothiazines, CoII(dmgBF2)2, macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes, and aqueous cerium(III). Most of the reductants were oxidized cleanly to the corresponding one-electron oxidation products, with the exception of phenothiazines which produced the corresponding oxides in a single-step reaction, and polypyridyl complexes of Fe(II) and Ru(II) that generated ligand-modified products. FeIVaqO2+ oxidizes even Ce(III) (E0 in 1 M HClO4 = 1.7more » V) with a rate constant greater than 104 M–1 s–1. In 0.10 M aqueous HClO4 at 25 °C, the reactions of Os(phen)32+ (k = 2.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), IrCl63– (1.6 × 106), ABTS2– (4.7 × 107), and Fe(cp)(C5H4CH2OH) (6.4 × 107) appear to take place by outer sphere electron transfer (OSET). The rate constants for the oxidation of Os(phen)32+ and of ferrocenes remained unchanged in the acidity range 0.05 < [H+] < 0.10 M, ruling out prior protonation of FeIVaqO2+ and further supporting the OSET assignment. A fit to Marcus cross-relation yielded a composite parameter (log k22 + E0Fe/0.059) = 17.2 ± 0.8, where k22 and E0Fe are the self-exchange rate constant and reduction potential, respectively, for the FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+ couple. Comparison with literature work suggests k22 < 10–5 M–1 s–1 and thus E0(FeIVaqO2+/FeIIIaqO+) > 1.3 V. For proton-coupled electron transfer, the reduction potential is estimated at E0 (FeIVaqO2+, H+/FeIIIaqOH2+) ≥ 1.95 V.« less

  13. Genomic Comparison of Translocating and Non-Translocating Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Nathan L.; Katouli, Mohammad; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of E. coli across the gut epithelium can result in fatal sepsis in post-surgical patients. In vitro and in vivo experiments have identified the existence of a novel pathotype of translocating E. coli (TEC) that employs an unknown mechanism for translocating across epithelial cells to the mesenteric lymph nodes and the blood stream in both humans and animal models. In this study the genomes of four TEC strains isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes of a fatal case of hospitalised patient (HMLN-1), blood of pigs after experimental shock (PC-1) and after non-lethal haemorrhage in rats (KIC-1 and KIC-2) were sequenced in order to identify the genes associated with their adhesion and/or translocation. To facilitate the comparison, the genomes of a non-adhering, non-translocating E. coli (46–4) and adhering but non-translocating E. coli (73–89) were also sequenced and compared. Whole genome comparison revealed that three (HMLN-1, PC-1 and KIC-2) of the four TEC strains carried a genomic island that encodes a Type 6 Secretion System that may contribute to adhesion of the bacteria to gut epithelial cells. The human TEC strain HMLN-1 also carried the invasion ibeA gene, which was absent in the animal TEC strains and is likely to be associated with host-specific translocation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the four TEC strains were distributed amongst three distinct E. coli phylogroups, which was supported by the presence of phylogroup specific fimbriae gene clusters. The genomic comparison has identified potential genes that can be targeted with knock-out experiments to further characterise the mechanisms of E. coli translocation. PMID:26317913

  14. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  15. Proton-Sensing Ovarian Cancer G Protein-Coupled Receptor 1 on Dendritic Cells Is Required for Airway Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Takeshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Kamide, Yosuke; Ichimonji, Isao; Tomura, Hideaki; Tobo, Masayuki; Sato, Koichi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Dobashi, Kunio; Mori, Tetsuya; Harada, Akihiro; Yamada, Masanobu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) stimulation by extracellular protons causes the activation of G proteins and subsequent cellular functions. However, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of OGR1 in airway responses remain largely unknown. In the present study, we show that OGR1-deficient mice are resistant to the cardinal features of asthma, including airway eosinophilia, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and goblet cell metaplasia, in association with a remarkable inhibition of Th2 cytokine and IgE production, in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Intratracheal transfer to wild-type mice of OVA-primed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) from OGR1-deficient mice developed lower AHR and eosinophilia after OVA inhalation compared with the transfer of those from wild-type mice. Migration of OVA-pulsed DCs to peribronchial lymph nodes was also inhibited by OGR1 deficiency in the adoption experiments. The presence of functional OGR1 in DCs was confirmed by the expression of OGR1 mRNA and the OGR1-sensitive Ca2+ response. OVA-induced expression of CCR7, a mature DC chemokine receptor, and migration response to CCR7 ligands in an in vitro Transwell assay were attenuated by OGR1 deficiency. We conclude that OGR1 on DCs is critical for migration to draining lymph nodes, which, in turn, stimulates Th2 phenotype change and subsequent induction of airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:24244587

  16. Memantine transport by a proton-coupled organic cation antiporter in hCMEC/D3 cells, an in vitro human blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kei; Kitamura, Atsushi; Okura, Takashi; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Memantine is clinically used for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease and is highly distributed to the brain. The aim of this study is to characterize memantine transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) using hCMEC/D3 cells, a human BBB model. The initial uptake velocity of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells was concentration-dependent, and was reduced by metabolic inhibitors, but was independent of extracellular sodium ion and membrane potential. Intracellular alkalization and intracellular acidification markedly reduced and enhanced the uptake, respectively. The uptake was strongly inhibited by quinidine, pyrilamine and verapamil, and was moderately inhibited by TEA (substrate of OCTs and OCTNs) and l-carnitine (substrate of OCTN2), but was not inhibited by MPP(+) (substrate of OCTs and PMAT) or ergothioneine (substrate of OCTN1). Although relatively abundant expression of OCTN2 gene has been observed in hCMEC/D3 cells, knockdown of OCTN2 with siRNA did not decrease memantine uptake. Memantine and diphenhydramine each showed inhibition of the other's uptake in a competitive manner. Thus, proton-coupled organic cation antiporter(s) appears to be involved in the transport of memantine in hCMEC/D3 cells, at least in part. Our results indicate that the in vivo BBB permeability of memantine in humans can be predicted from the in vitro uptake clearance in hCMEC/D3 cells. PMID:25857234

  17. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas andDetermination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Thomas Ira

    2007-07-10

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate ofnuclear muon capture by the proton, performed by the MuCap Collaborationusing a new technique based on a time projection chamber operating inultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at room temperature and 1 MPapressure. The hydrogen target's low gas density of 1 percent compared toliquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from theformation of muonic molecules. The capture rate was obtained from thedifference between the mu- disappearance rate in hydrogen--as determinedfrom data collected in the experiment's first physics run in fall2004--and the world averagefor the mu+ decay rate. After combining theresults of my analysis with the results from another independent analysisof the 2004 data, the muon capture rate from the hyperfine singlet groundstate of the mu-p atom is found to be Lambda_S = 725.0 +- 17.4 1/s, fromwhich the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, gP(q2 = -0.88m2mu)= 7.3 +- 1.1, is extracted. This result for gP is consistent withtheoretical predictions that are based on the approximate chiral symmetryof QCD.

  18. Spectroscopic Investigation of Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Ruthenium Complex, [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H_2O)]2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Erin M.; Marsh, Brett; Voss, Jonathan; Garand, Etienne

    2015-06-01

    The splitting of H_2O into H_2 and O_2 is an attractive option for alternative energy, but the oxygen evolution step poses a significant challenge. A decades-long effort to produce a suitable water oxidation catalyst (WOC) has made progress on this front, but the precise reaction mechanism of these catalysts is still not well understood. One of the most extensively studied WOCs is [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H_2O)]2+ (tpy = 2,2':6,2"-terpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Presented here are gas-phase infrared spectra of water clusters of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(OH_2)]2+ and the first intermediate of the catalytic cycle, [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(OH)]2+. In particular, the O-H stretches are used as a probe of solvation strength, and trends in their spectral shifts are examined as a function of cluster size. With the aid of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, these spectra reveal structural changes induced by solvation that provide clear evidence for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), in support of proposed mechanisms.

  19. 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine Thienoyl Regioisomers as Targeted Antifolates for Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wallace, Adrianne; Raghavan, Sudhir; Deis, Siobhan M.; Wilson, Mike R.; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Orr, Steven; George, Christina; O’Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Mitchell-Ryan, Shermaine; Dann, Charles E.; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted-pyrrolo[2,3-d]-pyrimidine antifolate thiophene regioisomers of AGF94 (4) with a thienoyl side chain and three-carbon bridge lengths [AGF150 (5) and AGF154 (7)] were synthesized as potential antitumor agents. These analogues inhibited proliferation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) sublines expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β (IC50s < 1 nM) or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (IC50 < 7 nM). Compounds 5 and 7 inhibited KB, IGROV1, and SKOV3 human tumor cells at subnanomolar concentrations, reflecting both FRα and PCFT uptake. AGF152 (6) and AGF163 (8), 2,4-diamino-5-substituted-furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thiophene regioisomers, also inhibited growth of FR-expressing CHO and KB cells. All four analogues inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Crystal structures of human GARFTase complexed with 5 and 7 were reported. In severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing SKOV3 tumors, 7 was efficacious. The selectivity of these compounds for PCFT and for FRα and β over the ubiquitously expressed reduced folate carrier is a paradigm for selective tumor targeting. PMID:26317331

  20. Functional roles of aspartate residues of the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT-SLC46A1); a D156Y mutation causing hereditary folate malabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daniel Sanghoon; Min, Sang Hee; Russell, Laura; Zhao, Rongbao; Fiser, Andras

    2010-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT; SLC46A1) mediates folate transport into enterocytes in the proximal small intestine; pcft loss-of-function mutations are the basis for hereditary folate malabsorption. The current study explored the roles of Asp residues in PCFT function. A novel, homozygous, loss-of-function mutation, D156Y, was identified in a child of Pakistani origin with hereditary folate malabsorption. Of the 6 other conserved Asp residues, only one, D109, is shown to be required for function. D156Y, along with a variety of other substitutions at this site (Trp, Phe, Val, Asn, or Lys), lacked function due to instability of the PCFT protein. Substantial function was preserved with Glu, Gly, and, to a lesser extent, with Ser, Thr, and Ala substitutions. This correlated with PCFT bio-tinylated at the cell surface. In contrast, all D109 mutants, including D109E, lacked function irrespective of pH (4.5, 5.5, and 7.4) or substrate concentration (0.5-100μM), despite surface expression comparable to wild-type PCFT. Hence, D156 plays a critical role in PCFT protein stability, and D109, located in the first intracellular loop between the second and third transmembrane domains, is absolutely required for PCFT function. PMID:20805364

  1. The SLC36 family of proton-coupled amino acid transporters and their potential role in drug transport

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, David T; Anderson, Catriona MH

    2011-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier (SLC) 36 family are involved in transmembrane movement of amino acids and derivatives. SLC36 consists of four members. SLC36A1 and SLC36A2 both function as H+-coupled amino acid symporters. SLC36A1 is expressed at the luminal surface of the small intestine but is also commonly found in lysosomes in many cell types (including neurones), suggesting that it is a multipurpose carrier with distinct roles in different cells including absorption in the small intestine and as an efflux pathway following intralysosomal protein breakdown. SLC36A1 has a relatively low affinity (Km 1–10 mM) for its substrates, which include zwitterionic amino and imino acids, heterocyclic amino acids and amino acid-based drugs and derivatives used experimentally and/or clinically to treat epilepsy, schizophrenia, bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia and cancer. SLC36A2 is expressed at the apical surface of the human renal proximal tubule where it functions in the reabsorption of glycine, proline and hydroxyproline. SLC36A2 also transports amino acid derivatives but has a narrower substrate selectivity and higher affinity (Km 0.1–0.7 mM) than SLC36A1. Mutations in SLC36A2 lead to hyperglycinuria and iminoglycinuria. SLC36A3 is expressed only in testes and is an orphan transporter with no known function. SLC36A4 is widely distributed at the mRNA level and is a high-affinity (Km 2–3 µM) transporter for proline and tryptophan. We have much to learn about this family of transporters, but from current knowledge, it seems likely that their function will influence the pharmacokinetic profiles of amino acid-based drugs by mediating transport in both the small intestine and kidney. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Transporters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7 PMID:21501141

  2. A mechano-chemiosmotic model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis in energy-transforming membranes: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Eldar A; Kasumov, Ruslan E; Kasumova, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    ATP is synthesized using ATP synthase by utilizing energy either from the oxidation of organic compounds, or from light, via redox reactions (oxidative- or photo phosphorylation), in energy-transforming membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria. ATP synthase undergoes several changes during its functioning. The generally accepted model for ATP synthesis is the well-known rotatory model (see e.g., Junge et al., Nature 459:364-370, 2009; Junge and Müller, Science 333:704-705, 2011). Here, we present an alternative modified model for the coupling of electron and proton transfer to ATP synthesis, which was initially developed by Albert Lester Lehninger (1917-1986). Details of the molecular mechanism of ATP synthesis are described here that involves cyclic low-amplitude shrinkage and swelling of mitochondria. A comparison of the well-known current model and the mechano-chemiosmotic model is also presented. Based on structural, and other data, we suggest that ATP synthase is a Ca(2+)/H(+)-K(+) Cl(-)-pump-pore-enzyme complex, in which γ-subunit rotates 360° in steps of 30°, and 90° due to the binding of phosphate ions to positively charged amino acid residues in the N-terminal γ-subunit, while in the electric field. The coiled coil b 2-subunits are suggested to act as ropes that are shortened by binding of phosphate ions to positively charged lysines or arginines; this process is suggested to pull the α 3 β 3-hexamer to the membrane during the energization process. ATP is then synthesized during the reverse rotation of the γ-subunit by destabilizing the phosphated N-terminal γ-subunit and b 2-subunits under the influence of Ca(2+) ions, which are pumped over from storage-intermembrane space into the matrix, during swelling of intermembrane space. In the process of ATP synthesis, energy is first, predominantly, used in the delivery of phosphate ions and protons to the α 3 β 3-hexamer against the energy barrier with the help of C-terminal alpha

  3. Charge Transport in the ClC-type Chloride-Proton Anti-porter from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Kieseritzky, Gernot; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2011-01-01

    The first chloride transporter identified in the superfamily of ClC chloride channels was from Escherichia coli (EClC) (Accardi, A., and Miller, C. (2004) Nature 427, 803–807). Pathways, energetics, and mechanism of proton and chloride translocation and their coupling are up to now unclear. To bridge the hydrophobic gap of proton transport, we modeled four stable buried waters into both subunits of the WT EClC structure. Together they form a “water wire” connecting Glu-203 with the chloride at the central site, which in turn connects to Glu-148, the hypothetical proton exit site. Assuming the transient production of hydrochloride in the central chloride binding site of EClC, the water wire could establish a transmembrane proton transport pathway starting from Glu-203 all the way downstream onto Glu-148. We demonstrated by electrostatic and quantum chemical computations that protonation of the central chloride is energetically feasible. We characterized all chloride occupancies and protonation states possibly relevant for the proton-chloride transport cycle in EClC and constructed a working model. Accordingly, EClC evolves through states involving up to two excess protons and between one and three chlorides, which was required to fulfill the experimentally observed 2:1 stoichiometry. We show that the Y445F and E203H mutants of EClC can operate similarly, thus explaining why they exhibit almost WT activity levels. The proposed mechanism of coupled chloride-proton transport in EClC is consistent with available experimental data and allows predictions on the importance of specific amino acids, which may be probed by mutation experiments. PMID:21059656

  4. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  5. Crystallographic snapshot of cellulose synthesis and membrane translocation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Strumillo, Joanna; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biological macromolecule, is an extracellular, linear polymer of glucose molecules. It represents an essential component of plant cell walls but is also found in algae and bacteria. In bacteria, cellulose production frequently correlates with the formation of biofilms, a sessile, multicellular growth form. Cellulose synthesis and transport across the inner bacterial membrane is mediated by a complex of the multi-spanning catalytic BcsA subunit and the membrane-anchored, periplasmic BcsB protein. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of BcsA and BcsB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides containing a translocating polysaccharide. The structure of the BcsA-B translocation intermediate reveals the architecture of the cellulose synthase, demonstrates how BcsA forms a cellulose-conducting channel, and suggests a model for the coupling of cellulose synthesis and translocation in which the nascent polysaccharide is extended by one glucose molecule at a time. PMID:23222542

  6. Downside risk of wildlife translocation.

    PubMed

    Chipman, R; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C; Mendoza, M

    2008-01-01

    Translocation has been used successfully by wildlife professionals to enhance or reintroduce populations of rare or extirpated wildlife, provide hunting or wildlife viewing opportunities, farm wild game, and reduce local human-wildlife conflicts. However, accidental and intentional translocations may have multiple unintended negative consequences, including increased stress and mortality of relocated animals, negative impacts on resident animals at release sites, increased conflicts with human interests, and the spread of diseases. Many wildlife professionals now question the practice of translocation, particularly in light of the need to contain or eliminate high profile, economically important wildlife diseases and because using this technique may jeopardize international wildlife disease management initiatives to control rabies in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes in North America. Incidents have been documented where specific rabies variants (Texas gray fox, canine variant in coyotes, and raccoon) have been moved well beyond their current range as a result of translocation, including the emergence of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Here, we review and discuss the substantial challenges of curtailing translocation in the USA, focusing on movement of animals by the public, nuisance wildlife control operators, and wildlife rehabilitators. PMID:18634483

  7. Evaluation of proton-coupled folate transporter (SLC46A1) polymorphisms as risk factors for neural tube defects and oral clefts.

    PubMed

    VanderMeer, Julia E; Carter, Tonia C; Pangilinan, Faith; Mitchell, Adam; Kurnat-Thoma, Emma; Kirke, Peadar N; Troendle, James F; Molloy, Anne M; Munger, Ronald G; Feldkamp, Marcia L; Mansilla, Maria A; Mills, James L; Murray, Jeff C; Brody, Lawrence C

    2016-04-01

    Many folate-related genes have been investigated for possible causal roles in neural tube defects (NTDs) and oral clefts. However, no previous reports have examined the major gene responsible for folate uptake, the proton-coupled folate transporter (SLC46A1). We tested for association between these birth defects and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC46A1 gene. The NTD study population included 549 complete and incomplete case-family triads, and 999 controls from Ireland. The oral clefts study population comprised a sample from Utah (495 complete and incomplete case-family triads and 551 controls) and 221 Filipino multiplex cleft families. There was suggestive evidence of increased NTD case risk with the rs17719944 minor allele (odds ratio (OR): 1.29; 95% confidence intervals (CI): [1.00-1.67]), and decreased maternal risk of an NTD pregnancy with the rs4795436 minor allele (OR: 0.62; [0.39-0.99]). In the Utah sample, the rs739439 minor allele was associated with decreased case risk for cleft lip with cleft palate (genotype relative risk (GRR): 0.56 [0.32-0.98]). Additionally, the rs2239907 minor allele was associated with decreased case risk for cleft lip with cleft palate in several models, and with cleft palate only in a recessive model (OR: 0.41; [0.20-0.85]). These associations did not remain statistically significant after correcting for multiple hypothesis testing. Nominal associations between SLC46A1 polymorphisms and both Irish NTDs and oral clefts in the Utah population suggest some role in the etiology of these birth defects, but further investigation in other populations is needed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26789141

  8. Efficient Epoxidation of Styrene Derivatives by a Nonheme Iron(IV)-Oxo Complex via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer with Triflic Acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyun; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-06-15

    Styrene derivatives are not oxidized by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) in acetonitrile at 298 K, whereas epoxidation of styrene derivatives by the iron(IV)-oxo complex occurs efficiently in the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) via proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) with HOTf. Logarithms of the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted expoxidation of styrene derivatives with [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and PCET from electron donors to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes exhibit a remarkably unified correlation with the driving force of PCET in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes are taken into account. The same PCET driving force dependence is obtained for the first-order rate constants of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the precursor complexes. Thus, HOTf-promoted epoxidation of styrene derivatives by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) proceeds via the rate-determining electron transfer from styrene derivatives to the diprotonated species of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+), as shown in the reactions of HOTf-promoted oxygen atom transfer from thioanisols to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) and HOTf-promoted hydrogen atom transfer from toluene derivatives to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). PMID:26010774

  9. Improved accuracy of 15N-1H scalar and residual dipolar couplings from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC experiments on protonated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad

    2009-03-01

    The presence of dipole-dipole cross-correlated relaxation as well as unresolved E.COSY effects adversely impacts the accuracy of (1)J(NH) splittings measured from gradient-enhanced IPAP-HSQC spectra. For isotropic samples, the size of the systematic errors caused by these effects depends on the values of (2)J(NHalpha), (3)J(NHbeta) and (3)J(HNHalpha). Insertion of band-selective (1)H decoupling pulses in the IPAP-HSQC experiment eliminates these systematic errors and for the protein GB3 yields (1)J(NH) splittings that agree to within a root-mean-square difference of 0.04 Hz with values measured for perdeuterated GB3. Accuracy of the method is also highlighted by a good fit to the GB3 structure of the (1)H-(15)N RDCs extracted from the minute differences in (1)J(NH) splitting measured at 500 and 750 MHz (1)H frequencies, resulting from magnetic susceptibility anisotropy. A nearly complete set of (2)J(NHalpha) couplings was measured in GB3 in order to evaluate whether the impact of cross-correlated relaxation is dominated by the (15)N-(1)H(alpha) or (15)N-(1)H(beta) dipolar interaction. As expected, we find that (2)J(NHalpha) < or = 2 Hz, with values in the alpha-helix (0.86 +/- 0.52 Hz) slightly larger than in beta-sheet (0.66 +/- 0.26 Hz). Results indicate that under isotropic conditions, N-H(N)/N-H(beta) cross-correlated relaxation often dominates. Unresolved E.COSY effects under isotropic conditions involve (3)J(HNHalpha) and J(NHalpha), but when weakly aligned any aliphatic proton proximate to both N and H(N) can contribute. PMID:19205898

  10. Hydrogen bond network between amino acid radical intermediates on the proton-coupled electron transfer pathway of E. coli α2 ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Nick, Thomas U; Lee, Wankyu; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank; Stubbe, JoAnne; Bennati, Marina

    2015-01-14

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides in all organisms. In all Class Ia RNRs, initiation of nucleotide diphosphate (NDP) reduction requires a reversible oxidation over 35 Å by a tyrosyl radical (Y122•, Escherichia coli) in subunit β of a cysteine (C439) in the active site of subunit α. This radical transfer (RT) occurs by a specific pathway involving redox active tyrosines (Y122 ⇆ Y356 in β to Y731 ⇆ Y730 ⇆ C439 in α); each oxidation necessitates loss of a proton coupled to loss of an electron (PCET). To study these steps, 3-aminotyrosine was site-specifically incorporated in place of Y356-β, Y731- and Y730-α, and each protein was incubated with the appropriate second subunit β(α), CDP and effector ATP to trap an amino tyrosyl radical (NH2Y•) in the active α2β2 complex. High-frequency (263 GHz) pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of the NH2Y•s reported the gx values with unprecedented resolution and revealed strong electrostatic effects caused by the protein environment. (2)H electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy accompanied by quantum chemical calculations provided spectroscopic evidence for hydrogen bond interactions at the radical sites, i.e., two exchangeable H bonds to NH2Y730•, one to NH2Y731• and none to NH2Y356•. Similar experiments with double mutants α-NH2Y730/C439A and α-NH2Y731/Y730F allowed assignment of the H bonding partner(s) to a pathway residue(s) providing direct evidence for colinear PCET within α. The implications of these observations for the PCET process within α and at the interface are discussed. PMID:25516424

  11. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process–commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  12. Protein translocation: what's the problem?

    PubMed

    Corey, Robin A; Allen, William J; Collinson, Ian

    2016-06-15

    We came together in Leeds to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of Prof. Stephen Baldwin. For many years we, together with Sheena Radford and Roman Tuma (colleagues also of the University of Leeds), have worked together on the problem of protein translocation through the essential and ubiquitous Sec system. Inspired and helped by Steve we may finally be making progress. My seminar described our latest hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of protein translocation, supported by results collected in Bristol and Leeds on the tractable bacterial secretion process-commonly known as the Sec system; work that will be published elsewhere. Below is a description of the alternative and contested models for protein translocation that we all have been contemplating for many years. This review will consider their pros and cons. PMID:27284038

  13. The mechanics of ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Achenbach, John; Nierhaus, Knud H

    2015-07-01

    The ribosome translates the sequence of codons of an mRNA into the corresponding sequence of amino acids as it moves along the mRNA with a codon-step width of about 10 Å. The movement of the million-dalton complex ribosome is triggered by the universal elongation factor G (EF2 in archaea and eukaryotes) and is termed translocation. Unraveling the molecular details of translocation is one of the most challenging tasks of current ribosome research. In the last two years, enormous progress has been obtained by highly-resolved X-ray and cryo-electron microscopic structures as well as by sophisticated biochemical approaches concerning the trigger and control of the movement of the tRNA2·mRNA complex inside the ribosome during translocation. This review inspects and surveys these achievements. PMID:25514765

  14. Sequence-specific assembly of FtsK hexamers establishes directional translocation on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James E.; Sherratt, David J.; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    FtsK is a homohexameric, RecA-like dsDNA translocase that plays a key role in bacterial chromosome segregation. The FtsK regulatory γ-subdomain determines directionality of translocation through its interaction with specific 8 base pair chromosomal sequences [(KOPS); FtsK Orienting / Polarizing Sequence(s)] that are cooriented with the direction of replication in the chromosome. We use millisecond-resolution ensemble translocation and ATPase assays to analyze the assembly, initiation, and translocation of FtsK. We show that KOPS are used to initiate new translocation events rather than reorient existing ones. By determining kinetic parameters, we show sigmoidal dependences of translocation and ATPase rates on ATP concentration that indicate sequential cooperative coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA motion. We also estimate the ATP coupling efficiency of translocation to be 1.63–2.11 bp of dsDNA translocated/ATP hydrolyzed. The data were used to derive a model for the assembly, initiation, and translocation of FtsK hexamers. PMID:21048089

  15. A G-protein subunit translocation embedded network motif underlies GPCR regulation of calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K; Karunarathne, W K Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K V; Gautam, N

    2014-07-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  16. Partners with reciprocal translocations: genetic counseling for the 'double translocation'.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Hartsfield, J K; Vance, G H

    1998-05-01

    SV at age 2 years presented with multiple congenital anomalies including an absent left kidney, anal stenosis, vertebral abnormalities, partial sacral agenesis, microcephaly, dysmorphic facial features, growth deficiency, and developmental delay. She was found to have a complex chromosomal rearrangement derived from balanced translocations in each parent. PMID:9660061

  17. Fluoride inhibition of proton-translocating ATPases of oral bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, S V; Bender, G R; Marquis, R E

    1987-01-01

    The ATPases of isolated membranes of lactic acid bacteria were found to be inhibited by fluoride in a complex manner. Among the enzymes tested, that of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was the most sensitive to fluoride, and the initial rate of hydrolysis of ATP was reduced 50% by approximately 3 mM fluoride. The enzyme of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646 was the most resistant, and about 25 mM fluoride was required for 50% inhibition. The response to fluoride appeared to involve reversible, noncompetitive inhibition during short exposure to low levels of fluoride and nonreversible inhibition at higher fluoride levels. In addition, kinetic studies of the effects of fluoride on the enzymes of membranes of S. mutans and L. casei indicated that reversible inhibition was at least partly overcome at high levels of either ATP or Mg. The effects of pH on fluoride inhibition of ATPases were markedly different from the effects of pH on inhibition of acid/base regulation of intact cells by fluoride. It appeared that formation of HF was not required for inhibition of the ATPases. F1 ATPases isolated from the membranes by washing with buffers of low ionic strength proved to be less sensitive to fluoride than the membrane-associated F1F0 holoenzymes, and it was concluded that the F0 or membrane sector of the holoenzyme is involved in fluoride inhibition. PMID:2889674

  18. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Baldwin, Steve A; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:27183269

  19. Permeation of membranes by the neutral form of amino acids and peptides: relevance to the origin of peptide translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The flux of amino acids and other nutrient solutes such as phosphate across lipid bilayers (liposomes) is 10(5) slower than facilitated inward transport across biological membranes. This suggest that primitive cells lacking highly evolved transport systems would have difficulty transporting sufficient nutrients for cell growth to occur. There are two possible ways by which early life may have overcome this difficulty: (1) The membranes of the earliest cellular life-forms may have been intrinsically more permeable to solutes; or (2) some transport mechanism may have been available to facilitate transbilayer movement of solutes essential for cell survival and growth prior to the evolution of membrane transport proteins. Translocation of neutral species represents one such mechanism. The neutral forms of amino acids modified by methylation (creating protonated weak bases) permeate membranes up to 10(10) times faster than charged forms. This increased permeability when coupled to a transmembrane pH gradient can result in significantly increased rates of net unidirectional transport. Such pH gradients can be generated in vesicles used to model protocells that preceded and were presumably ancestral to early forms of life. This transport mechanism may still play a role in some protein translocation processes (e.g. for certain signal sequences, toxins and thylakoid proteins) in vivo.

  20. Two-way communication between SecY and SecA suggests a Brownian ratchet mechanism for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William John; Corey, Robin Adam; Oatley, Peter; Sessions, Richard Barry; Radford, Sheena E; Tuma, Roman; Collinson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The essential process of protein secretion is achieved by the ubiquitous Sec machinery. In prokaryotes, the drive for translocation comes from ATP hydrolysis by the cytosolic motor-protein SecA, in concert with the proton motive force (PMF). However, the mechanism through which ATP hydrolysis by SecA is coupled to directional movement through SecYEG is unclear. Here, we combine all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with single molecule FRET and biochemical assays. We show that ATP binding by SecA causes opening of the SecY-channel at long range, while substrates at the SecY-channel entrance feed back to regulate nucleotide exchange by SecA. This two-way communication suggests a new, unifying 'Brownian ratchet' mechanism, whereby ATP binding and hydrolysis bias the direction of polypeptide diffusion. The model represents a solution to the problem of transporting inherently variable substrates such as polypeptides, and may underlie mechanisms of other motors that translocate proteins and nucleic acids. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15598.001 PMID:27183269

  1. Bacterial translocation in experimental uremia.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Duarte, Joãn Bosco; de Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Mariana; Nochi, Rubens Jardim

    2004-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not experimental uremia would induce bacterial translocation. Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into two groups: uremic (n = 20) and control (n = 20). Under anesthesia, the upper and lower left renal poles and the marginal lateral parenchyma were excised in uremic group. Seven days later, in a second operation, the liver, spleen and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were excised and cultured. Blood samples were sent for biochemical analysis (BUN, creatinine, sodium and potassium) and cultured. Specimens of the jejunum (1 cm below the Treitz angle) and ileum (1 cm above the ileocecal valve) were collected and sent for histological examination and scored for the degree of inflammation of the mucosa using a classification proposed by Chiu et al. in 1970. Uremic rats presented higher BUN, creatinine and potassium than controls. Bacterial translocation was more frequent in uremic than in control animals (8/20 (40%) vs. 1/20 (5%); p = 0.02). Translocation in uremic rats was observed mainly at the MLN (all eight cases). Both at the jejunum (uremic = 3 [0-5] vs. control = 2 [0-4]; p = 0.04) and the ileum (uremic - 2 [0-5] vs. control = 0 [0-3]; p = 0.01), inflammation score was higher in uremic rats than in controls. The intestinal mucosa barrier is impaired and bacterial translocation occurs in experimental uremia. PMID:15497213

  2. Light-Dependent Translocation of Arrestin in Rod Photoreceptors is Signaled Through a Phospholipase C Cascade and Requires ATP

    PubMed Central

    Orisme, Wilda; Li, Jian; Goldmann, Tobias; Bolch, Susan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2009-01-01

    Partitioning of cellular components is a critical mechanism by which cells can regulate their activity. In rod photoreceptors, light induces a large-scale translocation of arrestin from the inner segments to the outer segments. The purpose of this project is to elucidate the signaling pathway necessary to initiate arrestin translocation to the outer segments and the mechanism for arrestin translocation. Mouse retinal organotypic cultures and eyes from transgenic Xenopus tadpoles expressing a fusion of GFP and rod arrestin were treated with both activators and inhibitors of proteins in the phosphoinositide pathway. Confocal microscopy was used to image the effects of the pharmacological agents on arrestin translocation in rod photoreceptors. Retinas were also depleted of ATP using potassium cyanide to assess the requirement for ATP in arrestin translocation. In this study, we demonstrate that components of the G-protein-linked phospholipase C (PLC) pathway play a role in initiating arrestin translocation. Our results show that arrestin translocation can be stimulated by activators of PLC and protein kinase C (PKC), and by cholera toxin in the absence of light. Arrestin translocation to the outer segments is significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC and PKC. Importantly, we find that treatment with potassium cyanide inhibits arrestin translocation in response to light. Collectively, our results suggest that arrestin translocation is initiated by a G-protein-coupled cascade through PLC and PKC signaling. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that at least the initiation of arrestin translocation requires energy input. PMID:19887106

  3. Mutations alter the sodium versus proton use of a Bacillus clausii flagellar motor and confer dual ion use on Bacillus subtilis motors.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Naoya; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-09-23

    Bacterial flagella contain membrane-embedded stators, Mot complexes, that harness the energy of either transmembrane proton or sodium ion gradients to power motility. Use of sodium ion gradients is associated with elevated pH and sodium concentrations. The Mot complexes studied to date contain channels that use either protons or sodium ions, with some bacteria having only one type and others having two distinct Mot types with different ion-coupling. Here, alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii KSM-K16 was shown to be motile in a pH range from 7 to 11 although its genome encodes only one Mot (BCl-MotAB). Assays of swimming as a function of pH, sodium concentration, and ion-selective motility inhibitors showed that BCl-MotAB couples motility to sodium at the high end of its pH range but uses protons at lower pH. This pattern was confirmed in swimming assays of a statorless Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing either BCl-MotAB or one of the two B. subtilis stators, sodium-coupled Bs-MotPS or proton-coupled Bs-MotAB. Pairs of mutations in BCl-MotB were identified that converted the naturally bifunctional BCl-MotAB to stators that preferentially use either protons or sodium ions across the full pH range. We then identified trios of mutations that added a capacity for dual-ion coupling on the distinct B. subtilis Bs-MotAB and Bs-MotPS motors. Determinants that alter the specificity of bifunctional and single-coupled flagellar stators add to insights from studies of other ion-translocating transporters that use both protons and sodium ions. PMID:18796609

  4. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  5. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  6. Structural determinants of human proton-coupled folate transporter oligomerization: role of GXXXG motifs and identification of oligomeric interfaces at transmembrane domains 3 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Kugel, Sita; Huang, Jenny; Wilson, Lucas J.; Wloszczynski, Patrick A.; Ye, Jun; Matherly, Larry H.; Hou, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    The human proton-coupled folate transporter (hPCFT) is expressed in solid tumours and is active at pHs characterizing the tumour microenvironment. Recent attention focused on exploiting hPCFT for targeting solid tumours with novel cytotoxic anti-folates. hPCFT has 12 transmembrane domains (TMDs) and forms homo-oligomers with functional significance. The hPCFT primary sequence includes GXXXG motifs in TMD2 (G93XXXG97) and TMD4 (G155XXXG159). To investigate roles of these motifs in hPCFT function, stability and surface expression, we mutated glycine to leucine to generate single or multiple substitution mutants. Only the G93L and G159L mutants preserved substantial [3H]methotrexate (Mtx) transport when expressed in hPCFT-null (R1-11) HeLa cells. Transport activity of the glycine-to-leucine mutants correlated with surface hPCFT by surface biotinylation and confocal microscopy with ECFP*-tagged hPCFTs, suggesting a role for GXXXG in hPCFT stability and intracellular trafficking. When co-expressed in R1-11 cells, haemagglutinin-tagged glycine-to-leucine mutants and His10-tagged wild-type (WT) hPCFT co-associated on nickel affinity columns, suggesting that the GXXXG motifs are not directly involved in hPCFT oligomerization. This was substantiated by in situ FRET experiments with co-expressed ECFP*- and YFP-tagged hPCFT. Molecular modelling of dimeric hPCFT structures showed juxtaposed TMDs 2, 3, 4 and 6 as potential structural interfaces between monomers. hPCFT cysteine insertion mutants in TMD3 (Q136C and L137C) and TMD6 (W213C, L214C, L224C, A227C, F228C, F230C and G231C) were expressed in R1-11 cells and cross-linked with 1,6-hexanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, confirming TMD juxtapositions. Altogether, our results imply that TMDs 3 and 6 provide critical interfaces for formation of hPCFT oligomers, which might be facilitated by the GXXXG motifs in TMD2 and TMD4. PMID:25877470

  7. Targeting Nonsquamous Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer via the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter with 6-Substituted Pyrrolo[2,3-d]Pyrimidine Thienoyl Antifolates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun; Yang, Si; Polin, Lisa; Kushner, Juiwanna; White, Kathryn; Huang, Jenny; Ratnam, Manohar; Gangjee, Aleem; Matherly, Larry H

    2016-04-01

    Pemetrexed (PMX) is a 5-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolate used for therapy of nonsquamous nonsmall cell lung cancer (NS-NSCLC). PMX is transported by the reduced folate carrier (RFC) and proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT). Unlike RFC, PCFT is active at acidic pH levels characterizing the tumor microenvironment. By real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, PCFT transcripts and proteins were detected in primary NS-NSCLC specimens. In six NS-NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1437, H460, H1299, H1650, and H2030), PCFT transcripts and proteins were detected by real-time RT-PCR and western blots, respectively. 6-Substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolates related to PMX [compound 1 (C1) and compound 2 (C2), respectively] are selective substrates for PCFT over RFC. In the NS-NSCLC cell lines, both [(3)H]PMX and [(3)H]C2 were transported by PCFT. C1 and C2 inhibited proliferation of the NS-NSCLC cell lines; A549, H460, and H2030 cells were more sensitive to C1 than to PMX. C1 and C2 inhibited glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase in de novo purine nucleotide biosynthesis. When treated at pH 6.8, which favors PCFT uptake, C1 and C2 inhibited clonogenicity of H460 cells greater than PMX; PMX inhibited clonogenicity more than C1 or C2 at pH 7.2, which favors RFC transport over PCFT. Knockdown of PCFT in H460 cells resulted in decreased [(3)H]PMX and [(3)H]C2 transport and decreased growth inhibition by C1 and C2, and to a lesser extent by PMX. In vivo efficacy of C1 was seen toward H460 tumor xenografts in severe-combined immunodeficient mice. Our results suggest that 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolates offer significant promise for treating NS-NSCLC by selective uptake by PCFT. PMID:26837243

  8. Inhibition of Membrane Transport in Streptococcus faecalis by Uncouplers of Oxidative Phosphorylation and Its Relationship to Proton Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Harold, F. M.; Baarda, J. R.

    1968-01-01

    We studied the effect of compounds that uncouple oxidative phosphorylation on membrane function in Streptoccocus faecalis, an organism which relies upon glycolysis for the generation of metabolic energy. At low concentrations (ranging from 10−7 to 10−4m), tetrachlorosalicylanilide, tetramethyldipicrylamine, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, pentachlorophenol, and dicoumarol strongly inhibited energy-dependent transport of rubidium, phosphate, and certain amino acids. However, these compounds had little effect on the generation of adenosine triphosphate via glycolysis or on its utilization for the synthesis of macromolecules. They also did not seriously inhibit uptake of those monosaccharides and amino acids which do not require concurrent metabolism. It is proposed that the uncouplers interfere with the utilization of metabolic energy for membrane transport. The uncouplers accelerated the translocation of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. It appears that a proton-impermeable membrane is required for transport, perhaps, because a proton gradient is involved in the coupling of metabolic energy to the translocation of substrates across the membrane. PMID:4177737

  9. Inhibition of membrane transport in Streptococcus faecalis by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and its relationship to proton conduction.

    PubMed

    Harold, F M; Baarda, J R

    1968-12-01

    We studied the effect of compounds that uncouple oxidative phosphorylation on membrane function in Streptoccocus faecalis, an organism which relies upon glycolysis for the generation of metabolic energy. At low concentrations (ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-4)m), tetrachlorosalicylanilide, tetramethyldipicrylamine, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, pentachlorophenol, and dicoumarol strongly inhibited energy-dependent transport of rubidium, phosphate, and certain amino acids. However, these compounds had little effect on the generation of adenosine triphosphate via glycolysis or on its utilization for the synthesis of macromolecules. They also did not seriously inhibit uptake of those monosaccharides and amino acids which do not require concurrent metabolism. It is proposed that the uncouplers interfere with the utilization of metabolic energy for membrane transport. The uncouplers accelerated the translocation of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane. It appears that a proton-impermeable membrane is required for transport, perhaps, because a proton gradient is involved in the coupling of metabolic energy to the translocation of substrates across the membrane. PMID:4177737

  10. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole. PMID:19143783

  11. Linkage map construction involving a reciprocal translocation.

    PubMed

    Farré, A; Benito, I Lacasa; Cistué, L; de Jong, J H; Romagosa, I; Jansen, J

    2011-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a novel statistical-genetic approach for the construction of linkage maps in populations obtained from reciprocal translocation heterozygotes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Using standard linkage analysis, translocations usually lead to 'pseudo-linkage': the mixing up of markers from the chromosomes involved in the translocation into a single linkage group. Close to the translocation breakpoints recombination is severely suppressed and, as a consequence, ordering markers in those regions is not feasible. The novel strategy presented in this paper is based on (1) disentangling the "pseudo-linkage" using principal coordinate analysis, (2) separating individuals into translocated types and normal types and (3) separating markers into those close to and those more distant from the translocation breakpoints. The methods make use of a consensus map of the species involved. The final product consists of integrated linkage maps of the distal parts of the chromosomes involved in the translocation. PMID:21153624

  12. Yeast Pol4 Promotes Tel1-Regulated Chromosomal Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Sastre-Moreno, Guillermo; Aguilera, Andrés; Blanco, Luis

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most dangerous DNA lesions, since their erroneous repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) can generate harmful chromosomal rearrangements. PolX DNA polymerases are well suited to extend DSB ends that cannot be directly ligated due to their particular ability to bind to and insert nucleotides at the imperfect template-primer structures formed during NHEJ. Herein, we have devised genetic assays in yeast to induce simultaneous DSBs in different chromosomes in vivo. The repair of these breaks in trans could result in reciprocal chromosomal translocations that were dependent on classical Ku-dependent NHEJ. End-joining events leading to translocations were mainly based on the formation of short base pairing between 3′-overhanging DNA ends coupled to gap-filling DNA synthesis. A major proportion of these events were specifically dependent on yeast DNA polymerase Pol4 activity. In addition, we have discovered that Pol4-Thr540 amino acid residue can be phosphorylated by Tel1/ATM kinase, which could modulate Pol4 activity during NHEJ. Our data suggest that the role of Tel1 in preventing break-induced chromosomal translocations can, to some extent, be due to its stimulating effect on gap-filling activity of Pol4 to repair DSBs in cis. Overall, this work provides further insight to the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair by NHEJ and presents a new perspective to the understanding of how chromosomal translocations are formed in eukaryotic cells. PMID:23874240

  13. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development. PMID:25040040

  14. Voltage-gated Proton Channels

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels, HV1, have vaulted from the realm of the esoteric into the forefront of a central question facing ion channel biophysicists, namely the mechanism by which voltage-dependent gating occurs. This transformation is the result of several factors. Identification of the gene in 2006 revealed that proton channels are homologues of the voltage-sensing domain of most other voltage-gated ion channels. Unique, or at least eccentric, properties of proton channels include dimeric architecture with dual conduction pathways, perfect proton selectivity, a single-channel conductance ~103 smaller than most ion channels, voltage-dependent gating that is strongly modulated by the pH gradient, ΔpH, and potent inhibition by Zn2+ (in many species) but an absence of other potent inhibitors. The recent identification of HV1 in three unicellular marine plankton species has dramatically expanded the phylogenetic family tree. Interest in proton channels in their own right has increased as important physiological roles have been identified in many cells. Proton channels trigger the bioluminescent flash of dinoflagellates, facilitate calcification by coccolithophores, regulate pH-dependent processes in eggs and sperm during fertilization, secrete acid to control the pH of airway fluids, facilitate histamine secretion by basophils, and play a signaling role in facilitating B-cell receptor mediated responses in B lymphocytes. The most elaborate and best-established functions occur in phagocytes, where proton channels optimize the activity of NADPH oxidase, an important producer of reactive oxygen species. Proton efflux mediated by HV1 balances the charge translocated across the membrane by electrons through NADPH oxidase, minimizes changes in cytoplasmic and phagosomal pH, limits osmotic swelling of the phagosome, and provides substrate H+ for the production of H2O2 and HOCl, reactive oxygen species crucial to killing pathogens. PMID:23798303

  15. Competing Pathways in the photo-Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reduction of fac-[Re(bpy)(CO)₃(4,40-bpy]+* by Hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, David J.; Brennaman, Kyle M.; Bettis, Stephanie E.; Wang, Li; Binstead, Robert A.; Papanikolas, John M.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-06-30

    The emitting metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state of fac-[Re{sup I}(bpy)(CO)₃(4,4'-bpy)]+ (1) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, 4,4'-bpy is 4,4'-bipyridine), [Re II(bpy –•)(CO)₃(4,4'-bpy)]+*, is reductively quenched by 1,4-hydroquinone (H₂Q) in CH₃CN at 23 ± 2 °C by competing pathways to give a common electron–proton-transfer intermediate. In one pathway, electron transfer (ET) quenching occurs to give Re{sup I}(bpy –•)(CO)₃(4,4'-bpy)]⁰ with k = (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10⁹ M –1 s –1, followed by proton transfer from H₂Q to give [ReI(bpy)(CO)₃(4,4'-bpyH )]+. Protonation triggers intramolecular bpy –•→ 4,4'-bpyH{sup +} electron transfer. In the second pathway, preassociation occurs between the ground state and H₂Q at high concentrations. Subsequent Re → bpy MLCT excitation of the adduct is followed by electron–proton transfer from H₂Q in concert with intramolecular bpy –•→ 4,4'-bpyH+ electron transfer to give [ReI(bpy)(CO)₃(4,4'-bpyH)]+ with k = (1.0 ± 0.4) × 10⁹ s–1 in 3:1 CH₃CN/H₂O.

  16. Towards a thermodynamic definition of efficacy in partial agonism: The thermodynamics of efficacy and ligand proton transfer in a G protein-coupled receptor of the rhodopsin class.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Kenneth J; Sykes, Shane C; Davies, Robin H

    2010-11-15

    The thermodynamic binding profiles of agonist and antagonist complexes of the 4-hydroxypropanolamine partial agonist, prenalterol, on the chronotropic adrenergic response in guinea-pig right atria were determined over a 15 °C temperature range. The tissue response was compared with data on the ethanolamine agonist, isoprenaline, given by binding studies in a number of rat tissues. Utilising the residue conservatism surrounding the known active conformers bound to either of two aspartate residues (α-helices II, III) in both receptors (β(1), β(2)) and species (guinea-pig, rat and human), no significant deformation in the extended side chain could be found in prenalterol's agonist binding compared to isoprenaline. Antagonist binding gave a highly favourable entropy contribution at 30.0 °C of -4.7±1.2 kcal/mol. The enthalpy change between bound agonist and antagonist complexes, a function of the efficacy alone, was -6.4±1.1 kcal/mol, coincident with the calculated intrinsic preference of a primary/secondary amine-aspartate interaction for a neutral hydrogen-bonded form over its ion pair state, giving values of 6.3-6.6 kcal/mol with calculations of good quality, a figure expected to be close to that shown within a hydrophobic environment. Delivery of a proton to a conserved aspartate anion (α-helix II) becomes the critical determinant for agonist action with resultant proton transfer stabilisation dominating the enthalpy change. A proposed monocation-driven ligand proton pumping mechanism within the ternary complex is consistent with the data, delivery between two acid groups being created by the movement of the cation and the counter-movement of the ligand protonated amine moving from Asp 138 (α-helix III) to Asp 104 (α-helix II). PMID:20727346

  17. Translocation (Y;12) in lipoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cher-Wei; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Johannessen, Catherine; Hornick, Jason L; Dal Cin, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm in adults, and have been extensively characterized at the cytogenetic level. Chromosomal aberrations have been observed in the majority of lipomas, two-thirds of which involve chromosomal region 12q14.3. To date, structural rearrangements have been reported affecting every chromosome except chromosome Y. Here we report a case of a lipoma that shows a novel apparently balanced translocation involving chromosomes Y and 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a break-apart HMGA2 in-house probe set detected a single signal on the normal chromosome 12 but not on either the derivative chromosome Y or 12, indicating a cryptic loss of 12q14.3, where HMGA2 is mapped. Immunohistochemical studies, however, revealed overexpression of HMGA2 with nuclear expression in the majority of tumor cells, whereas MDM2 and CDK4 were negative. The overexpression of HMGA2 may be caused by a cryptic chromosomal aberration affecting either the cytogenetically unaltered HMGA2 allele or HMGA2 regulators elsewhere. The current case broadens our knowledge about the translocation partners of HMGA2 in lipomas and highlights the biological complexity in regulating HMGA2 expression. PMID:21356192

  18. Interactions of histatin 5 and histatin 5-derived peptides with liposome membranes: surface effects, translocation and permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Den Hertog, Alice L; Wong Fong Sang, Harro W; Kraayenhof, Ruud; Bolscher, Jan G M; Van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V

    2004-01-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, among which are histatin 5 and the derived peptides dhvar4 and dhvar5, enter their target cells and interact with internal organelles. There still are questions about the mechanisms by which antimicrobial peptides translocate across the membrane. We used a liposome model to study membrane binding, translocation and membrane-perturbing capacities of histatin 5, dhvar4 and dhvar5. Despite the differences in amphipathic characters of these peptides, they bound equally well to liposomes, whereas their membrane activities differed remarkably: dhvar4 translocated at the fastest rate, followed by dhvar5, whereas the histatin 5 translocation rate was much lower. The same pattern was seen for the extent of calcein release: highest with dhvar4, less with dhvar5 and almost none with histatin 5. The translocation and disruptive actions of dhvar5 did not seem to be coupled, because translocation occurred on a much longer timescale than calcein release, which ended within a few minutes. We conclude that peptide translocation can occur through peptide-phospholipid interactions, and that this is a possible mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides enter cells. However, the translocation rate was much lower in this model membrane system than that seen in yeast cells. Thus it is likely that, at least for some peptides, additional features promoting the translocation across biological membranes are involved as well. PMID:14733612

  19. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  20. mRNA Translocation Occurs During the Second Step of Ribosomal Intersubunit Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2010-01-01

    During protein synthesis, mRNA and tRNA undergo coupled translocation through the ribosome in a process that is catalyzed by elongation factor EF-G. Based on cryo-EM reconstructions, counterclockwise and clockwise rotational movements between the large and small ribosomal subunits have been implicated in a proposed ratcheting mechanism to drive the unidirectional movement of translocation. We have used a combination of two fluorescence-based approaches to study the timing of these events: Intersubunit FRET measurements to observe relative rotational movement of the subunits and a fluorescence quenching assay to monitor translocation of mRNA. Binding of EF-G·GTP first induces rapid counterclockwise intersubunit rotation, followed by a slower, clockwise reversal of the rotational movement. Comparison of the rates of these movements reveals that mRNA translocation occurs during the second, clockwise rotation event, corresponding to the transition from the hybrid state to the classical state. PMID:21399643

  1. Impact of OH Radical-Initiated H2CO3 Degradation in the Earth's Atmosphere via Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Sourav; Hazra, Montu K

    2016-02-01

    The decomposition of isolated carbonic acid (H2CO3) molecule into CO2 and H2O (H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O) is prevented by a large activation barrier (>35 kcal/mol). Nevertheless, it is surprising that the detection of the H2CO3 molecule has not been possible yet, and the hunt for the free H2CO3 molecule has become challenging not only in the Earth's atmosphere but also on Mars. In view of this fact, we report here the high levels of quantum chemistry calculations investigating both the energetics and kinetics of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation reaction to interpret the loss of the H2CO3 molecule in the Earth's atmosphere. It is seen from our study that proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) are the two mechanisms by which the OH radical initiates the degradation of the H2CO3 molecule. Moreover, the PCET mechanism is potentially the important one, as the effective barrier, defined as the difference between the zero point vibrational energy (ZPE) corrected energy of the transition state and the total energy of the isolated starting reactants in terms of bimolecular encounters, for the PCET mechanism at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory is ∼3 to 4 kcal/mol lower than the effective barrier height associated with the HAT mechanism. The CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level predicted effective barrier heights for the degradations of the two most stable conformers of H2CO3 molecule via the PCET mechanism are only ∼2.7 and 4.3 kcal/mol. A comparative reaction rate analysis at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory has also been carried out to explore the potential impact of the OH radical-initiated H2CO3 degradation relative to that from water (H2O), formic acid (FA), acetic acid (AA) and sulfuric acid (SA) assisted H2CO3 → CO2 + H2O decomposition reactions in both the Earth's troposphere and stratosphere. The comparison of the reaction rates reveals that, although the atmospheric concentration of the OH radical is

  2. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  3. Energy coupling and respiration in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Drozd, J W

    1976-11-01

    Intact cells of Nitrosomonas europaea grown in an ammonium salts medium will oxidise ammonium ions, hydroxylamine and ascorbate-TMPD; there is no oxidation of carbon monoxide, methane or methanol. The Km value for ammonia oxidation is highly pH dependent with a minimum value of 0.5 mM above pH 8.0. This suggests that free ammonia is the species crossing the cytoplasmic membrane(s). The measurement of respiration driven proton translocation indicates that there is probably only one proton translocating loop (loop 3) association with hydroxylamine oxidation. The oxidation of "endogenous" substrates is sometimes associated with more than one proton-translocating loop. These results indicate that during growth hydroxylamine oxidation is probably associated with a maximum P/O ratio of 1. PMID:13754

  4. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  5. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function.

    PubMed

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Boynton, Lin S; Eguchi, Raphael R; Deriy, Ludmila V; Hogarth, D Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Villereal, Mitchel L; Beacham, Daniel W; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J

    2015-11-24

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H(+) into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  6. Phosphorus Compounds in Translocating Phloem

    PubMed Central

    Bieleski, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    Phosphate-32P was introduced into a turnip leaf, and 3 hr later, the vascular bundles were stripped from the petiole and their phosphate ester pattern was studied. The pattern did not alter along their length and was like that of other tissues. Pumpkin leaves were painted with phosphate-32P; and later, the petioles were cut, the sieve tube exudates were collected and their phosphate ester patterns were studied. Exudates collected after 10 min had a high proportion of their 32P present in Pi and nucleoside triphosphates, while exudates collected after long translocation times (4-22 hr) had a lower proportion in these, and a higher proportion in hexose monophosphates and UDP glucose. In general, the ester patterns were like those of other tissues. The results indicate that sieve tubes are metabolically active, and that Pi is the primary form in which phosphorus moves in the phloem. Images PMID:16657091

  7. DNA translocation through graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Christopher A; Healy, Ken; Wanunu, Meni; Ray, Vishva; Peterman, Neil; Bartel, John; Fischbein, Michael D; Venta, Kimberly; Luo, Zhengtang; Johnson, A T Charlie; Drndić, Marija

    2010-08-11

    We report on DNA translocations through nanopores created in graphene membranes. Devices consist of 1-5 nm thick graphene membranes with electron-beam sculpted nanopores from 5 to 10 nm in diameter. Due to the thin nature of the graphene membranes, we observe larger blocked currents than for traditional solid-state nanopores. However, ionic current noise levels are several orders of magnitude larger than those for silicon nitride nanopores. These fluctuations are reduced with the atomic-layer deposition of 5 nm of titanium dioxide over the device. Unlike traditional solid-state nanopore materials that are insulating, graphene is an excellent electrical conductor. Use of graphene as a membrane material opens the door to a new class of nanopore devices in which electronic sensing and control are performed directly at the pore. PMID:20698604

  8. Dichotomous Hydrogen Atom Transfer vs. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer During Activation of X-H Bonds (X = C, N, O) by Nonheme Iron-Oxo Complexes of Variable Basicity

    PubMed Central

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Lacy, David C.; Borovik, A. S.; Shaik, Sason

    2013-01-01

    We describe herein the hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT)/ proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactivity for FeIV-oxo and FeIII-oxo complexes (1–4) that activate C-H, N-H, and O-H bonds in 9,10 dihydroanthracene (S1), dimethylformamide (S2), 1,2 diphenylhydrazine (S3), p-methoxyphenol (S4), and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (S5). In 1–3, the iron is pentacoordinated by tris[N'-tert-butylureaylato)-N-ethylene]aminato ([H3buea]3−) or its derivatives. These complexes are basic, in the order 3 >> 1 > 2. Oxidant 4, [FeIVN4Py(O)]2+ (N4Py: N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-bis(2-pyridyl) methylamine), is the least basic oxidant. The DFT results match experimental trends and exhibit a mechanistic spectrum ranging from concerted HAT and PCET reactions to concerted-asynchronous proton transfer (PT) / electron transfer (ET) mechanisms, all the way to PT. The singly occupied orbital along the O---H---X (X= C, N, O) moiety in the TS shows clearly that in the PCET cases, the electron is transferred separately from the proton. The Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not account for the observed reactivity pattern, as evidenced by the scatter in the plot of calculated barrier vs. reactions driving forces. However, a plot of the deformation energy in the TS vs. the respective barrier provides a clear signature of the HAT/PCET dichotomy. Thus, in all C-H bond activations, the barrier derives from the deformation energy required to create the TS, whereas in N-H/O-H bond activations, the deformation energy is much larger than the corresponding barrier, indicating the presence of stabilizing interaction between the TS fragments. A valence bond model is used to link the observed results with the basicity/acidity of the reactants. PMID:24124906

  9. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, bb, and μμ pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1fb-1 at 7TeV and up to 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. From the high-resolution γγ and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02+0.26–0.27 (stat) +0.14–0.15 (syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in themore » different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09(stat)+0.08–0.07 (theo) ± 0.07(syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. As a result, no significant deviations are found.« less

  10. An attempt to evaluate the effect of proton-coupled electron transfer on the H-abstraction step of the reaction between 1,1-dimethylhydrazine and cytochrome P450 compound I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirao, Hajime; Chuanprasit, Pratanphorn

    2015-02-01

    A series of density functional theory and G4 calculations are performed to quantify the extent to which proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) lowers the barrier for H-abstraction in the reaction between 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) and the compound I intermediate of a cytochrome P450 enzyme. The homolytic bond dissociation energy of UDMH is larger than that of 1,4-cyclohexadiene; nevertheless, the H-abstraction barrier is significantly lower for the former substrate. The barrier lowering in the UDMH reaction caused by PCET is roughly estimated to be 9 kcal/mol. Valence bond structures are analyzed in detail to figure out how PCET lowers the barrier height.

  11. Intramolecular, Exciplex-Mediated, Proton-Coupled, Charge-Transfer Processes in N,N-Dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium Cations: Influence of Anion, Solvent Polarity, and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Safko, Trevor M; Faleiros, Marcelo M; Atvars, Teresa D Z; Weiss, Richard G

    2016-06-16

    An intramolecular exciplex-mediated, proton-coupled, charge-transfer (PCCT) process has been investigated for a series of N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-ammonium cations with different anions (PyS) in solvents of low to intermediate polarity over a wide temperature range. Solvent mediates both the equilibrium between conformations of the cation that place the pyrenyl and ammonium groups in proximity (conformation C) or far from each other (conformation O) and the ability of the ammonium group to transfer a proton adiabatically in the PyS excited singlet state. Thus, exciplex emission, concurrent with the PCCT process, was observed only in hydrogen-bond accepting solvents of relatively low polarity (tetrahydrofuran, ethyl acetate, and 1,4-dioxane) and not in dichloromethane. From the exciplex emission and other spectroscopic and thermodynamic data, the acidity of the ammonium group in conformation C of the excited singlet state of PyS (pKa*) has been estimated to be ca. -3.4 in tetrahydrofuran. The ratios between the intensities of emission from the exciplex and the locally excited state (IEx/ILE) appear to be much more dependent on the nature of the anion than are the rates of exciplex formation and decay, although the excited state data do not provide a quantitative measure of the anion effect on the C-O equilibrium. The activation energies associated with exciplex formation in THF are calculated to be 0.08 to 0.15 eV lower than for the neutral amine, N,N-dimethyl-3-(1-pyrenyl)propan-1-amine. Decay of the exciplexes formed from the deprotonation of PyS is hypothesized to occur through charge-recombination processes. To our knowledge, this is the first example in which photoacidity and intramolecular exciplex formation (i.e., a PCCT reaction) are coupled. PMID:27268751

  12. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates. PMID:27241233

  13. Electrostatic coupling of ion pumps.

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Frausto, J; Lüger, P; Apell, H J

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the electrostatic interactions between membrane-embedded ion-pumps and their consequences for the kinetics of pump-mediated transport processes have been examined. We show that the time course of an intrinsically monomolecular transport reaction can become distinctly nonexponential, if the reaction is associated with charge translocation and takes place in an aggregate of pump molecules. First we consider the electrostatic coupling of a single dimer of ion-pumps embedded in the membrane. Then we apply the treatment to the kinetic analysis of light-driven proton transport by bacteriorhodopsin which forms two-dimensional hexagonal lattices. Finally, for the case of nonordered molecules, we also consider a model in which the pumps are randomly distributed over the nodes of a lattice. Here the average distance is equal to that deduced experimentally and the elemental size of the lattice is the effective diameter of one single pump. This latter model is applied to an aggregate of membrane-embedded Na, K- and Ca-pumps. In all these cases the electrostatic potential considered is the exact solution calculated from the method of electrical images for a plane membrane of finite thickness immersed in an infinite aqueous solution environment. The distributions of charges (ions or charged binding sites) are considered homogeneous or discrete in the membrane and/or in the external solution. In the case of discrete distributions we compare the results from a mean field approximation and a stochastic simulation. PMID:1371705

  14. Translocation step size and mechanism of the RecBC DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P R; Kowalczykowski, S C

    2000-05-18

    DNA helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA. They are a diverse group of proteins that move in a linear fashion along a one-dimensional polymer lattice--DNA--by using a mechanism that couples nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to both translocation and double-stranded DNA unwinding to produce separate strands of DNA. The RecBC enzyme is a processive DNA helicase that functions in homologous recombination in Escherichia coli; it unwinds up to 6,250 base pairs per binding event and hydrolyses slightly more than one ATP molecule per base pair unwound. Here we show, by using a series of gapped oligonucleotide substrates, that this enzyme translocates along only one strand of duplex DNA in the 3'-->5' direction. The translocating enzyme will traverse, or 'step' across, single-stranded DNA gaps in defined steps that are 23 (+/-2) nucleotides in length. This step is much larger than the amount of double-stranded DNA that can be unwound using the free energy derived from hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP, implying that translocation and DNA unwinding are separate events. We propose that the RecBC enzyme both translocates and unwinds by a quantized, two-step, inchworm-like mechanism that may have parallels for translocation by other linear motor proteins. PMID:10830968

  15. Resolution and measurement of heteronuclear dipolar couplings of a noncrystalline protein immobilized in a biological supramolecular assembly by proton-detected MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Ho; Yang, Chen; Opella, Stanley J.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional 15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift and three-dimensional 1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift/1H chemical shift MAS solid-state NMR correlation spectra of the filamentous bacteriophage Pf1 major coat protein show single-site resolution in noncrystalline, intact-phage preparations. The high sensitivity and resolution result from 1H detection at 600 MHz under 50 kHz magic angle spinning using ∼0.5 mg of perdeuterated and uniformly 15N-labeled protein in which the exchangeable amide sites are partially or completely back-exchanged (reprotonated). Notably, the heteronuclear 1H-15N dipolar coupling frequency dimension is shown to select among 15N resonances, which will be useful in structural studies of larger proteins where the resonances exhibit a high degree of overlap in multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra.

  16. Distinct functions of elongation factor G in ribosome recycling and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Savelsbergh, Andreas; Rodnina, Marina V.; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF-G) promotes the translocation step in bacterial protein synthesis and, together with ribosome recycling factor (RRF), the disassembly of the post-termination ribosome. Unlike translocation, ribosome disassembly strictly requires GTP hydrolysis by EF-G. Here we report that ribosome disassembly is strongly inhibited by vanadate, an analog of inorganic phosphate (Pi), indicating that Pi release is required for ribosome disassembly. In contrast, the function of EF-G in single-round translocation is not affected by vanadate, while the turnover reaction is strongly inhibited. We also show that the antibiotic fusidic acid blocks ribosome disassembly by EF-G/RRF at a 1000-fold lower concentration than required for the inhibition of EF-G turnover in vitro and close to the effective inhibitory concentration in vivo, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of fusidic acid is primarily due to the direct inhibition of ribosome recycling. Our results indicate that conformational coupling between EF-G and the ribosome is principally different in translocation and ribosome disassembly. Pi release is not required for the mechanochemical function of EF-G in translocation, whereas the interactions between RRF and EF-G introduce tight coupling between the conformational change of EF-G induced by Pi release and ribosome disassembly. PMID:19324963

  17. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    PubMed

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'. PMID:7823046

  18. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leadingmore » order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).« less

  19. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton–proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb–1 collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445–3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to the strong coupling constant αS is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of αS(MZ) = 0.1171 ± 0.0013(exp)+0.0073–0.0047(theo).

  20. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, Nℓ (ℓ=e,μ), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one Nℓ flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MNℓ) mass plane excluded at a 95% confidence level extends to approximately MWR =more » 3.0TeV and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR, MNℓ) exclusion region beyond previous results.« less

  1. Search for heavy neutrinos and W bosons with right-handed couplings in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-26

    A search for heavy, right-handed neutrinos, Nℓ (ℓ=e,μ), and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model, has been performed by the CMS experiment. The search was based on a sample of two lepton plus two jet events collected in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. For models with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one N flavor contributes significantly to the WR decay width, the region in the two-dimensional (MWR,MN) mass plane excluded at a 95% confidence level extends to approximately MWR = 3.0TeV and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the WR boson mass, depending on the value of MWR. This search significantly extends the (MWR, MN) exclusion region beyond previous results.

  2. What Drives the Translocation of Proteins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sanford M.; Peskin, Charles S.; Oster, George F.

    1992-05-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems.

  3. Stress and translocation: alterations in the stress physiology of translocated birds.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Molly J; Delehanty, David J; Romero, L Michael

    2009-06-01

    Translocation and reintroduction have become major conservation actions in attempts to create self-sustaining wild populations of threatened species. However, avian translocations have a high failure rate and causes for failure are poorly understood. While 'stress' is often cited as an important factor in translocation failure, empirical evidence of physiological stress is lacking. Here we show that experimental translocation leads to changes in the physiological stress response in chukar partridge, Alectoris chukar. We found that capture alone significantly decreased the acute glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT) response, but adding exposure to captivity and transport further altered the stress response axis (the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) as evident from a decreased sensitivity of the negative feedback system. Animals that were exposed to the entire translocation procedure, in addition to the reduced acute stress response and disrupted negative feedback, had significantly lower baseline CORT concentrations and significantly reduced body weight. These data indicate that translocation alters stress physiology and that chronic stress is potentially a major factor in translocation failure. Under current practices, the restoration of threatened species through translocation may unwittingly depend on the success of chronically stressed individuals. This conclusion emphasizes the need for understanding and alleviating translocation-induced chronic stress in order to use most effectively this important conservation tool. PMID:19324794

  4. Stress and translocation: alterations in the stress physiology of translocated birds

    PubMed Central

    Dickens, Molly J.; Delehanty, David J.; Romero, L. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Translocation and reintroduction have become major conservation actions in attempts to create self-sustaining wild populations of threatened species. However, avian translocations have a high failure rate and causes for failure are poorly understood. While ‘stress’ is often cited as an important factor in translocation failure, empirical evidence of physiological stress is lacking. Here we show that experimental translocation leads to changes in the physiological stress response in chukar partridge, Alectoris chukar. We found that capture alone significantly decreased the acute glucocorticoid (corticosterone, CORT) response, but adding exposure to captivity and transport further altered the stress response axis (the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis) as evident from a decreased sensitivity of the negative feedback system. Animals that were exposed to the entire translocation procedure, in addition to the reduced acute stress response and disrupted negative feedback, had significantly lower baseline CORT concentrations and significantly reduced body weight. These data indicate that translocation alters stress physiology and that chronic stress is potentially a major factor in translocation failure. Under current practices, the restoration of threatened species through translocation may unwittingly depend on the success of chronically stressed individuals. This conclusion emphasizes the need for understanding and alleviating translocation-induced chronic stress in order to use most effectively this important conservation tool. PMID:19324794

  5. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogenbirk, Marc A; Heideman, Marinus R; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-06-28

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  6. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  7. Driven Polymer Translocation into a Crosslinked Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sean, David; Slater, Gary

    2015-03-01

    In a typical polymer translocation setup, a thin membrane is used to separate two chambers and a polyelectrolyte is driven by an electric field to translocate from one side of the membrane to the other via a small nanopore. However, the high translocation rate that results from the forces required to drive this process makes optical and/or electrical analysis of the translocating polymer challenging. Using coarse-grained Langevin Dynamics simulations we investigate how the translocation process can be slowed down by placing a crosslinked gel on the trans-side of the membrane. Since the driving electric field is localized in the neighborhood of the nanopore, electrophoretic migration is only achieved by a ``pushing'' action from the polymer segment residing in the nanopore. For the case of a flexible polymer we find that the polymer fills the gel pores via multiple ``herniation'' processes, whereas for a semi-flexible chain in a tight gel there are no hernias and the polymer follows a smooth curvilinear path. Moreover, for the case of a semi-flexible polymer the gel makes the translocation process more uniform by reducing the acceleration at the end of the process.

  8. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseikelmann, B

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal gene transfer and transkingdom sex. Analyses of genes and gene products involved in DNA transfer suggest that DNA is transferred through a protein channel spanning the bacterial envelope. No common model exists for DNA translocation during phage infection. Perhaps various mechanisms are necessary as a result of the different morphologies of bacteriophages. The DNA translocation processes during conjugation, T-DNA transfer, and transformation are more consistent and may even be compared to the excretion of some proteins. On the basis of analogies and homologies between the proteins involved in DNA translocation and protein secretion, a common basic model for these processes is presented. PMID:7968916

  9. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  10. A Novel de novo Balanced Reciprocal Translocation t(18;22) Associated with Recurrent Miscarriages: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Usha R.; Ponnala, Rajitha; Dalal, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent miscarriage is a major concern in the couples with reproductive problems. The chromosomal abnormalities, mainly balanced rearrangements are reported in variable phenotypes and the prevalence of them is 2-8% in such couples. Case Presentation In this study, the clinical, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic evaluations were performed on a couple with RM. The cytogenetic analysis of the husband revealed a balanced reciprocal translocation of t(18;22)(q21.1;q12) whereas wife had a normal karyotype of 46,XX. Further spectral karyotyping was performed to rule out the involvement of any other chromosomal aberrations present in the genome. Additional whole chromosome paint FISH (Fluorescence in situ hybridization) with paint probes 18 and 22 confirmed the translocation. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a novel (18;22) translocation with unique breakpoints and their association with RM. The reciprocal translocations provide a good opportunity for the identification of disease associated genes. However, in recurrent miscarriages, most of them do not disrupt any gene at the breakpoint but can lead to unbalanced gametes and hence poor reproductive outcome like RM or birth of a child with malformations and intellectual disability. The translocation breakpoints might be risk factors for RM. Moreover, the impact of the balanced translocations in association with RM is discussed in this report. PMID:24918085

  11. Non-adiabatic couplings and dynamics in proton transfer reactions of Hn (+) systems: Application to H2+H2 (+)→H+H3 (+) collisions.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio; Naumkin, Fedor

    2015-12-21

    Analytical derivatives and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are derived for Hn (+) systems (n = 3-5). The method uses a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem applied to a multi-state description based on diatomics-in-molecules (for H3 (+)) or triatomics-in-molecules (for H4 (+) and H5 (+)) formalisms, corrected with a permutationally invariant many-body term to get high accuracy. The analytical non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are compared with ab initio calculations performed at multi-reference configuration interaction level. These magnitudes are used to calculate H2(v(')=0,j(')=0)+H2 (+)(v,j=0) collisions, to determine the effect of electronic transitions using a molecular dynamics method with electronic transitions. Cross sections for several initial vibrational states of H2 (+) are calculated and compared with the available experimental data, yielding an excellent agreement. The effect of vibrational excitation of H2 (+) reactant and its relation with non-adiabatic processes are discussed. Also, the behavior at low collisional energies, in the 1 meV-0.1 eV interval, of interest in astrophysical environments, is discussed in terms of the long range behaviour of the interaction potential which is properly described within the triatomics-in-molecules formalism. PMID:26696058

  12. Non-adiabatic couplings and dynamics in proton transfer reactions of Hn+ systems: application to H2+H2+→H+H3+ collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio; Naumkin, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    Analytical derivatives and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are derived for Hn+ systems (n=3, 4 and 5). The method uses a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem applied to a multi-state description based on diatomics-in-molecules (for H3+) or triatomics-in-molecules (for H4+ and H5+) formalisms, corrected with a permutationally invariant many-body term to get high accuracy. The analytical non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are compared with ab initio calculations performed at multi-reference configuration interaction level. These magnitudes are used to calculate H2(v′=0,j′=0)+H2+(v,j=0) collisions, to determine the effect of electronic transitions using a molecular dynamics method with electronic transitions. Cross sections for several initial vibrational states of H2+ are calculated and compared with the available experimental data, yielding an excellent agreement. The effect of vibrational excitation of H2+ reactant, and its relation with non-adiabatic processes are discussed. Also, the behavior at low collisional energies, in the 1 meV-0.1 eV interval, of interest in astrophysical environments, are discussed in terms of the long range behaviour of the interaction potential which is properly described within the TRIM formalism. PMID:26696058

  13. Non-adiabatic couplings and dynamics in proton transfer reactions of Hn + systems: Application to H 2 + H2 + → H + H3 + collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Sanz, Cristina; Aguado, Alfredo; Roncero, Octavio; Naumkin, Fedor

    2015-12-01

    Analytical derivatives and non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are derived for H n+ systems (n = 3-5). The method uses a generalized Hellmann-Feynman theorem applied to a multi-state description based on diatomics-in-molecules (for H 3+ ) or triatomics-in-molecules (for H 4+ and H 5+ ) formalisms, corrected with a permutationally invariant many-body term to get high accuracy. The analytical non-adiabatic coupling matrix elements are compared with ab initio calculations performed at multi-reference configuration interaction level. These magnitudes are used to calculate H 2 ( v ' = 0 , j ' = 0 ) + H2 + ( v , j = 0 ) collisions, to determine the effect of electronic transitions using a molecular dynamics method with electronic transitions. Cross sections for several initial vibrational states of H 2+ are calculated and compared with the available experimental data, yielding an excellent agreement. The effect of vibrational excitation of H 2+ reactant and its relation with non-adiabatic processes are discussed. Also, the behavior at low collisional energies, in the 1 meV-0.1 eV interval, of interest in astrophysical environments, is discussed in terms of the long range behaviour of the interaction potential which is properly described within the triatomics-in-molecules formalism.

  14. Local-global conformational coupling in a heptahelical membrane protein: transport mechanism from crystal structures of the nine states in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, Janos K; Schobert, Brigitte

    2004-01-13

    Proton pumps utilize a chemical or photochemical reaction to create pH and electrical gradients between the interior and the exterior of cells and organelles that energize ATP synthesis and the accumulation and extrusion of solutes and ions. G-protein coupled receptors bind agonists and assume signaling states that communicate with the coupled transducers. How these two kinds of proteins convert chemical potential to a proton transmembrane electrochemical potential or a signal are the great questions in structural membrane biology, and they may have a common answer. Bacteriorhodopsin, a particularly simple integral membrane protein, functions as a proton pump but has a heptahelical structure like membrane receptors. Crystallographic structures are now available for all of the intermediates of the bacteriorhodopsin transport cycle, and they describe the proton translocation mechanism, step by step and in atomic detail. The results show how local conformational changes propagate upon the gradual relaxation of the initially twisted photoisomerized retinal toward the two membrane surfaces. Such local-global conformational coupling between the ligand-binding site and the distant regions of the protein may be the shared mechanism of ion pumps and G-protein related receptors. PMID:14705925

  15. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, bb, and μμ pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1fb-1 at 7TeV and up to 19.7fb-1 at 8TeV. From the high-resolution γγ and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02+0.26–0.27 (stat) +0.14–0.15 (syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtained in the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09(stat)+0.08–0.07 (theo) ± 0.07(syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. As a result, no significant deviations are found.

  16. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-29

    cycle and may be widely relevant to polysaccharide synthesizing or degrading enzymes that couple catalysis with chain translocation.« less

  17. Simulations of cellulose translocation in the bacterial cellulose synthase suggest a regulatory mechanism for the dimeric structure of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Brandon C.; Crowley, Michael F.; Himmel, Michael E.; Zimmer, Jochen; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-01-01

    may be widely relevant to polysaccharide synthesizing or degrading enzymes that couple catalysis with chain translocation. PMID:27143998

  18. Structural determinants of proton blockage in aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Roux, Benoît; Pomès, Régis

    2004-10-15

    Aquaporins are an important class of membrane channels selective for water and linear polyols but impermeable to ions, including protons. Recent computational studies have revealed that the relay of protons through the water-conduction pathway of aquaporin channels is opposed by a substantial free energy barrier peaking at the signature NPA motifs. Here, free-energy simulations and continuum electrostatic calculations are combined to examine the nature and the magnitude of the contribution of specific structural elements to proton blockage in the bacterial glycerol uptake facilitator, GlpF. Potential of mean-force profiles for both hop and turn steps of structural diffusion in the narrow pore are obtained for artificial variants of the GlpF channel in which coulombic interactions between the pore contents and conserved residues Asn68 and Asn203 at the NPA signature motifs, Arg206 at the selectivity filter, and the peptidic backbone of the two half-helices M3 and M7, which are arranged in head-to-head fashion around the NPA motifs, are turned off selectively. A comparison of these results with electrostatic energy profiles for the translocation of a probe cation throughout the water permeation pathway indicates that the free-energy profile for proton movement inside the narrow pore is dominated by static effects arising from the distribution of charged and polar groups of the channel, whereas dielectric effects contribute primarily to opposing the access of H+ to the pore mouths (desolvation penalty). The single most effective way to abolish the free-energy gradients opposing the movement of H+ around the NPA motif is to turn off the dipole moments of helices M3 and M7. Mutation of either of the two NPA Asn residues to Asp compensates for charge-dipole and dipole-dipole effects opposing the hop and turn steps of structural diffusion, respectively, and dramatically reduces the free energy barrier of proton translocation, suggesting that these single mutants could

  19. H2 and (H2)2 molecules with an ab initio optimization of wave functions in correlated state: electron-proton couplings and intermolecular microscopic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kądzielawa, Andrzej P.; Bielas, Agata; Acquarone, Marcello; Biborski, Andrzej; Maśka, Maciej M.; Spałek, Józef

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen molecules H2 and {{≤ft( {{H}2} \\right)}2} are analyzed with electronic correlations taken into account between the 1s electrons in an exact manner. The optimal single-particle Slater orbitals are evaluated in the correlated state of H2 by combining their variational determination with the diagonalization of the full Hamiltonian in the second-quantization language. All electron-ion coupling constants are determined explicitly and their relative importance is discussed. Sizable zero-point motion amplitude and the corresponding energy are then evaluated by taking into account the anharmonic contributions up to the ninth order in the relative displacement of the ions from their static equilibrium value. The applicability of the model to solid molecular hydrogen is briefly analyzed by calculating intermolecular microscopic parameters for the 2× {{H}2} rectangular configuration, as well its ground state energy.

  20. Long-Distance Electron Transfer Coupled to Proton Pumping and Energy Transduction in Biological Systems: A Semiempirical First-Principles Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xuehe; Ly, Ngan M.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    2007-12-01

    The first-principles method of electron tunneling currents for electron transfer was previously used to compute the electron coupling matrix in the Marcus theory as well as the tunneling pathway at the extended Huckel level of theory of electronic structure for the redox centers in some living systems such as cytochrome c oxidase. We present here the work in recent development of electron tunneling currents theory that implements in its formalism the inherent systematic ZDO approximation used in ZINDO/S quantum chemical model of electronic structure. Together with the molecular orbitals so calculated semiempirically we develop an approach that is consistent in its approximation, more accurate than the previous methodology and particularly applicable to large biological systems which cannot yet be fully treated ab initio. We calibrate this approach with ab initio results for a small model system of protein, the donor-bridge-acceptor complex of (His)2 (Met)Cu+-(Cys)-(Gly5)-(His)Ru3+bpy5Im, and make predictive calculations for the real biological electron transfer systems of His126 Ru-modified blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and cytochrome c oxidase. Furthermore, the coupling between electron transfer and energy transfer is demonstrated with the thermal motion in protein dynamics for the case of DNA repair by photolyase. Continuing work is underway on the newly crystallized structure of NADH dehydrogenase, the electron entrance to the cellular electron transport respiratory chain. Combining both the rigor of tunneling currents theory and the expedience of ZINDO/S quantum chemical model our approach offers a useful computational method for long-distance electron transfer in biological systems.

  1. Microbiology of bacterial translocation in humans

    PubMed Central

    O'Boyle, C; MacFie, J; Mitchell, C; Johnstone, D; Sagar, P; Sedman, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Gut translocation of bacteria has been shown in both animal and human studies. Evidence from animal studies that links bacterial translocation to the development of postoperative sepsis and multiple organ failure has yet to be confirmed in humans. 
Aims—To examine the spectrum of bacteria involved in translocation in surgical patients undergoing laparotomy and to determine the relation between nodal migration of bacteria and the development of postoperative septic complications. 
Methods—Mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), serosal scrapings, and peripheral blood from 448 surgical patients undergoing laparotomy were analysed using standard microbiological techniques. 
Results—Bacterial translocation was identified in 69 patients (15.4%). The most common organism identified was Escherichia coli (54%). Both enteric bacteria, typical of indigenous intestinal flora, and non-enteric bacteria were isolated. Postoperative septic complications developed in 104 patients (23%). Enteric organisms were responsible in 74% of patients. Forty one per cent of patients who had evidence of bacterial translocation developed sepsis compared with 14% in whom no organisms were cultured (p<0.001). Septic morbidity was more frequent when a greater diversity of bacteria resided within the MLN, but this was not statistically significant. 
Conclusion—Bacterial translocation is associated with a significant increase in the development of postoperative sepsis in surgical patients. The organisms responsible for septic morbidity are similar in spectrum to those observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes. These data strongly support the gut origin hypothesis of sepsis in humans. 

 Keywords: bacterial translocation; mesenteric lymph nodes; serosal scrapings; enteric bacteria; postoperative sepsis PMID:9505882

  2. Molecular studies of free and translocation trisomy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Lefort, G.

    1994-09-01

    Twenty cases of trisomy 13 were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra chromosome. Six cases had translocation trisomy: two de novo rob(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;14q), one paternally derived rob(13q;14q), two de novo t(13q;13q), and one mosaic de novo t(13q;13q)r(13). Eighteen of nineteen informative patients were consistant with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in any of the three t(13q;13q) cases indicate that all were most likely isochromosomes of post-meiotic origin. In addition, two free trisomy cases were compatible with a somatic origin. Two mosaic free trisomy-13 cases, however, were both consistent with a maternal meiotic origin. The patient with a paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13;14) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. One balanced (non-trisomic) case with a non-mosaic 45,-13,-13,+t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologs, as has been found for all homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. It is therefore also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. We cannot therefore infer anything about the origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the two cases with de novo t(13q;14q) plus a maternally derived trisomy 13.

  3. Proton diffusion along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, E. S.; Stuchebrukhov, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Biological surfaces are known to be capable of retaining protons and facilitating their lateral diffusion. Since the surface dynamically exchanges protons with the bulk, the proton movement from a source to a target at the surface acquires a complicated pattern of coupled surface and bulk (2D + 3D) diffusion of which the main feature is that the surface acts as a proton-collecting antenna enhancing the proton flux from the bulk. A phenomenological model of this process is reviewed and its applications to recent experiments on lipid bilayers and small unilaminar vesicles are discussed. The model (i) introduces the important notions of the fast and slow regimes of proton exchange between the surface and the bulk, (ii) permits evaluation of the antenna radius and amplification coefficient in both regimes, (iii) explains the observed macroscopically large distances (in the micrometer range; Antonenko and Pohl 1998 FEBS Lett. 429 197) that the proton can travel along lipid membranes embedded into pure aqueous solutions, and (iv) predicts the dependence of the steady-state proton flux and the kinetics of the non-stationary diffusion upon the buffer concentration in buffered solutions. The surface diffusion coefficient for small unilaminar vesicles is calculated from experimental data (Sandén et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 4129) to be 1 × 10 - 5 cm2 s - 1. The dependence of the shape of the kinetic curves representing protonation/deprotonation of a lipid-bound pH-sensitive dye attached to a planar bilayer lipid membrane upon the buffer concentration (Serowy et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 1031) and the effect of changing the membrane composition (Antonenko and Pohl 2008 Eur. Biophys. J. 37 865) are explained.

  4. Proton diffusion along biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, E S; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2011-06-15

    Biological surfaces are known to be capable of retaining protons and facilitating their lateral diffusion. Since the surface dynamically exchanges protons with the bulk, the proton movement from a source to a target at the surface acquires a complicated pattern of coupled surface and bulk (2D + 3D) diffusion of which the main feature is that the surface acts as a proton-collecting antenna enhancing the proton flux from the bulk. A phenomenological model of this process is reviewed and its applications to recent experiments on lipid bilayers and small unilaminar vesicles are discussed. The model (i) introduces the important notions of the fast and slow regimes of proton exchange between the surface and the bulk, (ii) permits evaluation of the antenna radius and amplification coefficient in both regimes, (iii) explains the observed macroscopically large distances (in the micrometer range; Antonenko and Pohl 1998 FEBS Lett. 429 197) that the proton can travel along lipid membranes embedded into pure aqueous solutions, and (iv) predicts the dependence of the steady-state proton flux and the kinetics of the non-stationary diffusion upon the buffer concentration in buffered solutions. The surface diffusion coefficient for small unilaminar vesicles is calculated from experimental data (Sandén et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 4129) to be 1 × 10(-5) cm(2) s(-1). The dependence of the shape of the kinetic curves representing protonation/deprotonation of a lipid-bound pH-sensitive dye attached to a planar bilayer lipid membrane upon the buffer concentration (Serowy et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 1031) and the effect of changing the membrane composition (Antonenko and Pohl 2008 Eur. Biophys. J. 37 865) are explained. PMID:21613715

  5. Flow-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore from a confining nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingming; Chen, Qiaoyue; Duan, Xiaozheng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-05-01

    We study the flow-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore from a confining nanotube, using a hybrid simulation method that couples point particles into a fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann fluid. Our simulation illustrates that the critical velocity flux of the polymer linearly decreases with the decrease in the size of the confining nanotube, which corresponds well with our theoretical analysis based on the blob model of the polymer translocation. Moreover, by decreasing the size of the confining nanotube, we find a significantly favorable capture of the polymer near its ends, as well as a longer translocation time. Our results provide the computational and theoretical support for the development of nanotechnologies based on the ultrafiltration and the single-molecule sequencing. PMID:27155652

  6. Flow-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore from a confining nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingming; Chen, Qiaoyue; Duan, Xiaozheng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-05-01

    We study the flow-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore from a confining nanotube, using a hybrid simulation method that couples point particles into a fluctuating lattice-Boltzmann fluid. Our simulation illustrates that the critical velocity flux of the polymer linearly decreases with the decrease in the size of the confining nanotube, which corresponds well with our theoretical analysis based on the blob model of the polymer translocation. Moreover, by decreasing the size of the confining nanotube, we find a significantly favorable capture of the polymer near its ends, as well as a longer translocation time. Our results provide the computational and theoretical support for the development of nanotechnologies based on the ultrafiltration and the single-molecule sequencing.

  7. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly. PMID:27083746

  8. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  9. The orally active antihyperglycemic drug beta-guanidinopropionic acid is transported by the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter hPAT1.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Linda; Dorn, Madlen; Markwardt, Fritz; Brandsch, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The orally administered creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (beta-GPA) decreases plasma glucose levels by increasing the sensitivity to insulin. This effect is based on a beta-GPA induced expression of mRNA and total protein content of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. Although the oral availability of beta-GPA is well established, the underlying uptake mechanism has not yet been studied. We investigated whether the H(+)-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1, which is expressed in the apical membrane of intestinal cells, accepts guanidine derivatives as substrates. Uptake of l-[(3)H]proline into Caco-2 cells expressing hPAT1 constitutively was strongly inhibited by beta-GPA and its derivatives guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) and 4-guanidinobutyric acid (4-GBA). Competition assays revealed apparent affinity constants of about 1.5 mM. Electrophysiological measurements at hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes unequivocally demonstrated that beta-GPA, GAA and 4-GBA are effectively transported by this transport system in an electrogenic manner. We conclude that hPAT1 might be responsible for the intestinal absorption of beta-GPA thereby allowing its oral administration. Moreover, with beta-GPA we identified a new high affinity hPAT1 substrate that might be an interesting starting point for future drug design-drug delivery strategies. PMID:19358571

  10. Acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells: a role for the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor TDAG8.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression. PMID:24152439

  11. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression. PMID:24152439

  12. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are mademore » on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.« less

  13. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are made on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.

  14. Hydrodynamics of diamond-shaped gradient nanopillar arrays for effective DNA translocation into nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Bruce, Robert L; Duch, Elizabeth A; Patel, Jyotica V; Smith, Joshua T; Astier, Yann; Wunsch, Benjamin H; Meshram, Siddharth; Galan, Armand; Scerbo, Chris; Pereira, Michael A; Wang, Deqiang; Colgan, Evan G; Lin, Qinghuang; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2015-02-24

    Effective DNA translocation into nanochannels is critical for advancing genome mapping and future single-molecule DNA sequencing technologies. We present the design and hydrodynamic study of a diamond-shaped gradient pillar array connected to nanochannels for enhancing the success of DNA translocation events. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is utilized to interrogate the hydrodynamic interactions of the DNA with this unique structure, evaluate key DNA translocation parameters, including speed, extension, and translocation time, and provide a detailed mapping of the translocation events in nanopillar arrays coupled with 10 and 50 μm long channels. Our analysis reveals the important roles of diamond-shaped nanopillars in guiding DNA into as small as 30 nm channels with minimized clogging, stretching DNA to nearly 100% of their dyed contour length, inducing location-specific straddling of DNA at nanopillar interfaces, and modulating DNA speeds by pillar geometries. Importantly, all critical features down to 30 nm wide nanochannels are defined using standard photolithography and fabrication processes, a feat aligned with the requirement of high-volume, low-cost production. PMID:25626162

  15. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  16. A Non-uniform Stepping Mechanism for E. coli UvrD Monomer Translocation along Single Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Eric J.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3′ to 5′ directionality along single stranded DNA and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with novel analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupling stoichiometry, for UvrD monomer translocation along ssDNA. Our results suggest that the macroscopic rate of UvrD monomer translocation is not limited by each ATPase cycle, but rather by a slow step (pause) in each translocation cycle that occurs after four to five rapid one nucleotide translocation steps, with each rapid step coupled to hydrolysis of one ATP. These results suggest a non-uniform stepping mechanism that differs from either a Brownian motor or previous structure based inch-worm mechanisms. PMID:17499041

  17. A nonuniform stepping mechanism for E. coli UvrD monomer translocation along single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Eric J; Fischer, Christopher J; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Lohman, Timothy M

    2007-05-11

    E. coli UvrD is an SF1 helicase involved in several DNA metabolic processes. Although a UvrD dimer is needed for helicase activity, a monomer can translocate with 3' to 5' directionality along single-stranded DNA, and this ATP-dependent translocation is likely involved in RecA displacement. In order to understand how the monomeric translocase functions, we have combined fluorescence stopped-flow kinetic methods with recently developed analysis methods to determine the kinetic mechanism, including ATP coupling stoichiometry, for UvrD monomer translocation along ssDNA. Our results suggest that the macroscopic rate of UvrD monomer translocation is not limited by each ATPase cycle but rather by a slow step (pause) in each translocation cycle that occurs after four to five rapid 1 nt translocation steps, with each rapid step coupled to hydrolysis of one ATP. These results suggest a nonuniform stepping mechanism that differs from either a Brownian motor or previous structure-based inchworm mechanisms. PMID:17499041

  18. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous H V V couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ã.-.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Modak, A.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrott